WorldWideScience

Sample records for home monitoring function

  1. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  2. Home apnea monitor use - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000755.htm Home apnea monitor use - infants To use the sharing ... portable. Why is an Apnea Monitor Used at Home? A monitor may be needed when: Your baby ...

  3. ICD function and dysfunction in patients with arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases: the role of home monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmundis, C. de; Ricciardi, D.; Namdar, M.; Pappaert, G.; Rodriguez-Manero, M.; Wauters, K.; Casado-Arroyo, R.; Rao, J.J.; Bayrak, F.; Chierchia, G.B.; Sarkozy, A.; Brugada, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since their implementation in clinical practice, remote home monitoring systems (HM) have undoubtedly become an added value in patients with implantable devices for cardiac rhythm management. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HM on clinical management and outcome in

  4. Beyond Self-Monitoring: Understanding Non-functional Aspects of Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    -technical complexities in home-based healthcare technologies through three case studies of self-monitoring: 1) pre-eclampsia (i.e. pregnancy poisoning), 2) heart conditions, and 3) preventive care. Through the analysis seven themes emerged (people, resources, places, routines, knowledge, control and motivation) that can...

  5. An Assessment of Sleep Architecture as a Function of Degree of Handedness in College Women Using a Home Sleep Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propper, Ruth E.; Lawton, Nicole; Przyborski, Matt; Christman, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined sleep architecture as a function of handedness in a population of undergraduate college women using a home sleep monitor. Compared to strongly handed individuals, participants with a tendency toward mixed-handedness had a shorter sleep latency and spent a greater percentage of their sleep period asleep and less awake.…

  6. Blood pressure monitors for home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007482.htm Blood pressure monitors for home To use the sharing features ... may ask you to keep track of your blood pressure at home. To do this, you will need ...

  7. Home monitoring of blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Home blood pressure monitoring is the self-measurement of blood pressure by patients. In the diagnosis and management of high blood pressure it is complementary to 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and clinic blood pressure measurements. Home monitoring can also help to identify white-coat and masked hypertension.

  8. Smartphone home monitoring of ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Moon, Gyu; Landa, Joseph; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2012-06-01

    A system of ambulatory, halter, electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring system has already been commercially available for recording and transmitting heartbeats data by the Internet. However, it enjoys the confidence with a reservation and thus a limited market penetration, our system was targeting at aging global villagers having an increasingly biomedical wellness (BMW) homecare needs, not hospital related BMI (biomedical illness). It was designed within SWaP-C (Size, Weight, and Power, Cost) using 3 innovative modules: (i) Smart Electrode (lowpower mixed signal embedded with modern compressive sensing and nanotechnology to improve the electrodes' contact impedance); (ii) Learnable Database (in terms of adaptive wavelets transform QRST feature extraction, Sequential Query Relational database allowing home care monitoring retrievable Aided Target Recognition); (iii) Smartphone (touch screen interface, powerful computation capability, caretaker reporting with GPI, ID, and patient panic button for programmable emergence procedure). It can provide a supplementary home screening system for the post or the pre-diagnosis care at home with a build-in database searchable with the time, the place, and the degree of urgency happened, using in-situ screening.

  9. 21 CFR 884.2730 - Home uterine activity monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Home uterine activity monitor. 884.2730 Section... Devices § 884.2730 Home uterine activity monitor. (a) Identification. A home uterine activity monitor... and monitor that receive, process, and display data. This device is intended for use in women with a...

  10. Monitoring pressure ulcers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, W; Leonard, M

    1997-12-01

    Clinical indicators may be used to monitor the quality of care delivery. Unfortunately, they are often viewed by nursing staff as unnecessary paper work. This study used Waterlow's Pressure Sore Risk Assessment Tool as the basis of a clinical indicator to monitor pressure ulcers within a nursing home. It was found that by closely monitoring the skin status of residents, preventative actions could be implemented, thereby minimizing the risk of pressure ulcer development. The advantage of utilizing such a tool is that it is seen to be clinically relevant for nursing staff while providing a bank of data for quality management.

  11. Structure function monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  12. Views of individuals with spinal cord injury on the use of wearable cameras to monitor upper limb function in the home and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likitlersuang, Jirapat; Sumitro, Elizabeth R; Theventhiran, Pirashanth; Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Zariffa, José

    2017-11-01

    Hand function impairment after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) can significantly reduce independence. Unlike current hand function assessments, wearable camera systems could potentially measure functional hand usage at home, and thus benefit the development of neurorehabilitation strategies. The objective of this study was to understand the views of individuals with SCI on the use of wearable cameras to track neurorehabilitation progress and outcomes in the community. Questionnaires. Home simulation laboratory. Fifteen individuals with cervical SCI. After using wearable cameras in the simulated home environment, participants completed custom questionnaires, comprising open-ended and structured questions. Participants showed relatively low concerns related to data confidentiality when first-person videos are used by clinicians (1.93 ± 1.28 on a 5-point Likert scale) or researchers (2.00 ± 1.31). Storing only automatically extracted metrics reduced privacy concerns. Though participants reported moderate privacy concerns (2.53 ± 1.51) about wearing a camera in daily life due to certain sensitive situations (e.g. washrooms), they felt that information about their hand usage at home is useful for researchers (4.73 ± 0.59), clinicians (4.47 ± 0.83), and themselves (4.40 ± 0.83). Participants found the system moderately comfortable (3.27 ± 1.44), but expressed low desire to use it frequently (2.87 ± 1.36). Despite some privacy and comfort concerns, participants believed that the information obtained would be useful. With appropriate strategies to minimize the data stored and recording duration, wearable cameras can be a well-accepted tool to track function in the home and community after SCI.

  13. Smart homes and home health monitoring technologies for older adults: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Stroulia, Eleni; Nikolaidis, Ioanis; Miguel-Cruz, Antonio; Rios Rincon, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    Around the world, populations are aging and there is a growing concern about ways that older adults can maintain their health and well-being while living in their homes. The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic literature review to determine: (1) the levels of technology readiness among older adults and, (2) evidence for smart homes and home-based health-monitoring technologies that support aging in place for older adults who have complex needs. We identified and analyzed 48 of 1863 relevant papers. Our analyses found that: (1) technology-readiness level for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is low; (2) the highest level of evidence is 1b (i.e., one randomized controlled trial with a PEDro score ≥6); smart homes and home health monitoring technologies are used to monitor activities of daily living, cognitive decline and mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs; (3) there is no evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address disability prediction and health-related quality of life, or fall prevention; and (4) there is conflicting evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The level of technology readiness for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is still low. The highest level of evidence found was in a study that supported home health technologies for use in monitoring activities of daily living, cognitive decline, mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Smart Home: Controlling and Monitoring Households Appliances Using Gsm Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Budi Rahmadya; Fahrul Ghazi; Derisma

    2016-01-01

    This study discussed about using the smart home automation systems for household appliances such as lights and fans, by utilizing the GSM network as a communication medium to control and monitor the household appliances...

  15. Home energy monitors : Impact over the medium-term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van S.S.; Bakker, C.A.; Hal, van J.D.M. (Anke)

    2010-01-01

    Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS), e.g. energy monitors, are intermediary products that can visualize, manage, and/or monitor the energy use of other products or whole households. HEMS increasingly receive attention for their role in energy conservation in households. A literature review and a

  16. [Evaluation of family function in home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamori, Tadashi; Sato, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomohiro; Yamagishi, Tadashi; Hattori, Yukari; Ishii, Nobuo; Saka, Shohei; Koyanagi, Junko; Murase, Jutaro; Nitoh, Noriko; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuo, Kyoko; Moriya, Akemi; Ikemizu, Ayumi; Arino, Kaoru; Mori, Mitsuko; Sato, Kyoko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of a caring family are needed to improve home care. We propose a three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of family functioning. The first dimension is food, clothing, and shelter; the second dimension is patient, medical, and caring conditions; and the third dimension is the caring family condition. We used the home care score and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale at Kwansei Gakuin(FACESKG)IV for the quantitative evaluation of family functioning. Narrative medicine and ethnography are valuable for the qualitative evaluation of a caring family.

  17. Quality and Safety of Home ICP Monitoring Compared with In-Hospital Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne; Munch, Tina Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    , and adequacy for clinical evaluation in ICP monitoring in the home setting versus in-hospital monitoring. Methods: Patients were divided into two subgroups (home or hospital monitoring). We noted technical curve quality and clinically useful parameters for both subgroups. Results: Forty-four patients (aged 1...... evaluation of the data (p = 0.52). No clinically detectable complications were encountered in either group. Conclusion: We propose home ICP monitoring as a feasible and safe alternative to in-hospital monitoring in select cases where the patient's caregiver - with prior meticulous instructions - can......Introduction: Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is usually conducted in-hospital using stationary devices. Modern mobile ICP monitoring systems present new monitoring possibilities more closely following the patients' daily life. We reviewed patient safety, quality of technical data...

  18. Designing Intuitive Web Solutions for Monitoring Patients’ Rehabilitation at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihana Ferdous

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design of web-based remote monitoring interfaces aimed at supporting therapists and caregivers in supervising motor-cognitive rehabilitation plans of care to be performed by patients at home. This work was part of a three years’ research project where game-based environments for upper body motor rehabilitation of post-stroke patients were developed in collaboration with two main rehabilitation centers in Italy and Austria, for a subsequent deployment at patients’ homes. The paper will specifically focus on describing the iterative design of the home rehabilitation features for clinicians over the first two years of the project to enable the delivery and monitoring of more personalized, engaging plans of care for home therapy by rehabilitation centers and services.

  19. Network and Service Monitoring in Heterogeneous Home Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delphinanto, A.

    2012-01-01

    Home networks are becoming dynamic and technologically heterogeneous. They consist of an increasing number of devices which offer several functionalities and can be used for many different services. In the home, these devices are interconnected using a mixture of networking technologies (for

  20. Introducing a new monitoring manual for home fortification and strengthening capacity to monitor nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferds, Maria Elena D; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Lack of monitoring capacity is a key barrier for nutrition interventions and limits programme management, decision making and programme effectiveness in many low-income and middle-income countries. A 2011 global assessment reported lack of monitoring capacity was the top barrier for home fortification interventions, such as micronutrient powders or lipid-based nutrient supplements. A Manual for Developing and Implementing Monitoring Systems for Home Fortification Interventions was recently disseminated. It is comprehensive and describes monitoring concepts and frameworks and includes monitoring tools and worksheets. The monitoring manual describes the steps of developing and implementing a monitoring system for home fortification interventions, including identifying and engaging stakeholders; developing a programme description including logic model and logical framework; refining the purpose of the monitoring system, identifying users and their monitoring needs; describing the design of the monitoring system; developing indicators; describing the core components of a comprehensive monitoring plan; and considering factors related to stage of programme development, sustainability and scale up. A fictional home fortification example is used throughout the monitoring manual to illustrate these steps. The monitoring manual is a useful tool to support the development and implementation of home fortification intervention monitoring systems. In the context of systematic capacity gaps to design, implement and monitor nutrition interventions in many low-income and middle-income countries, the dissemination of new tools, such as monitoring manuals may have limited impact without additional attention to strengthening other individual, organisational and systems levels capacities. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Medicare home health utilization as a function of nursing home market factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, J H; Benjamin, A E

    1990-01-01

    Rapid increases in the size and costs of the home health market, unknown impacts of Medicare's DRG hospital reimbursement on the posthospital market, and general lack of knowledge about factors that explain interstate variation in home health utilization all suggest the importance of developing and testing models of Medicare home health use. This article proposes and tests a model of state home health utilization as a function of the nursing home market. This model proposes that home health u...

  2. Rationale and design of a randomized trial of home electronic symptom and lung function monitoring to detect cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations: the early intervention in cystic fibrosis exacerbation (eICE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtzin, N; West, N; Allgood, S; Wilhelm, E; Khan, U; Mayer-Hamblett, N; Aitken, M L; Ramsey, B W; Boyle, M P; Mogayzel, P J; Goss, C H

    2013-11-01

    Acute pulmonary exacerbations are central events in the lives of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary exacerbations lead to impaired lung function, worse quality of life, and shorter survival. We hypothesized that aggressive early treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbation may improve clinical outcomes. Describe the rationale of an ongoing trial designed to determine the efficacy of home monitoring of both lung function measurements and symptoms for early detection and subsequent early treatment of acute CF pulmonary exacerbations. A randomized, non-blinded, multi-center trial in 320 individuals with CF aged 14 years and older. The study compares usual care to a twice a week assessment of home spirometry and CF respiratory symptoms using an electronic device with data transmission to the research personnel to identify and trigger early treatment of CF pulmonary exacerbation. Participants will be enrolled in the study for 12 months. The primary endpoint is change in FEV1 (L) from baseline to 12 months determined by a linear mixed effects model incorporating all quarterly FEV1 measurements. Secondary endpoints include time to first acute protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbation, number of acute pulmonary exacerbations, number of hospitalization days for acute pulmonary exacerbation, time from the end of acute pulmonary exacerbation to onset of subsequent pulmonary exacerbation, change in health related quality of life, change in treatment burden, change in CF respiratory symptoms, and adherence to the study protocol. This study is a first step in establishing alternative approaches to the care of CF pulmonary exacerbations. We hypothesize that early treatment of pulmonary exacerbations has the potential to slow lung function decline, reduce respiratory symptoms and improve the quality of life for individuals with CF. © 2013.

  3. Home monitoring of blood pressure: patients' perception and role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the use of the blood pressure monitors by hypertensive patients in Jordanian homes and investigate their effect on emotional status and disease management, and the role of the pharmacist in this regard. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted over two months in 2012, in Amman, Jordan.

  4. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  5. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  6. Home care artificial heart monitoring system via internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J; Lee, J H; Choi, J; Lee, J; Kim, W G; Sun, K; Min, B G

    2004-10-01

    The availability of a remote management system, which provides both physiological-related information about the patient and device-related information about the implanted device, would be helpful during in vivo experiments or clinical trials involving artificial heart implantation. In order to be able to monitor the course of the in vivo experiment continuously regardless of the patient's location, an internet-based remote monitoring system was developed, which can monitor physiological-related information such as pressure (AoP, LAP, RAP, PAP) and flow data, as well as device-related information such as current, direction and pump operating conditions. The home care artificial heart monitoring system which we developed consists of four main components, which are the transcutaneous information transmission system (TITS), local monitoring station (LMS), data server station (DSS), and client monitoring station (CMS). The device-related information and physiological-related information can be transmitted in real time from a patient in a remote non-clinical environment to the specialist situated in a clinic depending on the current capabilities and availability of the internet. The local monitoring station situated at the remote site is composed of a data acquisition and preprocessing unit connected to a computer via its RS-232 port, and which communicate using a Java-based client-server architecture. The remote monitoring system so developed was used during an in vivo experiment of the artificial heart implantation for 2 months and performed successfully according to design specifications.

  7. A System for Monitoring Stroke Patients in a Home Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Bart; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Weusthof, Marcel H.H.; Hofs, D.H.W.; van Meulen, Fokke; Luinge, Hendrik J.; Lorussi, Frederico; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the changes of functional capacity and performance of stroke patients after returning home from a rehabilitation hospital is unknown for a physician, having no objective information about the intensity and quality of a patient's daily-life activities. Therefore, there is a need to develop

  8. Usage monitoring of electrical devices in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Saba; Chan, Adrian D C; Goubran, Rafik A

    2011-01-01

    Profiling the usage of electrical devices within a smart home can be used as a method for determining an occupant's activities of daily living. A nonintrusive load monitoring system monitors the electrical consumption at a single electrical source (e.g., main electric utility service entry) and the operating schedules of individual devices are determined by disaggregating the composite electrical consumption waveforms. An electrical device's load signature plays a key role in nonintrusive load monitoring systems. A load signature is the unique electrical behaviour of an individual device when it is in operation. This paper proposes a feature-based model, using the real power and reactive power as features for describing the load signatures of individual devices. Experimental results for single device recognition for 7 devices show that the proposed approach can achieve 100% classification accuracy with discriminant analysis using Mahalanobis distances.

  9. Biowaste home composting: experimental process monitoring and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatàno, Fabio; Pagliaro, Giacomo; Di Giovanni, Paolo; Floriani, Enrico; Mangani, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Because home composting is a prevention option in managing biowaste at local levels, the objective of the present study was to contribute to the knowledge of the process evolution and compost quality that can be expected and obtained, respectively, in this decentralized option. In this study, organized as the research portion of a provincial project on home composting in the territory of Pesaro-Urbino (Central Italy), four experimental composters were first initiated and temporally monitored. Second, two small sub-sets of selected provincial composters (directly operated by households involved in the project) underwent quality control on their compost products at two different temporal steps. The monitored experimental composters showed overall decreasing profiles versus composting time for moisture, organic carbon, and C/N, as well as overall increasing profiles for electrical conductivity and total nitrogen, which represented qualitative indications of progress in the process. Comparative evaluations of the monitored experimental composters also suggested some interactions in home composting, i.e., high C/N ratios limiting organic matter decomposition rates and final humification levels; high moisture contents restricting the internal temperature regime; nearly horizontal phosphorus and potassium evolutions contributing to limit the rates of increase in electrical conductivity; and prolonged biowaste additions contributing to limit the rate of decrease in moisture. The measures of parametric data variability in the two sub-sets of controlled provincial composters showed decreased variability in moisture, organic carbon, and C/N from the seventh to fifteenth month of home composting, as well as increased variability in electrical conductivity, total nitrogen, and humification rate, which could be considered compatible with the respective nature of decreasing and increasing parameters during composting. The modeled parametric kinetics in the monitored experimental

  10. Wireless health data exchange for home healthcare monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema.

  11. Wireless Health Data Exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malrey Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema.

  12. Home monitoring improves endpoint efficiency in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannson, Kerri A; Vittinghoff, Eric; Morisset, Julie; Lee, Joyce S; Balmes, John R; Collard, Harold R

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability, feasibility and analytical impact of home-based measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC) and dyspnoea as clinical endpoints in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).Patients with IPF performed weekly home-based assessment of FVC and dyspnoea using a mobile hand-held spirometer and self-administered dyspnoea questionnaires. Weekly variability in FVC and dyspnoea was estimated, and sample sizes were simulated for a hypothetical 24-week clinical trial using either traditional office-based interval measurement or mobile weekly assessment.In total, 25 patients were enrolled. Mean adherence to weekly assessments over 24 weeks was greater than 90%. Compared with change assessment using baseline and 24-week measurements only, weekly assessment of FVC resulted in enhanced precision and power. For example, a hypothetical 24-week clinical trial with FVC as the primary endpoint would require 951 patients using weekly home spirometry compared with 3840 patients using office spirometry measures at weeks 1 and 24 only. The ability of repeated measures to reduce clinical trial sample size was influenced by the correlation structure of the data.Home monitoring can improve the precision of endpoint assessments, allowing for greater efficiency in clinical trials of therapeutics for IPF. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  13. Self-monitoring has potential for home exercise programmes in patients with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M; Takedani, H; Haga, N; Kubota, M; Ishiyama, M; Ito, S; Nitta, O

    2014-03-01

    Haemophiliacs who have had to keep a physically inactive lifestyle due to bleeding during childhood are likely to have little motivation for exercise. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effectiveness of the self-monitoring of home exercise for haemophiliacs. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with intervention over 8 weeks at four hospitals in Japan. Subjects included 32 male outpatients aged 26-64 years without an inhibitor who were randomly allocated to a self-monitoring group and a control group. Individual exercise guidance with physical activity for improvement of their knee functions was given to both groups. The self-monitoring materials included an activity monitor and a feedback system so that the self-monitoring group could send feedback via the Internet and cellular phone. The self-monitoring was performed by checking exercise adherence and physical activity levels, bleeding history and injection of a coagulation factor. Both groups showed significant improvements in exercise adherence (P self-efficacy (P self-monitoring group compared with those in the control group. No increase in bleeding frequency and pain scale was noted. The self-monitoring of home exercise for haemophilic patients is useful for the improvement of exercise adherence, self-efficacy and knee extension strength. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Sensor Network Infrastructure for a Home Care Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Palumbo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the sensor network infrastructure for a home care system that allows long-term monitoring of physiological data and everyday activities. The aim of the proposed system is to allow the elderly to live longer in their home without compromising safety and ensuring the detection of health problems. The system offers the possibility of a virtual visit via a teleoperated robot. During the visit, physiological data and activities occurring during a period of time can be discussed. These data are collected from physiological sensors (e.g., temperature, blood pressure, glucose and environmental sensors (e.g., motion, bed/chair occupancy, electrical usage. The system can also give alarms if sudden problems occur, like a fall, and warnings based on more long-term trends, such as the deterioration of health being detected. It has been implemented and tested in a test environment and has been deployed in six real homes for a year-long evaluation. The key contribution of the paper is the presentation of an implemented system for ambient assisted living (AAL tested in a real environment, combining the acquisition of sensor data, a flexible and adaptable middleware compliant with the OSGistandard and a context recognition application. The system has been developed in a European project called GiraffPlus.

  15. Monitoring Technology Meets Care Work: Challenges of monitoring wet-beds in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bygholm, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring technology, especially sensor-based technology, is increasingly taken into use in care work. Despite the simplicity of these technologies - aimed to automate what appear as mundane monitoring tasks - recent research has identified major challenges primarily related to the technology's ability to meet the complexity of care work. Understanding intersectional challenges between these care technologies and care work is fundamental to improve design and use of health informatics. In this paper we present an analysis of interaction challenges between a wet-sensor at the task of monitoring wet beds at a nursing home. The analysis identifies the multifaceted nature of monitoring work and the intricacy of integrating sensor technology into the complex knowledge system of monitoring work.

  16. Health Monitoring System for Nursing Homes with Lightweight Security and Privacy Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu’e Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of aged population in China, it is urgent to design a safe and effective monitoring system for the nursing homes. An optimized scheme and high performance security and privacy protection for monitoring system have already become the focus studied especially. So this paper proposed a health monitoring system with lightweight security and privacy protection for nursing homes. Dual-band RFID, virtual routing location algorithm, and diet and exercise data collection based on RFID were adopted to obtain the location and health information. And that fused a mobile authentication protocol based on Hash function to realize security access and privacy protection, which can improve security and reduce the complexity of calculation and the implementation cost compared with the typical authentication protocols. The experiment results show that the ratio of relative network delay is below 35%. The system has strong real-time, high security, more comprehensive data, and lower cost of computation and communication. It can satisfy the requirements of health monitoring for nursing homes.

  17. Monitoring heart functions using telemetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelles, Sandra

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Health-economic background: The conditions for area-wide utilisation of telemedicine on national and European levels have to be developed. Before the nation-wide implementation in Germany can take place, the effectiveness of the structures and services of telemedicine has to be verified under everyday conditions. The utilisation of telemedicine has been assessed in recent HTA-reports that cover the existing scientific knowledge. This article also reports on the future role telemedicine could play in the telemetric monitoring of heart function. General background: With telemonitoring it is possible to keep body function data under continuous surveillance. This is especially useful for high-risk patients. Telemetry is the term used for the transfer of measured values from the sensor to the surveillance control point. Telemetric monitoring is well-suited for measuring cardiac function parameters without investing a lot of time and effort. Results: Telemedicine is well accepted by the patients. It has been indicated that the implementation of telemedicine reduces both the number of hospitalisations and the duration of hospitalisation. Treatment costs are accordingly reduced. With an early diagnosis, the therapy can be optimised precociously. Considering acute medical care, a diagnosis prior to hospitalisation can lead to a reduction in the time interval between admittance and the start of therapy. Considering preventive medical care, the continuous surveillance enables a timely diagnosis. The quality of life of the patient is hereby significantly enhanced. Conclusion: Telemetric monitoring can be applied in many areas of health care and be of positive assistance, within the single therapeutic strategies, to patients with acute and chronic cardiac illnesses. The integration of information- and communication systems available for the health sector can significantly support patient orientated medical care. This has been indicated in numerous studies

  18. Patient perceptions of remote monitoring for nocturnal home hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafazzo, Joseph A; Leonard, Kevin; Easty, Anthony C; Rossos, Peter G; Chan, Christopher T

    2010-10-01

    Adoption of nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) has been slow, due in part to patient-perceived barriers, such as anxiety and lack of self-efficacy. This study investigates patient perception of remote monitoring in addressing these barriers. Perceptions of remote patient monitoring (RPM) were studied through a quantitative survey and qualitative interviews. The NHHD and conventional hemodialysis (CHD) were included in the survey (209 in total). Twenty semistructured interviews were conducted as well as a focus group that included NHHD patients and family caregivers. The CHD patients had greater interest in adopting NHHD with RPM than without (1.90±1.37 vs. 1.71±1.28, Premote monitoring will ease the performing of NHHD (r=0.452, P=0.001) and the belief that RPM should be mandatory (r=0.541, P=0.000). Qualitative findings supported three themes: (1) There is an expectation for the use of RPM, (2) RPM should be used at a minimum transitionally, and (3) RPM acts as a surrogate support of family-caregivers. The RPM may lower perceived barriers to the adoption of NHHD, in part through its surrogate support of family caregivers. However, RPM alone is likely insufficient to alter patients' attitudes to undergo NHHD. RPM is a common expectation of CHD patients considering the therapy, at a minimum during the transitional phase. © 2010 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2010 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  19. Data Equivalency of an Interactive Voice Response System for Home Assessment of Back Pain and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S Shaw

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interactive voice response (IVR systems that collect survey data using automated, push-button telephone responses may be useful to monitor patients’ pain and function at home; however, its equivalency to other data collection methods has not been studied.

  20. Home environmental problems and physical function in Taiwanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chang, Wen-Chiung; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental hazards play an important role in the disablement process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between home environmental problems and personal physical function. Data were based on a two-stage nationwide survey and evaluation on the needs of long-term care in Taiwan. A total of 10,596 individuals aged 65 and over were included in this study. These participants were identified with physical or cognitive problems at the screening interview and further evaluated at the second interview on health condition, functional status, needs of long-term care, and home environmental problems. Six items of environmental hazards were assessed at the participants' homes with direct observation. The prevalence rates of home environmental problems were similar among older adults with different levels of physical function. No grab bars (79.6-85.1%) and no protections against slip (81.9-92.8%) in the bathroom were two commonly present hazards in older adults' homes. Older adults with a higher income (Odds ratio=OR=0.75), without income information (OR=0.78) or living with other persons (OR=0.74) were less likely to experience environmental problems at home. Results from this study revealed that home environment condition was associated with factors other than personal disabling conditions for the elderly. Modifying home environment, especially the bathroom, should be attached with great importance for physically disabled older adults.

  1. Economics of Home Monitoring for Apnea in Late Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Brian L; Amberson, Michael; Veit, Lauren; Freiberger, Christina; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Rhein, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity affects a small proportion but large absolute number of late preterm infants, with out-patient management variably utilized despite relative clinical equipoise and potential for improved cost-effectiveness. Over a 5-y period, from 2009 to 2013, infants born at ≥34 weeks gestational age at a level IIIB academic center in Boston, Massachusetts, with discharge-delaying apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events were identified. In-patient costs for discharge-delaying ABD events were compared with hypothetical out-patient management. Out-patient costs took into account 4-10 d of in-patient observation for ABD events before caffeine initiation, 3-5 d of additional in-patient observation before discharge, daily caffeine until 43 weeks corrected gestational age, home pulse oximetry monitoring until 44 weeks corrected gestational age, and consideration of variable readmission rates ranging from 0 to 10%. A total of 425 late preterm and term infants were included in our analysis. Utilization of hypothetical out-patient management resulted in cost savings per eligible patient ranging from $2,422 to $62, dependent upon variable periods of in-patient observation. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated few instances of decreased relative cost-effectiveness. Out-patient management of discharge-delaying ABD events in a late preterm and term population was a cost-effective alternative to prolonged in-patient observation. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Time-motion analysis of research nurse activities in a lung transplant home monitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Ruth; VanWormer, Arin; Lindgren, Bruce; MacMahon, Kathleen; Robiner, William; Finkelstein, Stanley

    2011-09-01

    The emergence and subsequent integration of new technologies precipitate changes in roles and work lives of nurses. The nurses' work with home monitoring technologies within a spirometry-based program that transmits pulmonary function data after lung transplantation has characteristics that are distinct from other types of direct patient care. Nurses' changing roles in such programs after transplantation have not been well described. To describe a time-motion study of 2 research nurses in the context of a home-spirometry study to monitor patients' pulmonary status after lung transplantation. A detailed list of research nurses' 67 routine work-related activities was developed and validated to monitor and record activities of research home monitoring nurses. Two weeks of observations were completed; recordings of a second observer established reliability of observations. In 48.8 hours of observation, 610 tasks related to monitoring of 45 patients were recorded. Task time ranged from brief seconds (eg, data review) to 39 minutes (eg, clinic visits). Between-observer intraclass correlation (r = 0.96) reflected high agreement in observations of the duration of activities. Agreement for category of activity was strong (kappa = 0.82), with high levels of agreement (96%). Computer tasks were the most frequent (118 tasks/week) and most time-intensive activities. Nurses' face-to-face interactions with health professionals were equally time intensive (both 267 minutes/week), but not as frequent. Data review tasks were the second most frequent (49/week), although less time-intensive (47 minutes/week). Findings reveal patterns of effort and time expenditure in nurses' evolving roles in home monitoring of the health status of patients after lung transplantation. These findings highlight the centrality and importance of well-developed data management, computer skills, and interprofessional communication skills of nurses who perform responsibilities in this emerging role in

  3. A personalised mobile-based home monitoring system for heart failure: The SUPPORT-HF Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Velardo, Carmelo; Chantler, Tracey; Shah, Syed Ahmar; Paton, Chris; Khorshidi, Reza; Tarassenko, Lionel; Rahimi, Kazem

    2015-10-01

    Despite their potential for improving health outcomes, mobile-based home monitoring systems for heart failure have not yet been taken up widely by the patients and providers. To design and iteratively move towards a personalised mobile health monitoring system for patients living with heart failure, according to their health care and usability needs. We present an iterative approach to refining a remote health monitoring system that is based on interactions between different actors (patients, clinicians, social scientists and engineers) and supports the collection of quantitative and qualitative information about user experience and engagement. Patients were provided with tablet computers and commercially available sensing devices (a blood pressure monitor, a set of weighing scales, and a pulse oximeter) in order to complete physiological measurements at home, answer symptom-specific questionnaires, review their personal readings, view educational material on heart failure self-management, and communicate with their health professionals. The system supported unobtrusive remote software upgrades via an application distribution channel and the activation or deactivation of functional components by health professionals during run-time operation. We report early findings from the application of this approach in a cohort of 26 heart failure patients (mean age 72±15 years), their caregivers and healthcare professionals who participated in the SUPPORT-HF (Seamless User-centred Proactive Provision Of Risk-stratified Treatment for Heart Failure) study over a one-year study period (mean patient follow-up duration=270±62 days). The approach employed in this study led to several system upgrades dealing in particular with patient requirements for better communication with the development team and personalised self-monitoring interfaces. Engagement with the system was constantly high throughout the study and during the last week of the evaluation, 23 patients (88%) used the

  4. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamyn Dahmen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  5. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L.; Cook, Diane J.; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed. PMID:28362342

  6. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L; Cook, Diane J; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-03-31

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  7. Home monitoring after ambulatory implanted primary cardiac implantable electronic devices: The home ambulance pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahuleva, Mariana S; Soydan, Nedim; Divchev, Dimitar; Lüsebrink, Ulrich; Schieffer, Bernhard; Erdogan, Ali

    2017-11-01

    The Home Monitoring (HM) system of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias or device system failures. The aim of this pilot study was to examine how the safety and efficacy of the HM system in patients after ambulatory implanted primary CIEDs compare to patients with a standard procedure and hospitalization. We hypothesized that HM and their modifications would be a useful extension of the present concepts for ambulatory implanted CIEDs. This retrospective analysis evaluates telemetric data obtained from 364 patients in an ambulatory single center over 6 years. Patients were assigned to an active group (n = 217), consisting of those who were discharged early on the day of implantation of the primary CIED, or to a control group (n = 147), consisting of those discharged and followed up with the HM system according to usual medical practices. The mean duration of hospitalization was 73.2% shorter in the active group than in the control group, corresponding to 20.5 ± 13 fewer hours (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.3-29.5; P ambulatory implanted CIED when compared with standard management of these patients. Early discharge with the HM system after ambulatory CIED implantation was safe and not inferior to the classic medical procedure. Thus, together with lower costs, HM and its modifications would be a useful extension of the present concepts for ambulatory implanted CIEDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Accessibility of home blood pressure monitors for blind and visually impaired people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslan, Mark M; Burton, Darren M; Wilson, Thomas E; Taylor, Steven; Chertow, Bruce S; Terry, Jack E

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of hypertension comorbid with diabetes is a significant health care issue. Use of the home blood pressure monitor (HBPM) for aiding in the control of hypertension is noteworthy because of benefits that accrue from following a home measurement regimen. To be usable by blind and visually impaired patients, HBPMs must have speech output to convey all screen information, an easily readable visual display, identifiable controls that are easy to use, and an accessible user manual. Data on the physical aspects and the features and functions of nine Food and Drug Administration-approved HBPMs (eight of which were recommended by the British Hypertension Society) were tabulated and analyzed for usability by blind and visually impaired individuals. Video Electronics Standards Association standards were used to measure contrast modulation in the displays of the HBPMs. Ten persons who are blind or visually impaired and who have diabetes were surveyed to determine how they monitor their blood pressure and to learn their ideas for improvements in usability. Physical controls were found to be easy to identify, and operating procedures were found to be relatively simple on all of the HBPMs, but user manuals were either inaccessible or minimally accessible to blind persons. The two HBPMs that have speech output do not voice all of the information that is displayed on the screen. Some functions that are standard in the HBPMs without speech output, such as the feature for automatically setting cuff inflation volume and memory, were lacking in the HBPMs with speech output. These features were mentioned as desirable in interviews with legally blind persons who are diabetic and who monitor their blood pressure at home. Visual display output was large and adequate in all of the HBPMs. Michelson contrast for numeric digits in the HBPM displays was also measured, ranging from 55 to 75% for characters with dominant spatial frequency components lying in the range of 0

  9. Security And Privacy Issues in Health Monitoring Systems: eCare@Home Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wearing, Thomas; Dragoni, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Automated systems for monitoring elderly people in their home are becoming more and more common. Indeed, an increasing number of home sensor networks for healthcare can be found in the recent literature, indicating a clear research direction in smart homes for health-care. Although the huge amount...... of sensitive data these systems deal with and expose to the external world, security and privacy issues are surpris-ingly not taken into consideration. The aim of this paper is to raise some key security and privacy issues that home health monitor systems should face with. The analysis is based on a real world...... monitoring sensor network for healthcare built in the context of the eCare@Home project....

  10. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  11. Telemedical home-monitoring of diabetic foot disease using photographic foot imaging - a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Constantijn E. V. B.; Bus, Sicco A.; Kottink, Anke I. R.; Bouwmans, Clazien A. M.; Schönbach-Spraul, Anna M.; van Baal, Sjef G.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of using a photographic foot imaging device (PFID) as a tele-monitoring tool in the home environment of patients with diabetes who were at high risk of ulceration. Images of the plantar foot were taken three times a week over a period of four months in the home of 22

  12. Schooling diabetes: Use of continuous glucose monitoring and remote monitors in the home and school settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Christine; Van Name, Michelle A; Weyman, Kate; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Finnegan, Jennifer; Sikes, Kristin; Tamborlane, William V; Sherr, Jennifer L

    2017-03-17

    Despite significant advances in type 1 diabetes (T1D) management, achieving targeted glycemic control in pediatric patients remains a struggle. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) with remote access holds the promise to address this challenge by allowing caregivers to monitor glucose, even when the child is not directly under their supervision. To explore real-time and remote CGM practices in homes and schools, including caregiver expectations regarding this technology. Parents and daytime caregivers. Respondents answered an anonymous survey assessing characteristics of CGM use. Cross-sectional data were collected and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Thirty-three parents and 17 daytime caregivers responded. Threshold alerts (alerts when patients reached certain pre-set high or low limits) were used most frequently, followed by rate of change alerts. Most parents and daytime caregivers responded to low- and high-threshold CGM alerts by confirming with a glucose meter prior to treatment; while about one-third endorsed treating lows without a confirmatory test. Most parents expected their child's daytime caregiver to respond to CGM alerts and daytime caregivers felt the parent's expectations of them were reasonable. All parents and most caregivers reported decreased overall worry/stress. Parents felt positive about CGM use and daytime caregivers felt comfortable with CGM. The positive and collaborative management reported by parents and daytime caregivers sets the stage for CGM to play an important role in the management of children with T1D both in the home and in the school settings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, Kristel; Goossens, Katrien; Elseviers, Monique; Van Bogaert, Peter; Dilles, Tinne

    2017-09-01

    This paper examines recently admitted nursing home residents' practical autonomy, their remaining social environment and their social functioning. In a cross-sectional design, 391 newly admitted residents of 67 nursing homes participated. All respondents were ≥65 years old, had mini-mental state examination ≥18 and were living in the nursing home for at least 1 month. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and validated measuring tools. The mean age was 84, 64% were female, 23% had a partner, 80% children, 75% grandchildren and 59% siblings. The mean social functioning score was 3/9 (or 33%) and the autonomy and importance of autonomy score 6/9 (or 67%). More autonomy was observed when residents could perform activities of daily living more independently, and cognitive functioning, quality of life and social functioning were high. Residents with depressive feelings scored lower on autonomy and social functioning compared to those without depressive feelings. Having siblings and the frequency of visits positively correlated with social functioning. In turn, social functioning correlated positively with quality of life. Moreover, a higher score on social functioning lowered the probability of depression. Autonomy or self-determination and maintaining remaining social relationships were considered to be important by the new residents. The remaining social environment, social functioning, quality of life, autonomy and depressive feelings influenced each other, but the cause--effect relation was not clear.

  14. Barriers to conducting ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring during hypertension screening in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronish, Ian M; Kent, Shia; Moise, Nathalie; Shimbo, Daichi; Safford, Monika M; Kynerd, Robert E; O'Beirne, Ronan; Sullivan, Alexandra; Muntner, Paul

    2017-09-01

    In 2015, the US Preventive Services Task Force updated their hypertension recommendations to advise that adults with elevated office blood pressure (BP) undergo out-of-office BP measurement to exclude white coat hypertension before diagnosis. Our goal was to determine the most important barriers to primary care providers' ordering ambulatory and home BP monitoring in the United States. We enrolled 63 primary care providers into nominal group panels in which participants iteratively listed and ranked barriers to ambulatory and home BP monitoring. Top-ranked barriers to ambulatory BP monitoring were challenges in accessing testing, costs of testing, concerns about the willingness or ability of patients to successfully complete tests, and concerns about the accuracy and benefits of testing. Top-ranked barriers to home BP monitoring were concerns about compliance with the correct test protocol, accuracy of tests results, out-of-pocket costs of home BP devices, and time needed to instruct patients on home BP monitoring protocol. Efforts to increase the use of ambulatory and home BP monitoring by primary care providers in the United States should prioritize increasing the financial and personnel resources available for testing and addressing provider concerns about patients' ability to conduct high-quality tests. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Home blood pressure monitoring in heart transplant recipients: comparison with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Pierre; Kreitmann, Bernard; Habib, Gilbert

    2014-02-15

    How reliable is home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) in heart transplant recipients is not known. Possibly, it may underestimate hypertensive burden, because blood pressure (BP) nondipper profile is frequent among these patients. This prospective study has been designed to determine whether HBPM adequately identifies hypertension in heart transplant recipients. We compared HBPM with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for the diagnosis of uncontrolled hypertension in 74 patients 13.5±6.7 years after heart transplantation. HBPM was measured with a validated semiautomatic device twice every morning and twice every evening on 7 consecutive days, within 15 days of ABPM. We also measured the relationship between HBPM, ABPM, and organ damage as measured by albuminuria and left ventricular mass. A nondipper profile was found in 53 (72%) patients. HBPM and ABPM were close according to Pearson bivariate correlations. There was no significant correlation between left ventricular mass and BP either at HBPM or ABPM. Proteinuria significantly correlated with systolic BP either at HBPM (R=0.42; P=0.0002) or ABPM (R=0.25; P=0.03). HBPM adequately classified 61 of 74 (82%) patients as hypertensives or as nonhypertensives or controlled hypertensives. Despite a high prevalence of nondipper profile, HBPM gives a reliable estimate of BP burden in most heart transplant recipients. Thus, our results strongly suggest that HBPM is useful for the long-term follow-up of heart transplant recipients.

  16. Functional Communication Training with Toddlers in Home Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Glen; Ester, Tera; Langhans, Sherri; Fox, Lise

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of functional communication training when used by mothers to address the serious challenging behaviors of toddlers. Multiple baseline (across home routines) designs were used with two mother-child dyads. The data showed mothers used the procedures correctly and interventions produced reductions in…

  17. Expert panel consensus recommendations for home blood pressure monitoring in Asia: the Hope Asia Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungha; Buranakitjaroen, Peera; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chia, Yook-Chin; Divinagracia, Romeo; Hoshide, Satoshi; Shin, Jinho; Siddique, Saulat; Sison, Jorge; Soenarta, Arieska Ann; Sogunuru, Guru Prasad; Tay, Jam Chin; Turana, Yuda; Wang, Ji-Guang; Zhang, Yuqing; Kario, Kazuomi

    2018-01-31

    Hypertension is the leading cause of mortality throughout Asia. Home blood pressure monitoring has the potential to improve hypertension control and is a useful adjunct to conventional office blood pressure measurements due to its diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular outcomes. At present, there are no region-specific guidelines addressing the use of home blood pressure monitoring in Asia. Therefore, an expert panel was convened to address the use of home blood pressure monitoring and develop key recommendations to help guide clinical practice throughout the Asia region. The resulting recommendations support the use of home blood pressure monitoring with a validated device as an accurate adjunct for diagnosing hypertension and predicting cardiovascular outcome. Diagnosis and treatment of hypertension should still be guided by conventional office/clinic blood pressure measurements. The expert panel encourages the incorporation of home blood pressure monitoring into local clinical guidelines and offers practical recommendations to ensure continuity of care where a validated home blood pressure device is not available.

  18. Home blood pressure level and decline in renal function among treated hypertensive patients: the J-HOME-Morning Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Kazuki; Obara, Taku; Kikuya, Masahiro; Satoh, Michihiro; Hosaka, Miki; Metoki, Hirohito; Nishigori, Hidekazu; Mano, Nariyasu; Nakayama, Masaaki; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the association between home and office blood pressure (BP) levels and further decline in renal function among treated hypertensive patients with and without renal dysfunction. We calculated annual decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) in 1535 treated hypertensive patients with home and office BP measurements. We defined ΔeGFR home, evening home and office systolic BP (SBP) levels and morning home diastolic BP (DBP) levels were positively associated with the risk of decline in renal function (trend P=0.003, 0.002, 0.003 and 0.004). Compared to patients with home SBP home SBPs ⩾135 mm Hg and between 130-135 mm Hg, while the risk was similar in those with home SBP of 125-130 mm Hg. For 1015 patients with normal eGFR at baseline, only morning home SBP level was positively associated with the risk of decline in renal function (trend P=0.004). Morning home BP might be useful for risk evaluation of decline in renal function even among treated hypertensive patients with normal renal function. Target levels of home BP control among treated hypertensive patients need to be further investigated.

  19. How Parents of Teens Store and Monitor Prescription Drugs in the Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Bettina; Moore, Roland S.; Grube, Joel W.; Jennings, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative interviews were conducted with parents of teens to explore how parents store and monitor prescription drugs in the home. Most parents had prescription drugs in the house, but took few precautions against teens accessing these drugs. Strategies for monitoring included moving the drugs to different locations, remembering how many pills…

  20. Improving interstage survival after Norwood operation: outcomes from 10 years of home monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Nancy A; Frommelt, Michele A; Tweddell, James S; Hehir, David A; Mussatto, Kathleen A; Frontier, Katherine D; Slicker, Julie A; Bartz, Peter J; Ghanayem, Nancy S

    2014-10-01

    Infants who undergo Norwood stage 1 palliation (S1P) continue with high-risk circulation until stage 2 palliation (S2P). Routine care during the interstage period is associated with 10% to 20% mortality. This report illustrates the sustained reduction of interstage mortality over 10 years associated with use of home monitoring. Daily monitoring of oxygen saturation and weight was done for all patients discharged to home after S1P. Notification of the care team occurred for oxygen saturation90%, weight gain30 g, or intakehome monitoring. Interstage survival was 98%. Breach of home criteria occurred in 59% (93 out of 157), with violation of oxygen saturationHome monitoring after S1P is associated with excellent interstage survival. Although a breach of monitoring criteria occurred in more than half of patients, our analysis failed to identify independent predictors of interstage events. Analysis of variables predicting mortality could not be assessed due to the low frequency of death in this cohort. Failure to identify specific variables for interstage events suggests that home monitoring, as part of an interstage surveillance program, should be applied to all S1P hospital survivors. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Whole-Home Dehumidifiers: Field-Monitoring Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Tom; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Johnson, Russell

    2014-09-23

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated a WHD field-metering study to expand current knowledge of and obtain data on WHD operation and energy consumption in real-world applications. The field study collected real-time data on WHD energy consumption, along with information regarding housing characteristics, consumer behavior, and various outdoor conditions expected to affect WHD performance and efficiency. Although the metering study collected similar data regarding air conditioner operation, this report discusses only WHDs. The primary objectives of the LBNL field-metering study are to (1) expand knowledge of the configurations, energy consumption profiles, consumer patterns of use (e.g., relative humidity [RH] settings), and environmental parameters of whole-home dehumidification systems; and (2) develop distributions of hours of dehumidifier operation in four operating modes: off, standby, fan-only, and compressor (also called dehumidification mode). Profiling energy consumption entails documenting the power consumption, duration of power consumption in different modes, condensate generation, and properties of output air of an installed system under field conditions of varying inlet air temperature and RH, as well as system configuration. This profiling provides a more detailed and deeper understanding of WHD operation and its complexities. This report describes LBNL’s whole-home dehumidification field-metering study conducted at four homes in Wisconsin and Florida. The initial phase of the WHD field-metering study was conducted on one home in Madison, Wisconsin, from June to December of 2013. During a second phase, three Florida homes were metered from June to October of 2014. This report presents and examines data from the Wisconsin site and from the three Florida sites.

  2. Secreted Reporters for Monitoring Multiple Promoter Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashgari, Ghazal; Kantar, Rami S; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2017-01-01

    Secreted reporter proteins are reliable modalities for monitoring of different biological processes, which can be measured longitudinally in conditioned medium of cultured cells or body fluids such as blood and urine, ex vivo. In this chapter, we will explore established secreted reporters and their applications and limitations for monitoring of promoter function. We will also describe both cell-based and blood-based assays for detecting three commonly used reporters: secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP ), Gaussia luciferase (Gluc), and Vargula luciferase (Vluc).

  3. Daily home BNP monitoring in heart failure for prediction of impending clinical deterioration: results from the HOME HF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth; Troughton, Richard; Dahlström, Ulf; Dargie, Henry; Krum, Henry; van der Meer, Peter; McDonagh, Theresa; Atherton, John J; Kupfer, Ken; San George, Richard C; Richards, Mark; Doughty, Robert

    2018-01-04

    Serial measurement of natriuretic peptides may guide management in heart failure (HF) patients. In previous trials, natriuretic peptides were infrequently monitored, which may undervalue the benefit of this approach. HOME was an adaptive three-arm randomized clinical study to test whether home monitoring of BNP could reduce HF-related death, hospitalization due to acute decompensated HF (ADHF), and ADHF treated with intravenous diuretics in the emergency department or outpatient setting. Enrolment was terminated early because of slow enrolment, low event rates, and the belief that an algorithm for assessing BNP trends was needed. Justification for pooling data from all study arms was made and analysis as a single observational study was performed. The analysis resulted in 107 patients who were monitored for a median of 172 days with BNP measures on a median of 74% of days. BNP values were highly variable within a patient. Dispersion between serial BNPs was calculated to be 39.3%, 57.7%, and 73.6% for 1, 60, and 120 days between measures, respectively. A moving average filter (fBNP) was calculated to reduce day-to-day fluctuations and track changes from week to week. There were 27 primary events in 17 362 patient days of monitoring; the hazard ratio for time-varying fBNP was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.48-3.34) per unit natural log (corresponding to a 2.72-fold change in fBNP level). The HOME HF study demonstrates the feasibility of home BNP measurement and shows the potential value of fBNP as an index of emerging clinical deterioration. Assessment of the clinical value of this is required. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Quinn, Terry J; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C; Stott, David J

    2017-04-03

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce costs and improve the quality of care compared. To assess the effects of long-term home or foster home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and two trials registers to November 2015. We included randomised and non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies complying with the EPOC study design criteria and comparing the effects of long-term home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. We reported the results narratively, as the substantial heterogeneity across studies meant that meta-analysis was not appropriate. We included 10 studies involving 16,377 participants, all of which were conducted in high income countries. Included studies compared community-based care with institutional care (care homes). The sample size ranged from 98 to 11,803 (median N = 204). There was substantial heterogeneity in the healthcare context, interventions studied, and outcomes assessed. One study was a randomised trial (N = 112); other included studies used designs that had potential for bias, particularly due lack of randomisation, baseline imbalances, and non-blinded outcome assessment. Most studies did not select (or exclude) participants for any specific disease state, with the exception of one study that only included patients if they had a stroke. All studies had methodological limitations, so readers should interpret results with caution.It is uncertain

  5. Get the Most Out of Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 3, 2015. Kaplan NM. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and white coat hypertension in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  6. A Real-Time Kinect Signature-Based Patient Home Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddi Blumrosen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of body kinematics during performance of daily life activities at home plays a significant role in medical condition monitoring of elderly people and patients with neurological disorders. The affordable and non-wearable Microsoft Kinect (“Kinect” system has been recently used to estimate human subject kinematic features. However, the Kinect suffers from a limited range and angular coverage, distortion in skeleton joints’ estimations, and erroneous multiplexing of different subjects’ estimations to one. This study addresses these limitations by incorporating a set of features that create a unique “Kinect Signature”. The Kinect Signature enables identification of different subjects in the scene, automatically assign the kinematics feature estimations only to the subject of interest, and provide information about the quality of the Kinect-based estimations. The methods were verified by a set of experiments, which utilize real-time scenarios commonly used to assess motor functions in elderly subjects and in subjects with neurological disorders. The experiment results indicate that the skeleton based Kinect Signature features can be used to identify different subjects in high accuracy. We demonstrate how these capabilities can be used to assign the Kinect estimations to the Subject of Interest, and exclude low quality tracking features. The results of this work can help in establishing reliable kinematic features, which can assist in future to obtain objective scores for medical analysis of patient condition at home while not restricted to perform daily life activities.

  7. A Real-Time Kinect Signature-Based Patient Home Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrosen, Gaddi; Miron, Yael; Intrator, Nathan; Plotnik, Meir

    2016-11-23

    Assessment of body kinematics during performance of daily life activities at home plays a significant role in medical condition monitoring of elderly people and patients with neurological disorders. The affordable and non-wearable Microsoft Kinect ("Kinect") system has been recently used to estimate human subject kinematic features. However, the Kinect suffers from a limited range and angular coverage, distortion in skeleton joints' estimations, and erroneous multiplexing of different subjects' estimations to one. This study addresses these limitations by incorporating a set of features that create a unique "Kinect Signature". The Kinect Signature enables identification of different subjects in the scene, automatically assign the kinematics feature estimations only to the subject of interest, and provide information about the quality of the Kinect-based estimations. The methods were verified by a set of experiments, which utilize real-time scenarios commonly used to assess motor functions in elderly subjects and in subjects with neurological disorders. The experiment results indicate that the skeleton based Kinect Signature features can be used to identify different subjects in high accuracy. We demonstrate how these capabilities can be used to assign the Kinect estimations to the Subject of Interest, and exclude low quality tracking features. The results of this work can help in establishing reliable kinematic features, which can assist in future to obtain objective scores for medical analysis of patient condition at home while not restricted to perform daily life activities.

  8. Novel Approach for Ensuring Increased Validity in Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav Wedege

    This paper proposes a novel technique to increase the validity of home blood pressure monitoring by using various sensor technologies as part of an intelligent environment platform in the home of the user. A range of recommendations exists on how to obtain a valid blood pressure but with the devi......This paper proposes a novel technique to increase the validity of home blood pressure monitoring by using various sensor technologies as part of an intelligent environment platform in the home of the user. A range of recommendations exists on how to obtain a valid blood pressure...... but with the devices currently available it cannot be verified whether a user is actually following the recommendations or not. An initial prototype is presented implementing part of the proposed solution including a limited pilot study as a status on the work in progress. Results indicate that the solution...

  9. A new system for continuous and remote monitoring of patients receiving home mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, L.

    2016-09-01

    Home mechanical ventilation is the treatment of patients with respiratory failure or insufficiency by means of a mechanical ventilator at a patient's home. In order to allow remote patient monitoring, several tele-monitoring systems have been introduced in the last few years. However, most of them usually do not allow real-time services, as they have their own proprietary communication protocol implemented and some ventilation parameters are not always measured. Moreover, they monitor only some breaths during the whole day, despite the fact that a patient's respiratory state may change continuously during the day. In order to reduce the above drawbacks, this work reports the development of a novel remote monitoring system for long-term, home-based ventilation therapy; the proposed system allows for continuous monitoring of the main physical quantities involved during home-care ventilation (e.g., differential pressure, volume, and air flow rate) and is developed in order to allow observations of different remote therapy units located in different places of a city, region, or country. The developed remote patient monitoring system is able to detect various clinical events (e.g., events of tube disconnection and sleep apnea events) and has been successfully tested by means of experimental tests carried out with pulmonary ventilators typically used to support sick patients.

  10. Monitoring kidney function in diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, P; Astrup, A S; Smidt, U M

    1994-01-01

    (SD))(p kidney function ml.min-1.year-1 was 4.7 (3.3) measured and 4.8 (3.5) estimated (mean(SD)) (NS), but the 95% limits...... of decline in glomerular filtration rate are comparable, but the limits of agreement are wide, which make the Cockroft-Gault method unacceptable for clinical purposes, i.e. monitoring progression in kidney function in the individual patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  11. Privacy versus autonomy: a tradeoff model for smart home monitoring technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Daphne; Knoefel, Frank; Goubran, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are proposed as a new location for the delivery of healthcare services. They provide healthcare monitoring and communication services, by using integrated sensor network technologies. We validate a hypothesis regarding older adults' adoption of home monitoring technologies by conducting a literature review of articles studying older adults' attitudes and perceptions of sensor technologies. Using current literature to support the hypothesis, this paper applies the tradeoff model to decisions about sensor acceptance. Older adults are willing to trade privacy (by accepting a monitoring technology), for autonomy. As the information captured by the sensor becomes more intrusive and the infringement on privacy increases, sensors are accepted if the loss in privacy is traded for autonomy. Even video cameras, the most intrusive sensor type were accepted in exchange for the height of autonomy which is to remain in the home.

  12. A Remote Health Monitoring System for the Elderly Based on Smart Home Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minggang

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposed a remote health monitoring system for the elderly based on smart home gateway. The proposed system consists of three parts: the smart clothing, the smart home gateway, and the health care server. The smart clothing collects the elderly's electrocardiogram (ECG) and motion signals. The home gateway is used for data transmission. The health care server provides services of data storage and user information management; it is constructed on the Windows-Apache-MySQL-PHP (WAMP) platform and is tested on the Ali Cloud platform. To resolve the issues of data overload and network congestion of the home gateway, an ECG compression algorithm is applied. System demonstration shows that the ECG signals and motion signals of the elderly can be monitored. Evaluation of the compression algorithm shows that it has a high compression ratio and low distortion and consumes little time, which is suitable for home gateways. The proposed system has good scalability, and it is simple to operate. It has the potential to provide long-term and continuous home health monitoring services for the elderly. PMID:29204258

  13. A Remote Health Monitoring System for the Elderly Based on Smart Home Gateway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Kai; Shao, Minggang; Wu, Shuicai

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposed a remote health monitoring system for the elderly based on smart home gateway. The proposed system consists of three parts: the smart clothing, the smart home gateway, and the health care server. The smart clothing collects the elderly's electrocardiogram (ECG) and motion signals. The home gateway is used for data transmission. The health care server provides services of data storage and user information management; it is constructed on the Windows-Apache-MySQL-PHP (WAMP) platform and is tested on the Ali Cloud platform. To resolve the issues of data overload and network congestion of the home gateway, an ECG compression algorithm is applied. System demonstration shows that the ECG signals and motion signals of the elderly can be monitored. Evaluation of the compression algorithm shows that it has a high compression ratio and low distortion and consumes little time, which is suitable for home gateways. The proposed system has good scalability, and it is simple to operate. It has the potential to provide long-term and continuous home health monitoring services for the elderly.

  14. A Remote Health Monitoring System for the Elderly Based on Smart Home Gateway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Guan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a remote health monitoring system for the elderly based on smart home gateway. The proposed system consists of three parts: the smart clothing, the smart home gateway, and the health care server. The smart clothing collects the elderly’s electrocardiogram (ECG and motion signals. The home gateway is used for data transmission. The health care server provides services of data storage and user information management; it is constructed on the Windows-Apache-MySQL-PHP (WAMP platform and is tested on the Ali Cloud platform. To resolve the issues of data overload and network congestion of the home gateway, an ECG compression algorithm is applied. System demonstration shows that the ECG signals and motion signals of the elderly can be monitored. Evaluation of the compression algorithm shows that it has a high compression ratio and low distortion and consumes little time, which is suitable for home gateways. The proposed system has good scalability, and it is simple to operate. It has the potential to provide long-term and continuous home health monitoring services for the elderly.

  15. Effects of changes in depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning on physical disability in home care elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lydia W; Conwell, Yeates

    2009-02-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of changes in depression status on physical disability in older persons receiving home care, examine whether the effect is due to concomitant changes in cognitive status, and test whether affective state and cognitive ability interact to influence physical disability. Multilevel analyses were conducted using longitudinal data collected about every 3 months from older participants in Michigan's community-based long-term care programs (N = 13,129). The data set provided an average of nine repeated measures of depressive symptoms, cognitive functioning, and physical disability. We estimated the lag effects of within-person changes in depression and cognitive status, and their interaction, on physical disability measured by activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), controlling for health-related events that occurred in the interim. Changes between not having and having depressive symptoms, including subsyndromal symptoms, are critical to physical disability for home care elders. The effects are independent of concomitant changes in cognitive status, which also have significant adverse effects on physical disability. There is some evidence that improvement of depression buffers the adverse effect of cognitive decline on IADL disability. Providers should monitor changes in depression and cognitive status in home care elders. Early detection and treatment of subthreshold depression, as well as efforts to prevent worsening of cognitive status in home care elders, may have a meaningful impact on their ability to live at home.

  16. Home Monitoring of Blood Pressure: Patients' Perception and Role ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    counseling patients on the proper use of blood pressure monitors (50 %) and delivering needed relevant education (56 %). A majority of ... Pharmacists take the lead in educating patients in this regard. Keywords: Jordan, Hypertension ... hypertension (193002) [2], a sample size of 377 was calculated, for a margin error of 5 ...

  17. Knowledge and practice of self home monitoring of blood glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of glucometer. Conclusions: The awareness of SMBG was good but ownership of glucometer was poor. Age and level of education were determinants of ownership of glucometer. Only level of education predicted ownership of glucometer. Key Words: Diabetes mellitus, blood glucose, self-monitoring, knowledge, practice ...

  18. Bridging the Self-care Deficit Gap: Remote Patient Monitoring and the Hospital-at-Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafazzo, Joseph A.; Leonard, Kevin; Easty, Anthony C.; Rossos, Peter G.; Chan, Christopher T.

    This study examines the use of a remote patient monitoring intervention to address the challenge of patient self-care in complex hospital-at-home therapies. It was shown that in a home hemodialysis patient group, remote patient monitoring facilitated self-care and was supported by patients and, in particular, family caregivers. This does not come without cost to the patient however, who now has greater personal responsibility and accountability for their health management. Promising results from this study indicate that most patients are willing to assume this cost in exchange for the possibility of improved health outcomes.

  19. Psychometric Evaluation of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS) Short Forms with Out-of-Home Care Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas J.; Duppong Hurley, Kristin; Lambert, Matthew C.; Epstein, Michael H.; Stevens, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a need for brief progress monitoring measures of behavioral and emotional symptoms for youth in out-of-home care. The Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman et al. in Manual of the peabody treatment progress battery. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 2010) is one measure that has clinician and youth short forms…

  20. HoCoS: Home Companion Software. A service oriented solution for elderly home accompanying and remote healthcare monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhouib, M A; Bougueroua, L; Istrate, D; Pino, M; Bernard, C

    2011-01-01

    The age of the population in all societies around the world is increasing. Elderly people prefer to maintain their independence, their autonomy and live at home as long as possible. We propose as a solution to this issue a Home Companion Software baptized HoCoS. This solution aims to help the elderly with daily life by providing an ergonomic and familiar interface. The second purpose is to integrate transparent remote healthcare monitoring service that ensures elderly security without disturbing the ergonomics of the application. We present service oriented architecture that offers extensibility and interoperability between heterogonous systems in order to combine several technologies and operators. We carried out ergonomic tests on this solution to evaluate its comfort and ease of use.

  1. [The good use of home blood pressure monitoring. Consensus document].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persu, A; Fagard, R; De Cort, P; Legat, P; Van Bortel, L

    2009-06-01

    Self or home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) is increasingly popular. Its prognostic value and clinical interest in the diagnosis and follow-up of hypertension are well established. In addition, experts widely agree on the fact that it improves hypertension management and therapeutic compliance. In particular, HBPM often allows to detect white coat hypertension (to be confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement). Unfortunately, a large part of HBPM devices in the European Union have not fulfilled independent validation criteria. Furthermore, many patients buy and use such devices without medical supervision. This consensus document summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of HBPM and the conditions of a proper use, in agreement with the recent European and American guidelines.

  2. Economic Evaluation of a Home-Based Age-Related Macular Degeneration Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, John S; Clemons, Traci; Regillo, Carl; Rayess, Nadim; Liffmann Kruger, Danielle; Rein, David

    2017-05-01

    Medicare recently approved coverage of home telemonitoring for early detection of incident choroidal neovascularization (CNV) among patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but no economic evaluation has yet assessed its cost-effectiveness and budgetary impact. To evaluate a home-based daily visual-field monitoring system using simulation methods and to apply the findings of the Home Monitoring of the Eye study to the US population at high risk for wet-form AMD. In this economic analysis, an evaluation of the potential cost, cost-effectiveness, and government budgetary impact of adoption of a home-based daily visual-field monitoring system among eligible Medicare patients was performed. Effectiveness and visual outcomes data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Home Monitoring of the Eye study, treatment data from the Wills Eye Hospital Treat & Extend study, and AMD progression data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 1 were used to simulate the long-term effects of telemonitoring patients with CNV in one eye or large drusen and/or pigment abnormalities in both eyes. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analysis and an alternative scenario using the Treat & Extend study control group outcomes were used to examine uncertainty in these data and assumptions. Home telemonitoring of patients with AMD for early detection of CNV vs usual care. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, net present value of lifetime societal costs, and 10-year nominal government expenditures. Telemonitoring of patients with existing unilateral CNV or multiple bilateral risk factors for CNV (large drusen and retinal pigment abnormalities) incurs $907 (95% CI, -$6302 to $2809) in net lifetime societal costs, costs $1312 (95% CI, $222-$2848) per patient during 10 years from the federal government's perspective, and results in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $35 663 (95% CI, cost savings to $235 613) per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Home telemonitoring

  3. Research and Development of Information and Communication Technology-based Home Blood Pressure Monitoring from Morning to Nocturnal Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Matsumoto, Yuri; Hamasaki, Haruna; Okawara, Yukie; Kondo, Maiko; Nozue, Ryoko; Yamagata, Hiromi; Okura, Ayako; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Asians have specific characteristics of hypertension (HTN) and its relationship with cardiovascular disease. The morning surge in blood pressure (BP) in Asians is more extended, and the association slope between higher BP and the risk for cardiovascular events is steeper in this population than in whites. Thus, 24-hour BP control including at night and in the morning is especially important for Asian patients with HTN. There are 3 components of "perfect 24-hour BP control": the 24-hour BP level, adequate dipping of nocturnal BP (dipper type), and adequate BP variability such as the morning BP surge. The morning BP-guided approach using home BP monitoring (HBPM) is the first step toward perfect 24-hour BP control. After controlling morning HTN, nocturnal HTN is the second target. We have been developing HBPM that can measure nocturnal BP. First, we developed a semiautomatic HBPM device with the function of automatic fixed-interval BP measurement during sleep. In the J-HOP (Japan Morning Surge Home Blood Pressure) study, the largest nationwide home BP cohort, we successfully measured nocturnal home BP using this device with data memory, 3 times during sleep (2, 3, and 4 am), and found that nocturnal home BP is significantly correlated with organ damage independently of office and morning BP values. The second advance was the development of trigger nocturnal BP (TNP) monitoring with an added trigger function that initiates BP measurements when oxygen desaturation falls below a variable threshold continuously monitored by pulse oximetry. TNP can detect the specific nocturnal BP surges triggered by hypoxic episodes in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. We also added the lowest heart rate-trigger function to TNP to detect the "basal nocturnal BP," which is determined by the circulating volume and structural cardiovascular system without any increase in sympathetic tonus. This double TNP is a novel concept for evaluating the pathogenic pressor mechanism of nocturnal BP

  4. HOW PARENTS OF TEENS STORE AND MONITOR PRESCRIPTION DRUGS IN THE HOME*

    OpenAIRE

    Friese, Bettina; Moore, Roland S; Grube, Joel W.; Jennings, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative interviews were conducted with parents of teens to explore how parents store and monitor prescription drugs in the home. Most parents had prescription drugs in the house, but took few precautions against teens accessing these drugs. Strategies for monitoring included moving the drugs to different locations, remembering how many pills were left, and how medication containers were positioned. Reasons given for not securing drugs were that parents did not think that their teens would...

  5. PRODUCTION MONITORING SYSTEM WITH PREDICTIVE FUNCTIONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANEL EISKOP

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current study is to analyse and develop production monitoring system (PMS for small and medium enterprises (SME with predictive functionality. The development of planned PMS covers design of hardware architecture, building data analysis and prediction tools. New tool wear forecast model has been developed. The proposed model extends traditional widely used models by introducing the effects of working regimes and multiple passes on tool/component wear.

  6. On Developing a Novel Versatile Framework for Heterogeneous Home Monitoring WSN networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. P. Antonopoulos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to deploy efficient and versatile WSN networks in the home environment is and will remain in the years to come a cornerstone objective in wireless networking. Respective services are continuously expanding requiring novel design and implementation approaches able to cover all relative present and even more importantly future requirements. This paper aims to present and convey knowledge and experience gained from such an effort in the context of home monitoring. Respective discussion covers all relative aspects and analyzes all critical challenges addressed ranging from identification and specification of the main requirements, to possible implementation approaches considered and finally the actual development undertaken. The final outcome considering the WSN home monitoring infrastructure as well as extracted knowledge and practical conclusions can be proven useful for further extending such an endeavour or even pursuing a different approach.

  7. The effects of home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Sacide; Mefkure Ozkaya, Hande; Banu Denizeri, Sabiha; Karabacak, Emrah

    2016-08-01

    Blood pressure monitoring is essential in hypertension, which is an important public health issue. Our objective was to compare the rates of blood pressure control and to investigate factors that affect blood pressure control in patients with hypertension. The records of 1006 patients with hypertension were examined retrospectively. The blood pressure control rates of the 394 patients who measured their blood pressure at home (group 1) and those who did not (group 2) were compared. In group 1, the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 123.91±12.63/78.64±8.92 mmHg measured at home, whereas it was 140.31±20.56/85.76±11.55 mmHg in the office setting (poffice BP control (phome BP control (p Home blood pressure monitoring is useful in preventing complications and achieving therapy compliance and is essential in diagnosis and treatment planning of hypertension.

  8. Functional diversity of home gardens and their agrobiodiversity conservation benefits in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbedomon, Rodrigue Castro; Salako, Valère Kolawolé; Fandohan, Adandé Belarmain; Idohou, Alix Frank Rodrigue; Glèlè Kakaї, Romain; Assogbadjo, Achille Ephrem

    2017-11-25

    Understanding the functional diversity of home gardens and their socio-ecological determinants is essential for mainstreaming these agroforestry practices into agrobiodiversity conservation strategies. This paper analyzed functional diversity of home gardens, identified the socio-ecological drivers of functions assigned to them, and assessed the agrobiodiversity benefits of home gardens functions. Using data on occurring species in home garden (HG) and functions assigned to each species by the gardeners, the study combined clustering and discriminant canonical analyses to explore the functional diversity of 360 home gardens in Benin, West Africa. Next, multinomial logistic models and chi-square tests were used to analyze the effect of socio-demographic characteristics of gardeners (age, gender, and education level), agro-ecological zones (humid, sub-humid, and semi-arid), and management regime (single and multiple managers) on the possession of a functional type of home gardens. Generalized linear models were used to assess the effect of the functions of home gardens and the determinant factor on their potential in conserving agrobiodiversity. Seven functional groups of home gardens, four with specific functions (food, medicinal, or both food and medicinal) and three with multiple functions (more than two main functions), were found. Women owned most of home gardens with primarily food plant production purpose while men owned most of home gardens with primarily medicinal plant production purposes. Finding also showed that multifunctional home gardens had higher plant species diversity. Specifically, crops and crop wild relatives occurred mainly in home gardens with food function while wild plant species were mostly found in home gardens with mainly medicinal function. Home gardening is driven by functions beyond food production. These functions are mostly related to direct and extractive values of home gardens. Functions of home gardens were gendered, with women

  9. Electromagnetic Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from GSM Mobile Phones Decreases the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, SMJ; Gholampour, M; Haghani, M; Mortazavi, G; Mortazavi, AR

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones are two-way radios that emit electromagnetic radiation in microwave range. As the number of mobile phone users has reached 6 billion, the bioeffects of exposure to mobile phone radiation and mobile phone electromagnetic interference with electronic equipment have received more attention, globally. As self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes control, home blood glucose testing kits are very popular. The main goal of this study was to investigate if radiofrequency radiation emitted from a common GSM mobile phone can alter the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Forty five female nondiabetic students aged 17-20 years old participated in this study. For Control-EMF group (30 students), blood glucose concentration for each individual was measured in presence and absence of radiofrequency radiation emitted by a common GSM mobile phone (HTC touch, Diamond 2) while the phone was ringing. For Control- Repeat group (15 students), two repeated measurements were performed for each participant in the absence of electromagnetic fields. The magnitude of the changes between glucose levels in two repeated measurements (|ΔC|) in Control-Repeat group was 1.07 ± 0.88 mg/dl while this magnitude for Control-EMF group was 7.53 ± 4.76 mg/dl (P electromagnetic interference in home blood glucose monitors. It can be concluded that electromagnetic interference from mobile phones has an adverse effect on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. We suggest that mobile phones should be used at least 50 cm away from home blood glucose monitors. PMID:25505778

  10. Electromagnetic Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from GSM Mobile Phones Decreases the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Smj; Gholampour, M; Haghani, M; Mortazavi, G; Mortazavi, Ar

    2014-09-01

    Mobile phones are two-way radios that emit electromagnetic radiation in microwave range. As the number of mobile phone users has reached 6 billion, the bioeffects of exposure to mobile phone radiation and mobile phone electromagnetic interference with electronic equipment have received more attention, globally. As self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes control, home blood glucose testing kits are very popular. The main goal of this study was to investigate if radiofrequency radiation emitted from a common GSM mobile phone can alter the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Forty five female nondiabetic students aged 17-20 years old participated in this study. For Control-EMF group (30 students), blood glucose concentration for each individual was measured in presence and absence of radiofrequency radiation emitted by a common GSM mobile phone (HTC touch, Diamond 2) while the phone was ringing. For Control- Repeat group (15 students), two repeated measurements were performed for each participant in the absence of electromagnetic fields. The magnitude of the changes between glucose levels in two repeated measurements (|ΔC|) in Control-Repeat group was 1.07 ± 0.88 mg/dl while this magnitude for Control-EMF group was 7.53 ± 4.76 mg/dl (P < 0.001, two-tailed test). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the electromagnetic interference in home blood glucose monitors. It can be concluded that electromagnetic interference from mobile phones has an adverse effect on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. We suggest that mobile phones should be used at least 50 cm away from home blood glucose monitors.

  11. Electromagnetic Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from GSM Mobile Phones Decreases the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones are two-way radios that emit electromagnetic radiation in microwave range. As the number of mobile phone users has reached 6 billion, the bioeffects of exposure to mobile phone radiation and mobile phone electromagnetic interference with electronic equipment have received more attention, globally. As self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes control, home blood glucose testing kits are very popular. The main goal of this study was to investigate if radiofrequency radiation emitted from a common GSM mobile phone can alter the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Forty five female nondiabetic students aged 17-20 years old participated in this study. For Control-EMF group (30 students, blood glucose concentration for each individual was measured in presence and absence of radiofrequency radiation emitted by a common GSM mobile phone (HTC touch, Diamond 2 while the phone was ringing. For Control- Repeat group (15 students, two repeated measurements were performed for each participant in the absence of electromagnetic fields. The magnitude of the changes between glucose levels in two repeated measurements (ΔC in Control-Repeat group was 1.07 ± 0.88 mg/dl while this magnitude for Control-EMF group was 7.53 ± 4.76 mg/dl (P < 0.001, two-tailed test. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the electromagnetic interference in home blood glucose monitors. It can be concluded that electromagnetic interference from mobile phones has an adverse effect on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. We suggest that mobile phones should be used at least 50 cm away from home blood glucose monitors.

  12. Smart home-based health platform for behavioral monitoring and alteration of diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Abdelsalam; Cook, Diane J; Schmalz, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers and medical practitioners have long sought the ability to continuously and automatically monitor patients beyond the confines of a doctor's office. We describe a smart home monitoring and analysis platform that facilitates the automatic gathering of rich databases of behavioral information in a manner that is transparent to the patient. Collected information will be automatically or manually analyzed and reported to the caregivers and may be interpreted for behavioral modification in the patient. Our health platform consists of five technology layers. The architecture is designed to be flexible, extensible, and transparent, to support plug-and-play operation of new devices and components, and to provide remote monitoring and programming opportunities. The smart home-based health platform technologies have been tested in two physical smart environments. Data that are collected in these implemented physical layers are processed and analyzed by our activity recognition and chewing classification algorithms. All of these components have yielded accurate analyses for subjects in the smart environment test beds. This work represents an important first step in the field of smart environment-based health monitoring and assistance. The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patients and evaluate the effects of alternative medicine and behavior regimens. We believe these technologies are essential for providing accessible, low-cost health assistance in an individual's own home and for providing the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. © Diabetes Technology Society

  13. Older Adults' and Caregivers' Perspectives on In-Home Monitoring Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Iris; Aligato, Allan; Krimmel, Tyler; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increase in the application and investigation of in-home monitoring systems to support older adults with dementia and their caregivers. The current study focused on a monitoring system that included the use of motion sensors and Internet connections with one-way communication capabilities. Only a limited number of studies have explored and compared older adults' and caregivers' perspectives on such monitoring systems. The purpose of the current study was to explore older adults' and caregivers' perspectives on in-home monitoring systems using photo elicitation techniques. Three overarching themes emerged: (a) feeling cared for (which included two sub-themes), (b) feeling cared about (which included three sub-themes), and (c) suggestions for change (which included four sub-themes). These results revealed the duality of care when using in-home monitoring. Clinical and other future implications are discussed. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(6), 43-50.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Implementing monitoring technologies in care homes for people with dementia: A qualitative exploration using Normalization Process Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alex; Wilson, Christine Brown; Stanmore, Emma; Todd, Chris

    2017-07-01

    Ageing societies and a rising prevalence of dementia are associated with increasing demand for care home places. Monitoring technologies (e.g. bed-monitoring systems; wearable location-tracking devices) are appealing to care homes as they may enhance safety, increase resident freedom, and reduce staff burden. However, there are ethical concerns about the use of such technologies, and it is unclear how they might be implemented to deliver their full range of potential benefits. This study explored facilitators and barriers to the implementation of monitoring technologies in care homes. Embedded multiple-case study with qualitative methods. Three dementia-specialist care homes in North-West England. Purposive sample of 24 staff (including registered nurses, clinical specialists, senior managers and care workers), 9 relatives and 9 residents. 36 semi-structured interviews with staff, relatives and residents; 175h of observation; resident care record review. Data collection informed by Normalization Process Theory, which seeks to account for how novel interventions become routine practice. Data analysed using Framework Analysis. Findings are presented under three main themes: 1. Reasons for using technologies: The primary reason for using monitoring technologies was to enhance safety. This often seemed to override consideration of other potential benefits (e.g. increased resident freedom) or ethical concerns (e.g. resident privacy); 2. Ways in which technologies were implemented: Some staff, relatives and residents were not involved in discussions and decision-making, which seemed to limit understandings of the potential benefits and challenges from the technologies. Involvement of residents appeared particularly challenging. Staff highlighted the importance of training, but staff training appeared mainly informal which did not seem sufficient to ensure that staff fully understood the technologies; 3. Use of technologies in practice: Technologies generated frequent

  15. Improving management and effectiveness of home blood pressure monitoring: a qualitative UK primary care study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Sabrina; Greenfield, Sheila M; Nouwen, Arie; McManus, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Self-monitoring blood pressure (SMBP) is becoming an increasingly prevalent practice in UK primary care, yet there remains little conceptual understanding of why patients with hypertension engage in self-monitoring. To identify psychological factors or processes prompting the decision to self-monitor blood pressure. A qualitative study of patients previously participating in a survey study about SMBP from four general practices in the West Midlands. Taped and transcribed in-depth interviews with 16 patients (6 currently monitoring, 2 used to self-monitor, and 8 had never self-monitored). Thematic analysis was undertaken. Three main themes emerged: 'self' and 'living with hypertension' described the emotional element of living with an asymptomatic condition; 'self-monitoring behaviour and medication' described overall views about self-monitoring, current practice, reasons for monitoring, and the impact on medication adherence; and 'the GP-patient transaction' described the power relations affecting decisions to self-monitor. Self-monitoring was performed by some as a protective tool against the fears of a silent but serious condition, whereas others self-monitor simply out of curiosity. People who self-monitored tended not to discuss this with their nurse or GP, partly due to perceiving minimal or no interest from their clinician about home monitoring, and partly due to fear of being prescribed additional medication. The decision to self-monitor appeared often to be an individual choice with no schedule or systems to integrate it with other medical care. Better recognition by clinicians that patients are self-monitoring, perhaps utilising the results in shared decision-making, might help integrate it into daily practice. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  16. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment Using Smart Home Monitoring of Complex Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Prafulla N; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2013-11-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the automated assessment of resident well-being. We hypothesize that the functional health of individuals, or ability of individuals to perform activities independently without assistance, can be estimated by tracking their activities using smart home technologies. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for assessing activity quality in smart homes. To validate our approach we quantify activity quality for 179 volunteer participants who performed a complex, interweaved set of activities in our smart home apartment. We observed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.79) between automated assessment of task quality and direct observation scores. Using machine learning techniques to predict the cognitive health of the participants based on task quality is accomplished with an AUC value of 0.64. We believe that this capability is an important step in understanding everyday functional health of individuals in their home environments.

  17. Monitoring and Detection Platform to Prevent Anomalous Situations in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarrubia, Gabriel; Bajo, Javier; De Paz, Juan F.; Corchado, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring and tracking people at home usually requires high cost hardware installations, which implies they are not affordable in many situations. This study/paper proposes a monitoring and tracking system for people with medical problems. A virtual organization of agents based on the PANGEA platform, which allows the easy integration of different devices, was created for this study. In this case, a virtual organization was implemented to track and monitor patients carrying a Holter monitor. The system includes the hardware and software required to perform: ECG measurements, monitoring through accelerometers and WiFi networks. Furthermore, the use of interactive television can moderate interactivity with the user. The system makes it possible to merge the information and facilitates patient tracking efficiently with low cost. PMID:24905853

  18. Monitoring and Detection Platform to Prevent Anomalous Situations in Home Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Villarrubia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring and tracking people at home usually requires high cost hardware installations, which implies they are not affordable in many situations. This study/paper proposes a monitoring and tracking system for people with medical problems. A virtual organization of agents based on the PANGEA platform, which allows the easy integration of different devices, was created for this study. In this case, a virtual organization was implemented to track and monitor patients carrying a Holter monitor. The system includes the hardware and software required to perform: ECG measurements, monitoring through accelerometers and WiFi networks. Furthermore, the use of interactive television can moderate interactivity with the user. The system makes it possible to merge the information and facilitates patient tracking efficiently with low cost.

  19. A Wireless Posture Monitoring System for Personalized Home-Based Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Macedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We live in an aging society, an issue that will be exacerbated in the coming decades, due to low birth rates and increasing life expectancy. With the decline in physical and cognitive functions with age, it is of the utmost importance to maintain regular physical activity, in order to preserve an individual’s mobility, motor capabilities and coordination. Within this context, this paper describes the development of a wireless sensor network and its application in a human motion capture system based on wearable inertial and magnetic sensors. The goal is to enable, through continuous real- time monitoring, the creation of a personalized home-based rehabilitation system for the elderly population and/or injured people. Within this system, the user can benefit from an assisted mode, in which their movements can be compared to a reference motion model of the same movements, resulting in visual feedback alerts given by the application. This motion model can be created previously, in a ‘learning phase’, under supervision of a caregiver.

  20. Functional decline in nursing home residents: A prognostic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Jerez-Roig

    Full Text Available To verify the probability of maintaining functional capacity in basic activities of daily living and identify the prognostic factors of functional decline in institutionalized older adults.A longitudinal study is presented herein, with 5 waves every 6 months, throughout 2 years (2013-2015, conducted with individuals ≥60 years old in 10 nursing homes in the city of Natal-RN (Brazil. Functional capacity was assessed by the items 'eating', 'personal hygiene', 'dressing', 'bathing', 'transferring', 'toileting' and 'walking', through a 5-item Likert scale. Sociodemographic, institution-related and health-related variables were considered to establish the baseline. Time dependent variables included continence decline, cognitive decline, increase in the number of medication, and incidences of falls, hospitalizations and fractures. The actuarial method, the log-rank test and Cox's regression were applied as statistical methods.The cumulative probability of functional maintenance was 78.2% (CI 95%: 72.8-82.7%, 65.1% (CI 95%: 58.9-70.5%, 53.5% (CI 95%: 47.2-59.5% and 44.0% (CI 95%: 37.7-50.2% at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, respectively. Predicting factors for functional decline were: severe cognitive impairment (HR = 1.96; p = 0.001, continence decline (HR = 1.85; p = 0.002 and incidence of hospitalizations (HR = 1.62; p = 0.020, adjusted by the incidence of depression, age, education level, presence of chronic diseases and low weight.The cumulative probability of maintaining functional capacity in institutionalized older adults was only 44% at the 2-year follow-up. Prognostic factors for functional decline included severe cognitive impairment, continence decline and incidence of hospitalizations.

  1. [Data security and the handling of patient data in home monitoring systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydenreich, F; Jürgens, C; Tost, F

    2009-09-01

    Data security must be considered seriously in the context of telemedical home monitoring because of the transmission and communication of patients' personal data. The contract governing medical treatment allows the ophthalmologist to process all data relevant to treatment. In Germany the legal framework for this purpose is provided by the Data Protection Act, various German hospital acts, and codes of medical professional conduct. In principle, these rules apply to telemedical home monitoring as well as to common physician-patient relationships. The patient must be informed extensively in an understandable manner and must give his or her written consent. However, the advanced options of new IT technologies demand the development of technical and organizational concepts that guarantee compliance with legal and regulatory affairs, assure data security, and prevent data abuse.

  2. Using preventive home monitoring to reduce hospital admission rates and reduce costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Birthe; Hæsum, Lisa Korsbakke Emtekær; Sørensen, Natascha

    2012-01-01

    We studied whether preventive home monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could reduce the frequency of hospital admissions and lower the cost of hospitalization. Patients were recruited from a health centre, general practitioner (GP) or the pulmonary hospital ward....... They were randomized to usual care or tele-rehabilitation with a telehealth monitoring device installed in their home for four months. A total of 111 patients were suitable for inclusion and consented to be randomized: 60 patients were allocated to intervention and three were lost to follow...... of admissions was €3461 per patient in the intervention group and €4576 in the control group; this difference was not significant. The Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to hospital admission were longer for the intervention group than the controls, but the difference was not significant. Future work requires...

  3. SymptomCare@Home: Developing an Integrated Symptom Monitoring and Management System for Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L; Eaton, Linda H; Echeverria, Christina; Mooney, Kathi H

    2017-10-01

    SymptomCare@Home, an integrated symptom monitoring and management system, was designed as part of randomized clinical trials to help patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy in ambulatory clinics and often experience significant symptoms at home. An iterative design process was informed by chronic disease management theory and features of assessment and clinical decision support systems used in other diseases. Key stakeholders participated in the design process: nurse scientists, clinical experts, bioinformatics experts, and computer programmers. Especially important was input from end users, patients, and nurse practitioners participating in a series of studies testing the system. The system includes both a patient and clinician interface and fully integrates two electronic subsystems: a telephone computer-linked interactive voice response system and a Web-based Decision Support-Symptom Management System. Key features include (1) daily symptom monitoring, (2) self-management coaching, (3) alerting, and (4) nurse practitioner follow-up. The nurse practitioner is distinctively positioned to provide assessment, education, support, and pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions to intensify management of poorly controlled symptoms at home. SymptomCare@Home is a model for providing telehealth. The system facilitates using evidence-based guidelines as part of a comprehensive symptom management approach. The design process and system features can be applied to other diseases and conditions.

  4. Application of smart technology in monitoring and control of home appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abdulrazaq

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The inherent dependency of home appliances on human for monitoring and control has been found to be mainly responsible for power wastage, and increase in the rate of wear and tear, which invariably implies additional spending on the part of owners. The smart technology provides a way out. This paper presents an automated system which is based on arduino and android device for monitoring and controlling appliances to prevent the wastage of power. The system design is based on the Microcontroller MIKRO-C software, active sensors and wireless internet services which is used in different monitoring and control processes of fan, air-conditioner, light and heater. The system when tested performs efficiently in monitoring and controlling through switching the appliances in the room based on human presence and environmental changes due to light intensity and temperature variation.

  5. Toward Intelligent Hemodynamic Monitoring: A Functional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Squara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology is now available to allow a complete haemodynamic analysis; however this is only used in a small proportion of patients and seems to occur when the medical staff have the time and inclination. As a result of this, significant delays occur between an event, its diagnosis and therefore, any treatment required. We can speculate that we should be able to collect enough real time information to make a complete, real time, haemodynamic diagnosis in all critically ill patients. This article advocates for “intelligent haemodynamic monitoring”. Following the steps of a functional analysis, we answered six basic questions. (1 What is the actual best theoretical model for describing haemodynamic disorders? (2 What are the needed and necessary input/output data for describing this model? (3 What are the specific quality criteria and tolerances for collecting each input variable? (4 Based on these criteria, what are the validated available technologies for monitoring each input variable, continuously, real time, and if possible non-invasively? (5 How can we integrate all the needed reliably monitored input variables into the same system for continuously describing the global haemodynamic model? (6 Is it possible to implement this global model into intelligent programs that are able to differentiate clinically relevant changes as opposed to artificial changes and to display intelligent messages and/or diagnoses?

  6. Sensor monitoring to measure and support daily functioning for independently living older people: a systematic review and road map for further development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Margriet C.; Poerbodipoero, Soemitro; Robben, Saskia; Daams, Joost; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; de Vos, Rien; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Kröse, Ben; Buurman, Bianca M.

    2013-01-01

    To study sensor monitoring (use of a sensor network placed in the home environment to observe individuals' daily functioning (activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living)) as a method to measure and support daily functioning for older people living independently at home.

  7. Workflow, time and patient satisfaction from the perspectives of home monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Renato Pietro; Morichelli, Loredana

    2013-06-01

    Remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices improves device surveillance and patient clinical management. The greatest challenge in implementing remote monitoring in standard practice is the need to develop new organizational models, capable of combining clinical effectiveness, low resource consumption, and patient acceptance. Since 2005, we developed a new model based on 'Primary Nursing' in which each patient is assigned to a nurse responsible for continuity of care. The model is essentially based on a cooperative interaction between the roles of an expert reference nurse and a responsible physician with an agreed list of respective tasks and responsibilities. After a pilot experience, the model was tested in a wide registry, the HomeGuide Registry, in which 1650 patients were enrolled. In this setting, remote monitoring sensitivity in detecting major cardiovascular events was very high (84%) with a positive predictive value of 97%. Overall, 95% of asymptomatic and 73% of actionable events were detected during remote monitoring sessions with a median reaction time of 3 days. Manpower was remarkably low: 55.5 min per health personnel per month every 100 patients. The strongest points of this model include strict definition of workflow, early reaction, traceability, continuity of care, maintaining human relationship with the patient. This model has been tested successfully even in a multicentre setting in the Model Project Monitor Centre study, in which one monitor centre screened daily remote monitoring data from nine satellite clinics.

  8. Passive in-home health and wellness monitoring: overview, value and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Majd

    2009-01-01

    Modern sensor and communication technology, coupled with advances in data analysis and artificial intelligence techniques, is causing a paradigm shift in remote management and monitoring of chronic disease. In-home monitoring technology brings the added benefit of measuring individualized health status and reporting it to the care provider and caregivers alike, allowing timely and targeted preventive interventions, even in home and community based settings. This paper presents a paradigm for geriatric care based on monitoring older adults passively in their own living settings through placing sensors in their living environments or the objects they use. Activity and physiological data can be analyzed, archived and mined to detect indicators of early disease onset or changes in health conditions at various levels. Examples of monitoring systems are discussed and results from field evaluation pilot studies are summarized. The approach has shown great promise for a significant value proposition to all the stakeholders involved in caring for older adults. The paradigm would allow care providers to extend their services into the communities they serve.

  9. WiSPH: A Wireless Sensor Network-Based Home Care Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Magaña-Espinoza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system based on WSN technology capable of monitoring heart rate and the rate of motion of seniors within their homes. The system is capable of remotely alerting specialists, caretakers or family members via a smartphone of rapid physiological changes due to falls, tachycardia or bradycardia. This work was carried out using our workgroup’s WiSe platform, which we previously developed for use in WSNs. The proposed WSN architecture is flexible, allowing for greater scalability to better allow event-based monitoring. The architecture also provides security mechanisms to assure that the monitored and/or stored data can only be accessed by authorized individuals or devices. The aforementioned characteristics provide the network versatility and solidity required for use in health applications.

  10. Efficient Active Sensing with Categorized Further Explorations for a Home Behavior-Monitoring Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwei Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robotics is a potential solution to home behavior monitoring for the elderly. For a mobile robot in the real world, there are several types of uncertainties for its perceptions, such as the ambiguity between a target object and the surrounding objects and occlusions by furniture. The problem could be more serious for a home behavior-monitoring system, which aims to accurately recognize the activity of a target person, in spite of these uncertainties. It detects irregularities and categorizes situations requiring further explorations, which strategically maximize the information needed for activity recognition while minimizing the costs. Two schemes of active sensing, based on two irregularity detections, namely, heuristic-based and template-matching-based irregularity detections, were implemented and examined for body contour-based activity recognition. Their time cost and accuracy in activity recognition were evaluated through experiments in both a controlled scenario and a home living scenario. Experiment results showed that the categorized further explorations guided the robot system to sense the target person actively. As a result, with the proposed approach, the robot system has achieved higher accuracy of activity recognition.

  11. Guidance on home blood pressure monitoring: A statement of the HOPE Asia Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi; Park, Sungha; Buranakitjaroen, Peera; Chia, Yook-Chin; Chen, Chen-Huan; Divinagracia, Romeo; Hoshide, Satoshi; Shin, Jinho; Siddique, Saulat; Sison, Jorge; Soenarta, Arieska Ann; Sogunuru, Guru Prasad; Tay, Jam Chin; Turana, Yuda; Wong, Lawrence; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2018-02-16

    Hypertension is an important modifiable cardiovascular risk factor and a leading cause of death throughout Asia. Effective prevention and control of hypertension in the region remain a significant challenge despite the availability of several regional and international guidelines. Out-of-office measurement of blood pressure (BP), including home BP monitoring (HBPM), is an important hypertension management tool. Home BP is better than office BP for predicting cardiovascular risk and HBPM should be considered for all patients with office BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg. It is important that HBPM is undertaken using a validated device and patients are educated about how to perform HBPM correctly. During antihypertensive therapy, monitoring of home BP control and variability is essential, especially in the morning. This is because HBPM can facilitate the choice of individualized optimal therapy. The evidence and practice points in this document are based on the Hypertension Cardiovascular Outcome Prevention and Evidence (HOPE) Asia Network expert panel consensus recommendations for HBPM in Asia. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Functional food monitoring as part of the new Dutch dietary monitoring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompelberg CJM; Jager M; Bakker MI; Buurma-Rethans EJM; Ocke MC; CVG

    2006-01-01

    Good data on functional food consumption necessary for an adequate Dutch nutrition policy are lacking. This lack may be overcome in future by including functional food monitoring in the new dietary monitoring system in the Netherlands. One specific form of monitoring could be an Internet-based

  13. Applying Utility Functions to Adaptation Planning for Home Automation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratskas, Pyrros; Paspallis, Nearchos; Kakousis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, George A.

    A pervasive computing environment typically comprises multiple embedded devices that may interact together and with mobile users. These users are part of the environment, and they experience it through a variety of devices embedded in the environment. This perception involves technologies which may be heterogeneous, pervasive, and dynamic. Due to the highly dynamic properties of such environments, the software systems running on them have to face problems such as user mobility, service failures, or resource and goal changes which may happen in an unpredictable manner. To cope with these problems, such systems must be autonomous and self-managed. In this chapter we deal with a special kind of a ubiquitous environment, a smart home environment, and introduce a user-preference-based model for adaptation planning. The model, which dynamically forms a set of configuration plans for resources, reasons automatically and autonomously, based on utility functions, on which plan is likely to best achieve the user's goals with respect to resource availability and user needs.

  14. Warfarin monitoring in nursing homes assessed by case histories. Do recommendations and electronic alerts affect judgements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, Reyes Serrano; Thue, Geir; Fylkesnes, Svein Ivar; Sandberg, Sverre; Kristoffersen, Ann Helen

    2017-09-01

    Older adults treated with warfarin are prone to complications, and high-quality monitoring is essential. The aim of this case history based study was to assess the quality of warfarin monitoring in a routine situation, and in a situation with an antibiotic-warfarin interaction, before and after receiving an electronic alert. In April 2014, a national web-based survey with two case histories was distributed among Norwegian nursing home physicians and general practitioners working part-time in nursing homes. Case A represented a patient on stable warfarin treatment, but with a substantial INR increase within the therapeutic interval. Case B represented a more challenging patient with trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMS) treatment due to pyelonephritis. In both cases, the physicians were asked to state the next warfarin dose and the INR recall interval. In case B, the physicians could change their suggestions after receiving an electronic alert on the TMS-warfarin interaction. Three hundred and ninety eight physicians in 292 nursing homes responded. Suggested INR recall intervals and warfarin doses varied substantially in both cases. In case A, 61% gave acceptable answers according to published recommendations, while only 9% did so for case B. Regarding the TMS-warfarin interaction in case history B, the electronic alert increased the percentage of respondents correctly suggesting a dose reduction from 29% to 53%. Having an INR instrument in the nursing home was associated with shortened INR recall times. Practical advice on handling of warfarin treatment and drug interactions is needed. Electronic alerts as presented in electronic medical records seem insufficient to change practice. Availability of INR instruments may be important regarding recall time.

  15. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  16. HOW PARENTS OF TEENS STORE AND MONITOR PRESCRIPTION DRUGS IN THE HOME*

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRIESE, BETTINA; MOORE, ROLAND S.; GRUBE, JOEL W.; JENNINGS, VANESSA K.

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative interviews were conducted with parents of teens to explore how parents store and monitor prescription drugs in the home. Most parents had prescription drugs in the house, but took few precautions against teens accessing these drugs. Strategies for monitoring included moving the drugs to different locations, remembering how many pills were left, and how medication containers were positioned. Reasons given for not securing drugs were that parents did not think that their teens would be interested in their prescription drugs and did not believe that they could be used to get high. This study highlights the need for parents to be educated about securing prescription drugs, the dangers of non-medical prescription drug use by teens, and which drugs might be used for non-medical purposes. PMID:25429166

  17. A Scoping Review of Economic Evaluations Alongside Randomised Controlled Trials of Home Monitoring in Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Kristensen, Mie Borch Dahl

    2017-09-04

    Many countries have considered telemedicine and home monitoring of patients as a solution to the demographic challenges that health-care systems face. However, reviews of economic evaluations of telemedicine have identified methodological problems in many studies as they do not comply with guidelines. The aim of this study was to examine economic evaluations alongside randomised controlled trials of home monitoring in chronic disease management and hereby to explore the resources included in the programme costs, the types of health-care utilisation that change as a result of home monitoring and discuss the value of economic evaluation alongside randomised controlled trials of home monitoring on the basis of the studies identified. A scoping review of economic evaluations of home monitoring of patients with chronic disease based on randomised controlled trials and including information on the programme costs and the costs of equipment was carried out based on a Medline (PubMed) search. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies include both costs of equipment and use of staff, but there is large variation in the types of equipment and types of tasks for the staff included in the costs. Equipment costs constituted 16-73% of the total programme costs. In six of the nine studies, home monitoring resulted in a reduction in primary care or emergency contacts. However, in total, home monitoring resulted in increased average costs per patient in six studies and reduced costs in three of the nine studies. The review is limited by the small number of studies found and the restriction to randomised controlled trials, which can be problematic in this area due to lack of blinding of patients and healthcare professionals and the difficulty of implementing organisational changes in hospital departments for the limited period of a trial. Furthermore, our results may be based on assessments of older telemedicine interventions.

  18. Monitoring game-based motor rehabilitation of patients at home for better plans of care and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, S; Gabrielli, S; Jonsdottir, J; Morando, M; Dellepiane, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the biomedical, remote monitoring infrastructure developed and currently tested in the EU REHAB@HOME project to support home rehabilitation of the upper extremity of persons post-stroke and in persons with other neurological disorders, such as Multiple Sclerosis patients, in order to track their progress over therapy and improve their Quality of Life. The paper will specifically focus on describing the initial testing of the tele-rehabilitation system's components for patients' biomedical monitoring over therapy, which support the delivery and monitoring of more personalized, engaging plans of care by rehabilitation centers and services.

  19. Monitoring of heavy metal concentrations in home outdoor air using moss bags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, Marcela, E-mail: arivera@creal.ca [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology CREAL, Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Zechmeister, Harald [University of Vienna, Faculty of Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Medina-Ramon, Mercedes; Basagana, Xavier [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology CREAL, Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Foraster, Maria [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology CREAL, Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Bouso, Laura [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology CREAL, Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Moreno, Teresa [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Solanas, Pascual; Ramos, Rafael [Research Unit, Family Medicine, Girona, Jordi Gol Institute for Primary Care Research (IDIAP Jordi Gol), Catalan Institute of Health, Catalunya (Spain); Department of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Girona (Spain); Koellensperger, Gunda [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Deltell, Alexandre [Polytechnic School, GREFEMA, University of Girona (Spain); Vizcaya, David [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology CREAL, Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    One monitoring station is insufficient to characterize the high spatial variation of traffic-related heavy metals within cities. We tested moss bags (Hylocomium splendens), deployed in a dense network, for the monitoring of metals in outdoor air and characterized metals' long-term spatial distribution and its determinants in Girona, Spain. Mosses were exposed outside 23 homes for two months; NO{sub 2} was monitored for comparison. Metals were not highly correlated with NO{sub 2} and showed higher spatial variation than NO{sub 2}. Regression models explained 61-85% of Cu, Cr, Mo, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn and 72% of NO{sub 2} variability. Metals were strongly associated with the number of bus lines in the nearest street. Heavy metals are an alternative traffic-marker to NO{sub 2} given their toxicological relevance, stronger association with local traffic and higher spatial variability. Monitoring heavy metals with mosses is appealing, particularly for long-term exposure assessment, as mosses can remain on site many months without maintenance. - Research highlights: > Moss bags can be used to measure the metal's long-term spatial distribution within cities. > Heavy metals in mosses are not highly correlated with ambient NO{sub 2} concentrations. > Heavy metals show higher spatial variation and association with traffic than NO{sub 2}. > Bus lines in the nearest street explain 75-85% of Mo, Cr, Sb, Sn and Cu variability. > Moss bags are useful for long-term at home exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. - The long-term spatial distribution of heavy metals, measured with moss bags, is mainly determined by proximity to bus lines.

  20. [Clinical utility of home blood pressure monitoring in patients under treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauk, L; Costa, H A; Caligiuri, S I

    2015-01-01

    A low number of patients who are treated with antihypertensive drugs achieve therapeutic goals. Home blood pressure monitoring is an excellent tool for studying this population. To determine the prevalence of patients with controlled and uncontrolled hypertension, as well as white-coat-effect and masked hypertension, and to evaluate the relationship with target organ damage in different groups. Blood pressure readings were performed simultaneously in the clinic and in the home using the same validated oscillometric equipment on 83 hypertensive patients on treatment with 2 or more antihypertensive drugs. They were then classified into 4 groups according to the cut-off values of the clinic and home blood pressure measurements. Left ventricular mass index, carotid intima media thickness, and microalbuminuria as markers of target organ damage, were also evaluated. Controlled blood pressure was present in 32.5%, 30.2% had sustained hypertension. The white coat effect was seen in 26.5%, while 10.8% were masked uncontrolled hypertension. Left ventricular mass index was higher in patients with no ambulatory control compared to controlled patients, and carotid IMT was also higher too in uncontrolled and white coat effect groups than controlled patients. More than one third of our patients who were treated with 2 or more drugs were not properly controlled, and they had significantly greater target organ damage than controlled patients. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of executive functioning and home environment in early reading development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.C.J.; Damhuis, C.M.P.; Sande, E. van de; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of executive functioning (EF) and home environment in the prediction of early reading development. In a longitudinal design, we followed 101 Dutch children from kindergarten to second grade. EF (attentional control, action control, short-term memory (STM)) and home factors

  2. Does Executive Function Mediate SES and Home Quality Associations with Academic Readiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth-Bart, Janean E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which executive function (EF) mediated associations of socioeconomic status (SES) and home-environment quality with academic readiness (math, letter and word identification, and knowledge of story-and-print concepts). Forty-nine 54-66-month old children and their mothers participated in a home observation and…

  3. Cognitive functioning, subjective memory complaints and risky behaviour predict minor home injuries in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Giuseppina; O Caffò, Alessandro; Bosco, Andrea

    2017-11-27

    Home accidents are one of the major causes of death, particularly in older people, young children and women. The first aim of this study was to explore the role of subjective memory complaints, cognitive functioning and risky behaviour as predictors of home injuries occurred in a year in a sample of healthy Italian older adults. The second aim was to investigate the role of risky behaviour as a mediator in the relationship between subjective and objective cognitive functioning and home injuries. One hundred thirty-three community-dwelling older people from southern Italy were administered a battery of tests to evaluate cognitive functioning, subjective memory complaints, and risky behaviour during home activities. Risky behaviour was evaluated using the Domestic Behaviour Questionnaire, created specifically for this purpose. The number of home injuries was recorded for a year throughout monthly telephone interviews. A path analysis was performed to test the following model: cognitive functioning and subjective memory complaints directly influence risky behaviour and number of accidents over a year; risky behaviour mediates the impact of cognitive functioning and subjective memory on number of accidents over a year. Path analysis confirmed the model tested except the role of risky behaviour as a mediator between cognitive functioning and home accidents. Risky behaviour could represent a further risk factor in cognitively intact older adults with subjective memory complaints. The assessment of both cognition and behaviour in elderly can make a valuable contribution in preventing home accidents in elderly.

  4. Feasibility and usability of a home monitoring concept based on mobile phones and near field communication (NFC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Jürgen; Kollmann, Alexander; Schreier, Günter

    2007-01-01

    Utilization of mobile information and communication technologies in home monitoring applications is becoming more and more common. The mobile phone, acting as a patient terminal for patients suffering from chronic diseases, provides an active link to the caregiver to transmit health status information and receive feedback. In such a concept the usability is still limited by the necessity of entering the values via the mobile phone's small keypad. The near field communication technology (NFC), a touch-based wireless interface that became available recently, may improve the usability level of such applications significantly. The focus of this paper is to describe the development of a prototype application based on this technology embedded in a home monitoring system. The feasibility and usability of this approach are evaluated and compared with concepts used in previous approaches. The high quantifier with respect to overall usability indicates that NFC may be the technology of choice for some tasks in home monitoring applications.

  5. Predicting medication adherence in multiple sclerosis using telephone-based home monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron P; Roubinov, Danielle S; Atkins, David C; Haselkorn, Jodie K

    2016-01-01

    Poor medication adherence exerts a substantial negative impact on the health and well-being of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Improving adherence rates requires a proactive approach of frequent and ongoing monitoring; however, this can be difficult to achieve within traditional, reactive health care systems that generally emphasize acute care services. Telephone-based home monitoring may circumvent these barriers and facilitate optimal care coordination and management for individuals with MS and other chronic illnesses. The current study evaluated the utility of a one-item, telephone-administered measure of adherence expectations as a prospective predictor of medication adherence across a six month period among individuals with MS. As part of a longitudinal study, Veterans with MS (N = 89) who were receiving medical services through the Veterans Health Administration completed monthly telephone-based interviews for six months. Using mixed model regression analyses, adherence expectations predicted adherence after adjusting for demographic, illness-related, and psychosocial factors (B = -5.54, p adherence expectations may represent an easy and efficient method for monitoring medication use among individuals with MS. The results offer an efficient method to detect and provide support for individuals who may benefit from interventions to promote medication adherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Periodic limb movements of sleep: empirical and theoretical evidence supporting objective at-home monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro M

    2016-08-01

    at-home PLMS monitors will prove increasingly important for clinical and research endeavors.Keywords: periodic limb movements, polysomnography, predictors, sleep, decision analysis, cost-effectiveness, diagnostic

  7. Home blood pressure predicts stroke incidence among older adults with impaired physical function: the Ohasama study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Hosaka, Miki; Matsuda, Ayako; Inoue, Ryusuke; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Murakami, Takahisa; Nomura, Kyoko; Kikuya, Masahiro; Metoki, Hirohito; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi

    2017-12-01

    Several observational studies have found modifying effects of functional status on the association between conventional office blood pressure (BP) and adverse outcomes. We aimed to examine whether the association between higher BP and stroke was attenuated or inverted among older adults with impaired function using self-measured home BP measurements. We followed 501 Japanese community-dwelling adults aged at least 60 years (mean age, 68.6 years) with no history of stroke. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for 1-SD increase in home BP and office BP measurements were calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model. Functional status was assessed by self-reported physical function. During a median follow-up of 11.5 years, first strokes were observed in 47 participants. Higher home SBP, but not office SBP, was significantly associated with increased risk of stroke among both 349 participants with normal physical function and 152 participants with impaired physical function [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) per 14.4-mmHg increase: 1.74 (1.12-2.69) and 1.77 (1.06-2.94), respectively], with no significant interaction for physical function (P = 0.56). Higher home DBP, but not office DBP, was also significantly associated with increased risk of stroke (P ≤ 0.029) irrespective of physical function (all P > 0.05 for interaction). Neither home BP nor office BP was significantly associated with all-cause mortality irrespective of physical function. Higher home BP was associated with increased risk of stroke even among those with impaired physical function. Measurements of home BP would be useful for stroke prevention, even after physical function decline.

  8. A system for ubiquitous fall monitoring at home via a wireless sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Luque, Francisco J; Zapata, Juan; Ruiz, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Accidental falls of our elderly, and physical injuries resulting, represent a major health and economic. Falls are the most common causes of serious injuries and a major health threats in the stratum of older population. Early detection of a fall is a key factor when trying to provide adequate care to the elderly person who has suffered an accident at home. In this paper, we present a support system for detecting falls of an elder person by a static wireless nonintrusive sensorial infrastructure based on heterogenous sensor nodes. This previous infrastructure, named AID (Alarm Intelligent Device), is an AAL (Ambient Assisted Living) system that allows to infer a potential fall. We have developed, different to other contributions, a specific low-power multi-hop network consists of nodes (Motes) that wirelessly communicate to each other and are capable of hopping radio messages to a base station where they are passed to a PC (or other possible client). The goal of this project is 1) to provide alerts to caregivers in the event of an accident, acute illness or strange (possibly dangerous) activities, and 2) to enable that authorized and authenticated caregivers by means of a itinerant wearable mote can be inserted into mesh and interact with it. In this paper, we describe an ubiquitous assistential monitoring system at home.

  9. Home blood pressure measurements: advantages and disadvantages compared to office and ambulatory monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafini, Sara; Fava, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) is an easy and standardized tool to measure blood pressure (BP) at home, which is recommended by several national and international guidelines to obtain reliable BP values. It is a useful and dependable measure of BP, which can add information to the more common and standardized methods, such as office (OBPM) and ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM), and sometimes substitute for them. Along with ABPM, HBPM detects out-of-office BP levels, helping to identify the white-coat effect and masked hypertension. Moreover, the large number of BP measurements obtained with HBPM has been demonstrated to be associated with future cardiovascular events and to provide information on day-to-day variability; this is a new aspect, the clinical significance of which is still under evaluation. By giving patients a more active role in the management of their chronic disease, HBPM can improve treatment adherence. The present review focuses on all these aspects and describes the pros and cons of HBPM use compared to OBPM and ABPM. In conclusion, although some aspects need to be clarified, the scientific evidence collected so far should encourage the more widespread use of HBPM in clinical practice.

  10. Home monitoring program reduces interstage mortality after the modified Norwood procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siehr, Stephanie L; Norris, Jana K; Bushnell, Julie A; Ramamoorthy, Chandra; Reddy, V Mohan; Hanley, Frank L; Wright, Gail E

    2014-02-01

    From 2002 to 2005, the interstage mortality after a modified Norwood procedure was 7% in our program. An interstage home monitoring program (HMP) was established to identify Norwood procedure patients at increased risk of decompensation and to reduce interstage mortality. Results of the first 5 years of the Norwood HMP were reviewed retrospectively. Interstage was defined as the time between Norwood hospital discharge and admission for second stage surgical palliation. In the HMP, families documented oxygen saturation, heart rate, weight, and feedings daily. Nurse practitioners called each family at least weekly, and when issues arose, action plans were determined based on symptom severity. Between October 2005 and October 2010 there were 46 Norwood procedure patients who survived to hospital discharge. All were enrolled in the HMP. Forty-five patients had a Norwood procedure with right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit, and 1 patient had a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. Interstage survival was 100%. Nineteen patients (41%) were admitted interstage; 5 patients were admitted twice, 1 patient was admitted 4 times. Seventeen patients (37%) required interstage interventions. Eight patients (17%) required major interventions: conduit stenting, aortic arch balloon angioplasty, emergent shunt, or early Glenn surgery. Minor interventions included supplemental oxygen, blood transfusion, intravenous hydration, diuresis, anti-arrhythmic therapy, or feeding adjustments. In the first 5 years of the HMP, all infants discharged after a modified Norwood procedure survived the interstage period. The HMP altered clinical management in 37% of patients. Home monitoring of oxygen saturation, heart rate, weight, and feedings, along with comprehensive care coordination, allowed timely interventions and reduced interstage mortality from 7% to 0%. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cost-benefit analysis of home blood pressure monitoring in hypertension diagnosis and treatment: an insurer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Alejandro; Woods, John R; Qiao, Nan; Jay, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring has been shown to be more effective than clinic BP monitoring for diagnosing and treating hypertension. However, reimbursement of home BP monitoring is uncommon in the United States because of a lack of evidence that it is cost beneficial for insurers. We develop a decision-analytic model, which we use to conduct a cost-benefit analysis from the perspective of the insurer. Model inputs are derived from the 2008 to 2011 claims data of a private health insurer in the United States, from 2009 to 2010 National Health and the Nutrition Examination Survey data, and from published meta-analyses. The model simulates the transitions among health states from initial physician visit to hypertension diagnosis, to treatment, to hypertension-related cardiovascular diseases, and patient death or resignation from the plan. We use the model to estimate cost-benefit ratios and both short- and long-run return on investment for home BP monitoring compared with clinic BP monitoring. Our results suggest that reimbursement of home BP monitoring is cost beneficial from an insurer's perspective for diagnosing and treating hypertension. Depending on the insurance plan and age group categories considered, estimated net savings associated with the use of home BP monitoring range from $33 to $166 per member in the first year and from $415 to $1364 in the long run (10 years). Return on investment ranges from $0.85 to $3.75 per dollar invested in the first year and from $7.50 to $19.34 per dollar invested in the long run. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Use of High-Frequency In-Home Monitoring Data May Reduce Sample Sizes Needed in Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko H Dodge

    Full Text Available Trials in Alzheimer's disease are increasingly focusing on prevention in asymptomatic individuals. This poses a challenge in examining treatment effects since currently available approaches are often unable to detect cognitive and functional changes among asymptomatic individuals. Resultant small effect sizes require large sample sizes using biomarkers or secondary measures for randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Better assessment approaches and outcomes capable of capturing subtle changes during asymptomatic disease stages are needed.We aimed to develop a new approach to track changes in functional outcomes by using individual-specific distributions (as opposed to group-norms of unobtrusive continuously monitored in-home data. Our objective was to compare sample sizes required to achieve sufficient power to detect prevention trial effects in trajectories of outcomes in two scenarios: (1 annually assessed neuropsychological test scores (a conventional approach, and (2 the likelihood of having subject-specific low performance thresholds, both modeled as a function of time.One hundred nineteen cognitively intact subjects were enrolled and followed over 3 years in the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Change (ISAAC study. Using the difference in empirically identified time slopes between those who remained cognitively intact during follow-up (normal control, NC and those who transitioned to mild cognitive impairment (MCI, we estimated comparative sample sizes required to achieve up to 80% statistical power over a range of effect sizes for detecting reductions in the difference in time slopes between NC and MCI incidence before transition.Sample size estimates indicated approximately 2000 subjects with a follow-up duration of 4 years would be needed to achieve a 30% effect size when the outcome is an annually assessed memory test score. When the outcome is likelihood of low walking speed defined using the individual-specific distributions of

  13. Ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring: gaps between clinical guidelines and clinical practice in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Sajita; Subramaniam, Kannan; Teo, Boon Wee; Tay, Jam Chin

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-office blood pressure (BP) measurements (home blood pressure monitoring [HBPM] and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring [ABPM]) provide important additional information for effective hypertension detection and management decisions. Therefore, out-of-office BP measurement is now recommended by several international guidelines. This study evaluated the practice and uptake of HBPM and ABPM among physicians from Singapore. A sample of physicians from Singapore was surveyed between 8 September and 5 October 2016. Those included were in public or private practice had been practicing for ≥3 years, directly cared for patients ≥70% of the time, and treated ≥30 patients for hypertension per month. The questionnaire covered six main categories: general BP management, BP variability (BPV) awareness/diagnosis, HBPM, ABPM, BPV management, and associated training needs. Sixty physicians (30 general practitioners, 20 cardiologists, and 10 nephrologists) were included (77% male, 85% aged 31-60 years, and mean 22-year practice). Physicians recommended HBPM and ABPM to 81% and 27% of hypertensive patients, respectively. HBPM was most often used to monitor antihypertensive therapy (88% of physicians) and 97% thought that ABPM was useful for providing information on BPV. HBPM instructions often differed from current guideline recommendations in terms of frequency, number of measurements, and timing. The proportion of consultation time devoted to discussing HBPM and BPV was one-quarter or less for 73% of physicians, and only 55% said that they had the ability to provide education on HBPM and BPV. Patient inertia, poor patient compliance, lack of medical consultation time, and poor patient access to a BP machine were the most common challenges for implementing out-of-office BP monitoring. Although physicians from Singapore do recommend out-of-office BP measurement to patients with hypertension, this survey identified several important gaps in knowledge and clinical practice.

  14. Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring in kidney transplant recipients is more adequate to monitor BP than office BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Fabiana; Prado, Elisangela dos Santos; Souza, Patricia Soares; da Silva, Giovanio Vieira; Lemos, Francine Brambate Carvalhinho; Mion, Decio; Nahas, William Carlos; David-Neto, Elias

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent among kidney transplantation recipients and considered as an important cardiovascular risk factor influencing patient survival and kidney graft survival. Aim. Compare the blood pressure (BP) control in kidney transplant patients through the use of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) is more comparable with the results of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring compared to the measurement of office blood pressure. From March 2008 to April 2009 prospectively were evaluated 183 kidney transplant recipients with time after transplantation between 1 and 10 years. Patients underwent three methods for measuring BP: office blood pressure measurement (oBP), HBPM and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). In total, 183 patients were evaluated, among them 94 were men (54%) and 89 women (46%). The average age was 50 ± 11 years. The average time of transplant was 57 ± 32 months. Ninety-nine patients received grafts from deceased donors (54%) and 84 were recipients of living donors (46%). When assessed using oBP, 56.3% presented with uncontrolled and 43.7% with adequate control of BP with an average of 138.9/82.3 ± 17.8/12.1 mmHg. However, when measured by HBPM, 55.2% of subjects were controlled and 44.8% presented with uncontrolled BP with an average of 131.1/78.5 ± 17.4/8.9 mmHg. Using the ABPM, we observed that 63.9% of subjects were controlled and 36.1% of patients presented uncontrolled BP with an average 128.8/80.5 ± 12.5/8.1 mmHg. We found that the two methods (oBP and HBPM) have a significant agreement, but the HBPM has a higher agreement that oBP, confirmed P = 0.026. We found that there is no symmetry in the data for both methods with McNemar test. The correlation index of Pearson linear methods for the ABPM with the other two methods were 0.494 for office measurement and 0.768 for HBPM, best value of HBPM with ABPM. Comparing the errors of the two methods by paired t-test, we obtained the descriptive level of 0.837. Looking

  15. In-Situ Monitoring of Immune Function Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monitoring the health and wellness of mission pilots is a critically important function. Space flight has an adverse effect on the human immune response. During...

  16. White-coat, masked and sustained hypertension detected by home blood pressure monitoring in adolescents: prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Thiago Veiga; Carneiro, Carolina de Souza; Morais, Polyana; Roriz, Vanessa; Mendonça, Karla Lorena; Nascente, Flávia Miquetichuc; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Barroso, Weimar Kunz Sebba; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Veiga

    2018-01-05

    Population-based studies estimating prevalence's of white-coat, masked and sustained hypertension in non-European adolescents are needed, particularly in developing countries. Aiming to determine these estimates and, additionally identify factors associated to these conditions this study was conducted. Cross-sectional study with a representative sample of secondary school students from a Brazilian state capital. Office measurements were performed with validated semi-automatic devices. Home BP (blood pressure) monitoring protocol included two day-time and two evening-time measurements over 6 days. Adolescents' were classified as: normotensives (office and home BP office and home BP ≥95th percentile); white-coat hypertensives (office BP ≥95th percentile and home BP office BP home BP ≥95th percentile). Logistic regression models were built to identify if sex, age, BMI and family history of HTN were independently associated with white-coat, masked and sustained hypertension. In a sample of 1024 adolescents, prevalence of white-coat, masked and sustained hypertension was 7.5%, 2.2% and 1.7%, respectively. Male sex was positively associated with white-coat hypertension (OR 2.68; 95%CI 1.58-4.54; p home BP monitoring was 7.5%, 2.2% and 1.7% respectively. Male sex was positively associated with white-coat hypertension in these adolescents while BMI was positively associated with both white-coat and sustained hypertension.

  17. An IoT System for Remote Monitoring of Patients at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KeeHyun Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Application areas that utilize the concept of IoT can be broadened to healthcare or remote monitoring areas. In this paper, a remote monitoring system for patients at home in IoT environments is proposed, constructed, and evaluated through several experiments. To make it operable in IoT environments, a protocol conversion scheme between ISO/IEEE 11073 protocol and oneM2M protocol, and a Multiclass Q-learning scheduling algorithm based on the urgency of biomedical data delivery to medical staff are proposed. In addition, for the sake of patients’ privacy, two security schemes are proposed—the separate storage scheme of data in parts and the Buddy-ACK authorization scheme. The experiment on the constructed system showed that the system worked well and the Multiclass Q-learning scheduling algorithm performs better than the Multiclass Based Dynamic Priority scheduling algorithm. We also found that the throughputs of the Multiclass Q-learning scheduling algorithm increase almost linearly as the measurement time increases, whereas the throughputs of the Multiclass Based Dynamic Priority algorithm increase with decreases in the increasing ratio.

  18. A Wearable and Highly Sensitive Graphene Strain Sensor for Precise Home-Based Pulse Wave Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Jiang, Xin; Zhong, Yujia; Zhao, Xuanliang; Lin, Shuyuan; Li, Jing; Li, Xinming; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhihong; Zhu, Hongwei

    2017-07-28

    Profuse medical information about cardiovascular properties can be gathered from pulse waveforms. Therefore, it is desirable to design a smart pulse monitoring device to achieve noninvasive and real-time acquisition of cardiovascular parameters. The majority of current pulse sensors are usually bulky or insufficient in sensitivity. In this work, a graphene-based skin-like sensor is explored for pulse wave sensing with features of easy use and wearing comfort. Moreover, the adjustment of the substrate stiffness and interfacial bonding accomplish the optimal balance between sensor linearity and signal sensitivity, as well as measurement of the beat-to-beat radial arterial pulse. Compared with the existing bulky and nonportable clinical instruments, this highly sensitive and soft sensing patch not only provides primary sensor interface to human skin, but also can objectively and accurately detect the subtle pulse signal variations in a real-time fashion, such as pulse waveforms with different ages, pre- and post-exercise, thus presenting a promising solution to home-based pulse monitoring.

  19. Examining Korean and Korean American older adults' perceived acceptability of home-based monitoring technologies in the context of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jane; Thompson, Hilaire J; Joe, Jonathan; Hall, Amanda; Demiris, George

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of home-based monitoring technologies by older adults, few studies have examined older adults' acceptance of these technologies, especially among people from diverse cultural groups. The purpose of this study was to explore Korean and Korean American older adults' attitudes toward and perceptions of home-based monitoring technologies in a cultural context. A qualitative analysis of focus groups and individual interviews using inductive coding methods and a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Several cultural factors that determine the acceptability of home-based monitoring technologies were identified. Most notably, the necessity of living alone due to loosened filial tradition and immigration was a main motivator for adopting these technologies for both Korean and Korean Americans. The level of satisfaction with the health care system or therapeutic interaction affected participants' perceived need for technologies. Compared with the Korean American group, Korean older adults regarded the government's role as more important in increasing adoption and use of new technologies. Contextual factors need to be considered when explaining perceptions of home-based monitoring technologies among older adults from various ethnic groups and developing diffusion strategies according to end users' attitudes, experiences, and cultural backgrounds.

  20. Ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring: gaps between clinical guidelines and clinical practice in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setia S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sajita Setia,1 Kannan Subramaniam,2 Boon Wee Teo,3 Jam Chin Tay4 1Chief Medical Office, Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2Global Medical Affairs, Asia Pacific Region, Pfizer Australia, West Ryde, New South Wales, Australia; 3Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of General Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Purpose: Out-of-office blood pressure (BP measurements (home blood pressure monitoring [HBPM] and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring [ABPM] provide important additional information for effective hypertension detection and management decisions. Therefore, out-of-office BP measurement is now recommended by several international guidelines. This study evaluated the practice and uptake of HBPM and ABPM among physicians from Singapore. Materials and methods: A sample of physicians from Singapore was surveyed between 8 September and 5 October 2016. Those included were in public or private practice had been practicing for ≥3 years, directly cared for patients ≥70% of the time, and treated ≥30 patients for hypertension per month. The questionnaire covered six main categories: general BP management, BP variability (BPV awareness/diagnosis, HBPM, ABPM, BPV management, and associated training needs. Results: Sixty physicians (30 general practitioners, 20 cardiologists, and 10 nephrologists were included (77% male, 85% aged 31–60 years, and mean 22-year practice. Physicians recommended HBPM and ABPM to 81% and 27% of hypertensive patients, respectively. HBPM was most often used to monitor antihypertensive therapy (88% of physicians and 97% thought that ABPM was useful for providing information on BPV. HBPM instructions often differed from current guideline recommendations in terms of frequency, number of measurements, and timing. The proportion of consultation time devoted to discussing HBPM and BPV was one-quarter or less for 73% of physicians, and

  1. Home-run probability as a function of coefficient of restitution of baseballs

    CERN Document Server

    Kuninaka, Hiroto; Mizutani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In baseball games, the coefficient of restitution of baseballs strongly affects the flying distance of batted balls, which determines the home-run probability. In Japan, the range of the coefficient of restitution of official baseballs has changed frequently over the past five years, causing the the number of home runs to vary drastically. We analyzed data from Japanese baseball games played in 2014 to investigate the statistical properties of pitched balls. In addition, we used the analysis results to develop a baseball-batting simulator for determining the home-run probability as a function of the coefficient of restitution. Our simulation results are explained by a simple theoretical argument.

  2. Multifaceted nutritional intervention among nursing-home residents has a positive influence on nutrition and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Damkjær, Karin; Beyer, Nina

    2008-01-01

    intervention study with nutrition (chocolate and homemade oral supplements), group exercise twice a week (45-60 min, moderate intensity), and oral care intervention one to two times a week, with the aim of improving nutritional status and function in elderly nursing-home residents. A follow-up visit was made 4......-home residents by means of a multifaceted intervention consisting of chocolate, homemade supplements, group exercise, and oral care. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  3. Treatment of depressed mothers in home visiting: impact on psychological distress and social functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Putnam, Frank W; Altaye, Mekibib; Teeters, Angelique R; Stevens, Jack; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2013-08-01

    Depression is prevalent in mothers receiving home visiting. Little is known about the impact of treatment on associated features of maternal depression in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a novel, adapted treatment for depressed mothers in home visiting on psychological distress and social functioning. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) was developed to treat depressed mothers in home visiting. A randomized clinical trial design was used in which subjects were 93 new mothers in a home visiting program. Mothers with major depressive disorder identified at 3 months postpartum were randomized into IH-CBT and ongoing home visiting (n = 47) or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46) in which they received home visitation alone and could obtain treatment in the community. Measures of psychological distress, social support, and social network were measured at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and three-month follow-up. Clinical features of depression and home visiting parameters were examined as potential moderators. Subjects receiving IH-CBT reported decreased psychological distress at post-treatment (ES = 0.77) and follow-up (ES = 0.73). Examination of types of psychological distress indicated broad improvements at both time points. Those receiving IH-CBT reported increased social support over time relative to those in the SHV condition. Effect sizes were modest at post-treatment (ES = 0.38) but increased at follow-up (ES = 0.65). Improvements were seen in affiliative and belonginess aspects of social support, in contrast to tangible support which was statistically non-significant. Findings were not moderated by clinical features of depression or home visiting parameters. No group differences were found in size of and involvement with social networks. IH-CBT is effective in reducing psychological distress and improving perceived social support in depressed mothers receiving home visiting. To the extent that mothers are better

  4. Tight Bounds for Distributed Functional Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, David P.; Zhang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    output to a function $f$ computed over the union of the inputs. The goal is to minimize the communication. We show the randomized communication complexity of estimating the number of distinct elements up to a $1+\\eps$ factor is $\\Omega(k/\\eps^2)$, improving the previous $\\Omega(k + 1/\\eps^2)$ bound......} t))$ to $\\tilde{\\Omega}(n^{1-2/p}/(\\eps^{4/p} t))$, giving the first bound for estimating $F_0$ in $t$ passes of $\\Omega(1/(\\eps^2 t))$ bits of space that does not use the gap-hamming problem, and showing a distribution for the gap-hamming problem with high external information cost or super...

  5. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M.; Goncalves-Bradley, Daniela C.; Quinn, Terry J.; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C.; Stott, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce

  6. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M.; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C.; Quinn, Terry J.; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C.; Stott, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this

  7. Time Monitoring and Executive Functioning in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyla, Timo; Carelli, Maria Grazia; Forman, Helen

    2007-01-01

    This study examined time-based prospective memory performance in relation to individual and developmental differences in executive functioning. School-age children and young adults completed six experimental tasks that tapped three basic components of executive functioning: inhibition, updating, and mental shifting. Monitoring performance was…

  8. Family functioning, health and social support assessed by aged home care clients and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautsalo, Katja; Rantanen, Anja; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe aged home care clients' and their family members' experiences of their family functioning, family health and social support received. An additional purpose was to determine which factors are connected with social support. Increasing life expectancy and ageing of the population require consideration of the adequacy of home care services and the role of family members as care providers. The older population is a very heterogeneous group because of their variable needs and several disabilities. To ensure the quality of home care, experimental information is needed from clients and their family members. A survey design with convenience sampling. The home care client and a family member of his/her answered a questionnaire together, including background questions, the Family Functioning, Health and Social Support instrument and an open question about support received from home care. Statistical methods were used to describe quantitative data, and content analysis was used in analysing the replies to the open question. Family health was noted as good, and family functioning and overall social support fairly good. An older person's higher basic education, higher age of the family member, better family health and male gender were connected with better social support received. The relationship of the older person and the family member as well as the duration of home care service use had an effect on social support received. The content analysis raised expectations related to time, planning of service, organisational factors and caring practise. Home care clients' and families' needs for support vary, and therefore, the assessment of needs, care planning and updating are important. The variable support needs of older people and their family members require flexible and adaptable home services. Cooperation between all participants involved in care would promote the well-being of the older person and the entire family. © 2012 Blackwell

  9. Institutional versus at-home long term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, P; Pitkala, K; Lees, C

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of functionally dependent older people require care and medical treatment. Increasingly governments are shifting resources into community care expecting both reduction in costs and improvement in the quality of care. However, it is difficult to establish the costs and benefits of institutional and the alternative at-home care. To assess the effects of institutional versus at-home care for functionally dependent older people on health outcomes, satisfaction (of functionally dependent older people, relatives and health care professionals), quality of care and costs. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (1999), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), Best Evidence (1990 to 1999), Ageline (1982 to 1999), Cinahl (1982 to 1999), EconLit (1969 to 1999), PsycInfo (1887 to 1999), NTIS (1980 to 1999), Scisearch (1980 to 1999), Sigle (1980 to 1999), and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. We contacted authors working in the field in an attempt to identify unpublished studies. Randomised trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies where functionally dependent older people were assigned to either institutional or at-home care. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. No meta analysis was conducted as only one trial was identified. One study was included involving 112 people. This evaluated a community care programme (CCP) organising foster care versus nursing home care. No studies were found where functionally dependent older people returned to their own homes. The included trial was small and of poor methodological quality. No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing functioning (ADL and IADL), mental status, attitudes to perceived health, life satisfaction or mortality. There is

  10. WITHDRAWN: Institutional versus at-home long term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, P; Pitkala, K; Lees, C

    2007-10-17

    An increasing number of functionally dependent older people require care and medical treatment. Increasingly governments are shifting resources into community care expecting both reduction in costs and improvement in the quality of care. However, it is difficult to establish the costs and benefits of institutional and the alternative at-home care. To assess the effects of institutional versus at-home care for functionally dependent older people on health outcomes, satisfaction (of functionally dependent older people, relatives and health care professionals), quality of care and costs. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (1999), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), Best Evidence (1990 to 1999), Ageline (1982 to 1999), Cinahl (1982 to 1999), EconLit (1969 to 1999), PsycInfo (1887 to 1999), NTIS (1980 to 1999), Scisearch (1980 to 1999), Sigle (1980 to 1999), and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. We contacted authors working in the field in an attempt to identify unpublished studies. Randomised trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies where functionally dependent older people were assigned to either institutional or at-home care. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. No meta analysis was conducted as only one trial was identified. One study was included involving 112 people. This evaluated a community care programme (CCP) organising foster care versus nursing home care. No studies were found where functionally dependent older people returned to their own homes. The included trial was small and of poor methodological quality. No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing functioning (ADL and IADL), mental status, attitudes to perceived health, life satisfaction or mortality. There is

  11. Exploring the feasibility and acceptability of sensor monitoring of gait and falls in the homes of persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Pamela; Wagner, Joanne M; Salter, Amber; Thomas, Florian P; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2016-09-01

    Gait parameters variability and falls are problems for persons with MS and have not been adequately captured in the home. Our goal was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of monitoring of gait and falls in the homes of persons with MS over a period of 30 days. To test the feasibility of measuring gait and falls for 30days in the home of persons with MS, spatiotemporal gait parameters stride length, stride time, and gait speed were compared. A 3D infrared depth imaging system has been developed to objectively measure gait and falls in the home environment. Participants also completed a 16-foot GaitRite electronic pathway walk to validate spatiotemporal parameters of gait (gait speed (cm/s), stride length (cm), and gait cycle time(s)) during the timed 25 foot walking test (T25FWT). We also documented barriers to feasibility of installing the in-home sensors for these participants. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor may be used as an alternative device to measure gait for persons with MS, depending on the desired accuracy level. Ultimately, using in-home sensors to analyze gait parameters in real time is feasible and could lead to better analysis of gait in persons with MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the ICare rebound tonometer as a home intraocular pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrani, Sanjay; Chatterjee, Ashmita; Wallace, David K; Santiago-Turla, Cecilia; Stinnett, Sandra

    2011-02-01

    (a) To investigate whether the ICare rebound tonometer can provide accurate measurements of intraocular pressure (IOP) in the hands of an inexperienced user compared with ICare measurements and Goldmann tonometry by a trained technician and (b) to assess the intrauser reproducibility of IOP measurements and the learning curve among patients using the ICare rebound tonometer. A trained technician used the ICare rebound tonometer to measure the IOP of the right eye of 100 glaucoma patients. The technician then instructed each patient on use of the ICare tonometer. Each patient then measured his/her own pressure using the ICare tonometer. Finally, a different technician, who was masked to both of the earlier readings, measured IOP by Goldmann applanation tonometry. Thirty patients repeated the ICare measurement 3 times (once every 5 min) 20 minutes after the initial IOP measurement. Of the 100 patients, 82 of patient ICare and the technician ICare readings were within 3 mm Hg of each other, and 75 of the patient ICare and Goldmann applanation tonometry measurements were within 3 mm Hg of each other. Intraclass correlations between self-administered ICare measurements 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 were 0.69, 0.71 and 0.81, respectively. In this study, the ICare rebound tonometer was accurate and reliable in the hands of patients. Patients can easily learn to self-administer this test, possibly allowing for home monitoring of IOP.

  13. Maternal relationship security as a moderator of home visiting impacts on maternal psychosocial functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Elizabeth; Burrell, Lori; Crowne, Sarah; Cluxton-Keller, Fallon; Fuddy, Loretta; Leaf, Philip J; Duggan, Anne

    2013-02-01

    There is variability in home visiting program impacts on the outcomes achieved by high risk families. An understanding of how effects vary among families is important for refining service targeting and content. The current study assessed whether and how maternal attributes, including relationship security, moderate short- and long-term home visiting impacts on maternal psychosocial functioning. In this multisite RCT of home visiting in a population-based, ethnically-diverse sample of families at risk for maltreatment of their newborns (n = 643), families were randomly assigned to home visited (HV) and control groups. HV families were to receive intensive services by trained paraprofessionals from birth-3 years. Outcome data were collected when children were 1, 2, and 3 years old and 7, 8, and 9 years old. Overall, short- and long-term outcomes for HV and control mothers did not differ significantly. Demographic attributes, a general measure of overall maternal risk, and partner violence did not moderate program impact on psychosocial functioning outcomes. Maternal relationship security did moderate program impact. Mothers who scored high on relationship anxiety but not on relationship avoidance showed the greatest benefits, particularly at the long-term follow-up. Mothers scoring high for both relationship anxiety and avoidance experienced some adverse consequences of home visiting. Further research is needed to determine mediating pathways and to inform and test ways to improve the targeting of home visiting and the tailoring of home visit service models to extend positive home visiting impacts to targeted families not benefiting from current models.

  14. An Intelligent Knowledge-Based and Customizable Home Care System Framework with Ubiquitous Patient Monitoring and Alerting Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Chiang, Hsin-Han; Yu, Chao-Wei; Chiang, Chuan-Yen; Liu, Chuan-Ming; Wang, Jenq-Haur

    2012-01-01

    This study develops and integrates an efficient knowledge-based system and a component-based framework to design an intelligent and flexible home health care system. The proposed knowledge-based system integrates an efficient rule-based reasoning model and flexible knowledge rules for determining efficiently and rapidly the necessary physiological and medication treatment procedures based on software modules, video camera sensors, communication devices, and physiological sensor information. This knowledge-based system offers high flexibility for improving and extending the system further to meet the monitoring demands of new patient and caregiver health care by updating the knowledge rules in the inference mechanism. All of the proposed functional components in this study are reusable, configurable, and extensible for system developers. Based on the experimental results, the proposed intelligent homecare system demonstrates that it can accomplish the extensible, customizable, and configurable demands of the ubiquitous healthcare systems to meet the different demands of patients and caregivers under various rehabilitation and nursing conditions. PMID:23112650

  15. Sensor monitoring to measure and support daily functioning for independently living older people: A systematic review and road map for further development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, M.C.; Poerbodipoero, S.; Robben, S.; Daams, J.; van Hartingsveldt, M.; de Vos, R.; de Rooij, S.E.; Kröse, B.; Buurman, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To study sensor monitoring (use of a sensor network placed in the home environment to observe individuals' daily functioning (activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living)) as a method to measure and support daily functioning for older people living independently

  16. Electronic monitoring of symptoms and lung function to assess asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Dillys; van Horck, Marieke; van de Kant, Kim; Vaassen, Sanne; Gulikers, Sjoerd; Winkens, Bjorn; Rosias, Philippe; Heynens, Jan; Muris, Jean; Essers, Brigitte; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Dompeling, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Asthma remains poorly controlled in children. Home monitoring of asthma control may help to improve the level of asthma control. To compare 2 methods to assess asthma control: (1) prospective home monitoring, based on daily assessment of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and electronic symptom score, and (2) Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) with retrospective assessment of symptoms and FEV1. Ninety-six children with asthma were prospectively followed up during 1 year. Asthma control was assessed by home monitoring, including an electronic symptom score based on Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria and FEV1 measurements. In the hospital, the ACQ was completed and FEV₁ was measured. Kappa analysis was performed to assess levels of agreement between the 2 methods. Agreement between the 2 methods was low (κ coefficient of 0.393). In 29 children (37%), prospective home monitoring was less optimistic than the retrospective assessment of asthma control by the ACQ. This study found low agreement between asthma control based on GINA criteria by means of prospective home monitoring and the hospital ACQ. The prospective home monitor detected more cases of less well-controlled asthma than the ACQ. However, optimization of adherence to home monitor use is necessary. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01239238. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control in older individuals: a French randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzourio, Christophe; Hanon, Olivier; Godin, Ophélia; Soumaré, Aicha; Dufouil, Carole

    2017-03-01

    Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring is one of the tools recommended in hypertension management. However, its influence in older adults is seldom investigated. We aimed to assess whether regular home BP monitoring leads to a reduction of BP and an improvement in hypertension control in older adults. In a 24-month trial, individuals aged 73-97 years were randomized in a control (office and home BP measured at 0, 12, and 24 months) or an intervention (office measured at 0, 12, and 24 months; home BP measured every 3 months) group. The primary outcome was the difference in means office BP over 24 months in hypertensive patients. Secondary outcomes included differences in mean home BP over follow-up in hypertensive patients, and frequency of hypertension and of drug use at 24 months in the total sample. Intention-to-treat analyses comprised 1733 persons, among which 1043 were hypertensive. Hypertensive patients in the intervention group experienced a significantly greater fall in office systolic BP (SBP) [mean between-group difference -2.1 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.1; -0.2, P = 0.03], home SBP (mean between-group difference -3.4, 95% CI -4.8; -2.1, P home diastolic BP (mean between-group difference -1.1, 95% CI -1.8; -0.4, P = 0.002) than those in the control group, in the main model. No overall differences were observed for office diastolic BP (P = 0.74), frequency of hypertension (P = 0.92), or drug use (P = 0.51) over time. Similar results were observed after adjustment for known predictors of BP though attenuated for office SBP (P = 0.07). Regular home BP monitoring every 3 months without co-intervention results in small but greater reductions of BP over time. Further research in large trials focused on older adults is needed to confirm the effectiveness of this intervention in a variety of settings.

  18. Older people home care through electronic health records: functions, data elements and security needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangraz Jeddi, Fatemeh; Akbari, Hossein; Rasoli, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    The issue of home care for older people is concerned with availability of information. To compare delivery of electronic health record (EHR) in home care for older people. An applied-comparative library study was conducted in 2015. The study population included Canada, Australia, England, Denmark and Taiwan. Data were extracted from literature related to EHR on home care and older people. The main functions included collection, documentation of lab and imaging results. Common data elements were demographic information, prescriptions and nursing observations. Security needs were identified according to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Document Act, enacted in Canada and the Privacy Act 1988 in Australia. The basic functions of EHR are determined as collection, documentation and retrieval of information. It is recommended that legislation protects access to information on personal health and implementation of a national unique identifier applicable to shared data.

  19. Twenty weeks of home-based interactive training of children with cerebral palsy improves functional abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Greve, Line Z; Kliim-Due, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home-based training is becoming ever more important with increasing demands on the public health systems. We investigated whether individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet improves functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy...... (CP). METHODS: Thirty four children with CP (aged 9-16; mean age 10.9 ± 2.4 years) (GMFCS I-II; MACS I-II) were included in this non-randomized controlled clinical training study. 12 children (aged 7-16; mean age: 11.3+/-0.9 years) were allocated to a control group in which measurements were performed...... home training of children with CP is an efficient way to deliver training, which can enable functional motor improvements and increased activity to perform daily activities. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN13188513 . Date of registration: 04/12/2014....

  20. Adding navigation, artificial audition and vital sign monitoring capabilities to a telepresence mobile robot for remote home care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniel, Sebastien; Letourneau, Dominic; Labbe, Mathieu; Grondin, Francois; Polgar, Janice; Michaud, Francois

    2017-07-01

    A telepresence mobile robot is a remote-controlled, wheeled device with wireless internet connectivity for bidirectional audio, video and data transmission. In health care, a telepresence robot could be used to have a clinician or a caregiver assist seniors in their homes without having to travel to these locations. Many mobile telepresence robotic platforms have recently been introduced on the market, bringing mobility to telecommunication and vital sign monitoring at reasonable costs. What is missing for making them effective remote telepresence systems for home care assistance are capabilities specifically needed to assist the remote operator in controlling the robot and perceiving the environment through the robot's sensors or, in other words, minimizing cognitive load and maximizing situation awareness. This paper describes our approach adding navigation, artificial audition and vital sign monitoring capabilities to a commercially available telepresence mobile robot. This requires the use of a robot control architecture to integrate the autonomous and teleoperation capabilities of the platform.

  1. Malnutrition is related to functional impairment in older adults receiving home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesswetter, E; Pohlhausen, S; Uhlig, K; Diekmann, R; Lesser, S; Heseker, H; Stehle, P; Sieber, C C; Volkert, D

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this work were (a) to provide a detailed description of the association between nutritional (Mini Nutritional Assessment; MNA®) and functional status in a sample of older adults receiving home care, using both questionnaire- and performance-based functional methods, and (b) to investigate the impact of different MNA subscales on this association. Multi-centre, cross-sectional. Home care. 296 persons ≥65 years in need of care (80.7±7.7 y). Nutritional status was determined by the MNA and functional status by two questionnaires (Instrumental and Basic Activities of Daily Living; IADL, ADL) and three performance tests (handgrip strength, HGS; Short Physical Performance Battery, SPPB; Timed 'Up and Go' Test, TUG). A categorical and a covariance analytical approach were used to test for differences in functional status between MNA groups (well nourished, risk of malnutrition, malnourished). In addition, functional parameters were correlated with total MNA, a modified MNA version (modMNA), where functional items were excluded, and MNA subscales ('functionality', 'general assessment', 'anthropometry', 'dietary assessment', and 'subjective assessment'). 57% of the participants were at risk of malnutrition and 12% malnourished. 35% reported severe limitations in IADL, 18% in ADL. 40%, 39% and 35% had severe limitations in HGS, SPPB and TUG; 9%, 28% and 34% were not able to perform the tests. Functional status deteriorated significantly from the well nourished to the malnourished group in all functional measures. The modMNA was weak but still significantly related to all functional parameters except TUG. The subscale 'functionality' revealed strongest correlations with functional measures. All other MNA subscales showed only weak or no associations. More than one half of the seniors receiving home care were at nutritional risk and poor functional level, respectively. Malnutrition according to MNA was significantly associated to both questionnaire- and

  2. Individualized guidance and telephone monitoring in a self-supervised home-based physiotherapeutic program in Parkinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihana Thaís Guerra de Oliveira Gondim

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Home therapeutic exercises have been a target of interest in the treatment of the Parkinson's disease (PD. The way that the physical therapist guides and monitors these exercises can impact the success of therapy. Objective: To evaluate the effects of individualized orientation and monitoring by telephone in a self-supervised home therapeutic exercise program on signs and symptoms of PD and quality of life (QoL. Methods: Single-blind randomized clinical trials with 28 people with PD (Hoehn and Yahr 1 to 3. Patients were randomized into two groups: experimental and control. The experimental group had a meeting with individualized guidance about physiotherapy exercises present in a manual, received the manual to guide their activities at home and obtained subsequent weekly monitoring by telephone. The control group received the usual cares by the service. Both were orientated to carry out exercises three times a week during 12 weeks. Was evaluated: (1 activities of daily living (ADL and motor examination sections of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and QoL by the Parkinson Disease Questionnaire 39 (PDQ-39. The analysis between groups was performed by the Mann-Whitney test and intragroup through the Wilcoxon (p < 0.05. Results: Significant improvement in ADL (p= 0.001 and motor examination (p= 0.0008 of the UPDRS, PDQ-39 total (p = 0.027 and dimensions mobility (p = 0.027, emotional well-being (p= 0.021 and bodily discomfort (p = 0.027 in the experimental group compared to the control group. Conclusion: The individualized guidance and weekly monitoring by telephone in a self-supervised home therapeutic exercises program promoted positive effects on ADL, motor examination and QoL of people in early stages of PD.

  3. Using in-Home Monitoring Technology to Identify Deviations in Daily Routines Preceding Changes in Health Trajectory of Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Yefimova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The boom of in-home monitoring technology offers unprecedented information about an individual’s interaction with the environment. A variety of low cost sensors can continuously and unobtrusively collect information about activities in the living space. Capturing early changes in the daily routines of vulnerable older adults residing in these “smart homes” may allow clinicians to predict and prevent negative health consequences through timely intervention. However, the current state of scienc...

  4. Accessibility attributes of blood glucose meter and home blood pressure monitor displays for visually impaired persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blubaugh, Morgan V; Uslan, Mark M

    2012-03-01

    The vast majority of diabetes-related self-management technology utilizes small visual displays (SVDs) that often produce a low level of contrast and suffer from high levels of reflection (glare). This is a major accessibility issue for the 3.5 million Americans with diabetes who have reduced vision. The purpose of this article is to gather comparative data on the key display attributes of the SVDs used in blood glucose meters (BGMs) and home blood pressure monitors (HBPMs) on the market today and determine which displays offer the best prospect for being accessible to people with reduced vision. Nine BGMs and eight HBPMs were identified for this study on the basis of amount of devices sold, fullfunctionality speech output, and advanced display technologies. An optical instrumentation system obtained contrast, reflection (glare), and font height measurements for all 17 displays. The contrast, reflection, and font-height values for the BGMs and HBPMs varied greatly between models. The Michelson contrast values for the BGMs ranged from 11% to 98% and font heights ranged 0.39-1.00 in. for the measurement results. The HBPMs had Michelson contrast values ranging 55-96% and font height ranging 0.28-0.94 in. for the measurement results. Due largely to the lack of display design standards for the technical requirements of SVDs, there is tremendous variability in the quality and readability of BGM and HBPM displays. There were two BGMs and one HBPM that exhibited high-contrast values and large font heights, but most of the devices exhibited either poor contrast or exceptionally high reflection. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. Efficacy of combination antihypertensive therapy with low-dose indapamide: assessment by blood pressure self-monitoring at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Hirayama, Hiroaki; Hanasawa, Tomohiro; Watabe, Daisuke; Asayama, Kei; Metoki, Hirohito; Kikuya, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito; Imai, Yutaka

    2005-05-01

    We examined the effects of the addition of low-dose indapamide to antihypertensive drugs of other classes, as well as its duration of action, using blood pressure (BP) self-monitoring at home. Seventy-six patients undergoing monotherapy with a calcium channel blocker (CCB), angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), or angiotensin AT1-receptor blocker (ARB), but had an average morning home systolic BP (SBP) > or =135 mmHg or diastolic BP (DBP) > or =85 mmHg, were studied. Indapamide (1 mg) was added to their existing treatment once daily for 4 weeks. The additional hypotensive effects of indapamide were evaluated by casual and home BPs, and the results were compared among the three groups of subjects classified according to their initial drug treatment classes. The morning/evening (M/E) ratio of BP reduction was calculated to assess the duration of the effect. Overall, indapamide significantly (P morning home BP (147 +/- 12/87 +/- 9 mmHg to 135 +/- 12/81 +/- 9 mmHg), evening home BP (138 +/- 15/79 +/- 10 mmHg to 126 +/- 12/73 +/- 9 mmHg), and casual BP (145 +/- 21/86 +/- 14 mmHg to 136 +/- 17/81 +/- 13 mmHg). All groups showed significant indapamide-induced home SBP/DBP decreases, whereas only the ACEI and ARB groups, but not the CCB group, showed a home pulse pressure (PP) reduction. Evening SBP and PP decreases were significantly greater in the ARB group than in the CCB group. The mean M/E ratio with indapamide was 0.95 for SBP and 0.85 for DBP. Low-dose indapamide used in combination can provide additional anti-hypertensive efficacy lasting for 24 h. The added effect of indapamide may be more prominent on ARBs than on CCBs.

  6. Shyness and Vocabulary: The Roles of Executive Functioning and Home Environmental Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion; Leerkes, Esther M.; Marcovitch, Stuart; Calkins, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Although shyness has often been found to be negatively related to vocabulary, few studies have examined the processes that produce or modify this relation. The present study examined executive functioning skills and home environmental stimulation as potential mediating and moderating mechanisms. A sample of 3 1/2-year-old children (N = 254) was…

  7. The Long-Term Effects of Functional Communication Training Conducted in Young Children's Home Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, David P.; Schieltz, Kelly M.; Berg, Wendy K.; Harding, Jay W.; Padilla Dalmau, Yaniz C.; Lee, John F.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the results of a series of studies that involved functional communication training (FCT) conducted in children's homes by their parents. The 103 children who participated were six years old or younger, had developmental delays, and engaged in destructive behaviors such as self-injury. The core procedures used in each study…

  8. Functional level, physical activity and wellbeing in nursing home residents in three Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönstedt, Helena; Hellström, Karin; Bergland, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to describe physical and cognitive function and wellbeing among nursing home residents in three Nordic countries. A second aim was to compare groups of differing ages, levels of dependency in daily life activities (ADL), degree of fall-related self-efficacy, wellbeing...

  9. Postlaunch Monitoring of Functional Foods - Methodology development (I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong N de; Ocke MC; CVG

    2004-01-01

    Already for some years, the development of a Postlaunch Monitoring system for functional foods is on the research agenda of several stakeholders involved, e.g. the industries, the government, and research institutes. Up till now, proposals for such a system have been highly hypothetical and only

  10. Attitudes and perceptions of adults of 60 years and older towards in-home monitoring of the activities of daily living with contactless sensors: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Veerle; Devriendt, Els; Tournoy, Jos; Milisen, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Contactless monitoring is increasingly used to enhance qualitative and cost-effective care for older persons. Succesful integration of this technology in older peoples' daily lives, depends on their acceptance of these systems. The primary purpose was to explore attitudes and perceptions of adults of 60 years and older towards contactless monitoring of the activities of daily living. A questionnaire was developed, validated and used in a cross-sectional survey with a convenience sample (n=245). The results were presented using descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses to explore variables associated with willingness to install the technology. Descriptive statistics indicate that adults of 60 years and older find contactless monitoring useful for various purposes (e.g. to remain living at home longer, safely and independently; for timely detection of emergency situations and gradually emerging health problems). They agree to share collected information with professional caregivers and own access to the data is valued. Respondents like to take part in diverse decisions about the monitoring (e.g. about the rooms in which it is installed, the type of sensors used and access of third parties to collected information). However, several concerns were expressed related to the functioning and financing of contactless monitoring. Bivariate analyses show that both socio-demographic factors (e.g. age, receiving professional home care) and attitudes and perceptions towards contactless monitoring (e.g. on its potential usefulness, on the availability of collected information, on the functional requirements and financial costs of the system and on the use of video cameras) can promote or impede acceptance of the technology. This explorative study indicates that older adults are willing to incorporate contactless monitoring in later life or when their health declines. They agree to share collected information with professional caregivers and clearly demand for participation in

  11. Leisure, functional disability and depression among older Chinese living in residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Zheng; Chong, Alice M L; Ng, Ting Kin; Liu, Susu

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has rarely examined the intervening and buffering effects of leisure on the relationship between age-related stress and health among institutionalized elders, especially in the Chinese context. This study thus examines the extent to which participation in leisure activities mediates and moderates the impact of functional disability on depression among older adults living in residential care homes in China. A total of 1429 participants (858 men) aged over 60 living in residential care homes, of which 46.1% experienced depression using a cut-off score ≥ 5 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale, were selected from a national survey across China by using the probability proportional to size sampling method. The findings showed that depression was positively predicted by functional disability and negatively predicted by participation in leisure activities. The results of the mediation analysis showed that participation in leisure activities partially mediated the relationship between functional disability and depression. Functional disability predicted depression both directly and indirectly through its negative influence on participation in leisure activities. Participation in leisure activities also significantly buffered the relationship between functional disability and depression such that the impact of functional disability was weaker for those who participated in leisure activities more frequently. These results provide support for the mediating and moderating roles of leisure in the stress-health relationship among institutionalized elders. To enhance residents' psychological health, residential care homes are recommended to organize more leisure activities.

  12. Effect of monitoring salt concentration of home-prepared dishes and using low-sodium seasonings on sodium intake reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadate, Misako; Ishihara, Junko; Iwasaki, Motoki; Kitamura, Kaori; Kato, Erika; Tanaka, Junta; Nakamura, Kazutoshi; Ishihara, Takuma; Shintani, Ayumi; Takachi, Ribeka

    2018-01-10

    Objective methods such as the monitoring of salt concentrations in home-prepared dishes may be effective in reducing salt intake. We investigated the effect of monitoring the salt concentration of home-prepared dishes (Monitoring) on salt reduction and change in taste threshold, and the effect of the simultaneous use of low-sodium seasonings (Seasoning) to compare the effect of Monitoring with the conventional method. We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled study using a 2 × 2 factorial design with two interventions. A total of 50 participants (40-75 years-old) were recruited among residents of Niigata Prefecture, a high sodium-consuming population in Japan, then randomly allocated to four groups. After excluding participants with incomplete urine collection, change in salt intake was evaluated using 24-hour urinary excretion as a surrogate of intake for 43 participants. Change in taste threshold was evaluated in 48 participants after excluding those with incomplete threshold measurement. The Monitoring intervention group showed a significant decrease in sodium intake (-777 mg/24 h), whereas the decrease in the Seasoning intervention group was not significant (-413 mg/24 h). Sodium intake did not statistically differ between the intervention and control groups (-1011 mg/24 h and -283 mg/24 h for Monitoring and Seasoning, respectively). The changes in taste threshold measurement were very small and did not markedly differ between groups. Monitoring the salt concentration of dishes had a potentially stronger salt-reducing effect than the use of low-sodium seasonings, a conventional method. Confirmation requires additional study with a larger sample size.

  13. [The functional planning of a enteral nutrition unit for home care at a hospital in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Salomon, Ana Lúcia; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita

    2013-11-01

    In order to warrant the quality of the products offered to their clients at home, hospitalar units need to adequate their physical structures to develop their specialized activities on enteral nutrition. The present article aims to provide a functional planning and tools for the reorganization of the physical space of an enteral nutrition preparation unit describing its features and function. A descriptive, prospective and documental study was undertaken, providing the tools for the functional planning and quality management at a unit of enteral nutrition preparation in a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. Data were collected in the period from 2000 to 2010. Through the establishment of a Home Enteral Nutrition Program in the Public Health Department of the Federal District and as determined by the publication of national legislation, a District Plan of High Complexity in Enteral Nutrition was conducted, according to the demographic and epidemiological profile of the population.This plan consisted of the proposal for implementation of the high complexity in nutritional therapy, according to the Health Ministry legislation. The number of patients assisted by this therapeutical modality has increased, which indicates the need to ensure the quality of dispensed formulas through the planning of functional spaces. The functional planning of an Enteral Nutrition Laboratory ensures assistance for the needs of the population enrolled at the hospital and at home, allowing the proper training of caregivers aiming at the adequacy of necessary precautions in manipulating enteral formulas. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. [Use of the DIAPHANE information system for the monitoring of patients treated by home hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselot, J P; Adhemar, J P; Laederich, J; Degoulet, P; Kleinknecht, D

    1979-12-01

    Data of the DIAPHANE Dialyse-Informatique system of the Society of Nephrology have been collected by patients just on a home dialysis program after training in the hemodialysis Unit of the Hospital of Montreuil. 35 patients have been using the computerized records since January 1978. A critical analysis of the first year has been made and results obtained have been compared with those obtained during the same period in patients dialysed in the Hospital. Results show that home dialysis patients are well able to fill in the computerized medical record concerning the dialysis session follow-up, and that the quality of the recorded information is similar to that recorded in hospital by nurses. Nevertheless few simplifications of home dialysis data sheet are considered. Computerized treatment of data collected on home dialysis program should allow useful comparisons required to improve the quality of care and expansion of this dialysis method.

  15. Infections and functional impairment in nursing home residents: a reciprocal relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büla, Christophe J; Ghilardi, Giuseppe; Wietlisbach, Vincent; Petignat, Christiane; Francioli, Patrick

    2004-05-01

    To determine the relationship between infections and functional impairment in nursing home residents. Prospective cohort study (follow-up period, 6 months). Thirty-nine nursing homes in western Switzerland. A total of 1,324 residents aged 65 and older (mean age 85.7; 76.6% female) who agreed to participate, or their proxies, by oral informed consent. Functional status measured every 3 months. Two different outcomes were used: (a) functional decline defined as death or decreased function at follow-up and (b) functional status score using a standardized measure. At the end of follow-up, mortality was 14.6%, not different for those with and without infection (16.2% vs 13.1%, P=.11). During both 3-month periods, subjects with infection had higher odds of functional decline, even after adjustment for baseline characteristics and occurrence of a new illness (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.2-2.2, P=.002, and AOR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-2.0, P=.008, respectively). The odds of decline increased in a stepwise fashion in patients with zero, one, and two or more infections. The analyses predicting functional status score (restricted to subjects who survived) gave similar results. A survival analysis predicting time to first infection confirmed a stepwise greater likelihood of infection in subjects with moderate and severe impairment at baseline than in subjects with no or mild functional impairment at baseline. Infections appear to be both a cause and a consequence of functional impairment in nursing home residents. Further studies should be undertaken to investigate whether effective infection control programs can also contribute to preventing functional decline, an important component of these residents' quality of life.

  16. THE FEATURES OF AIRCRAFT FUNCTIONAL SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Alexandrovich Krotov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The key steps of aircraft essential parameters and events monitoring during its operation are considered in the arti- cle. Conditions for specific risk monitoring are also presented.The notion of fail-safe feature of aircraft functional systems is analysed, and the necessity of continuous process of safety flight level estimate is shown. The method of quantitative assessment of key events and risks probabilities with the use of modern software is proposed. This method contains 5 basic stages: The monitoring parameters setting - this stage is initial and begins with the consideration of organization safety cul- ture, the main purposes and problems determination, the basic parameters and characteristics forming which are to be monitored. The event monitoring in operation - on this stage continuous process of key events searching and monitoring which are a thing of importance within the framework of the established problems takes place. This process is closely relat- ed to parameters monitoring set on the first stage. The event and risk estimate - this stage begins directly after the event has been discovered. The estimate pro- cess is as long as it is required to identify the event gravity. It also contains the preliminary risk estimate for using in priori- tization of initial expanded estimate and in the working out of plan for activities realization. The working out of plan for activities - on this stage correction data is determined that will make changes to aero- technics working out, operation, maintenance and to staff training directly in linkage to the problem event identified earlier. The activity carrying-out - the realization of actions according to the activity plan. This stage concludes priori- tization, planning and problem carrying-out. The dependence set between the probability of failure situations and the degree of their danger is shown. The key factors which are subject to be estimated while aircraft operating and which aim with

  17. Comparative effects of valsartan plus either cilnidipine or hydrochlorothiazide on home morning blood pressure surge evaluated by information and communication technology-based nocturnal home blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Tomitani, Naoko; Kanegae, Hiroshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2018-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that a valsartan/cilnidipine combination would suppress the home morning blood pressure (BP) surge (HMBPS) more effectively than a valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination in patients with morning hypertension, defined as systolic BP (SBP) ≥135 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥85 mm Hg assessed by a self-measuring information and communication technology-based home BP monitoring device more than three times before either combination's administration. This was an 8-week prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label clinical trial. The HMBPS, which is a new index, was defined as the mean morning SBP minus the mean nocturnal SBP, both measured on the same day. The authors randomly allocated 129 patients to the valsartan/cilnidipine (63 patients; mean 68.4 years) or valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide (66 patients; mean 67.3 years) combination groups, and the baseline HMBPS values were 17.4 mm Hg vs 16.9 mm Hg, respectively (P = .820). At the end of the treatment period, the changes in nocturnal SBP and morning SBP from baseline were significant in both the valsartan/cilnidipine and valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide groups (P surge. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Grayscale standard display function on LCD color monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monte, Denis; Casale, Carlo; Albani, Luigi; Bonfiglio, Silvio

    2007-03-01

    Currently, as a rule, digital medical systems use monochromatic Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) monitors to ensure an accurate reproduction of the Grayscale Standard Display Function (GSDF) as specified in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Standard. As a drawback, special panels need to be utilized in digital medical systems, while it would be preferable to use regular color panels, which are manufactured on a wide scale and are thus available at by far lower prices. The method proposed introduces a temporal color dithering technique to accurately reproduce the GSDF on color monitors without losing monitor resolution. By exploiting the characteristics of the Human Visual System (HVS) the technique ensures that a satisfactory grayscale reproduction is achieved minimizing perceivable flickering and undesired color artifacts. The algorithm has been implemented in the monitor using a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Quantitative evaluations of luminance response on a 3 Mega-pixel color monitor have shown that the compliance with the GSDF can be achieved with the accuracy level required by medical applications. At the same time the measured color deviation is below the threshold perceivable by the human eye.

  19. "SmartMonitor"--an intelligent security system for the protection of individuals and small properties with the possibility of home automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejlichowski, Dariusz; Gościewska, Katarzyna; Forczmański, Paweł; Hofman, Radosław

    2014-06-05

    "SmartMonitor" is an intelligent security system based on image analysis that combines the advantages of alarm, video surveillance and home automation systems. The system is a complete solution that automatically reacts to every learned situation in a pre-specified way and has various applications, e.g., home and surrounding protection against unauthorized intrusion, crime detection or supervision over ill persons. The software is based on well-known and proven methods and algorithms for visual content analysis (VCA) that were appropriately modified and adopted to fit specific needs and create a video processing model which consists of foreground region detection and localization, candidate object extraction, object classification and tracking. In this paper, the "SmartMonitor" system is presented along with its architecture, employed methods and algorithms, and object analysis approach. Some experimental results on system operation are also provided. In the paper, focus is put on one of the aforementioned functionalities of the system, namely supervision over ill persons.

  20. Twenty weeks of home-based interactive training of children with cerebral palsy improves functional abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Greve, Line Z; Kliim-Due, Mette; Rasmussen, Betina; Bilde, P E; Nielsen, Jens B

    2015-05-10

    Home-based training is becoming ever more important with increasing demands on the public health systems. We investigated whether individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet improves functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Thirty four children with CP (aged 9-16; mean age 10.9 ± 2.4 years) (GMFCS I-II; MACS I-II) were included in this non-randomized controlled clinical training study. 12 children (aged 7-16; mean age: 11.3+/-0.9 years) were allocated to a control group in which measurements were performed with 20 weeks interval without any intervening training. Daily activities, functional abilities of upper- and lower limbs, and balance were evaluated before, immediately after training and 12 weeks after training. The training consisted of 30 min daily home-based training for 20 weeks delivered through the internet. The training group on average completed 17 min daily training for the 20 week period (total of 40 h of training). The training group showed significant improvements of daily activities (AMPS), upper limb function (AHA) and functional tests of lower limbs (sit to stand, lateral step up, half knee to standing) after 20 weeks of training. No difference was found between the test after 20 weeks of training and the test 12 weeks after training. No significance was reached for balance after training. No difference was found for any parameter for the control group. Interactive home training of children with CP is an efficient way to deliver training, which can enable functional motor improvements and increased activity to perform daily activities. ISRCTN13188513 . Date of registration: 04/12/2014.

  1. Sheltering behavior and locomotor activity in 11 genetically diverse common inbred mouse strains using home-cage monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Loos

    Full Text Available Functional genetic analyses in mice rely on efficient and in-depth characterization of the behavioral spectrum. Automated home-cage observation can provide a systematic and efficient screening method to detect unexplored, novel behavioral phenotypes. Here, we analyzed high-throughput automated home-cage data using existing and novel concepts, to detect a plethora of genetic differences in spontaneous behavior in a panel of commonly used inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, FVB/NJ, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ and CAST/EiJ. Continuous video-tracking observations of sheltering behavior and locomotor activity were segmented into distinguishable behavioral elements, and studied at different time scales, yielding a set of 115 behavioral parameters of which 105 showed highly significant strain differences. This set of 115 parameters was highly dimensional; principal component analysis identified 26 orthogonal components with eigenvalues above one. Especially novel parameters of sheltering behavior and parameters describing aspects of motion of the mouse in the home-cage showed high genetic effect sizes. Multi-day habituation curves and patterns of behavior surrounding dark/light phase transitions showed striking strain differences, albeit with lower genetic effect sizes. This spontaneous home-cage behavior study demonstrates high dimensionality, with a strong genetic contribution to specific sets of behavioral measures. Importantly, spontaneous home-cage behavior analysis detects genetic effects that cannot be studied in conventional behavioral tests, showing that the inclusion of a few days of undisturbed, labor extensive home-cage assessment may greatly aid gene function analyses and drug target discovery.

  2. Effect of 3-Months Home-Based Exercise Program on Changes of Cognitive Functioning in Older Adults Living in Old People’s Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemček Dagmar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of regular participation in home-based exercise programme on cognitive functioning changes in institutionalised older adults. Two groups of participants were recruited for the study: experimental (n = 17 in mean age 76 ± 5.6 years, who participated in home-based exercise program and control (n = 14 in mean age 80 ± 4.2 years. The standardised Stroop Color-Word Test-Victoria version (VST was used to measure the level of cognitive functions. Group differences were analyzed with Mann-Whitney U-test for independent samples and for differences between pre-measurements and post-measurements on experimental and control group we used non-parametric Wilcoxon Signed - Rank Test. The level of significance was α < 0.05. Application of 3-months home-based exercise program significantly improved the cognitive functions only in one (Word condition; p<0.01 from three VST conditions in institutionalised older adults. That’s why we recommend longer participation in home-based exercise program, at least 6- months, with combination of various types of cognitive interventions, like concepts of cognitive training, cognitive rehabilitation, and cognitive stimulation to improve cognitive functioning in older adults living in old peoples’ homes.

  3. Vascular and lung function related to ultrafine and fine particles exposure assessed by personal and indoor monitoring: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Yulia; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Jensen, Ditte Marie

    2014-01-01

    -related effects. Methods: Associations between vascular and lung function, inflammation markers and exposure in terms of particle number concentration (PNC; d = 10-300 nm) were studied in a cross-sectional design with personal and home indoor monitoring in the Western Copenhagen Area, Denmark. During 48-h, PNC...

  4. Family Resource Allocation after Firstborns Leave Home: Implications for Secondborns' Academic Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexander C; Whiteman, Shawn D; Bernard, Julia M; McHale, Susan M

    2017-09-01

    This study assessed secondborn adolescents' perceptions of changes in the allocation of family resources following their firstborn siblings' departure from home after high school, and whether perceived changes were related to changes over 1 year in secondborns' academic functioning. Participants were secondborn siblings (mean age = 16.58, SD = 0.91) from 115 families in which the older sibling had left the family home in the previous year. Allocation of resources was measured via coded qualitative interviews. Most (77%) secondborns reported increases in at least one type of family resource (i.e., parental companionship, attention, material goods), and many reported an increase in multiple types of resources in the year following their older sibling's departure. Consistent with resource dilution theory, perceptions of increases in fathers' companionship, fathers' attention, and mothers' companionship were related to improvements over time in secondborns' academic functioning. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  5. Effect of electronic time monitors on children's television watching: pilot trial of a home-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Roberts, Vaughan; Maddison, Ralph; Dorey, Enid; Jiang, Yannan; Jull, Andrew; Tin Tin, Sandar

    2009-11-01

    This pilot study evaluated the feasibility (recruitment, retention, and acceptability) and preliminary efficacy of a six-week home-based electronic time monitor intervention on New Zealand children's television watching in 2008. Twenty-nine children aged 9 to 12 years who watched more than 20 h of television per week (62% male, mean age 10.4 years) were randomised to either the intervention or the control group. The intervention group received an electronic TV time monitor for 6 weeks and advice to restrict TV watching to 1 h per day or less. The control group was given verbal advice to restrict TV watching. Participant retention at 6 weeks was 93%. Semi-structured interviews with intervention families confirmed moderate acceptability of TV time monitors and several perceived benefits including better awareness of household TV viewing and improved time planning. Drawbacks reported included disruption to parents' TV watching and increased sibling conflict. Time spent watching television decreased by 4.2 h (mean change [SD]: -254 [536] min) per week in the intervention group compared with no change in the control group (-3 [241] min), but the difference between groups was not statistically significant, p=0.77. Both groups reported decreases in energy intake from snacks and total screen time and increases in physical activity measured by pedometer and between-group differences were not statistically significant. Electronic TV time monitors are feasible to use for home-based TV watching interventions although acceptability varies between families. Preliminary findings from this pilot suggest that such devices have potential to decrease children's TV watching but a larger trial is needed to confirm effectiveness. Future research should be family-orientated; take account of other screen time activities; and employ TV time monitors as just one of a range of strategies to decrease sedentary behaviour.

  6. Exercise adherence during home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling by individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbow, David R; Gorgey, Ashraf S; Ketchum, Jessica M; Moore, Jewel R; Hackett, Laurel A; Gater, David R

    2012-11-01

    The typically sedentary spinal cord injured population has limited physical activity options because of muscle paralysis, difficulties in transportation, and barriers to access rehabilitation/wellness facilities. It is important to investigate physical activity alternatives to increase physical activity levels and decrease the risk of inactivity-derived diseases. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling program on exercise adherence of those with spinal cord injury. Seventeen Veterans with posttraumatic C4-T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A-C spinal cord injury participated in two 8-wk exercise periods of home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling. Exercise adherence and the effects of six factors thought to influence exercise adherence were studied during both exercise periods. Exercise adherence rates for exercise periods 1 and 2 were 71.7% and 62.9%, respectively. Age, history of exercise, and pain not associated with the exercise activity were determined to have significant impact on exercise adherence rates. Exercise adherence rates were well above the reported 35% in the able-bodied population, which provides evidence for the feasibility of a home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling program. Younger adults with a history of being physically active have the highest potential for exercise adherence.

  7. Accessible Home Environments for People with Functional Limitations: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hea Young; MacLachlan, Malcolm; Clarke, Michael; Mannan, Hasheem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the health and social effects of accessible home environments for people with functional limitations, in order to provide evidence to promote well-informed decision making for policy guideline development and choices about public health interventions. MEDLINE and nine other electronic databases were searched between December 2014 and January 2015, for articles published since 2004. All study types were included in this review. Two reviewers independently screened 12,544 record titles or titles and abstracts based on our pre-defined eligibility criteria. We identified 94 articles as potentially eligible; and assessed their full text. Included studies were critically appraised using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool, version 2011. Fourteen studies were included in the review. We did not identify any meta-analysis or systematic review directly relevant to the question for this systematic review. A narrative approach was used to synthesise the findings of the included studies due to methodological and statistical heterogeneity. Results suggest that certain interventions to enhance the accessibility of homes can have positive health and social effects. Home environments that lack accessibility modifications appropriate to the needs of their users are likely to result in people with physical impairments becoming disabled at home. PMID:27548194

  8. Human Activity Recognition from Smart-Phone Sensor Data using a Multi-Class Ensemble Learning in Home Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Mitra, Jhimli; Karunanithi, Mohan; Dowling, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Home monitoring of chronically ill or elderly patient can reduce frequent hospitalisations and hence provide improved quality of care at a reduced cost to the community, therefore reducing the burden on the healthcare system. Activity recognition of such patients is of high importance in such a design. In this work, a system for automatic human physical activity recognition from smart-phone inertial sensors data is proposed. An ensemble of decision trees framework is adopted to train and predict the multi-class human activity system. A comparison of our proposed method with a multi-class traditional support vector machine shows significant improvement in activity recognition accuracies.

  9. Monitoring asthma in childhood: lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Alexander; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Sly, Peter D; Baraldi, Eugenio; Piacentini, Giorgio; Pavord, Ian; Lex, Christiane; Saglani, Sejal

    2015-06-01

    This review focuses on the methods available for measuring reversible airways obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation as hallmarks of asthma, and their role in monitoring children with asthma. Persistent bronchial obstruction may occur in asymptomatic children and is considered a risk factor for severe asthma episodes and is associated with poor asthma outcome. Annual measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s using office based spirometry is considered useful. Other lung function measurements including the assessment of BHR may be reserved for children with possible exercise limitations, poor symptom perception and those not responding to their current treatment or with atypical asthma symptoms, and performed on a higher specialty level. To date, for most methods of measuring lung function there are no proper randomised controlled or large longitudinal studies available to establish their role in asthma management in children. Noninvasive biomarkers for monitoring inflammation in children are available, for example the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide fraction, and the assessment of induced sputum cytology or inflammatory mediators in the exhaled breath condensate. However, their role and usefulness in routine clinical practice to monitor and guide therapy remains unclear, and therefore, their use should be reserved for selected cases. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  10. Monitoring asthma in childhood: lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Moeller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the methods available for measuring reversible airways obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR and inflammation as hallmarks of asthma, and their role in monitoring children with asthma. Persistent bronchial obstruction may occur in asymptomatic children and is considered a risk factor for severe asthma episodes and is associated with poor asthma outcome. Annual measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s using office based spirometry is considered useful. Other lung function measurements including the assessment of BHR may be reserved for children with possible exercise limitations, poor symptom perception and those not responding to their current treatment or with atypical asthma symptoms, and performed on a higher specialty level. To date, for most methods of measuring lung function there are no proper randomised controlled or large longitudinal studies available to establish their role in asthma management in children. Noninvasive biomarkers for monitoring inflammation in children are available, for example the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide fraction, and the assessment of induced sputum cytology or inflammatory mediators in the exhaled breath condensate. However, their role and usefulness in routine clinical practice to monitor and guide therapy remains unclear, and therefore, their use should be reserved for selected cases.

  11. [Relationship between burden of care at home and functional independence level after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmels, P; Ebermeyer, E; Bethoux, F; Gonard, C; Fayolle-Minon, I

    2002-03-01

    To determine the relationship between functional disability assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and burden of care in hemiplegic stroke patients living at home. The population is constituted of stroke survivors, initially treated in an academic inpatient Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation unit. Assessments included an evaluation of impairments (aphasia, negligence, cognitive impairment, motor impairment : Fugl-Meyer (FM) scale), disability (Functional Independence Measure (FIM) ), and burden of care (physical assistance and supervision). Forty-five subjects and their caregiver completed the assessments. Time spent on physical assistance and supervision were significantly correlated with FM and FIM scores. Cognitive deficits correlated with supervision time but not with physical assistance time. These results confirm the predictive value of functional independence measure relative to burden of care in a population of stroke patients with hemiplegia living at home. These results show that cognitive impairments are more specifically correlated with supervision time. This must be confirmed by studies taking into account functional and cognitive conditions of the patient, functional and psychological conditions of life of caregiver and also economical and environmental conditions of life.

  12. A functional biphasic biomaterial homing mesenchymal stem cells for in vivo cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Dai, Linghui; Man, Zhentao; Yuan, Lan; Chen, Haifeng; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2014-12-01

    Cartilage regeneration after trauma is still a great challenge for clinicians and researchers due to many reasons, such as joint load-bearing, synovial movement and the paucity of endogenous repair cells. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a functional biomaterial using a biphasic scaffold platform and a bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-specific affinity peptide. The biphasic scaffold platform retains more cells homogeneously within the sol-gel transition of chitosan and provides sufficient solid matrix strength. This biphasic scaffold platform is functionalized with an affinity peptide targeting a cell source of interest, BMSCs. The presence of conjugated peptide gives this system a biological functionality towards BMSC-specific homing both in vitro and in vivo. The functional biomaterial can stimulate stem cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation during in vitro culture. Six months after in vivo implantation, compared with routine surgery or control scaffolds, the functional biomaterials induced superior cartilage repair without complications, as indicated by histological observations, magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical properties. Beyond cartilage repair, this functional biphasic scaffold may provide a biomaterial framework for one-step tissue engineering strategy by homing endogenous cells to stimulate tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Control and Guidance of Low-Cost Robots via Gesture Perception for Monitoring Activities in the Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel D. Sempere

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a low-cost mini-robot that is controlled by visual gestures. The prototype allows a person with disabilities to perform visual inspections indoors and in domestic spaces. Such a device could be used as the operator's eyes obviating the need for him to move about. The robot is equipped with a motorised webcam that is also controlled by visual gestures. This camera is used to monitor tasks in the home using the mini-robot while the operator remains quiet and motionless. The prototype was evaluated through several experiments testing the ability to use the mini-robot’s kinematics and communication systems to make it follow certain paths. The mini-robot can be programmed with specific orders and can be tele-operated by means of 3D hand gestures to enable the operator to perform movements and monitor tasks from a distance.

  14. Control and Guidance of Low-Cost Robots via Gesture Perception for Monitoring Activities in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, Angel D; Serna-Leon, Arturo; Gil, Pablo; Puente, Santiago; Torres, Fernando

    2015-12-11

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost mini-robot that is controlled by visual gestures. The prototype allows a person with disabilities to perform visual inspections indoors and in domestic spaces. Such a device could be used as the operator's eyes obviating the need for him to move about. The robot is equipped with a motorised webcam that is also controlled by visual gestures. This camera is used to monitor tasks in the home using the mini-robot while the operator remains quiet and motionless. The prototype was evaluated through several experiments testing the ability to use the mini-robot's kinematics and communication systems to make it follow certain paths. The mini-robot can be programmed with specific orders and can be tele-operated by means of 3D hand gestures to enable the operator to perform movements and monitor tasks from a distance.

  15. Do Maltreated Children who Remain at Home Function Better than Those who Are Placed?

    OpenAIRE

    Mennen, Ferol E.; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of children in the child welfare system remain with their maltreating parents, yet little is known about their level of functioning and whether they are in need of mental health intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mental health functioning of an ethnically diverse sample of 302 maltreated children and 151 non maltreated children ages 9–12 to see if there were differences between those who remained at home, those placed in kin care, non-relative foster care...

  16. Workload and usefulness of daily, centralized home monitoring for patients treated with CIEDs: results of the MoniC (Model Project Monitor Centre) prospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtmann, Thomas; Stiller, Sascha; Marek, Andrea; Kespohl, Stefanie; Gomer, Michael; Kühlkamp, Volker; Zach, Göran; Löscher, Steffen; Baumann, Gert

    2013-02-01

    Automated, daily Home Monitoring (HM) of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients can improve patient care. Yet, HM introduction to routine clinical practice is challenged by resource allocation for regular HM data review. We tested the feasibility, safety, workload, and clinical usefulness of a centralized HM model consisting of one monitor centre and nine satellite clinics. Having no knowledge about patients' clinical data, a telemonitoring nurse (TN) and a supporting physician at the monitor centre screened and filtered HM data in 62 pacemaker and 59 ICD patients from nine satellite clinics for over 1 year. Basic screening of arrhythmic and technical events required 25.7 min (TN) and 0.7 min (physician) per working day, normalized for 100 patients monitored. Communication of relevant events to satellite clinics per email or phone required additional 4.3 min (TN) and 0.4 min (physician). Telemonitoring nurse also screened for abnormal developments in longitudinal data trends weekly for 3 months after implantation, and then monthly; one patient session lasted 4.0 ± 2.9 min. To handle transmission-gap notifications, TN needed additional 2.8 min daily. Satellite clinics received 231.3 observations from the monitor centre per 100 patients/year, which prompted 86.3 patient contacts or intensive HM screening periods by the satellite clinic itself (37.3% response rate), 51.7 extra follow-up controls (22.3%), and 30.1 clinical interventions (13.0%). Centralized HM was feasible, reliable, safe, and clinically useful. Basic screening and communication of relevant arrhythmic and technical events required a total of 30 min (TN) and 1.1 min (physician) daily per 100 patients monitored.

  17. ePoint.telemed--An Open Web-based Platform for Home Monitoring of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthe, Halgeir; Serrano, J Artur

    2015-01-01

    In North Norway, no telemonitoring services for chronic heart failure (CHF) have yet been established, hence no investigations in the area have been published. However, large distances and a sparse population are causes for extra expenditure on hospital visits. In this paper, we describe the ePoint.telemed platform for home telemonitoring of CHF patients. We have reviewed the literature on home monitoring techniques, and developed two prototype platforms for remote collection of physiological data. We have refined one of the prototypes and subjected it to user testing among health professionals and their clients. Fifty patients will be involved in a randomized controlled trial aiming to establish if the home telemonitoring of CHF is clinically feasible and cost-effective. The ePoint.telemed platform is a fully automated internet based system meant for early warnings in a CHF rehabilitation program. The core of the platform is a dashboard connected to a blood pressure meter, a weight scale, and a web-based patient questionnaire. Unlike traditional systems built on dedicated medical equipment, we are applying easy-to-use components geared towards the sports market.

  18. Home blood sodium monitoring, sliding-scale fluid prescription and subcutaneous DDAVP for infantile diabetes insipidus with impaired thirst mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Shihab

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Infants with diabetes insipidus (DI, especially those with impaired thirst mechanism or hypothalamic hyperphagia, are prone to severe sodium fluctuations, often requiring hospitalization. We aimed to avoid dangerous fluctuations in serum sodium and improve parental independence. Methods A 16-month old girl with central DI, absent thirst mechanism and hyperphagia following surgery for hypothalamic astrocytoma had erratic absorption of oral DDAVP during chemotherapy cycles. She required prolonged hospitalizations for hypernatremia and hyponatremic seizure. Intensive monitoring of fluid balance, weight and clinical assessment of hydration were not helpful in predicting serum sodium. Discharge home was deemed unsafe. Oral DDAVP was switched to subcutaneous (twice-daily injections, starting with 0.01mcg/dose, increasing to 0.024mcg/dose. The parents adjusted daily fluid allocation by sliding-scale, according to the blood sodium level (measured by handheld i-STAT analyser, Abbott. We adjusted the DDAVP dose if fluid allocation differed from maintenance requirements for 3 consecutive days. Results After 2.5 months, sodium was better controlled, with 84% of levels within reference range (135-145 mmol/L vs. only 51% on the old regimen (p = 0.0001. The sodium ranged from 132-154 mmol/L, compared to 120–156 on the old regimen. She was discharged home. Conclusion This practical regimen improved sodium control, parental independence, and allowed discharge home.

  19. Analysis of commode grab bar usage for the monitoring of older adults in the smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcelus, Amaya; Holtzman, Megan; Goubran, Rafik; Sveistrup, Heidi; Guitard, Paulette; Knoefel, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of falls inside the home is a common yet potentially hazardous issue for adults as they age. Even with the installation of physical aids such as grab bars, weight transfers on and off a toilet or bathtub can become increasingly difficult as a person's level of physical mobility and sense of balance deteriorate. Detecting this deterioration becomes an important goal in fall prevention within a smart home. This paper develops an unobtrusive method of analyzing the usage of toilet grab bars using pressure sensors embedded into the arm rests of a commode. Clinical parameters are successfully extracted automatically from a series of stand-to-sit (StSi) and sit-to-stand (SiSt) transfers performed by a trial group of young and older adults. A preliminary comparison of the parameters indicates differences between the two groups, and aligns well with published characteristics obtained using accelerometers worn on the body. The unobtrusive nature of this method provides a useful tool to be incorporated into a system of continuous monitoring of older adults within the smart home environment.

  20. A motivational health companion in the home as part of an intelligent health monitoring sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, V.; Wildvuur, S.; Kröse, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes our work in progress to develop a personal monitoring system that can monitor the physical and emotional condition of a patient by using contextual information from a sensor network, provide the patient with feedback concerning their health status and motivate the patient to

  1. homeSound: Real-Time Audio Event Detection Based on High Performance Computing for Behaviour and Surveillance Remote Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina-Pagès, Rosa Ma; Navarro, Joan; Alías, Francesc; Hervás, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    The consistent growth in human life expectancy during the recent years has driven governments and private organizations to increase the efforts in caring for the eldest segment of the population. These institutions have built hospitals and retirement homes that have been rapidly overfilled, making their associated maintenance and operating costs prohibitive. The latest advances in technology and communications envisage new ways to monitor those people with special needs at their own home, increasing their quality of life in a cost-affordable way. The purpose of this paper is to present an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) platform able to analyze, identify, and detect specific acoustic events happening in daily life environments, which enables the medic staff to remotely track the status of every patient in real-time. Additionally, this tele-care proposal is validated through a proof-of-concept experiment that takes benefit of the capabilities of the NVIDIA Graphical Processing Unit running on a Jetson TK1 board to locally detect acoustic events. Conducted experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by reaching an overall accuracy of 82% when identifying a set of 14 indoor environment events related to the domestic surveillance and patients’ behaviour monitoring field. Obtained results encourage practitioners to keep working in this direction, and enable health care providers to remotely track the status of their patients in real-time with non-invasive methods. PMID:28406459

  2. homeSound: Real-Time Audio Event Detection Based on High Performance Computing for Behaviour and Surveillance Remote Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina-Pagès, Rosa Ma; Navarro, Joan; Alías, Francesc; Hervás, Marcos

    2017-04-13

    The consistent growth in human life expectancy during the recent years has driven governments and private organizations to increase the efforts in caring for the eldest segment of the population. These institutions have built hospitals and retirement homes that have been rapidly overfilled, making their associated maintenance and operating costs prohibitive. The latest advances in technology and communications envisage new ways to monitor those people with special needs at their own home, increasing their quality of life in a cost-affordable way. The purpose of this paper is to present an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) platform able to analyze, identify, and detect specific acoustic events happening in daily life environments, which enables the medic staff to remotely track the status of every patient in real-time. Additionally, this tele-care proposal is validated through a proof-of-concept experiment that takes benefit of the capabilities of the NVIDIA Graphical Processing Unit running on a Jetson TK1 board to locally detect acoustic events. Conducted experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by reaching an overall accuracy of 82% when identifying a set of 14 indoor environment events related to the domestic surveillance and patients' behaviour monitoring field. Obtained results encourage practitioners to keep working in this direction, and enable health care providers to remotely track the status of their patients in real-time with non-invasive methods.

  3. Monitoring quality of care in nursing homes and making information available for the general public: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Moulin, Monique F M T; van Haastregt, Jolanda C M; Hamers, Jan P H

    2010-03-01

    To improve quality of care, nursing homes need to assess and monitor their performance. This study aims to gain insight in the availability and contents of publicly accessible quality systems in northwestern Europe and the USA. This study employed a systematic search consisting of searching bibliographic sources from 2005 to September 2009, personal communication with experts, a conventional internet search, and hand-searching of references. Ten out of the 14 included countries use a quality systems. There is a large variety in type and number of indicators assessed. In general more attention is paid to the assessment of structure and process indicators, compared to outcome indicators. The countries differ in the way the results are made available to the general public. It can be concluded that monitoring and publicizing data on quality of care in nursing homes is becoming increasingly widespread. However, the systems still need further development and refinement. The systems need to be further developed regarding validity and reliability. Furthermore, the uniformity of the systems should be increased, more attention must be paid to the assessment of patient satisfaction, and additional insight must be gained in the user-friendliness of the systems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Telemedical systems for home monitoring of patients with chronic conditions in rural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Maciejewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the requirements and possible implementations of a telemedical system. The idea of remote patient monitoring is a point of interest for researchers in Poland, and is also in high demand in fields such as diabetology, cardiology, and geriatrics, among others. Aging society, medical care costs and many other factors make remote patient care a promising idea for the future. For each and every condition, a specialized type of sensor must be used to allow specific measurements to be performed. Moreover, a local data storage and communication device must be provided for the sensor to be able to relay data to the station. A smart phone can be used perform such tasks. By implementing such remote diagnostic systems it is possible to collect, process, store and present vital medical data that can be used immediately to perform diagnosis, or later as reference for expert systems. The ‘Borboleta’ and ‘SaguiSaúde’ systems already implemented can serve as a base for system analysis. The systems provide necessary functions and can be used as reference. Many factors contribute to the success of the telemedical system, such as ease of access, scalability, safety, platform independence, and many others. For easier implementation and clarity, the system should be divided into independent layers, which will also make it easier to modify and integrate into other medical systems. Making the system easy to use for patients, medical staff, administrators and data managers makes the task of system design especially challenging. One must decide which information is necessary for each type of user and provide them clearly and in an orderly fashion.

  5. Monitoring Sound Levels and Soundscape Quality in the Living Rooms of Nursing Homes: A Case Study in Flanders (Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Aletta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been an increasing interest in the acoustic environment and its perceptual counterpart (i.e., the soundscape of care facilities and their potential to affect the experience of residents with dementia. There is evidence that too loud sounds or poor soundscape quality more generally can affect negatively the quality of life of people with dementia and increase agitation. The AcustiCare project aims to use the soundscape approach to enhance the Quality of Life (QoL of residents and to reduce Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD, as well as improving the everyday experience of nursing homes for both residents and staff members. In order to gain further insights into the sound environments of such facilities, sound level monitoring and soundscape data collection campaigns were conducted in the living rooms of five nursing homes in Flanders. Results showed that sound levels (dB and loudness levels (sone did not vary significantly between days of the week, but they did so between moments of the day and between living rooms. From the perceptual point of view, several soundscape attributes and the perceived prominence of different sound source types varied significantly between the living rooms investigated, and a positive correlation was found between sound levels and the number of persons present in the living rooms. These findings claim for further attention on the potential role of the sound domain in nursing homes, which should promote (and not only permit better living and working conditions for residents and staff members of nursing homes.

  6. Multifaceted nutritional intervention among nursing-home residents has a positive influence on nutrition and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Damkjaer, Karin; Beyer, Nina

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a multifaceted 11-wk intervention comprising nutrition, group exercise, and oral care would have a significant influence on nutrition and function in elderly (>or=65 y) nursing-home residents. The study was an 11-wk randomized controlled intervention study with nutrition (chocolate and homemade oral supplements), group exercise twice a week (45-60 min, moderate intensity), and oral care intervention one to two times a week, with the aim of improving nutritional status and function in elderly nursing-home residents. A follow-up visit was made 4 mo after the end of the intervention. Assessments were weight, body mass index, dietary intake, handgrip strength, Senior Fitness Test, Berg's Balance Scale, and the prevalence of plaque. A total of 121 subjects (61%) accepted the invitation and 62 were randomized to the intervention group. Six of these dropped out during the 11 wk. At the 4-mo follow-up there were 15 deaths in the intervention group and 8 in the control group. The nutrition and exercise were well tolerated. After 11 wk the change in percentage of weight (P = 0.005), percentage of body mass index (P = 0.003), energy intake (P = 0.084), protein intake (P = 0.012), and Berg's Balance Scale (P = 0.004) was higher in the intervention group than in the control group. In addition, the percentage of subjects whose functional tests improved was higher in the intervention group. Both groups lost the same percentage of weight after the intervention (P = 0.908). The total percentage of weight loss from baseline to follow-up was higher in the control group (P = 0.019). Oral care was not well accepted and the prevalence of plaque did not change. It is possible to improve nutrition and function in elderly nursing-home residents by means of a multifaceted intervention consisting of chocolate, homemade supplements, group exercise, and oral care.

  7. Associations between physical function and depression in nursing home residents with mild and moderate dementia: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Linda Aimée Hartford Kvæl; Astrid Bergland; Elisabeth Wiken Telenius

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study is to describe depression and physical function in nursing home residents with dementia, as well as to examine the associations between depression and balance...

  8. Stability of daily home-based measures of postural control over an 8-week period in highly functioning older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Denise; Greene, Barry R; Sheehan, Katie; Walsh, Lorcan; Kenny, Rose A; Caulfield, Brian

    2015-02-01

    The focus of this study was to monitor daily objective measures of standing postural control over an 8-week period, recorded in a person's home, in a population of healthy older adults. Establishing natural patterns of variation in the day-to-day signal, occurring in the relative absence of functional decline or disease, would enable us to determine thresholds for changes in postural control from baseline that could be considered clinically important. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults (3 M, 15 F, 72 ± 6 years) participated in a home-based trial where each day they were asked to complete a technology-enabled routine consisting of a short questionnaire, as well as a quiet standing balance trial. Centre of pressure (COP) excursions were calculated over the course of each daily balance trial to generate variables such as postural sway length and mean sway frequency. The data demonstrated large differences between subjects in centre of pressure measures (coefficients of variation ranging 37-107 %, depending on the variable). Each participant also exhibited variations in their day-to-day trials (e.g. coefficients of variation across 8 weeks ranging ~17-56 %, within person for mean COP distance). Inter- and intra-subject differences were not strongly related to functional tests, suggesting that these variations were not necessarily aberrant movement patterns, but are seemingly representative of natural movement variability. The idea of applying a group-focused approach at an individual level may result in misclassifying important changes for a particular individual. Early detection of deterioration can only be achieved through the creation of individual trajectories for each person, that are inherently self referential.

  9. Understanding Challenges and Opportunities of Preventive Blood Pressure Self-Monitoring at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    methods to understand existing challenges and uncover opportunities of self-monitoring technologies to support preventive healthcare activities among older adults. Emerging challenges from our study were: rule complexity for self-measuring, reliability of measurements, interpretation, understanding...... to support people’s preventive self-monitoring needs compared with existing solutions. Furthermore, supporting the active and informed citizen can improve older adult’s care abilities, awareness and activation towards preventive care....

  10. Patient experiences with self-monitoring renal function after renal transplantation: results from a single-center prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lint, Céline L; van der Boog, Paul Jm; Wang, Wenxin; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Rövekamp, Ton Jm; Neerincx, Mark A; Rabelink, Ton J; van Dijk, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    After a kidney transplantation, patients have to visit the hospital often to monitor for early signs of graft rejection. Self-monitoring of creatinine in addition to blood pressure at home could alleviate the burden of frequent outpatient visits, but only if patients are willing to self-monitor and if they adhere to the self-monitoring measurement regimen. A prospective pilot study was conducted to assess patients' experiences and satisfaction. For 3 months after transplantation, 30 patients registered self-measured creatinine and blood pressure values in an online record to which their physician had access to. Patients completed a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up to assess satisfaction, attitude, self-efficacy regarding self-monitoring, worries, and physician support. Adherence was studied by comparing the number of registered with the number of requested measurements. Patients were highly motivated to self-monitor kidney function, and reported high levels of general satisfaction. Level of satisfaction was positively related to perceived support from physicians (Pself-efficacy (Pmonitoring of creatinine and blood pressure after transplantation offers a promising strategy. Important prerequisites for safe implementation in transplant care seem to be support from physicians and patients' confidence in both their own self-monitoring skills and the accuracy of the devices used.

  11. Halfway Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandham, Jessica L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pros and cons of Alaska's unique Family Partnership Charter School, which oversees distribution of public funding to home-schooling families, offers support to help home-schooling parents meet district standards on their own terms, and monitors required purchase of teacher time and expenditures. A sidebar describes an Alaskan…

  12. Evaluation of treatment in the Smart Home IRIS in terms of functional independence and occupational performance and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocepek, Julija; Roberts, Anne E K; Vidmar, Gaj

    2013-01-01

    The development of assistive technologies, home modifications, and smart homes has rapidly advanced in the last two decades. Health professionals have recognised the benefits of these technologies in improving individual's quality of life. The Smart Home IRIS was established in 2008 within the University Rehabilitation Institute in Ljubljana with the aim to enable persons with disabilities and elderly people to test various assistive technologies and technical solutions for their independent living. We investigated the effect of treatments in the Smart Home IRIS. A convenience sample of 59 persons with disabilities and elderly people (aged 24-81 years) who were treated in the Smart Home IRIS from April to December 2011 participated. Standardised instruments--the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)--were administered at the first assessment in the Smart Home IRIS and at a second assessment at the participant's home after 6-12 months. All the outcomes statistically significantly improved from the first to the second assessment. The treatments in the Smart Home IRIS appeared to contribute to higher occupational performance and satisfaction with performance and higher functional independence of persons with disabilities and elderly people.

  13. Evaluation of Treatment in the Smart Home IRIS in terms of Functional Independence and Occupational Performance and Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Ocepek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of assistive technologies, home modifications, and smart homes has rapidly advanced in the last two decades. Health professionals have recognised the benefits of these technologies in improving individual’s quality of life. The Smart Home IRIS was established in 2008 within the University Rehabilitation Institute in Ljubljana with the aim to enable persons with disabilities and elderly people to test various assistive technologies and technical solutions for their independent living. We investigated the effect of treatments in the Smart Home IRIS. A convenience sample of 59 persons with disabilities and elderly people (aged 24–81 years who were treated in the Smart Home IRIS from April to December 2011 participated. Standardised instruments—the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM—were administered at the first assessment in the Smart Home IRIS and at a second assessment at the participant’s home after 6–12 months. All the outcomes statistically significantly improved from the first to the second assessment. The treatments in the Smart Home IRIS appeared to contribute to higher occupational performance and satisfaction with performance and higher functional independence of persons with disabilities and elderly people.

  14. Semireal Time Monitoring Of The Functional Movements Of The Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Robert J.; Baumrind, Sheldon; Curry, Sean; Molthen, Robert A.

    1983-07-01

    Many branches of dental practice would benefit from the availability of a relatively accurate, precise, and efficient method for monitoring the movements of the human mandible during function. Mechanical analog systems have been utilized in the past but these are difficult to quantify, have limited accuracy due to frictional resistance of the components, and contain information only on the borders of the envelopes of possible movement of the landmarks measured (rather than on the functional paths of the landmarks which lie within their envelopes). Those electronic solutions which have been attempted thus far have been prohibitively expensive and time consuming for clinical use, have had lag times between data acquisition and display, or have involved such restrictions of freedom of motion as to render ambiguous the meaning of the data obtained. We report work aimed at developing a relatively non-restrictive semi-real time acoustical system for monitoring the functional movement of the mandible relative to the rest of the head. A set of three sparking devices is mounted to the mandibular component of a light, relatively non-constraining extra-oral harness and another set of three sparkers is attached to the harness' cranial or skull component. The sparkers are fired sequentially by a multiplexer and the sound associated with each firing is recorded by an array of three or more microphones. Computations based on the known speed of sound are used to evaluate the distances between the sparkers and the microphones. These data can then be transformed by computer to provide numeric or graphic information on the movement of selected mandibular landmarks with respect to the skull. Total elapsed time between the firing of the sparkers and the display of graphic information need not exceed 30-60 seconds using even a relatively modest modern computer.

  15. User preferences and usability of iVitality: optimizing an innovative online research platform for home-based health monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Osch M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mara van Osch,1 AJM Rövekamp,2 Stephanie N Bergman-Agteres,1 Liselotte W Wijsman,3,4 Sharon J Ooms,5 Simon P Mooijaart,3,4,6 Joan Vermeulen71Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, 2Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, 3Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, 4Netherlands Consortium for Healthy Ageing, Leiden, 5Department of Geriatric Medicine, Radboud Alzheimer Centre, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, 6Institute for Evidence-Based Medicine in Old Age, Leiden, 7Research School, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the NetherlandsBackground: The iVitality online research platform has been developed to gain insight into the relationship between early risk factors (ie, poorly controlled hypertension, physical or mental inactivity and onset and possibly prevention of dementia. iVitality consists of a website, a smartphone application, and sensors that can monitor these indicators at home. Before iVitality can be implemented, it should fit the needs and preferences of users, ie, offspring of patients with dementia. This study aimed to explore users’ motivation to participate in home-based health monitoring research, to formulate requirements based on users’ preferences to optimize iVitality, and to test usability of the smartphone application of iVitality.Methods: We recruited 13 participants (aged 42–64 years, 85% female, who were offspring of patients with dementia. A user-centered methodology consisting of four iterative phases was used. Three semistructured interviews provided insight into motivation and acceptance of using iVitality (phase 1. A focus group with six participants elaborated on expectations and preferences regarding iVitality (phase 2. Findings from phase 1 and 2 were triangulated by two semistructured interviews (phase 3. Four participants assessed the usability of the smartphone application (phase 4 using a think aloud

  16. Incorporating robotic-assisted telerehabilitation in a home program to improve arm function following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Susan M; Reiss, Aimee; Buchanan, Sharon; Sahu, Komal; Rosenfeldt, Anson B; Clark, Cindy; Wolf, Steven L; Alberts, Jay L

    2013-09-01

    After stroke, many individuals lack resources to receive the intensive rehabilitation that is thought to improve upper extremity motor function. This case study describes the application of a telerehabilitation intervention using a portable robotic device combined with a home exercise program (HEP) designed to improve upper extremity function. The participant was a 54-year-old man, 22 weeks following right medullary pyramidal ischemic infarct. At baseline, he exhibited residual paresis of the left upper extremity, resulting in impaired motor control consistent with a flexion synergistic pattern, scoring 22 of 66 on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. The participant completed 85 total hours of training (38 hours of robotic device and 47 hours of HEP) over the 8-week intervention period. The participant demonstrated an improvement of 26 points on the Action Research Arm Test, 5 points on the Functional Ability Scale portion of the Wolf Motor Function Test, and 20 points on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, all of which surpassed the minimal clinically important difference. Of the 17 tasks of the Wolf Motor Function Test, he demonstrated improvement on 11 of the 15 time-based tasks and both strength measures. The participant reported an overall improvement in his recovery from stroke on the Stroke Impact Scale quality-of-life questionnaire from 40 of 100 to 65 of 100. His score on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale improved by 19 points. This case demonstrates that robotic-assisted therapy paired with an HEP can be successfully delivered within a home environment to a person with stroke. Robotic-assisted therapy may be a feasible and efficacious adjunct to an HEP program to elicit substantial improvements in upper extremity motor function, especially in those persons with stroke who lack access to stroke rehabilitation centers.

  17. A Framework to Improve Energy Efficient Behaviour at Home through Activity and Context Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Óscar; Prieto, Javier; Alonso, Ricardo S; Corchado, Juan M

    2017-07-31

    Real-time Localization Systems have been postulated as one of the most appropriated technologies for the development of applications that provide customized services. These systems provide us with the ability to locate and trace users and, among other features, they help identify behavioural patterns and habits. Moreover, the implementation of policies that will foster energy saving in homes is a complex task that involves the use of this type of systems. Although there are multiple proposals in this area, the implementation of frameworks that combine technologies and use Social Computing to influence user behaviour have not yet reached any significant savings in terms of energy. In this work, the CAFCLA framework (Context-Aware Framework for Collaborative Learning Applications) is used to develop a recommendation system for home users. The proposed system integrates a Real-Time Localization System and Wireless Sensor Networks, making it possible to develop applications that work under the umbrella of Social Computing. The implementation of an experimental use case aided efficient energy use, achieving savings of 17%. Moreover, the conducted case study pointed to the possibility of attaining good energy consumption habits in the long term. This can be done thanks to the system's real time and historical localization, tracking and contextual data, based on which customized recommendations are generated.

  18. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  19. Stable oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanosensors for environmental biocontaminant monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Maria V; Leng, Weinan; Carzolio, Marcos; Pruden, Amy; Vikesland, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The global propagation of environmental biocontaminants such as antibiotic resistant pathogens and their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is a public health concern that highlights the need for improved monitoring strategies. Here, we demonstrate the environmental stability and applicability of an oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanosensor. The mecA ARG was targeted as model biocontaminant due to its presence in clinically-relevant pathogens and to its emergence as an environmental contaminant. mecA-specific nanosensors were tested for antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) detection in ARG-spiked effluent from four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The mecA-specific nanosensors showed stability in environmental conditions and in high ionic strength ([MgCl2]<50mM), and high selectivity against mismatched targets. Spectrophotometric detection was reproducible with an LOD of 70pM (≈4×107genes/μL), even in the presence of interferences associated with non-target genomic DNA and complex WWTP effluent. This contribution supports the environmental applicability of a new line of cost-effective, field-deployable tools needed for wide-scale biocontaminant monitoring. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Characteristics and trends in required home care by GPs in Austria: diseases and functional status of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichler Ingrid

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost all societies carry responsibility towards patients who require continuous medical care at home. In many health systems the general practitioner cooperates with community based services of home care and coordinates all medical and non medical activities. In Austria the general practitioner together and in cooperation with relatives of the patient and professional organisations usually takes on this task by visiting his patients. This study was carried out to identify diseases that need home care and to describe the functional profile of home care patients in eastern Austria. Methods Cross sectional observational study with 17 GP practices participating during 2 study periods in 1997 and in 2004 in eastern Austria. Each GP identified patients requiring home care and assessed their underlying diseases and functional status by filling in a questionnaire personally after an encounter. Patients in nursing homes were excluded. Statistical tests used were t-tests, contingency tables, nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and Fisher-combination test. Results Patients with degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (65% caused by Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular occlusive disease and patients with degenerative diseases of the skeletal system (53% were the largest groups among the 198 (1997 and 261 (2004 home care cases of the 11 (1997 and 13 (2004 practices. Malignant diseases in a terminal state constituted only 5% of the cases. More than two thirds of all cases were female with an average age of 80 years. Slightly more than 70% of the patients were at least partially mobile. Conclusion Home care and home visits for patients with degenerative diseases of the central nervous and skeletal system are important elements of GP's work. Further research should therefore focus on effective methods of training and rehabilitation to better the mental and physical status of patients living in their private homes.

  1. Physical and functional implications of aquatic exercise for nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, Tim; Neville, Christine; Baguley, Chantelle; Clifton, Karen; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has reported benefits for those with dementia. In the current study we investigated the feasibility of delivery and the physical and functional benefits of an innovative aquatic exercise program for adults with moderate to severe dementia living in a nursing home aged care facility. Ten adults (88.4 years, inter quartile range 12.3) participated twice weekly for 12 weeks. Anthropometric and grip strength data, and measures of physical function and balance were collected at baseline and post-intervention. Feasibility was assessed by attendance, participation, enjoyment and recruitment. Following exercise, participant's left hand grip strength had improved significantly (p = .017). Small to moderate effect sizes were observed for other measures. A number of delivery challenges emerged, but participant enjoyment, benefits and attendance suggest feasibility. Aquatic exercise shows promise as an intervention among those with dementia who live in a nursing home aged care facility. Greater program investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new multidisciplinary home care telemedicine system to monitor stable chronic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a randomized study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe León

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has changed the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in developed countries, where it has become a chronic disease. This clinical scenario requires a new approach to simplify follow-up appointments and facilitate access to healthcare professionals.We developed a new internet-based home care model covering the entire management of chronic HIV-infected patients. This was called Virtual Hospital. We report the results of a prospective randomised study performed over two years, comparing standard care received by HIV-infected patients with Virtual Hospital care. HIV-infected patients with access to a computer and broadband were randomised to be monitored either through Virtual Hospital (Arm I or through standard care at the day hospital (Arm II. After one year of follow up, patients switched their care to the other arm. Virtual Hospital offered four main services: Virtual Consultations, Telepharmacy, Virtual Library and Virtual Community. A technical and clinical evaluation of Virtual Hospital was carried out.Of the 83 randomised patients, 42 were monitored during the first year through Virtual Hospital (Arm I and 41 through standard care (Arm II. Baseline characteristics of patients were similar in the two arms. The level of technical satisfaction with the virtual system was high: 85% of patients considered that Virtual Hospital improved their access to clinical data and they felt comfortable with the videoconference system. Neither clinical parameters [level of CD4+ T lymphocytes, proportion of patients with an undetectable level of viral load (p = 0.21 and compliance levels >90% (p = 0.58] nor the evaluation of quality of life or psychological questionnaires changed significantly between the two types of care.Virtual Hospital is a feasible and safe tool for the multidisciplinary home care of chronic HIV patients. Telemedicine should be considered as an appropriate support service for the management

  3. Perceptions of seniors with heart failure regarding autonomous zero-effort monitoring of physiological parameters in the smart-home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Taherzadeh, Golnoush; Jae Chang, Isaac Sung; Boger, Jennifer; Arcelus, Amaya; Mak, Susanna; Chessex, Caroline; Mihailidis, Alex

    Technological advances are leading to the ability to autonomously monitor patient's health status in their own homes, to enable aging-in-place. To understand the perceptions of seniors with heart failure (HF) regarding smart-home systems to monitor their physiological parameters. In this qualitative study, HF outpatients were invited to a smart-home lab, where they completed a sequence of activities, during which the capacity of 5 autonomous sensing modalities was compared to gold standard measures. Afterwards, a semi-structured interview was undertaken. These were transcribed and analyzed using an interpretive-descriptive approach. Five themes emerged from the 26 interviews: (1) perceptions of technology, (2) perceived benefits of autonomous health monitoring, (3) disadvantages of autonomous monitoring, (4) lack of perceived need for continuous health monitoring, and (5) preferences for autonomous monitoring. Patient perception towards autonomous monitoring devices was positive, lending credence to zero-effort technology as a viable and promising approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of the trajectory of functional decline for advance care planning in a nursing home population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Suanne; Robinson, Andrew; Eagar, Kathy

    2017-09-01

    To identify diagnostic groups and the form of the trajectory of functional decline that has the potential to enhance advance care planning (ACP) in a nursing home (NH) population. Retrospective, longitudinal study with dependent variable (function) derived from the Resident Classification Scale (RCS), 1997-2008. Trajectory modelling used linear and curvilinear terms. The organ failure or other residents have a linear average functional decline. The organ failure residents had an average decline of 6.5 points per year and average function score at death of 68.6, CI [62.4, 74.8]. The cancer and frailty residents had significant curvilinear terms. The frailty residents had a slower rate of decline at 9.54 points per year and were most care dependent at death, with an average function score of 77.1, CI [73.8, 80.9]. Functional change is a measurable variable for a predictive tool to enhance ACP for NH residents based on their diagnosis. © 2017 AJA Inc.

  5. Monitoring Functional Traits of Alpine Vegetation using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Wulf, H.; Schaepman, M. E.; Schmid, B.

    2016-12-01

    Plant functional traits can be used to study the interactions between plants and ecosystem functioning as well as the response of plants to various environmental pressures. Continuous monitoring of plant functional traits dynamics on a large spatial scale is important to understand the mechanisms of ecosystem function degradation, especially on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. In this study, we investigated spatiotemporal trends of functional traits (i.e., chlorophyll content, phenology, leaf area index proxy of leaf size and above ground biomass proxy of leaf mass) in the eastern part of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau based on the combined analysis of multi-sensor satellite data and field observations at three spatial scales (ground-truth data at 1 m, Landsat at 30 m, MODIS at 500 m), and analyzed potential factors contribute to their spatiotemporal trends. Chlorophyll content (Chl) and biomass was retrieved based on 94 field plots measurements. LAI was analyzed using MCD15A3H product and estimated values using digital hemispherical photographs in the field. Plant phenology will be processed based on MODIS NDVI time series and hourly Phenocam observations. The preliminary results show that (1) Chl, LAI and biomass show high spatial heterogeneity trends and increase in 2001 - 2015. (2) Elevation played an important role in the spatial pattern of LAI and Chl variation in 15 years. A dividing line of approximately 3800 m exists and shows that below this line, LAI and Chl changes more complicated, showing significantly positive and negative linear trend. While above this altitude, the change rate of two variables keeps relatively stable. Vegetation in low elevation is exposed to high habitat diversity by showing high Chl, LAI and biomass spatial heterogeneity. The vegetation in high habitat diversity may be more sensitive to climatic variables and human activities than higher elevation since warming contribute to the positive trend of traits while human factors like urbanization

  6. A Primary Study of Indirect ECG Monitor Embedded in a Bed for Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akinori; Shiogai, Yuuki; Ishiyama, Yoji

    A system for monitoring electrocardiogram (ECG) through clothes inserted between the measuring electrodes and the body surface of a subject when lying on a mattress has been proposed. The principle of the system is based on capacitive coupling involving the electrode, the clothes, and the skin. Validation of the system revealed the following: (1) In spite of the gain attenuation in the pass band of the system, distortion of the detected signal was subtle even when clothes thicker than 1mm were inserted, (2) The system was able to yield a stable ECG from a subject particularly during sound sleep, (3) The system succeeded in detecting ECG after changing the posture into any of supine, right lateral, or left lateral positions by adopting a newly devised electrode configuration. Therefore, the proposed system appears promising for application to bedding as a non-invasive and awareness-free system for ECG monitoring during sleep.

  7. Functional status decline as a measure of adverse events in home health care: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feldman Penny H

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research that examines the quality of home health care is complex because no gold standard exists for measuring adverse outcomes, and because the patient and clinician populations are highly heterogeneous. The objectives in this study are to develop models to predict functional decline for three indices of functional status as measures of adverse events in home health care and determine which index is most appropriate for risk-adjusting for future quality research. Methods Data come from the Outcomes and Assessment Information Set (OASIS from a large urban home health care agency and other agency data. Prognostic data yields 49,437 episodes, while follow-up data yields 47,684 episodes. We tested three indices defined as substantial decline in three or more (gt3_ADLs, two or more (gt2_ADLs, and one or more (gt1_ADLs ADLs. Multivariate logistic regression determines the performance of the models for each index as measured by the c-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi square (χ2. Results Frequencies for gt3_ADLs, gt2_ADLs, and gt1_ADLs are 212 (0.43%, 783 (1.58%, and 4,271 (8.64% respectively. Follow-up results are comparable with frequencies of 218 (0.46%, 763 (1.60%, and 3,949 (8.28% for each index. Gt3_ADLs does not produce valid models. The model for gt2_ADLs consistently yields a higher c-statistic compared to gt1_ADLs (0.754 vs. 0.679, respectively. Both indices' models yield non-significant Hosmer-Lemeshow chi square indicating reasonable model fit. Findings for gt2_ADLs and gt1_ADLs are consistent over time as indicated by follow-up data results. Conclusion Gt2_ADLs yields the best models as indicated by a high c-statistic and a non-significant Hosmer-Lemeshow χ2, both of which exhibit exceptional consistency. We conclude that gt2_ADLs may be preferable in defining ADL adverse events in the context of home health care.

  8. ESUMS: a mobile system for continuous home monitoring of rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strisland, Frode; Svagård, Ingrid; Seeberg, Trine M; Mathisen, Bjørn Magnus; Vedum, Jon; Austad, Hanne O; Liverud, Anders E; Kofod-Petersen, Anders; Bendixen, Ole Christian

    2013-01-01

    The pressure on the healthcare services is building up for several reasons. The ageing population trend, the increase in life-style related disease prevalence, as well as the increased treatment capabilities with associated general expectation all add pressure. The use of ambient healthcare technologies can alleviate the situation by enabling time and cost-efficient monitoring and follow-up of patients discharged from hospital care. We report on an ambulatory system developed for monitoring of physical rehabilitation patients. The system consists of a wearable multisensor monitoring device; a mobile phone with client application aggregating the data collected; a service-oriented-architecture based server solution; and a PC application facilitating patient follow-up by their health professional carers. The system has been tested and verified for accuracy in controlled environment trials on healthy volunteers, and also been usability tested by 5 congestive heart failure patients and their nurses. This investigation indicated that patients were able to use the system, and that nurses got an improved basis for patient follow-up.

  9. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions.

  10. Smartphone-Based pH Sensor for Home Monitoring of Pulmonary Exacerbations in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Alexander; Phelps, Tom; Yao, Chengyang; Venkatesh, A G; Conrad, Douglas; Hall, Drew A

    2017-05-30

    Currently, Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients lack the ability to track their lung health at home, relying instead on doctor checkups leading to delayed treatment and lung damage. By leveraging the ubiquity of the smartphone to lower costs and increase portability, a smartphone-based peripheral pH measurement device was designed to attach directly to the headphone port to harvest power and communicate with a smartphone application. This platform was tested using prepared pH buffers and sputum samples from CF patients. The system matches within ~0.03 pH of a benchtop pH meter while fully powering itself and communicating with a Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone paired with either a glass or Iridium Oxide (IrOx) electrode. The IrOx electrodes were found to have 25% higher sensitivity than the glass probes at the expense of larger drift and matrix sensitivity that can be addressed with proper calibration. The smartphone-based platform has been demonstrated as a portable replacement for laboratory pH meters, and supports both highly robust glass probes and the sensitive and miniature IrOx electrodes with calibration. This tool can enable more frequent pH sputum tracking for CF patients to help detect the onset of pulmonary exacerbation to provide timely and appropriate treatment before serious damage occurs.

  11. Decreased nocturnal awakenings in young adults performing bikram yoga: a low-constraint home sleep monitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudesia, Ravi S; Bianchi, Matt T

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the impact of Bikram Yoga on subjective and objective sleep parameters. We compared subjective (diary) and objective (headband sleep monitor) sleep measures on yoga versus nonyoga days during a 14-day period. Subjects (n = 13) were not constrained regarding yoga-practice days, other exercise, caffeine, alcohol, or naps. These activities did not segregate by choice of yoga days. Standard sleep metrics were unaffected by yoga, including sleep latency, total sleep time, and percentage of time spent in rapid eye movement (REM), light non-REM, deep non-REM, or wake after sleep onset (WASO). Consistent with prior work, transition probability analysis was a more sensitive index of sleep architecture changes than standard metrics. Specifically, Bikram Yoga was associated with significantly faster return to sleep after nocturnal awakenings. We conclude that objective home sleep monitoring is feasible in a low-constraint, real-world study design. Further studies on patients with insomnia will determine whether the results generalize or not.

  12. Decreased Nocturnal Awakenings in Young Adults Performing Bikram Yoga: A Low-Constraint Home Sleep Monitoring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudesia, Ravi S.; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the impact of Bikram Yoga on subjective and objective sleep parameters. We compared subjective (diary) and objective (headband sleep monitor) sleep measures on yoga versus nonyoga days during a 14-day period. Subjects (n = 13) were not constrained regarding yoga-practice days, other exercise, caffeine, alcohol, or naps. These activities did not segregate by choice of yoga days. Standard sleep metrics were unaffected by yoga, including sleep latency, total sleep time, and percentage of time spent in rapid eye movement (REM), light non-REM, deep non-REM, or wake after sleep onset (WASO). Consistent with prior work, transition probability analysis was a more sensitive index of sleep architecture changes than standard metrics. Specifically, Bikram Yoga was associated with significantly faster return to sleep after nocturnal awakenings. We conclude that objective home sleep monitoring is feasible in a low-constraint, real-world study design. Further studies on patients with insomnia will determine whether the results generalize or not. PMID:22577578

  13. Knowledge, availability, and use of ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring in primary care in Spain: the MAMPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rioboó, Enrique; Pérula de Torres, Luis A; Banegas, José R; Lobos-Bejarano, José M; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; García Criado, Emilio I; Martin-Carrillo, Pilar; Martín-Rabadán Muro, María; Egocheaga Cabello, M Isabel; Maiques Galán, Antoni

    2018-01-19

    To examine the degree of knowledge and management of automated devices for office blood pressure measurement (AD), home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in primary care in Spain. Online self-administered survey sent between May 2016 and February 2017 to 2221 primary-care physicians working across Spain. Clinicians were mostly identified through national primary-care scientific societies (20% overall response rate). Participants' mean age was 47.7 years, 55% were women, and 54% reported at least 20 years of primary-care practice. Among them, 47.5% considered ABPM the best diagnostic method for hypertension, 23% chose HBPM, and 7.1% chose office blood pressure. Also, 78.2% had AD available at their centers and 49.0% had ABPM, with slight urban/rural differences. HBPM was recommended in daily practice for hypertension diagnosis by 67% of participants, whereas 30% recommended ABPM. Cost to the patients was the main reason for not using HBPM (42.7%) as was lack of accessibility for not using ABPM (69.8%). Lack of specific training was also reported as an important reason in both cases. Even in the possibly best primary care scenario presented by highly motivated physicians (respondents to a voluntary anonymous survey), enormous gaps were observed between current guidelines' recommendations on ABPM and HBPM use for confirming hypertension and the modest degree of knowledge, availability, and use of these technologies.

  14. Reproducibility of masked hypertension in adults with untreated borderline office blood pressure: comparison of ambulatory and home monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J; Hinderliter, Alan L; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V; Fine, Jason; Dominik, Rosalie

    2010-11-01

    We examined short-term reproducibility of masked hypertension (MH) among adults with recent "borderline" office blood pressure (BP) and compared agreement of ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and home BP monitoring (HBPM) in detecting MH. Fifty participants underwent repeated office BP measurements, 24-h ABPM, and HBPM sessions 1-week apart. Participants with office average office average pairing and HBPM session-office average pairing for diagnosing MH using a "standard" of two pairings of office and 24-h average ABPM (using a cutoff ≥130/80 mm Hg). Prevalence rates of MH based on office-daytime ABPM pairings were 54 and 53%, with agreement of 73% (κ = 0.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.72). MH was less prevalent (43 and 35%) using HBPM-office pairings, with agreement of 69% (κ = 0.34; 95% CI 0.06-0.62). Office-HBPM pairings and office-daytime ABPM pairings had poor agreement on MH classification on both occasions, with κ of -0.06 and 0.10. Sensitivity and specificity of daytime ABPM-office pairing were 93 and 83%. Sensitivity and specificity of HBPM-office pairing were 23 and 67%. MH appears to have fair-to-moderate reproducibility, favoring the hypothesis that office BP measurement systematically fails to identify some patients who should be treated as hypertensive. HBPM may not be adequate for detecting MH, or may identify a different "type" of MH than ABPM.

  15. Cost estimation of hypertension management based on home blood pressure monitoring alone or combined office and ambulatory blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Karpettas, Nikos; Athanasakis, Kostas; Kollias, Anastasios; Protogerou, Athanase D; Achimastos, Apostolos; Stergiou, George S

    2014-10-01

    This study aims at estimating the resources consumed and subsequent costs for hypertension management, using home blood pressure (BP) monitoring (HBPM) alone versus combined clinic measurements and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (C/ABPM). One hundred sixteen untreated hypertensive subjects were randomized to use HBPM or C/ABPM for antihypertensive treatment initiation and titration. Health resources utilized within 12-months follow-up, their respective costs, and hypertension control were assessed. The total cost of the first year of hypertension management was lower in HBPM than C/ABPM arm (€1336.0 vs. €1473.5 per subject, respectively; P cost was identical in both arms. There was no difference in achieved BP control and drug expenditure (HBPM: €233.1 per subject; C/ABPM: €247.6 per subject; P = not significant), whereas the cost of BP measurements and/or visits was higher in C/ABPM arm (€393.9 vs. €516.9, per patient, respectively P cost for subsequent years (>1) was €348.9 and €440.2 per subject, respectively for HBPM and C/ABPM arm and €2731.4 versus €3234.3 per subject, respectively (P cost than C/ABPM, and the same trend is observed in 5-year projection. The results on the resources consumption can be used to make cost estimates for other health-care systems.

  16. Does Subtype Matter? Assessing the Effects of Maltreatment on Functioning in Preadolescent Youth in Out-of-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Christie L. M.; Friend, Angela; Garrido, Edward F.; Taussig, Heather N.; Culhane, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Attempts to understand the effects of maltreatment subtypes on childhood functioning are complicated by the fact that children often experience multiple subtypes. This study assessed the effects of maltreatment subtypes on the cognitive, academic, and mental health functioning of preadolescent youth in out-of-home care using both…

  17. Non-invasive monitoring of the activities of daily living of elderly people at home--a pilot study of the usage of domestic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Georgina Corte; Gallay, Floriane; Berenguer, Marc; Mourrain, Christine; Couturier, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a feasibility study of a system for non-invasive monitoring of subjects at home. Electrical activity was recorded from room lights and from electrical domestic appliances; this was translated into the probability of physical activity or a particular Activity of Daily Living (ADL). Thirteen volunteer subjects were monitored for a period of 6.4 months (range 3-8). The mean age of the subjects was 80 years and they all lived alone at home; one had moderate Alzheimer's disease. A one-week validation was carried out to ascertain whether the recorded activity actually occurred. The results showed that daily and nocturnal activity could be well differentiated. The probability of having eaten, taken a bath and going to the toilet could be calculated each day. Eating was the most accurately measured ADL; toileting and bathing results were less accurate. The system appears to be a promising component of home telecare.

  18. The effectiveness of a life style modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring in control of hypertension: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tin Tin; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Nahar, Azmi Mohamed; Azizan, Nurul Ain; Hairi, Farizah Mohd; Thangiah, Nithiah; Dahlui, Maznah; Bulgiba, Awang; Murray, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Death rates due to hypertension in low and middle income countries are higher compared to high income countries. The present study is designed to combine life style modification and home blood pressure monitoring for control of hypertension in the context of low and middle income countries. The study is a two armed, parallel group, un-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial undertaken within lower income areas in Kuala Lumpur. Two housing complexes will be assigned to the intervention group and the other two housing complexes will be allocated in the control group. Based on power analysis, 320 participants will be recruited. The participants in the intervention group (n = 160) will undergo three main components in the intervention which are the peer support for home blood pressure monitoring, face to face health coaching on healthy diet and demonstration and training for indoor home based exercise activities while the control group will receive a pamphlet containing information on hypertension. The primary outcomes are systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Secondary outcome measures include practice of self-blood pressure monitoring, dietary intake, level of physical activity and physical fitness. The present study will evaluate the effect of lifestyle modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control, during a 6 month intervention period. Moreover, the study aims to assess whether these effects can be sustainable more than six months after the intervention has ended.

  19. Multimodal activity monitoring for home rehabilitation of geriatric fracture patients--feasibility and acceptance of sensor systems in the GAL-NATARS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschollek, Michael; Becker, Marcus; Bauer, Jürgen M; Bente, Petra; Dasenbrock, Lena; Elbers, Katharina; Hein, Andreas; Kolb, Gerald; Künemund, Harald; Lammel-Polchau, Christopher; Meis, Markus; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Hubertus; Remmers, Hartmut; Schulze, Mareike; Steen, Enno-Edzard; Thoben, Wilfried; Wang, Ju; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Haux, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Demographic change will lead to a diminishing care workforce faced with rising numbers of older persons in need of care, suggesting meaningful use of health-enabling technologies, and home monitoring in particular, to contribute to supporting both the carers and the persons in need. We present and discuss the GAL-NATARS study design along with first results regarding technical feasibility of long-term home monitoring and acceptance of different sensor modalities. Fourteen geriatric participants with mobility-impairing fractures were recruited in three geriatric clinics. Following inpatient geriatric rehabilitation, their homes were equipped with ambient sensor components for three months. Additionally, a wearable accelerometer was employed. Technical feasibility was assessed by system and component downtimes, technology acceptance by face-to-face interviews. The overall system downtime was 6%, effected by two single events, but not by software failures. Technology acceptance was rated very high by all participants at the end of the monitoring periods, and no interference with their social lives was reported. Home-monitoring technologies were well-accepted by our participants. The information content of the data still needs to be evaluated with regard to clinical outcome parameters as well as the effect on the quality of life before recommending large-scale implementations.

  20. Social and functional health of home care clients with different levels of cognitive impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garms-Homolová, Vjenka; Notthoff, Nanna; Declercq, Anja; van der Roest, Henriette G; Onder, Graziano; Jónsson, Pálmi; van Hout, Hein

    2017-01-01

    The ability to manage one's life with some degree of independence, to fulfill basic obligations, and to participate in social activities are social functions that delineate the core of 'social health'. We examine to what extent clients of community care in Europe (n = 2884) complete such activities despite their cognitive problems. We focus on mildly and moderately impaired people, aged 65+ years. Data were collected using the interRAI HC-Assessment in IBenC-project. We tested the association between participants' capacity and performance in three LADLs (instrumental activities of daily living) and their cognitive performance and specific memory problems. About 30% of home care clients in Europe suffer from mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. Their relatively independent coping with requirements of routine activities is strongly determined by overall cognitive performance. Specific memory functions seem unimportant, except for procedural memory. It is striking that all clients, and particularly those with mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment, interact mostly with close relatives and friends. Mild-to-moderate cognitive limitations do not hinder clients from coping semi-independently with routine requirements. When considering the influence of cognitive function on clients' capacity and performance in everyday activities and social relations, a comprehensive construct of cognitive function has to be applied.

  1. Dance as Prevention of Late Life Functional Decline Among Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Vankova, Hana; Volicer, Ladislav; Veleta, Petr; Holmerova, Iva

    2015-08-28

    Late life deterioration of functional status is associated with adverse health outcomes and increased cost of care. This trial was conducted to determine whether dance-based intervention could reverse functional decline among nursing home (NH) residents. A total of 189 residents of seven NHs in the Czech Republic were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. More detailed data were collected in a subsample of 52 participants. Intervention consisted of 3-month dance-based exercise. Functional status was assessed by the get-up-and-go test, basic activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and senior fitness tests (SFTs). Participants in the control group experienced a significant decline in get-up-and-go test, IADL, and in four of the six SFTs. The intervention proved to be effective in preventing this deterioration and improved chair stand test and chair sit-and-reach test. The findings indicate that a relatively simple dance-based exercise can slow down deterioration of functional status in NH residents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Do Maltreated Children who Remain at Home Function Better than Those who Are Placed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennen, Ferol E; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K

    2010-12-01

    The majority of children in the child welfare system remain with their maltreating parents, yet little is known about their level of functioning and whether they are in need of mental health intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mental health functioning of an ethnically diverse sample of 302 maltreated children and 151 non maltreated children ages 9-12 to see if there were differences between those who remained at home, those placed in kin care, non-relative foster care or a comparison group of children who were not maltreated. Children were evaluated on multiple measures of mental health functioning, both self report and caregiver report. Results showed that the maltreated children did not differ by placement type but did score significantly higher than the comparison children on many measures. There were substantial numbers of maltreated children scoring in the clinical range of measures in all placement types with over 60% of those remaining with birth parents being seen as functioning at a level that indicated a need for mental health intervention. While fewer comparison children had scores indicating a need for mental health care, the numbers were higher than noted in national studies. Implications of the findings are presented.

  3. Energy Management System and Interactive Functions of Smart Plug for Smart Home

    OpenAIRE

    Win Thandar Soe; Innocent Mpawenimana; Mathieu Di Fazio; Cécile Belleudy; Aung Ze Ya

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent electronic equipment and automation network is the brain of high-tech energy management systems in critical role of smart homes dominance. Smart home is a technology integration for greater comfort, autonomy, reduced cost, and energy saving as well. These services can be provided to home owners for managing their home appliances locally or remotely and consequently allow them to automate intelligently and responsibly their consumption by individual or collective control systems. I...

  4. Self-Monitoring Kidney Function Post Transplantation: Reliability of Patient-Reported Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lint, Céline; Wang, Wenxin; van Dijk, Sandra; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Rövekamp, Ton Jm; Neerincx, Mark A; Rabelink, Ton J; van der Boog, Paul Jm

    2017-09-26

    The high frequency of outpatient visits after kidney transplantation is burdensome to both the recovering patient and health care capacity. Self-monitoring kidney function offers a promising strategy to reduce the number of these outpatient visits. The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is safe to rely on patients' self-measurements of creatinine and blood pressure, using data from a self-management randomized controlled trial. For self-monitoring creatinine, each participant received a StatSensor Xpress-i Creatinine Meter and related test material. For self-monitoring blood pressure, each participant received a Microlife WatchBP Home, an oscillometric device for blood pressure self-measurement on the upper arm. Both devices had a memory function and the option to download stored values to a computer. During the first year post transplantation, 54 patients registered their self-measured creatinine values in a Web-based Self-Management Support System (SMSS) which provided automatic feedback on the registered values (eg, seek contact with hospital). Values registered in the SMSS were compared with those logged automatically in the creatinine device to study reliability of registered data. Adherence to measurement frequency was determined by comparing the number of requested with the number of performed measurements. To study adherence to provided feedback, SMSS-logged feedback and information from the electronic hospital files were analyzed. Level of adherence was highest during months 2-4 post transplantation with over 90% (42/47) of patients performing at least 75% of the requested measurements. Overall, 87.00% (3448/3963) of all registered creatinine values were entered correctly, although values were often registered several days later. If (the number of) measured and registered values deviated, the mean of registered creatinine values was significantly lower than what was measured, suggesting active selection of lower creatinine values

  5. One-channel multi-function AC power monitor; Ichikairogata takino koryu denryoku monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, A.; Irumano, Y. [Fuji Electric Instruments Co. Ltd., Yamanashi (Japan)

    2000-10-10

    This AC power monitor receives inputs of AC voltage and AC current. With these inputs converted into digital data, the monitor calculates wattage, wattage-hour, reactive wattage, reactive wattage-hour, power factor, and frequency, and then saves the calculated data into the memory card periodically. The AC power monitor is designed as a useful tool for energy monitoring and saving. It can be used as an independent unit or a component linked to the high level system through the communication line. Exclusive-use split-type current transformers are prepared to make a current measurement system in combination with the monitor. (author)

  6. Brain Computer Interfaces on Track to Home: Results of the Evaluation at Disabled End-Users's Homes and Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felip eMiralles

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The BackHome system is a multi-functional BCI system, the final outcome of a User Centred Design approach, whose ambition is to move BCI systems from laboratories into the home of people in need for their independent home use. The paper presents the results of testing and evaluation of the BackHome system with end-users at their own homes. Results show moderate to good acceptance from end-users, caregivers and therapists; which reported promising usability levels, good user satisfaction and levels of control in the use of services and home support based on remote monitoring tools.

  7. Guide Map for Preserving Remaining Ability of Nursing Home Residents With Physical-Cognitive Functional Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyunJu; Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Mi So; Choi, Jung Eun; Chang, Sung Ok

    2017-02-01

    As the population ages, preserving the remaining ability of residents is emphasized in nursing homes. Establishing the nursing knowledge of nursing home-specific practice should be included in the continuing education of new nursing home nurses. This study developed a practical guide map for preserving the remaining ability of nursing home residents by analyzing 144 residents' case data pertaining to the nursing care provided by 19 nurses skilled in nursing homes, as well as conducting a literature review. From the collected data, 236 nursing diagnoses were given to the 144 cases. As the residents' physical conditions and psychosocial characteristics were linked with the nursing process, various steps were needed to plan the nursing process of preserving the remaining ability of nursing home residents. This practical guide map will be useful for new nurses in nursing homes to improve the quality care of elderly residents. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(2):73-80. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. A Structural and Functional Model of Teachers' Monitoring Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Barinova, Nataliya A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the present issue is caused by a strong need to conduct monitoring processes in all types of teaching processes and a poor development of theoretical, content and technological, scientific and methodological material for teachers' monitoring skills development during their teaching practice. The aim of the article is to create and…

  9. Preliminary Design of Critical Function Monitoring System of PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    A PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) is under development at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A critical function monitoring system of the PGSFR is preliminarily studied. The functions of CFMS are to display critical plant variables related to the safety of the plant during normal and accident conditions and guide the operators corrective actions to keep the plant in a safe condition and mitigate the consequences of accidents. The minimal critical functions of the PGSFR are composed of reactivity control, reactor core cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, primary heat transfer system(PHTS) heat removal, sodium water reaction mitigation, radiation control and containment conditions. The variables and alarm legs of each critical function of the PGSFR are as follows; - Reactivity control: The variables of reactivity control function are power range neutron flux instrumentation, intermediate range neutron flux instrumentation, source range neutron flux instrumentation, and control rod bottom contacts. The alarm leg to display the reactivity controls consists of status of control drop malfunction, high post trip power and thermal reactivity addition. - Reactor core cooling: The variables are PHTS sodium level, hot pool temperature of PHTS, subassembly exit temperature, cold pool temperature of the PHTS, PHTS pump current, and PHTS pump breaker status. The alarm leg consists of high core delta temperature, low sodium level of the PHTS, high subassembly exit temperature, and low PHTS pump load. - Reactor coolant system integrity: The variables are PHTS sodium level, cover gas pressure, and safeguard vessel sodium level. The alarm leg is composed of low sodium level of PHTS, high cover gas pressure and high sodium level of the safety guard vessel. - PHTS heat removal: The variables are PHTS sodium level, hot pool temperature of PHTS, core exit temperature, cold pool temperature of the PHTS, flow rate of passive residual heat removal system

  10. [Home blood pressure monitoring in addition to office blood pressure determination is useful in patients with systolic hypertension before their inclusion into a drug trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girerd, X; Fourcade, J; Fauvel, J P; Villeneuve, F; Denolle, T; Marquand, A; Dourmap, C; Hanon, O

    2006-01-01

    In patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension, to estimate the value of home blood pressure monitoring in addition to office blood pressure for inclusion in a trial. 80 patients with systolic hypertension, defined as SBP > or =140 mmHg and pulse pressure > or =60 mmHg, were treated for 4 weeks with a thiazide diuretic at usual dose (25 mg HCTZ or 1.5 mg indapamide or methyclothiazide 5 mg). Blood pressure was measured using an automatic monitor (Omron M6) at office and at home in the 3 days prior the visit. Subjects with an uncontrolled hypertension were included in the second part of the trial only if there fulfilled inclusion criteria: office SBP > or =140 mmHg and home SBP > or =135 mmHg (mean of 18 measurements obtained on 3 consecutive days) and office pulse pressure > or =60 mmHg. After 4 weeks with diuretic treatment, 62% of patients fulfilled 3 criteria and were included in the second part of the trial. It was observed 76% of patients with office SBP > or =140 mmHg, 72% with office pulse pressure > or =60 mmHg and 70% with both office SBP and PP criteria. However, only 67% of patients had home SBP > or =135 mmHg. Discrepancy between office and home SBP was observed and subjects with a white coat hypertension was noticed in 14% and masked hypertension in 5%. If patients with systolic hypertension have to be included into a drug trial because there are uncontrolled, home blood pressure monitoring in addition to office blood pressure is a very useful criteria for inclusion because misclassifications due to white coat or masked hypertension is frequent in these patients.

  11. Effects of Stem Cell Factor on Cell Homing During Functional Pulp Regeneration in Human Immature Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangsawasdi, Nisarat; Zehnder, Matthias; Patcas, Raphael; Ghayor, Chafik; Siegenthaler, Barbara; Gjoksi, Bebeka; Weber, Franz E

    2017-02-01

    Conventional root canal treatment in immature permanent teeth can lead to early tooth loss in children because root formation is discontinued. We investigated whether the stem cell factor (SCF) could facilitate cell homing in the pulpless immature root canal and promote regeneration of a functional pulp. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were exposed to SCF at various concentrations for assessing cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation toward odonto/osteoblasts by 3D-chemotaxis slides, WST-1 assay, and alkaline phosphatase activity, respectively. Fibrin gels were used to deliver 15 μg/mL SCF for in vivo experiments. The release kinetic of SCF was assessed in vitro. Two corresponding human immature premolars, with or without SCF, were placed at rat calvariae for 6 and 12 weeks. All tooth specimens were either analyzed histologically and the percentage of tissue ingrowth determined or the cells were extracted from the pulp space, and the mRNA level of DMP1, DSPP, Col1, NGF, and VEGF were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the presence of SCF, we saw an increase in hMSCs directional migration, proliferation, and odonto/osteogenic differentiation. SCF also increased the extent of tissue ingrowth at 6 weeks but not at 12 weeks. However, at this time point, the formed tissue appeared more mature in samples with SCF. In terms of gene transcription, DMP1, Col1, and VEGF were the significantly upregulated genes, while DSPP and NGF were not affected. Our results suggest that SCF can accelerate cell homing and the maturation of the pulp-dentin complex in human immature teeth.

  12. A flexible home monitoring platform for patients affected by chronic heart failure directly integrated with the remote Hospital Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Massimiliano; Bacchillone, Tony; Saponara, Sergio; Fanucci, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Today Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) represents one of leading cause of hospitalization among chronic disease, especially for elderly citizens, with a consequent considerable impact on patient quality of life, resources congestion and healthcare costs for the National Sanitary System. The current healthcare model is mostly in-hospital based and consists of periodic visits, but unfortunately it does not allow to promptly detect exacerbations resulting in a large number of rehospitalization. Recently physicians and administrators identify telemonitoring systems as a strategy able to provide effective and cost efficient healthcare services for CHF patients, ensuring early diagnosis and treatments in case of necessity. This work presents a complete and integrated ICT solution to improve the management of chronic heart failure through the remote monitoring of vital signs at patient home, able to connect in-hospital care of acute syndrome with out-of-hospital follow-up. The proposed platform represents the patient's interface, acting as link between biomedical sensors and the data collection point at the Hospital Information System (HIS) in order to handle in transparent way the reception, analysis and forwarding of the main physiological parameters.

  13. The relationship between knee extension strength and lower extremity functions in nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kirimoto, Hikari; Inamura, Atsushi; Yagi, Maiko; Omori, Yoshitsugu; Yamada, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    To assess the relationships between knee extension strengths and lower extremity functions in subjects with dementia and to predict lower extremity functions using knee extension strength. Fifty-four nursing home residents with dementia were enrolled in the study. The strength of the knee extensor was measured using a hand-held dynamometer. To predict lower extremity functions, subjects were classified into two groups: those who could dress their lower body, toilet, transfer to bed/toilet/shower and walk independently, and those who required assistance. Knee extension strength was compared between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that the strength of the knee extensor muscles was a significant predictor of the ability to dress the lower body (odds ratio, 109.90; 95% CI, 7.60-1589.49), toileting (odds ratio, 18.29; 95% CI, 2.41-138.84), transferring to bed/toilet/shower (odds ratio, 39.70; 95% CI, 4.51-349.08), and gait performance (odds ratio, 12.77; 95% CI, 2.30-70.77). The curve of the negative and positive predictive values indicated that a cutoff score of 0.8 Nm/kg would provide the best balance for dressing the lower body and toileting; 1.2 Nm/kg for transferring to bed/toilet/shower; and 0.6 Nm/kg for gait performance. Knee extension strength was significantly related to the lower extremity functions in people with dementia. Moreover, threshold levels of strength existed that could predict lower extremity dysfunctions in people with dementia.

  14. The Impact of Fear of Falling on Functional Independence Among Older Adults Receiving Home Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Lawson OTR, LMSSW, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are the fifth leading cause of death for adults aged 65 years and older. Several intrinsic and extrinsic fall risk factors have been identified, butthere is less understanding of the impact of a fear of falling on falls. Seventy percent of recent fallers and 40% percent of non-fallers report a fear of falling. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between a fear of falling and a history of falls, as well as the impact on the functional independence of community-dwelling older adults receiving home health services. Methods: The participants completed the Falls Efficacy Scale, the Modified Timed Up and Go Test, self- reported fear of falling, and the KATZ ADL-staircase. The participants were primarily Hispanic females. Results: There was not a significant correlation between a fear of falling and a history of falls. Only participants' age, gender, and the number of medical diagnoses were predictive of past falls. There was a moderate correlation between impaired functional mobility and dependence with activities of daily living (ADL. Additionally, a fear of falling was associated with dependence to perform ADLs as measured objectively. Conclusion: Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of interventions that include dual-task challenges during therapeutic interventions and ADL retraining to reduce fall risk among older adults.

  15. Guidelines for Developing Telehealth Services and Troubleshooting Problems with Telehealth Technology When Coaching Parents to Conduct Functional Analyses and Functional Communication Training in Their Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John F; Schieltz, Kelly M; Suess, Alyssa N; Wacker, David P; Romani, Patrick W; Lindgren, Scott D; Kopelman, Todd G; Dalmau, Yaniz C Padilla

    2015-10-01

    The researchers in the project used telehealth to conduct functional analyses and functional communication training in homes of children diagnosed with autism who displayed problem behavior. Parents conducted all assessment and treatment procedures within their homes while receiving coaching from applied behavior analysts located approximately 200 miles away from them. In this article, the researchers summarize the technical systems they used to develop a telehealth service and the concerns and problems they have encountered using telehealth and provide some guidelines for how to troubleshoot those problems.

  16. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized

  17. Long-term olive oil-based parenteral nutrition sustains innate immune function in home patients without active underlying disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Versleijen, M.W.J.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Simonetti, E.R.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: It remains unclear whether impaired host defenses contribute to the increased risk for infectious complications seen in patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN). The aim of this study was to compare the innate immune function of patients on olive oil-based HPN with that of

  18. Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

  19. The Nursing Home Minimum Data Set Assessment Instrument: Manifest Functions and Unintended Consequences--Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Applebaum, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a uniform instrument used in nursing homes to assess residents. In January 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published a draft of a new MDS--version 3.0. This article traces the instrument's development and the design decisions that shaped it, discusses the MDS's manifest functions--data collection…

  20. Needs in nursing homes and their relation with cognitive and functional decline, behavioral and psychological symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Unmet needs are becoming acknowledged as better predictors of the worst prognostic outcomes than common measures of functional or cognitive decline. Their accurate assessment is a pivotal component of effective care delivery, particularly in institutionalized care where little is known about the needs of its residents, many of whom suffer from dementia and show complex needs. The aims of this study were to describe the needs of an institutionalized sample and to analyze its relationship with demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample from three nursing homes. All residents were assessed with a comprehensive protocol that included Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI and Adults and Older Adults Functional Inventory (IAFAI. To identify needs, the Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE was used. The final sample included 175 residents with a mean age of 80.6(sd=10.1. From these, 58.7% presented cognitive deficit (MMSE and 45.2% depressive symptoms (GDS. Statistically significant negative correlations were found between MMSE score and met(rs=-0.425, unmet(rs=-0.369 and global needs(rs=-0.565. Data also showed significant correlations between depressive symptoms and unmet(rs=0.683 and global needs(rs=0.407 and between behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD and unmet (rs=0.181 and global needs (rs=0.254. Finally, significant correlations between functional impairment and met(rs=0.642, unmet(rs=0.505 and global needs(rs=0.796 were also found. These results suggest that in this sample, more unmet needs are associated with the worst outcomes measured. This is consistent with previous findings and seems to demonstrate that the needs of those institutionalized elderly remain under-diagnosed and untreated.

  1. Psychometric performance and responsiveness of the functional outcomes of sleep questionnaire and sleep apnea quality of life instrument in a randomized trial: the HomePAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Martha E; Rosen, Carol L; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis C; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K

    2014-12-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) specific for sleep disorders have had limited psychometric evaluation in the context of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We investigated the psychometric properties of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Instrument (SAQLI). We evaluated the FOSQ and SAQLI construct and criterion validity, determined a minimally important difference, and assessed for associations of responsiveness to baseline subject characteristics and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in a RCT population. Secondary analysis of data collected in a multisite RCT of home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (HomePAP trial). Individuals enrolled in the HomePAP trial (n = 335). N/A. The FOSQ and SAQLI subscores demonstrated high reliability and criterion validity, correlating with Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Survey domains. Correlations were weaker with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Both the FOSQ and SAQLI scores improved after 3 mo with CPAP therapy. Averaging 4 h or more of CPAP use was associated with an increase in the FOSQ beyond the minimally important difference. Baseline depressive symptoms and sleepiness predicted FOSQ and SAQLI responsiveness; demographic, objective obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity and sleep habits were not predictive in linear regression. The FOSQ and SAQLI are responsive to CPAP intervention, with the FOSQ being more sensitive to differences in CPAP adherence than the SAQLI. These instruments provide unique information about health outcomes beyond that provided by changes in physiological measures of OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index). Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Apnea (HomePAP) URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00642486. NIH clinical trials registry number: NCT00642486. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Remote Monitoring Systems for Chronic Patients on Home Hemodialysis: Field Test of a Copresence-Enhanced Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Kim, Jinman; Jung, Younhyun; Arisy, Adani; Nicdao, Mary Ann; Mikaheal, Mary; Baldacchino, Tanya; Khadra, Mohamed; Sud, Kamal

    2017-08-29

    Patients undertaking long-term and chronic home hemodialysis (HHD) are subject to feelings of isolation and anxiety due to the absence of physical contact with their health care professionals and lack of feedback in regards to their dialysis treatments. Therefore, it is important for these patients to feel the "presence" of the health care professionals remotely while on hemodialysis at home for better compliance with the dialysis regime and to feel connected with health care professionals. This study presents an HHD system design for hemodialysis patients with features to enhance patient's perceived "copresence" with their health care professionals. Various mechanisms to enhance this perception were designed and implemented, including digital logbooks, emotion sharing, and feedback tools. The mechanism in our HHD system aims to address the limitations associated with existing self-monitoring tools for HHD patients. A field trial involving 3 nurses and 74 patients was conducted to test the pilot implementation of the copresence design in our HHD system. Mixed method research was conducted to evaluate the system, including surveys, interviews, and analysis of system data. Patients created 2757 entries of dialysis cases during the period of study. Altogether there were 492 entries submitted with "Very Happy" as the emotional status, 2167 entries with a "Happy" status, 56 entries with a "Neutral" status, 18 entries with an "Unhappy" status, and 24 entries with a "Very unhappy" status. Patients felt assured to share their emotions with health care professionals. Health care professionals were able to prioritize the review of the entries based on the emotional status and also felt assured to see patients' change in mood. There were 989 entries sent with short notes. Entries with negative emotions had a higher percentage of supplementary notes entered compared to the entries with positive and neutral emotions. The qualitative data further showed that the HHD system was

  3. The effects of integrated home care and discharge practice on functional ability and health-related quality of life: a cluster-randomised trial among home care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Hammar

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the effects of integrated home care and discharge practice on the functional ability (FA and health-related quality of life (HRQoL of home care patients. Methods: A cluster randomised trial (CRT with Finnish municipalities (n=22 as the units of randomisation. At baseline the sample included 669 patients aged 65 years or over. Data consisted of interviews (at discharge, and at 3-week and 6-month follow-up, medical records and care registers. The intervention was a generic prototype of care/case management-practice (IHCaD-practice that was tailored to municipalities needs. The aim of the intervention was to standardize practices and make written agreements between hospitals and home care administrations, and also within home care and to name a care/case manager pair for each home care patient. The main outcomes were HRQoL—as measured by a combination of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP and the EQ-5D instrument for measuring health status—and also Activities of Daily Living (ADL. All analyses were based on intention-to-treat. Results: At baseline over half of the patient population perceived their FA and HRQoL as poor. At the 6-month follow-up there were no improvements in FA or in EQ-5D scores, and no differences between groups. In energy, sleep, and pain the NHP improved significantly in both groups at the 3-week and at 6-month follow-up with no differences between groups. In the 3-week follow-up, physical mobility was higher in the trial group. Conclusions: Although the effects of the new practice did not improve the patients' FA and HRQoL, except for physical mobility at the 3-week follow-up, the workers thought that the intervention worked in practice. The intervention standardised practices and helped to integrate services. The intervention was focused on staff activities and through the changed activities also had an effect on patients. It takes many years to achieve permanent changes in every worker

  4. Evaluating the Feasibility and Intercorrelation of Measurements on the Functioning of Residents Living in Scandinavian Nursing Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena

    2010-01-01

    these measurements. Method. The design was cross-sectional and 322 residents’ functions were evaluated by grip strength, the Timed Chair Stand Test, Berg’s Balance Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale, Swedish version of Mini-Mental State Examination, 10-m walking and wheelchair propulsion at self-selected and maximum speed......, functional independence measure, physiotherapy clinical outcome variables, and the Nursing Home Life Space...

  5. Predictors of Functional Capacity Changes in a US Population of Medicare Home Health Care Patients with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Elizabeth A.; Gordon, Nahida; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Koroukian, Siran M.; Piña, Ileana; Riggs, Jennifer S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Functional capacity is widely recognized as a key factor in maintaining the ability of older people to live independently and safely at home. Promoting functional capacity is an important priority particularly in home health care (HHC). The purpose of the study was to examine predictors of functional capacity change among HHC patients with heart failure (HF). Materials and methods Clinical and administrative data from 2005 from the Medicare Chronic Conditions Warehouse were linked at the population level for HHC patients with a primary diagnosis of HF. The primary outcome was change in functional capacity score from HHC admission to HHC discharge. Results Over the course of the episode (M = 44 days), most (70%) patients improved, 15.6% stayed the same, and 14.4% declined in ADL scores. The mean change score was modest (mean = −0.74, SD = 1.11) with a median change of −0.58. Multivariate analyses (R2 = .23) showed that the largest influence was the admission ADL score followed by receiving any physical therapy, admission ability to manage oral medications, cognitive functioning, rehabilitation prognosis, and urinary incontinence. Discussion There is a modest rate of improvement from admission to discharge that likely represents the progressive nature of HF and/or the short time frames over which home health care is provided. Providers may want to use the predictive factors to identify patients most at risk for functional decline. PMID:21899899

  6. [The role of complementary examinations and home monitoring in patient at risk from apparent life threatening event, apneas and sudden infant death syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Monseny, A; Bobillo Pérez, S; Martínez Planas, A; García García, J J

    2015-08-01

    Home apnea monitors detect abnormalities in cardiac and respiratory frequency, but their use in the diagnosis of respiratory -related sleep disturbances in children has not been demonstrated, as was originally thought. To describe the type of patients being monitored, for how long and their outcome. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted on patients with controlled home cardiorespiratory monitoring from October 2008 to September 2012 in the Outpatient department of a Maternity tertiary hospital. During the study period 88 patients were included, 58% of them were male, with a median age of 15.5 days, and followed up for a period of 4.7 months. The reason for monitoring was in a 20.5% due to a history of sudden death without finding underlying pathology in 20.5%, 25% due to apnea of prematurity, 20.5% due to apparent life-threatening event, and 14.8% due to choking. Other causes accounted for 19.3% (apnea/hypopnea, desaturation and periodic breathing). Of these last three groups, pathological events were observed in 50% of them: reflux disease (9), apnea of prematurity (2), neurological causes (3), and apnea of unknown cause (10). Suspected infant apnea is a cause for consultation that creates a great deal of concern to the family and the pediatrician. Home monitoring is useful in detecting changes in cardiac and respiratory frequency, but is necessary to limit its indications and ensure proper monitoring of these patients, avoiding the abuse of other tests or treatments. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of Omron RS8, RS6, and RS3 home blood pressure monitoring devices, in accordance with the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi H

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hakuo Takahashi, Masamichi Yoshika, Toyohiko YokoiDepartment of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, JapanBackground: Allowing patients to measure their blood pressure at home is recognized as being of clinical value. However, it is not known how often these measurements are taken correctly. Blood pressure monitors for home use fall into two types based on the position of the cuff, ie, at the upper arm or the wrist. The latter is particularly convenient, as measurements can be taken fully clothed. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the wrist-type blood pressure monitors Omron RS8 (HEM-6310F-E, Omron RS6 (HEM-6221-E, and Omron RS3 (HEM-6130-E.Methods: A team of three trained doctors validated the performance of these devices by comparing the measurements obtained from these devices with those taken using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. All the devices met the validation requirements of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.Results: The difference in blood pressure readings between the tested device and the standard mercury sphygmomanometer was within 3 mmHg, which is acceptable according to the European Society of Hypertension guidelines.Conclusion: All the home devices tested were found to be suitable for measuring blood pressure at home because their performance fulfilled the requirement of the guidelines.Keywords: blood pressure, device, European Society of Hypertension, guideline, measurement, validation

  8. Functional outcomes of nursing home residents in relation to features of the environment: validity of the Professional Environmental Assessment Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Susan E; Morgan, Debra G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this article was to examine associations between specific dimensions of nursing home environments and the functional ability (walking and eating) of residents with dementia, and to contribute to the ongoing psychometric development of the Professional Environmental Assessment Protocol (PEAP). One-year prospective cohort study. Fifteen nursing homes in a western Canadian province. Convenience sample of 120 nursing home residents with middle-stage dementia. Every 2 weeks we observed residents' abilities to walk to the dining room and to feed themselves. At the end of a year of observation and immediately following a brief interview with the unit managers, we used the PEAP to measure the extent to which 9 specific dimensions of nursing home environments support the ability of residents with dementia to walk and to eat. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the effect of specific environmental features on residents' walking and eating disability. "Support of functional ability" was associated with a reduced hazard of both walking and eating disability. The environmental dimensions of "maximizing awareness and orientation" and better "quality of stimulation" were associated specifically with reduced hazard of walking disability, whereas the dimensions of the nursing home environment specifically associated with a reduced hazard of eating disability included improved "safety and security," "opportunities for personal control," and "regulation of stimulation." The Cox proportional hazards models using the 13-point PEAP scale were not significantly different from nested models using the 5-point PEAP scale, indicating that the 2 scales did not differ in their ability to discriminate between more and less supportive environments for residents with dementia. Specific dimensions of the nursing home environment reduced the hazard of walking disability, whereas others reduced the hazard of eating disability. Modifying specific features of nursing home

  9. The implementation of the functional task exercise programme for elderly people living at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleuren Margot A H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Functional Task Exercise programme is an evidence-based exercise programme for elderly people living at home. It enhances physical capacity with sustainable effects. FTE is provided by physiotherapists and remedial therapists. Although the intervention was found to be effective in a Randomised Controlled Trial, we may not assume that therapists will automatically supply the programme or that elderly people will automatically join the programme. This study protocol focuses on identifying determinants of implementation, developing implementation strategies and studying the effects of the implementation in daily practice. Methods/Design Phase 1: The systematic identification of determinants of the implementation of FTE among therapists and the elderly. A questionnaire study was conducted in a random sample of 100 therapists, and interviews took place with 23 therapists and 8 elderly people (aged 66 to 80 years. The determinants were broken down into four categories: the characteristics of the environment, the organisation, the therapists, and the training programme. Phase 2: Developing and applying strategies adapted to the determinants identified. Fifteen physiotherapists will be trained to provide FTE and to recruit elderly people living at home. The therapists will then deliver the 12-week programme to two groups of elderly, each consisting of six to twelve people aged 70 years or older. Phase 3: Study of implementation and the impact. To study the actual use of FTE: 1 therapists record information about the selection of participants and how they apply the key features of FTE, 2 the participating elderly will keep an exercise logbook, 3 telephone interviews will take place with the therapists and the elderly and there will be on-site visits. The effects on the elderly people will be studied using: 1 the Patient-Specific Questionnaire, the Timed Up and Go test and a two performance tests. All tests will be performed at

  10. Practical Aspects of Research Monitoring: Methodological and Functional Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Onosov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of designing, testing and implementing the National system of monitoring the quality of meteorological services in Russia. Within the framework of this project a large-scale research program was carried out aimed to develop the conception, methodology, research tools and design of customer assessment of the Roshydromet services.

  11. Self-Monitoring of Gaze in High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Nadel, Jacqueline; Martin, Jean-Claude; Simonin, Jerome; Bailleul, Pauline; Wang, Yun; Gepner, Daniel; Le Barillier, Florence; Constant, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Atypical visual behaviour has been recently proposed to account for much of social misunderstanding in autism. Using an eye-tracking system and a gaze-contingent lens display, the present study explores self-monitoring of eye motion in two conditions: free visual exploration and guided exploration via blurring the visual field except for the focal…

  12. Potential predictors of functional outcomes after home-based constraint-induced therapy for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-ling; Lin, Keh-chung; Kang, Lin-ju; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Hsieh-ching; Hsieh, Yu-wei

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to identify predictors for treatment outcomes after home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD. Forty-three children (aged 4-12 yr) with CP were treated with individualized CIT at home for 4 wk. Potential predictors were age, sex, affected hand, and upper-extremity motor capacity measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, 2nd edition (PDMS-2). Outcomes were the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL) Amount of Hand Use and Quality of Hand Use subscales and the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). RESULTS. A higher PDMS-2 Visual-Motor Integration subscale score predicted a better WeeFIM score after home-based CIT (adjusted R² = .35). Younger age predicted better performance on the PMAL Amount of Hand Use and Quality of Hand Use subscales (adjusted R² = .06-.08) after home-based CIT. CONCLUSION. The potential predictors may allow occupational therapy practitioners to target those children who will benefit most after home-based constraint-induced therapy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  13. Correlation of Blood Pressure Variability as Measured By Clinic, Self-measurement at Home, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán-Huerta, José; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Montoro-García, Silvia; Abellán-Alemán, José; Soria-Arcos, Federico

    2018-02-09

    Blood pressure variability (BPV) has been postulated as a potential predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. No agreement exists as to which measurement method is best for BPV estimation. We attempt to assess the correlation between BPV obtained at the doctor's office, self-measurement at home (SMBP) and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Eight weekly clinic BP measurements, 2 SMBP series, and 1 24-hour ABPM recording were carried out in a sample of treated hypertensive patients. BPV was calculated using the SD, the "coefficient of variation" and the "average real variability." Determinants of short-, mid-, and long-term BPV (within each measurement method) were also calculated. The different BPV determinants were correlated "intramethod" and "intermethod" by linear regression test. For the 104 patients (66.5 ± 7.7 years, 58.7% males), the ABPM BPV (SD, systolic/diastolic: 14.5 ± 3.1/9.8 ± 2.5 mm Hg) was higher than the SMBP (12.2 ± 9.8/7.4 ± 5.8 mm Hg; P < 0.001) and clinic BPV (10 ± 8.9/5.9 ± 4.9 mm Hg; P = 0.001). The main BPV correlation between methods was weak, with a maximum R2 = 0.17 (P < 0.001) between clinic and SMBP systolic BPV. The "intramethod" correlation of BPV yielded a maximum R2 = 0.21 (P < 0.001) between morning diastolic SMBP intershift/intermeans variability. The "intermethod" correlation of short-, mid-, and long-term BPV determinants was weak (maximum R2 = 0.22, P < 0.001, between clinic intraday variability/SMBP morning intershift variability). The "intramethod" and "intermethod" correlation between BPV determinants was weak or nonexistent, even when comparing determinants reflecting the same type of temporal BPV. Our data suggest that BPV reflects a heterogeneous phenomenon that strongly depends on the estimation method and the time period evaluated.

  14. Functional lipidomics in patients on home parenteral nutrition: Effect of lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironi, Loris; Guidetti, Mariacristina; Verrastro, Ornella; Iacona, Claudia; Agostini, Federica; Pazzeschi, Caterina; Sasdelli, Anna Simona; Melchiorre, Michele; Ferreri, Carla

    2017-07-07

    To investigate the fatty acid-based functional lipidomics of patients on long-term home parenteral nutrition receiving different intravenous lipid emulsions. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out on 3 groups of adults on home parenteral nutrition (HPN), receiving an HPN admixture containing an olive-soybean oil-based intravenous lipid emulsion (IVLE) (OO-IVLE; n = 15), a soybean- medium-chain triacylglycerol-olive-fish oil-based IVLE (SMOF-IVLE; n = 8) or HPN without IVLE (No-IVLE; n = 8) and 42 healthy controls (HCs). The inclusion criteria were: duration of HPN ≥ 3 mo, current HPN admixtures ≥ 2 mo and HPN infusions ≥ 2/wk. Blood samples were drawn 4-6 h after the discontinuation of the overnight HPN infusion. The functional lipidomics panel included: the red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid (FA) profile, molecular biomarkers [membrane fluidity: saturated/monounsaturated FA ratio = saturated fatty acid (SFA)/monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) index; inflammatory risk: n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio = n-6/n-3 index; cardiovascular risk: sum of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) = n-3 index; free radical stress: sum of FA trans isomers = %trans index] and FA pathway enzyme activity estimate (delta-9-desaturase = D9D; delta-6-desaturase = D6D; delta-5-desaturase = D5D; elongase = ELO). Statistics were carried out using nonparametric tests. The amount of each FA was calculated as a percentage of the total FA content (relative%). In the OO-IVLE group, the percentage of oleic acid in the RBCs was positively correlated with the weekly load of OO-IVLE (r = 0.540, P = 0.043). In the SMOF-IVLE cohort, the RBC membrane EPA and DHA were positively correlated with the daily amount of SMOF-IVLE (r = 0.751, P = 0.044) and the number of HPN infusions per week (r = 0.753; P = 0.046), respectively. The SMOF-IVLE group showed the highest EPA and DHA and the lowest arachidonic acid percentages (P < 0.001). The RBC membrane

  15. Impact of Amputation Level and Comorbidities on Functional Status of Nursing Home Residents Following Lower Extremity Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Todd R.; Petroski, Gregory F.; Kruse, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nursing home residents’ ability to independently function is associated with their quality of life. The impact of amputations on functional status in this population remains unclear. This analysis evaluated the effect of amputations—Transmetatarsal (TMA), Below-knee (BK), and Above-knee (AK)—on residents’ ability to perform self-care activities. METHODS: Medicare inpatient claims were linked with nursing home assessment data to identify admissions for amputation. The MDS ADL-Long form score (0-28; higher indicating greater impairment), based on seven activities of daily living, was calculated before and after amputation. Hierarchical modeling determined the effect of the surgery on residents’ post-amputation function. Controlling for comorbidity, cognition, and pre-hospital function allowed for evaluation of activities of daily living (ADL) trajectories over time. RESULTS: 4965 residents underwent amputation: 490 TMA, 1596 BK and 2879 AK. Mean age was 81 and 54% of the patients were women. Most were White (67%) or African-American (26.5%). Comorbidities prior to amputation included diabetes (DM, 70.7%), coronary heart disease (57.1%), chronic kidney disease (53.6%), and/or congestive heart failure (CHF, 52.1%). Mortality within 30 days of hospital discharge was 9.0% and hospital readmission was 27.7%. Stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and poor baseline cognitive function were associated with the poorest functional outcome after amputation. Compared with residents who received TMA, those who had BK or AK recovered more slowly and failed to return to baseline function by six months. BK was found to have a superior functional trajectory compared with AK. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly nursing home residents undergoing BK or AK amputation failed to return to their functional baseline within six month. Among frail elderly nursing home residents, higher amputation level, stroke, ESRD, poor baseline cognitive scores, and female gender were associated

  16. Using air quality monitoring to reduce second-hand smoke exposure in homes: the AFRESH feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruaraidh Dobson

    2017-06-01

    participants to create smoke-free homes, although it is not possible to generalise the results of this small study. However, the resources required for the delivery of AFRESH do not match with the resources available in third-sector organisations, despite smoke-free homes being a policy priority

  17. Patient experiences with self-monitoring renal function after renal transplantation: results from a single-center prospective pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lint, C.L. van; Boog, P.J.M. van der; Wang, W.; Brinkman, W.P.; Rövekamp, T.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Rabelink, T.J.; Dijk, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Background: After a kidney transplantation, patients have to visit the hospital often to monitor for early signs of graft rejection. Self-monitoring of creatinine in addition to blood pressure at home could alleviate the burden of frequent outpatient visits, but only if patients are willing to

  18. Associations between physical function and depression in nursing home residents with mild and moderate dementia: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvæl, Linda Aimée Hartford; Bergland, Astrid; Telenius, Elisabeth Wiken

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study is to describe depression and physical function in nursing home residents with dementia, as well as to examine the associations between depression and balance function, lower limb muscle strength, mobility and activities of daily living. The secondary aim is to examine the differences in physical function between the groups classified as depressed and not depressed. Design The study has a cross-sectional design. Setting A convenience sample of 18 nursing homes in, and around, Oslo, Norway, participated. Participants We included 170 nursing home residents aged 60–100 years with mild or moderate degree of dementia defined by a score of 1 or 2 on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Outcome measures Assessments used were Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), ‘the 6-metre walking test’ (walking speed), 30 s Chair Stand Test (CST) and the Barthel Index (BI). Results Nursing home residents with dementia are a heterogeneous group in terms of physical function and depression. By applying the recommended cut-off of ≥8 on CSDD, 23.5% of the participants were classified as being depressed. The results revealed significant associations between higher scores on CSDD (indicating more symptoms of depression) and lower scores on BBS (95% CI −0.12 to −0.02, p=0.006), 30 s CST (95% CI −0.54 to −0.07, p=0.001) as well as maximum walking speed (95% CI −4.56 to −0.20, p=0.003) (indicating lower level of physical function). Conclusion Better muscle strength, balance and higher walking speed were significantly associated with less depressive symptoms. The potential interaction of dementia with poor physical function and depression indicates an area to explore in future epidemiological studies with a prospective design. Trial registration number NCT02262104. PMID:28729326

  19. Functional tooth units and nutritional status of older people in care homes in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiatman, Melissa; Ueno, Masayuki; Ohnuki, Mari; Hakuta, Chiyoko; Shinada, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between functional tooth units (FTUs) and nutritional status. One hundred females (mean age: 72.4 ± 8.2 years) at four private care homes in Jakarta, Indonesia were interviewed and clinically examined. The oral examination included the assessment of teeth, prosthetic status, and number of FTUs. The total number of FTUs was further divided by tooth composition: natural tooth against natural tooth (NN-FTUs), natural tooth against denture (ND-FTUs), and denture against denture (DD-FTUs). Nutritional status was evaluated using the body mass index (BMI) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The mean numbers of teeth present, NN-FTUs, ND-FTUs, DD-FTUs, and total FTUs were 13.1 ± 10.4, 1.7 ± 3.0, 1.2 ± 3.3, 0.4 ± 1.2 and 3.3 ± 4.4, respectively. The mean BMI and MNA scores were 24.8 ± 5.0 and 22.6 ± 2.8, respectively. Subjects with a normal BMI had a significantly higher total number of FTUs (3.6 ± 4.6) compared with underweight subjects (0.1 ± 0.3). Subjects with a normal MNA had a significantly higher number of NN-FTU (2.6 ± 3.7) compared to those who were at risk or in a state of under-nutrition (1.2 ± 2.4). This study revealed significant relationships between the number of FTUs and nutritional status. Keeping the posterior occlusion should be emphasized in order to maintain good nutritional status in older subjects. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Arntz, Y; Dumitresco, B; Eclancher, B; Prat, V

    1999-01-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) wh...

  1. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B. E-mail: eclan@alsace.u-strasbg.fr; Prat, V

    1999-06-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients.

  2. Renal function monitoring in heart failure – what is the optimal frequency? A narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; Devonald, Mark Alexander John; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2017-01-01

    The second most common cause of hospitalization due to adverse drug reactions in the UK is renal dysfunction due to diuretics, particularly in patients with heart failure, where diuretic therapy is a mainstay of treatment regimens. Therefore, the optimal frequency for monitoring renal function in these patients is an important consideration for preventing renal failure and hospitalization. This review looks at the current evidence for optimal monitoring practices of renal function in patients with heart failure according to national and international guidelines on the management of heart failure (AHA/NICE/ESC/SIGN). Current guidance of renal function monitoring is in large part based on expert opinion, with a lack of clinical studies that have specifically evaluated the optimal frequency of renal function monitoring in patients with heart failure. Furthermore, there is variability between guidelines, and recommendations are typically nonspecific. Safer prescribing of diuretics in combination with other antiheart failure treatments requires better evidence for frequency of renal function monitoring. We suggest developing more personalized monitoring rather than from the current medication‐based guidance. Such flexible clinical guidelines could be implemented using intelligent clinical decision support systems. Personalized renal function monitoring would be more effective in preventing renal decline, rather than reacting to it. PMID:28901643

  3. Renal function monitoring in heart failure - what is the optimal frequency? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naher, Ahmed; Wright, David; Devonald, Mark Alexander John; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-01-01

    The second most common cause of hospitalization due to adverse drug reactions in the UK is renal dysfunction due to diuretics, particularly in patients with heart failure, where diuretic therapy is a mainstay of treatment regimens. Therefore, the optimal frequency for monitoring renal function in these patients is an important consideration for preventing renal failure and hospitalization. This review looks at the current evidence for optimal monitoring practices of renal function in patients with heart failure according to national and international guidelines on the management of heart failure (AHA/NICE/ESC/SIGN). Current guidance of renal function monitoring is in large part based on expert opinion, with a lack of clinical studies that have specifically evaluated the optimal frequency of renal function monitoring in patients with heart failure. Furthermore, there is variability between guidelines, and recommendations are typically nonspecific. Safer prescribing of diuretics in combination with other antiheart failure treatments requires better evidence for frequency of renal function monitoring. We suggest developing more personalized monitoring rather than from the current medication-based guidance. Such flexible clinical guidelines could be implemented using intelligent clinical decision support systems. Personalized renal function monitoring would be more effective in preventing renal decline, rather than reacting to it. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2008-01-01

    . The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before...... aspirin treatment in healthy subjects. Serum-thromboxane B(2) (S-TxB(2)) was measured to assess compliance. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers not receiving aspirin, duplicate measurements resulted in coefficients of variation (CV) of 7.9 % for the PFA-100 and 5.2 % for OPA. During aspirin treatment, CVs were...

  5. The Home-Heart-Walk study, a self-administered walk test on perceived physical functioning, and self-care behaviour in people with stable chronic heart failure: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiyun; Newton, Phillip J; Budhathoki, Chakra; Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Macdonald, Peter S; Davidson, Patricia M

    2017-08-01

    Adherence to self-care recommendations is associated with improved patient outcomes and improved quality of life for people living with heart failure. The Home-Heart-Walk (HHW) is an intervention to promote physical activity adapting the elements of a six minute walk test, a reliable and valid measure. This adaptation was designed to support self-monitoring of physical functioning and promote the self-care of people with heart failure. The primary outcome of the Home-Heart-Walk was perceived physical functioning and the secondary outcomes were six-minute walk test distance, health related quality of life, self-care behaviour, self-efficacy and physical activity level. A multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants ( N=132) were recruited from three academic hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Participants were randomized to either the Home-Heart-Walk group or the control group. Perceived physical functioning, health related quality of life, self-care behaviour, exercise self-efficacy and physical activity level were measured at baseline and at three- and six-month follow-up. After adjusting for baseline scores, there were no statistically significant between-group differences in perceived physical functioning, six-minute walk test distance, health related quality of life and exercise self-efficacy at follow-up. The intervention group had improvement in self-care behaviour ( F(1,129) = 4.75, p = 0.031) and physical activity level ( U = 1713, z = -2.12, p = 0.034) at the six-month follow-up compared with the control group. The Home-Heart-Walk did not improve the perceived physical functioning of the intervention group. Although the feasibility and acceptability of this strategy to support self-monitoring and improve self-care behaviour was demonstrated, self-reported adherence was unreliable; newer technologies may offer better assessment of adherence.

  6. Self-Monitoring Interventions for At-Risk Middle School Students: The Importance of Considering Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Donald E., III; Simonsen, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    Self-monitoring is a popular, efficient, and effective intervention that is associated with improved academic and social behavior for students across age and ability levels. To date, this is the first study to directly compare the outcomes of self-monitoring functionally relevant and non-relevant replacement behaviors. Specifically, we used an…

  7. Micro-device combining electrophysiology and optical imaging for functional brain monitoring in freely moving animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Qihong; Zhang, Lingke; Li, Miao; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring brain activities in awake and freely moving status is very important in physiological and pathological studies of brain functions. In this study, we developed a new standalone micro-device combining electrophysiology and optical imaging for monitoring the cerebral blood flow and neural activities with more feasibility for freely moving animals.

  8. Increasing Compliance in Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using Functional Behavioral Assessment and Self-Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jamie P.; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    Noncompliance in three elementary age students with intellectual disabilities was assessed using functional behavioral assessments. Escape was identified as the primary function of the behavior in all three students, and access to tangible items was identified in one of the students as a secondary function. Teacher-monitoring and self-monitoring…

  9. Home Blood Pressure Monitoring as an Alternative to Confirm Diagnoses of Hypertension in Adolescents with Elevated Office Blood Pressure from a Brazilian State Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Thaís Inacio Rolim; Jardim, Thiago Veiga; Carneiro, Carolina de Souza; Ferreira, Vanessa Roriz; Mendonça, Karla Lorena; Morais, Polyana Resende Silva de; Nascente, Flávia Miquetichuc Nogueira; Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso de; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2017-09-01

    Regional differences of using home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as an alternative to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in hypertensive adolescents are unknown. Define if HBPM is an option to confirm diagnoses of hypertension in adolescents from a Brazilian capital with elevated office blood pressure (BP). Adolescents (12-18years) from public and private schools with BP > 90th percentile were studied to compare and evaluate the agreement among office BP measurements, HBPM and ambulatory BP monitoring. Office BP measurements, HBPM and ABPM were performed according to guidelines recommendations. Semi-automatic devices were used for BP measurements. Values of p office measurement values (127.3 ± 13.8 mmHg over 74.4 ± 9.5 mmHg - p office BP and can be used as an alternative to ABPM.

  10. Can the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors be affected by the Received Signal Strength of 900 MHz GSM Mobile Phones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: People who use home blood glucose monitors may use their mobile phones in the close vicinity of medical devices. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of the signal strength of 900 MHz GSM mobile phones on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Methods: Sixty non-diabetic volunteer individuals aged 21 - 28 years participated in this study. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose level by using a common blood glucose monitoring system. Each blood sample was analyzed twice, within ten minutes in presence and absence of electromagnetic fields generated by a common GSM mobile phone during ringing. Blood samples were divided into 3 groups of 20 samples each. Group 1: exposure to mobile phone radiation with weak signal strength. Group2: exposure to mobile phone radiation with strong signal strength. Group3: exposure to a switched–on mobile phone with no signal strength. Results: The magnitude of the changes in the first, second and third group between glucose levels of two measurements (׀ΔC׀ (were 7.4±3.9 mg/dl, 10.2±4.5 mg/ dl, 8.7±8.4 mg/dl respectively. The difference in the magnitude of the changes between the 1st and the 3rd groups was not statistically significant. Furthermore, the difference in the magnitude of the changes between the 2nd and the 3rd groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Findings of this study showed that the signal strength of 900 MHz GSM mobile phones cannot play a significant role in changing the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors.

  11. Can the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors be affected by the Received Signal Strength of 900 MHz GSM Mobile Phones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, J; Ghafaripour, F; Mortazavi, S A R; Mortazavi, S M J; Shojaei-Fard, M B

    2015-12-01

    People who use home blood glucose monitors may use their mobile phones in the close vicinity of medical devices. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of the signal strength of 900 MHz GSM mobile phones on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Sixty non-diabetic volunteer individuals aged 21 - 28 years participated in this study. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose level by using a common blood glucose monitoring system. Each blood sample was analyzed twice, within ten minutes in presence and absence of electromagnetic fields generated by a common GSM mobile phone during ringing. Blood samples were divided into 3 groups of 20 samples each. Group 1: exposure to mobile phone radiation with weak signal strength. Group2: exposure to mobile phone radiation with strong signal strength. Group3: exposure to a switched-on mobile phone with no signal strength. The magnitude of the changes in the first, second and third group between glucose levels of two measurements (׀ΔC׀) were 7.4±3.9 mg/dl, 10.2±4.5 mg/dl, 8.7±8.4 mg/dl respectively. The difference in the magnitude of the changes between the 1st and the 3rd groups was not statistically significant. Furthermore, the difference in the magnitude of the changes between the 2nd and the 3rd groups was not statistically significant. Findings of this study showed that the signal strength of 900 MHz GSM mobile phones cannot play a significant role in changing the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors.

  12. Effects of a 10-week multimodal exercise program on physical and cognitive function of nursing home residents: a psychomotor intervention pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catarina; Rosado, Hugo; Cruz-Ferreira, Ana; Marmeleira, José

    2017-08-03

    Nursing home institutionalization tends to exacerbate loss of functioning. Examine the feasibility and the effect of a psychomotor intervention-a multimodal exercise program promoting simultaneous cognitive and motor stimulation-on the executive (planning ability and selective attention) and physical function of nursing home residents. Seventeen participants engaged in a 10-week multimodal exercise program and 17 maintained usual activities. Exercise group improved planning ability (25-32%), selective attention (19-67%), and physical function [aerobic endurance, lower body strength, agility, balance, gait, and mobility (19-41%)], corresponding to an effect size ranging from 0.29 (small) to 1.11 (high), p functions of the nursing home residents, reverting the usual loss of both cognitive and motor functioning in older adult institutionalized. Multimodal exercise programs may help to maintain or improve nursing home residents' functioning.

  13. Effects of a mobility monitoring system on the cost of care in relation to reimbursement at Swiss nursing homes: learnings from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Mario; Tietz, Rigo; Gattinger, Heidrun; Hantikainen, Virpi; Ott, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Nursing homes in Switzerland are under pressure to efficiently coordinate staff activities to cover their personnel costs under the care financing system. In this study, the use of a mobility monitoring system accompanied with case conferences was investigated in order to improve sleep quality and estimate the cost benefit of this intervention. In an open two-phase randomized controlled trial at three nursing homes, residents with cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. In the intervention group, a 10-week period of intensive use of the monitoring system and case conferences led by an advanced nurse practitioner (Phase I) was followed by 3 months of reduced use of the monitoring system and case conferences led by an internal registered nurse (Phase II). In the control group, the monitoring system was only used for data acquisition. Nurses reported the activities with a specifically developed tool. Based on the recorded activities, the cost of care was calculated. The correlating reimbursement per patient was calculated from the care levels in the Swiss reimbursement system. Data from 44 residents was included in the analysis with a linear mixed model. Although analysis revealed no statistically significant effects, results indicate that the use of a monitoring system can guide nurses in organizing their tasks to increase effectiveness. Information systems such as the mobility monitor can help to identify single outliers that do not correspond with the overall situation. In the health care system, problematic individual cases can account for a disproportionally high cost levels. It was shown that information systems can have a significant economic impact in the long run. The study is registered at the German Clinical Trials Register under the Nr. DRKS00006829 .

  14. Explanation of the project - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis Explanation of the project...icy | Contact Us Explanation of the project - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  15. Download - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis Download First of all, ple...e Policy | Contact Us Download - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  16. Graph of growth data - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis Graph of growth data Data ... The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  17. Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Functional Recovery Following Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Nancy K.; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F.; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M.; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For many older people, long-term functional limitations persist after a hip fracture. The efficacy of a home exercise program with minimal supervision after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ends has not been established. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a home exercise program with minimal contact with a physical therapist improved function after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ended. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted from September 2008 to October 2012 in the homes of 232 functionally limited older adults who had completed traditional rehabilitation after a hip fracture. INTERVENTIONS The intervention group (n = 120) received functionally oriented exercises (such as standing from a chair, climbing a step) taught by a physical therapist and performed independently by the participants in their homes for 6 months. The attention control group (n = 112) received in-home and telephone-based cardiovascular nutrition education. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Physical function assessed at baseline, 6 months (ie, at completion of the intervention), and 9 months by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was change in function at 6 months measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range 0-12, higher score indicates better function) and the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) mobility and daily activity (range, 23-85 and 9-101, higher score indicates better function). RESULTS Among the 232 randomized patients, 195 were followed up at 6 months and included in the primary analysis. The intervention group (n=100) showed significant improvement relative to the control group (n=95) in functional mobility (mean SPPB scores for intervention group: 6.2 [SD, 2.7] at baseline, 7.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; control group: 6.0 [SD, 2.8] at baseline, 6.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; and between-group differences: 0.8 [95% CI, 0.4 to 1.2], P < .001; mean AM-PAC mobility scores for intervention group: 56.2 [SD, 7.3] at baseline, 58

  18. Effect of a home-based exercise program on functional recovery following rehabilitation after hip fracture: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Nancy K; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M

    2014-02-19

    For many older people, long-term functional limitations persist after a hip fracture. The efficacy of a home exercise program with minimal supervision after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ends has not been established. To determine whether a home exercise program with minimal contact with a physical therapist improved function after formal hip fracture rehabilitation ended. Randomized clinical trial conducted from September 2008 to October 2012 in the homes of 232 functionally limited older adults who had completed traditional rehabilitation after a hip fracture. The intervention group (n = 120) received functionally oriented exercises (such as standing from a chair, climbing a step) taught by a physical therapist and performed independently by the participants in their homes for 6 months. The attention control group (n = 112) received in-home and telephone-based cardiovascular nutrition education. Physical function assessed at baseline, 6 months (ie, at completion of the intervention), and 9 months by blinded assessors. The primary outcome was change in function at 6 months measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range 0-12, higher score indicates better function) and the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) mobility and daily activity (range, 23-85 and 9-101, higher score indicates better function). Among the 232 randomized patients, 195 were followed up at 6 months and included in the primary analysis. The intervention group (n=100) showed significant improvement relative to the control group (n=95) in functional mobility (mean SPPB scores for intervention group: 6.2 [SD, 2.7] at baseline, 7.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; control group: 6.0 [SD, 2.8] at baseline, 6.2 [SD, 3] at 6 months; and between-group differences: 0.8 [95% CI, 0.4 to 1.2], P < .001; mean AM-PAC mobility scores for intervention group: 56.2 [SD, 7.3] at baseline, 58.1 [SD, 7.9] at 6 months; control group: 56 [SD, 7.1] at baseline, 56.6 [SD, 8.1] at 6 months

  19. Thermography: a new option to monitor filtering bleb function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamann, Matthias K J; Maier, Anna-Karina B; Gonnermann, Johannes; Klein, Julian P; Ruokonen, Peter; Pleyer, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the filtering bleb function after trabeculectomy using a new ocular surface thermography device. Thirty-five eyes of 35 patients after trabeculectomy were included in this prospective study. The filtering bleb function was tested with a new ocular surface-oriented, infrared radiation thermographic device in a noncontact manner (TG 1000). The eyes were classified into poorly controlled and well-controlled intraocular pressure (IOP) groups according to the patients' postoperative IOP. According to Kawasaki and colleagues, the mean temperature decrease in the filtering bleb (TDB) for evaluating bleb function was used, where TDB=(mean temperature of the temporal and nasal bulbar conjunctiva)-(mean temperature of the filtering bleb). Furthermore, the filtering bleb was evaluated during 10 seconds of eye opening and a new parameter was introduced, the TB10sec. TDB and TB10sec were analyzed statistically. The TDB was 0.911°C (±0.467) and the TB10sec was -1.027°C (±0.312) in the well-controlled IOP group. The TDB was 0.599°C (±0.499), and the TB10sec was -0.623°C (±0.265) in the poorly controlled IOP group, respectively. The difference in TDB (P=0.045), as well as that of TB10sec (Pthermography using Tomey TG 1000 may be a useful tool in the evaluation of filtering bleb function.

  20. Diagnosing and monitoring diabetic macular edema: structural and functional tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midena, Edoardo; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic macular edema remains a major cause of visual impairment in adults despite the use of intensive glycemic control, photocoagulation therapy and new intravitreal drugs in the treatment of this disease. Although early diagnosis and treatment lead to better results, we still have patients who become legally blind. Therefore, better structural and functional characterization of this disease is necessary in order to customize treatment.

  1. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to optimize the calibration of the depth cameras, to describe the multi-camera data fusion and to specify a global positioning projection to maintain the compatibility with outdoor positioning systems. The monitoring of the people trajectories at home is intended for the early detection of a shift in daily activities which highlights disabilities and loss of autonomy. This system is meant to improve homecare health management at home for a better end of life at a sustainable cost for the community.

  2. Effects of Home-Based Constraint-Induced Therapy versus Dose-Matched Control Intervention on Functional Outcomes and Caregiver Well-Being in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21…

  3. Database Description - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis Database Description Gener...al information of database Database name The Rice Growth Monitoring for the Phenotypic Functional Analysis A...- The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  4. The UCB particle monitor: A tool for logging frequency of smoking and the intensity of second-hand smoke concentrations in the home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semple, Sean; Apsley, Andrew; Moir, Gill; Henderson, George; Ayres, Jon, E-mail: sean.semple@abdn.ac.u [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Liberty Safe Work Research Centre, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    Second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure generates a large public health burden. Recent legislation has moved to prohibit smoking in public places and there are concerns that this may lead to an increase in exposures in private homes. Measurement of SHS aerosol has tended to use active pumped samples or longer-term diffusive badges. Pumped methods are noisy and poorly tolerated in home settings while diffusive badges do not provide real-time data. The UCB particle monitor (UCB-PM) is a modified smoke-alarm device capable of logging changes in airborne particulate matter over extended periods and has been used successfully to measure biomass fuel smoke concentrations in developing world settings This study has examined the use of the UCB-PM to measure SHS aerosol in both controlled laboratory conditions and a pilot field trial over a 7 day period in a smoker's home. Comparisons with a pumped sampler (TSI Sidepak Personal Aerosol Monitor) indicate good agreement over a range of exposure concentrations but there is evidence of a threshold effect at approximately 0.5 mg/m{sup 3} of fine particulate measured as PM{sub 2.5}. While this threshold effect undermines the ability of the device to provide useful data on the time-weighted average SHS concentration, the field trial indicates that that the UCB-PM has a sensitivity of about 71% and a specificity of 98%. The device has many advantages including zero noise operation, low cost and long battery life and may be a useful tool in quitting and smoke-free home intervention studies.

  5. The UCB particle monitor: A tool for logging frequency of smoking and the intensity of second-hand smoke concentrations in the home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Sean; Apsley, Andrew; Moir, Gill; Henderson, George; Ayres, Jon

    2009-02-01

    Second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure generates a large public health burden. Recent legislation has moved to prohibit smoking in public places and there are concerns that this may lead to an increase in exposures in private homes. Measurement of SHS aerosol has tended to use active pumped samples or longer-term diffusive badges. Pumped methods are noisy and poorly tolerated in home settings while diffusive badges do not provide real-time data. The UCB particle monitor (UCB-PM) is a modified smoke-alarm device capable of logging changes in airborne particulate matter over extended periods and has been used successfully to measure biomass fuel smoke concentrations in developing world settings This study has examined the use of the UCB-PM to measure SHS aerosol in both controlled laboratory conditions and a pilot field trial over a 7 day period in a smoker's home. Comparisons with a pumped sampler (TSI Sidepak Personal Aerosol Monitor) indicate good agreement over a range of exposure concentrations but there is evidence of a threshold effect at approximately 0.5 mg/m3 of fine particulate measured as PM2.5. While this threshold effect undermines the ability of the device to provide useful data on the time-weighted average SHS concentration, the field trial indicates that that the UCB-PM has a sensitivity of about 71% and a specificity of 98%. The device has many advantages including zero noise operation, low cost and long battery life and may be a useful tool in quitting and smoke-free home intervention studies.

  6. Using the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 for monitoring aspirin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Mickley, Hans; Korsholm, Lars

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to evaluate the test characteristics of the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) in patients treated with aspirin. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of two sub-studies. In study 1, 10 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10 controls had...... platelet function assessed by optical platelet aggregation and the PFA-100 method in two 5-week periods. Patients with IHD were treated with aspirin 150 mg/day (first 5-week period), and 300 mg/day (second 5-week period), whereas the controls only received aspirin (150 mg/day) during the second 5-week...... period. From the results of study 1, we found that a cut-off value for the PFA-100 collagen/epinephrine cartridge aspirin (sensitivity 0.91, specificity 1.00). A good agreement between the PFA-100 method and optical platelet aggregation was found. Within...

  7. FY1995 report on the remote monitoring system for the aged at home; 1995 nendo zaitaku koreisha no kenko jotai enkaku kanshi system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of the project is to develop a prototype system which monitors the health conditions of the aged living alone by measuring his/her electronic cardiograms at sleep and the activity of movement at daytime which are gathered by telephone lines. The practicability of the system is also verified. After our newly developed health monitoring system was applied for one year in four people over age 80, this system is useful to monitor both ECG during night and the daily activity at home of the aged living alone for long term without being aware. In each subject, a unique pattern of ECG waveform and the daily activity at home was found. Since the individual activity was fairly stable throughout the year, we were able to point out the unusual days by comparing the daily activity pattern with the reference pattern and analysis the reason. As to the clinical problem, we called one subject to come to see a doctor after we found temporary ventricular arrhythmia in his record. On the occasion of unusual activity, we called the subject and/or his/her neighbors and found a health problem. Depending on the response to the call, the system administrator took an appropriate action like informing the relatives or making a visit. (NEDO)

  8. Effectiveness of home exercise on pain, function, and strength of manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury: a high-dose shoulder program with telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Straaten, Meegan G; Cloud, Beth A; Morrow, Melissa M; Ludewig, Paula M; Zhao, Kristin D

    2014-10-01

    To test the effectiveness of a high-dose home exercise/telerehabilitation program for manual wheelchair users who have a spinal cord injury (SCI) by determining whether the intervention would reduce pain and increase function, as we hypothesized. A pre-post trial with outcomes measured at 3 time points: baseline, postintervention (12wk), and follow-up (>24 wk). Subjects performed an exercise program at their homes using telerehabilitation for therapist monitoring of technique and exercise advancement. Baseline and postintervention data were collected at a motion analysis laboratory in a tertiary medical center. A convenience sample of manual wheelchair users (N=16, 3 women; average age, 41y; average time in a wheelchair, 16y) with shoulder pain (average pain duration, 9y) and mechanical impingement signs on physical examination. A 12-week home exercise program of rotator cuff and scapular stabilization exercises was given to each participant. The program included a high dose of 3 sets of 30 repetitions, 3 times weekly, and regular physical therapist supervision via videoconferencing. Primary outcomes of pain and function were measured with the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI), Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Index, and Shoulder Rating Questionnaire (SRQ). Secondary outcomes of strength were measured with isometric strength tests of scapulothoracic and glenohumeral muscles, and a static fatigue test of the lower trapezius. Pain was reduced and function improved after the intervention. There was a significant main effect for pain and function between the 3 time points based on the Friedman signed-ranked test, WUSPI (χ(2)2=5.10, P=.014), DASH Index (χ(2)2=5.41, P=.012), and SRQ (χ(2)2=23.71, P≤.001). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests demonstrated that isometric strength measurements of the serratus anterior and scapular retractors increased after the exercise intervention ([t=2.42, P=.04] and [t=4.67, P=.003], respectively). Muscle impulse

  9. Home-based Exercise on Functional Outcome of the Donor Lower Extremity in Oral Cancer Patients after Fibula Flap Harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yuan Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: After harvesting the fibula flap, pain, sensory disturbance, weakness of donor leg, reduced walking endurance, ankle instability, and lower walking speed had been reported. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess functional outcome of regular home-based exercise on donor ankle strength, endurance, and walking ability after free fibula flap for mandibular reconstruction. Methods: Fourteen patients were recruited. Objective isokinetic testing and a 6-min walk test (6MWT were used to evaluate ankle strength/endurance and walking ability, respectively. Results: There was a significant increase in the peak torque of ankle dorsiflexion/foot inversion of the healthy leg and ankle dorsiflexion/foot eversion of the donor leg after exercise (p < 0.05. After home-based exercise, there was reduced asymmetry in the peak torques of ankle dorsiflexion and foot eversion and the total work of foot eversion between the donor and healthy legs. In 6MWT, no significant difference was found between the walking distances before and after exercise. Conclusion: Regular home-based exercise could improve the strength of ankle dorsiflexion and foot eversion of the donor leg, and get more symmetric ankle motor function between the donor and healthy legs.

  10. Effect of home-based exercise on functional ability of hemodialysis patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Shafipour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: hemodialysis patients suffer from impaired functional ability. Several pilot studies have been conducted concerning the effect of home-based exercise on functional ability of hemodialysis patients; however, there have been observed some contradictions between the results of these studies. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the effects of home-based exercise on functional ability of hemodialysis patients using meta-analysis. Methods: In this review study, for the purpose of finding studies published electronically form 2000 to 2016, the papers published in journals indexed in the databases of “PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar Cochrane” were used. Also, to analyze the full text of these articles, Stata Software Version 11 was used. Heterogeneity index between the studies was determined using Cochran (Q c and I2 tests. Since heterogeneity was observed between the studies, a random effect model was used to estimate the mean score of the standardized difference of a 6-minute walk test in order to measure the functional ability of hemodialysis patients in two experimental and comparison groups. Results: Four articles were finally selected in this meta-analysis. 68 patients were in the experimental group and 65 were in the control group. After the intervention, the mean score of the standardized difference of a 6-minute walk test in the experimental group with a confidence interval of 95% was 0.21 (-0.15, 0.57 units more than before the intervention, which was statistically not significant. Conclusion: The results of the meta-analysis showed that home-based exercise increased the functional ability of hemodialysis patients although this effect was not significant.

  11. Prognostic significance of blood pressure measured in the office, at home and during ambulatory monitoring in older patients in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagard, R H; Van Den Broeke, C; De Cort, P

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prognostic significance of out-of-the-office blood pressure (BP) measurement in older patients in general practice, and to compare the results for BP measured in the office, at home and during 24-h ambulatory monitoring. All registerd patients who were 60 years or older were eligible for the study, except when bedridden, demented or admitted in a home for sick elderly people, or when they had suffered a myocardial infarction or stroke. After baseline measurements in 1990-1993, incidence of major cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke) was ascertained in 2002-2003 and related to the BPs by use of multivariate Cox regression analysis. Age of the 391 patients averaged 71+/-9 years; 40% were men. During median follow-up of 10.9 years, 86 patients (22%) suffered a cardiovascular event. The adjusted relative hazard rate, associated with a 1 s.d. increment in systolic BP was 1.13 for office BP (NS), and, respectively, 1.32, 1.33 and 1.42, for home, daytime and night time BP (Poffice BPs was independent of office BP. The prognostic value of home BP was equal to (systolic) or even better (diastolic) than that of daytime BP. Night time BP predicted cardiovascular events independent of all other BPs. Prognosis of white-coat hypertension was similar to that of true normotension, but better than in sustained hypertension. In conclusion, the prognostic value of home BP is better than that of office BP in older patients in primary care, and is at least equal to that of daytime ambulatory BP. The prognosis of patients with white-coat hypertension is similar to that of true normotensives.

  12. A rapid membrane potential assay to monitor CFTR function and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Rangan; Sivashanmugam, Perumal; Warner, Keith

    2013-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is an important regulator of ion transport and fluid secretion in humans. Mutations to CFTR cause cystic fibrosis, which is a common recessive genetic disorder in Caucasians. Involvement of CFTR has been noted in other important diseases, such as secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease. The assays to monitor CFTR function that have been described to date either are complicated or require specialized instrumentation and training for execution. In this report, we describe a rapid FlexStation-based membrane potential assay to monitor CFTR function. In this assay, agonist-mediated activation of CFTR results in membrane depolarization that can be monitored using a fluorescent membrane potential probe. Availability of a simple mix-and-read assay to monitor the function of this important protein might accelerate the discovery of CFTR ligands to study a variety of conditions.

  13. Prospects for integration of satellite communications, navigation and monitoring functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinal, George

    1989-03-01

    The basic equations of analog ranging are shown to be essentially identical to those for digital time synchronization. Digital system design parameters such as energy per bit, bandwidth and data rate indicate that communications and ranging/timing are two sides of the same coin. Integrated user equipment such as navigation receivers and standard C terminals are shown to be less expensive and more convenient to operate than separate systems. Extensive sharing of hardware functions is possible. The distinction between communications and ranging can be considered to be a software matter. The role of Inmarsat in furthering such integration is described.

  14. Home closure as a weapon in the Dutch war on drugs: Does judicial review function as a safety net?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, L Michelle; Vols, Michel; Brouwer, Jan G

    2018-01-01

    A widespread sense of a failing criminal justice system and increased feelings of insecurity changed the response to crime into a culture of control, which is characterized by policies that punish and exclude. In the Netherlands, these influences can be witnessed in the war on drugs where local authorities use their administrative power to close homes involved in drug-related crime. Citizens can invoke judicial review over these administrative interferences by claiming that such closure results in an unfair balance between purposes, means and consequences. This paper assesses whether judicial review functions as a safety net against losing one's home due to drug-related crime. We used doctrinal legal research methods to examine the "law in the books" and empirical legal research methods to analyse the "law in action". We used a survey to investigate how often the drug-related closure power was used in 2015, and we statistically analysed all published case law of Dutch lower courts between 2007 and 2016. The scope of the closure power broadened over the years and our data show that local authorities fiercely make use of this instrument. In 41.4% of the cases, citizens are successful in fighting the closure. While scholarly literature indicates that judicial courts function as safeguards by questioning the proportionality of administrative action, raising a proportionality defence does not necessarily result in a more favourable outcome for citizens. In fact, raising a proportionality defence makes it more likely to result in dismissal of the appeal. The stretched scope of the drug-related closure power together with the relatively low success rate of citizens who fight the loss of their home and a seemingly meaningless proportionality check show no sign of a safety net against the loss of one's home at the suit of a local authority. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. "Missing pieces"--functional, social, and environmental barriers to recovery for vulnerable older adults transitioning from hospital to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Hoi-Cheung, Doug; Garcia, Veronica; Kessell, Eric; Sarkar, Urmimala; Goldman, Lauren; Schneidermann, Michelle; Critchfield, Jeffrey; Pierluissi, Edgar; Kushel, Margot

    2014-08-01

    To describe barriers to recovery at home for vulnerable older adults after leaving the hospital. Standard qualitative research techniques, including purposeful sampling of participants according to age, sex, race, and English proficiency, were used to ensure a wide breadth of experiences. All participants were interviewed in their native language (English, Spanish, or Chinese). Two investigators independently coded interviews using the constant comparative method. The entire research team, with diverse backgrounds in primary care, hospital medicine, geriatrics, and nursing, performed thematic analysis. Urban public safety-net teaching hospital. Vulnerable older adults (low income and health literacy, limited English proficiency) enrolled in a larger discharge interventional study. Qualitative data (participant quotations) were organized into themes. Twenty-four individuals with a mean age of 63 (range 55-84), 66% male, 67% nonwhite, 16% Spanish speaking, 16% Chinese speaking were interviewed. An overarching theme of "missing pieces" was identified in the plan for postdischarge recovery at home, from which three specific subthemes emerged: functional limitations and difficulty with mobility and self-care tasks, social isolation and lack of support from family and friends, and challenges from poverty and the built environment at home. In contrast, participants described mostly supportive experiences with traditional focuses of transition, care such as following prescribed medication and diet regimens. Hospital-based discharge interventions that focus on traditional aspects of care may overlook social and functional gaps in postdischarge care at home for vulnerable older adults. Postdischarge interventions that address these challenges may be necessary to reduce readmissions in this population. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Functional imaging with reinforcement, eyetracking, and physiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Vincent; Grinband, Jack; Teichert, Tobias; Pestilli, Franco; Dashnaw, Stephen; Hirsch, Joy

    2008-11-13

    We use functional brain imaging (fMRI) to study neural circuits that underlie decision-making. To understand how outcomes affect decision processes, simple perceptual tasks are combined with appetitive and aversive reinforcement. However, the use of reinforcers such as juice and airpuffs can create challenges for fMRI. Reinforcer delivery can cause head movement, which creates artifacts in the fMRI signal. Reinforcement can also lead to changes in heart rate and respiration that are mediated by autonomic pathways. Changes in heart rate and respiration can directly affect the fMRI (BOLD) signal in the brain and can be confounded with signal changes that are due to neural activity. In this presentation, we demonstrate methods for administering reinforcers in a controlled manner, for stabilizing the head, and for measuring pulse and respiration.

  17. Hospital-at-home integrated care programme for older patients with orthopaedic conditions: Early community reintegration maximising physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Miquel Àngel; Closa, Conxita; Santaeugènia, Sebastià J; Inzitari, Marco; Ribera, Aida; Gallofré, Miquel

    2016-06-01

    Older citizens with orthopaedic conditions need specialised care for the facilitation of early community reintegration and restitution of physical function. We introduced a new community care programme as an alternative to usual hospital rehabilitation for orthopaedic patients. This was an observational study of a cohort of older orthopaedic patients attending a hospital-at-home integrated care programme (HHU), compared with a contemporary cohort of users of a geriatric rehabilitation unit (GRU) in the urban area of Badalona, Catalonia, Spain. Functional gain at discharge was measured using the Barthel Index (BI). Other outcomes were: length of intervention (days), rehabilitation efficiency and discharge destination. Over the 2 years of the study we assessed 270 patients (69 at HHU; 201 at GRU). We found no significant differences in baseline characteristics between HHU and GRU groups-mean (IQR) or % age 83 (79-87) vs. 84 (79-88), cognitive impairment 27.5% vs. 24.9%, functional decline 40 (31-48) vs. 43 (32-58). Overall, we found no statistically significant differences between HHU and GRU groups on functional gain: 35 (22-45) vs. 32 (18-46), and discharge home 85.5% vs. 86.1%. Length of intervention was shorter in the HHU group, 43 (32-56) vs. 57 (44-81); prehabilitation efficiency between HHU and GRU groups in the hip fracture subgroup was 0.27 (0.09 to 0.46); p=0.004. This hospital-at-home service obtained similar clinical results to the usual hospital-based rehabilitation care, and for hip fracture patients attending that service, rehabilitation efficiency was better. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The effect of a health maintenance program on physical function and mental health of the elderly in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki Wol

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a Health Maintenance Program on physical functions and mental health of the elderly in nursing homes. Sixty elderly(over 65 years old) in a randomized control study participated in a 16-week group-based intervention including functional exercises and health education. The participants were divided into 3 groups(Health Maintenance Program Group, Supportive Music Exercise Group, and Control Group) of 20 elderly each. Data was collected from Dec. 1st, 2005 to Mar. 30th, 2006. Physical function of lower body strength was assessed using a 30-second chair test, flexibility was assessed using a sit-and-reach test, and static balance was assessed by the ability to balance on one leg with open and closed eyes. Depression was assessed using the Korean Form of the Geriatric Depression Scale and self esteem was assessed using Rosenberg's Self Esteem Questionnaire. Data was analyzed by Chi-square test, One-way ANOVA, and Repeated measure two factor analysis. A Health Maintenance Program significantly increased muscle strength, flexibility and static balance, but depression and self-esteem scores were not significantly changed. Findings demonstrated that a Health Maintenance Program was more effective on physical function than mental health of the elderly in nursing homes.

  19. Effect of in-home and community-based services on the functional status of elderly in the long-term care insurance system in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olivares-Tirado, Pedro; Tamiya, Nanako; Kashiwagi, Masayo

    2012-01-01

    ...), making long-term care services a universal entitlement for elderly. Overseas literature suggests that the effectiveness of a home visiting program is uncertain in terms of preventing a decline in the functional status of elderly individuals...

  20. Workshop Postlaunch Monitoring 'Functional Foods', waar ligt de rol van sector VCV?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong N de; Ocke MC; CVG

    2003-01-01

    In December 2002 the RIVM's Nutrition and Consumer Safety Division held a workshop aimed at defining its position and future tasks in a Post-launch Monitoring (PLM) system for functional foods, which is yet to be developed. Here, (unexpected) effects of the use of functional foods after marketing

  1. Cognitive function among the elderly. Comparison of home care clients and independent seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, G.; Briffett, E.; Moulton, N.

    1994-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey from the Centre for Rural Health Studies of 210 elderly clients in a rural home care program found that 18.1% had severe or moderate cognitive impairment, yet only 6.6% of 167 elderly community residents living independently in a rural community had similar impairment. While the difference was significant, our methodology could not determine whether a causal association existed. PMID:8312755

  2. Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yi-Chieh; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Shyu, Meei-Ling; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Chang, Hsiu-Ju

    2017-08-01

    To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95% confidence interval, .09-.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=-.44; 95% confidence interval, -.83 to -.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  3. Neurotechnology for monitoring and restoring sensory, motor, and autonomic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pae C.; Knaack, Gretchen; Weber, Douglas J.

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and exponential advances in micro- and nanotechnologies over the last decade have enabled devices that communicate directly with the nervous system to measure and influence neural activity. Many of the earliest implementations focused on restoration of sensory and motor function, but as knowledge of physiology advances and technology continues to improve in accuracy, precision, and safety, new modes of engaging with the autonomic system herald an era of health restoration that may augment or replace many conventional pharmacotherapies. DARPA's Biological Technologies Office is continuing to advance neurotechnology by investing in neural interface technologies that are effective, reliable, and safe for long-term use in humans. DARPA's Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX) program is creating a fully implantable system that interfaces with peripheral nerves in amputees to enable natural control and sensation for prosthetic limbs. Beyond standard electrode implementations, the Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program is investing in innovative approaches to minimally or non-invasively interface with the peripheral nervous system using novel magnetic, optogenetic, and ultrasound-based technologies. These new mechanisms of interrogating and stimulating the peripheral nervous system are driving towards unparalleled spatiotemporal resolution, specificity and targeting, and noninvasiveness to enable chronic, human-use applications in closed-loop neuromodulation for the treatment of disease.

  4. Depression is associated with poor functioning in activities of daily living among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Eide, Geir E; Ranhoff, Anette H

    2011-11-01

    To explore depressive symptoms among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment and the relationship between their depressive symptoms and dependence on activities of daily living, comorbidity and sociodemographic variables. Depression has become a major health care concern among older people, but depression and its association with functioning in activities of daily living among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment has previously not been studied in Norway. A cross-sectional comparative design. The sample comprised older residents (age 65-102 years; n = 227) from 30 nursing homes with at least six months of residence. All nursing home residents had a Clinical Dementia Rating scale score ≤0·5 and were capable of conversation. Scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale (15 items) and demographic variables were collected during face-to-face interviews. The activities of daily living were assessed using the Katz Index based on nurses' observation, and medical diagnoses were obtained from the patient records. Pearson's chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression were used to identify possible associations between activities of daily living and depression. After adjustment for age, sex, marital status, length of stay per year and education, more dependence on activities of daily living was associated with depression [odds ratio (OR): 1·18; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1·04-1·37; p = 0·02]. Higher age was associated with less depression (OR: 0·64; 95% CI: 0·43-0·94; p = 0·02), that is, the odds of depression declined by 36% for each 10-year increase in age. Our results suggest that depression symptoms are a major health problem among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment and that younger residents are more prone to having depressive symptoms. Nursing home staff should communicate with and observe residents closely for signs of depression, especially younger residents with high dependence on activities of daily living

  5. Linking clinic and home: a randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial of real-time, wireless blood pressure monitoring for older patients with kidney disease and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Dena E; Abdelmalek, Joseph A; Miracle, Cynthia M; Low, Chai; Barsotti, Ryan; Rios, Phil; Stepnowsky, Carl; Agha, Zia

    2013-02-01

    Older adults with chronic kidney disease have a high rate of uncontrolled hypertension. Home monitoring of blood pressure (BP) is an integral part of management, but requires that patients bring records to clinic visits. Telemonitoring interventions, however, have not targeted older, less technologically-skilled populations. Veterans with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease and uncontrolled hypertension were randomized to a novel telemonitoring device pairing a Bluetooth-enabled BP cuff with an Internet-enabled hub, which wirelessly transmitted readings (n=28), or usual care (n=15). Home recordings were reviewed weekly and telemonitoring participants were contacted if BP was above goal. The prespecified primary endpoints were improved data exchange and device acceptability. Secondary endpoint was BP change. Forty-three participants (average age 68 years, 75% white) completed the 6-month study. Average start-of-study BP was 147/78 mmHg. Those in the intervention arm had a median of 29 (IQR 22, 53) transmitted BP readings per month, with 78% continuing to use the device regularly, whereas only 20% of those in the usual care group brought readings to in-person visits. The median number of telephone contacts triggered by the wireless monitoring was 2 (IQR 1, 4) per patient. Both groups had a significant improvement in systolic BP (P<0.05, for both changes); systolic BP fell a median of 13 mmHg in monitored participants compared with 8.5 mmHg in usual care participants (P for comparison 0.31). This low-cost wireless monitoring strategy led to greater sharing of data between patients and clinic and produced a trend toward improvements in BP control over usual care at 6 months.

  6. Association of cardiovascular system medications with cognitive function and dementia in older adults living in nursing homes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enwu; Dyer, Suzanne M; O'Donnell, Lisa Kouladjian; Milte, Rachel; Bradley, Clare; Harrison, Stephanie L; Gnanamanickam, Emmanuel; Whitehead, Craig; Crotty, Maria

    2017-06-01

    To examine associations between cardiovascular system medication use with cognition function and diagnosis of dementia in older adults living in nursing homes in Australia. As part of a cross-sectional study of 17 Australian nursing homes examining quality of life and resource use, we examined the association between cognitive impairment and cardiovascular medication use (identified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Classification System) using general linear regression and logistic regression models. People who were receiving end of life care were excluded. Participants included 541 residents with a mean age of 85.5 years (± 8.5), a mean Psychogeriatric Assessment Scale-Cognitive Impairment (PAS-Cog) score of 13.3 (± 7.7), a prevalence of cardiovascular diseases of 44% and of hypertension of 47%. Sixty-four percent of participants had been diagnosed with dementia and 72% had received cardiovascular system medications within the previous 12 months. Regression models demonstrated the use of cardiovascular medications was associated with lower (better) PAS-Cog scores [Coefficient (β) = -3.7; 95% CI: -5.2 to -2.2; P cardiovascular system medication use and better cognitive status among older adults living in nursing homes. In this population, there may be differential access to health care and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors. This association warrants further investigation in large cohort studies.

  7. Posterior Teeth Occlusion Associated with Cognitive Function in Nursing Home Older Residents: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kenji; Izumi, Maya; Furuta, Michiko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Kageyama, Shinya; Ganaha, Seijun; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and subsequent reduction of modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline is important for extending healthy life expectancy in the currently aging society. Although a recent increase in studies on the state or number of the teeth and cognitive function, few studies have focused on the association between posterior teeth occlusion necessary to maintain chewing function and cognitive function among older adults. This study examined the association between posterior teeth occlusion and cognitive function in nursing home older residents. In this cross-sectional study, 279 residents aged ≥60 years from eight nursing homes in Aso City, Japan participated in cognitive function and dental status assessments and completed a comprehensive questionnaire survey in 2014. Cognitive function was measured using a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Posterior teeth occlusion was assessed using a total number of functional tooth units (total-FTUs), depending on the number and location of the remaining natural and artificial teeth on implant-supported, fixed, and removable prostheses. Linear regression models were used to assess univariate and multivariate associations between total-FTUs and MMSE scores. Models were sequentially adjusted for demographic characteristics, number of natural teeth, socioeconomic status, health behaviors, comorbidities, physical function, and nutritional status. Among the 200 residents included in our analysis, mean MMSE scores and total-FTUs were 11.0 ± 8.6 and 9.3 ± 4.6, respectively. Higher total-FTUs were significantly associated with higher MMSE scores after adjustment for demographics and teeth number (B = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.22–0.74). The association remained significant even after adjustment for all covariates (B = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.01–0.49). The current findings demonstrated that loss of posterior teeth occlusion was independently associated with cognitive decline in nursing home older residents in

  8. Reliability of implantable cardioverter defibrillator home monitoring in forecasting the need for regular office visits, and patient perspective. Japanese HOME-ICD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Eiichi; Kasai, Atsunobu; Fujii, Eitarou; Yamashiro, Kohei; Brugada, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) technology has emerged as a potentially efficient method to manage patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-Ds). This study evaluated the reliability of daily RM in forecasting the need for regular in-hospital follow-ups (RFUs). Two hundred and fifteen patients implanted with Biotronik Lumax devices (142 ICDs, 73 CRT-Ds) were enrolled. RFU was performed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after implantation. Immediately before an RFU, the physician forecasted the need for RFU based on RM data (pre-RFU assessment). A completed RFU session was classified as necessary if an action was undertaken potentially influencing patient safety, device therapy, or medication therapy (post-RFU assessment). Overall, 663 pairs of pre- and post-RFU assessments were compared. The number of pre-RFU assessments failing to predict the need for RFU was 38 (5.7%), fulfilling the study hypothesis of 5.0±4.0% (Prate of false pre-RFU forecasts with high clinical relevance was 2 (0.3%). RM correctly forecasted non-necessity of 498 scheduled RFUs (75.1%). Patient acceptance of RM was evaluated using a targeted questionnaire. Of 182 interviewed patients, 172 (94.5%) felt security and comfort. RM-based forecasts appear sufficiently accurate to safely individualize RFU. Most patients have a positive attitude towards RM.

  9. Long-term accelerometry-triggered video monitoring and detection of tonic-clonic and clonic seizures in a home environment: Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vel, Anouk; Milosevic, Milica; Bonroy, Bert; Cuppens, Kris; Lagae, Lieven; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Huffel, Sabine; Ceulemans, Berten

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the VARIA system (video, accelerometry, and radar-induced activity recording) and validation of accelerometry-based detection algorithms for nocturnal tonic-clonic and clonic seizures developed by our team. We present the results of two patients with tonic-clonic and clonic seizures, measured for about one month in a home environment with four wireless accelerometers (ACM) attached to wrists and ankles. The algorithms were developed using wired ACM data synchronized with the gold standard video-/electroencephalography (EEG) and then run offline on the wireless ACM signals. Detection of seizures was compared with semicontinuous monitoring by professional caregivers (keeping an eye on multiple patients). The best result for the two patients was obtained with the semipatient-specific algorithm which was developed using all patients with tonic-clonic and clonic seizures in our database with wired ACM. It gave a mean sensitivity of 66.87% and false detection rate of 1.16 per night. This included 13 extra seizures detected (31%) compared with professional caregivers' observations. While the algorithms were previously validated in a controlled video/EEG monitoring unit with wired sensors, we now show the first results of long-term, wireless testing in a home environment.

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT MONITORING MODALITIES IN THE DETECTION OF NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: The Home Study, Report Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; Clemons, Traci E; Harrington, Molly; Bressler, Susan B; Elman, Michael J; Kim, Judy E; Garfinkel, Richard; Heier, Jeffrey S; Brucker, Alexander; Boyer, David

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effectiveness of different monitoring modalities to detect incident neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Secondary analyses compared the rates of detecting incident neovascular AMD in prescheduled office visits versus office visits triggered by monitoring device or by symptom realization in a randomized trial evaluating home telemonitoring device plus standard care (device arm) versus standard care alone. At prescheduled office visits, neovascular AMD was detected in 14/1927 visits (0.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4%-1.1%) and 14/1949 visits (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.3%-1.1%) in the device and standard care alone arms, respectively. Thirty-seven participants with neovascular AMD were detected in 318 office visits (11.6%, 95% CI: 8.1%-15.2%) triggered by device or symptom realization and 17 neovascular AMD in 65 office visits (26%, 95% CI: 15.5%-36.8%) triggered by symptom realization in the device and standard care alone arms, respectively. The home device strategy had a higher neovascular-AMD detection rate than prescheduled office visits (relative risk = 16.0 [95% CI: 8.8-29.3]). Neovascular AMD detected at triggered visits were associated with less vision loss from baseline in the device arm versus standard care alone arm (-3 letters vs. -11.5 letters, respectively, P = 0.03). Telemonitoring may alter the management of patients with AMD and improve vision outcomes.

  11. Acceptance and usability of a home-based monitoring tool of health indicators in children of people with dementia: a Proof of Principle (POP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessen, April Bcg; Vermeulen, Joan; de Witte, Luc P

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale cohort studies are needed to confirm the relation between dementia and its possible risk factors. The inclusion of people with dementia in research is a challenge, however, children of people with dementia are at risk and are highly motivated to participate in dementia research. For technologies to support home-based data collection during large-scale studies, participants should be able and willing to use technology for a longer period of time. This study investigated acceptance and usability of iVitality, a research platform for home-based monitoring of dementia health indicators, in 151 children of people with dementia and investigated which frequency of measurements is acceptable for them. Participants were randomized to fortnightly or monthly measurements. At baseline and after 3 months, participants completed an online questionnaire regarding the acceptance (Technology Acceptance Model; 38 items) and usability (Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire; 24 items) of iVitality. Items were rated from 1 (I totally disagree) to 7 (I totally agree). Participants were also invited to take part in an online focus group (OFG) after 3 months of follow-up. Descriptive statistics and both two-sample/independent and paired t-tests were used to analyze the online questionnaires and a directed content analysis was used to analyze the OFGs. Children of people with dementia accept iVitality after long-term use and evaluate iVitality as a user-friendly, useful, and trusted technology, despite some suggestions for improvement. Overall, mean scores on acceptance and usability were higher than 5 (I somewhat agree), although the acceptance subscales "social influence" and "time" were rated somewhat lower. No significant differences in acceptance and usability were found between both protocol groups. Over time, "affect" significantly increased among participants measuring blood pressure fortnightly. iVitality has the potential to be used in large-scale studies for home

  12. Longitudinal functional changes, depression, and health-related quality of life among stroke survivors living at home after inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutai, Hitoshi; Furukawa, Tomomi; Nakanishi, Kosuke; Hanihara, Tokiji

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated changes in functional status in home-dwelling stroke survivors 1-3 years after inpatient rehabilitation. It also examined the factors associated with longitudinal functional changes and health-related quality of life. Survey evaluations were conducted at the homes of 27 stroke survivors. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Short Form 36, Frenchay Activities Index, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were used to assess functional status, quality of life, social activity, and depression symptoms, respectively. From the time of discharge to follow-up (mean: 2.1 ± 0.6 years), total FIM and motor FIM scores were mildly improved, and cognitive FIM score was significantly improved. On the Short Form 36, physical functioning, general health, and vitality scores were lower than norm-based scores. Multiple regression analyses showed a positive association between change in motor FIM score and Frenchay Activities Index score and a negative association between change in cognitive FIM score and elapsed time after discharge. With regard to health-related quality of life, motor FIM score was associated with the physical component summary, whereas age and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score were associated with the mental component summary. Social participation was associated with long-term improvement in activities of daily living, indicating that interventions targeting social function are important for maintaining and further improving activities of daily living in stroke survivors. Health-related quality of life was correlated with activities of daily living and depression; therefore, interventions targeting these parameters are important in improving the quality of life of stroke survivors. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  13. Time's up! Involvement of metamemory knowledge, executive functions, and time monitoring in children's prospective memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurten, Marie; Lejeune, Caroline; Meulemans, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This study examined time-based prospective memory (PM) in children and explored the possible involvement of metamemory knowledge and executive functions in the use of an appropriate time-monitoring strategy depending on the ongoing task's difficulty. Specifically, a sample of 72 typically developing children aged 4, 6, and 9 years old were given an original PM paradigm composed of both an ongoing procedural activity and a PM task. Half of the participants (expert group) were trained in the ongoing activity before the prospective test. As expected, results show that time monitoring had a positive effect on children's PM performance. Furthermore, mediation analyses reveal that strategic time monitoring was predicted by metamemory knowledge in the expert group but only by executive functions in the novice group. Overall, these findings provide interesting avenues to explain how metamemory knowledge, strategy use, and executive functions interact to improve PM performance during childhood.

  14. Comparison study of chest physiotherapy home training programmes on respiratory functions in patients with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldan, Ipek; Gurses, H Nilgun; Yuksel, Husniye

    2008-08-01

    To compare the effects of home training programmes, threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise on spirometry and maximal pressures in patients with muscular dystrophy. Prospective blinded 12-week study. Cardiopulmonary department of university hospital. Twenty-three patients with muscular dystrophy (17 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy and 6 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy) assigned to the threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise groups with alternate allocation. Spirometry, maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) and maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) were measured before and after training. In the threshold inspiratory muscle training group threshold pressure load was determined as equal to 30% of weekly PImax measurement. In the breathing exercise group, patients performed deep and forceful diaphragmatic and segmental exercises. All patients performed exercises at home and once a week at hospital under supervision. The improvement of PImax in the threshold inspiratory muscle training group was more significant than the improvement observed in the breathing exercise group (P=0.05). PEmax increased significantly only in the breathing exercise group (P=0.01). Spirometry results did not change significantly in both groups after the training. We conclude that respiratory muscle strength is enhanced by training in the patients with muscular dystrophy who are ambulatory, but inspiratory and/or expiratory training effect is specific to the trained muscles. The techniques that improve the strength of respiratory muscles should be included in the physiotherapy management of patients with muscular dystrophy.

  15. Home range and diving behaviour of Heaviside's dolphins monitored by satellite off the west coast of South Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, RW; David, JHM; Meÿer, MA; Sekiguchi, K; Best, PB; Dassis, M; Rodríguez, DH

    2014-01-01

    Three Heaviside's dolphins Cephalorhynchus heavisidii were fitted with satellite depth recorders off the west coast of South Africa during February-April 1997 and monitored for 51, 73 and 130 days, respectively...

  16. Report of practicability of a 6-month home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling program in an individual with tetraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Moore, Jewel R.; Gater, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sedentarism is common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, new technologies such as functional electrical stimulation cycles with internet connectivity may provide incentive by removing some of the limitations and external barriers. Objective To determine the effectiveness of a long-term home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremities cycling (FES-LEC) program on exercise adherence, body composition, energy expenditure, and quality of life (QOL) in an adult with chronic tetraplegia. Participant A 53-year-old man, 33 years post-motor complete C4 SCI participated in FES-LEC in his home, three sessions per week for 24 weeks. Methods Exercise adherence was calculated as the percentage of performed cycling sessions relative to the recommended number of cycling sessions. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Energy expenditure was measured using a COSMED K4b2 and QOL via the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) Brief Questionnaire. Testing was performed before and after the 24-week exercise program. Results The participant cycled 59 out of a recommended 72 sessions which is an exercise adherence rate of 82%. Body composition displayed increases in total body lean mass (LM) with an increase of 3.3% and an increase in leg LM of 7.1%. Energy expenditure increased by 1.26 kcal/minute or greater than 200%. The physical and psychological domain scores of QOL increased by 25 and 4.5%, respectively. Conclusion This case study provides encouragement concerning the practicality of a home-based FES-LEC program for those with SCI. PMID:22507029

  17. Education technology with continuous real time monitoring of the current functional and emotional students' states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyushin, M. V.; Kolobashkina, L. V.

    2017-01-01

    The education technology with continuous monitoring of the current functional and emotional students' states is suggested. The application of this technology allows one to increase the effectiveness of practice through informed planning of the training load. For monitoring the current functional and emotional students' states non-contact remote technologies of person bioparameters registration are encouraged to use. These technologies are based on recording and processing in real time the main person bioparameters in a purely passive mode. Experimental testing of this technology has confirmed its effectiveness.

  18. The association of functional capacity with health-related behavior among urban home-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulander, Tommi

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed to examine whether functional capacity among the urban home-dwelling older adults associates with health-related behavior. We also examined whether health-related behavior and certain diseases can be seen as mechanisms explaining socioeconomic disparities in functional capacity. A cross-sectional survey from 2008 was used to study 1395 older adults aged 75 and over living in one of the central areas of the city center of Helsinki, the capital of Finland. Associations of activities of daily living (ADL) with, smoking, food habits, physical activity, socioeconomic status and certain diseases were tested using ordinal regression model. Current smokers had slightly poorer functional ability than non-smokers among men. Those who did not use vegetables and/or fruits daily had a poorer functional capacity than daily users. Physically inactive respondents had clearly poorer functional capacity in comparison to active ones. Those with lower education had poorer functional status than higher educated irrespective of health-related behaviors and certain diseases. As health-related behaviors are modifiable, intervention programs should be targeted at all older adults with or without health problems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease and Diabetes Blood Glucose Monitoring Insulin Injection Resources Mental Health and Diabetes Healthy Holiday Eating Lifestyle Resources Improve Medication Taking Spanish Language Resources AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors ...

  20. Intraoperative Monitoring and Mapping of the Functional Integrity of the Brainstem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Conejero, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic damage is very high in surgical interventions in or around the brainstem. However, surgical techniques and intraoperative neuromonitoring (ION) have evolved sufficiently to increase the likelihood of successful functional outcomes in many patients. We present a critical review of the methodologies available for intraoperative monitoring and mapping of the brainstem. There are three main groups of techniques that can be used to assess the functional integrity of the brainstem: 1) mapping, which provides rapid anatomical identification of neural structures using electrical stimulation with a hand-held probe, 2) monitoring, which provides real-time information about the functional integrity of the nervous tissue, and 3) techniques involving the examination of brainstem reflexes in the operating room, which allows for the evaluation of the reflex responses that are known to be crucial for most brainstem functions. These include the blink reflex, which is already in use, and other brainstem reflexes that are being explored, such as the masseter H-reflex. This is still under development but is likely to have important functional consequences. Today an abundant armory of ION methods is available for the monitoring and mapping of the functional integrity of the brainstem during surgery. ION methods are essential in surgery either in or around the brainstem; they facilitate the removal of lesions and contribute to notable improvements in the functional outcomes of patients. PMID:27449909

  1. Monitored energy use of homes with geothermal heat pumps: A compilation and analysis of performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, J.R.; Meier, A.

    1997-12-01

    The performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) was assessed by comparing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and whole house energy use of GHP houses and control houses. Actual energy savings were calculated and compared to expected savings (based on ARI ratings and literature) and predicted savings (based on coefficient of performance - COP - measurements). Differences between GHP and control houses were normalized for heating degree days and floor area or total insulation value. Predicted savings were consistently slightly below expected savings but within the range of performance cited by the industry. Average rated COP was 3.4. Average measured COP was 3.1. Actual savings were inconsistent and sometimes significantly below predicted savings. No correlation was found between actual savings and actual energy use. This suggests that factors such as insulation and occupant behavior probably have greater impact on energy use than type of HVAC equipment. There was also no clear correlation between climate and actual savings or between climate and actual energy use. There was a trend between GHP installation date and savings. Newer units appear to have lower savings than some of the older units which is opposite of what one would expect given the increase in rated efficiencies of GHPs. There are a number of explanations for why actual savings are repeatedly below rated savings or predicted savings. Poor ground loop sizing or installation procedures could be an issue. Given that performance is good compared to ASHPs but poor compared to electric resistance homes, the shortfall in savings could be due to duct leakage. The takeback effect could also be a reason for lower than expected savings. Occupants of heat pump homes are likely to heat more rooms and to use more air-conditioning than occupants of electric resistance homes. 10 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Compliance monitoring in business processes: Functionalities, application, and tool-support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Linh Thao; Maggi, Fabrizio Maria; Montali, Marco; Rinderle-Ma, Stefanie; van der Aalst, Wil M.P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, monitoring the compliance of business processes with relevant regulations, constraints, and rules during runtime has evolved as major concern in literature and practice. Monitoring not only refers to continuously observing possible compliance violations, but also includes the ability to provide fine-grained feedback and to predict possible compliance violations in the future. The body of literature on business process compliance is large and approaches specifically addressing process monitoring are hard to identify. Moreover, proper means for the systematic comparison of these approaches are missing. Hence, it is unclear which approaches are suitable for particular scenarios. The goal of this paper is to define a framework for Compliance Monitoring Functionalities (CMF) that enables the systematic comparison of existing and new approaches for monitoring compliance rules over business processes during runtime. To define the scope of the framework, at first, related areas are identified and discussed. The CMFs are harvested based on a systematic literature review and five selected case studies. The appropriateness of the selection of CMFs is demonstrated in two ways: (a) a systematic comparison with pattern-based compliance approaches and (b) a classification of existing compliance monitoring approaches using the CMFs. Moreover, the application of the CMFs is showcased using three existing tools that are applied to two realistic data sets. Overall, the CMF framework provides powerful means to position existing and future compliance monitoring approaches. PMID:26635430

  3. Multi-functional power quality monitoring and report-back system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Shun-Yu. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Cheng-Shiu University, Kaohsiung (China); Teng, Jen-Hao; Chang, David [Department of Electrical Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung (China); Chen, Chia-Yen [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper tries to use USB and personal digital assistant to develop a novel power quality (PQ) monitoring platform and then integrates GPRS technique into the proposed PQ platform to realize a wide-area PQ monitoring and report-back system. The works of this paper can be divided into three parts. First, a small-scale PQ monitoring platform with appropriately designed I/O interfaces and peripherals is designed and implemented. Next, a GPRS module which can be integrated into the designed PQ monitoring platform is developed. Finally, a web server with well-designed database and web human-machine interfaces used to record abnormal PQ data and display PQ data are designed. The proposed GPRS-based wide-area PQ monitoring and report-back system can be used for PQ monitoring with minimum cost and maximum efficiency. All the functions implemented in this paper can realize the novel, real-time and wide-area PQ monitoring. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the proposed system. (author)

  4. Monitoring Threshold Functions over Distributed Data Streams with Node Dependent Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Malinovsky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring data streams in a distributed system has attracted considerable interest in recent years. The task of feature selection (e.g., by monitoring the information gain of various features requires a very high communication overhead when addressed using straightforward centralized algorithms. While most of the existing algorithms deal with monitoring simple aggregated values such as frequency of occurrence of stream items, motivated by recent contributions based on geometric ideas we present an alternative approach. The proposed approach enables monitoring values of an arbitrary threshold function over distributed data streams through stream dependent constraints applied separately on each stream. We report numerical experiments on a real-world data that detect instances where communication between nodes is required, and compare the approach and the results to those recently reported in the literature.

  5. Functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors and system developed for full-scale pavement monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Liu, Wanqiu; He, Jianping; Xing, Xiaoying; Cao, Dandan; Gao, Xipeng; Hao, Xiaowei; Cheng, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-05-19

    Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements.

  6. Functionality Enhancement of Industrialized Optical Fiber Sensors and System Developed for Full-Scale Pavement Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements.

  7. Biochemical diagnosis and monitoring of disorders of renal functions in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Balík, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Aims: A systematic approach to renal function monitoring using information taken by means of renal function tests calculated from serum and urine specimen has not been comprehensively explored. The application of analysis of natriuretic peptides and low molecular weight proteins in diagnosis of advanced renal failure has not been tested in critical ill patients. The performance of continuous renal replacement therapy depends on adequate anticoagulation of the extracorporeal circuit. Prostacyc...

  8. Glycosylated hemoglobin and functional decline in community-dwelling nursing home-eligible elderly adults with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Celia K; Eng, Catherine; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Boscardin, W John; Rice-Trumble, Kathy; Lee, Sei J

    2012-07-01

    To determine whether glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels predict functional decline in older adults. Longitudinal cohort study. Community-dwelling, nursing home (NH)-eligible individuals with diabetes mellitus enrolled at On Lok between October 2002 and December 2008 (367 participants, 1,579 HbA1c measurements). On Lok Lifeways, the original model for Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly. The outcomes were functional decline or death at 2 years. The primary predictor was HbA1c. Age, sex, race and ethnicity, baseline function, comorbid conditions, length of time enrolled at On Lok, insulin use, and clustering of HbA1c within participants were adjusted for with mixed-effects Poisson regression. Mean age was 80, and 185 participants (50%) were taking insulin. Sixty-three percent of participants experienced functional decline, and 75% experienced death or functional decline during the study period. At 2 years, higher HbA1c was associated with less functional decline or death (P for trend = .006). Accounting for clustering and confounding factors, HbA1c of 8.0% to 8.9% was associated with a lower likelihood (relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.79-0.99) of functional decline or death than HbA1c of 7.0% to 7.9%. In community-dwelling, NH-eligible individuals with diabetes mellitus, HbA1c of 8.0% to 8.9% is associated with better functional outcomes at 2 years than HbA1c of 7.0% to 7.9%, suggesting that the current American Geriatrics Society guideline recommending a HbA1c target of 8.0% or less for older adults with limited life expectancy may be lower than necessary to maintain function. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Autocorrelation Function for Monitoring the Gap between The Steel Plates During Laser Welding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Horník, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 3 (2016), s. 1223-1232 ISSN 1875-3892 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding * process monitoring * autocorrelation function Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  10. Self-Monitoring Kidney Function Post Transplantation: Reliability of Patient-Reported Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lint, C.L. van; Wang, W.; Dijk, S. van; Brinkman, W.P.; Rövekamp, T.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Rabelink, T.J.; Boog, P.J.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    Background: The high frequency of outpatient visits after kidney transplantation is burdensome to both the recovering patient and health care capacity. Self-monitoring kidney function offers a promising strategy to reduce the number of these outpatient visits. Objective: The objective of this study

  11. Self-Monitoring Kidney Function Post Transplantation : Reliability of Patient-Reported Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lint, Céline; Wang, W.; van Dijk, Sandra; Brinkman, W.P.; Rövekamp, T.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van der Boog, Paul J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The high frequency of outpatient visits after kidney transplantation is burdensome to both the recovering patient and health care capacity. Self-monitoring kidney function offers a promising strategy to reduce the number of these outpatient visits. Objective: The objective of this

  12. Cutaneous respirometry as novel technique to monitor mitochondrial function: A feasibility study in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Harms (Floor A.); R.J. Stolker (Robert); E.G. Mik (Egbert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The protoporphyrin IX-triplet state lifetime technique (PpIX-TSLT) is proposed as a potential clinical non-invasive tool to monitor mitochondrial function. This technique has been evaluated in several animal studies. Mitochondrial respirometry allows measurement in vivo of

  13. Green light for liver function monitoring using indocyanine green? An overview of current clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J. J.; Wietasch, J. K. G.; Absalom, A. R.; Hendriks, H.G.D.; Scheeren, T. W. L.

    2014-01-01

    The dye indocyanine green is familiar to anaesthetists, and has been studied for more than half a century for cardiovascular and hepatic function monitoring. It is still, however, not yet in routine clinical use in anaesthesia and critical care, at least in Europe. This review is intended to provide

  14. How Stimulus and Task Complexity Affect Monitoring in High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, Sophieke; Vissers, Constance Th. W. M.; Egger, Jos I. M.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are able to update and monitor working memory representations of visual input, and whether performance is influenced by stimulus and task complexity. 15 high-functioning adults with ASD and 15 controls were asked to allocate either elements of abstract figures or…

  15. Longitudinal Ambient Sensor Monitoring for Functional Health Assessments: A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, S.; Pol, M.; Kröse, B.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient monitoring systems offer great possibilities for health trend analysis in addition to anomaly detection. Health trend analysis helps care professionals to evaluate someones functional health and direct or evaluate the choice of interventions. This paper presents one case study of a person

  16. Unit-based functional IDDT testing for aging degradation monitoring in a VLIW processor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yong; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, functional unit-based IDDT testing has been applied for a 90nm VLIW processor to monitor its aging degradation. This technique can provide health data for reliability evaluation as used in e.g. prognostic software for lifetime prediction. The test-program development based on the

  17. Functional lung MRI for regional monitoring of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till F Kaireit

    Full Text Available To test quantitative functional lung MRI techniques in young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF compared to healthy volunteers and to monitor immediate treatment effects of a single inhalation of hypertonic saline in comparison to clinical routine pulmonary function tests.Sixteen clinically stable CF patients and 12 healthy volunteers prospectively underwent two functional lung MRI scans and pulmonary function tests before and 2h after a single treatment of inhaled hypertonic saline or without any treatment. MRI-derived oxygen enhanced T1 relaxation measurements, fractional ventilation, first-pass perfusion parameters and a morpho-functional CF-MRI score were acquired.Compared to healthy controls functional lung MRI detected and quantified significantly increased ventilation heterogeneity in CF patients. Regional functional lung MRI measures of ventilation and perfusion as well as the CF-MRI score and pulmonary function tests could not detect a significant treatment effect two hours after a single treatment with hypertonic saline in young adults with CF (p>0.05.This study shows the feasibility of functional lung MRI as a non-invasive, radiation-free tool for monitoring patients with CF.

  18. Heart failure in children - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children; Cor pulmonale - home monitoring for children; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure home monitoring for children ... PF, Lougheed J, Dancea A, et al. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: ...

  19. A pilot study: dose adaptation of capecitabine using mobile phone toxicity monitoring - supporting patients in their homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Andrew; Love, Sharon B; Larsen, Mark; Shanyinde, Milensu; Waters, Rachel; Grainger, Lisa; Shearwood, Vanessa; Brooks, Claire; Gibson, Oliver; Young, Annie M; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    Real-time symptom monitoring using a mobile phone is potentially advantageous for patients receiving oral chemotherapy. We therefore conducted a pilot study of patient dose adaptation using mobile phone monitoring of specific symptoms to investigate relative dose intensity of capecitabine, level of toxicity and perceived supportive care. Patients with breast or colorectal cancer receiving capecitabine completed a symptom, temperature and dose diary twice a day using a mobile phone application. This information was encrypted and automatically transmitted in real time to a secure server, with moderate levels of toxicity automatically prompting self-care symptom management messages on the screen of the patient's mobile phone or in severe cases, a call from a specialist nurse to advise on care according to an agreed protocol. Patients (n = 26) completed the mobile phone diary on 92.6 % of occasions. Twelve patients had a maximum toxicity grade of 3 (46.2 %). The average dose intensity for all patients as a percentage of standard dose was 90 %. In eight patients, the dose of capecitabine was reduced, and in eight patients, the dose of capecitabine was increased. Patients and healthcare professionals involved felt reassured by the novel monitoring system, in particular, during out of hours. It is possible to optimise the individual dose of oral chemotherapy safely including dose increase and to manage chemotherapy side effects effectively using real-time mobile phone monitoring of toxicity parameters entered by the patient.

  20. Time-limited home-care reablement services for maintaining and improving the functional independence of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Andy; Furlong, Mairead; McGilloway, Sinead; Molloy, David W; Stevenson, Michael; Donnelly, Michael

    2016-10-11

    Reablement, also known as restorative care, is one possible approach to home-care services for older adults at risk of functional decline. Unlike traditional home-care services, reablement is frequently time-limited (usually six to 12 weeks) and aims to maximise independence by offering an intensive multidisciplinary, person-centred and goal-directed intervention. To assess the effects of time-limited home-care reablement services (up to 12 weeks) for maintaining and improving the functional independence of older adults (aged 65 years or more) when compared to usual home-care or wait-list control group. We searched the following databases with no language restrictions during April to June 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (OvidSP); Embase (OvidSP); PsycINFO (OvidSP); ERIC; Sociological Abstracts; ProQuest Dissertations and Theses; CINAHL (EBSCOhost); SIGLE (OpenGrey); AgeLine and Social Care Online. We also searched the reference lists of relevant studies and reviews as well as contacting authors in the field. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster randomised or quasi-randomised trials of time-limited reablement services for older adults (aged 65 years or more) delivered in their home; and incorporated a usual home-care or wait-list control group. Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias of individual studies and considered quality of the evidence using GRADE. We contacted study authors for additional information where needed. Two studies, comparing reablement with usual home-care services with 811 participants, met our eligibility criteria for inclusion; we also identified three potentially eligible studies, but findings were not yet available. One included study was conducted in Western Australia with 750 participants (mean age 82.29 years). The second study was conducted in Norway (61 participants; mean age 79 years).We are very uncertain as to

  1. Clinical significance of automatic warning function of cardiac remote monitoring systems in preventing acute cardiac episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Gao, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In addition to ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM), a cardiac remote monitoring system can provide an automatic warning function through the general packet radio service (GPRS) network, enabling earlier diagnosis, treatment and improved outcome of cardiac diseases. The purpose of this study was to estimate its clinical significance in preventing acute cardiac episodes. Using 2 leads (V1 and V5 leads) and the automatic warning mode, 7160 patients were tested with a cardiac remote monitoring system from October 2004 to September 2007. If malignant arrhythmias or obvious ST-T changes appeared in the electrocardiogram records was automatically transferred to the monitoring center, the patient and his family members were informed, and the corresponding precautionary or therapeutic measures were implemented immediately. In our study, 274 cases of malignant arrhythmia, including sinus standstill and ventricular tachycardia, and 43 cases of obvious ST-segment elevation were detected and treated. Because of early detection, there was no death or deformity. A cardiac remote monitoring system providing an automatic warning function can play an important role in preventing acute cardiac episodes.

  2. Privacy Control as a Function of Personal Space In Single-Family Homes in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majd Al-Homoud

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between people and the built environment requires understanding of the relationship between human behavior and physical settings. To further verify this notion, this study attempts to investigate privacy control as an effect of personal space expressed by quality and quantity of bedroom space in single-family homes. Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted to elicit the data. The location of the study was Daheyat Al--Ferdous community, Fuhais, Jordan. Respondents were requested to record to the presence of certain physical components in their personal bedroom space that may potentially increase their feel of privacy control in general. Results indicated that some physical components such a kitchenette, a TV, and an audio station in the bedroom were important. Additional factors that affected privacy control feel included shape of the room, as square rooms provided more sense of control. In addition, smaller bedroom area increased feel of control, and a corridor before bedroom was seen as a predictor of privacy control.

  3. Social care home Hrastovec in the cleft between care and custodial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Bohak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the enforcement of the Mental Health legislation in 2008, Hrastovec has been faced with new challenges and became the first social care home to have founded a so called secure unit. In line with the original mission of Hrastovec, the secure unit was dedicated to persons with multiple disabilities, including persons with difficulties in mental development as well as with long-term problems in mental health. After almost a decade, the original purpose of the secure unit has been challenged by the need to take care of post-forensic patients following the decision of the Court. The concerns that such patients are still dangerous to the society and that the unit does not have appropriate and specialized conditions, and thus cannot ensure appropriate safety for its users, remained unheard. Considering that the main purpose of Hrastovec is to provide social care for persons with special needs it seems that there is a need to make suitable changes for their benefit.

  4. Wireless Remote Monitoring of Glucose Using a Functionalized ZnO Nanowire Arrays Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype wireless remote glucose monitoring system interfaced with a ZnO nanowire arrays-based glucose sensor, glucose oxidase enzyme immobilized onto ZnO nanowires in conjunction with a Nafion® membrane coating, which can be effectively applied for the monitoring of glucose levels in diabetics. Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM services like General Packet Radio Service (GPRS and Short Message Service (SMS have been proven to be logical and cost effective methods for gathering data from remote locations. A communication protocol that facilitates remote data collection using SMS has been utilized for monitoring a patient’s sugar levels. In this study, we demonstrate the remote monitoring of the glucose levels with existing GPRS/GSM network infra-structures using our proposed functionalized ZnO nanowire arrays sensors integrated with standard readily available mobile phones. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purposes. Such applications can reduce health care costs and allow caregivers to monitor and support to their patients remotely, especially those located in rural areas.

  5. Wireless remote monitoring of glucose using a functionalized ZnO nanowire arrays based sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed M Usman; Aijazi, Tasuif; Axelsson, Kent; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype wireless remote glucose monitoring system interfaced with a ZnO nanowire arrays-based glucose sensor, glucose oxidase enzyme immobilized onto ZnO nanowires in conjunction with a Nafion® membrane coating, which can be effectively applied for the monitoring of glucose levels in diabetics. Global system for mobile communications (GSM) services like general packet radio service (GPRS) and Short Message Service (SMS) have been proven to be logical and cost effective methods for gathering data from remote locations. A communication protocol that facilitates remote data collection using SMS has been utilized for monitoring a patient's sugar levels. In this study, we demonstrate the remote monitoring of the glucose levels with existing GPRS/GSM network infra-structures using our proposed functionalized ZnO nanowire arrays sensors integrated with standard readily available mobile phones. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purposes. Such applications can reduce health care costs and allow caregivers to monitor and support to their patients remotely, especially those located in rural areas.

  6. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-04-19

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

  7. Does subtype matter? Assessing the effects of maltreatment on functioning in preadolescent youth in out-of-home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Christie L M; Friend, Angela; Garrido, Edward F; Taussig, Heather N; Culhane, Sara E

    2012-09-01

    Attempts to understand the effects of maltreatment subtypes on childhood functioning are complicated by the fact that children often experience multiple subtypes. This study assessed the effects of maltreatment subtypes on the cognitive, academic, and mental health functioning of preadolescent youth in out-of-home care using both "variable-centered" and "person-centered" statistical analytic approaches to modeling multiple subtypes of maltreatment. Participants included 334 preadolescent youth (ages 9-11) placed in out-of-home care due to maltreatment. The occurrence and severity of maltreatment subtypes (physical abuse, sexual abuse, physical neglect, and supervisory neglect) were coded from child welfare records. The relationships between maltreatment subtypes and children's cognitive, academic, and mental health functioning were evaluated with the following approaches: (1) "Variable-centered" analytic methods: a. Regression approach: Multiple regression was used to estimate the effects of each maltreatment subtype (separate analyses for occurrence and severity), controlling for the other subtypes. b. Hierarchical approach: Contrast coding was used in regression analyses to estimate the effects of discrete maltreatment categories that were assigned based on a subtype occurrence hierarchy (sexual abuse > physical abuse > physical neglect > supervisory neglect). (2) "Person-centered" analytic method: Latent class analysis was used to group children with similar maltreatment severity profiles into discrete classes. The classes were then compared to determine if they differed in terms of their ability to predict functioning. The approaches identified similar relationships between maltreatment subtypes and children's functioning. The most consistent findings indicated that maltreated children who experienced physical or sexual abuse were at highest risk for caregiver-reported externalizing behavior problems, and those who experienced physical abuse and/or physical

  8. Class and Home Problems. The Lambert W Function in Ultrafiltration and Diafiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Novel analytical solutions based on the Lambert W function for two problems in ultrafiltration and diafiltration are described. Example problems, suitable for incorporation into an introductory module in unit operations, membrane processing, or numerical methods are provided in each case.

  9. Decreased Nocturnal Awakenings in Young Adults Performing Bikram Yoga: A Low-Constraint Home Sleep Monitoring Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Matt T.; Kudesia, Ravi S.

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the impact of Bikram Yoga on subjective and objective sleep parameters. We compared subjective (diary) and objective (headband sleep monitor) sleep measures on yoga versus nonyoga days during a 14-day period. Subjects ( = 1 3 ) were not constrained regarding yoga-practice days, other exercise, caffeine, alcohol, or naps. These activities did not segregate by choice of yoga days. Standard sleep metrics were unaffected by yoga, including sleep latency, total sleep t...

  10. Long-Term Measurement of Maternal Pulse Rate Dynamics Using a Home-Based Sleep Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major adaptations occur in the maternal cardiovascular system during pregnancy and after delivery; knowledge of these changes is essential to the health management of pregnant women. This paper presents a longitudinal study and proposes a methodology to monitor daily pulse rates (PRs and characterize the weekly changes in maternal PRs before and after delivery. PRs were recorded during nightly sleep using an automatic monitoring system. PRs of the nonpregnant woman were taken as a reference. Weekly PR properties were characterized by histogram and a two-Gaussian mixture model. A coupling use of sample entropy and pulse rate was applied to cluster the stages during recovery period after delivery. Results depicted a profile of individual’s cardiac recovery process in late pregnancy and after delivery. The results reveal that maternal PRs show different patterns in various stages of recovery. Later stages of recovery seemed to require a much longer period. The present study introduced a convenient approach in long-term maternal cardiac condition monitoring.

  11. In hip osteoarthritis, Nordic Walking is superior to strength training and home based exercise for improving function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, T.; Siersma, Volkert; Magnusson, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    This observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial compared the short- and long-term effects of 4 months of supervised strength training (ST) in a local fitness center, supervised Nordic Walking (NW) in a local park, and unsupervised home-based exercise (HBE, control) on functional performance......-efficacy, and health-related quality of life) were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, and 12 months. Based on intention-to-treat-analyses improvements [mean (95% CI)] after intervention in number of chair stands were equal in all three groups at 4 months [ST: 0.9 (0.2–1.6), NW: 1.9 (0.8–3.0), HBE: 1.1 (0...

  12. Acceptance and usability of a home-based monitoring tool of health indicators in children of people with dementia: a Proof of Principle (POP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boessen AB

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available April BCG Boessen,1 Joan Vermeulen,2 Luc P de Witte3 1Research Centre for Technology in Care, Faculty of Health, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands; 2Lunet zorg, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 3The Innovation Centre, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Large-scale cohort studies are needed to confirm the relation between dementia and its possible risk factors. The inclusion of people with dementia in research is a challenge, however, children of people with dementia are at risk and are highly motivated to participate in dementia research. For technologies to support home-based data collection during large-scale studies, participants should be able and willing to use technology for a longer period of time. Objective: This study investigated acceptance and usability of iVitality, a research platform for home-based monitoring of dementia health indicators, in 151 children of people with dementia and investigated which frequency of measurements is acceptable for them. Methods: Participants were randomized to fortnightly or monthly measurements. At baseline and after 3 months, participants completed an online questionnaire regarding the acceptance (Technology Acceptance Model; 38 items and usability (Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire; 24 items of iVitality. Items were rated from 1 (I totally disagree to 7 (I totally agree. Participants were also invited to take part in an online focus group (OFG after 3 months of follow-up. Descriptive statistics and both two-sample/independent and paired t-tests were used to analyze the online questionnaires and a directed content analysis was used to analyze the OFGs. Results: Children of people with dementia accept iVitality after long-term use and evaluate iVitality as a user-friendly, useful, and trusted technology, despite some suggestions for improvement. Overall, mean scores on acceptance and usability were higher than 5 (I somewhat agree, although the

  13. Monitoring of spasticity and functional ability in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury with a functional electrical stimulation cycling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenfelser, Werner; Hackl, Harald; Hufgard, Josef; Kastner, Josef; Gstaltner, Karin; Gföhler, Margit

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the integration of motor function and spasticity assessment of individuals with spinal cord injury into cycling therapy. Twenty-three participants with incomplete spinal cord injury performed 18 training sessions (standard deviation (SD) 14) on an instrumented tricycle combined with functional electrical stimulation. Each therapy session included a power output test to assess the participants' ability to pedal actively and a spasticity test routine that measures the legs' resistance to the pedalling motion. In addition, the required time for the therapy phases was monitored. The results of the power output test showed a monthly increase in power output of 4.4 W (SD 13.7) at 30 rpm and 18.2 W (SD 23.9) at 60 rpm. The results of the spasticity assessment indicate a 12.2 W (SD 9.7) reduction in resistance at 60 rpm after the FES training for the subject group with spasticity. In clinical use over a time-period of 2 years this combined form of therapy and motor function assessment was well accepted by participants. The active power output test and the spasticity test routine offered a proper tool to monitor participants' progress in functional rehabilitation and changes in spasticity.

  14. The effects of a home-visiting discharge education on maternal self-esteem, maternal attachment, postpartum depression and family function in the mothers of NICU infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Mee; Kim, Mi-Ran

    2004-12-01

    A quasi-experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of a home visiting discharge education program on the maternal self-esteem, attachment, postpartum depression and family function in 35 mothers of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants. Twenty-three mothers in the intervention group received the home visiting discharge education while 12 mothers in the control group received the routine, hospital discharge education. Baseline data was collected in both groups one day after delivery. The intervention group received the home visiting discharge education while the control group did the routine hospital-based discharge education. The questionnaire including the data on maternal self-esteem, attachment, postpartum depression and family function were collected within 1 week after the discharge by mail. The scores of maternal self-esteem, and attachment were significantly increased, and the postpartum depression and the family function score were decreased after the home visiting discharge education in intervention group. There were no changes in these variables before and after the routine hospital-based discharge education in control group. These results support the beneficial effects of home visiting discharge education on the maternal role adaptation and family function of the mothers of NICU infants.

  15. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it.

  16. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it. PMID:22319361

  17. Parent perspectives on home participation of high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder compared with a matched group of children without autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilson, Snæfrídur T; Jakobsdóttir, Gunnhildur; Ólafsdóttir, Linda B

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have focused on home participation of high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder. We employed a mixed-methods design to explore and compare parent perspectives on (1) participation of children with and without autism spectrum disorder in activities at home, (2) the environmental features and resources that affect these children's home participation and (3) the strategies parents use to help their children participate at home. The Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY) was used to gather online survey and qualitative data from parents of 99 high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder and 241 children without autism spectrum disorder. Independent sample t-tests and χ2 tests were used to explore differences between groups, and Cohen's d was calculated to examine effect sizes. Differences were obtained on all Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth dimensions but particularly when comparing parents' satisfaction and perceived environmental barriers to their children's participation. The qualitative analyses revealed that parents in both groups used similar strategies to facilitate their children's participation at home, although parents of children with autism spectrum disorder made use of more distinct modifications. Our results highlight the importance of environmental aspects and point to how practitioners can support families in their efforts to promote their child's participation at home.

  18. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber as nano-neuron interface for monitoring neural function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Morrison, Barclay [ORNL; Yu, Zhe [Columbia University

    2012-01-01

    Neural chips, which are capable of simultaneous, multi-site neural recording and stimulation, have been used to detect and modulate neural activity for almost 30 years. As a neural interface, neural chips provide dynamic functional information for neural decoding and neural control. By improving sensitivity and spatial resolution, nano-scale electrodes may revolutionize neural detection and modulation at cellular and molecular levels as nano-neuron interfaces. We developed a carbon-nanofiber neural chip with lithographically defined arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrodes and demonstrated its capability of both stimulating and monitoring electrophysiological signals from brain tissues in vitro and monitoring dynamic information of neuroplasticity. This novel nano-neuron interface can potentially serve as a precise, informative, biocompatible, and dual-mode neural interface for monitoring of both neuroelectrical and neurochemical activity at the single cell level and even inside the cell.

  19. The need for home-based geriatric care and physical, mental, and social functioning of seniors of over 65 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dziechciaż

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increased percentage of seniors observed within society establishes new challenges for healthcare systems. Aim of the research : To estimate the need for geriatric, home-based care for people over 65 years of age living in rural areas, in the context of physical, mental, and social functioning. Material and methods: The research methods included the diagnostic poll method and direct observation. The following research tools were used: Barthel Index, Lawton Index, Abbreviated Mental Test Score by Hodkinson, Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form, and an authorial interview questionnaire. The criterion for home-based geriatric care was to be declared as a geriatric patient. The research was carried out among 504 people in the ages of 66 to 94 years (average: 77.41 years. Results: For home-based geriatric care, significantly more women than men were qualified (p < 0.01. The average age of respondents qualified for home-based geriatric care was higher than the age of other test subjects (p < 0.001. Subjects qualified for home-based geriatric care were more often widowed (p < 0.001 with incomplete primary education (p < 0.001 and substantially were living alone (p < 0.05. Among the people qualified for home-based geriatric care there were more multi-diseases, worsened agility to perform basic and complex daily life activities, and worsened cognitive and emotional performance (p < 0.001 than with other test subjects. Conclusions : For home-based geriatric care, a third of seniors living in rural areas were qualified. The need for home-based geriatric care was determined by suffering from multi-diseases, having functional, emotional, and cognitive disorders, progressing age, being female, having low education, and being widowed.

  20. The Development of Smart Home System for Controlling and Monitoring Energy Consumption using WebSocket Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthayawiroj, Niti; Nilaphruek, Pongpon

    2017-03-01

    Energy consumption especially electricity is considered one of the most serious problems in households these days. It is because the amount of electricity consumed is more than the amount that people actually need. This means that there is an overusing which resulted from the inconvenience of moving to the switch to turn off the light or any appliances and it is often that closing the light is forgettable, for instance; in addition, there are no tools for monitoring how much energy that is consumed in residents. From this, it can be easily seen that people are having a problem in energy usage monitor and control. There are two main objectives of this study including 1) creating the communication framework among server, clients and devices, and 2) developing the prototype system that try to solve the mentioned problems which gives the user an opportunity to know the amount of electricity they have used in their houses and also the ability to turn appliances on and off through the Internet on smart devices such as smart phones and tablets that support Android platform or any web browser. Raspberry Pi is used as a microcontroller and the data is transferred to the smart device by WebSocket protocol which is strongly recommended for real-time communication. The example features on the device’s screen are user management, controlling and monitoring of appliances. The result expresses that the system is very effective and not difficult to use from users’ satisfaction. However, current sensors may be used for a more accurate electricity measurement and Wi-Fi module for more appliances to calculate its power in the future.

  1. Discontinuous and Continuous Indoor Air Quality Monitoring in Homes with Fireplaces or Wood Stoves as Heating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Dambruoso, Paolo Rosario; Di Gilio, Alessia; Di Palma, Valerio; Marzocca, Annalisa; Tutino, Maria

    2015-12-24

    Around 50% of the world's population, particularly in developing countries, uses biomass as one of the most common fuels. Biomass combustion releases a considerable amount of various incomplete combustion products, including particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The paper presents the results of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) measurements in six houses equipped with wood burning stoves or fireplaces as heating systems. The houses were monitored for 48-h periods in order to collect PM10 samples and measure PAH concentrations. The average, the maximum and the lowest values of the 12-h PM10 concentration were 68.6 μg/m³, 350.7 μg/m³ and 16.8 μg/m³ respectively. The average benzo[a]pyrene 12-h concentration was 9.4 ng/m³, while the maximum and the minimum values were 24.0 ng/m³ and 1.5 ng/m³, respectively. Continuous monitoring of PM10, PAHs, Ultra Fine Particle (UFP) and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC) was performed in order to study the progress of pollution phenomena due to biomass burning, their trends and contributions to IAQ. The results show a great heterogeneity of impacts on IAQ in terms of magnitude and behavior of the considered pollutants' concentrations. This variability is determined by not only different combustion technologies or biomass quality, but overall by different ignition mode, feeding and flame management, which can also be different for the same house. Moreover, room dimensions and ventilation were significant factors for pollution dispersion. The increase of PM10, UFP and PAH concentrations, during lighting, was always detected and relevant. Continuous monitoring allowed singling out contributions of other domestic sources of considered pollutants such as cooking and cigarettes. Cooking contribution produced an impact on IAQ in same cases higher than that of the biomass heating system.

  2. Discontinuous and Continuous Indoor Air Quality Monitoring in Homes with Fireplaces or Wood Stoves as Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi de Gennaro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Around 50% of the world’s population, particularly in developing countries, uses biomass as one of the most common fuels. Biomass combustion releases a considerable amount of various incomplete combustion products, including particulate matter (PM and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The paper presents the results of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ measurements in six houses equipped with wood burning stoves or fireplaces as heating systems. The houses were monitored for 48-h periods in order to collect PM10 samples and measure PAH concentrations. The average, the maximum and the lowest values of the 12-h PM10 concentration were 68.6 μg/m3, 350.7 μg/m3 and 16.8 μg/m3 respectively. The average benzo[a]pyrene 12-h concentration was 9.4 ng/m3, while the maximum and the minimum values were 24.0 ng/m3 and 1.5 ng/m3, respectively. Continuous monitoring of PM10, PAHs, Ultra Fine Particle (UFP and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC was performed in order to study the progress of pollution phenomena due to biomass burning, their trends and contributions to IAQ. The results show a great heterogeneity of impacts on IAQ in terms of magnitude and behavior of the considered pollutants’ concentrations. This variability is determined by not only different combustion technologies or biomass quality, but overall by different ignition mode, feeding and flame management, which can also be different for the same house. Moreover, room dimensions and ventilation were significant factors for pollution dispersion. The increase of PM10, UFP and PAH concentrations, during lighting, was always detected and relevant. Continuous monitoring allowed singling out contributions of other domestic sources of considered pollutants such as cooking and cigarettes. Cooking contribution produced an impact on IAQ in same cases higher than that of the biomass heating system.

  3. Long-term olive oil-based parenteral nutrition sustains innate immune function in home patients without active underlying disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, E D; Roelofs, H M J; Versleijen, M W J; Te Morsche, R H M; Simonetti, E R; Hermans, P W M; Wanten, G J A

    2013-08-01

    It remains unclear whether impaired host defenses contribute to the increased risk for infectious complications seen in patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN). The aim of this study was to compare the innate immune function of patients on olive oil-based HPN with that of healthy controls. Innate immune functions and (anti-)oxidant balance were studied in 20 patients on olive oil-based HPN without an active underlying immune-mediated disease (Clinoleic(®), ≥ 6 months; >3 times/week), and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Neutrophils of patients and controls had a similar capacity to eliminate Streptococcus pneumoniae. Also, levels of activation markers (CD66b, CD11b, CD62L) in granulocytes and monocytes, phorbol ester- and zymosan-induced neutrophil oxygen radical production were not different between patients and controls. No differences in (anti-)oxidant status were found, except for higher concentrations of oxidized glutathione and lower plasma selenium and vitamin C in patients compared to controls. Compromised innate immune function does not seem to explain the increased risk for infectious complications in HPN patients using olive oil-based lipid emulsions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Cognitive impairment, dementia and functional status of nursing home residents: cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleydis Blanco Torres

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dementia is one of the diseases with the greatest impact on the individual and family health, constituting a strong predictor of institutionalization. Objective. To identify cognitive impairment and dementia in residents of a nursing home and to describe these biological variables. Methods. A descriptive, correlational and cross-sectional quantitative approach in 61 elderly male residents was conducted to determine the presence of cognitive impairment (CI, dementia, comorbidities and functional status. Information was obtained from medical records. Results. 35 residents had CI. Mean age of patients with CI was 79.4 (± 9.81 years vs. 78.6 (± 9.79 in patients without CI. 25 residents were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, 4 had vascular dementia, 3 had frontotemporal dementia and 1 resident had Lewy bodies dementia. 2 patients with cognitive impairment did not meet any dementia criteria. Significant association between the degree of cognitive impairment and functional status of patients was found (x2 = 25.76, P = 0.0001, with a mean negative correlation between the response to MMSE and FAQ (Spearman = -0.726, P = 0.000. Hypertension was the most commonly found non communicable disease in residents and patients with CI had a Charlson Comorbidity Index greater than those without CI (z = -2.434, P = 0.015. Conclusions. Mean age, functional impairment, and comorbidities were greater in residents with CI as compared to residents without CI. Among older adults with cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s was the predominant dementia.

  5. Fuzzy logic and optical correlation-based face recognition method for patient monitoring application in home video surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbouz, Marwa; Alfalou, Ayman; Brosseau, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Home automation is being implemented into more and more domiciles of the elderly and disabled in order to maintain their independence and safety. For that purpose, we propose and validate a surveillance video system, which detects various posture-based events. One of the novel points of this system is to use adapted Vander-Lugt correlator (VLC) and joint-transfer correlator (JTC) techniques to make decisions on the identity of a patient and his three-dimensional (3-D) positions in order to overcome the problem of crowd environment. We propose a fuzzy logic technique to get decisions on the subject's behavior. Our system is focused on the goals of accuracy, convenience, and cost, which in addition does not require any devices attached to the subject. The system permits one to study and model subject responses to behavioral change intervention because several levels of alarm can be incorporated according different situations considered. Our algorithm performs a fast 3-D recovery of the subject's head position by locating eyes within the face image and involves a model-based prediction and optical correlation techniques to guide the tracking procedure. The object detection is based on (hue, saturation, value) color space. The system also involves an adapted fuzzy logic control algorithm to make a decision based on information given to the system. Furthermore, the principles described here are applicable to a very wide range of situations and robust enough to be implementable in ongoing experiments.

  6. Open label feasibility study evaluating D-mannose combined with home-based monitoring of suspected urinary tract infections in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Pakzad, Mahreen; Haslam, Collette; Gonzales, Gwen; Curtis, Carmel; Porter, Bernadette; Chataway, Jeremy; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2017-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of using D-mannose, a natural food supplement, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) reporting recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) as a preventative. A single-center, open-label, feasibility study enrolled patients with MS, using and not using urinary catheters, experiencing recurrent UTIs (≥3/year or ≥2/6 months). Participants were given D-mannose powder 1.5 grams twice daily for 16-weeks and were instructed to monitor suspected UTIs at home using urine dipsticks. Diaries were used to record compliance, number of prescriptions of antibiotics received for UTIs, results of urine dipsticks and cultures. Overall, 22 patients with MS, median age 50 years (46-59) were enrolled: 10 were not using catheters and 12 were using catheters. The compliance rates for using D-mannose and dipsticks for testing suspected UTIs were 100% and 90.2%, respectively. Sixty-one episodes of suspected UTIs were recorded, 19/61 (31.1%) were confirmed UTIs and 29/61 (47.5%) prescriptions of antibiotics were made. The number of monthly proven UTIs decreased both in catheter users and non-users (P < 0.01). No adverse effects were reported. Using D-mannose in patients with MS experiencing recurrent UTIs and self-monitoring for infections is feasible and safe. Further studies are required to establish efficacy. CinicalTrials.gov (identifier NCT02490046). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Follow-up home visits with registered dietitians have a positive effect on the functional and nutritional status of geriatric medical patients after discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Kjær, Stine; Hansen, Birthe Stenbæk

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To assess the additional benefits of individualized nutritional counselling by a registered dietitian in geriatric patients' home after discharge from hospital, in relation to risk of re-admissions, functional status, nutritional status, use of social services and mortality.......Design:Twelve-week single-blind randomized controlled study.Setting and subjects:Geriatric medical patients (65+ years) at nutritional risk.Interventions:Participants were randomly allocated to receive a visit in their homes, either three individualized nutritional counselling by a registered dietitian complemented...... a positive effect on the functional and nutritional status of geriatric medical patients after discharge....

  8. Design of wearable and wireless multi-parameter monitoring system for evaluating cardiopulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shih-Hong; Lin, Bor-Shing; Wang, Chen-An; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2017-09-01

    The 6-minute walking test (6MWT) is the test most commonly used to evaluate cardiopulmonary function in patients with respiratory or heart disease. However, there was previously no integrated monitoring system available to simultaneously record both the real-time cardiopulmonary physiological parameters and the walking information (i.e., walking distance, speed, and acceleration) during the 6MWT. In this study, then, a wearable and wireless multi-parameter monitoring system was proposed to simultaneously monitor oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rhythm, and the walking information during the 6MWT. A multi-parameter detection algorithm was also designed to estimate the heart rate effectively. The results of the study indicate that this system was able to reveal the dynamic changes and differences in walking speed and acceleration during the 6MWT. As such, the system has the potential to provide a more integrated approach to monitoring cardiopulmonary parameters and walking information simultaneously during the 6MWT. The proposed system warrants further investigation as an assistive assessment tool in evaluating cardiopulmonary function and may be widely applied in cardiopulmonary-related and sports medicine applications in the future. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The functional neuroanatomy of spontaneous retrieval and strategic monitoring of delayed intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stefanie M; Ruge, Hannes; Walser, Moritz; Goschke, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An intention stored in prospective memory (PM) for later execution can be retrieved either strategically through preparatory attentional processes such as active monitoring for PM targets or spontaneously through automatic retrieval processes when encountering a relevant cue. Using functional MRI to identify distinct brain areas involved in spontaneous retrieval of intentions and to dissociate them from monitoring-related processes, we compared brain activity in PM blocks in which subjects had to maintain and execute an intention in response to rarely occurring PM cues with blocks in which the previous intention had been completed. Although the PM task incurred performance costs in the ongoing task and was associated with increased block-related activation in the rostro-lateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC), performance costs and RLPFC activation were no longer observed after the intention had been completed, providing further evidence for an involvement of RLPFC in strategic monitoring during PM tasks. By contrast, event-related activation induced by PM cues was observed in the ventral parietal cortex (VPC), precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex even after the intention was completed. These activations are consistent with the notion of spontaneous intention retrieval possibly mediated through a bottom-up driven re-activation of intention representations still persisting in a heightened state of activation in episodic memory. In conclusion, the results highlight the functional relevance of VPC and precuneus in prospective memory retrieval, possibly reflecting spontaneous, cue-based processes as opposed to top-down controlled strategic monitoring. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Educational intervention toward preventive home visitors reduced functional decline in community-living older women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, K; Vass, M; Kvist, K

    2007-01-01

    ,060 older adults living in the municipalities participated. We adopt the approach introduced by Dufouil et al. (2004) and treat dropouts due to death differently from dropouts from other reasons. RESULTS: Educational intervention to primary care professionals was associated with better functional ability......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether immediate effects of a 3-year educational intervention in primary health care were confirmed 18 months after the end of the intervention. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A controlled 3-year intervention study in 34 Danish municipalities with randomization...... and intervention at municipality level. The 17 intervention municipality visitors received regular education, and GPs were introduced to a short assessment program. The effect was measured at the individual level by questions about functional ability at the end of the intervention period and 1(1/2) years later; 4...

  11. Randomization to nutritional intervention at home did not improve postoperative function, fatigue or well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Bach; Hessov, Ib

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative fatigue and deterioration in functional capacity have been correlated to postoperative weight loss. This suggested that nutritional support to enhance the regain of weight might improve upon the convalescence. METHODS: Patients were allocated randomly at discharge...... to standard management or to dietary advice and protein-rich supplements for 4 months. The convalescence of 32 patients admitted electively for colorectal surgery and of 21 operated on for acute obstruction or severe peritonitis was studied. RESULTS: The intervention substantially increased protein intake...

  12. The relationship between cognitive and physical function among residents of a Czech senior home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies Matthé

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The decline in cognition and physical fitness is common in advanced age. Objective: The relationship between cognition and aerobic capacity was compared to the relationship between cognition and balance. Methods: Twenty one females and six male residents of a Czech senior center participated in the study (mean age: 77.5 ± 7.0; range: 62-86 years. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE was used for assessing cognition, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS for assessing balance, and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT assessed physical fitness. Based on the MMSE scores, two groups of cognitive functioning were formed - high and low. Results: Participants in the "high MMSE" group reached a significantly higher score on the 6MWT (p = .01 than the "low MMSE" group. Group differences on the BBS were marginally significant (p = .07, d = 0.6. Conclusions: Based on this sample, the level of physical fitness can be explained by cognitive functioning, while that of balance should be further studied in its relationship to cognitive functioning.

  13. Home Blood Pressure Monitoring as an Alternative to Confirm Diagnoses of Hypertension in Adolescents with Elevated Office Blood Pressure from a Brazilian State Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Thaís Inacio Rolim; Jardim, Thiago Veiga; Carneiro, Carolina de Souza; Ferreira, Vanessa Roriz; Mendonça, Karla Lorena; de Morais, Polyana Resende Silva; Nascente, Flávia Miquetichuc Nogueira; de Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2017-01-01

    Background Regional differences of using home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as an alternative to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in hypertensive adolescents are unknown. Objectives Define if HBPM is an option to confirm diagnoses of hypertension in adolescents from a Brazilian capital with elevated office blood pressure (BP). Methods Adolescents (12-18years) from public and private schools with BP > 90th percentile were studied to compare and evaluate the agreement among office BP measurements, HBPM and ambulatory BP monitoring. Office BP measurements, HBPM and ABPM were performed according to guidelines recommendations. Semi-automatic devices were used for BP measurements. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results We included 133 predominantly males (63.2%) adolescents with a mean age of 15±1.6 years. HBPM systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure mean values were similar to the daytime ABPM values (120.3 ± 12.6 mmHg x 121.5 ± 9.8 mmHg - p = 0.111 and 69.4 ± 7.7 mmHg x 70.2 ± 6.6 mmHg - p = 0.139) and lower than the office measurement values (127.3 ± 13.8 mmHg over 74.4 ± 9.5 mmHg - p < 0,001). The Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement between HBPM and ABPM. Conclusions HBPM is an option to confirm diagnoses of hypertension in adolescents from a Brazilian state capital with elevated office BP and can be used as an alternative to ABPM. PMID:28793045

  14. Functional Segregation within the Muscles of Aquatic Propulsion in the Asiatic Water Monitor (Varanus salvator)

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Arthur Young; Jessica Dumais; Nicholas John; Brandon Lyons; Andrew Macduff; Matthew Most; Nathan A. Reiser; Peter J Reiser

    2016-01-01

    Water monitor lizards (Varanus salvator) swim using sinusoidal oscillations generated at the base of their long (50% of total body length) tail. In an effort to determine which level of the structural/organizational hierarchy of muscle is associated with functional segregation between the muscles of the tail base, an array of muscle features — myosin heavy chain profiles, enzymatic fiber types, twitch and tetanic force production, rates of fatigue, muscle compliance, and electrical activity ...

  15. Gap assessment in current soil monitoring networks across Europe for measuring soil functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, J. P.; Saby, N. P. A.; Jones, A.; Louwagie, G.; Micheli, E.; Rutgers, M.; Schulte, R. P. O.; Spiegel, H.; Toth, G.; Creamer, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Soil is the most important natural resource for life on Earth after water. Given its fundamental role in sustaining the human population, both the availability and quality of soil must be managed sustainably and protected. To ensure sustainable management we need to understand the intrinsic functional capacity of different soils across Europe and how it changes over time. Soil monitoring is needed to support evidence-based policies to incentivise sustainable soil management. To this aim, we assessed which soil attributes can be used as potential indicators of five soil functions; (1) primary production, (2) water purification and regulation, (3) carbon sequestration and climate regulation, (4) soil biodiversity and habitat provisioning and (5) recycling of nutrients. We compared this list of attributes to existing national (regional) and EU-wide soil monitoring networks. The overall picture highlighted a clearly unbalanced dataset, in which predominantly chemical soil parameters were included, and soil biological and physical attributes were severely under represented. Methods applied across countries for indicators also varied. At a European scale, the LUCAS-soil survey was evaluated and again confirmed a lack of important soil biological parameters, such as C mineralisation rate, microbial biomass and earthworm community, and soil physical measures such as bulk density. In summary, no current national or European monitoring system exists which has the capacity to quantify the five soil functions and therefore evaluate multi-functional capacity of a soil and in many countries no data exists at all. This paper calls for the addition of soil biological and some physical parameters within the LUCAS-soil survey at European scale and for further development of national soil monitoring schemes.

  16. A randomized trial of two home-based exercise programmes to improve functional walking post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nancy E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn J; Scott, Susan C; Moriello, Carolina; Brophy, James

    2013-07-01

    To estimate the relative effectiveness in improving walking ability and other mobility and health outcomes post-stroke of two home-based exercise programmes - stationary cycling and an exercise and walking programme. An observer-blinded, randomized, pragmatic, trial with repeated measures. Hospital centers in two Canadian cities. People within 12 months of acute stroke who were able to walk >10 meters independently and healthy enough to engage in exercise. Two dose-equivalent interventions, one involving stationary cycling and the other disability-targeted interventions were tested. Both protocols required daily moderate intensity exercise at home building up to 30 minutes per day. One group exercised on a stationary bicycle, the second group carried out mobility exercises and brisk walking. The primary outcome was walking capacity as measured by the six-minute walk test (6MWT). Secondary outcomes were physical function, role participation, health-related quality of life exercise adherence, and adverse events. The study failed to meet recruitment targets: 87 participants (cycle group, n = 43; exercise group, n = 44) participated. No significant effects of group or time were revealed for the 6MWT, which was approximately 320 m at randomization. A significant effect for role participation was found in favor of the exercise group (global odds ratio (OR) for cycling vs. exercise was 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27-0.95). Change in the 6MWT between highest and lowest adherence categories was statistically significant (p = 0.022). Both programmes were equally effective in maintaining walking capacity after discharge from stroke rehabilitation; or were equally ineffective in improving walking capacity. Clinical Trials Gov number: NCT00786045.

  17. Home- and Community-Based Occupational Therapy Improves Functioning in Frail Older People: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Leen; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Bouckaert, Leen; Declercq, Anja; Graff, Maud J L; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2017-08-01

    The objective is to assess the effectiveness of occupational therapy to improve performance in daily living activities in community-dwelling physically frail older people. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. We included randomized controlled trials reporting on occupational therapy as intervention, or as part of a multidisciplinary approach. This systematic review was carried out in accordance with the Cochrane methods of systematic reviews of interventions. Meta-analyses were performed to pool results across studies using the standardized mean difference. The primary outcome measures were mobility, functioning in daily living activities, and social participation. Secondary outcome measures were fear of falling, cognition, disability, and number of falling persons. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the studies were of reasonable quality with low risk of bias. There was a significant increase in all primary outcomes. The pooled result for functioning in daily living activities was a standardized mean difference of -0.30 (95% CI -0.50 to -0.11; P = .002), for social participation -0.44 (95% CI -0.69, -0.19; P = .0007) and for mobility -0.45 (95% CI -0.78 to -0.12; P = .007). All secondary outcomes showed positive trends, with fear of falling being significant. No adverse effects of occupational therapy were found. There is strong evidence that occupational therapy improves functioning in community-dwelling physically frail older people. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Education and home based training for intermittent claudication: functional effects and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, Alain; Lafitte, Marianne; Pucheu, Yann; Couffinhal, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Supervised exercise programs increase physical performance in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). However, there are a limited number of programs, and to date they have failed to provide evidence of long-term adherence to exercise or any meaningful effect on Quality of Life (QoL). We created a program of therapeutic education and a personalized program of reconditioning exercise for patients with PAD. Patients with an ankle-brachial index (ABI) below 0.9 in at least one limb, and an absolute claudication distance (ACD) ≤500 meters, were included in the study. Quality of Life (QoL) as measured by SF-36, cardiovascular risk factors and functional parameters were evaluated at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Forty-six patients completed the program. Cardiovascular risks were controlled and stabilized over time. SF-36 scores improved significantly and remained stable. Initial and absolute claudication distance (ICD and ACD) as well as other functional parameters improved significantly (6 months: +138 m or +203% ICD and +139 m or +84% ACD). Ten patients (22%) did not show improvement in ICD or ACD within the first 3 months, but their SF-36 score did increase at subsequent visits. Interestingly, these patients had a significantly lower ACD at baseline. This study measured beneficial effects of an educational therapeutic program for patients with PAD. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in functional and QoL parameters during the first 3 months of coaching, and long-term persistence of the results even when patients were no longer coached. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Home point-of-care international normalised ratio monitoring sustained by a non-selective educational program in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajolle, Fanny; Lasne, Dominique; Elie, Caroline; Cheurfi, Radhia; Grazioli, Aurélie; Traore, Maladon; Souillard, Patrick; Boudjemline, Younes; Jourdain, Patrick; Bonnet, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Adverse events related to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy might be reduced by point-of-care international normalised ratio (POC INR) monitoring supported by an education program (EP). Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-selective VKA paediatric EP (regardless of the social, economic, educational or linguistic levels) by analysing the time spent in the therapeutic range (TTR), VKA adverse events and compliance to treatment, and INR control prescriptions. The EP was modified from the pediatric EP previously described but improved by a specifically devised child-focused game. One hundred four consecutive children (median age 8 years) receiving VKA were included in a standardised EP. Patients were in self-testing, and dose adjustments were made by a single physician for three tolerance ranges according to the underlying disease: [2.5-4], [1.8-3.2], and [1.5-2.5]. The median follow-up was 481 days [70-1,001]. The overall TTR was 81.4% [36-100]. The TTR were 74%, 85.6% and 89% for the ranges [2.5-4], [1.8-3.2], and [1.5-2.5], respectively. These results were sustainable during the study period. Only one serious VKA adverse event was recorded. The median number of POC INR tests was 2.5 [1.6-5.7] INR per patient and month. Patients/families performed POC INR when requested in 86.9% of the cases. More than 90% of the families found the EP supportive and wished to follow a long-term reinforcement program. In conclusion, this non-selective child-focused EP for VKA therapy, strongly supported by our dedicated game, is useful in maintaining efficacy, safety and compliance to anticoagulation and its monitoring.

  20. Effects of a low-volume, nutrient- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement on nutritional and functional status: a randomized, controlled trial in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Inken; Bartram, Matthias; Liao, Yuye; Poeschl, Karin; Kolpatzik, Sarah; Uter, Wolfgang; Sieber, Cornel C; Stehle, Peter; Volkert, Dorothee

    2013-08-01

    Although oral nutritional supplements (ONS) are known to be effective to treat malnutrition in the elderly, evidence from nursing home populations, including individuals with dementia, is rare, especially with regard to functionality and well-being. A known barrier for ONS use among elderly is the volume that needs to be consumed, resulting in low compliance and thus reduced effectiveness. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a low-volume, energy- and nutrient-dense ONS on nutritional status, functionality, and quality of life (QoL) of nursing home residents. Randomized controlled intervention trial. Six nursing homes in Nürnberg and Fuerth, Germany. Nursing home residents affected by malnutrition or at risk of malnutrition. Random assignment to intervention (IG) and control group (CG), receiving 2 × 125 mL ONS (600 kcal, 24 g protein) per day and routine care, respectively, for 12 weeks. Nutritional (weight, body mass index [BMI], upper arm and calf circumferences, MNA-SF) and functional parameters (handgrip strength, gait speed, depressive mood [GDS], cognition [MMSE], activities of daily living [Barthel ADL]) as well as QoL (QUALIDEM) were assessed at baseline (T1) and after 12 weeks (T2). ONS intake was registered daily and compliance calculated. A total of 77 residents (87 ± 6 y, 91% female) completed the study; 78% had dementia (MMSE home residents with high functional impairment and resulted in significant improvements of nutritional status and, thus, were effective to support treatment of malnutrition. Assessment of function was hampered by dementia and immobility, limiting the assessment of functionality, and highlighting the need for better tools for elderly with functional impairments. ONS may positively affect QoL but this requires further research. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In hip osteoarthritis, Nordic Walking is superior to strength training and home-based exercise for improving function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, T; Siersma, V; Magnusson, S P; Kjaer, M; Christensen, H E; Beyer, N

    2017-08-01

    This observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial compared the short- and long-term effects of 4 months of supervised strength training (ST) in a local fitness center, supervised Nordic Walking (NW) in a local park, and unsupervised home-based exercise (HBE, control) on functional performance in 60+-year-old persons (n = 152) with hip osteoarthritis (OA) not awaiting hip replacement. Functional performance [i.e., 30-s chair stand test (primary outcome), timed stair climbing, and 6-min walk test] and self-reported outcomes (i.e., physical function, pain, physical activity level, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life) were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, and 12 months. Based on intention-to-treat-analyses improvements [mean (95% CI)] after intervention in number of chair stands were equal in all three groups at 4 months [ST: 0.9 (0.2-1.6), NW: 1.9 (0.8-3.0), HBE: 1.1 (0.1-2.0)] but greater in the NW group [1.4 (0.02-2.8)] than in the ST group at 12 months. Generally, improvements in functional performance were greater (P < 0.001-P < 0.03) after NW compared with HBE and ST at all follow-up time points. Furthermore, NW was superior (P < 0.01) to HBE for improving vigorous physical activity and to both ST and HBE for improving (P < 0.01) mental health. These data suggest that NW is the recommended exercise modality compared with ST and HBE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Distributed Computing and Monitoring Technologies for Older Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonovs, Juris; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Krüger, Volker

    at home, deriving the common functional requirements for monitoring technology. Next, the work identifies the state of the art of technological monitoring approaches that are practically applicable to geriatric patients. A survey is presented on a range of such interdisciplinary fields as smart homes......This book summarizes various approaches for the automatic detection of health threats to older patients at home living alone. The text begins by briefly describing those who would most benefit from healthcare supervision. The book then summarizes possible scenarios for monitoring an older patient...

  3. Learning and activity after irradiation of the young mouse brain analyzed in adulthood using unbiased monitoring in a home cage environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Niklas; Kalm, Marie; Nilsson, Marie K L; Mallard, Carina; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Blomgren, Klas

    2011-03-01

    Cranial radiotherapy during the treatment of pediatric malignancies may cause adverse late effects. It is important to find methods to assess the functional effects of ionizing radiation in animal models and to evaluate the possible ameliorating effects of preventive or reparative treatment strategies. We investigated the long-term effects of a single 8-Gy radiation dose to the brains of 14-day-old mice. Activity and learning were evaluated in adulthood using open field and trace fear conditioning (TFC). These established methods were compared with the novel IntelliCage platform, which enables unbiased analysis of both activity and learning over time in a home cage environment. Neither activity nor learning was changed after irradiation, as judged by the open field and TFC analyses. The IntelliCage, however, revealed both altered activity and learning impairment after irradiation. Place learning and reversal learning were both impaired in the IntelliCage 3 months after irradiation. These results indicate that activity and learning should be assessed using multiple methods and that unbiased analysis over time in a home cage environment may offer advantages in the detection of subtle radiation-induced effects on the young brain.

  4. Digital Living at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille Viktoria Kathja; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2013-01-01

    Does living with digital technology inevitably lead to digital living? Users talking about a digital home control system, they have had in their homes for eight years, indicate that there is more to living with digital technology than a functional-operational grip on regulation. Our analysis...... of these user voices has directed us towards a ‘home-keeping’ design discourse, which opens new horizons for design of digital home control systems by allowing users to perform as self-determined controllers and groomers of their habitat. The paper concludes by outlining the implications of a ‘home...

  5. A prospective study of symptoms, function, and medication use during acute illness in nursing home residents: design, rationale and cohort description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sophia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home residents are at high risk for developing acute illnesses. Compared with community dwelling adults, nursing home residents are often more frail, prone to multiple medical problems and symptoms, and are at higher risk for adverse outcomes from acute illnesses. In addition, because of polypharmacy and the high burden of chronic disease, nursing home residents are particularly vulnerable to disruptions in transitions of care such as medication interruptions in the setting of acute illness. In order to better estimate the effect of acute illness on nursing home residents, we have initiated a prospective cohort which will allow us to observe patterns of acute illnesses and the consequence of acute illnesses, including symptoms and function, among nursing home residents. We also aim to examine the patterns of medication interruption, and identify patient, provider and environmental factors that influence continuity of medication prescribing at different points of care transition. Methods This is a prospective cohort of nursing home residents residing in two nursing homes in a metropolitan area. Baseline characteristics including age, gender, race, and comorbid conditions are recorded. Participants are followed longitudinally for a planned period of 3 years. We record acute illness incidence and characteristics, and measure symptoms including depression, pain, withdrawal symptoms, and function using standardized scales. Results 76 nursing home residents have been followed for a median of 666 days to date. At baseline, mean age of residents was 74.4 (± 11.9; 32% were female; 59% were white. The most common chronic conditions were dementia (41%, depression (38%, congestive heart failure (25% and chronic obstructive lung disease (27%. Mean pain score was 4.7 (± 3.6 on a scale of 0 to 10; Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 score was 5.2 (± 4.4. During follow up, 138 acute illness episodes were identified, for an

  6. Effects on centre-based training and home-based training on physical function, quality of life and fall incidence in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Thomas M K; Tong, C Y

    2014-05-01

    This was a quasi-experimental study to compare the effects of center-based training with home-based training on physical function, quality of life and fall incidence in older adults. Fifty older adults were recruited to receive exercise training for 6 months. Participants in the center-based group received training under supervision of a physiotherapist at the day training center. Those in the home-based group received training assisted by a care worker at home. The outcome measures were the Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), Short-form 12 (SF-12) and fall incidence. Assessments were performed on all participants before and after the 6-month intervention period. Center-based training supervised by a physiotherapist was found to have beneficial effects on physical function, quality of life and fall incidence while home-based training assisted by a care worker had no effect on physical condition and self-rated health status in community dwelling older adults. Service agents should provide center-based or home-based training to the ageing population in a user-friendly way with consideration of factors such as rehabilitation potential and accessibility of transportation.

  7. Monitoring daily affective symptoms and memory function using interactive voice response in outpatients receiving electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzino, Tera L; Rabinowitz, Terry; Althoff, Robert R; Helzer, John E

    2013-12-01

    Recently, there has been a gradual shift from inpatient-only electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) toward outpatient administration. Potential advantages include convenience and reduced cost. But providers do not have the same opportunity to monitor treatment response and adverse effects as they do with inpatients. This can obviate some of the potential advantages of outpatient ECT, such as tailoring treatment intervals to clinical response. Scheduling is typically algorithmic rather than empirically based. Daily monitoring through an automated telephone, interactive voice response (IVR), is a potential solution to this quandary. To test feasibility of clinical monitoring via IVR, we recruited 26 patients (69% female; mean age, 51 years) receiving outpatient ECT to make daily IVR reports of affective symptoms and subjective memory for 60 days. The IVR also administered a word recognition task daily to test objective memory. Every seventh day, a longer IVR weekly interview included questions about suicidal ideation. Overall daily call compliance was high (mean, 80%). Most participants (96%) did not consider the calls to be time-consuming. Longitudinal regression analysis using generalized estimating equations revealed that participant objective memory functioning significantly improved during the study (P response monitoring of outpatient ECT can provide more detailed clinical information than standard outpatient ECT assessment. Interactive voice response data offer providers a comprehensive, longitudinal picture of patient treatment response and adverse effects as a basis for treatment scheduling and ongoing clinical management.

  8. Younger Children with Cerebral Palsy Respond Better Than Older Ones to Therapist-Based Constraint-Induced Therapy at Home on Functional Outcomes and Motor Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsieh-ching; Kang, Lin-ju; Chen, Chia-ling; Lin, Keh-chung; Chen, Fei-chuan; Wu, Katie P H

    2016-01-01

    To examine the differences in efficacy of home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) on functional outcomes and motor control in two age groups of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-three children with spastic unilateral CP receiving 4-week home-based CIT by a therapist were divided into younger (6-8 years; n = 11) and older (9-12 years; n = 12) groups. The home-based CIT involved intensive functional training of the more affected upper-limb while restraining the less affected upper-limb. The outcome measures were Peabody Developmental Motor Scale-2nd edition (PDMS-2) that was being used in a modified way, Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM), and reach-to-grasp kinematic parameters, including reaction time (RT), normalized movement time (MT), normalized movement units (MUs), peak velocity (PV), and maximum grip aperture (MGA). The outcome measures were assessed at baseline, 4-weeks (post-treatment), 3- and 6-months (follow-up). The younger group showed greater changes in visual motor integration skills and RT at all post-tests after intervention than the older group. Groups had comparable changes on any other measures. Younger children with CP responded better to home-based CIT on some areas of upper-limb functions and reach-to-grasp motor control strategies than older children.

  9. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  10. Can a Home-based Cardiac Physical Activity Program Improve the Physical Function Quality of Life in Children with Fontan Circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Roni M; Ginde, Salil; Mussatto, Kathleen; Neubauer, Jennifer; Earing, Michael; Danduran, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Patients after Fontan operation for complex congenital heart disease (CHD) have decreased exercise capacity and report reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies suggest hospital-based cardiac physical activity programs can improve HRQOL and exercise capacity in patients with CHD; however, these programs have variable adherence rates. The impact of a home-based cardiac physical activity program in Fontan survivors is unclear. This pilot study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and benefits of an innovative home-based physical activity program on HRQOL in Fontan patients. A total of 14 children, 8-12 years, with Fontan circulation enrolled in a 12-week moderate/high intensity home-based cardiac physical activity program, which included a home exercise routine and 3 formalized in-person exercise sessions at 0, 6, and 12 weeks. Subjects and parents completed validated questionnaires to assess HRQOL. The Shuttle Test Run was used to measure exercise capacity. A Fitbit Flex Activity Monitor was used to assess adherence to the home activity program. Of the 14 patients, 57% were male and 36% had a dominant left ventricle. Overall, 93% completed the program. There were no adverse events. Parents reported significant improvement in their child's overall HRQOL (P home-based cardiac physical activity program is safe and feasible in preteen Fontan patients. Parent proxy-reported HRQOL and objective measures of exercise capacity significantly improved. A 6-month follow up session is scheduled to assess sustainability. A larger study is needed to determine the applicability and reproducibility of these findings in other age groups and forms of complex CHD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Predictors of Functional Changes in Italian Nursing Home Residents: The U.L.I.S.S.E. Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedecostante, Massimiliano; Dell'Aquila, Giuseppina; Eusebi, Paolo; Volpato, Stefano; Zuliani, Giovanni; Abete, Pasquale; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Cherubini, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    To identify independent predictors of the risk of functional decline in older nursing home (NH) residents. A longitudinal observational study. Thirty-one NHs participating in the U.L.I.S.S.E. project, distributed throughout Italy. All older (≥65 years) long-term NH residents without complete disability and with at least one follow-up evaluation during the 12-month study period (n = 1263). All participants underwent a standardized comprehensive evaluation using the Italian version of the Minimum Data Set for NHs. The activities of daily living (ADLs) Long-Form scale was used to evaluate functional status. Facility characteristics were collected using an ad hoc designed questionnaire. Of the NH residents, 40.4% experienced a decline in the ADL during the follow-up. The mixed effect logistic regression model showed that depression (odds ratio [OR] 1.45, confidence interval [CI] 1.16-1.81, P = .005) and the use of antipsychotics (OR 1.30, CI 1.06-1.60, P = .016) were associated with a higher probability of ADL decline, whereas the presence of a geriatrician (OR 0.60, CI 0.41-0.88, P = .015) and a higher than median hour per resident per week of nursing care (OR 0.55, CI 0.37-0.80, P = .006) were associated with a lower risk. Our findings suggest that preventing functional decline in NH residents might be possible by optimizing the management of depression and by reducing the current high prescription rate of antipsychotics. Moreover, the presence of a geriatrician, associated with an adequate amount of nursing care, seem to be important facilities characteristics to achieve this goal. These findings should be tested in large-scale pragmatic clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards integrative physiological monitoring of the critically ill: From cardiovascular to microcirculatory and cellular function monitoring at the bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Donati (Abele); D. Tibboel (Dick); C. Ince (Can)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCurrent hemodynamic monitoring of critically ill patients is mainly focused on monitoring of pressure-derived hemodynamic variables related to systemic circulation. Increasingly, oxygen transport pathways and indicators of the presence of tissue dysoxia are now being considered. In

  13. Measurement and monitoring of electrocardiogram belt tension in premature infants for assessment of respiratory function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegyi Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monitoring of the electrocardiogram (ECG in premature infants with conventional adhesive-backed electrodes can harm their sensitive skin. Use of an electrode belt prevents skin irritation, but the effect of belt pressure on respiratory function is unknown. A strain gauge sensor is described which measures applied belt tension. Method The device frame was comprised of an aluminum housing and slide to minimize the device weight. Velcro tabs connected housing and slide to opposite tabs located at the electrode belt ends. The slide was connected to a leaf spring, to which were bonded two piezoresistive transducers in a half-bridge circuit configuration. The device was tested for linearity and calibrated. The effect on infant respiratory function of constant belt tension in the normal range (30 g–90 g was determined. Results The mechanical response to a step input was second order (fn = 401 Hz, ζ = 0.08. The relationship between applied tension and output voltage was linear in the range 25–225 gm of applied tension (r2 = 0.99. Measured device sensitivity was 2.18 mV/gm tension using a 5 V bridge excitation voltage. When belt tension was increased in the normal range from 30 gm to 90 gm, there was no significant change in heart rate and most respiratory functions during monitoring. At an intermediate level of tension of 50 gm, pulmonary resistance and work of breathing significantly decreased. Conclusion The mechanical and electrical design of a device for monitoring electrocardiogram electrode belt tension is described. Within the typical range of application tension, cardiovascular and respiratory function are not substantially negatively affected by electrode belt force.

  14. Monitoring of lower urinary tract function in patients with spinal cord injury using near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Nigro, Mark; Stothers, Lynn

    2012-02-01

    Background: One of the most important conditions where there is loss of normal bladder function is spinal cord injury (SCI). Currently, evaluation of bladder function is limited to periodic invasive urodynamic testing (UDS). The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in monitoring bladder function in patients with SCI during bladder filling and emptying and to investigate the correlations of NIRS measures with simultaneous UDS parameters. NIRS is a non-invasive optical method to study tissue oxygenation, hemodynamics and function by monitoring changes in the chromophore concentrations of oxygenated (O2Hb), deoxygenated (HHb) and total hemoglobin (tHb). Methods: 10 adult paraplegic patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction who were referred for regular urodynamic evaluation were recruited. Changes in O2Hb, HHb and tHb, and tissue saturation index (TSI%) in the detrusor were monitored and recorded by a wireless NIRS system during the urodynamic evaluation. Time points of urgency and urinary leakage were marked and patterns of change in NIRS parameters were compared to standard urodynamic pressure tracings. Results: Strong consistency between changes in NIRS-derived tHb and changes in intravesical pressure were observed during filling across the subjects. During bladder filling a gradual increase in O2Hb and tHb with minimal changes in HHb was observed. Interestingly, a drop in TSI% was detected seconds before strong urgency and urinary leakage. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest a relationship between noninvasive NIRS measures and UDS parameters during bladder filling in SCI patients.

  15. Monitoring behaviour in a time-based prospective memory task: the involvement of executive functions and time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioni, Giovanna; Stablum, Franca

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated time-based prospective memory (PM) performance in 76 younger and 76 older adults with a time-monitoring task in which participants were required to press a designated key every 5 minutes while watching a movie. Participants were assigned to two conditions, free and fixed monitoring. In free monitoring participants could check a clock when they wanted, but in fixed monitoring they were restricted a maximum of six times every 5 minutes. We also investigated the involvement of time perception, inhibition, and updating in time-based PM performance. We hypothesised that participants with inefficiencies in those three cognitive functions would have less strategic monitoring behaviour and would also be less accurate at the target time. In the free-monitoring condition older adults checked the clock more frequently than younger participants, but presented with a similar pattern of monitoring behaviour and increased their frequency of clock checking closer to the target time. In the fixed-monitoring condition younger participants checked the clock more frequently than older adults and showed a strategic pattern of monitoring. Older adults did not show strategic use of clock checking and their monitoring function remained unchanged. Differences in PM accuracy and monitoring behaviour are discussed according to different involvement of cognitive abilities.

  16. Benefits of being bilingual? The relationship between pupils' perceptions of teachers' appreciation of their home language and executive functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriot, C.M.M.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Bakker, J.T.A.; Droop, W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to investigate whether bilingual pupil's perceptions of teachers' appreciation of their home language were of influence on bilingual cognitive advantages. Design: We examined whether Dutch bilingual primary school pupils who speak either German or Turkish at home differed in

  17. Telecommunication monitoring is a method for studies of the effect of heliomagnetic fluctuations on cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibisov, S M; Vishnevsky, V V; Ragulskaya, M V

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the results of 9-year biogeophysical monitoring (1998-2007) of spatial and time effects of space weather and atmospheric and climatic factors on the status of normal subjects, which was carried out simultaneously in geographical areas situated at different latitudes. Requirements to conditions of long-term telecommunication biogeophysical monitoring studies are formulated, providing the reliability and reproducibility of the experiment results. The results indicate that the role of atmospheric and climatic factors in modification of dynamic regimens of human body functioning is significantly higher in subjects living at lower latitudes. The spatial and time regularities of the effects of space and physical factors on human body were detected (the latitude, time, trigger, amplitude, synergetic, and cumulative effects of the population averaging of the reaction). These effects indicate that human body belongs to a class of open nonlinear dynamic systems with all characteristics intrinsic of it.

  18. Fiber optic based multiprobe system for intraoperative monitoring of brain functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Flamm, E. S.; Pennie, William; Chance, Britton

    1991-05-01

    Monitoring of brain functions during neurosurgical conditions have been made by various groups of investigators. Attempts were made to monitor EEG or evoked potentials, cerebral blood flow, mitochondrial redox state during various neurosurgical procedures. In order to monitor various functions of the brain we have developed a new multiprobe (MPA) assembly, based on fiber optic probes and ion selective electrodes, enabling the assessment of relative CBF, mitochondrial redox state (NADH fluorescence) and ion homeostasis in real-time, intraoperatively. The base features of the multiprobe assembly were described previously (A. Mayevsky, J. Appl. Physiol. 54, 740-748, 1983). The multiprobe holder (made of Delarin) contained a bundle of fibers transmitting light to and from the brain as well as 3 ion selective electrodes (K+%/, Ca(superscript 2+, Na+) combined with DC steady potential electrodes (Ag/AgCl). The common part of the light guide contained 2 groups of fibers. For the Laser Doppler flowmetry one input fiber and two output fibers were glued in a triangular shape and connected to the standard commercial plug of the Laser Doppler flowmeter. For the monitoring of NADH redox state 10 excitation and 10 emission fibers were randomly mixed between and around the fibers used for the Laser Doppler flowmetry. This configuration of the fibers enabled us to monitor CBF and NADH redox state from about the same tissue volume. The ion selective electrodes were connected to an Ag/AgCl electrode holders and the entire MPA was protected by a Plexiglass sleeve. Animal experiments were used for the verification of the methods and recording of typical responses to various pathological situations. The entire multiprobe assembly was sterilized by the standard gas sterilization routine and was checked for electrodes integrity and calibration inside the operation room 24 hours later. The MPA was located on the exposed human cortex using a micromanipulator and data collection started

  19. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and respiratory ), social workers, personal care aides, home medical equipment suppliers, and most importantly, informal caregivers (e.g., ... also available to help with home assessment. Assistive Technology to improve home safety can also be an ...

  20. First Experiences With a Wearable Multisensor Device in a Noninvasive Continuous Glucose Monitoring Study at Home, Part II: The Investigators' View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Mattia; Mueller, Martin; Zakharov, Pavel; Talary, Mark S; Donath, Marc; Stahel, Werner A; Caduff, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Extensive past work showed that noninvasive continuous glucose monitoring with a wearable multisensor device worn on the upper arm provides useful information about glucose trends to improve diabetes therapy in controlled and semicontrolled conditions. To test previous findings also in uncontrolled conditions, a long term at home study has been organized to collect multisensor and reference glucose data in a population of 20 type 1 diabetes subjects. A total of 1072 study days were collected and a fully on-line compatible algorithmic routine linking multisensor data to glucose applied to estimate glucose levels noninvasively. The algorithm used here calculates glucose values from sensor data and adds a constant obtained by a daily calibration. It provides point inaccuracy measured by a MARD of 35.4 mg/dL on test data. This is higher than current state-of-the-art minimally invasive devices, but still 86.9% of glucose rate points fall within the zone AR+BR. The multisensor device and the algorithmic routine used earlier in controlled conditions tracks glucose changes also in uncontrolled conditions, although with lower accuracy. The examination of learning curves suggests that obtaining more data would not improve the results. Therefore, further efforts would focus on the development of more complex algorithmic routines able to compensate for environmental and physiological confounders better.

  1. Home blood pressure monitoring is better predictor of cardiovascular disease and target organ damage than office blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Sandra C; Mello, Renato G B de; Fuchs, Felipe C

    2013-11-01

    The available, albeit rare, evidence indicates the superiority of home- over office blood pressure monitoring (HBPM vs OBP) to predict cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. We performed a systematic review to update the efficacy of HBPM vs OBP as predictors of all-cause mortality, CV death, and target organ damage. Two reviewers independently performed the literature search in various databases. A meta-analysis with a fixed-effect model was conducted, and the heterogeneity and inconsistency indices were assessed. The search identified 291 articles, of which 10 were eligible for inclusion in the study, and five articles published in 2012 were included in the meta-analysis. A previous meta-analysis showed the superiority of HBPM over OBP to predict all-cause mortality, CV mortality, and CV events. The meta-analysis of articles published in 2012 identified that HBPM was also a better predictor of proteinuria than OBP. In conclusion, the results of our systematic review and meta-analysis confirm that HBPM is a better predictor of CV outcomes and target organ damage than OBP.

  2. Artificial stone dust-induced functional and inflammatory abnormalities in exposed workers monitored quantitatively by biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Ophir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of kitchen and bath countertops in Israel is based mainly on artificial stone that contains 93% silica as natural quartz, and ∼3500 workers are involved in cutting and processing it. Artificial stone produces high concentrations of silica dust. Exposure to crystalline silica may cause silicosis, an irreversible lung disease. Our aim was to screen exposed workers by quantitative biometric monitoring of functional and inflammatory parameters. 68 exposed artificial stone workers were compared to 48 nonexposed individuals (controls. Exposed workers filled in questionnaires, and all participants underwent pulmonary function tests and induced sputum analyses. Silica was quantitated by a Niton XL3 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Pulmonary function test results of exposed workers were significantly lower and induced sputa showed significantly higher neutrophilic inflammation compared to controls; both processes were slowed down by the use of protective measures in the workplace. Particle size distribution in induced sputum samples of exposed workers was similar to that of artificial stone dust, which contained aluminium, zirconium and titanium in addition to silica. In conclusion, the quantitation of biometric parameters is useful for monitoring workers exposed to artificial stone in order to avoid deterioration over time.

  3. Replacing ambulatory surgical follow-up visits with mobile app home monitoring: modeling cost-effective scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-09-22

    Women's College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications. The proposed cost-effectiveness study models the replacement of conventional, in-person postoperative follow-up care with mobile app follow-up care following ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. This is a societal perspective cost-effectiveness analysis, wherein all costs are assessed irrespective of the payer. The patient/caregiver, health care system, and externally borne costs are calculated within the first postoperative month based on cost information provided by WCH and QoC Health Inc. The effectiveness of telemedicine and conventional follow-up care is measured as successful surgical outcomes at 30-days postoperative, and is modeled based on previous clinical trials containing similar patient populations and surgical risks. This costing assumes that 1000 patients are enrolled in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) mobile app follow-up per year and that 1.64 in-person follow-ups are attended in the conventional arm within the first month postoperatively. The total cost difference between mobile app and in-person follow-up care is $245 CAD ($223 USD based on the current exchange rate), with in-person follow-up being more expensive ($381 CAD) than mobile app follow-up care ($136 CAD). This takes into account the total of health care system, patient, and external borne costs. If we examine health care system costs alone, in

  4. Replacing Ambulatory Surgical Follow-Up Visits With Mobile App Home Monitoring: Modeling Cost-Effective Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications. Objective The proposed cost-effectiveness study models the replacement of conventional, in-person postoperative follow-up care with mobile app follow-up care following ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Methods This is a societal perspective cost-effectiveness analysis, wherein all costs are assessed irrespective of the payer. The patient/caregiver, health care system, and externally borne costs are calculated within the first postoperative month based on cost information provided by WCH and QoC Health Inc. The effectiveness of telemedicine and conventional follow-up care is measured as successful surgical outcomes at 30-days postoperative, and is modeled based on previous clinical trials containing similar patient populations and surgical risks. Results This costing assumes that 1000 patients are enrolled in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) mobile app follow-up per year and that 1.64 in-person follow-ups are attended in the conventional arm within the first month postoperatively. The total cost difference between mobile app and in-person follow-up care is $245 CAD ($223 USD based on the current exchange rate), with in-person follow-up being more expensive ($381 CAD) than mobile app follow-up care ($136 CAD). This takes into account the total of health care system, patient, and external borne costs. If we examine

  5. Effect of a high-intensity exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia: an assessor blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telenius, Elisabeth Wiken; Engedal, Knut; Bergland, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is among the leading causes of functional loss and disability in older adults. Research has demonstrated that nursing home patients without dementia can improve their function in activities of daily living, strength, balance and mental well being by physical exercise. The evidence on effect of physical exercise among nursing home patients with dementia is scarce and ambiguous. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a high intensity functional exercise program on the performance of balance in nursing home residents with dementia. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of this exercise on muscle strength, mobility, activities of daily living, quality of life and neuropsychiatric symptoms. This single blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 170 persons with dementia living in nursing homes. Mean age was 86.7 years (SD = 7.4) and 74% were women. The participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 87) or a control group (n = 83). The intervention consisted of intensive strengthening and balance exercises in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. The control condition was leisure activities. The intervention group improved the score on Bergs Balance Scale by 2.9 points, which was significantly more than the control group who improved by 1.2 points (p = 0.02). Having exercised 12 times or more was significantly associated with improved strength after intervention (pexercise group after the intervention, compared to the control group (p = 0.048). The results from our study indicate that a high intensity functional exercise program improved balance and muscle strength as well as reduced apathy in nursing home patients with dementia. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02262104.

  6. Effect of a high-intensity exercise program on physical function and mental health in nursing home residents with dementia: an assessor blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Wiken Telenius

    Full Text Available Dementia is among the leading causes of functional loss and disability in older adults. Research has demonstrated that nursing home patients without dementia can improve their function in activities of daily living, strength, balance and mental well being by physical exercise. The evidence on effect of physical exercise among nursing home patients with dementia is scarce and ambiguous. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a high intensity functional exercise program on the performance of balance in nursing home residents with dementia. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of this exercise on muscle strength, mobility, activities of daily living, quality of life and neuropsychiatric symptoms.This single blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 170 persons with dementia living in nursing homes. Mean age was 86.7 years (SD = 7.4 and 74% were women. The participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 87 or a control group (n = 83. The intervention consisted of intensive strengthening and balance exercises in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. The control condition was leisure activities.The intervention group improved the score on Bergs Balance Scale by 2.9 points, which was significantly more than the control group who improved by 1.2 points (p = 0.02. Having exercised 12 times or more was significantly associated with improved strength after intervention (p<0.05. The level of apathy was lower in the exercise group after the intervention, compared to the control group (p = 0.048.The results from our study indicate that a high intensity functional exercise program improved balance and muscle strength as well as reduced apathy in nursing home patients with dementia.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02262104.

  7. Radio-immunoassay of salivary progesterone for monitoring ovarian function in female infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luisi, M.; Franchi, F.; Bianchi, S.; Gravina, G.; Podesta, A.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-two women, aged from 25 to 41 years, with infertility due to chronic anovulation were admitted to the study together with 36 age-matched controls with proven ovulatory cycles. Paired plasma (3 ml) and whole unstimulated saliva (10 ml) samples were collected over a 30 day period, starting from the first day of a menstrual bleeding, in patients, and throughout the menstrual cycle, in controls. Salivary progesterone levels, measured in women with infertility, ranged from undetectable values to 16 pmol/l during the first, and from 36 to 98 pmol/l during the second half of the monitoring period. In eugonadal women the steroid levels ranged from 34 to 46 pmol/I and from 96 to 780 pmol/l during the follicular and luteal phases, respectively. The saliva/plasma progesterone ratio ranged from 0.58 to 2.71 p. cent and a good correlation between salivary and plasma levels was found at each time of monitoring. Many (86 p. cent) of patients, which were randomly allocated to a low-or high-dose epimestrol administration schedule, appeared to be sensitive to the drug, achieving, after therapy, salivary progesterone levels which were within the range of controls. Since correct assessment of luteal function in basal conditions and during therapy requires multiple steroid measurements, and since saliva can be obtained by non-invasive techniques, salivary assays represent an attractive alternative to plasma ones for monitoring ovarian activity, also during specific treatment.

  8. Dynamic monitors of brain function: a new target in neurointensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Enrico; Marton, Elisabetta; Feletti, Alberto; Scarpa, Bruno; Longatti, Pierluigi; Zanatta, Paolo; Giorgi, Emanuele; Sorbara, Carlo

    2011-07-15

    Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings and continuous electroencephalography (EEG) are important tools with which to predict Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Their combined use may potentially allow for early detection of neurological impairment and more effective treatment of clinical deterioration. We followed up 68 selected comatose patients between 2007 and 2009 who had been admitted to the Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit of Treviso Hospital after being diagnosed with subarachnoid haemorrhage (51 cases) or intracerebral haemorrhage (17 cases). Quantitative brain function monitoring was carried out using a remote EEG-SEP recording system connected to a small amplification head box with 28 channels and a multimodal stimulator (NEMO; EBNeuro, Italy NeMus 2; EBNeuro S.p.A., Via P. Fanfani 97/A - 50127 Firenze, Italy). For statistical analysis, we fit a binary logistic regression model to estimate the effect of brain function monitoring on the probability of GOS scores equal to 1. We also designed a proportional odds model for GOS scores, depending on amplitude and changes in both SEPs and EEG as well as on the joint effect of other related variables. Both families of models, logistic regression analysis and proportional odds ratios, were fit by using a maximum likelihood test and the partial effect of each variable was assessed by using a likelihood ratio test. Using the logistic regression model, we observed that progressive deterioration on the basis of EEG was associated with an increased risk of dying by almost 24% compared to patients whose condition did not worsen according to EEG. SEP decreases were also significant; for patients with worsening SEPs, the odds of dying increased to approximately 32%. In the proportional odds model, only modifications of Modified Glasgow Coma Scale scores and SEPs during hospitalisation statistically significantly predicted GOS scores. Patients whose SEPs worsened during the last time interval had an

  9. Towards developing drought impact functions to advance drought monitoring and early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmair, Sophie; Stahl, Kerstin; Hannaford, Jamie; Svoboda, Mark

    2015-04-01

    In natural hazard analysis, damage functions (also referred to as vulnerability or susceptibility functions) relate hazard intensity to the negative effects of the hazard event, often expressed as damage ratio or monetary loss. While damage functions for floods and seismic hazards have gained considerable attention, there is little knowledge on how drought intensity translates into ecological and socioeconomic impacts. One reason for this is the multifaceted nature of drought affecting different domains of the hydrological cycle and different sectors of human activity (for example, recognizing meteorological - agricultural - hydrological - socioeconomic drought) leading to a wide range of drought impacts. Moreover, drought impacts are often non-structural and hard to quantify or monetarize (e.g. impaired navigability of streams, bans on domestic water use, increased mortality of aquatic species). Knowledge on the relationship between drought intensity and drought impacts, i.e. negative environmental, economic or social effects experienced under drought conditions, however, is vital to identify critical thresholds for drought impact occurrence. Such information may help to improve drought monitoring and early warning (M&EW), one goal of the international DrIVER project (Drought Impacts: Vulnerability thresholds in monitoring and Early-warning Research). The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of designing "drought impact functions" for case study areas in Europe (Germany and UK) and the United States to derive thresholds meaningful for drought impact occurrence; to account for the multidimensionality of drought impacts, we use the broader term "drought impact function" over "damage function". First steps towards developing empirical drought impact functions are (1) to identify meaningful indicators characterizing the hazard intensity (e.g. indicators expressing a precipitation or streamflow deficit), (2) to identify suitable variables representing impacts

  10. Brain Functional Network in Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnostic Markers for Diagnosis and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common type of dementia that is clinically characterized by the presence of memory impairment and later by impairment in other cognitive domains. The clinical diagnosis is based on interviews with the patient and his/her relatives and on neuropsychological assessment, which are also used to monitor cognitive decline over time. Several biomarkers have been proposed for detecting AD in its earliest stages, that is, in the predementia stage. In an attempt to find noninvasive biomarkers, researchers have investigated the feasibility of neuroimaging tools, such as MR, SPECT, and FDG-PET imaging, as well as neurophysiological measurements using EEG. In this paper, we investigate the brain functional networks in AD, focusing on main neurophysiological techniques, integrating with most relevant functional brain imaging findings.

  11. Nano-enabled paper humidity sensor for mobile based point-of-care lung function monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Mitradip; Nemade, Harshal B; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2017-08-15

    The frequency of breathing and peak flow rate of exhaled air are necessary parameters to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs) such as asthma, bronchitis, or pneumonia. We developed a lung function monitoring point-of-care-testing device (LFM-POCT) consisting of mouthpiece, paper-based humidity sensor, micro-heater, and real-time monitoring unit. Fabrication of a mouthpiece of optimal length ensured that the exhaled air was focused on the humidity-sensor. The resistive relative humidity sensor was developed using a filter paper coated with nanoparticles, which could easily follow the frequency and peak flow rate of the human breathing. Adsorption followed by condensation of the water molecules of the humid air on the paper-sensor during the forced exhalation reduced the electrical resistance of the sensor, which was converted to an electrical signal for sensing. A micro-heater composed of a copper-coil embedded in a polymer matrix helped in maintaining an optimal temperature on the sensor surface. Thus, water condensed on the sensor surface only during forcible breathing and the sensor recovered rapidly after the exhalation was complete by rapid desorption of water molecules from the sensor surface. Two types of real-time monitoring units were integrated into the device based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) and smart phones. The LED based unit displayed the diseased, critical, and fit conditions of the lungs by flashing LEDs of different colors. In comparison, for the mobile based monitoring unit, an application was developed employing an open source software, which established a wireless connectivity with the LFM-POCT device to perform the tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Submaximal Running Test With Postexercise Cardiac Autonomic and Neuromuscular Function in Monitoring Endurance Training Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari; Laine, Tanja; Hynynen, Esa; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-01-01

    Vesterinen, V, Nummela, A, Laine, T, Hynynen, E, Mikkola, J, and Häkkinen, K. A submaximal running test with postexercise cardiac autonomic and neuromuscular function in monitoring endurance training adaptation. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 233-243, 2017-The aim of this study was to investigate whether a submaximal running test (SRT) with postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR), heart rate variability (HRV), and countermovement jump (CMJ) measurements could be used to monitor endurance training adaptation. Thirty-five endurance-trained men and women completed an 18-week endurance training. Maximal endurance performance and maximal oxygen uptake were measured every 8 weeks. In addition, SRTs with postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ measurements were carried out every 4 weeks. Submaximal running test consisted of two 6-minute stages at 70 and 80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) and a 3-minute stage at 90% HRmax, followed by a 2-minute recovery stage for measuring postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ test. The highest responders according to the change of maximal endurance performance showed a significant improvement in running speeds during stages 2 and 3 in SRT, whereas no changes were observed in the lowest responders. The strongest correlation was found between the change of maximal endurance performance and running speed during stage 3, whereas no significant relationships were found between the change of maximal endurance performance and the changes of postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ. Running speed at 90% HRmax intensity was the most sensitive variable to monitor adaptation to endurance training. The present submaximal test showed potential to monitor endurance training adaptation. Furthermore, it may serve as a practical tool for athletes and coaches to evaluate weekly the effectiveness of training program without interfering in the normal training habits.

  13. Long-Term Effects of Individually Tailored Physical Training and Activity on Physical Function, Well-Being and Cognition in Scandinavian Nursing Home Residents: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Bergland, Astrid; Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Granbo, Randi; Hellström, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of physical functions such as muscle strength, balance and mobility is fundamental to maintaining independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The physical activity level of most nursing home residents is very low, which implies that they are often subject to a decline in health, mobility, autonomy and social contacts and are also at risk of suffering a decline in mental well-being. In a previous study, we demonstrated that transfers, balance and physical activity level improved after 3 months of individually tailored intervention in nursing home residents. To evaluate the long-term effects on ADL, balance function, physical activity level, physical performance, falls-related self-efficacy, well-being and cognitive function 3 months after the completion of our intervention in nursing home residents. The study was a multicenter randomized, controlled clinical trial with a parallel-group design. It was conducted in nursing homes in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, with an intervention period lasting 3 months and a follow-up at 6 months. Initially, 322 nursing home residents with a mean age of 85 years were included; 85 from Sweden, 171 from Norway and 66 from Denmark. Of these, 241 [129 intervention group (IG), 112 control group (CG)] were eligible for the 6-month follow-up tests. The level of dependence in ADL, physical activity level, several dimensions of physical function, well-being, falls-related self-efficacy and cognitive function were assessed with reliable and valid instruments at baseline, immediately after 3 months of intervention and 3 months later at the 6-month follow-up. After 3 months of intervention and an additional period of 3 months without intervention, only the following 2 variables demonstrated significant group differences: social and cognitive function, measured by the Functional Independence Measure n-r, where the IG deteriorated while the CG was almost stable. However, regarding transfers, the IG deteriorated significantly

  14. A Combined sEMG and Accelerometer System for Monitoring Functional Activity in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Serge H.; Cheng, M. Samuel; Chang, Shey-Sheen; Moore, John; De Luca, Gianluca; Nawab, S. Hamid; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2010-01-01

    Remote monitoring of physical activity using body-worn sensors provides an alternative to assessment of functional independence by subjective, paper-based questionnaires. This study investigated the classification accuracy of a combined surface electromyographic (sEMG) and accelerometer (ACC) sensor system for monitoring activities of daily living in patients with stroke. sEMG and ACC data (eight channels each) were recorded from 10 hemiparetic patients while they carried out a sequence of 11 activities of daily living (identification tasks), and 10 activities used to evaluate misclassification errors (nonidentification tasks). The sEMG and ACC sensor data were analyzed using a multilayered neural network and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to identify the minimal sensor configuration needed to accurately classify the identification tasks, with a minimal number of misclassifications from the nonidentification tasks. The results demonstrated that the highest sensitivity and specificity for the identification tasks was achieved using a subset of four ACC sensors and adjacent sEMG sensors located on both upper arms, one forearm, and one thigh, respectively. This configuration resulted in a mean sensitivity of 95.0%, and a mean specificity of 99.7% for the identification tasks, and a mean misclassification error of system for automatic recognition of motor tasks used to assess functional independence in patients with stroke. PMID:20051332

  15. Mobile personal health records for pregnancy monitoring functionalities: Analysis and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiri, Mariam; Idri, Ali; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio

    2016-10-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) are a rapidly growing area of health information technology. PHR users are able to manage their own health data and communicate with doctors in order to improve healthcare quality and efficiency. Mobile PHR (mPHR) applications for mobile devices have obtained an interesting market quota since the appearance of more powerful mobile devices. These devices allow users to gain access to applications that used to be available only for personal computers. This paper analyzes the functionalities of mobile PHRs that are specific to pregnancy monitoring. A well-known Systematic Literature Review (SLR) protocol was used in the analysis process. A questionnaire was developed for this task, based on the rigorous study of scientific literature concerning pregnancy and applications available on the market, with 9 data items and 35 quality assessments. The data items contain calendars, pregnancy information, health habits, counters, diaries, mobile features, security, backup, configuration and architectural design. A total of 33 mPHRs for pregnancy monitoring, available for iOS and Android, were selected from Apple App store and Google Play store, respectively. The results show that none of the mPHRs selected met 100% of the functionalities analyzed in this paper. The highest score achieved was 77%, while the lowest was 17%. In this paper, these features are discussed and possible paths for future development of similar applications are proposed, which may lead to a more efficient use of smartphone capabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A smarter home, the smarter choice?

    OpenAIRE

    Nesheim, Marie Berland; Rosnes, Kine Sandanger

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Strategic Management In a world of expanding connected products, home automation has shown itself as one of the biggest trends to follow. Home automation is the automation of the home via highly advanced systems that control multiple functions of the home - more often called smart homes. The purpose of this thesis is to examine the developments of smart homes and how it affects us as consumers. We also try to identify users, benefits and issues of smart homes. The r...

  17. Update History of This Database - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis Update History of This Dat...ged. 2014/02/10 The Rice Growth Monitoring for the Phenotypic Functional Analysis English archive site is op...ened. 2003/10/01 The Rice Growth Monitoring System for the Phenotypic Functional ...Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  18. Home-based versus center-based aerobic exercise on cardiopulmonary performance, physical function, quality of life and quality of sleep of overweight patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoike, Danilo Takashi; Baria, Flavia; Kamimura, Maria Ayako; Ammirati, Adriano; Cuppari, Lilian

    2017-06-22

    The association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity can decrease the patients' cardiopulmonary capacity, physical functioning and quality of life. The search for effective and practical alternative methods of exercise to engage patients in training programs is of great importance. Therefore, we aimed to compare the effects of home-based versus center-based aerobic exercise on the cardiopulmonary and functional capacities, quality of life and quality of sleep of overweight non-dialysis-dependent patients with CKD (NDD-CKD). Forty sedentary overweight patients CKD stages 3 and 4 were randomly assigned to an exercise group [home-based group (n = 12) or center-based exercise group (n = 13)] or to a control group (n = 15) that did not perform any exercise. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, functional capacity tests, quality of life, quality of sleep and clinical parameters were assessed at baseline, 12 and 24 weeks. The VO2peak and all cardiopulmonary parameters evaluated were similarly improved (p exercise groups. The functional capacity tests improved during the follow-up in the home-based group (p exercise groups were also reflected in improvement of quality of life and sleep (p exercise groups, and no changes in any of the parameters investigated were found in the control group. Home-based aerobic training was as effective as center-based training in improving the physical and functional capabilities, quality of life and sleep in overweight NDD-CKD patients.

  19. The Use of Computer-Assisted Home Exercises to Preserve Physical Function after a Vestibular Rehabilitation Program: A Randomized Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Michael Smærup; Læssøe, Uffe; Grönvall, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether elderly patients with vestibular dysfunction are able to preserve physical functional level, reduction in dizziness, and the patient's quality of life when assistive computer technology is used in comparison with printed instructions...... their high functional level indicating that the elderly should not necessarily exercise for the first three months after termination of the training in the outpatient clinic. Conclusion. Elderly vestibular dysfunction patients exercising at home seem to maintain their functional level, level of dizziness...

  20. Long-Term Effects of Individually Tailored Physical Training and Activity on Physical Function, Well-Being and Cognition in Scandinavian Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena; Helbostad, Jorunn L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The preservation of physical functions such as muscle strength, balance and mobility is fundamental to maintaining independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The physical activity level of most nursing home residents is very low, which implies that they are often subject...... the individuals' capability, gains in ADL function, balance and transfer ability deteriorated during the 3 months following the intervention period. Thus, continuous, individually adjusted and supported physical activity seems crucial for the maintenance of physical functions in these vulnerable elderly persons...

  1. The relationship between regular second-hand smoke exposure at home and indictors of lung function in healthy school boys in Khartoum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghani, Tarig Hakim; Saeed, Amal M

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke at home has been linked to many complications, including impaired lung ventilatory function; however, there is great variation in intensity of this complication between individuals of different countries. The aim of this study was to determine relationship between regular second-hand smoke exposure at home and the spirometric derived values forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow 50% and peak expiratory flow rate in healthy school boys in Khartoum. A total of 135 male school pupils were selected randomly from three governmental primary schools for boys in Khartoum. Inclusion criteria were healthy school pupil, 9-14 years old, not active smoker, either exposed regularly to cigarette smoke at home since birth or not exposed to cigarette smoke or any other type of smoke inside or outside the house. All spirometric measurements were performed using Clement Clarke All-flow Spirometer. 69 school pupils were exposed regularly to second-hand smoke at home, whereas 66 pupils were not. Fathers were responsible for 67.5% of second-hand smoke at home; relatives for 30% and mothers for 2.5%. Mean FVC (± SD) was 2.21 ± 0.57 l for the exposed pupils and 2.41 ± 0.35 l for the non-exposed, showing reduction by about 8%. Mean FEV1 (mean ± SD) was 2.03 ± 0.46 l for the exposed and 2.20 ± 0.42 l for the non-exposed, indicating reduction by about 7%. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (psecond-hand smoke exposure at home causes significant reduction in FVC and FEV1 by about 7%-8% in school pupils in Khartoum.

  2. Wireless fetal heart rate monitoring in inpatient full-term pregnant women: testing functionality and acceptability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline A Boatin

    Full Text Available We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5% successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0 on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96. Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively, useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively, and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively. In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of

  3. Home blood pressure monitoring and hypertension status among US adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostchega, Yechiam; Berman, Lewis; Hughes, Jeffery P; Chen, Te-Ching; Chiappa, Michele M

    2013-09-01

    Currently, no national prevalence is available on home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM). This report is based on national-level, cross-sectional data for noninstitutionalized US adults aged ≥18 years (n = 6,001 participants) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2009-2010. Overall, 21.7% of the population reported HBPM in the past year. Using 2010 Census data as a reference, approximately 33 million (14.5%) individuals engaged in monthly or more frequent HBPM. The frequency of HBPM increased with higher age, higher body mass index, higher family income-to-poverty ratio, and a higher number of health-care visits (all, P < 0.05). Adults with health-care coverage engaged in monthly or more frequent HBPM than adults without coverage (16.1% vs. 8.4%; P < 0.05). Among people with hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90mm Hg or currently taking medication), 36.6% engaged in monthly or more frequent HBPM. Of those with hypertension whom were aware, treated, and controlled, 41.9%, 43.5%, and 42.1%, respectively, engaged in monthly or more frequent HBPM. Adjusting for covariables, those who were aware of, treated for, and controlled their hypertension were more likely to have a higher frequency of HBPM than the reference: unaware, untreated, and uncontrolled (odds ratio (OR) = 3.59; OR = 3.96; and OR = 1.50, respectively). Approximately 14.5% of adults engaged in monthly or more frequent HBPM. Being aware of hypertension, being pharmacologically treated, and being controlled were associated with an increased frequency of HBPM. Even among these categories of people with hypertension, <50% were using HBPM.

  4. Role of patient education in the perception and acceptance of home monitoring after recent implantation of cardioverter defibrillators: the EDUCAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Gabriel; Amara, Walid; Mansourati, Jacques; Bizeau, Olivier; Couderc, Philippe; Delarche, Nicolas; Garrigue, Stéphane; Guyomar, Yves; Hermida, Jean-Sylvain; Moïni, Cyrus; Popescu, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Much attention is being paid to the education of and provision of medical information to patients, to optimize their understanding and acceptance of their disease. To ascertain the impact of educating recent recipients of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) on their perception and acceptance of a home monitoring (HM) system. Questionnaire 1, completed one month after ICD implantation, was designed to assess: the quality of patient preparation for HM; patient comprehension of HM; and patient anxiety experienced during its installation. The comprehension questions were assigned a score of -2 for an incorrect answer, +1 for a correct answer and 0 for neither (total score ranging from -40 to +20). Questionnaire 2, completed six months after ICD implantation, assessed patient acceptance of and anxiety about HM. The registry included 571 patients (mean age 63.9±12.8 years; 83% men; 76% of ICDs implanted for primary prevention) followed by HM for 6.2±1.2 months. Questionnaire 1 was completed by 430 (75.3%) patients and questionnaire 2 by 398 (69.7%) patients. Younger patients had a better comprehension of HM than older patients. High-quality training conditions improved the comprehension score, and a positive association was observed between anxiety and acceptance levels and the comprehension score. The 80±20% mean data transmission rate (days of transmission/days of follow-up ratio) was unrelated to the comprehension scores. A clear understanding was associated with a higher acceptance of HM, although it was unrelated to the data transmission rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Home, Smart Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The article places focus on how smart technologies integrated in a one family- home and particular the window offer unique challenges and opportunities for designing buildings with the best possible environments for people and nature. Toward an interdisciplinary approach, we address the interaction...... between daylight defined in technical terms and daylight defined in aesthetic, architectural terms. Through field-tests of a Danish carbon-neutral home and an analysis of five key design parameters, we explore the contradictions and potentials in smart buildings, using the smart window as example of how...... to the energy design is central. The study illuminates an approach of the design of smart houses as living organisms by connecting technology with the needs of the occupants with the power and beauty of daylight....

  6. Prognostic value of ambulatory and home blood pressures compared with office blood pressure in the general population: follow-up results from the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate e Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Roberto; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Michele; Cesana, Giancarlo; Corrao, Giovanni; Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2005-04-12

    Studies in hypertensive patients suggest that ambulatory blood pressure (BP) is prognostically superior to office BP. Much less information is available in the general population, however. Obtaining this information was the purpose of the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate e Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study. Office, home, and 24-hour ambulatory BP values were obtained in 2051 subjects between 25 and 74 years of age who were representative of the general population of Monza (Milan, Italy). Subjects were followed up for an average of 131 months, during which time cardiovascular and noncardiovascular fatal events were recorded (n=186). Office, home, and ambulatory BP values showed a significant exponential direct relationship with risk of cardiovascular or all-cause death. The goodness of fit of the relationship was greater for systolic than for diastolic BP and for night than for day BP, but its overall value was not better for home or ambulatory than for office BP. The slope of the relationship, however, was progressively greater from office to home and ambulatory BP. Home and night BP modestly improved the goodness of fit of the risk model when added to office BP. In the PAMELA population, risk of death increased more with a given increase in home or ambulatory than in office BP. The overall ability to predict death, however, was not greater for home and ambulatory than for office BP, although it was somewhat increased by the combination of office and outside-of-office values. Systolic BP was almost invariably superior to diastolic BP, and night BP was superior to day BP.

  7. Monitoring fetal maturation-objectives, techniques and indices of autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Dirk; Żebrowski, Jan; Cysarz, Dirk; Gonçalves, Hernâni; Pytlik, Adelina; Amorim-Costa, Célia; Bernardes, João; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Witte, Otto W; Schleußner, Ekkehard; Stroux, Lisa; Redman, Christopher; Georgieva, Antoniya; Payne, Stephen; Clifford, Gari; Signorini, Maria G; Magenes, Giovanni; Andreotti, Fernando; Malberg, Hagen; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Lakhno, Igor; Schneider, Uwe

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring the fetal behavior does not only have implications for acute care but also for identifying developmental disturbances that burden the entire later life. The concept, of 'fetal programming', also known as 'developmental origins of adult disease hypothesis', e.g. applies for cardiovascular, metabolic, hyperkinetic, cognitive disorders. Since the autonomic nervous system is involved in all of those systems, cardiac autonomic control may provide relevant functional diagnostic and prognostic information. The fetal heart rate patterns (HRP) are one of the few functional signals in the prenatal period that relate to autonomic control and, therefore, is predestinated for its evaluation. The development of sensitive markers of fetal maturation and its disturbances requires the consideration of physiological fundamentals, recording technology and HRP parameters of autonomic control. Based on the ESGCO2016 special session on monitoring the fetal maturation we herein report the most recent results on: (i) functional fetal autonomic brain age score (fABAS), Recurrence Quantitative Analysis and Binary Symbolic Dynamics of complex HRP resolve specific maturation periods, (ii) magnetocardiography (MCG) based fABAS was validated for cardiotocography (CTG), (iii) 30 min recordings are sufficient for obtaining episodes of high variability, important for intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) detection in handheld Doppler, (iv) novel parameters from PRSA to identify Intra IUGR fetuses, (v) evaluation of fetal electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings, (vi) correlation between maternal and fetal HRV is disturbed in pre-eclampsia. The reported novel developments significantly extend the possibilities for the established CTG methodology. Novel HRP indices improve the accuracy of assessment due to their more appropriate consideration of complex autonomic processes across the recording technologies (CTG, handheld Doppler, MCG, ECG). The ultimate objective is their dissemination

  8. An error-related negativity potential investigation of response monitoring function in individuals with Internet addiction disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhe eZhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Internet addiction disorder (IAD is an impulse disorder or at least related to impulse control disorder. Deficits in executive functioning, including response monitoring, have been proposed as a hallmark feature of impulse control disorders. The error-related negativity (ERN reflects individual’s ability to monitor behavior. Since IAD belongs to a compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder, theoretically, it should present response monitoring functional deficit characteristics of some disorders, such as substance dependence, ADHD or alcohol abuse, testing with an Erikson flanker task. Up to now, no studies on response monitoring functional deficit in IAD were reported. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics in a modified Erikson flanker task.23 subjects were recruited as IAD group. 23 matched age, gender and education healthy persons were recruited as control group. All participants completed the modified Erikson flanker task while measured with event-related potentials (ERPs. IAD group made more total error rates than did controls (P < 0.01; Reactive times for total error responses in IAD group were shorter than did controls (P < 0.01. The mean ERN amplitudes of total error response conditions at frontal electrode sites and at central electrode sites of IAD group were reduced compared with control group (all P < 0.01. These results revealed that IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics and shares ERN characteristics of compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder.

  9. Health and Functioning of Families of Children With Special Health Care Needs Cared for in Home Care, Long-term Care, and Medical Day Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    To examine and compare child and parent or guardian physical and mental health outcomes in families with children with special health care needs who have medically complex technology-dependent needs in home care, long-term care (LTC), and medical day care (MDC) settings. The number of children requiring medically complex technology-dependent care has grown exponentially. In this study, options for their care are home care, LTC, or MDC. Comparison of child and parent/guardian health outcomes is unknown. Using repeated measures data were collected from 84 dyads (parent/guardian, medically complex technology-dependent child) for 5 months using Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Generic Core Module 4.0 and Family Impact Module Data analysis: χ(2), RM-ANCOVA. There were no significant differences in overall physical health, mental health, and functioning of children by care setting. Most severely disabled children were in home care; moderately disabled in MDC; children in vegetative state LTC; however, parents perceived children's health across care setting as good to excellent. Parents/guardians from home care reported the poorest physical health including being tired during the day, too tired to do the things they like to do, feeling physically weak, or feeling sick and had cognitive difficulties, difficulties with worry, communication, and daily activities. Parents/guardians from LTC reported the best physical health with time and energy for a social life and employment. Trends in health care policy indicate a movement away from LTC care to care in the family home where data indicate these parents/guardians are already mentally and functionally challenged.

  10. Patient experiences with self-monitoring renal function after renal transplantation: results from a single-center prospective pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Lint CL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Céline L van Lint,1 Paul JM van der Boog,1 Wenxin Wang,2,3 Willem-Paul Brinkman,2 Ton JM Rövekamp,3 Mark A Neerincx,2 Ton J Rabelink,1 Sandra van Dijk1,4 1Department of Nephrology, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC, Leiden, 2Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Delft University of Technology, Delft, 3Department of Technology in Healthcare, Prevention and Health, Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO, Leiden, 4Department of Health, Medical and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands Background: After a kidney transplantation, patients have to visit the hospital often to monitor for early signs of graft rejection. Self-monitoring of creatinine in addition to blood pressure at home could alleviate the burden of frequent outpatient visits, but only if patients are willing to self-monitor and if they adhere to the self-monitoring measurement regimen. A prospective pilot study was conducted to assess patients’ experiences and satisfaction.Materials and methods: For 3 months after transplantation, 30 patients registered self-measured creatinine and blood pressure values in an online record to which their physician had access to. Patients completed a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up to assess satisfaction, attitude, self-efficacy regarding self-monitoring, worries, and physician support. Adherence was studied by comparing the number of registered with the number of requested measurements.Results: Patients were highly motivated to self-monitor kidney function, and reported high levels of general satisfaction. Level of satisfaction was positively related to perceived support from physicians (P<0.01, level of self-efficacy (P<0.01, and amount of trust in the accuracy of the creatinine meter (P<0.01. The use of both the creatinine and blood pressure meter was considered pleasant and useful, despite the level of trust in the

  11. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    of these systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account......Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in non-clinical settings such as the private home can challenge, among others, older adults. To support such unsupervised care activities, an increasingly number of reminders and monitoring systems are being designed. However, most...... for the home setting and people’s everyday activities....

  12. A multi-component exercise regimen to prevent functional decline and bone fragility in home-dwelling elderly women: randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinkanta, S; Heinonen, A; Sievänen, H; Uusi-Rasi, K; Pasanen, M; Ojala, K; Fogelholm, M; Kannus, P

    2007-04-01

    This study showed that combination of strength, balance, agility and jumping training prevented functional decline and bone fragility in home-dwelling elderly women. The finding supports the idea that it is possible to maintain good physical functioning by multi-component exercise program and thus postpone the age-related functional problems. This 1-year randomized, controlled exercise intervention trial assessed the effects of two different training programs and their combination on physical functioning and bone in home-dwelling elderly women. One hundred and forty-nine healthy women aged 70-78 years were randomly assigned into: group 1-resistance training (RES), group 2-balance-jumping training (BAL), group 3-combination of resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB), and group 4-controls (CON). Self-rated physical functioning, leg extensor force, dynamic balance, and bone mass and structure were measured. Self-rated physical functioning improved in the COMB group, but was reduced in the CON group; the mean inter-group difference was 10% (95% CI: 0-22%). Mean increase in the leg extensor force was higher in the RES (14%; 4-25%) and COMB (13%; 3-25%) compared with the CON groups. Dynamic balance improved in the BAL (6%; 1-11%) and in the COMB (8%; 3-12%) groups. There were no inter-group differences in BMC at the proximal femur. In those COMB women who trained at least twice a week, the tibial shaft structure weakened 2% (0-4%) less than those in the CON group. Strength, balance, agility, and jumping training (especially in combination) prevented functional decline in home-dwelling elderly women. In addition, positive effects seen in the structure of the loaded tibia indicated that exercise may also play a role in preventing bone fragility.

  13. Monitoring cognitive function and need with the automated neuropsychological assessment metrics in Decompression Sickness (DCS) research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Sammuel G.

    1993-01-01

    Hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) research presents the medical monitor with the difficult task of assessing the onset and progression of DCS largely on the basis of subjective symptoms. Even with the introduction of precordial Doppler ultrasound techniques for the detection of venous gas emboli (VGE), correct prediction of DCS can be made only about 65 percent of the time according to data from the Armstrong Laboratory's (AL's) hypobaric DCS database. An AL research protocol concerned with exercise and its effects on denitrogenation efficiency includes implementation of a performance assessment test battery to evaluate cognitive functioning during a 4-h simulated 30,000 ft (9144 m) exposure. Information gained from such a test battery may assist the medical monitor in identifying early signs of DCS and subtle neurologic dysfunction related to cases of asymptomatic, but advanced, DCS. This presentation concerns the selection and integration of a test battery and the timely graphic display of subject test results for the principal investigator and medical monitor. A subset of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) developed through the Office of Military Performance Assessment Technology (OMPAT) was selected. The ANAM software provides a library of simple tests designed for precise measurement of processing efficiency in a variety of cognitive domains. For our application and time constraints, two tests requiring high levels of cognitive processing and memory were chosen along with one test requiring fine psychomotor performance. Accuracy, speed, and processing throughout variables as well as RMS error were collected. An automated mood survey provided 'state' information on six scales including anger, happiness, fear, depression, activity, and fatigue. An integrated and interactive LOTUS 1-2-3 macro was developed to import and display past and present task performance and mood-change information.

  14. [Evaluation and analysis of monitoring and early warning functions of the occupational disease reporting system in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Li, Tao; Liu, Mengxuan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the monitoring and early warning functions of the occupational disease reporting system right now in China, and to analyze their influencing factors. An improved audit tool (ODIT) was used to score the monitoring and early warning functions with a total score of 10. The nine indices were completeness of information on the reporting form, coverage of the reporting system, accessibility of criteria or guidelines for diagnosis, education and training for physicians, completeness of the reporting system, statistical methods, investigation of special cases, release of monitoring information, and release of early warning information. According to the evaluation, the occupational disease reporting system in China had a score of 5.5 in monitoring existing occupational diseases with a low score for release of monitoring information; the reporting system had a score of 6.5 in early warning of newly occurring occupational diseases with low scores for education and training for physicians as well as completeness of the reporting system. The occupational disease reporting system in China still does not have full function in monitoring and early warning. It is the education and participation of physicians from general hospitals in the diagnosis and treatment of occupational diseases and suspected occupational diseases that need to be enhanced. In addition, the problem of monitoring the incidence of occupational diseases needs to be solved as soon as possible.

  15. Cochlear Nerve Action Potential Monitoring for Preserving Function of an Unseen Cochlear Nerve in Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Kojima, Atsuhiro; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Kusaka, Gen; Naritaka, Heiji

    2017-10-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cochlear nerve action potential (CNAP) has been used in patients with small vestibular schwannoma (<15 mm) to preserve cochlear nerve function. We performed surgery for a larger vestibular schwannoma under CNAP monitoring with the aim of preserving cochlear nerve function, and compared the data with findings from 10 patients with hemifacial spasm who underwent microvascular decompression surgery. We report the case of a patient with a 26-mm vestibular schwannoma and normal hearing function who underwent neurosurgery under electrophysiological monitoring of the facial and cochlear nerves. Amplitudes of evoked facial muscle responses were maintained at approximately 70% during the operation. The latency of wave V on brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) increased by 0.5 ms, and amplitude was maintained at approximately 70% of the value at the beginning of the operation. Latencies of P1, N1, and P2 on CNAP did not change intraoperatively. These latencies were comparable to those of 10 normal patients with hemifacial spasm. CNAP monitoring proved very useful in confirming the location of the cochlear nerve in the operative field and preserving cochlear nerve function. Both facial nerve function and hearing acuity were completely preserved after tumor removal, and wave V latency on BAEP returned to normal and was maintained in the normal range for at least 2 years. CNAP monitoring is extremely useful for preserving the function of the unseen cochlear nerve during vestibular schwannoma surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phylogenetic and functional metagenomic profiling for assessing microbial biodiversity in environmental monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljo Kisand

    Full Text Available Decisions guiding environmental management need to be based on a broad and comprehensive understanding of the biodiversity and functional capability within ecosystems. Microbes are of particular importance since they drive biogeochemical cycles, being both producers and decomposers. Their quick and direct responses to changes in environmental conditions modulate the ecosystem accordingly, thus providing a sensitive readout. Here we have used direct sequencing of total DNA from water samples to compare the microbial communities of two distinct coastal regions exposed to different anthropogenic pressures: the highly polluted Port of Genoa and the protected area of Montecristo Island in the Mediterranean Sea. Analysis of the metagenomes revealed significant differences in both microbial diversity and abundance between the two areas, reflecting their distinct ecological habitats and anthropogenic stress conditions. Our results indicate that the combination of next generation sequencing (NGS technologies and bioinformatics tools presents a new approach to monitor the diversity and the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Integration of metagenomics into environmental monitoring campaigns should enable the impact of the anthropogenic pressure on microbial biodiversity in various ecosystems to be better assessed and also predicted.

  17. Phylogenetic and functional metagenomic profiling for assessing microbial biodiversity in environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Veljo; Valente, Angelica; Lahm, Armin; Tanet, Gerard; Lettieri, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Decisions guiding environmental management need to be based on a broad and comprehensive understanding of the biodiversity and functional capability within ecosystems. Microbes are of particular importance since they drive biogeochemical cycles, being both producers and decomposers. Their quick and direct responses to changes in environmental conditions modulate the ecosystem accordingly, thus providing a sensitive readout. Here we have used direct sequencing of total DNA from water samples to compare the microbial communities of two distinct coastal regions exposed to different anthropogenic pressures: the highly polluted Port of Genoa and the protected area of Montecristo Island in the Mediterranean Sea. Analysis of the metagenomes revealed significant differences in both microbial diversity and abundance between the two areas, reflecting their distinct ecological habitats and anthropogenic stress conditions. Our results indicate that the combination of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and bioinformatics tools presents a new approach to monitor the diversity and the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Integration of metagenomics into environmental monitoring campaigns should enable the impact of the anthropogenic pressure on microbial biodiversity in various ecosystems to be better assessed and also predicted.

  18. High spatiotemporal resolution monitoring of hydrological function across degraded peatlands in the south west UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashe, Josie; Luscombe, David; Grand-Clement, Emilie; Gatis, Naomi; Anderson, Karen; Brazier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Exmoor/Dartmoor Mires Project is a peatland restoration programme focused on the geoclimatically marginal blanket bogs of South West England. In order to better understand the hydrological functioning of degraded/restored peatlands and support land management decisions across these uplands, this study is providing robust spatially distributed, hydrological monitoring at a high temporal resolution and in near real time. This paper presents the conceptual framework and experimental design for three hydrological monitoring arrays situated in headwater catchments dominated by eroding and drained blanket peatland. Over 250 individual measurements are collected at a high temporal resolution (15 minute time-step) via sensors integrated within a remote telemetry system. These are sent directly to a dedicated server over VHF and GPRS mobile networks. Sensors arrays are distributed at varying spatial scales throughout the studied catchments and record multiple parameters including: water table depth, channel flow, temperature, conductivity and pH measurements. A full suite of meteorological sensors and ten spatially distributed automatic flow based water samplers are also connected to the telemetry system and controlled remotely. This paper will highlight the challenges and solutions to obtaining these data in exceptionally remote and harsh field conditions over long (multi annual) temporal scales.

  19. Control charts demonstrated limited utility for the monitoring of lung function in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robin M; Hayen, Andrew; Macaskill, Petra; Irwig, Les; Reddel, Helen K

    2012-01-01

    Statistical process control charts have been advocated for use in monitoring of lung function in asthma. We aimed to evaluate their application in asthma using existing data from a randomized trial. Patients on optimal inhaled corticosteroid/bronchodilator therapy (n=81) were randomized to continue the same or change to corticosteroid alone. Baseline statistical control was assessed from 20 days of electronically recorded lung function (peak expiratory flow [PEF], forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV(1)]). The ability to detect lung function changes was assessed during 10 days after randomization. PEF measurements were in statistical control during baseline for only 59-79% of patients for different combinations of five control chart rules (e.g., Rule 1: >3 standard deviations outside mean and 95% expected to be in control), with similar proportions for FEV(1). After randomization, among those previously in statistical control, Rule 1 signaled lower FEV(1) for 35% of patients randomized to treatment change compared with 6% continuing baseline treatment (P=0.004). Control charts performed poorly for PEF, signaling a decrease for 8% of patients randomized to treatment change compared with 11% continuing treatment (P=0.7). A paradoxical increase was signaled for many patients continuing treatment. Control charts may not be suitable for use in many patients with asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A miniature cadmium telluride detector module for continuous monitoring of left-ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, P B; Berger, H J; Steidley, J; Brendel, A F; Gottschalk, A; Zaret, B L

    1981-02-01

    The authors describe a miniature cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector module for continuous monitoring of ventricular function using an equilibrium radionuclide blood-pool label. The detector and collimator are small, light, and suitable for direct attachment to the chest wall. Clinical studies in 18 patients using a prototype system demonstrated reasonably good correlation with left-ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) determined by first-pass studies performed with a multicrystal scintillation camera (r = 0.74) and gated equilibrium studies performed with a computerized sodium iodide (Nal) probe (r = 0.76). The CdTe device may prove to be useful in patients in intensive and coronary care units as well as in ambulatory patients.

  1. Automatic monitoring of ecosystem structure and functions using integrated low-cost near surface sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ryu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Hwang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface sensors are able to acquire more reliable and detailed information with higher temporal resolution than satellite observations. Conventional near surface sensors usually work individually, and thus they require considerable manpower from data collection through information extraction and sharing. Recent advances of Internet of Things (IoT) provides unprecedented opportunities to integrate various low-cost sensors as an intelligent near surface observation system for monitoring ecosystem structure and functions. In this study, we developed a Smart Surface Sensing System (4S), which can automatically collect, transfer, process and analyze data, and then publish time series results on public-available website. The system is composed of micro-computer Raspberry pi, micro-controller Arduino, multi-spectral spectrometers made from Light Emitting Diode (LED), visible and near infrared cameras, and Internet module. All components are connected with each other and Raspberry pi intelligently controls the automatic data production chain. We did intensive tests and calibrations in-lab. Then, we conducted in-situ observations at a rice paddy field and a deciduous broadleaf forest. During the whole growth season, 4S obtained landscape images, spectral reflectance in red, green, blue, and near infrared, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR), and leaf area index (LAI) continuously. Also We compared 4S data with other independent measurements. NDVI obtained from 4S agreed well with Jaz hyperspectrometer at both diurnal and seasonal scales (R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 0.059), and 4S derived fPAR and LAI were comparable to LAI-2200 and destructive measurements in both magnitude and seasonal trajectory. We believe that the integrated low-cost near surface sensor could help research community monitoring ecosystem structure and functions closer and easier through a network system.

  2. The effects of a nighttime nap on the error-monitoring functions during extended wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Shoichi; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Murphy, Timothy I; Abe, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of a 1-hr nighttime nap, and the associated sleep inertia, on the error-monitoring functions during extended wakefulness using the 2 event-related potential components thought to reflect error detection and emotional or motivational evaluation of the error, i.e., the error-related negativity/error-negativity (ERN/Ne) and error-positivity (Pe), respectively. Participants awakened at 07:00 the morning of the experimental day, and performed a stimulus-response compatibility (arrow-orientation) task at 21:00, 02:00, and 03:00. A cognitive task with EEG data recording was performed in a laboratory setting. Twenty young adults (mean age 21.3 ± 1.0 yr, 14 males) participated. Half of the participants took a 1-hr nap, and the others had a 1-hr awake-rest period from 01:00-02:00. Behavioral performance and amplitude of the Pe declined after midnight (i.e., 02:00 and 03:00) compared with the 21:00 task period in both groups. During the task period starting at 03:00, the participants in the awake-rest condition reported less alertness and showed fewer correct responses than those who napped. However, there were no effects of a nap on the amplitude of the ERN/Ne or Pe. Our results suggest that a 1-hr nap can alleviate the decline in subjective alertness and response accuracy during nighttime; however, error-monitoring functions, especially emotional or motivational evaluation of the error, might remain impaired by extended wakefulness even after the nap. This phenomenon could imply that night-shift workers experiencing extended wakefulness should not overestimate the positive effects of a nighttime 1-hr nap during extended wakefulness.

  3. Morning Versus Evening Bright Light Treatment at Home to Improve Function and Pain Sensitivity for Women with Fibromyalgia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Ong, Jason C; Shakoor, Najia; Williams, David A; Burns, John

    2017-01-01

    To test the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of a home-based morning versus evening bright light treatment on function and pain sensitivity in women with fibromyalgia. A single blind randomized study with two treatment arms: 6 days of a 1 hour morning light treatment or 6 days of a 1 hour evening light treatment. Function, pain sensitivity, and circadian timing were assessed before and after treatment. Participants slept at home, except for two nights in Sleep Center. Ten women meeting the American College of Rheumatology's diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, including normal blood test results. Self-reported function was assessed with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Pain sensitivity was assessed using a heat stimulus that gave measures of threshold and tolerance. Circadian timing was assessed with the dim light melatonin onset. Both morning and evening light treatments led to improvements in function and pain sensitivity. However, only the morning light treatment led to a clinically meaningful improvement in function (>14% reduction from baseline FIQ) and morning light significantly increased pain threshold more than evening light ( P  fibromyalgia. Those who undergo morning light treatment may show improvements in function and pain sensitivity. Advances in circadian timing may be one mechanism by which morning light improves pain sensitivity. Findings can inform the design of a randomized controlled trial.

  4. Clinical, demographic and functional characteristics associated with pharmacotherapy for heart failure in older home care clients: a retrospective, population-level, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foebel, Andrea D; Heckman, George A; Hirdes, John P; Tyas, Suzanne L; Tjam, Erin Y; McKelvie, Robert S; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2011-07-01

    Use of combination pharmacotherapy, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers) and β-adrenoceptor antagonists (β-blockers) in the management of heart failure (HF) can reduce mortality, prevent functional decline and reduce health service use. However, these first-line therapies are underused in older populations. This article describes the use and predictors of use of first-line HF therapies in a population-based cohort of older home care clients in Ontario, Canada. To examine the use and correlates of first-line pharmacotherapy in older home care clients with HF. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study of Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care (RAI-HC) data in individuals aged ≥65 years receiving home care services in the province of Ontario, Canada. Data collected were from all 14 health regions in Ontario. Home care clients with HF were identified from among those aged ≥65 years whose first RAI-HC assessment occurred between January 2004 and December 2007 (n = 176 866). Potential correlates of pharmacotherapy for HF were identified from the RAI-HC and examined using multivariable logistic regression. HF prevalence was 12.4%. Among clients with HF, 28.6% received no first-line pharmacotherapy; this proportion declined by 6% over the 4 years studied. Only 28.0% were receiving recommended combination therapy. First-line pharmacotherapy use was dependent on hypertension and diabetes mellitus status. Use of pharmacotherapy was less likely among older clients and those with functional impairment, airway disease or behavioural symptoms. Approximately 29% of older home care clients with HF received no first-line HF pharmacotherapy, while another 28% received optimal first-line HF pharmacotherapy. In addition to the expected clinical correlates, the increased likelihood of non-use associated with clients' demographic and functional characteristics raises

  5. Hospital at home: home-based end of life care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Wee, Bee; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Background The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and patients with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end of life care at home. Objectives To determine if providing home-based end of life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients’ symptoms, quality of life, health service costs and care givers compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) to October 2009, Ovid MED-LINE(R) 1950 to March 2011, EMBASE 1980 to October 2009, CINAHL 1982 to October 2009 and EconLit to October 2009. We checked the reference lists of articles identified for potentially relevant articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end of life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible we presented the data in narrative summary tables. Main results We included four trials in this review. Those receiving home-based end of life care were statistically significantly more likely to die at home compared with those receiving usual care (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi 2 = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I2 = 0% (three trials; N=652)). We detected no statistically significant differences for functional status (measured by the Barthel Index), psychological well-being or cognitive status, between patients receiving home-based end of life care compared with those receiving standard care (which

  6. Physiorack: an integrated MRI safe/conditional, gas delivery, respiratory gating, and subject monitoring solution for structural and functional assessments of pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaweish, Ahmed F; Charles, H Cecil

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the use of a modular MRI conditional respiratory monitoring and gating solution, designed to facilitate proper monitoring of subjects' vital signals and their respiratory efforts, during free-breathing and breathheld 19F, oxygen-enhanced, and Fourier-decomposition MRI-based acquisitions. All Imaging was performed on a Siemens TIM Trio 3 Tesla MRI scanner, following Institutional Review Board approval. Gas delivery is accomplished through the use of an MR compatible pneumotachometer, in conjunction with two three-way pneumatically controlled Hans Rudolph Valves. The pneumatic valves are connected to Douglas bags used as the gas source. A mouthpiece (+nose clip) or an oro-nasal Hans Rudolph disposable mask is connected following the pneumatic valve to minimize dead-space and provide an airtight seal. Continuous monitoring/sampling of inspiratory and expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide levels at the mouthpiece/mask is achieved through the use of an Oxigraf gas analyzer. Forty-four imaging sessions were successfully monitored, during Fourier-decomposition (n=3), fluorine-enhanced (n=29), oxygen-enhanced, and ultra short echo (n=12) acquisitions. The collected waveforms, facilitated proper monitoring and coaching of the subjects. We demonstrate an inexpensive, off-the-shelf solution for monitoring these signals, facilitating assessments of lung function. Monitoring of respiratory efforts and exhaled gas concentrations assists in understanding the heterogeneity of lung function visualized by gas imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  8. Home-based functional exercises aimed at managing kinesiophobia contribute to improving disability and quality of life of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Rocca, Barbara; Salvaderi, Stefano; Fiorentini, Roberta; Restelli, Maddalena; Foti, Calogero

    2013-02-01

    To compare the improvement in disability, kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life obtained by means of home-based functional exercises aimed at managing kinesiophobia with that obtained by giving subjects undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) advice to stay active after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. Randomized controlled trial with 6-months' follow-up. Patients' homes. Patients (N=110; 40 men; mean age, 67y) at the end of a 15-day period of in-hospital rehabilitation after undergoing primary TKA. In the experimental group, before returning home, the patients were asked to continue the functional exercises learned during hospitalization in twice-weekly 60-minute sessions for 6 months, and were given a book containing theoretical information about the management of kinesiophobia. In the control group, the patients were advised to stay active and gradually recover their usual activities. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance with baseline values as the covariates (Pkinesiophobia was useful in changing the course of disability, fear-avoidance beliefs, pain, and the quality of life in patients with TKA. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Short-term effects of self-massage combined with home exercise on pain, daily activity, and autonomic function in patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuan-Chi; Wang, Tzyy-Jiuan; Chang, Cheng-Chiang; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Lin, Shiou-Ping; Chang, Shin-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present was to investigate the short-term effects of a program combining self-massage and home exercise for patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS). [Subjects and Methods] In this retrospective study, 63 patients were allocated to the experimental (n = 32) and control (n = 31) groups. Both groups received 6 sessions of treatment with physical modalities over the course of two weeks. The experimental group completed an additional program with a combination of self-massage and home exercise. The outcome measurements included a pain scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT), neck disability index (NDI), patient-specific functional scales (PSFS), and heart rate variability (HRV). The interactions between the groups and over time were analyzed using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. [Results] Only the experimental group demonstrated significant improvements in the pain scale with varying conditions. The PPTs of the trigger points increased significantly in the experimental group, and significant functional improvements in NDI and PSFS were observed in the same group. There were significant increases in high-frequency HRV and high-frequency % in the experimental group. [Conclusion] Treatment with physical modalities plus combination of self-massage and home exercise is more effective than the physical modalities treatment alone.

  10. Home Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Furniture Tip-Overs filter Water and Drowning Apply Water and Drowning filter Space and Place: (-) Remove Home filter Home Car and Road Apply Car and Road filter Sports and Play Apply Sports and Play filter Type: Activities for ...

  11. Effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor control, motor performance and daily function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-ling; Kang, Lin-ju; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Fei-Chuan; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Wu, Ching-yi

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor performance, daily function and reaching control for children with cerebral palsy. A single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Forty-seven children (23 boys; 24 girls) with unilateral cerebral palsy, aged 6-12 years, were randomized to constraint-induced therapy (n = 24) or traditional rehabilitation (n = 23). Constraint-induced therapy involved intensive functional training of the more affected arm while the less affected arm was restrained. Traditional rehabilitation involved functional unilateral and bilateral arm training. Both groups received individualized therapist-based interventions at home for 3.5-4 hours/day, two days a week for four weeks. Motor performance and daily function were measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition and the Pediatric Motor Activity Log. Reaching control was assessed by the kinematics of reaction time, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. There were larger effects in favour of constraint-induced therapy on motor performance, daily function, and some aspects of reaching control compared with traditional rehabilitation. Children receiving constraint-induced therapy demonstrated higher scores for Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition - Grasping (pretest mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 3.1; posttest, 44.1 ± 2.8; P Motor Activity Log (pretest, 1.8 ± 0.3; posttest, 2.5 ± 0.3; P control of reaching in children with unilateral cerebral palsy than traditional rehabilitation.

  12. Long-term home and community-based exercise programs improve function in community-dwelling older people with cognitive impairment: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lewis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Question: Do long-term (> 3 months home or community-based exercise programs improve function, reduce falls and prevent hospital readmissions in older people with cognitive impairment? Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, controlled trials. Electronic databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Medline, Embase, AMED were searched from the earliest date possible until March 2016. Participants: Older adults (≥ 65 years with cognitive impairment living in the community. Intervention: Supervised home or community-based exercise programs longer than 3 months. Outcome measures: The primary outcomes were function (including balance and activities of daily living, falls and hospital readmissions. Results: Of 1011 studies identified, seven trials with 945 participants met the inclusion criteria. Compared with no intervention, long-term exercise programs improved functional independence in basic activities of daily living by a moderate and significant amount (SMD 0.77, 95% CI 0.17 to 1.37, I2 = 67%, and improved functional independence in instrumental activities of daily living by a small and significant amount (SMD 0.44, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.86, I2 = 42%. Long-term exercise improved balance (mean difference in functional reach test 5.2 cm, 95% CI 0.5 to 9.9, I2 = 76%. Data from two individual trials suggest that long-term exercise programs also reduce falls in older people with cognitive impairment. However, there was limited reporting of the effect of exercise on hospital readmissions for this group of people. Conclusions: Long-term home and community-based exercise programs improve function in older adults living in the community with cognitive impairment. Review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015029602. [Lewis M, Peiris CL, Shields N (2016 Long-term home and community-based exercise programs improve function in community-dwelling older people with cognitive impairment: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 23–29

  13. Magnetic induction pneumography: a planar coil system for continuous monitoring of lung function via contactless measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doga Gursoy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of lung function is of particular interest to the mechanically ventilated patients during critical care. Recent studies have shown that magnetic induction measurements with single coils provide signals which are correlated with the lung dynamics and this idea is extended here by using a 5 by 5 planar coil matrix for data acquisition in order to image the regional thoracic conductivity changes. The coil matrix can easily be mounted onto the patient bed, and thus, the problems faced in methods that use contacting sensors can readily be eliminated and the patient comfort can be improved. In the proposed technique, the data are acquired by successively exciting each coil in order to induce an eddy-current density within the dorsal tissues and measuring the corresponding response magnetic field strength by the remaining coils. The recorded set of data is then used to reconstruct the internal conductivity distribution by means of algorithms that minimize the residual norm between the estimated and measured data. To investigate the feasibility of the technique, the sensitivity maps and the point spread functions at different locations and depths were studied. To simulate a realistic scenario, a chest model was generated by segmenting the tissue boundaries from NMR images. The reconstructions of the ventilation distribution and the development of an edematous lung injury were presented. The imaging artifacts caused by either the incorrect positioning of the patient or the expansion of the chest wall due to breathing were illustrated by simulations.

  14. The effect of focused attention and open monitoring meditation on attention network function in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Ben; Eddershaw, Rachael; Meron, Daniel; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2013-12-30

    Mindfulness meditation techniques are increasingly popular both as a life-style choice and therapeutic adjunct for a range of mental and physical health conditions. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which mindfulness meditation and its constituent practices might produce positive change in cognition and emotion. Our study directly compared the effects of Focused Attention (FA) and Open-Monitoring (OM) meditation on alerting, orienting and executive attention network function in healthy individuals. Participants were randomized to three intervention groups: open-focused meditation, focused attention, and relaxation control. Participants completed an emotional variant of the Attention Network Test (ANT) at baseline and post-intervention. OM and FA practice improved executive attention, with no change observed in the relaxation control group. Improvements in executive attention occurred in the absence of change in subjective/self-report mood and cognitive function. Baseline levels of dispositional/trait mindfulness were positively correlated with executive control in the ANT at baseline. Our results suggest that mindfulness meditation might usefully target deficits in executive attention that characterise mood and anxiety disorders. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Home hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar, John W; Perkins, Anthony; Heaf, James G

    2015-01-01

    We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use.......We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use....

  16. Macrophages homing to metastatic lymph nodes can be monitored with ultrasensitive ferromagnetic iron-oxide nanocubes and a 1.5T clinical MR scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Rim Cho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the ability of macrophages to specifically home to tumors, their potential use as a delivery vehicle for cancer therapeutics has been suggested. Tracking the delivery and engraftment of macrophages into human tumors with a 1.5T clinical MR scanner requires the development of sensitive contrast agents for cell labeling. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether intravenously injected macrophages could target a primary tumor as well as metastatic LNs, and whether these cells could be detected in vivo by MRI. METHODOLOGY: Peritoneal macrophages were obtained from BALB/c nude mice. The viability, phagocytotic capacity and migratory activity of the macrophages were assessed. MR imaging was performed using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner and we estimated the T2* of the labeled macrophages. Metastatic lymph nodes were produced in BALB/c nude mice. We administrated 2×10⁶ macrophages labeled with 50 µg Fe/mL FIONs intravenously into the mice. In the 3D T2* GRE MR images obtained one day after the injection of the labeled macrophages or FION solution, the percentages of pixels in the tumors or LNs below the minimum normalized SI (signal intensity threshold were summated and reported as the black pixel count (% for the FION hypointensity. Tumors in the main tumor model as well as the brachial, axillary and inguinal lymph nodes in the metastatic LN models were removed and stained. For all statistical analyses, single-group data were assessed using t test or the Mann-Whitney test. Repeated measurements analysis of variance (ANOVA with Tukey-Kramer post hoc comparisons were performed for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: The FION-labeled macrophages, which could be non-invasi