WorldWideScience

Sample records for home medical care

  1. Nurse Physiotherapy in Medical Home Care

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlářová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis is centred on theme medical home care, importace of nurse physiotherapy and significance nurse physiotherapy by patiens in medical home care. It look on wide of use at illnies cerebral apoplexy, the theses of nurse physiotherapy and some suggestions and tips how the nurse physiotherapy instruments use for patients by cerebral apoplexy. Substance of the bachelor's thesis make research of use nurse physioterapy by medical workers and of knowledge how utilize in medical home ca...

  2. The Fresenius Medical Care home hemodialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaeper, Christian; Diaz-Buxo, Jose A

    2004-01-01

    The Fresenius Medical Care home dialysis system consists of a newly designed machine, a central monitoring system, a state-of-the-art reverse osmosis module, ultrapure water, and all the services associated with a successful implementation. The 2008K@home hemodialysis machine has the flexibility to accommodate the changing needs of the home hemodialysis patient and is well suited to deliver short daily or prolonged nocturnal dialysis using a broad range of dialysate flows and concentrates. The intuitive design, large graphic illustrations, and step-by-step tutorial make this equipment very user friendly. Patient safety is assured by the use of hydraulic systems with a long history of reliability, smart alarm algorithms, and advanced electronic monitoring. To further patient comfort with their safety at home, the 2008K@home is enabled to communicate with the newly designed iCare remote monitoring system. The Aquaboss Smart reverse osmosis (RO) system is compact, quiet, highly efficient, and offers an improved hygienic design. The RO module reduces water consumption by monitoring the water flow of the dialysis system and adjusting water production accordingly. The Diasafe Plus filter provides ultrapure water, known for its long-term benefits. This comprehensive approach includes planning, installation, technical and clinical support, and customer service.

  3. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  4. Nonemergency Acute Care: When It's Not the Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Gregory P; Kressly, Susan J; Perrin, James M; Richerson, Julia E; Sankrithi, Usha M

    2017-05-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) affirms that the optimal location for children to receive care for acute, nonemergency health concerns is the medical home. The medical home is characterized by the AAP as a care model that "must be accessible, family centered, continuous, comprehensive, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective." However, some children and families use acute care services outside the medical home because there is a perceived or real benefit related to accessibility, convenience, or cost of care. Examples of such acute care entities include urgent care facilities, retail-based clinics, and commercial telemedicine services. Children deserve high-quality, appropriate, and safe acute care services wherever they access the health care system, with timely and complete communication with the medical home, to ensure coordinated and continuous care. Treatment of children under established, new, and evolving practice arrangements in acute care entities should adhere to the core principles of continuity of care and communication, best practices within a defined scope of services, pediatric-trained staff, safe transitions of care, and continuous improvement. In support of the medical home, the AAP urges stakeholders, including payers, to avoid any incentives (eg, reduced copays) that encourage visits to external entities for acute issues as a preference over the medical home. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Medication errors in home care: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Astrid; Bentsen, Signe Berit

    2017-11-01

    To explore registered nurses' experiences of medication errors and patient safety in home care. The focus of care for older patients has shifted from institutional care towards a model of home care. Medication errors are common in this situation and can result in patient morbidity and mortality. An exploratory qualitative design with focus group interviews was used. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 20 registered nurses in home care. The data were analysed using content analysis. Five categories were identified as follows: lack of information, lack of competence, reporting medication errors, trade name products vs. generic name products, and improving routines. Medication errors occur frequently in home care and can threaten the safety of patients. Insufficient exchange of information and poor communication between the specialist and home-care health services, and between general practitioners and healthcare workers can lead to medication errors. A lack of competence in healthcare workers can also lead to medication errors. To prevent these, it is important that there should be up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers during the transfer of patients from specialist to home care. Ensuring competence among healthcare workers with regard to medication is also important. In addition, there should be openness and accurate reporting of medication errors, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medicines. To prevent medication errors in home care, up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers is important when patients are transferred from specialist to home care. It is also important to ensure adequate competence with regard to medication, and that there should be openness when medication errors occur, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Autism-Specific Primary Care Medical Home Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Allison; Scal, Peter; Wey, Andrew; Gaillard, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six subjects received primary medical care within an autism-specific medical home intervention (www.autismmedicalhome.com) and 157 controls received standard primary medical care. Subjects and controls had autism spectrum disorder diagnoses. Thirty-four subjects (74%) and 62 controls (40%) completed pre and post surveys. Controlling for…

  7. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and respiratory ), social workers, personal care aides, home medical equipment suppliers, and most importantly, informal caregivers (e.g., ... also available to help with home assessment. Assistive Technology to improve home safety can also be an ...

  8. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    . Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health...... care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. METHOD: Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge...

  9. Value and the medical home: effects of transformed primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfillan, Richard J; Tomcavage, Janet; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Davis, Duane E; Graham, Jove; Roy, Jason A; Pierdon, Steven B; Bloom, Frederick J; Graf, Thomas R; Goldman, Roy; Weikel, Karena M; Hamory, Bruce H; Paulus, Ronald A; Steele, Glen D

    2010-08-01

    The primary care medical home has been promoted to integrate and improve patient care while reducing healthcare spending, but with little formal study of the model or evidence of its efficacy. ProvenHealth Navigator (PHN), an intensive multidimensional medical home model that addresses care delivery and financing, was introduced into 11 different primary care practices. The goals were to improve the quality, efficiency, and patient experience of care. To evaluate the ability of a medical home model to improve the efficiency of care for Medicare beneficiaries. Observational study using regression modeling based on preintervention and postintervention data and a propensity-selected control cohort. Four years of claims data for Medicare patients at 11 intervention sites and 75 control groups were analyzed to compute hospital admission and readmission rates, and the total cost of care. Regression modeling was used to establish predicted rates and costs in the absence of the intervention. Actual results were compared with predicted results to compute changes attributable to the PHN model. ProvenHealth Navigator was associated with an 18% (P Investing in the capabilities of primary care practices to serve as medical homes may increase healthcare value by improving the efficiency of care. This study demonstrates that the PHN model is capable of significantly reducing admissions and readmissions for Medicare Advantage members.

  10. Patient-Centered Medical Home Capacity and Ambulatory Care Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Hearld, Kristine R; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has increasingly received attention as a model of care to potentially remedy the cost and quality problems that confront the US health care system, including and especially ambulatory care-related issues. This study examined the association between physician practices' PCMH capacity and 3 indicators of ambulatory care utilization: (1) emergency department utilization, (2) ambulatory care sensitive hospitalization rate, and (3) 30-day all-cause readmission rate. Results show that overall PCMH capacity is associated with lower rates, and technical aspects of the PCMH in particular were associated with lower utilization rates while interpersonal capabilities were not.

  11. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  12. Medical Foster Homes: Can the Adult Foster Care Model Substitute for Nursing Home Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    To compare characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of care of veterans in the rapidly expanding Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical foster home (MFH) with those of three other VHA long-term care (LTC) programs. Descriptive, unmatched study. VHA MFHs, home-based primary care (HBPC), community living centers (CLCs), and community nursing homes (CNHs). Veterans newly enrolled in one of the four LTC settings in calendar years 2010 or 2011. Using VA and Medicare data from fiscal years 2010 and 2011, demographic characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of 388 veterans in MFHs were compared with 26,037 of those in HBPC, 5,355 in CLCs, and 5,517 in CNHs in the year before and the year after enrollment. Veterans enrolled in the MFH program were more likely to be unmarried than those in other LTC programs and had higher levels of comorbidity and frailty than veterans receiving HBPC but had similar levels of comorbidity, frailty, and healthcare use as those in CLCs and CNHs. MFH veterans incurred lower costs than those in CNHs and CLCs. MFHs served a distinct subset of veterans with levels of comorbidity and frailty similar to those of veterans cared for in CLCs and CNHs at costs that were comparable to or lower than those of the VHA. Propensity-matched comparisons will be necessary to confirm these findings. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. [Choice of Expiration for Cancer Patients under Home Medical Care - Palliative Care Unit or Home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Takashi; Okagaki, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Okino, Akie

    2015-12-01

    Kohka Public Hospital(KPH)was rebuilt at a new place in April 2013. The Palliative Care Unit(PCU)was newly constructed during renovation. We examined the will and outcome of cancer patients, especially on expiration. A 123 patients died in 2014: 27 died at the PCU, and the remaining 7 at home. Of 27 patients, 20 were willing to die at the PCU, and one patient visited the hospital after judgment by the Visiting Nurse Center. Other 6 patients were admitted finally after their families experienced fatigue. Six of seven patients who died at home, showed a strong will to stay at home. We think that patients' will drives the clinical course, especially in their end-stage. In this context, the majority of the patients decided their terminal place based on their will. On the contrary, there were several cases whose requests were not fulfilled. To overcome the problem, we should discuss cancer patients' will to make a choice regarding death at the end-stage of their lives and the place of expiration in advance. We including the staff of social care and regional medical resources, should co-operate and share information on these patients to solve the problems.

  14. Population Health and Tailored Medical Care in the Home: the Roles of Home-Based Primary Care and Home-Based Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Christine S; Leff, Bruce

    2017-10-12

    With the growth of value-based care, payers and health systems have begun to appreciate the need to provide enhanced services to homebound adults. Recent studies have shown that home-based medical services for this high-cost, high-need population reduce costs and improve outcomes. Home-based medical care services have two flavors that are related to historical context and specialty background-home-based primary care (HBPC) and home-based palliative care (HBPalC). Although the type of services provided by HBPC and HBPalC (together termed "home-based medical care") overlap, HBPC tends to encompass longitudinal and preventive care, while HBPalC often provides services for shorter durations focused more on distress management and goals of care clarification. Given workforce constraints and growing demand, both HBPC and HBPalC will benefit from working together within a population health framework-where HBPC provides care to all patients who have trouble accessing traditional office practices and where HBPalC offers adjunctive care to patients with high symptom burden and those who need assistance with goals clarification. Policy changes that support provision of medical care in the home, population health strategies that tailor home-based medical care to the specific needs of the patients and their caregivers, and educational initiatives to assure basic palliative care competence for all home-based medical providers will improve access and reduce illness burden to this important and underrecognized population. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Paramedic-Initiated Home Care Referrals and Use of Home Care and Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amol A; Klich, John; Thurston, Adam; Scantlebury, Jordan; Kiss, Alex; Seddon, Gayle; Sinha, Samir K

    2017-11-15

    We examined the association between paramedic-initiated home care referrals and utilization of home care, 9-1-1, and Emergency Department (ED) services. This was a retrospective cohort study of individuals who received a paramedic-initiated home care referral after a 9-1-1 call between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Home care, 9-1-1, and ED utilization were compared in the 6 months before and after home care referral. Nonparametric longitudinal regression was performed to assess changes in hours of home care service use and zero-inflated Poisson regression was performed to assess changes in the number of 9-1-1 calls and ambulance transports to ED. During the 24-month study period, 2,382 individuals received a paramedic-initiated home care referral. After excluding individuals who died, were hospitalized, or were admitted to a nursing home, the final study cohort was 1,851. The proportion of the study population receiving home care services increased from 18.2% to 42.5% after referral, representing 450 additional people receiving services. In longitudinal regression analysis, there was an increase of 17.4 hours in total services per person in the six months after referral (95% CI: 1.7-33.1, p = 0.03). The mean number of 9-1-1 calls per person was 1.44 (SD 9.58) before home care referral and 1.20 (SD 7.04) after home care referral in the overall study cohort. This represented a 10% reduction in 9-1-1 calls (95% CI: 7-13%, p home care referral and 0.79 (SD 6.27) after home care referral, representing a 7% reduction (95% CI: 3-11%, p home care records were included in the analysis, the reductions in 9-1-1 calls and ambulance transports to ED were attenuated but remained statistically significant. Paramedic-initiated home care referrals in Toronto were associated with improved access to and use of home care services and may have been associated with reduced 9-1-1 calls and ambulance transports to ED.

  16. [The trial of the domiciliary nutrition support team in which a home medical care office offers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hisaki; Kamei, Miwa; Yamada, Akiko; Toshima, Kazue; Morita, Hideki; Kodama, Naoto; Okabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2010-12-01

    The function of home care support by a medical office is to offer the best medical care for the patient. It is essential that the medical office is capable of taking a call 24-hour a day and 365-day a year from a patient who needs help at home. Our medical office was specialized in home care treatment. Furthermore, we offer a home rehabilitation or a home nutrition education to the patient. On the other hand, a nutritional support is important as well as medical supports. To offer a high quality medical care at home, we created a nutrient support system in our hospital, and formed an at-home nutrition support team(at-home NST). The team is consisted of a medical staff and dietitian, a physical therapist and a speech therapist. As a result of the at-home NST, We improved the followings: (1) we were able to collect a nutritional data basis including a patient 's height and weight, (2) we made a good use of patient's eating habit at home during the medical treatment, and (3) we could make a good use of medical service to a home care patient by managing the information accumulated by nutritional surveillance. In multidisciplinary collaboration, at-home NST can grasp a versatility status of the patient positively. We continue to offer a medical care that is demanded from a home care patient because the activity of the at-home NST raises a quality of medical service we provide.

  17. Improving the Quality of Home Health Care for Children With Medical Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Golden, Shannon L

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe the quality of home health care services for children with medical complexity, identify barriers to delivering optimal home health care, and discuss potential solutions to improve home health care delivery. In this qualitative study, we conducted 20 semistructured in-depth interviews with primary caregivers of children with medical complexity, and 4 focus groups with 18 home health nurses. During an iterative analysis process, we identified themes related to quality of home health care. There is substantial variability between home health nurses in the delivery of home health care to children. Lack of skills in nurses is common and has serious negative health consequences for children with medical complexity, including hospitalizations, emergency room visits, and need for medical procedures. Inadequate home health care also contributes to caregiver burden. A major barrier to delivering optimal home health care is the lack of training of home health nurses in pediatric care and technology use. Potential solutions for improving care include home health agencies training nurses in the care of children with medical complexity, support for nurses in clinical problem solving, and reimbursement for training nurses in pediatric home care. Caregiver-level interventions includes preparation of caregivers about: providing medical care for their children at home and addressing problems with home health care services. There are problems in the quality of home health care delivered to children with medical complexity. Training nurses in the care of children with medical complexity and preparing caregivers about home care could improve home health care quality. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dementia - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: HomeMedical Encyclopedia → Dementia - home care URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007428.htm Dementia - home care To use the ...

  19. Present Activities and Problems of Home Medical Care by Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Satomi; Nishimura, Tetsunari

    2017-01-01

    The rapidly aging population in Japan led to the revision of the dispensing fees, with reviews of the system for added fees on prescriptions for home-bound patients by one-pharmacist pharmacies. However, given the current situation, it is difficult for pharmacies to be engaged in home care, so there are few small pharmacies that are willing to do so. This situation led to a decrease in the number of pharmacists who are experienced in home care. Pharmacists are requesting that practical training in home care be included in the Model Core Curriculum. It is difficult for all students to receive Sample Practical Training, so I joined a working group that created case studies that demonstrate simulated experiences of home care. I believe that case studies are an instructional tool that offers essential points for acquiring practical knowledge. Case studies can reduce the anxiety of inexperienced pharmacists to engage in home care, and I expect that this educational approach will contribute to the promotion of business related to home care for pharmacists.

  20. Higher Referrals for Diabetes Education in a Medical Home Model of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manard, William T; Syberg, Kevin; Behera, Anit; Salas, Joanne; Schneider, F David; Armbrecht, Eric; Hooks-Anderson, Denise; Crannage, Erica; Scherrer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The medical home model has been gaining attention from the health care community as a strategy for improved outcomes for management of chronic disease, including diabetes. The purpose of this study was to compare referrals for diabetes education among patients receiving care from a medical home model versus a traditional practice. Data were obtained from a large, university-affiliated primary care patient data registry. All patients (age 18-96 years) with a diagnosis of prediabetes or diabetes and seen by a physician at least twice during 2011 to 2013 were selected for inclusion. Multivariate regression models measuring the association between medical home status and referral to diabetes education were computed before and after adjusting for covariates. A significantly (P medical home than without a medical home (23.9% vs 13.5%) received a referral for diabetes education. After adjusting for covariates, medical home patients were 2.7 times more likely to receive a referral for diabetes education (odds ratio, 2.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.69-4.35). Patients in a medical home model were more likely to receive referrals for diabetes education than patients in a standard university-affiliated family medicine practice. Future longitudinal designs that match characteristics of patients with a medical home with those of patients without one will provide strong evidence to determine whether referral to diabetes education is a result of the medical home model of care independent of confounding factors. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  1. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  2. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  3. Roles and Educational Effects of Clinical Case Studies in Home Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Tomoji; Shimazoe, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Due to the progression of aging in Japan, pharmacists need to participate in home medical care. To enable pharmacists with no previous experience to participate in home medical care of patients with various diseases in the home environment, it is necessary to adopt an approach of training them in advance. It is thought useful for such clinical training to include patient case studies, which may facilitate the training of pharmacists for home medical care through simulated experience. "The working group to create home clinical cases for education" was launched by a group of university faculty, who have educational knowledge, and trained pharmacists who work with the patients at home. The home care cases were compiled by the university faculty members and the home care practice pharmacists. Working pharmacists and students at pharmaceutical college studied the same case studies of home medical care, and their self-evaluations were compared. They showed that the students rated themselves higher than the pharmacists. One of the reasons was the systematic education of the case studies. The clinical case studies are a good educational tool to promote home care medicine in pharmacies and university pharmaceutical colleges.

  4. A positive deviance approach to understanding key features to improving diabetes care in the medical home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbay, R.A.; Friedberg, M.W.; Miller-Day, M.; Cronholm, P.F.; Adelman, A.; Schneider, E.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The medical home has gained national attention as a model to reorganize primary care to improve health outcomes. Pennsylvania has undertaken one of the largest state-based, multipayer medical home pilot projects. We used a positive deviance approach to identify and compare factors driving

  5. Do primary care medical homes facilitate care transitions after psychiatric discharge for patients with multiple chronic conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa E; Jackson, Carlos; Beadles, Christopher A; Lichstein, Jesse C; Ellis, Alan R; Farley, Joel F; Morrissey, Joseph P; DuBard, C Annette

    2016-01-01

    Primary-care-based medical homes may facilitate care transitions for persons with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) including serious mental illness. The purpose of this manuscript is to assess outpatient follow-up rates with primary care and mental health providers following psychiatric discharge by medical home enrollment and medical complexity. Using a quasi-experimental design, we examined data from North Carolina Medicaid-enrolled adults with MCC hospitalized with an inpatient diagnosis of depression or schizophrenia during 2008-2010. We used inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting and assessed associations between medical home enrollment and outpatient follow-up within 7 and 30 days postdischarge. Medical home enrollees (n=16,137) were substantially more likely than controls (n= 11,304) to receive follow-up care with any provider 30 days post discharge. Increasing patient complexity was associated with a greater probability of primary care follow-up. Medical complexity and medical home enrollment were not associated with follow-up with a mental health provider. Hospitalized persons with MCC including serious mental illness enrolled in a medical home were more likely to receive timely outpatient follow-up with a primary care provider but not with a mental health specialist. These findings suggest that the medical home model may be more adept at linking patients to providers in primary care rather than to specialty mental health providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical Home Features of VHA Primary Care Clinics and Avoidable Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Rose, Danielle E; Canelo, Ismelda; Upadhyay, Anjali S; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    As the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) reorganizes providers into the patient-centered medical home, questions remain whether this model of care can demonstrate improved patient outcomes and cost savings. We measured adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics prior to widespread implementation of the patient-centered medical home and examined if they were associated with lower risk and costs of potentially avoidable hospitalizations. Secondary patient data was linked to clinic administrative and survey data. Patient and clinic factors in the baseline year (FY2009) were used to predict patient outcomes in the follow-up year. 2,853,030 patients from 814 VHA primary care clinics Patient outcomes were measured by hospitalizations for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) and their costs and identified through diagnosis and procedure codes from inpatient records. Clinic adoption of medical home features was obtained from the American College of Physicians Medical Home Builder®. The overall mean home builder score in the study clinics was 88 (SD = 13) or 69%. In adjusted analyses an increase of 10 points in the medical home adoption score in a clinic decreased the odds of an ACSC hospitalization for patients by 3% (P = 0.032). By component, higher access and scheduling (P = 0.004) and care coordination and transitions (P = 0.020) component scores were related to lower risk of an ACSC hospitalization, and higher population management was related to higher risk (P = 0.023). Total medical home features was not related to ACSC hospitalization costs among patients with at least one (P = 0.074). Greater adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics was found to be significantly associated with lower risk of avoidable hospitalizations with access and scheduling and care coordination/transitions in care as key factors.

  7. The caring behaviors of the home health nurse and influence on medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rhoda A

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the caring behaviors of the home health nurse toward the patient influence the patient's medication adherence. The study focused on what effects the verbal and nonverbal caring behaviors of the nurse toward the patient have on the patient's medication adherence. How is the patient's perception of caring by the nurse related to his or her medication adherence? The study was conducted in a Midwestern home health agency over a 4-week period. Findings indicated an improvement in the use of verbal and nonverbal caring behaviors by the nurses with their patients. The patients perceived an increased use of these caring behaviors by the nurses with them. The patients' medication adherence and barriers to adherence improved. Other significant findings indicated that the verbal and nonverbal caring behaviors of the nurses and the patients' perception of the caring behaviors influenced and improved the patients' medication adherence by week 4.

  8. Safety in home care: A research protocol for studying medication management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easty Anthony

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is an ongoing global priority, with medication safety considered a prevalent, high-risk area of concern. Yet, we have little understanding of the supports and barriers to safe medication management in the Canadian home care environment. There is a clear need to engage the providers and recipients of care in studying and improving medication safety with collaborative approaches to exploring the nature and safety of medication management in home care. Methods A socio-ecological perspective on health and health systems drives our iterative qualitative study on medication safety with elderly home care clients, family members and other informal caregivers, and home care providers. As we purposively sample across four Canadian provinces: Alberta (AB, Ontario (ON, Quebec (QC and Nova Scotia (NS, we will collect textual and visual data through home-based interviews, participant-led photo walkabouts of the home, and photo elicitation sessions at clients' kitchen tables. Using successive rounds of interpretive description and human factors engineering analyses, we will generate robust descriptions of managing medication at home within each provincial sample and across the four-province group. We will validate our initial interpretations through photo elicitation focus groups with home care providers in each province to develop a refined description of the phenomenon that can inform future decision-making, quality improvement efforts, and research. Discussion The application of interpretive and human factors lenses to the visual and textual data is expected to yield findings that advance our understanding of the issues, challenges, and risk-mitigating strategies related to medication safety in home care. The images are powerful knowledge translation tools for sharing what we learn with participants, decision makers, other healthcare audiences, and the public. In addition, participants engage in knowledge exchange

  9. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-08-03

    Medication management is the most challenging component of a successful transition from hospital to home, a challenge of growing complexity as the number of older persons living with chronic conditions grows, along with increasingly specialised and accelerated hospital treatment plans. Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge. Data consisted of field notes and photographs from the patients' homes, medication lists and medical records. Field notes were analysed in four steps. The analysis showed 12 stages in medication management in which nurses strove to adjust medication management to the patients' actual health status by mediating on knowledge of the patient, information to the patient and on rules and regulations and by establishing order in medication lists and medications in the home. The nurse-patient relationship, the integration of care and the context of care challenged patient safety in visiting nurses' medication management in patients' homes after hospital discharge. The implications for practice were the following: to ensure nurses' opportunities to continuously evolve their observation skills and skills in making sound clinical judgements; to establish interprofessional working processes which support the continuous assessment of patients' needs and the adjustment of care and treatment; to clarify expectations to nurses' responsibility and patients' privacy. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. The Impact of the Medical Home on Access to Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheak-Zamora, Nancy C.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience difficulty accessing health care services. Using parent-reported data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we examined whether having a medical home reduces unmet need for specialty care services for children with ASD (n = 3,055). Descriptive…

  11. [Current Status of Medical Care for Nursing Home Residents in Germany - Results of an Empirical Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleina, T; Horn, A; Suhr, R; Schaeffer, D

    2017-05-01

    Following recent studies revealing deficits in general and specialised medical care of nursing home residents in Germany, the discussion on the quality of medical care of residents in residential care facilities has intensified in the past years. As a result, political efforts have been undertaken to facilitate improvements in this context. We collected data on the health status and medical care of 778 residents from 8 nursing homes in order to investigate the current situation regarding medical care for nursing home residents in Germany. Most of them were multimorbid, taking several prescribed medications. Our results showed that about 91% of the residents had personal contact to general practitioners or internists quarterly and only 1.3% had no such contacts within a year. The frequency of contacts to other medical specialists was comparably low. For example, within a year, only 18.9% of the residents had contact to urologists; only 16.7% had contact to ophthalmologists; only 39.6% had contact to dentists and only 10.6% of the female residents had contact to gynaecologists. Despite the fact that many of the residents showed specific medical care needs, these rates were below the utilisation rates of older population groups not living in long-term care homes. This leads to the conclusion that previous efforts to optimise medical care in nursing homes were only partially successful. Well known deficits are still remaining. Considering potential consequences for residents, further and consequent actions are required to improve the general and specialised medical care in institutionalised long-term care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Helnæs, Ann Kathrine; Schultz, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with one or more psychotropic medications (PMs), especially in the elderly, is associated with risk, and the effects of treatment are poorly validated. The aim of this article was to describe the use of PM in a population of citizens receiving either residential care or home...... care with focus on the prevalence of drug use, the combination of different PMs and doses in relation to current recommendations. METHODS: The medication lists of 214 citizens receiving residential care (122) and home care (92) were collected together with information on age, gender and residential...

  13. Seniors managing multiple medications: using mixed methods to view the home care safety lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ariella; Macdonald, Marilyn; Marck, Patricia; Toon, Lynn; Griffin, Melissa; Easty, Tony; Fraser, Kimberly; MacKinnon, Neil; Mitchell, Jonathan; Lang, Eddy; Goodwin, Sharon

    2015-12-12

    Patient safety is a national and international priority with medication safety earmarked as both a prevalent and high-risk area of concern. To date, medication safety research has focused overwhelmingly on institutional based care provided by paid healthcare professionals, which often has little applicability to the home care setting. This critical gap in our current understanding of medication safety in the home care sector is particularly evident with the elderly who often manage more than one chronic illness and a complex palette of medications, along with other care needs. This study addresses the medication management issues faced by seniors with chronic illnesses, their family, caregivers, and paid providers within Canadian publicly funded home care programs in Alberta (AB), Ontario (ON), Quebec (QC) and Nova Scotia (NS). Informed by a socio-ecological perspective, this study utilized Interpretive Description (ID) methodology and participatory photographic methods to capture and analyze a range of visual and textual data. Three successive phases of data collection and analysis were conducted in a concurrent, iterative fashion in eight urban and/or rural households in each province. A total of 94 participants (i.e., seniors receiving home care services, their family/caregivers, and paid providers) were interviewed individually. In addition, 69 providers took part in focus groups. Analysis was iterative and concurrent with data collection in that each interview was compared with subsequent interviews for converging as well as diverging patterns. Six patterns were identified that provide a rich portrayal of the complexity of medication management safety in home care: vulnerabilities that impact the safe management and storage of medication, sustaining adequate supports, degrees of shared accountability for care, systems of variable effectiveness, poly-literacy required to navigate the system, and systemic challenges to maintaining medication safety in the home

  14. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Yukihiro, E-mail: yuyu@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education.

  15. Health and Functioning of Families of Children With Special Health Care Needs Cared for in Home Care, Long-term Care, and Medical Day Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    To examine and compare child and parent or guardian physical and mental health outcomes in families with children with special health care needs who have medically complex technology-dependent needs in home care, long-term care (LTC), and medical day care (MDC) settings. The number of children requiring medically complex technology-dependent care has grown exponentially. In this study, options for their care are home care, LTC, or MDC. Comparison of child and parent/guardian health outcomes is unknown. Using repeated measures data were collected from 84 dyads (parent/guardian, medically complex technology-dependent child) for 5 months using Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Generic Core Module 4.0 and Family Impact Module Data analysis: χ(2), RM-ANCOVA. There were no significant differences in overall physical health, mental health, and functioning of children by care setting. Most severely disabled children were in home care; moderately disabled in MDC; children in vegetative state LTC; however, parents perceived children's health across care setting as good to excellent. Parents/guardians from home care reported the poorest physical health including being tired during the day, too tired to do the things they like to do, feeling physically weak, or feeling sick and had cognitive difficulties, difficulties with worry, communication, and daily activities. Parents/guardians from LTC reported the best physical health with time and energy for a social life and employment. Trends in health care policy indicate a movement away from LTC care to care in the family home where data indicate these parents/guardians are already mentally and functionally challenged.

  16. Medication discrepancy and potentially inappropriate medication in older Chinese-American home-care patients after hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sophia H; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Foust, Janice B; Boltz, Marie P; Kim, Hongsoo

    2012-10-01

    Studies of potential medication problems among older adults have focused on English-speaking populations in a single health care setting or a single potential medication problem. No previous studies investigated potential inappropriate medications (PIMs) and medication discrepancies (MDs) among older Chinese Americans during care transitions from hospital discharge to home care. The aims of this study were to examine, in older Chinese Americans, the prevalence of both PIMs and MDs; the relationship between PIMs and MDs; and the patient and hospitalization characteristics associated with them during care transitions from hospital discharge to home care. This cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of older Chinese Americans from a large certified nonprofit home-care agency in New York City from June 2010 to July 2011. PIMs were identified by using 2002 diagnosis-independent Beers criteria. MDs were identified by comparing the differences between hospital discharge medication order and home-care admission medication order. Prevalence of PIMs and MDs and their relationship was determined. Logistic regression examined the relationship between hospitalization and patient characteristics with PIMs and MDs. The sample consisted of 82 older Chinese-American home-care patients. Twenty (24.3%) study participants were prescribed at least one PIM at hospital discharge. Fifty-one (67.1%) study participants experienced at least one MD. A positive correlation was found between the occurrence of PIMs and MDs (r = 0.22; P = 0.05). Number of medications was the only significant factor associated with both PIMs and MDs. In addition, older age and more hospitalization days were associated with PIMs. The evident prevalence of PIMs and MDs supports the practice of evaluating the appropriateness of medications while reconciling inconsistencies in medication regimens. The number of medications was the only factor associated with both PIMs and MDs, underscoring the need to

  17. Work Domain Analysis for understanding medication safety in care homes in England: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Rosemary H M; Anderson, Janet E; Buckle, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Medication safety and errors are a major concern in care homes. In addition to the identification of incidents, there is a need for a comprehensive system description to avoid the danger of introducing interventions that have unintended consequences and are therefore unsustainable. The aim of this study was to explore the impact and uniqueness of Work Domain Analysis (WDA) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of medication safety problems within the care home system and identify the potential benefits of WDA to design safety interventions to improve medication safety. A comprehensive, systematic and contextual overview of the care home medication system was developed for the first time. The novel use of the abstraction hierarchy (AH) to analyse medication errors revealed the value of the AH to guide a comprehensive analysis of errors and generate system improvement recommendations that took into account the contextual information of the wider system. It is widely acknowledged that a systems approach is necessary to improve medication safety. This study used a cognitive engineering method, Work Domain Analysis, to map the care home medication system and analyse medication errors. A macro-level view of the system was developed and this has provided a knowledge base for future interventions.

  18. The Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print A ... for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a place ...

  19. The impact of medical technology on sense of security in the palliative home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Berit; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The increase in the use of medical devices in palliative home care requires that patients and next-of-kin feel secure. Therefore, the aim was to describe medical technology's impact on the sense of security for patients, next-of-kin and district nurses. Deductive content analysis was conducted on data from three previous studies, using the theoretical framework 'palliative home care as a secure base'. The use of medical technology was shown to have an impact on the sense of security for all involved. A sense of control was promoted by trust in staff and their competence in managing the technology, which was linked to continuity. Inner peace and being in comfort implied effective symptom relief facilitated by pain pumps and being relieved of responsibility. Health care professionals need to have practical knowledge about medical technology, but at the same time have an awareness of how to create and maintain a sense of security.

  20. The Medical Home and Care Coordination in Disaster Recovery: Hypothesis for Interventions and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Robert K; Abramson, David M; Redlener, Irwin; Gracy, Delaney

    2015-08-01

    In postdisaster settings, health care providers encounter secondary surges of unmet primary care and mental health needs that evolve throughout disaster recovery phases. Whatever a community's predisaster adequacy of health care, postdisaster gaps are similar to those of any underserved region. We hypothesize that existing practice and evidence supporting medical homes and care coordination in primary care for the underserved provide a favorable model for improving health in disrupted communities. Elements of medical home services can be offered by local or temporary providers from outside the region, working out of mobile clinics early in disaster recovery. As repairs and reconstruction proceed, local services are restored over weeks or years. Throughout recovery, major tasks include identifying high-risk patients relative to the disaster and underlying health conditions, assisting displaced families as they transition through housing locations, and tracking their evolving access to health care and community services as they are restored. Postdisaster sources of financial assistance for the disaster-exposed population are often temporary and evolving, requiring up-to-date information to cover costs of care until stable services and insurance coverage are restored. Evidence to support disaster recovery health care improvement will require research funding and metrics on structures, processes, and outcomes of the disaster recovery medical home and care coordination, based on adaptation of standard validated methods to crisis environments.

  1. [Medical care support intervention to the patient and family who has chosen a terminal care at home - an influence of satisfactory experience on the culture of terminal care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mariko; Kouketsu, Nobuko; Ozaki, Mitsuyo; Tomita, Ikue; Hong, Youngjae; Miura, Hisayuki; Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2010-12-01

    The National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan implemented a home medical care support system for aged patients in April 2009. In this study, we report a case of terminal care system where a medical care intervention was carried out by a close coordination of visiting nurses and other staffs with a "at-home terminal care" brochure on hand, and we discussed how this system was brought forward satisfactory and how it affected this culture.

  2. Sedative load of medications prescribed for older people with dementia in care homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Elizabeth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine the sedative load and use of sedative and psychotropic medications among older people with dementia living in (residential care homes. Methods Medication data were collected at baseline and at two further time-points for eligible residents of six care homes participating in the EVIDEM-End Of Life (EOL study for whom medication administration records were available. Regular medications were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system and individual sedative loads were calculated using a previously published model. Results At baseline, medication administration records were reviewed for 115 residents; medication records were reviewed for 112 and 105 residents at time-points 2 and 3 respectively. Approximately one-third of residents were not taking any medications with sedative properties at each time-point, while a significant proportion of residents had a low sedative load score of 1 or 2 (54.8%, 59.0% and 57.1% at baseline and time-points 2 and 3 respectively. More than 10% of residents had a high sedative load score (≥ 3 at baseline (12.2%, and this increased to 14.3% at time-points 2 and 3. Approximately two-thirds of residents (66.9% regularly used one or more psychotropic medication(s. Antidepressants, predominantly selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs, were most frequently used, while antipsychotics, hypnotics and anxiolytics were less routinely administered. The prevalence of antipsychotic use among residents was 19.0%, lower than has been previously reported for nursing home residents. Throughout the duration of the study, administration of medications recognised as having prominent sedative adverse effects and/or containing sedative components outweighed the regular use of primary sedatives. Conclusions Sedative load scores were similar throughout the study period for residents with dementia in each of the care homes. Scores were

  3. Payment and Care for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Patients: Toward a Specialized Medical Home for Complex Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, James L; McClellan, Mark B; Majhail, Navneet S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Bredeson, Christopher N; Maziarz, Richard T; LeMaistre, Charles F; Lill, Michael C; Farnia, Stephanie H; Komanduri, Krishna V; Boo, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Patient-centered medical home models are fundamental to the advanced alternative payment models defined in the Medicare Access and Children's Health Insurance Plan Reauthorization Act (MACRA). The patient-centered medical home is a model of healthcare delivery supported by alternative payment mechanisms and designed to promote coordinated medical care that is simultaneously patient-centric and population-oriented. This transformative care model requires shifting reimbursement to include a per-patient payment intended to cover services not previously reimbursed such as disease management over time. Payment is linked to quality measures, including proportion of care delivered according to predefined pathways and demonstrated impact on outcomes. Some medical homes also include opportunities for shared savings by reducing overall costs of care. Recent proposals have suggested expanding the medical home model to specialized populations with complex needs because primary care teams may not have the facilities or the requisite expertise for their unique needs. An example of a successful care model that may provide valuable lessons for those creating specialty medical home models already exists in many hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) centers that deliver multidisciplinary, coordinated, and highly specialized care. The integration of care delivery in HCT centers has been driven by the specialty care their patients require and by the payment methodology preferred by the commercial payers, which has included bundling of both inpatient and outpatient care in the peritransplant interval. Commercial payers identify qualified HCT centers based on accreditation status and comparative performance, enabled in part by center-level comparative performance data available within a national outcomes database mandated by the Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act of 2005. Standardization across centers has been facilitated via voluntary accreditation implemented by Foundation for

  4. The strategic nature of individual change behavior: How physicians and their staff implement medical home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Timothy; Scott, Sarah

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of care is central to primary care system success and transformation. Less is known about which PCMH activities primary care workers most frequently perform, if or why they might view that work more favorably, and how such work may function strategically to advance individual and organizational adaptation to new demands, as well as deliver good patient care. Understanding better how primary care physicians and staff perceive, experience, and use certain types of PCMH work for adapting to new demands looms a key imperative for gaining insights into PCMH implementation at the workplace level. Using a worker adaptation perspective that emphasizes the role of social learning and individual agency, this study explores the strategic nature of PCMH implementation through 51 in-depth interviews with physicians and staff in six accredited PCMHs. Select medical home activities were identified, in which primary care physicians and staff most engaged on a daily basis, and they fell into five distinct PCMH work domains labeled team care, medical home responsibilities, care management, access, and medication management. These activities had common features such as high levels of familiarity, simplicity, and camaraderie. In addition, through their experiences performing these activities, physicians and staff appeared to gain strategic benefits for themselves and the larger organization including enhanced self-efficacy and readiness for change. The findings show that particular forms of PCMH work not only advance patient care in favorable ways but also enhance individual and organizational capacity for adapting to this innovative model and its demands. This knowledge adds to our understanding of how to implement PCMH care in ways that are good for workers, primary care organizations, and patients and offers practical guidance as to which forms of PCMH work should be encouraged, incented, and rewarded.

  5. Evaluating sociodemographic and medical conditions of patients under home care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Önder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In our study, we aimed to reveal medical conditions and the sociodemographic conditions of patients under home care service. Methods: Our study is planned on 52 patients who are under home care service at Sarıkamış State Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014. Patients' sex, education, social security status, comorbid diseases and general health status were recorded. Results: Fifty-two patients enrolled. 21 of them (40.4% were men, 31 of them (59.6 % were women. It is revealed that In 36 patients (69.2% did not receive formal education throughout their lives, while16 (30.8% of them had only primary education. All female patients were housewives. The most frequent diseases in home care patients were cerebrovascular disease in 18 (34.6% subjects, Alzheimer's disease in 9 (17.3%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 4 (7.7% d. 38 patients (73.1% needed routine follow-up. Most of the patients (61.5% had green card health insurance. Only 6 patients (11.5% were in need of narcotic analgesics. Thirteen patients had pressure ulcers due to immobilization. Evaluating the exercise capacity of the patients; 43 (82.7% could not dressed themselves, 38 (73.1% could not use phone. Thirty-two patients had urinary incontinence and 31 had fecal incontinence. Conclusion: Today, population of patients who need home care service is increasing due to ease access to home care service and increase in survival. For a better care of patients, home care providers should be well educated and differences on features of patients and medical conditions it should be taken into consideration.

  6. Development and validation of a new quality of life scale for patients receiving home-based medical care: The Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitani, Hiroko; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kazushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Asai, Atsushi; Maeda, Keiko; Nomura, Hideki; Shimojima, Takuya; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ohshima, Hiroko; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2017-03-01

    To develop and validate a scale that assesses quality of life in patients receiving home-based medical care. A new quality of life scale was developed and evaluated in four phases: (i) item generation; (ii) first field study with a 14-item questionnaire; (iii) preliminary validation study, to reduce the number of items to four; and (iv) second field study comprising 40 patients, to evaluate the validity of the final version. Participants were requested to answer both the final version of the scale and the Short Form-8, to enable identification of any relationship between the two. Items were generated after discussions with doctors and care managers, and 14 items were selected for the draft version. In the preliminary validation study, 10 items were deleted, based on the results of statistical analysis of the data from the first field study. A psychometric analysis showed that the final four-item questionnaire had internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.7), and a significant association with the Short Form-8. We created the first quality of life scale for patients receiving home-based medical care. The scale's internal consistency was confirmed, as well as its external validity. This scale can be used independently of factors such as a patient's age, sex, level of independence in the presence of dementia or disability, swallowing function, hearing ability and communication ability, and can be used with ease in routine clinical practice. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 440-448. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. The Care of Children With Congenital Heart Disease in Their Primary Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantin-Hermoso, M Regina; Berger, Stuart; Bhatt, Ami B; Richerson, Julia E; Morrow, Robert; Freed, Michael D; Beekman, Robert H

    2017-11-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth anomaly. With advances in repair and palliation of these complex lesions, more and more patients are surviving and are discharged from the hospital to return to their families. Patients with CHD have complex health care needs that often must be provided for or coordinated for by the primary care provider (PCP) and medical home. This policy statement aims to provide the PCP with general guidelines for the care of the child with congenital heart defects and outlines anticipated problems, serving as a repository of current knowledge in a practical, readily accessible format. A timeline approach is used, emphasizing the role of the PCP and medical home in the management of patients with CHD in their various life stages. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Effects of health insurance on non-working married women’s medical care use and bed days at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examines whether bed days are alternative methods to medical care use for treating a particular illness. If bed days at home are considered as an alternative to medical treatment, then medical care use and bed days at home should be influenced by an individual’s health insurance status. Method This study uses data from the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) on medical care use and bed days at home for each contracted illness of non-working married women. Results The results suggest that the health insurance status of non-working married women has considerable influence on their choice between medical care use and bed days at home. In addition, those with health insurance are more likely to use medical care and less likely to use bed days at home, but they tend to avoid the simultaneous use of medical care and bed days at home. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies’ findings indicating that absences from work and medical care use among working males may be complements, this study’s results for non-working married women without health insurance suggest that they use rest and medical treatment as substitutes, not complements. PMID:23816313

  9. Young adults with spina bifida transitioned to a medical home: a survey of medical care in Jacksonville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Antonio M; Wood, David L; Keeley, Cortney; James, Hector E; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-10-23

    OBJECT The transition of the young adult with spina bifida (YASB) from pediatric to adult health care is considered a priority by organized pediatrics. There is a paucity of transition programs and related studies. Jacksonville Health and Transition Services (JaxHATS) is one such transition program in Jacksonville, Florida. This study's purpose was to evaluate the health care access, utilization, and quality of life (QOL) of a group of YASBs who have transitioned from pediatric care. METHODS A survey tool addressing access to health care and quality of health and life was developed based on an established survey. Records of the Spinal Defects Clinic held at Wolfson Children's Hospital and JaxHATS Clinic were reviewed and YASBs (> 18 and spina bifida (SB) specialists; none reported difficulty or delays in obtaining health care. Only 2 patients required emergent care in the last year for an SB-related medical problem. Seven respondents reported very good to excellent QOL. Family, lifestyle, and environmental factors were also examined. CONCLUSIONS In this small group of YASBs with a medical home, easy access to care for medical conditions was the norm, with few individuals having recent emergency visits and almost all reporting at least a good overall QOL. Larger studies of YASBs are needed to evaluate the positive effects of medical homes on health and QOL in this population.

  10. Patient Experience of Chronic Illness Care and Medical Home Transformation in Safety Net Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Elizabeth L; Gao, Yue; Peek, Monica E; Nocon, Robert S; Gunter, Kathryn E; Lee, Sang Mee; Chin, Marshall H

    2018-02-01

    To examine the relationship between medical home transformation and patient experience of chronic illness care. Thirteen safety net clinics located in five states enrolled in the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of randomly selected adult patients were completed at baseline (n = 303) and postintervention (n = 271). Questions from the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) (100-point scale) were used to capture patient experience of chronic illness care. Generalized estimating equation methods were used to (i) estimate how differential improvement in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) capability affected differences in modified PACIC scores between baseline and postintervention, and (ii) to examine cross-sectional associations between PCMH capability and modified PACIC scores for patients at completion of the intervention. In adjusted analyses, high PCMH improvement (above median) was only marginally associated with a larger increase in total modified PACIC score (adjusted β = 7.7, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]: -1.1 to 16.5). At completion of the intervention, a 10-point higher PCMH capability score was associated with an 8.9-point higher total modified PACIC score (95 percent CI: 3.1-14.7) and higher scores in four of five subdomains (patient activation, delivery system design, contextual care, and follow-up/coordination). We report that sustained, 5-year medical home transformation may be associated with modest improvement in patient experience of chronic illness care for vulnerable populations in safety net clinics. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. [Assessment of our home care and home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Suzushino, Seiko; Tamotsu, Kiyokazu

    2014-12-01

    We conducted home care and home palliative care from the department of home care. We provided home care services to 190 patients(105 men, 85 women)in October 2013. Their average age was 78.7(range: 32-102)years old, and home care had been underway from 1 day to 8 years, 10 months. Among all participants, 168(88.4%)suffered from malignant diseases, 168 patients had died, and over half of deceased patients(88 out of 168)had died at home. We used opioids for control of cancer pain, carried out home parenteral nutrition(HPN), home enteral nutrition(HEN), percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy( PEG), and removed pleural effusion and ascites during home care. In order to facilitate the practice of palliative care by the palliative care team, which consists of various medical staff in the hospital, we are giving high priority to education and enlightenment in the hospital. To provide enlightenment, education, and cooperation between regional home care and home palliative care, we are also conducting educational lectures in the regional party of the Iwaki city medical associate, and providing combined educational-medical training for home care and home palliative care by various medical staff.

  12. Family physicians' experiences when collaborating with district nurses in home care-based medical treatment. A grounded theory study

    OpenAIRE

    Modin, Sonja; T?rnkvist, Lena; Furhoff, Anna-Karin; Hylander, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This article concerns Swedish family physicians' (FPs) experiences collaborating with district nurses (DNs) when the DNs provide medical treatment for home care patients. The aim was to develop a model to illuminate this process from the FPs' perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 FPs concerning one of their patients with home care by a DN. The interview focused on one patient's treatment and care by different care providers and the collabor...

  13. Pharmaceutical care and home delivery of medication to patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña San José Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the implementation of a new model face to face and remote pharmaceutical care with home delivery of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were selected to start this new model of care. Four characteristics were taken into account for the choice: chronicity of the disease, frequency of doctor visits, pharmaceutical care value and conservation of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines at room temperature. Results: Out of 68 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and treated with tyronsine kinase inhibitors, 42 were selected due to the frequency of their hematologist visits. An introductory letter and a questionnaire about their preferences were sent to these patients.Sixteen of them expressed their desire to participate. The legal department designed a confidentiality contract, as well as a model of informed consent. A logistic distribution model based on defined routes and timetables was established. Prior to inclusion, pharmaceutical care was performed in a face to face consultation and the communication way was established for the followings remote consultations. Home delivery had a monthly cost of 13.2 € (including VAT per patient. All the patients who started this program continue in it. To date, 5 deliveries per patient have been conducted Conclusions: It is possible to establish an alternative model of pharmaceutical care with home delivery of medication, keeping the pharmacist-patient relationship, avoiding travel, ensuring the confidentiality and rationalizing the stocks

  14. Medication review of community-dwelling seniors using intensified home-care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, M; Harder, S

    2011-03-01

    Investigations on medication burden, falling, and inappropriate dosing in renal impairment have been obtained in patients living in nursing homes. Data from home-dwelling patients in intensified ambulatory care, especially from Germany are scant. We evaluated patients daily visited by an ambulatory care service (Cohort 1, n = 102, median age 80 y) or had care given by relatives only (cohort 2, n = 101, median age 76 y) at baseline (V1), 6 (V2) and 12 months (V3). At V1 patients in Cohort 1 had 5 (median, range 3 - 15) and at V3 6 (3 - 17) medications. No differences could be observed between cohorts regarding number and pattern of medications. At V1, 30/102 patients of Cohort 1 had creatinine measured within the last 6 months, 13/30 patients had an eGFR < 50 ml/min. 6/34 medications which need dose-adjustment were unadjusted. Low surveillance of renal function and unadjusted dosing were also observed at other visits and also in Cohort 2. Within 1 year, 29/75 mobile patients in cohort 1 had a fall, 18/29 patients had a benzodiazepine prescribed regularly, whereas a benzodiazepine was prescribed in 6/46 patients which did not fall (chi2 p = 0.004). In Cohort 2, the number of falling patients was lower (19/84 mobile patients, p = 0.028). 11/19 patients had a benzodiazepine prescribed, in contrast to 5/65 patients which did not fall (chi2 p = 0.001). It needs to be elucidated whether a care service can contribute to medication safety in patients e.g. by reviewing medication charts and organizing for controls of ancillary laboratory values.

  15. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... are chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help ...

  16. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  17. [Sharing patient information using iPads in the introduction of IT for home medical care-construction of a network for home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Atsutomo; Kijima, Yasuaki

    2012-12-01

    In hospitals, information technology(IT)has been a natural part of care for some time. However, IT has not yet been widely introduced into home care. While performing home care, healthcare providers must carry numerous patients' medical records, and are unable to share the information included in those records with other providers. Thus, we introduced the system of sharing patient information using iPads. This system enables access to patient information regardless of time and place. In addition, we can share information such as X-ray images and computed tomography(CT)scans between different clinics. Thus, we are able to give clearer instructions to patients and other providers in a smoother way. This system could be used to construct a network for home care. In the future, we could aim to share patient information within a much wider network, including families and other kinds of organizations, for optimal care. This system will aid in the development of IT use in home care.

  18. Incorporating a pharmacist into an interprofessional team providing transgender care under a medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Cheyenne; Colip, Leslie; Sharon, Nathaniel; Conklin, Jessica

    2017-02-01

    A pharmacist's role in providing care to transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) patients within a medical home model of care is described. A comprehensive transgender services clinic was established in February 2015 in New Mexico. Clinic services are provided under an "informed consent" model of care, as opposed to the traditional "gatekeeper" approach. The clinic's interprofessional team consists of a clinical pharmacist, a psychiatrist, a nurse practitioner, an endocrinologist, a diabetes educator, a massage therapist, a nurse, a nutritionist, and medical assistants. The clinical pharmacist has served in the following roles: (1) assessing health literacy and tailoring the consent process to the patient's literacy level, (2) initiating in-depth discussion of the medical risks and benefits of cross-sex hormone therapy (HT), as well as HT alternatives, (3) discussing typical timelines for physical outcomes of HT, (4) discussing a patient's expectations and goals for csHT, (5) discussing the different HT formulations and helping to determine which formulation is best suited to meeting patient's goals, (6) helping the team obtain prior authorizations for csHT, and (7) managing risk reduction strategies such as smoking cessation and weight loss. Involvement of a pharmacist in the clinic has improved care access and quality for TGNC patients in the southwestern United States. A pharmacist in an interprofessional team staffing a clinic for TGNC people has assumed multiple responsibilities and helped improve patient care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of the Rochester Medical Home Initiative on Primary Care Practices, Quality, Utilization, and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Meredith B; Sinaiko, Anna D; Eastman, Diana; Chapman, Benjamin; Partridge, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) may improve the quality of primary care while reducing costs and utilization. Early evidence on the effectiveness of PCMH has been mixed. We analyze the impact of a PCMH intervention in Rochester NY on costs, utilization, and quality of care. A propensity score-matched difference-in-differences analysis of the effect of the PCMH intervention relative to a comparison group of practices. Qualitative interviews with PCMH practice managers on their experiences and challenges with PCMH practice transformation. Seven pilot practices and 61 comparison practices (average of 36,531 and 30,192 attributed member months per practice, respectively). Interviews with practice leaders at all pilot sites. Individual HEDIS quality measures of preventive care, diabetes care, and care for coronary artery disease. Utilization measures of hospital use, office visits, imaging and laboratory tests, and prescription drug use. Cost measures are inpatient, prescription drug, and total spending. After 3 years, PCMH practices reported decreased ambulatory care sensitive emergency room visits and use of imaging tests, and increased primary care visits and laboratory tests. Utilization of prescription drugs increased but drug spending decreased. PCMH practices reported increased rates of breast cancer screening and low-density lipid screening for diabetes patients, and decreased rates of any prevention quality indicator. The PCMH model leads to significant changes in patient care, with reductions in some services and increases in others. This study joins a growing body of work that finds no effect of PCMH transformation on total health care spending.

  20. Age, Race, and Gender Differences in Antipsychotic Medication Use among Children Prior to Entry to Out-of-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robst, John; Armstrong, Mary; Dollard, Norin

    2009-01-01

    There is growing literature examining the use of psychotropic medications and specifically antipsychotic medications among youth in the United States. This study uses administrative claims data to assess antipsychotic medication use among children prior to being served in therapeutic out-of-home care settings and whether there are utilization…

  1. Response to depression treatment in the Aging Brain Care Medical Home model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaMantia MA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael A LaMantia,1–4 Anthony J Perkins,5,6 Sujuan Gao,2,7 Mary G Austrom,8,9 Cathy A Alder,10 Dustin D French,11,12 Debra K Litzelman,2,3,13 Ann H Cottingham,3 Malaz A Boustani1–3,5 1Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 2Regenstrief Institute, Inc., 3Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 4Department of Medicine, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, 5Indiana University Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, 6Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, 7Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, 8Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, 9Indiana University Alzheimer’s Disease Center, 10Eskenazi Health, Indianapolis, IN, 11Department of Ophthalmology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 12Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, Chicago, IL, 13Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: To evaluate the effect of the Aging Brain Care (ABC Medical Home program’s depression module on patients’ depression severity measurement over time.Design: Retrospective chart review.Setting: Public hospital system.Participants: Patients enrolled in the ABC Medical Home program between October 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014.Methods: The response of 773 enrolled patients who had multiple patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9 scores recorded in the ABC Medical Home program’s depression care protocol was evaluated. Repeatedly measured PHQ-9 change scores were the dependent variables in the mixed effects models, and demographic and comorbid medical conditions were tested as potential independent variables while including random effects for time and intercept.Results: Among those patients with baseline PHQ-9 scores >10, there was a significant decrease in PHQ-9 scores over time (P<0.001; however, the effect

  2. Stakeholder Perspectives on Changes in Hypertension Care Under the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Alison J.; Kellom, Katherine; Miller-Day, Michelle; McClintock, Heather F. de Vries; Kaye, Elise M.; Gabbay, Robert; Cronholm, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, yet the proportion of adults whose hypertension is controlled is low. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model for care delivery that emphasizes patient-centered and team-based care and focuses on quality and safety. Our goal was to investigate changes in hypertension care under PCMH implementation in a large multipayer PCMH demonstration project that may have led to improvements in hypertension control. Methods The PCMH transformation initiative conducted 118 semistructured interviews at 17 primary care practices in southeastern Pennsylvania between January 2011 and January 2012. Clinicians (n = 47), medical assistants (n = 26), office administrators (n = 12), care managers (n = 11), front office staff (n = 7), patient educators (n = 4), nurses (n = 4), social workers (n = 4), and other administrators (n = 3) participated in interviews. Study personnel used thematic analysis to identify themes related to hypertension care. Results Clinicians described difficulties in expanding services under PCMH to meet the needs of the growing number of patients with hypertension as well as how perceptions of hypertension control differed from actual performance. Staff and office administrators discussed achieving patient-centered hypertension care through patient education and self-management support with personalized care plans. They indicated that patient report cards were helpful tools. Participants across all groups discussed a team- and systems-based approach to hypertension care. Conclusion Practices undergoing PCMH transformation may consider stakeholder perspectives about patient-centered, team-based, and systems-based approaches as they work to optimize hypertension care. PMID:26916899

  3. Teamwork and delegation in medical homes: primary care staff perspectives in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Gala; Stewart, Greg L; Lampman, Michelle; Pelak, Mary; Solimeo, Samantha L

    2014-07-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) relies on a team approach to patient care. For organizations engaged in transitioning to a PCMH model, identifying and providing the resources needed to promote team functioning is essential. To describe team-level resources required to support PCMH team functioning within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and provide insight into how the presence or absence of these resources facilitates or impedes within-team delegation. Semi-structured interviews with members of pilot teams engaged in PCMH implementation in 77 primary care clinics serving over 300,000 patients across two VHA regions covering the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest United States. A purposive sample of 101 core members of pilot teams, including 32 primary care providers, 42 registered nurse care managers, 15 clinical associates, and 12 clerical associates. Investigators from two evaluation sites interviewed frontline primary care staff separately, and then collaborated on joint analysis of parallel data to develop a broad, comprehensive understanding of global themes impacting team functioning and within-team delegation. We describe four themes key to understanding how resources at the team level supported ability of primary care staff to work as effective, engaged teams. Team-based task delegation was facilitated by demarcated boundaries and collective identity; shared goals and sense of purpose; mature and open communication characterized by psychological safety; and ongoing, intentional role negotiation. Our findings provide a framework for organizations to identify assets already in place to support team functioning, as well as areas in need of improvement. For teams struggling to make practice changes, our results indicate key areas where they may benefit from future support. In addition, this research sheds light on how variation in medical home implementation and outcomes may be associated with variation in team-based task delegation.

  4. Characteristics of Primary Care Physicians in Patient-centered Medical Home Practices: United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Esther; Kurtzman, Ellen; Lau, Denys T; Taplin, Caroline; Bindman, Andrew B

    2017-02-01

    Objective-This report describes the characteristics of primary care physicians in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices and compares these characteristics with those of primary care physicians in non-PCMH practices. Methods-The data presented in this report were collected during the induction interview for the 2013 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a national probability sample survey of nonfederal physicians who see patients in office settings in the United States. Analyses exclude anesthesiologists, radiologists, pathologists, and physicians in community health centers. In this report, PCMH status is self-defined as having been certified by one of the following organizations: Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, The Joint Commission, National Committee for Quality Assurance, URAC, or other certifying bodies. Estimates exclude physicians missing information on PCMH status. Sample data are weighted to produce national estimates of physicians and characteristics of their practices. Results-In 2013, 18.0% of office-based primary care physicians worked in practices certified as PCMHs. A higher percentage of primary care physicians in PCMH practices (68.8%) had at least one physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or certified nurse midwife on staff compared with non-PCMH practices (47.7%). A higher percentage of primary care physicians in PCMH practices reported electronic transmission (69.6%) as the primary method for receiving information on patients hospitalized or seen in emergency departments compared with non-PCMH practices (41.5%). The percentage of primary care physicians in practices reporting quality measures or quality indicators to payers or organizations monitoring health care quality was higher in PCMH practices (86.8%) compared with non-PCMH practices (70.2%). All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  5. Computerised clinical decision support systems to improve medication safety in long-term care homes: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Marasinghe, Keshini Madara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Computerised clinical decision support systems (CCDSS) are used to improve the quality of care in various healthcare settings. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CCDSS on improving medication safety in long-term care homes (LTC). Medication safety in older populations is an important health concern as inappropriate medication use can elevate the risk of potentially severe outcomes (ie, adverse drug reactions, ADR). With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LT...

  6. Current Status of Home Medical Care Waste Collection by Nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2017-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the current status of home medical care (HMC) waste collection by nurses for individual items and whether the collection rate differs with city size. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,022 nursing offices, of which 645 offices provided valid responses. Offices were classified into three groups according to the local population size. Responses indicated that used syringes and needles, except for pen-type self-injection needles, were collected by >50% of HMC nurses. On the other hand, enteral nutrients, nutritional adjustment diet vessels, feeding tubes, portable injectors, ventilator masks, endotracheal suction catheters, tracheal cannulas, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) bags, and urinary catheters and bags had a low collection rate in comparison with syringes or needles. The collection percentage of used syringes, needles, and infusion needles (p nurses. On the contrary, nonhazardous HMC waste should be collected by municipalities. This paper illustrates the status of waste collection of individual home medical care (HMC) items by HMC nurses. Infectious waste, such as needles and syringes, is collected by nurses. The collection rate of infectious waste by nurses in large cities was low compared with that in small cities. Although municipalities are responsible for collecting all HMC waste, sharp or infectious items should be collected by HMC doctors or nurses, whereas nonhazardous HMC waste should be collected by the municipalities.

  7. Catheter replacement structure in home medical care settings and regional characteristics in Tokyo and three adjoining prefectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takuma; Yoshie, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Rumiko; Kawagoe, Shohei; Hirahara, Satoshi; Iijima, Katsuya; Akahoshi, Toru; Tsuji, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the association between the structure of catheter replacement services in home medical care settings and regional characteristics. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was carried out from August to September 2013. Participants were physicians from 5338 clinics that provided medical care services at home, and nurses from 1619 home-visit nursing stations in Tokyo and three adjoining prefectures. The questionnaire covered catheter replacement (gastrostomy tubes, nasogastric tubes, tracheal cannulas) during home medical care, and the professions of those who replaced urethral catheters for male and female patients. Regions were divided into two groups (higher- and lower-density regions) based on the number of clinics, number of home-visit nursing stations and the ratio of the population aged ≥65 years. The rates of respondents that reported catheter replacement was usually executed, and those who reported catheters were replaced by "physicians in principle" were compared between the groups. Responses were received from 842 clinics (16.3%) and 499 home-visit nursing stations (31.4%). In the higher-density regions, the rate of physicians who reported urethral catheters for male patients were replaced by "physicians in principle" was significantly higher than in the lower-density regions (P home medical care settings, urethral catheters for male patients are replaced by nurses in regions where physician resources are limited. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 628-636. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Facilitators and Barriers to Care Coordination in Patient-centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) from Coordinators' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Asia; Howard, Jenna; Shaw, Eric K; Cohen, Deborah J; Shahidi, Laleh; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    Care coordinators are increasingly featured in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) projects, yet little research examines how coordinators themselves define and experience their role. This is the first study describing experiences of care coordinators across the US from their own perspectives. This qualitative study used a 5-month private, online discussion forum to gather data from 25 care coordinators from PCMH practices representing diversity in practice size, setting, and type. Participants answered questions and interacted with one another, creating an online social learning collaborative while allowing for data collection for research. Coordinators identified barriers and facilitators in their work at the organization/system level, the interpersonal level, and the individual level. Some factors emerged as both barriers and facilitators, including the functionality of clinical information technology; the availability of community resources; interactions with clinicians and other health care facilities; interactions with patients; and self-care practices for mental health and wellness. Colocation and full integration into practices were other key facilitators, whereas excessive case loads and data management responsibilities were felt to be important barriers. While all the barriers and facilitators were important to performing coordinators' roles, relationship building materialized as key to effective care coordination, whether with clinicians, patients, or outside organizations. We discuss implications for practice and provide suggestions for further research. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  9. Payment reform in the patient-centered medical home: Enabling and sustaining integrated behavioral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Ross, Kaile M; Davis, Melinda M; Melek, Stephen P; Kathol, Roger; Gordon, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a promising framework for the redesign of primary care and more recently specialty care. As defined by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the PCMH framework has 5 attributes: comprehensive care, patient-centered care, coordinated care, accessible services, and quality and safety. Evidence increasingly demonstrates that for the PCMH to best achieve the Triple Aim (improved outcomes, decreased cost, and enhanced patient experience), treatment for behavioral health (including mental health, substance use, and life stressors) must be integrated as a central tenet. However, challenges to implementing the PCMH framework are compounded for real-world practitioners because payment reform rarely happens concurrently. Nowhere is this more evident than in attempts to integrate behavioral health clinicians into primary care. As behavioral health clinicians find opportunities to work in integrated settings, a comprehensive understanding of payment models is integral to the dialogue. This article describes alternatives to the traditional fee for service (FFS) model, including modified FFS, pay for performance, bundled payments, and global payments (i.e., capitation). We suggest that global payment structures provide the best fit to enable and sustain integrated behavioral health clinicians in ways that align with the Triple Aim. Finally, we present recommendations that offer specific, actionable steps to achieve payment reform, complement PCMH, and support integration efforts through policy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Development of an Interdisciplinary Team Communication Framework and Quality Metrics for Home-Based Medical Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Roya; Sheehan, Orla C; Garrigues, Sarah K; Saliba, Debra; Leff, Bruce; Ritchie, Christine S

    2016-08-01

    The unique needs of homebound adults receiving home-based medical care (HBMC) (ie, home-based primary care and home-based palliative care services) are ideally provided by interdisciplinary care teams (IDTs) that provide coordinated care. The composition of team members from an array of organizations and the unique dimension of providing care in the home present specific challenges to timely access and communication of patient care information. The objective of this work was to develop a conceptual framework and corresponding quality indicators (QIs) that assess how IDT members for HBMC practices access and communicate key patient information with each other. A systematic review of peer-reviewed and gray literature was performed to inform a framework for care coordination in the home and the development of candidate QIs to assess processes by which all IDT members optimally access and use patient information. A technical expert panel (TEP) participated in a modified Delphi process to assess the validity and feasibility of each QI and to identify which would be most suitable for testing in the field. Thematic analysis of literature revealed 4 process themes for how HBMC practices might engage in high-quality care coordination: using electronic medical records, conducting interdisciplinary team meetings, sharing standardized patient assessments, and communicating via secure e-messaging. Based on these themes, 9 candidate QIs were developed to reflect these processes. Three candidate QIs were assessed by the TEP as valid and feasible to measure in an HBMC practice setting. These indicators focused on use of IDT meetings, standardized patient assessments, and secure e-messaging. Translating the complex issue of care coordination into QIs will improve care delivered to vulnerable home-limited adults who receive HBMC. Guided by the literature, we developed a framework to reflect optimal care coordination in the home setting and identified 3 candidate QIs to field-test in

  11. Family physicians' experiences when collaborating with district nurses in home care-based medical treatment. A grounded theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This article concerns Swedish family physicians' (FPs) experiences collaborating with district nurses (DNs) when the DNs provide medical treatment for home care patients. The aim was to develop a model to illuminate this process from the FPs' perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 FPs concerning one of their patients with home care by a DN. The interview focused on one patient's treatment and care by different care providers and the collaboration among them. Grounded theory methodology (GTM) was used in the analyses. Results It was essential for FPs to collaborate with and rely on DNs in the medical treatment of home care patients. According to the FPs, factors such as the disease, FPs' working conditions and attitude determined how much of the initiative in this treatment FPs retained or left to DNs. Depending on the circumstances, two different roles were adopted by the individual FPs: medical conductors who retain the initiative and medical consultants who leave the initiative to DNs. Factors as the disease, DNs' attitudes towards collaboration and DNs' working conditions influenced whether or not the FPs felt that grounds for relying on DNs were satisfactory. Regardless of the role of the FP, conditions for medical treatment were judged by the FPs to be good enough when the grounds for relying on the DN were satisfactory and problematic when they were not. Conclusions In the role of conductor, the FP will identify when the grounds for relying on the DN are unsatisfactory and be able to take action, but in the role of consultant the FP will not detect this, leaving home care patients without appropriate support. Only when there are satisfactory grounds for relying on the DN, will conditions for providing home care medical treatment be good enough when the FP adopts a consultative role. PMID:20979649

  12. Family physicians' experiences when collaborating with district nurses in home care-based medical treatment. A grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hylander Ingrid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article concerns Swedish family physicians' (FPs experiences collaborating with district nurses (DNs when the DNs provide medical treatment for home care patients. The aim was to develop a model to illuminate this process from the FPs' perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 FPs concerning one of their patients with home care by a DN. The interview focused on one patient's treatment and care by different care providers and the collaboration among them. Grounded theory methodology (GTM was used in the analyses. Results It was essential for FPs to collaborate with and rely on DNs in the medical treatment of home care patients. According to the FPs, factors such as the disease, FPs' working conditions and attitude determined how much of the initiative in this treatment FPs retained or left to DNs. Depending on the circumstances, two different roles were adopted by the individual FPs: medical conductors who retain the initiative and medical consultants who leave the initiative to DNs. Factors as the disease, DNs' attitudes towards collaboration and DNs' working conditions influenced whether or not the FPs felt that grounds for relying on DNs were satisfactory. Regardless of the role of the FP, conditions for medical treatment were judged by the FPs to be good enough when the grounds for relying on the DN were satisfactory and problematic when they were not. Conclusions In the role of conductor, the FP will identify when the grounds for relying on the DN are unsatisfactory and be able to take action, but in the role of consultant the FP will not detect this, leaving home care patients without appropriate support. Only when there are satisfactory grounds for relying on the DN, will conditions for providing home care medical treatment be good enough when the FP adopts a consultative role.

  13. Doctor-patient communication without family is most frequently practiced in patients with malignant tumors in home medical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takuma; Imanaga, Teruhiko; Matsuzaki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Promotion of home medical care is absolutely necessary in Japan where is a rapidly aging society. In home medical care settings, triadic communications among the doctor, patient and the family are common. And "communications just between the doctor and the patient without the family" (doctor-patient communication without family, "DPC without family") is considered important for the patient to frankly communicate with the doctor without consideration for the family. However, the circumstances associated with DPC without family are unclear. Therefore, to identify the factors of the occurrence of DPC without family, we conducted a cross-sectional mail-in survey targeting 271 families of Japanese patients who had previously received home medical care. Among 227 respondents (83.8%), we eventually analyzed data from 143, excluding families of patients with severe hearing or cognitive impairment and severe verbal communication dysfunction. DPC without family occurred in 26.6% (n = 38) of the families analyzed. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed using a model including Primary disease, Daily activity, Duration of home medical care, Interval between doctor visits, Duration of doctor's stay, Existence of another room, and Spouse as primary caregiver. As a result, DPC without family was significantly associated with malignant tumor as primary disease (OR, 3.165; 95% CI, 1.180-8.486; P = 0.022). In conclusion, the visiting doctors should bear in mind that the background factor of the occurrence of DPC without family is patient's malignant tumors.

  14. Evaluating the Impact of Parent-Reported Medical Home Status on Children's Health Care Utilization, Expenditures, and Quality: A Difference-in-Differences Analysis with Causal Inference Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Yu, Hao; Friedberg, Mark W

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of the parent-reported medical home status on health care utilization, expenditures, and quality for children. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) during 2004-2012, including a total of 9,153 children who were followed up for 2 years in the survey. We took a causal difference-in-differences approach using inverse probability weighting and doubly robust estimators to study how changes in medical home status over a 2-year period affected children's health care outcomes. Our analysis adjusted for children's sociodemographic, health, and insurance statuses. We conducted sensitivity analyses using alternative statistical methods, different approaches to outliers and missing data, and accounting for possible common-method biases. Compared with children whose parents reported having medical homes in both years 1 and 2, those who had medical homes in year 1 but lost them in year 2 had significantly lower parent-reported ratings of health care quality and higher utilization of emergency care. Compared with children whose parents reported having no medical homes in both years, those who did not have medical homes in year 1 but gained them in year 2 had significantly higher ratings of health care quality, but no significant differences in health care expenditures and utilization. Having a medical home may help improve health care quality for children; losing a medical home may lead to higher utilization of emergency care. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. The Impact of Patient-Centered Medical Homes on Quality of Care and Medication Adherence in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, JaeJin

    2016-11-01

    Current evidence suggests that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) potentially increase overall quality of disease management, including preventive care. However, there are mixed findings regarding quality of diabetes care, and little evidence exists with respect to the effect of PCMHs on medication adherence in patients with diabetes. To investigate associations between PCMHs and process measures of diabetes care, as well as adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) in patients with diabetes in a nationally representative U.S. Using the 2009-2013 longitudinal data files from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, adult diabetes patients were identified. Patients whose usual sources of care have all PCMH features at baseline (i.e., enhanced access after hours and online, shared decision making, and enhanced patient engagement) were categorized as the PCMH group, which was compared with patients without PCMH features. Process measures of diabetes care included ≥ 2 hemoglobin A1c tests and ≥ 1 cholesterol test, foot examination, dilated eye examination, and flu vaccination during 1 year of follow-up. Medication possession ratio (MPR) during follow-up was calculated for patients with OHAs without any insulin use, with MPR ≥ 80% considered to be adherent to OHAs. Univariate and multivariate regression models considering sampling strata and weights were used to examine the association between the PCMH and study outcomes. A total of 3,334 patients with diabetes was identified, representing 61 million U.S. lives. The mean (SE) age was 61.6 (0.3) years, and 52.4% of patients were female. The mean (SE) years of having diabetes was 12.0 (0.2) years. Approximately 11.4% of the patients were categorized as the PCMH group at baseline, and only 3.6% of those patients remained in the PCMH group for 2 years. Of the diabetic patients identified, only 26.9% met all of the diabetes care process measure criteria defined in this study. A higher proportion of patients met

  16. Impact of the medical home model on the quality of primary care: the Belgian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureaux, Catherine; Perelman, Julian; Mendes da Costa, Elise; Roch, Isabelle; Annemans, Lieven; Heymans, Isabelle; Closon, Marie-Christine

    2015-05-01

    The Belgium medical home (MH) model, which has been garnering support of late, resembles its US counterpart in that it aims at improving the quality of health care while containing costs. To compare the quality of care offered by MHs with that offered by traditional individual practices (IPs) in Belgium in terms of the extent of their adherence to clinical practice guidelines in antibiotherapy, cervical-cancer screening, influenza vaccination, and the management of diabetes. This is a retrospective study using public insurance claims data. Data consisted of a random sample of patients using the services of MHs and IPs who were previously matched according to sex, age category, location, disability, and socioeconomic status. We applied the McNemar test, the t test, or the Wilcoxon test, depending on the type of variable being compared. The final sample comprised 43,678 patients in the year 2004. On the basis of a review of the literature, we selected 4 themes, corresponding to 25 indicators: antibiotherapy, cervical-cancer screening, influenza vaccination, and the management of diabetes. MHs were more likely than IPs to adhere to evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. They prescribed less and more appropriate antibiotherapy, provided wider influenza-vaccination coverage for target groups, and provided a better follow-up for diabetics than did IPs. In regard to cervical-cancer screening, no significant differences were found. MHs, as they combine a greater adherence to guidelines and savings in secondary care, are a cost-effective alternative to traditional IPs and therefore should be encouraged.

  17. Integrating the home management plan of care for children with asthma into an electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shilpa J; Longhurst, Christopher A; Lin, Anna; Garrett, Lyn; Gillette-Arroyo, Jenny; Mark, John D; Wood, Matthew S; Sharek, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Asthma exacerbation is one of the most common causes for pediatric hospitalization. One of the three Joint Commission quality measures--which has proven the most challenging--addresses the provision of a home management plan of care (HMPC) for discharge of pediatric inpatients with a primary diagnosis of asthma. A user-friendly electronic medical record (EMR)-generated HMPC was developed and implemented at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) Palo Alto, California, an HPMC needed to be completed before entry of an inpatient discharge order. A cohort study using historical controls was conducted in 2010-2011. Patients were eligible to receive an HMPC if they were between the ages of 2 and 17 years old at discharge, had a length of stay HMPC increased from 65.3% for the 39 months (April 1, 2007-June 30, 2010) before integration of the HMPC into EMR to 93.7% for the 18 months after integration (July 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011); p HMPC found it to be significantly easier to complete, less time-consuming, and less prone to potential errors or omission. Lessons learned at LPCH included the need for a continuous surveillance and improvement model, which resulted in several iterations of the HMPC; the importance of soliciting user input, which resulted in improvements in work flow; and consistent support from the quality management and information technology departments, which are crucial to eliminating barriers and facilitating improvement.

  18. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. [Mapping of risks related to medication care in nursing homes: An overview in Alsace - France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K; Beck, M; Rybarczyk-Vigouret, M C; Michel, B

    2015-06-01

    Medication care of patients in nursing homes involves a complex circuit whose related risks need to be identified. The aim of this study was first to map risks related to medication care in a representative panel of nursing homes under contract with community pharmacies in Alsace, then to propose improvement action plans to remedy the weaknesses identified. This study was conducted on a representative sample of 23 nursing homes in Alsace in 2014. A self-assessment questionnaire (Interdiag EHPAD), divided into 7 fields and made up of 198 questions, was completed by each of the 23 nursing homes during multidisciplinary meetings that were organized by the OMEDIT (observatoire du médicament, des dispositifs médicaux et de l'innovation thérapeutique of Alsace). The percentages of controlled risks were calculated for each of the 7 fields of the medication circuit, both at nursing home and regional levels. Similarly, the percentages of non-controlled risks were calculated for each of the 198 items. Considering the 7 fields, regional percentages of controlled risks varied from 63% to 85%. The field relative to drug supply was the best controlled, while that relative to prevention was the least controlled. Considering the 198 items, 30 important vulnerability points were identified, among which stand out: failure to report and to analyze adverse drug events, lack of involvement of general practitioner in nursing homes through collaborative approaches and transcription by nurse staff of oral or handwritten prescriptions in medical software. The analysis of those items led to the proposal of 13 improvement actions. The study pointed out mainly difficulties linked to the absence of suitable risk management policies and the lack of adjustment between nursing home staffs and general practitioners. In contrast, it revealed that the collaboration between nursing homes and community pharmacies was successful overall. Finally, we hope that this multi-center study, that led to

  20. What the Desirable Collaboration between Care Workers in Nursing Homes and Phamacists Should Be: An Approach for Security and Safe Medication for Residents in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Hideyuki; Shiraishi, Akira; Miki, Akiko; Satoh, Hiroki; Konishi, Yukari; Asai, Kohei; Funahashi, Kenichi; Usui, Yoshinobu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2017-01-01

    In our previous research, there was no collaboration between care workers and pharmacists, for the most part. As a result, it was discovered that in some cases, problems concerning medication of nursing home residents had not been resolved. To solve this issue, we brought together care workers and pharmacists for a workshop we conducted. We assigned 12 care workers with at least two years of experience and 12 pharmacists to four mixed groups and guided them in the management of in-home long-term medical care and conducted small group discussions (SGD) using the KJ method. In the pre-survey before the workshop, all 12 care workers replied "yes" to having experienced "concerns over medication" and nine (75%) replied "no" to having experienced "discussions (consultations) with pharmacists regarding the medication of residents". As a result of the SGD, "information sharing among professionals" was revealed as a problem common to all groups. Furthermore, common countermeasures for this issue included communication notes and holding collaborative meetings. In the post-survey after the workshop, 67% of the participants replied that their thoughts concerning countermeasures were "coherent", and everyone replied that their "awareness was increased". In a follow-up survey after the workshop, 82% of the participants replied that they were using some form of what they had learned and discovered in the workshop in their actual work.

  1. Provision and use of safety-engineered medical devices among home care and hospice nurses in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss, Jack K

    2010-10-01

    Nurses who provide care in the home are at risk of blood exposure from needlesticks. Using safety-engineered medical devices reduces the risk of needlestick. The objectives of this study were to assess provision of safety devices by home care and hospice agencies as well as the use of these devices by home care and hospice nurses in North Carolina, and to examine the association between provision and use. A mail survey was conducted among North Carolina home care and hospice nurses in 2006. The adjusted response rate was 69% (n = 833). The percentage of nurses who were always provided with safety devices ranged from 51% (blood tube holders) to 83% (winged steel needles). Ninety-five percent of nurses who were always provided with safety devices, but only 15%-50% of nurses who were not always provided with safety devices, used a safety device the last time they used that general type of device. Among nurses who did not use a safety device on that occasion, 60%-80% did not use it because it was not provided by the agency. This study suggests that limited access is the primary reason for home care/hospice nurses' failure to use safety devices. The policy goal of providing safety devices to health care workers in all situations in which such devices could reduce their risk of needlestick is not being achieved for home care nurses in North Carolina. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acceptance of home support and integrated care among advanced COPD patients who live outside large medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damps-Konstańska, Iwona; Werachowska, Lidia; Krakowiak, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Cynowska, Bogumiła; Górecka, Dorota; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Kozielski, Jerzy; Jassem, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Poor self-management constitutes a risk factor for COPD deterioration. Patients from rural areas located at a considerable distance from large medical centers frequently need home-support in advanced stages of the disease. Integrated care has been proposed as a comprehensive model for appropriate treatment, coordination and holistic support. The aim of the study was to assess whether home visits provided by trained assistants are needed and accepted by advanced COPD patients living in rural areas a to evaluate whether an individual short educational program can actually improve such patients' knowledge of COPD and inhaler use. Thirty patients with severe or very severe but stable COPD participated in one-month home-assistance interventions twice a week. The total value ≥70 of SGRQ (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire) was recorded in 18 (60%) patients. At the beginning of the study, the patients' knowledge of COPD and inhalation techniques was highly unsatisfactory. Significant improvement in all items (p=0.00) was obtained after the intervention. The risk for poor self-management was high. All patients had at least one 'factor' that indicated the need for home-support. A total of 240 visits (100%) were completed. Patients expressed high acceptance for home-based support delivered by medical assistants twice a week for one month. No patients opposed this kind of care and most of them expressed interest in receiving it in the future. The results suggest a compelling need for home care and demonstrate full acceptance of this kind of support on the part of advanced COPD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Home care service at the division of general medicine in Jichi Medical University Hospital--the terminal stage cancer patient's care in the past 3 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Yuko; Tsuruoka, Koki; Amagai, Yoko; Kajii, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    We have provided a home care service for the past 20 years as a part of our community medical program at the Division of General Medicine in Jichi Medical University Hospital (JMUH). We reflected our activities of the past 3 years since 2004, and considered our meanings of home care service at the University Hospital. Especially, we reported on terminal stage cancer patients who died in the past 3 years. We normally visit about 10 homes of our patients who live near the University Hospital. There has been a decreasing trend toward a regular home visit by doctor, but an emergency visit has been increasing. Further more, we visited many elderly cerebral vascular patients in the past. However, many terminal stage cancer patients have now been requesting us to visit their homes. A total of 17 patients died in the past 3 years: 10 of 17 patients died at their homes, and 6 of them were terminal stage cancer patients who died at their homes.

  4. Laxative use in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Heather; Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L; Norton, Christine; Fader, Mandy; Wells, Mandy; Morris, Jackie; Williams, Peter

    2010-06-01

    This paper is a report of an investigation into the factors associated with laxative-taking by older people in care homes. Constipation is a common source of discomfort, pain and morbidity for care home residents, and laxative-taking is prevalent. Differences in the extent to which older people suffer from constipation may result from care routines rather than demographic or clinical factors. Primary data were gathered from care records as part of a larger study in seven care homes (without on-site nursing) in London, England in 2003-2004. Backward stepwise logistic regression modelling was used to investigate factors (age, sex, level of dependency [Barthel]), number of comorbidities, number of medications, constipating medications, length of stay in care home, diagnosis of dementia/Alzheimer disease) associated with regular laxative-taking. Of 168 residents, 99 (58.9%) were routinely given laxatives. Taking more medicines (moving up one category: 0, 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, > or = 7) increased the likelihood of taking laxatives more than threefold, after controlling for all other factors. Women were 2.9 times more likely to take laxatives than men. Having dementia/Alzheimer disease increased the likelihood of taking laxatives by 2.6 times. Laxative-taking was statistically significantly lower in two of the care homes. Laxative use amongst older people in care homes varies and may not be based on rational criteria. Nurses working in care homes and with care staff can help to implement appropriate bowel care for older people.

  5. New to care: demands on a health system when homeless veterans are enrolled in a medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Bourgault, Claire; Johnson, Erin E; Redihan, Stephen G; Borgia, Matthew; Aiello, Riccardo; Kane, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    We compared service use among homeless and nonhomeless veterans newly enrolled in a medical home model and identified patterns of use among homeless veterans associated with reductions in emergency department (ED) use. We used case-control matching with a nested cohort analysis to measure 6-month health services use, new diagnoses, and care use patterns in veterans at the Providence, Rhode Island, Veterans Affairs Medical Center from 2008 to 2011. We followed 127 homeless and 106 nonhomeless veterans. Both groups had similar rates of chronic medical and mental health diagnoses; 25.4% of the homeless and 18.1% of the nonhomeless group reported active substance abuse. Homeless veterans used significantly more primary, mental health, substance abuse, and ED care during the first 6 months. Homeless veterans who accessed primary care at higher rates (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11, 1.92) or who used specialty and primary care (RRR = 10.95; 95% CI = 1.58, 75.78) had reduced ED usage. Homeless veterans in transitional housing or doubled-up at baseline (RRR = 3.41; 95% CI = 1.24, 9.42) had similar reductions in ED usage. Homeless adults had substantial health needs when presenting for care. High-intensity primary care and access to specialty care services could reduce ED use.

  6. [Establishment of Specialized Pediatric Palliative Home Care in the Medical Valley of the European Metropolitan Area Nuremberg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Steven; Gravou-Apostolatou, Chara; Rascher, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Background As part of the 2007 health reform in Germany the structure of outpatient palliative care for children and adolescents was adopted for the first time and then implemented in Erlangen-Nuremberg in 2009. Methods The introduction of Pediatric Palliative Home Care (PPHC) at the Hospital for Children and Adolescents at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg was retrospectively analyzed between the years 2009 to 2014. Referring medical records (paper-based and electronic) were evaluated systematically. Results Considering 69 patients within this study, 44 (63.8%) died during the investigated period and 61% of these Patients deceased at home. 60 patients (87%) had a written emergency plan, which was jointly developed with patients and particularly their parents and relatives in cooperation with the PPHC team. Over the years and with increasing experience, the number and duration of emergency hospitalization decreased. Even complex therapies, such as patient-controlled analgesia with PCA pump could be implemented on an outpatient basis. Conclusion The descriptive cohort study demonstrates that palliative care for children, despite the medical and structural complexity is possible in an ambulatory setting. It allows a similar, if not better care, compared to inpatient palliative care for children and adolescents, not only for the affected patients, but also for their families. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. A "Medical Mission" at Home: The Needs of Rural America in Terms of Otolaryngology Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ryan; Pou, Anna; Friedlander, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the population, Medicaid, uninsured, and otolaryngology practice demographics for 7 representative rural Southeastern states, and propose academic-affiliated outreach clinics as a service to help meet the specialty care needs of an underserved rural population, based on the "medical mission" model employed in…

  8. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Schultz, Hanne; Jensen, Margit Bak

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with one or more psychotropic medications (PMs), especially in the elderly, is associated with risk, and the effects of treatment are poorly validated. The aim of this article was to describe the use of PM in a population of citizens receiving either residential care or ho...

  9. If we build it, who will come? Working-age adults with chronic health care needs and the medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Stephen P; Rasch, Elizabeth K; Chan, Leighton

    2011-02-01

    Currently, there is a call to implement and test the patient-centered medical home in adult populations, particularly among those with chronic conditions. However, the size, composition, and service use of the population who might require this coordinated care model need to be assessed, as does the way they are defined and identified. Using nationally representative data from the 2002 to 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we provide a preliminary profile of the population of working-age adults with chronic health care needs (ACHCN), including those with chronic health conditions and disabilities. ACHCN comprised the majority (52%) of the working-aged population. Relative to persons without chronic health care needs, they had significantly more service use, access problems, and 4 times more health care expenditures. Of the 2 disability groups within the larger population of ACHCN, those reporting need for help or supervision with activities of daily livings (ADLs) or instrumental ADLs (IADLs) had the highest rates/percentages of the following: mean chronic (3.5) and acute (4.4) conditions during the year, service use (all services), and access problems. The ADL/IADL-limited group reported annual medical expenditures totaling 100 billion dollars, more than what was spent on the entire working-age population without chronic health care needs. These data reveal the drawbacks of selecting the potential population targeted for a medical home on the basis of diagnosis alone. New measurement approaches on the basis of shared need for ongoing health and related services are required to bridge the division between disability and chronic health conditions.

  10. Using Statewide Data on Health Care Quality to Assess the Effect of a Patient-Centered Medical Home Initiative on Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Nathan D; Finch, Michael; Wholey, Douglas

    2017-06-13

    Patient-centered medical homes comprise a large portion of modern health care redesign. However, most efforts have reflected rigid, limited models of transformation. In addition, evaluations of their impact on quality of care have relied on data designed for other purposes. Minnesota's Health Care Home (HCH) initiative is a statewide medical home model relying on state-run, adaptive certification and supportive data infrastructure. This longitudinal study leverages a unique statewide system of clinic-reported, patient-level quality data (2010-2013) to assess the effect of being in a HCH clinic on health care quality. Measures included optimal quality (meeting all targets) and average quality (number of targets met) for asthma, vascular, and diabetes care; colorectal cancer screening; depression follow-up; and depression remission. Depending on measure and year, the analytic sample included 246,023 - 3,335,994 child and adult patients in 404-651 clinics. Using endogenous treatment effects models to address endogeneity, and including patient- and clinic-level covariates and clinic-level selection bias corrections, the authors produced potential outcomes means and average treatment effects (ATEs). HCH patients received better quality versus non-HCH patients for most outcomes. For example, the adjusted rate receiving optimal diabetes care was 453.7/1000 adult HCH patients versus 327.2/1000 non-HCH adult patients (ATE = 126.5; P quality generally echoed optimal care findings. These findings indicate the usefulness of statewide quality data and support the effectiveness of adaptive, state-run medical home programs. Additional integration of services may be needed for mental health conditions.

  11. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered.

  12. Continuous subcutaneous delivery of medications for home care palliative patients-using an infusion set or a pump?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menahem, Sasson; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety, feasibility, and efficacy of continuous drug delivery by the subcutaneous route through a solution bag connected to an infusion set compared with an infusion pump in a home palliative care setting. Patients in need of continuous subcutaneous medication delivery for pain control, nausea, and/or vomiting were recruited. The study was designed as a double-blind, crossover study. The patient was connected to two parallel subcutaneous lines running simultaneously, connected together to a line entering the subcutaneous tissue. One line is connected to an infusion set and the other to a pump. The infusion set included a 500-cc solution bag connected to a 1.5-m plastic tube containing a drip chamber controlled by a roller clamp that is gravity driven without hyaluronidase. Active medications were randomly assigned to start in either administration method and switched after 24 h. An independent research assistant evaluated symptom control and side effects at baseline and every 24 h for 2 days using a structured questionnaire. Another independent research assistant connected the lines after adding medications and evaluated technical and clinical failures. Twenty-seven patients were recruited, and of them, 18 completed the study. Incidents in fluid administration were more common through the infusion set (18 times) compared to the pump (only twice). On the other hand, no clinical significant change was noted in the average symptom levels and side effects when medications were given through the infusion set versus the pump. No local edema or irritation was observed in either way of administration. In a home palliative care setting with a medical staff on call for 24 h, using medications for symptom control can be considered to be infused to a fluid solution bag through an infusion set instead of using a syringe driver or a pump when there is a responsible caregiver to follow up on the fluid. Subcutaneous constant drug delivery

  13. Multi-professional clinical medication reviews in care homes for the elderly: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial with cost effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sach Tracey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence demonstrates that measures are needed to optimise therapy and improve administration of medicines in care homes for older people. The aim of this study is to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of a novel model of multi-professional medication review. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial design, involving thirty care homes. In line with current practice in medication reviews, recruitment and consent will be sought from general practitioners and care homes, rather than individual residents. Care homes will be segmented according to size and resident mix and allocated to the intervention arm (15 homes or control arm (15 homes sequentially using minimisation. Intervention homes will receive a multi-professional medication review at baseline and at 6 months, with follow-up at 12 months. Control homes will receive usual care (support they currently receive from the National Health Service, with data collection at baseline and 12 months. The novelty of the intervention is a review of medications by a multi-disciplinary team. Primary outcome measures are number of falls and potentially inappropriate prescribing. Secondary outcome measures include medication costs, health care resource use, hospitalisations and mortality. The null hypothesis proposes no difference in primary outcomes between intervention and control patients. The primary outcome variable (number of falls will be analysed using a linear mixed model, with the intervention specified as a fixed effect and care homes included as a random effect. Analyses will be at the level of the care home. The economic evaluation will estimate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care from a National Health Service and personal social services perspective. The study is not measuring the impact of the intervention on professional working relationships, the medicines culture in care homes or the generic health-related quality of life of

  14. Informed palliative care in nursing homes through the interRAI Palliative Care instrument: a study protocol based on the Medical Research Council framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2014-12-05

    Nursing homes are important locations for palliative care. Through comprehensive geriatric assessments (CGAs), evaluations can be made of palliative care needs of nursing home residents. The interRAI Palliative Care instrument (interRAI PC) is a CGA that evaluates diverse palliative care needs of adults in all healthcare settings. The evaluation results in Client Assessment Protocols (CAPs: indications of problems that need addressing) and Scales (e.g. Palliative Index for Mortality (PIM)) which can be used to design, evaluate and adjust care plans. This study aims to examine the effect of using the interRAI PC on the quality of palliative care in nursing homes. Additionally, it aims to evaluate the feasibility and validity of the interRAI PC. This study covers phases 0, I and II of the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for designing and evaluating complex interventions, with a longitudinal, quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design and with mixed methods of evaluation. In phase 0, a systematic literature search is conducted. In phase I, the interRAI PC is adapted for use in Belgium and implemented on the BelRAI-website and a practical training is developed. In phase II, the intervention is tested in fifteen nursing homes. Participating nursing homes fill out the interRAI PC during one year for all residents receiving palliative care. Using a pretest-posttest design with quasi-random assignment to the intervention or control group, the effect of the interRAI PC on the quality of palliative care is evaluated with the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS). Psychometric analysis is conducted to evaluate the predictive validity of the PIM and the convergent validity of the CAP 'Mood' of the interRAI PC. Qualitative data regarding the usability and face validity of the instrument are collected through focus groups, interviews and field notes. This is the first study to evaluate the validity and effect of the interRAI PC in nursing homes, following a methodology

  15. "Best care on home ground" versus "elitist healthcare": concerns and competing expectations for medical tourism development in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rory; Adams, Krystyna; Bishop, Lisa; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy

    2015-02-03

    Many countries have demonstrated interest in expanding their medical tourism sectors because of its potential economic and health system benefits. However, medical tourism poses challenges to the equitable distribution of health resources between international and local patients and private and public medical facilities. Currently, very little is known about how medical tourism is perceived among front line workers and users of health systems in medical tourism 'destinations'. Barbados is one such country currently seeking to expand its medical tourism sector. Barbadian nurses and health care users were consulted about the challenges and benefits posed by ongoing medical tourism development there. Focus groups were held with two stakeholder groups in May, 2013. Nine (n = 9) citizens who use the public health system participated in the first focus group and seven (n = 7) nurses participated in the second. Each focus group ran for 1.5 hours and was digitally recorded. Following transcription, thematic analysis of the digitally coded focus group data was conducted to identify cross-cutting themes and issues. Three core concerns regarding medical tourism's health equity impacts were raised; its potential to 1) incentivize migration of health workers from public to private facilities, 2) burden Barbados' lone tertiary health care centre, and 3) produce different tiers of quality of care within the same health system. These concerns were informed and tempered by the existing a) health system structure that incorporates both universal public healthcare and a significant private medical sector, b) international mobility among patients and health workers, and c) Barbados' large recreational tourism sector, which served as the main reference in discussions about medical tourism's impacts. Incorporating these concerns and contextual influences, participants' shared their expectations of how medical tourism should locally develop and operate. By engaging with local

  16. Does access to a medical home differ according to child and family characteristics, including special-health-care-needs status, among children in Alabama?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Beverly A; Altarac, Maja; Swaminathan, Shailender; Kirby, Russell S; Kulczycki, Andrzej; Ellis, Dawn E

    2007-02-01

    Our goal was to examine relationships among access to a medical home, special-health-care-needs status, and child and family characteristics in one Southern state. We hypothesized that access to a medical home is influenced by several family and child sociodemographic characteristics, including special-health-care status. We used data from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health. The study sample comprised all Alabama resident children. The main dependent variable was a medical home; the primary independent variable classified children according to children-with-special-health-care-needs status. We controlled for child age, gender, race, family structure, health status, insurance coverage, household education, and poverty. We first explored means or proportions for the study variables and then estimated multivariate logistic regression models. Children with special health care needs were significantly more likely than children without special health care needs to have a personal doctor or nurse, to have a preventive health care visit in the previous 12 months, and to have good communication with their provider. Children with special health care needs were also more likely to experience problems accessing specialty care, equipment, or services. Being uninsured, living at or near the federal poverty level, in a household where no one completed high school, being black, having less than excellent or good health, and living in a nontraditional family structure were characteristics associated with being less likely to have a medical home. In general, children-with-special-health-care-needs status was not related to having a medical home, but dependency on prescription medicine was. Assuring that all children, irrespective of family income, have access to and are enrolled in health insurance plans will move us closer to the national goal of having a medical home for all children, especially those with a special health care need, by 2010.

  17. Association between medical home enrollment and health care utilization and costs among breast cancer patients in a state Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Racquel E; Goyal, Ravi K; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Domino, Marisa Elena; Wheeler, Stephanie B

    2015-11-15

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is increasingly being implemented in an effort to improve and coordinate primary care, but its effect on health care utilization among breast cancer patients remains unclear. The objective of this study was to examine health care utilization and expenditures as a function of PCMH enrollment among breast cancer patients in North Carolina's Medicaid program. North Carolina Medicaid claims linked to North Carolina Central Cancer Registry records (2003-2007) were used to examine monthly patterns of health care use and expenditures. Controlling for a selection bias for time-invariant characteristics, fixed effects regression models analyzed associations between PCMH enrollment and utilization of outpatient, inpatient, and emergency department (ED) services and Medicaid expenditures during the 15 months after the diagnosis of breast cancer. Among 758 breast cancer patients, 381 (50%) were enrolled in a PCMH at some time in the 15 months after diagnosis. After controlling for individual fixed effects, PCMH enrollment was significantly associated with greater outpatient service use, but there was no difference in the probability of inpatient hospitalizations or ED visits. Enrollment in a PCMH was associated with increased average expenditures of $429 per month during the first 15 months. Greater outpatient care utilization and increased average expenditures among breast cancer patients enrolled in a PCMH may suggest that these women have improved access to primary and specialty care. Expanding PCMHs may change patterns of service utilization for Medicaid breast cancer patients but may not be associated with lower costs. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. [Sharing information of urological cancer patient in terminal stage using Cybozulive® for home medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Yusuke; Gobara, Ayako; Takamoto, Daiji; Yasuda, Kengo; Nakamura, Masafumi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Asahina, Kan; Kamijo, Takeo

    2014-09-01

    It is very important to share patient information because home patient care involves several different specialties of care. We introduced Cybozulive ® , a cloud-based free groupware, for 14 terminal-stage patients with urological cancer to share information among doctors and co-medical staff. This system enables access to patient information regardless of time and place. Of the 14 patients (mean age 74.4 years), 11 died of cancer. The average period in which Cybozulive® was used for the patients was 210 days. The average number of entries to the electronic bulletin board in this period was 88.4. We were able to obtain more information about the patients from the website. There was no difference in the average number of times that the patient consulted the out patient clinic before and after the introduction of Cybozulive® (before 7.0 ; after 6.3). After introduction of this system, eleven patients were hospitalized in our department 21 times. Eighteen of these 21 times, since we had acquired patient information from the website beforehand, there was a quick response for management of the emergency admission. This system could be used to construct a network for home care and may be helpful for sharing patient information in homecare.

  19. Statement of the American Psychological Association in response to the "joint principles: integrating behavioral health care into the patient-centered medical home".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Norman B; Belar, Cynthia D; Cubic, Barbara A; Garrison, Ellen G; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2014-06-01

    Comments on the article "Joint principles: Integrating behavioral health care into the patient-centered medical home" (see record 2014-24217-011), presented by the Working Party Group on Integrated Behavioral Healthcare. The American Psychological Association (APA) shares concerns about the lack of reference to behavioral health care in the original 2007 Joint Principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home for which this new document is intended to supplement but not replace. The decision to support the supplemental Joint Principles was not an easy one for APA, as there is one area of significant concern. That concern is related to the use of the term "physician-directed medical practice"

  20. Demand and predictors for post-discharge medical counseling in home care patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Tan Ding

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Post-discharge care is challenging due to the high rate of adverse events after discharge. However, details regarding post-discharge care requirements remain unclear. Post-discharge medical counseling (PDMC by telephone service was set-up to investigate its demand and predictors. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted from April 2011 to March 2012 in a tertiary referral center in northern Taiwan. Patients discharged for home care were recruited and educated via telephone hotline counseling when needed. The patient's characteristics and call-in details were recorded, and predictors of PDMC use and worsening by red-flag sign were analyzed. RESULTS: During the study period, 224 patients were enrolled. The PDMC was used 121 times by 65 patients in an average of 8.6 days after discharge. The red-flag sign was noted in 17 PDMC from 16 patients. Of the PDMC used, 50% (n = 60 were for symptom change and the rest were for post-discharge care problems and issues regarding other administrative services. Predictors of PDMC were underlying malignancy and lower Barthel index (BI. On the other hand, lower BI, higher adjusted Charlson co-morbidity index (CCI, and longer length of hospital stay were associated with PDMC and red-flag sign. CONCLUSIONS: Demand for PDMC may be as high as 29% in home care patients within 30 days after discharge. PDMC is needed more by patients with malignancy and lower BI. More focus should also be given to those with lower BI, higher CCI, and longer length of hospital stay, as they more frequently have red flag signs.

  1. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care. PMID:21881429

  2. Home health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Home Care Services Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  3. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  4. FastStats: Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... Centers Hospice Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare ...

  5. Associations between the patient-centered medical home and preventive care and healthcare quality for non-elderly adults with mental illness: A surveillance study analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bowdoin, Jennifer J.; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Puleo, Elaine; Keller, David; Roche, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) may improve outcomes for non-elderly adults with mental illness, but the extent to which PCMHs are associated with preventive care and healthcare quality for this population is largely unknown. Our study addresses this gap by assessing the associations between receipt of care consistent with the PCMH and preventive care and healthcare quality for non-elderly adults with mental illness. Methods This surveillance study used self-reported data fo...

  6. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leadership positions are very important to maintaining quality care in the nursing home. Here are some things to look for ... symptoms, and health problems. May 2013 Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in ...

  7. FastStats: Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Nursing Home Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ...

  8. Incentivizing primary care providers to innovate: building medical homes in the post-Katrina New Orleans safety net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Schmidt, Laura A; Wu, Kevin J; Wiley, James

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate safety-net clinics' responses to a novel community-wide Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) financial incentive program in post-Katrina New Orleans. Between June 2008 and June 2010, we studied 50 primary care clinics in New Orleans receiving federal funds to expand services and improve care delivery. Multiwave, longitudinal, observational study of a local safety-net primary care system. Clinic-level data from a semiannual survey of clinic leaders (89.3 percent response rate), augmented by administrative records. Overall, 62 percent of the clinics responded to financial incentives by achieving PCMH recognition from the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA). Higher patient volume, higher baseline PCMH scores, and type of ownership were significant predictors of achieving NCQA recognition. The steepest increase in adoption of PCMH processes occurred among clinics achieving the highest, Level 3, NCQA recognition. Following NCQA recognition, 88.9 percent stabilized or increased their use of PCMH processes, although several specific PCMH processes had very low rates of adoption overall. Findings demonstrate that widespread PCMH implementation is possible in a safety-net environment when external financial incentives are aligned with the goal of practice innovation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. 76 FR 28917 - Medical Foster Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... home, VA will provide inspections of the home, oversight, and medical foster home caregiver training... oversight and medical foster home caregiver training. If a medical foster home does not meet VA's criteria... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN80 Medical Foster Homes AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION...

  10. Formal and informal support of family caregivers managing medications for patients who receive end-of-life care at home: a cross-sectional survey of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Brian T; Berman, Rebecca; Lau, Denys T

    2014-10-01

    Managing medications is a complex responsibility of family caregivers caring for end-of-life patients. This study characterizes caregivers with and without formal/informal support managing medications for patients who receive end-of-life care at home. To explore factors related to caregivers' support with managing medications for end-of-life home hospice patients. A convenience-sampled, cross-sectional telephone survey. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were administered to 120 caregivers managing medications, who were referred by five Chicago-based home hospice services. We measured caregivers' additional formal (paid) and informal (unpaid) support with managing medications, and caregiver/patient socio-demographic, relational, and health characteristics. While 47 (39%) had no additional support with managing medications, 27 (22.5%) had formal support, 37 (31%) informal, and 9 (7.5%) both. Seven caregivers (19%) with formal and 13 (31%) with informal support reported disagreements concerning treatment plans. Caregivers lacking formal support tended to be racial/ethnic minorities, live with the patient in their home, or report greater emotional burden. Caregivers with formal support tended to report higher education/income, lower mutuality, or care for a patient with over 6 months' hospice enrollment. Caregivers lacking informal support tended to be spousal caregivers, live with the patient, or have experience caring for another dying person. Our study suggests that high proportions of caregivers may not have support managing medications for patients receiving hospice care at home. More research should examine whether the observed variations in obtaining support indicate disparities or unmet needs among caregivers. Disagreement about treatment with formal/informal support also warrants further investigation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. The Adolescent "Expanded Medical Home": School-Based Health Centers Partner with a Primary Care Clinic to Improve Population Health and Mitigate Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Laurie, Anna R; Plegue, Melissa A; Richarson, Caroline R

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality health care is a crucial social determinant of health. We describe the implementation of an "expanded medical home" partnering a primary care practice (the Ypsilanti Health Center [YHC]) with local school-based health centers (the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools [RAHS]), and to assess whether this model improves access to and quality of care for shared patients. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, we define the steps in, barriers to, and facilitating factors in implementing the expanded medical home model. Visits and quality measures were assessed for patients seen by YHC only versus YHC/RAHS at baseline and during the intervention. At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P < .001). Overall, patients seen in the expanded medical home had a higher likelihood of receiving quality metric services than patients in YHC only (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-2.05) across all measures. Thoughtful and intentional implementation of an expanded medical home partnership between primary care physicians and school-based health centers increases the number of shared high-risk adolescent patients. Shared patients have improved compliance with quality measures, which may lead to long-term improved health equity. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  12. Potentially inappropriate medications used by the elderly: prevalence and risk factors in Brazilian care homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vieira de Lima, Thaís Jaqueline; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Garbin, Artênio José Isper; Sumida, Dóris Hissako; Saliba, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) among the elderly is a serious public health problem because it is intrinsically linked to increased morbidity and mortality, causing high costs to public health systems...

  13. "Best care on home ground" versus "elitist healthcare": concerns and competing expectations for medical tourism development in Barbados

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, Rory; Adams, Krystyna; Bishop, Lisa; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    ...'. Barbados is one such country currently seeking to expand its medical tourism sector. Barbadian nurses and health care users were consulted about the challenges and benefits posed by ongoing medical tourism development...

  14. High-Performing Primary Care Teams: Creating The Air Force Medical Home Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Karen Lowton. "What Fosters or Prevents Interprofessional Teamworking in Primary and Community Care ? A Literature Review." International Journal of Nursing Studies 45 (2008): 140-153. ...Foundation 2007, 6. (4) Joan Sargeant, Elaine Loney, and Gerard Murphy, “Effective Interprofessional Teams: ‘Contact Is Not Enough’ to Build a Team,” Journal ...Primary and Community Care ? A Literature Review, International Journal of Nursing Studies 45, (2008), 151. And Sargeant, “Effective

  15. Reasons for unmet need for child and family health services among children with special health care needs with and without medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jane E; Nugent, Colleen N; Gaboda, Dorothy; Russell, Louise B

    2013-01-01

    Medical homes, an important component of U.S. health reform, were first developed to help families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) find and coordinate services, and reduce their children's unmet need for health services. We hypothesize that CSHCN lacking medical homes are more likely than those with medical homes to report health system delivery or coverage problems as the specific reasons for unmet need. Data are from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), a national, population-based survey of 40,723 CSHCN. We studied whether lacking a medical home was associated with 9 specific reasons for unmet need for 11 types of medical services, controlling for health insurance, child's health, and sociodemographic characteristics. Weighted to the national population, 17% of CSHCN reported at least one unmet health service need in the previous year. CSHCN without medical homes were 2 to 3 times as likely to report unmet need for child or family health services, and more likely to report no referral (OR= 3.3), dissatisfaction with provider (OR=2.5), service not available in area (OR= 2.1), can't find provider who accepts insurance (OR=1.8), and health plan problems (OR=1.4) as reasons for unmet need (all pneeds. Attributable risk estimates suggest that if the 50% of CSHCN who lacked medical homes had one, overall unmet need for child health services could be reduced by as much as 35% and unmet need for family health services by 40%.

  16. [Evaluation of family function in home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamori, Tadashi; Sato, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomohiro; Yamagishi, Tadashi; Hattori, Yukari; Ishii, Nobuo; Saka, Shohei; Koyanagi, Junko; Murase, Jutaro; Nitoh, Noriko; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuo, Kyoko; Moriya, Akemi; Ikemizu, Ayumi; Arino, Kaoru; Mori, Mitsuko; Sato, Kyoko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of a caring family are needed to improve home care. We propose a three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of family functioning. The first dimension is food, clothing, and shelter; the second dimension is patient, medical, and caring conditions; and the third dimension is the caring family condition. We used the home care score and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale at Kwansei Gakuin(FACESKG)IV for the quantitative evaluation of family functioning. Narrative medicine and ethnography are valuable for the qualitative evaluation of a caring family.

  17. Integrating Maternal Mental Health Care in the Pediatric Medical Home: Treatment Engagement and Child Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Mary C; Platt, Rheanna E; Steinberg, Danielle N; Cluxton-Keller, Fallon; Osborne, Lauren M; Carter, Tracy; Payne, Jennifer L; Solomon, Barry S

    2017-10-01

    Maternal depression is associated with an array of poor child health outcomes, and low-income women face many barriers to accessing treatment. In this pilot study, we assessed treatment engagement in a maternal mental health clinic staffed by a case manager and psychiatrist in an urban pediatric practice. We also examined factors associated with engagement as well as child health outcomes and health care use. Nearly half of the women enrolled attended at least 4 sessions with a psychiatrist in 6 months. Text messaging with the case manager was associated with a greater compliance with psychiatrist sessions. Comparing index children with their siblings prior to enrollment, a higher percentage had immunizations up to date at 1 year of age (82% vs 43%, P = .01), and well-child visit compliance trended toward significance (65% vs 35%, P = .06). The pediatric setting holds promise as an innovative venue to deliver maternal mental health care.

  18. Community health worker integration into the health care team accomplishes the triple aim in a patient-centered medical home: a Bronx tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Sally; Matos, Sergio; Hicks, April; Chang, Ji; Reich, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers are ideally suited to the care coordination niche within the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) team, but there are few case studies detailing how to accomplish this integration. This qualitative study documents how community health workers (CHWs) were integrated into a PCMH in South Bronx, New York. Results show that integration was linked to clear definition of their care coordination role within the care team, meticulous recruitment, training and supervision by a senior CHW, shared leadership of the care management team, and documented value for money. By helping the team understand patients' backgrounds, constraints, and preferences, they helped everyone genuinely focus on the patient.

  19. Financing of Pediatric Home Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpser, Edwin; Hudak, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric home health care is an effective and holistic venue of treatment of children with medical complexity or developmental disabilities who otherwise may experience frequent and/or prolonged hospitalizations or who may enter chronic institutional care. Demand for pediatric home health care is increasing while the provider base is eroding, primarily because of inadequate payment or restrictions on benefits. As a result, home care responsibilities assumed by family caregivers have increased and imposed financial, physical, and psychological burdens on the family. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act set forth 10 mandated essential health benefits. Home care should be considered as an integral component of the habilitative and rehabilitative services and devices benefit, even though it is not explicitly recognized as a specific category of service. Pediatric-specific home health care services should be defined clearly as components of pediatric services, the 10th essential benefit, and recognized by all payers. Payments for home health care services should be sufficient to maintain an adequate provider work force with the pediatric-specific expertise and skills to care for children with medical complexity or developmental disability. Furthermore, coordination of care among various providers and the necessary direct patient care from which these care coordination plans are developed should be required and enabled by adequate payment. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for high-quality care by calling for development of pediatric-specific home health regulations and the licensure and certification of pediatric home health providers. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. "Pharming out" support: a promising approach to integrating clinical pharmacists into established primary care medical home practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunisholz, Kimberly D; Olson, Jeff; Anderson, Jonathan W; Hays, Emily; Tilbury, Peggy M; Winter, Bradley; Rickard, Josh; Hamilton, Sharon; Parkin, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Objective Embedding clinical pharmacists into ambulatory care settings needs to be assessed in the context of established medical home models. Methods A retrospective, observational study examined the effectiveness of the Intermountain Healthcare Collaborative Pharmacist Support Services (CPSS) program from 2012-2015 among adult patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) and/or high blood pressure (HBP). Patients who attended this program were considered the intervention (CPSS) cohort. These patients were matched using propensity scores with a reference group (no-CPSS cohort) to determine the effect of achieving disease management goals and time to achievement. Results A total of 17,684 patients had an in-person office visit with their provider and 359 received CPSS (the matched no-CPSS cohort included 999 patients). CPSS patients were 93% more likely to achieve a blood pressure goal < 140/90 mmHg, 57% more likely to achieve HbA1c values < 8%, and 87% more likely to achieve both disease management goals compared with the reference group. Time to goal achievement demonstrated increasing separation between the study cohorts across the entire study period ( P < .001), and specifically, at 180 days post-intervention (HBP: 48% vs 27% P < .001 and DM: 39% vs 30%, P < .05). Conclusions CPSS participation is associated with significant improvement in achievement of disease management goals, time to achievement, and increased ambulatory encounters compared with the matched no-CPSS cohort.

  1. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted.

  2. Financing home care in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Gulácsi, L.; Boerma, W.; Hutchinson, A.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Naiditch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Financial incentives are widely used to get better value for money. Incentives can be applied to authorities responsible for home care, or to agencies that provide services or to clients who receive care. Details of the financing system of home care services very much determine the

  3. Emotional exhaustion in primary care during early implementation of the VA's medical home transformation: Patient-aligned Care Team (PACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Lisa S; Schmidt Hackbarth, Nicole; Darling, Jill; Rodriguez, Hector P; Stockdale, Susan E; Cordasco, Kristina M; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2015-03-01

    Transformation of primary care to new patient-centered models requires major changes in healthcare organizations, including interprofessional expectations and organizational policies. Emotional exhaustion (EE) among workers can accompany major organizational change, threatening its success. Yet little guidance exists about the magnitude of associations with EE during primary care transformation. We assessed EE during the initial phase of national primary care transformation in the Veterans Health Administration. Cross-sectional online surveys of primary care clinicians (PCCs) and staff in 23 primary care clinics within 5 healthcare systems in 1 veterans administration administrative region. We used descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable analyses adjusted for clinic membership and weighted for nonresponse. 515 veterans administration employees (191 PCCs and 324 other primary care staff). Outcome is the EE subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Predictors include clinic characteristics (from administrative data) and self-reported efficacy for change, experiences with transformation, and perspectives about the organization. The overall response rate was 64% (515/811). In total, 53% of PCCs and 43% of staff had high EE. PCCs (vs. other primary care staff), female (vs. male), and non-Latino (vs. Latino) respondents reported higher EE. Respondents reporting higher efficacy for change and participatory decision making had lower EE scores, adjusting for sex and race. Recognition by healthcare organizations of the potential for clinician and staff EE during primary care transformation is critical. Methods for reducing EE by increasing clinician and staff change efficacy and opportunities to participate in decision making should be considered, with attention to PCCs, and women.

  4. Optimizing health care delivery by integrating workplaces, homes, and communities: how occupational and environmental medicine can serve as a vital connecting link between accountable care organizations and the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Robert K; Sherman, Bruce; Loeppke, Ronald R; McKenzie, Judith; Mueller, Kathryn L; Yarborough, Charles M; Grundy, Paul; Allen, Harris; Larson, Paul W

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, the health care reform discussion in the United States has focused increasingly on the dual goals of cost-effective delivery and better patient outcomes. A number of new conceptual models for health care have been advanced to achieve these goals, including two that are well along in terms of practical development and implementation-the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) and accountable care organizations (ACOs). At the core of these two emerging concepts is a new emphasis on encouraging physicians, hospitals, and other health care stakeholders to work more closely together to better coordinate patient care through integrated goals and data sharing and to create team-based approaches that give a greater role to patients in health care decision-making. This approach aims to achieve better health outcomes at lower cost. The PCMH model emphasizes the central role of primary care and facilitation of partnerships between patient, physician, family, and other caregivers, and integrates this care along a spectrum that includes hospitals, specialty care, and nursing homes. Accountable care organizations make physicians and hospitals more accountable in the care system, emphasizing organizational integration and efficiencies coupled with outcome-oriented, performance-based medical strategies to improve the health of populations. The ACO model is meant to improve the value of health care services, controlling costs while improving quality as defined by outcomes, safety, and patient experience. This document urges adoption of the PCMH model and ACOs, but argues that in order for these new paradigms to succeed in the long term, all sectors with a stake in health care will need to become better aligned with them-including the employer community, which remains heavily invested in the health outcomes of millions of Americans. At present, ACOs are largely being developed as a part of the Medicare and Medicaid systems, and the PCMH model is still gathering

  5. Taking care of your back at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back strain treatment; Back pain - home care; Low back pain - home care; Lumbar pain - home care; LBP - home care; Sciatic - home care ... R, Loeser JD, Owens DK, et al. Interventional therapies, surgery, ... pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the ...

  6. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    services to veterans who meet certain eligibility rules including hospital and medical care , disability compensation and pensions,3 education ,4...prosthetic and orthotic devices, including eyeglasses and hearing aids; home health services, hospice care , palliative care , and institutional respite care ...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Veterans Medical Care : FY2011 Appropriations Sidath Viranga

  7. Associations between the patient-centered medical home and preventive care and healthcare quality for non-elderly adults with mental illness: A surveillance study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdoin, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Puleo, Elaine; Keller, David; Roche, Joan

    2016-08-24

    Patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) may improve outcomes for non-elderly adults with mental illness, but the extent to which PCMHs are associated with preventive care and healthcare quality for this population is largely unknown. Our study addresses this gap by assessing the associations between receipt of care consistent with the PCMH and preventive care and healthcare quality for non-elderly adults with mental illness. This surveillance study used self-reported data for 6,908 non-elderly adults with mental illness participating in the 2007-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Preventive care and healthcare quality measures included: participant rating of all healthcare; cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening; current smoking; smoking cessation advice; flu shot; foot exam and eye exam for people with diabetes; and follow-up after emergency room visit for mental illness. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to compare the odds of meeting preventive care and healthcare quality measures for participants without a usual source of care, participants with a non-PCMH usual source of care, and participants who received care consistent with the PCMH. Compared to participants without a usual source of care, those with a non-PCMH usual source of care had better odds of meeting almost all measures examined, while those who received care consistent with the PCMH had better odds of meeting most measures. Participants who received care consistent with the PCMH had better odds of meeting only one measure compared to participants with a non-PCMH usual source of care. Compared with having a non-PCMH usual source of care, receipt of care consistent with the PCMH does not appear to be associated with most preventive care or healthcare quality measures. These findings raise concerns about the potential value of the PCMH for non-elderly adults with mental illness and suggest that alternative models of primary care are needed to improve outcomes and address

  8. Administering anticipatory medications in end-of-life care: a qualitative study of nursing practice in the community and in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eleanor; Morbey, Hazel; Brown, Jayne; Payne, Sheila; Seale, Clive; Seymour, Jane

    2015-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, an approach to improving end-of-life care has been the introduction of 'just in case' or 'anticipatory' medications. Nurses are often responsible for deciding when to use anticipatory medications, but little is known about their experiences. To examine nurses' decisions, aims and concerns when using anticipatory medications. An ethnographic study in two UK regions, using observations and interviews with nurses working in community and nursing home teams (n = 8). Observations (n = 83) and interviews (n = 61) with community nurses. Nurses identified four 'conditions' that needed to be established before they implemented anticipatory medications: (1) irreversibility; (2) inability to take oral medication; (3) where the patient was able, they should consent and (4) decision had to be independent of demands or requests from patient's relatives. By using anticipation medications, nurses sought to enable patients to be 'comfortable and settled' by provision of gradual relief of symptoms at the lowest dose possible. They aimed to respond quickly to needs, seeking to avoid hospital admission or medical call-out, while adhering to local prescribing policies. Worries included distinguishing between pain and agitation, balancing risks of under- and over-medication and the possibility of hastening death. Nurses take a leading role in the administration of anticipatory medications. Nurses apply consideration and caution to the administration of anticipatory medications but some experience emotional burden. Education, training and experience played a role in the nurses' confidence and should continue to be central to efforts to improving the quality of palliative care in the community and nursing homes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Network solutions for home health care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Almut; Lind, Leili

    2003-01-01

    The growing number of the elderly in industrialised countries is increasing the pressure on respective health care systems. This is one reason for recent trends in the development and expansion of home health care organisations. With Internet access available to everyone and the advent of wireless technologies, advanced telehomecare is a possibility for a large proportion of the population. In the near future, one of the authors plans to implement a home health care infrastructure for patients with congestive heart failure and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The system is meant to support regular and ad-hoc measurements of medical parameters in patient homes and transmission of measurement data to the home health care provider. In this paper we look at network technologies that connect sensors and input devices in the patient home to a home health care provider. We consider wireless and Internet technologies from functional and security-related perspectives and arrive at a recommendation for our system. Security and usability aspects of the proposed network infrastructures are explored with special focus on their impact on the patient home.

  10. Study protocol: improving the transition of care from a non-network hospital back to the patient's medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Roman A; Lawrence, Emily; McCreight, Marina; Fehling, Kelty; Peterson, Jamie; Glasgow, Russell E; Rabin, Borsika A; Burke, Robert; Battaglia, Catherine

    2017-02-10

    The process of transitioning Veterans to primary care following a non-Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitalization can be challenging. Poor transitions result in medical complications and increased hospital readmissions. The goal of this transition of care quality improvement (QI) project is to identify gaps in the current transition process and implement an intervention that bridges the gap and improves the current transition of care process within the Eastern Colorado Health Care System (ECHCS). We will employ qualitative methods to understand the current transition of care process back to VA primary care for Veterans who received care in a non-VA hospital in ECHCS. We will conduct in-depth semi-structured interviews with Veterans hospitalized in 2015 in non-VA hospitals as well as both VA and non-VA providers, staff, and administrators involved in the current care transition process. Participants will be recruited using convenience and snowball sampling. Qualitative data analysis will be guided by conventional content analysis and Lean Six Sigma process improvement tools. We will use VA claim data to identify the top ten non-VA hospitals serving rural and urban Veterans by volume and Veterans that received inpatient services at non-VA hospitals. Informed by both qualitative and quantitative data, we will then develop a transitions care coordinator led intervention to improve the transitions process. We will test the transition of care coordinator intervention using repeated improvement cycles incorporating salient factors in value stream mapping that are important for an efficient and effective transition process. Furthermore, we will complete a value stream map of the transition process at two other VA Medical Centers and test whether an implementation strategy of audit and feedback (the value stream map of the current transition process with the Transition of Care Dashboard) versus audit and feedback with Transition Nurse facilitation of the process using the

  11. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    , parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a "bell cord" to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication...... with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when......BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...

  12. Home Health Care Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all Home Health Agencies that have been registered with Medicare. The list includes addresses, phone numbers, and quality measure ratings for each agency.

  13. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Please use this checklist to use and maintain your medical device safely and effectively in your home. As a homecare medical device user, you ... home monitoring devices. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist For additional government sources and information visit: CDRH ...

  14. 77 FR 5186 - Medical Foster Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... the home continues to meet the requirements of this part, as well as oversight and medical foster home... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN80 Medical Foster Homes AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This document amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) ``Medical...

  15. Merging Systems: Integrating Home Visitation and the Family-Centered Medical Home

    OpenAIRE

    Tschudy, Megan M.; Toomey, Sara L.; Cheng, Tina L.

    2013-01-01

    To improve the health of children and bend the health care cost curve we must integrate the individual and population approaches to health and health care delivery. The 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health laid out the continuum for integration of primary care and public health stretching from isolation to merging systems. Integration of the family-centered medical home (FCMH) and home visitation (HV) would ...

  16. Public authority over home care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.A.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kroneman, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ageing society, decreasing resources and financial constraints are putting governments under pressure. Across Europe, division of responsibilities for long-term care are being reconsidered. Under these pressures, the role of governments in home care could be changing. This paper will

  17. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    SpeakUP TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Home Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged ... family members, caregivers, doctors and health care professionals. Home care organizations all across the country are working to ...

  18. Home Care Providers to the Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen M; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA......). METHODS: We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched...... providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. RESULTS: Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases...

  19. VNA HouseCalls of greater Cleveland, Ohio: development and pilot evaluation of a program for high-risk older adults offering primary medical care in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anetzberger, Georgia J; Stricklin, Mary Lou; Gauntner, Daniel; Banozic, Richard; Laurie, Roberta

    2006-01-01

    The need for primary medical care in the home will increase with a growing elderly and disabled population. The effectiveness of the service must be assessed in light of its relatively high costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate VNA HouseCalls of Greater Cleveland, Ohio during its first year of operations. The program targets high-risk older adults using teams of advanced practice nurses and physicians. The pilot evaluation focused on the attainment of identified program goals. Data collection techniques included clinical record review (N = 139), mailed referral source satisfaction survey, and both mailed and telephone interview patient satisfaction surveys. The results showed that the typical patient served by VNA HouseCalls was a homebound woman in advanced old age with regular family contact and both physical and mental disorders. When asked, the typical patient indicated that without the program she would not have received the care that she needed.VNA HouseCalls helped in preventing functional decline and reducing hospitalization. It received high satisfaction ratings from both referral sources and patients. Study findings suggest that primary care in the home bears further examination for addressing community need and affecting positive patient outcomes for high risk older adults.

  20. Making Medical Devices Safer at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition and recommend any changes related to your equipment. Report serious events to the device supplier and to FDA's MedWatch . For more advice to consumers, see Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist and Additional Resources on Home ...

  1. Home Care Reform in the Netherlands. Impacts on Unpaid Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction In the Netherlands, about half a million people make use of home care, that is, formally arranged, and publicly financed home care services. Until 1 January 2007, Dutch home care provisioning used to be supplied by relatively small, profit and non-profit home care

  2. Interprofessional collaboration and communication in nursing homes: a qualitative exploration of problems in medical care for nursing home residents – study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christiane A; Tetzlaff, Britta; Theile, Gudrun; Fleischmann, Nina; Cavazzini, Christoph; Geister, Christina; Scherer, Martin; Weyerer, Siegfried; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the current state of collaboration and communication between nurses and general practitioners in nursing homes, as well as needs and expectations of nursing home residents and their families. Finally, we aim to develop a new model of collaboration and communication. Rising numbers of residents in nursing homes present a challenge for general practice and nursing in most Western countries. In Germany, general practitioners visit their patients in nursing homes, where nurses work in shifts. This leads to a big variety of contacts with regard to persons involved and ways of communication. Qualitative multicentre study. Study part 1 explores needs and problems in interprofessional collaboration in interviews with nursing home residents and their relatives, general practitioners and nurses. Simultaneously, general practitioners' visits in nursing homes are observed directly. In study part 2, general practitioners and nurses will discuss findings from study part 1 in focus groups, aiming to develop strategies for the improvement of shortcomings in a participatory way. Based on the results, experts will contribute to the emerging model of collaboration and communication in a multi-professional workshop. Finally, this model will be tested in a small feasibility study. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research approved funding in March 2011. The study is expected to uncover deficits and opportunities in interprofessional collaboration in nursing homes. It provides deeper understanding of the concepts of all involved person groups and adds important clues for the interaction between professionals and older people in this setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Implementation of the patient-centered medical home in the Veterans Health Administration: associations with patient satisfaction, quality of care, staff burnout, and hospital and emergency department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karin M; Helfrich, Christian; Sun, Haili; Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Dolan, Emily; Taylor, Leslie; Wong, Edwin; Maynard, Charles; Hernandez, Susan E; Sanders, William; Randall, Ian; Curtis, Idamay; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementing the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) initiative aims to improve health outcomes through team-based care, improved access, and care management. To track progress and evaluate outcomes at all VHA primary care clinics, we developed and validated a method to assess PCMH implementation. To create an index that measures the extent of PCMH implementation, describe variation in implementation, and examine the association between the implementation index and key outcomes. We conducted an observational study using data on more than 5.6 million veterans who received care at 913 VHA hospital-based and community-based primary care clinics and 5404 primary care staff from (1) VHA clinical and administrative databases, (2) a national patient survey administered to a weighted random sample of veterans who received outpatient care from June 1 to December 31, 2012, and (3) a survey of all VHA primary care staff in June 2012. Composite scores were constructed for 8 core domains of PACT: access, continuity, care coordination, comprehensiveness, self-management support, patient-centered care and communication, shared decision making, and team-based care. Patient satisfaction, rates of hospitalization and emergency department use, quality of care, and staff burnout. Fifty-three items were included in the PACT Implementation Progress Index (Pi2). Compared with the 87 clinics in the lowest decile of the Pi2, the 77 sites in the top decile exhibited significantly higher patient satisfaction (9.33 vs 7.53; P burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory emotional exhaustion subscale, 2.29 vs 2.80; P = .02), lower hospitalization rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (4.42 vs 3.68 quarterly admissions for veterans 65 years or older per 1000 patients; P emergency department use (188 vs 245 visits per 1000 patients; P < .001). The extent of PCMH implementation, as

  4. 'High-tech' home care: overview of professional care in patients on home parenteral nutrition and implications for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Achterberg, Theo; Jansen, Jan; Wanten, Geert; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the quality, quantity and content of care given to home parenteral nutrition-dependent patients by various professionals in the Netherlands and to detect potential shortcomings. Home parenteral nutrition is a lifesaving treatment for patients who cannot eat or cannot eat sufficiently. Very little is known about follow-up care after hospital stay. Yet this is an important aspect of care as patients must cope with high-tech skills at home. Also, complications and psychosocial complaints can occur. Survey. A patient questionnaire was used to assess contacts with professionals and possible shortcomings in care. Nursing files from home parenteral nutrition nurses were reviewed for information from all contact moments. Home parenteral nutrition nurses and home care teams were interviewed to assess nursing care and to detect bottlenecks. The nutrition support team was primarily responsible for the home parenteral nutrition care. Physical complaints like abdominal pain or nausea and venous access problems like fever were discussed most often. Patients were satisfied about the nutrition support team, but both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial problems. Furthermore, the included patients visited their General Practitioner 11 times per year on average (range 1-104). Patients experienced a bottleneck with respect to the general practitioner's knowledge of home parenteral nutrition-related matters. Home parenteral nutrition patients visit the nutrition support team and their general practitioner most frequently and much attention is paid to medical and physical problems. Psychosocial problems, however, were only discussed in a minority of patients, and this was experienced as a shortcoming. Relevance to clinical practice.  Both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial

  5. Exploring new operational research opportunities within the Home Care context: the chemotherapy at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahed, Salma; Marcon, Eric; Sahin, Evren; Feillet, Dominique; Dallery, Yves

    2009-06-01

    Home Care (HC) services provide complex and coordinated medical and paramedical care to patients at their homes. As health care services move into the home setting, the need for developing innovative approaches that improve the efficiency of home care organizations increases. We first conduct a literature review of investigations dealing with operation planning within the area of home care management. We then address a particular issue dealing with the planning of operations related to chemotherapy at home as it is an emergent problem in the French context. Our interest is focused on issues specific to the anti-cancer drug supply chain. We identify various models that can be developed and analyze one of them.

  6. The moral geography of home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaschenko, J

    1994-12-01

    One result of the historical division of labor between nurses and physicians is that nurses became the eyes and ears of the physician, extending their perceptual capabilities across space and time. This "gaze of medicine" has evolved with the rise of technology, hospitals, and the medical profession to a sort of scientific totalitarianism. Protecting and enhancing patient agency, which is part of the moral work of nursing practice, can be difficult under such circumstances. Yet the geography of sickness is changing as patients move from the hospital back to the home. Because home is thought of as private, as the patient's domain, nurses may think that supporting patient agency will be easier with this transformation of health care. But that assumption may not be warranted since the gaze of medicine will follow patients and change the landscape of the home. The challenge for nursing will be to sharpen the "gaze of nursing," which is an antidote to the strictly biomedical understanding of disease.

  7. [Alcohol in care homes for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menecier-Ossia, Laure; Kholler, Maureen; Moscato, Alba; Menecier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The majority of those living in care homes for the elderly are very old, with multiple pathologies and taking multiple forms of medication. They are therefore more fragile and vulnerable in the face of alcohol, both with occasional consumption or with addictive behaviour. Far from anecdotal, these situations arise almost on a daily basis for the frontline caregivers. They are sometimes difficult to detect by other professionals who do not have such prolonged contact with the residents. Addressing the risk as well as the misuse of alcohol in a nursing home is a matter for the whole institute and must involve all the players, professionals, families and residents, in a cross-disciplinary and coherent approach. Addiction treatment, in the particular case of nursing home residents, as for the general population, considers all methods of consumption and actions, from prevention to the reduction of risks or harmful effects, to curative treatment, including alcohol withdrawal.

  8. Australian home care work: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesy, Debra; Jakimowicz, Samantha; Saunders, Carla; Lewis, Joanne

    2018-02-09

    The home care sector comprises one of Australia's fastest growing workforces, yet few papers capture the overall landscape of Australian home care. This integrative review investigates home care work with the aim of better understanding care recipients and their needs, funding and regulation, care worker skills, tasks, demographics, employment conditions and training needs. Over 2,700 pieces of literature were analysed to inform this review. Results suggest sector fragmentation and a home care workforce who, although well placed to improve outcomes for care recipients, are in need of better training and employment support. Suggestions for future research regarding Australian home care include studies that combine both aged and disability aspects of care, more research around care recipients, priority needs and strategies for addressing them, and how best to prepare home care workers for their roles.

  9. Integrating Advanced Practice Nurses in Home Care. Recommendations for a Teaching Home Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Mezey, Mathy

    1998-01-01

    A telephone survey of home care agencies and providers revealed a need for the following: evidence of the effectiveness of nurse practitioners in home care, regulatory and financial support for nurse practitioner home care, and development of home care agencies as clinical sites for training. (SK)

  10. Home care services for sick children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castor, Charlotte; Hallström, Inger; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore healthcare professionals' conceptions of caring for sick children in home care services. BACKGROUND: Families often prefer home care to hospital care, and the number of home care services for children is increasing. Caring for children at home has been recognised...... using a phenomenographic analysis. RESULTS: Three description categories emerged: "A challenging opportunity", "A child perspective", and "Re-organise in accordance with new prerequisites." Providing home care services for children was conceived to evoke both professional and personal challenges......-functioning team work were important organisational aspects. CONCLUSION: Providing home care for children was a challenging but rewarding task for healthcare professionals used to care for adults. To provide care with a child perspective was experienced as important even though there were conflicting conceptions...

  11. Efficacy of integrated interventions combining psychiatric care and nursing home care for nursing home residents: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Janine; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Verhey, Frans R J; Schols, Jos M G A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing home residents needing both psychiatric care and nursing home care for either somatic illness or dementia combined with psychiatric disorders or severe behavioural problems are referred to as Double Care Demanding patients, or DCD patients. Integrated models of care seem to be necessary in order to improve the well-being of these residents. Two research questions were addressed. First, which integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are described in the research literature? And second, which outcomes of integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are reported in the literature? A critical review of studies was done that involved integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care on psychiatric disorders and severe behavioural problems in nursing home patients. A systematic literature search was performed in a number of international databases. Eight intervention trials, including four RCTs (2b level of evidence), were identified as relevant studies for the purpose of this review. Seven studies, three of which were RCTs, showed beneficial effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach combining medical, psychiatric and nursing interventions on severe behavioural problems in DCD nursing home patients. Important elements of a successful treatment strategy for DCD nursing home patients include a thorough assessment of psychiatric, medical and environmental causes as well as programmes for teaching behavioural management skills to nurses. DCD nursing home patients were found to benefit from short-term mental hospital admission.This review underlines the need for more rigorously designed studies to assess the effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach towards DCD nursing home residents. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Factors predicting a home death among home palliative care recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ming-Chung; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Chen, Chu-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ping; Lien, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Jia-Yi; Woung, Lin-Chung; Chan, Shang-Yih

    2017-10-01

    Awareness of factors affecting the place of death could improve communication between healthcare providers and patients and their families regarding patient preferences and the feasibility of dying in the preferred place.This study aimed to evaluate factors predicting home death among home palliative care recipients.This is a population-based study using a national representative sample retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Subjects receiving home palliative care, from 2010 to 2012, were analyzed to evaluate the association between a home death and various characteristics related to illness, individual, and health care utilization. A multiple-logistic regression model was used to assess the independent effect of various characteristics on the likelihood of a home death.The overall rate of a home death for home palliative care recipients was 43.6%. Age; gender; urbanization of the area where the patients lived; illness; the total number of home visits by all health care professionals; the number of home visits by nurses; utilization of nasogastric tube, endotracheal tube, or indwelling urinary catheter; the number of emergency department visits; and admission to intensive care unit in previous 1 year were not significantly associated with the risk of a home death. Physician home visits increased the likelihood of a home death. Compared with subjects without physician home visits (31.4%) those with 1 physician home visit (53.0%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.93-5.42) and those with ≥2 physician home visits (43.9%, AOR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.06-4.70) had higher likelihood of a home death. Compared with subjects with hospitalization 0 to 6 times in previous 1 year, those with hospitalization ≥7 times in previous 1 year (AOR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.34-0.95) had lower likelihood of a home death.Among home palliative care recipients, physician home visits increased the likelihood of a home death. Hospitalizations ≥7

  13. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for any...

  14. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    The use of digital technology is increasing in home care services in Denmark. In the municipality of Copenhagen digital screens visits are being used as an alternative version of the traditional (physical) home visit to a selected population to increase quality and efficiency in the home care...

  15. Teaching home care to family medicine residents.

    OpenAIRE

    Boillat, M.; Boulet, S.; Poulin de Courval, L.

    1996-01-01

    A growing elderly population suffering from chronic and debilitating diseases, the rising cost of institutional care, and increasing demand from patients for home visits indicate that home care will become a more important part of family physicians' practice in the future. We describe a model for teaching family medicine residents how to provide home services.

  16. Heart failure in children - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children; Cor pulmonale - home monitoring for children; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure home monitoring for children ... PF, Lougheed J, Dancea A, et al. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: ...

  17. Unnecessary complexity of home medication regimens among seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Lee A; Lindquist, Lucy M; Zickuhr, Lisa; Friesema, Elisha; Wolf, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether seniors consolidate their home medications or if there is evidence of unnecessary regimen complexity. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 200 community-dwelling seniors >70 years in their homes. Subjects demonstrated how they took their medications in a typical day and the number of times a day patients would take medications was calculated. A pharmacist and physician blinded to patient characteristics examined medication regimens and determined the fewest number of times a day they could be taken by subjects. Home medication regimens could be simplified for 85 (42.5%) subjects. Of those subjects not optimally consolidating their medications, 53 (26.5%) could have had the number of times a day medications were taken reduced by one time per day; 32 (16.0%) reduced by two times or more. The three most common causes of overcomplexity were (1) misunderstanding medication instructions, (2) concern over drug absorption (i.e. before meals), and (3) perceived drug-drug interactions. Almost half of seniors had medication regimens that were unnecessarily complicated and could be simplified. This lack of consolidation potentially impedes medication adherence. Health care providers should ask patients to explicitly detail when medication consumption occurs in the home. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Home Health Care and Discharged Hospice Care Patients: United States, 2000 and 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 290), other organic psychotic conditions–chronic (294), and Alzheimer’s disease (331.0). Diagnoses —One or more diseases or injuries in the home health care or discharged hospice care patient’s medical record. Diagnoses were recorded as: + Home health ...

  19. Factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Hitoshi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Atsushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Maeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Takuya; Nomura, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2017-08-08

    Polypharmacy, which is often observed in elderly patients, has been associated with several unfavorable outcomes, including an increased risk of potentially inappropriate medications, medication non-adherence, drug duplication, drug-drug interactions, higher healthcare costs and adverse drug reactions. A significant association between polypharmacy and adverse outcomes among older people living in the community has also been confirmed. A reduction in the number of medications should thus be pursued for many older individuals. Nevertheless, the factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients have not been reported. Here, we investigated those factors in elderly home-care patients in Japan. We used the data of the participants in the Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical investigation. Polypharmacy was defined as the current use of six or more different medications. We carried out univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations between polypharmacy and each of several factors. A total of 153 home-care patients were registered. The mean number of medications used per patient was 5.9, and 51.5% of the patients belonged to the polypharmacy group. The multivariate model showed that the patients' scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Mini-Nutrition Assessment Short Form were inversely associated with polypharmacy, and potentially inappropriate medication was most strongly associated with polypharmacy (odds ratio 4.992). The present findings showed that polypharmacy was quite common among the elderly home-care patients, and they suggest that home-care physicians should prescribe fewer medications in accord with the deterioration of home-care patients' general condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Nutrition in care homes and home care: How to implement adequate strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvanitakis, M.; Beck, Anne Marie; Coppens, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background & aims: Undernutrition in home care and care home settings is an unrecognized problem with significant consequences. The present work was edited after a forum concerning nutrition in these settings was held in Brussels in order to tackle the problem. Methods: Various aspects of the que......Background & aims: Undernutrition in home care and care home settings is an unrecognized problem with significant consequences. The present work was edited after a forum concerning nutrition in these settings was held in Brussels in order to tackle the problem. Methods: Various aspects...... are various: medical, social, environmental, organizational and financial. Lack of alertness of individuals, their relatives and health-care professionals play an important role. Undernutrition enhances the risk of infection, hospitalization, mortality and alter the quality of life. Moreover, undernutrition...... related-disease is an economic burden in most countries. Nutritional assessment should be part of routine global management. Nutritional support combined with physical training and an improved ambiance during meats is mandatory. Awareness, information and collaboration with all the stakeholders should...

  1. The Future of Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Steven; Madigan, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Rosati, Robert J.; McCann, Barbara A.; Hornbake, Rodney; MacMillan, Richard; Jones, Kate; Bowles, Kathryn; Dowding, Dawn; Lee, Teresa; Moorhead, Tracey; Rodriguez, Sally; Breese, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Future of Home Health project sought to support transformation of home health and home-based care to meet the needs of patients in the evolving U.S. health care system. Interviews with key thought leaders and stakeholders resulted in key themes about the future of home health care. By synthesizing this qualitative research, a literature review, case studies, and the themes from a 2014 Institute of Medicine and National Research Council workshop on “The Future of Home Health Care,” the authors articulate a vision for home-based care and recommend a bold framework for the Medicare-certified home health agency of the future. The authors also identify challenges and recommendations for achievement of this framework. PMID:27746670

  2. Care homes crisis must be addressed urgently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine

    2014-11-04

    The annual report on the state of health and social care in England from the Care Quality Commission makes for worrying reading. As well as safety concerns in 80 per cent of the hospitals that it inspected, the watchdog warns of a shortage of nurses in care homes - one in three vacancies is unfilled in some places and one in five care homes inspected had too few staff on duty to ensure patient safety and good quality care.

  3. Caring at home until death: enabled determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carole A; Bottorff, Joan L; McFee, Erin; Bissell, Laura J; Fyles, Gillian

    2017-04-01

    The importance of family caregivers in providing palliative care at home and in supporting a home death is well supported. Gaining a better understanding of what enables palliative family caregivers to continue caring at home for their family members until death is critical to providing direction for more effective support. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of bereaved family caregivers whose terminally ill family members with advanced cancer were successful in achieving a desired home death. A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach was used. Data were collected using semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews conducted in-person or via telephone in addition to field notes and reflective journaling. The study took place in British Columbia, Canada, and included 29 bereaved adult family caregivers who had provided care for a family member with advanced cancer and experienced a home death. Four themes captured the experience of caring at home until death: context of providing care, supportive antecedents to providing care, determination to provide care at home, and enabled determination. Factors that enabled determination to achieve a home death included initiation of formal palliative care, asking for and receiving help, augmented care, relief or respite, and making the healthcare system work for the ill person. Clarifying caregiving goals and supporting the factors that enable caregiver determination appear to be critical in enhancing the likelihood of a desired home death.

  4. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  5. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  6. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  7. Palliative home care: A designer′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigmanshu Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development. In the period of 2 weeks, patients and their caregivers were silently observed in their natural surroundings during home care visits in order to listen their problems, identify the pattern of questions for the home care team, their natural way of storytelling, organizational techniques for medicines and medical reports, care givers lives, patient journey, etc. Such observations have enabled the understanding of the phenomena of home palliative care and have led to the identification of certain influential variables of the practice.

  8. Home care in childhood diabetes : a controlled evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Zoeteweij (Moniek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis considers children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and their psychological and medical functioning during 31 months of participation in a home-care program compared to traditional hospital-based care. In general, diabetes mellitus -derived from the greek diabainein

  9. Can home care services achieve cost savings in long-term care for older people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V L; Ondrich, J; Laditka, S

    1998-07-01

    To determine whether efficient allocation of home care services can produce net long-term care cost savings. Hazard function analysis and nonlinear mathematical programming. Optimal allocation of home care services resulted in a 10% net reduction in overall long-term care costs for the frail older population served by the National Long-Term Care (Channeling) Demonstration, in contrast to the 12% net cost increase produced by the demonstration intervention itself. Our findings suggest that the long-sought goal of overall cost-neutrality or even cost-savings through reducing nursing home use sufficiently to more than offset home care costs is technically feasible, but requires tighter targeting of services and a more medically oriented service mix than major home care demonstrations have implemented to date.

  10. Demystifying aged care for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Rosemary; Miller, Karen; Dugmore, Helen; Etherton-Beer, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Residential aged care environments can provide valuable learning opportunities for health professional education. An aged care community-university partnership developed the Beyond the Teaching Nursing Home: Community Partnership of Learning and Care (BTTNH: CPLC) programme, where older adults volunteer in learning activities with health professional students. This article describes medical students' experience of participating in a clinical learning activity as part of the broader programme. Fourth-year medical students (enrolled in a 6-year medical degree) on geriatric medicine rotation participated in a half-day clinical visit as part of the BTTNH: CPLC programme. Medical students participated in an interview activity with an older adult from the aged care facility. A survey was administered to evaluate medical students' experience of the structured clinical visit to a residential aged care facility. Residential aged care environments can provide valuable learning opportunities for health professional education RESULTS: Medical students valued the learning experience of interacting with older adults, observation of the residential aged care environment and learning about the needs of older adults living in residential aged care. Providing meaningful learning opportunities for medical students in residential aged care environments may contribute to a better understanding of residents, aged care environments, development of communication skills, professional role and clinical decision-making skills that are relevant for the care of older adults not only in aged care but also in other care settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Quinn, Terry J; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C; Stott, David J

    2017-04-03

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce costs and improve the quality of care compared. To assess the effects of long-term home or foster home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and two trials registers to November 2015. We included randomised and non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies complying with the EPOC study design criteria and comparing the effects of long-term home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. We reported the results narratively, as the substantial heterogeneity across studies meant that meta-analysis was not appropriate. We included 10 studies involving 16,377 participants, all of which were conducted in high income countries. Included studies compared community-based care with institutional care (care homes). The sample size ranged from 98 to 11,803 (median N = 204). There was substantial heterogeneity in the healthcare context, interventions studied, and outcomes assessed. One study was a randomised trial (N = 112); other included studies used designs that had potential for bias, particularly due lack of randomisation, baseline imbalances, and non-blinded outcome assessment. Most studies did not select (or exclude) participants for any specific disease state, with the exception of one study that only included patients if they had a stroke. All studies had methodological limitations, so readers should interpret results with caution.It is uncertain

  12. Innovative Urgent Care for the Palliative Patient at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Carmel L; Pooler, Charlotte; Arsenault, Julia E; Berean, Colleen; Sharman, Robert; Cameron, Cheryl L; de Kock, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    Palliative and end-of-life patients in their homes are at risk of developing symptom crises requiring urgent care. The usual care for these patients involves transport to an Emergency Department (ED) despite the preference of most palliative patients to stay home. The objective of this initiative was to develop an innovative strategy to provide collaborative care in the home to alleviate symptoms and avoid transport. A partnership was created among Emergency Medical Services and Community Care staff, physicians, and leaders to enable patients to stay at home with existing resources during symptom crisis. As a result of the initiative, patients were able to stay at home more frequently. When patients required transport to the ED, it occurred after attempted symptom management in the home. A total of 110 calls were tracked in the first 18 months of the initiative. Of those, 61% ended with the patient staying home, in alignment with their preferred place of care at the end of life. A collaborative approach by care providers in the community enabled patients to stay home despite symptom crisis near the end of life.

  13. The Medical Home Model and Pediatric Asthma Symptom Severity: Evidence from a National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan; Carlson, Angeline M

    2017-08-14

    The objective was to investigate the association between receiving care under the medical home model and parental assessment of the severity of asthma symptoms. It was hypothesized that parents of children who received care under the medical home model reported less severe asthma symptoms compared with their counterparts, whose care did not meet the medical home criteria. Secondary analyses were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Children with asthma aged 0-17 years were included and classified as receiving care from the medical home if their care contained 5 components: a personal doctor, a usual source of sick care, family-centered care, no problems getting referrals, and effective care coordination. Ordinal logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between parent-rated severity of asthma symptoms (mild, moderate, and severe symptoms) and the medical home. Approximately 52% of 8229 children who reported having asthma received care from the medical home. Only 30.8% of children with severe asthma symptoms received care that met the medical home criteria, compared to 55.7% of children with mild symptoms. After accounting for confounding factors, obtaining care under the medical home model decreased the odds of parent-reported severe asthma symptoms by 31% (adjusted odds ratio 0.69; 95% CI, 0.56-0.85). Study results suggest that the medical home model can reduce parent-rated severity of asthma symptoms. The findings highlight the importance of providing medical home care to children with asthma to improve the outcomes that matter most to children and their families.

  14. Safety Climate and Use of Personal Protective Equipment and Safety Medical Devices among Home Care and Hospice Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEISS, Jack K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety medical devices is mandated for healthcare workers to reduce the risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) from exposure to patients’ blood. Research has shown that a strong safety climate may promote increased use of PPE. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between safety climate and use of PPE among homecare/hospice nurses in North Carolina. To this end, a mail survey was conducted in 2006. The response rate, adjusted on the assumption that the proportion of eligible nurses from among those who did not return the questionnaire or could not be contacted was similar to the proportion among those who did return the questionnaire, was 69% (n=833 eligibles). The percentage of nurses who used the specified PPE was two to three times greater among nurses who had a strong safety climate. Safety climate was only weakly associated with using safety devices. These results suggest that improving safety climate may be a powerful tool for increasing use of PPE. PMID:25055845

  15. Quality assessment of palliative home care in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaccabarozzi, Gianlorenzo; Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio; Limonta, Fabrizio; Floriani, Maddalena; Pellegrini, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The complexity of end-of-life care, represented by a large number of units caring for dying patients, of different types of organizations motivates the importance of measure the quality of provided care. Despite the law 38/2010 promulgated to remove the barriers and provide affordable access to palliative care, measurement, and monitoring of processes of home care providers in Italy has not been attempted. Using data drawn by an institutional voluntary observatory established in Italy in 2013, collecting home palliative care units caring for people between January and December 2013, we assess the degree to which Italian home palliative care teams endorse a set of standards required by the 38/2010 law and best practices as emerged from the literature. The evaluation strategy is based on Rasch analysis, allowing to objectively measuring both performances of facilities and quality indicators' difficulty on the same metric, using 14 quality indicators identified by the observatory's steering committee. Globally, 195 home care teams were registered in the observatory reporting globally 40 955 cured patients in 2013 representing 66% of the population of home palliative care units active in Italy in 2013. Rasch analysis identifies 5 indicators ("interview" with caregivers, continuous training provided to medical and nursing staff, provision of specialized multidisciplinary interventions, psychological support to the patient and family, and drug supply at home) easy to endorse by health care providers and 3 problematic indicators (presence of a formally established Local Network of Palliative care in the area of reference, provision of the care for most problematic patient requiring high intensity of the care, and the percentage of cancer patient dying at Home). The lack of Local Network of Palliative care, required by law 38/2010, is, at the present, the main barrier to its application. However, the adopted methodology suggests that a clear roadmap for health facilities

  16. Technology-dependent Children and Home Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Akçay Didişen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, with the rapid development in the field of healthcare technology which is reflected in medicine and patient care, the number of children who are dependent on technological tools and in need of special care, and sustain life in the home environment is rapidly increasing. These children require a multidisciplinary, multifunctional care at home. In the provision of care, healthcare workers, such as physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and psychologists, work in coordination. The aim of this review was to draw attention to the care of the technology-dependent children at home. In order to achieve the goals of the care given to the technology-dependent child, inclusion of the family in the provision of care is of importance. In order to improve the care given to these children at home, home care services must be well planned and their families should be trained on the issue because delaying the discharge of these children may increase their risk of developing a hospital-acquired infection and can extend the length of their stay in the hospital. This not only increases hospital costs but also leads to the occupation of a bed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Therefore, home healthcare is an alternative for technology-dependent children with chronic diseases and for their families. Therefore, more efforts should be made to plan and evaluate home care services, to set up support and training systems, and to make legal arrangements.

  17. Home Care Services: Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care services range from skilled care provided by nurses or physical or occupational therapists to household support, ... Does the home health aide have a positive attitude? Are you and your loved one comfortable with ...

  18. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  19. Medical center farmers markets: a strategic partner in the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R; Rovniak, Liza S; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Morrison, Kathy J; Dillon, Judith F; Bates, Beth Y

    2013-08-01

    The number of medical center-based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution's commitment to the medical home. We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market's Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance's report on the medical home. During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care.

  20. Long-term home care scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Jensen, Thomas Sejr

    In several countries, home care is provided for certain citizens living at home. The long-term home care scheduling problem is to generate work plans spanning several days such that a high quality of service is maintained and the overall cost is kept as low as possible. A solution to the problem...... provides detailed information on visits and visit times for each employee on each of the covered days. We propose a branch-and-price algorithm for the long-term home care scheduling problem. The pricing problem generates one-day plans for an employee, and the master problem merges the plans with respect...

  1. American Academy of Home Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... articles Community Paramedicine Is at the Forefront of Home Care Medicine By Linda DeCherrie, MD Learn how community ... You can still learn from the leaders in home-based primary care. All of the stand-out sessions will be ...

  2. Complexity of occupational exposures for home health-care workers: nurses vs. home health aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittle, Beverly; Agbonifo, Noma; Suarez, Rassull; Davis, Kermit G; Ballard, Tangela

    2016-11-01

    To identify occupational exposures for home health-care nurses and aides. Home health-care workers' occupational injury rates in the USA are higher than the national average, yet research on causative exposures and hazards is limited. Participants were interviewed about annual frequency of occupational exposures and hazards. Exposure and hazard means were compared between home health-care nurses and aides using a Wilcoxon two-sample test. A majority of the sample was over 40 years old and obese, potentially increasing injury risks. Home health-care nurses performed more clinical tasks, increasing exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Home health-care aides performed more physical tasks with risk for occupational musculoskeletal injuries. They also dispensed oral medications and anti-cancer medications, and were exposed to drug residue at a frequency comparable to home health-care nurses. Both groups were exposed to occupational second-hand smoke. Establishing employee safety-related policies, promoting healthy lifestyle among staff, and making engineered tools readily available to staff can assist in decreasing exposures and hazards. Implications for nursing management include implementation of health-promotion programmes, strategies to reduce exposure to second-hand smoke, ensuring access to and education on assistive and safety devices, and education for all staff on protection against drug residue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Organizational factors and change strategies associated with medical home transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Leif I; Stuck, Logan H; Crain, A Lauren; Tillema, Juliana O; Flottemesch, Thom J; Whitebird, Robin R; Fontaine, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information about how to transform primary care practices into medical homes. The research team surveyed leaders of the first 132 primary care practices in Minnesota to achieve medical home certification. These surveys measured priority for transformation, the presence of medical home practice systems, and the presence of various organizational factors and change strategies. Survey response rates were 98% for the Change Process Capability Questionnaire survey and 92% for the Physician Practice Connections survey. They showed that 80% to 100% of these certified clinics had 15 of the 18 organizational factors important for improving care processes and that 60% to 90% had successfully used 16 improvement strategies. Higher priority for this change (P = .001) and use of more strategies (P = .05) were predictive of greater change in systems. Clinics contemplating medical home transformation should consider the factors and strategies identified here and should be sure that such a change is indeed a high priority for them. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Hospital at home: home-based end of life care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Wee, Bee; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Background The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and patients with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end of life care at home. Objectives To determine if providing home-based end of life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients’ symptoms, quality of life, health service costs and care givers compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) to October 2009, Ovid MED-LINE(R) 1950 to March 2011, EMBASE 1980 to October 2009, CINAHL 1982 to October 2009 and EconLit to October 2009. We checked the reference lists of articles identified for potentially relevant articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end of life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible we presented the data in narrative summary tables. Main results We included four trials in this review. Those receiving home-based end of life care were statistically significantly more likely to die at home compared with those receiving usual care (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi 2 = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I2 = 0% (three trials; N=652)). We detected no statistically significant differences for functional status (measured by the Barthel Index), psychological well-being or cognitive status, between patients receiving home-based end of life care compared with those receiving standard care (which

  5. Nursing homes and end-of-life care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2013-10-01

    To describe end-of-life care in Japanese nursing homes by comparing facility and characteristics of residents dying in nursing homes with those who had been transferred and had died in hospitals, and by comparing the quality of end-of-life care with hospitals and with their respective counterparts in the United States. National sample of 653 nursing homes with responses from 371 (57%) on their facility characteristics, 241 (37%) on their resident characteristics, and 92 (14%) on the residents' quality of life. All 5 hospitals in a city 80 miles from Tokyo cooperated. Nursing home staff answered questionnaires on facility and resident characteristics. Resident level data were obtained from 1158. The questionnaire on the quality of care was responded to by 256 (63%) of the decedents' families in nursing homes and 205 (48%) in hospitals. Facility characteristics included items on physicians, nurse staffing, and the facility's end-of-life care policy. Resident characteristics included basic demographics, level of dementia, and resident's and family's preference for the site of death. The Toolkit was used to measure the quality of end-of-life care. The proportion of those dying within the nursing home was related to the facility's policy on end-of-life care and the family's preference. The quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes was generally better than in hospitals, and than in their respective counterparts in the United States. Financial incentives by the Japanese government to promote end-of-life care in nursing homes may have contributed to increasing the proportion of deaths within the facility. The quality of care in nursing homes was evaluated as being better than hospitals. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Administering anticipatory medications in end-of-life care: A qualitative study of nursing practice in the community and in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, E; Morbey, H.; Brown, J.; Payne, S; Seale, C.; Seymour, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the United Kingdom, an approach to improving end-of-life care has been the introduction of ‘just in case’ or ‘anticipatory’ medications. Nurses are often responsible for deciding when to use anticipatory medications, but little is known about their experiences.\\ud Aim: To examine nurses’ decisions, aims and concerns when using anticipatory medications.\\ud Design: An ethnographic study in two UK regions, using observations and interviews with nurses working in community and nurs...

  7. Caring for home-based care workers | de Saxe Zerden | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based care has emerged as a service delivery model to cope with the devastation caused by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where medical and traditional care infrastructures have been overwhelmed. In these communities homebased care workers provide critical services, which include physical, ...

  8. Nursing Home Physician Specialists: A Response to the Workforce Crisis in Long-Term Care

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Marginalization of physicians in the nursing home threatens the overall care of increasingly frail nursing home residents who have medically complex illnesses. The authors propose that creating a nursing home medicine specialty, which recognizes the nursing home as a unique practice site, would go a long way toward remedying existing problems with care in skilled nursing facilities and would best serve the needs of the 1.6 million nursing home residents in the United States. Reviewing what is...

  9. HOME LONG-TERM CARE IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kułagowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The considerable proportion of the elderly, the chronically ill and the disabled in community is an economic and organizational challenge for the state social policy. It requires a large, steadily increasing financing from the public funds and creating an optional care model to fulfill the needs of citizens and guarantee high quality services. Development of the long-term care is one of the problems to be solved. This paper presents: – a long-term care forms, organization and tasks; – a role of long-term care but particularly home longterm care to protect health in Poland; – problems related with home long-term care functioning.

  10. Associations Between Home Death and the Use and Type of Care at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Rebecca; Asada, Yukiko; Burge, Frederick; Lawson, Beverley

    2018-01-01

    Despite wishes for and benefits of home deaths, a discrepancy between preferred and actual location of death persists. Provision of home care may be an effective policy response to support home deaths. Using the population-based mortality follow-back study conducted in Nova Scotia, we investigated the associations between home death and formal care at home and between home death and the type of formal care at home. We found (1) the use of formal care at home at the end of life was associated with home death and (2) the use of formal home support services at home was associated with home death among those whose symptoms were well managed.

  11. The Patient-Centered Medical Home: How Is It Related to Quality and Equity Among the General Adult Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibling, Nadine

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates whether patient-reported characteristics of the medical home are associated with improved quality and equity of preventive care, advice on health habits, and emergency department use. We used adjusted risk ratios to examine the association between medical home characteristics and care measures based on the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Medical home characteristics are associated with 6 of the 11 outcome measures, including flu shots, smoking advice, exercise advice, nutrition advice, all advice, and emergency department visits. Educational and income groups benefit relatively equally from medical home characteristics. However, compared with insurance and access to a provider, medical home characteristics have little influence on overall disparities in care. In sum, our findings support that medical home characteristics can improve quality and reduce emergency visits but we find no evidence that medical home characteristics alleviate disparities in care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Oral Health Care in Home Care Service – Personnels’ Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lundqvist, Pontus; Mathson, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Elderly nowadays stay longer in their own home. This raises the standards on home care service to contribute to the maintenance of elderly’s general and oral health. Our objective is therefore to explore attitudes about how home care workers view oral health care and the importance of good oral health for elderly clients. 8 subjects (22 to 61 years of age) were selected for the study working in home care service, which all gave their informed consent. Semi-structured interviews were performed...

  13. [Scorpion puncture: medical treatment and home remedies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas-Flores, Artemio; Lagunas-Jaimes, Gregoria Natividad

    2009-01-01

    The scorpion puncture is a medical urgency. The greater frequency happens in Jalisco, Morelos and Guerrero. Controversy in the medical treatment persists, some use serum anti-scorpion, others only in critical cases. People by tradition are used the home remedies to cure the scorpion puncture. Our objective was to know the medical treatment and home remedies used in scorpion punctures in the State of Guerrero. Retrospective, cross-sectional-descriptive, observational study through a non-probabilistic sample by quotas during a period of eight years with 1,174 patients with age above 18 years with a interview applied by medical students. All the affected patients used home remedies, 94% went to the physician, the more frequent remedies used were garlic, tobacco, cacahuananche, salt, eggs. The most frequent prescribed drugs were: antiscorpion serum, calcium, chloroquine, an antihistamine drugs. Of the total of affected patients, 45% were children and 53 % adults. In Guerrero, it is traditional to use different home remedies. Doctors used antiscorpion serum in the 56.73% of the cases and symptomatic treatment with different medications.

  14. A medical home: value and implications of knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzano, A John; McInerney, Claire R; McDaniel, Reuben R; Meese, Abigail; Alajmi, Bibi; Mohr, Stewart M; Tallia, Alfred F

    2009-01-01

    Central to the "medical home" concept is the premise that the delivery of effective primary care requires a fundamental shift in relationships among practice members and between practice members and patients. Primary care practices can potentially increase their capacity to deliver effective care through knowledge management (KM), a process of sharing and making existing knowledge available or by developing new knowledge among practice members and patients. KM affects performance by influencing work relationships to enhance learning, decision making, and task execution. We extend our previous work to further characterize, describe, and contrast how primary care practices exhibit KM and explain why KM deserves attention in medical home redesign initiatives. Case studies were conducted, drawn from two higher and lower performing practices, which were purposely selected based on disease management, prevention, and productivity measures from an improvement trial. Observations of operations, clinical encounters, meetings, and interviews with office members and patients were transcribed and coded independently using a KM template developed from a previous secondary analysis. Face-to-face discussions resolved coding differences among research team members. Confirmation of findings was sought from practice participants. Practices manifested varying degrees of KM effectiveness through six interdependent processes and multiple overlapping tools. Social tools, such as face-to-face-communication for sharing and developing knowledge, were often more effective than were expensive technical tools such as an electronic medical record. Tool use was tailored for specific outcomes, interacted with each other, and leveraged by other organizational capacities. Practices with effective KM were more open to adopting and sustaining new ways of functioning, ways reflecting attributes of a medical home. Knowledge management differences occur within and between practices and can explain

  15. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care + Share widget - Select to show What’s home health care? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  16. Paediatric palliative care at home: a single centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee Ai; Khalid, Farah

    2016-02-01

    There is increased awareness of paediatric palliative care in Malaysia, but no local published data on home care services. We aimed to describe the paediatric experience at Hospis Malaysia, a community-based palliative care provider in Malaysia. We conducted a retrospective case note review of patients aged up to 21 years who were referred to Hospis Malaysia from 2009 to 2013. A total of 137 patients (92 male, 45 female) with a median age of 140 (3-250) months were included in this study. The majority (71.5%) had malignancies. At referral, 62 patients were still in hospital and 17 died prior to discharge. A total of 108 patients received home visits. At the first home visit, 89.8% of patients had at least one physical symptom. Pain was the most common (52.5%) symptom. Patients had various supportive devices: 39 were on feeding tubes, ten had tracheostomies, five were on bilevel positive airway pressure and ten had urinary catheters. 66 families discussed the preferred location of care at end-of-life. Among those who died, 78.9% died at home, as they preferred (p home death and age, diagnosis and number of home visits. Bereavement follow-up occurred for 93.3% of families. Community care referrals tend to occur late, with 25.5% of patients dying within two weeks of referral. At referral, patients often had untreated physical symptoms. The majority of families preferred and had a home death. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  17. Aggression and violence against home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, André; Höge, Thomas

    2004-07-01

    This article describes the development of the Violence and Aggression in Health Care Questionnaire (VAQ) and the application of the measure in the field of home care. In a 1st sample of 361 German home care workers, the scales of the VAQ reached internal consistencies from .72 to .93. A confirmatory factor analysis gave evidence to the hypothesized factor structure. Significant correlation with indicators of psychophysical strain and health resulted in a 2nd sample of 180 home care workers. In multiple regression analysis based on a 3rd sample of 180 home care workers, verbal aggression by patients was a significant predictor of negative psychological outcomes. The relationship is completely mediated by negative emotional reactions after aggressive incidents.

  18. [Neonatal palliative care at home: Contribution of the regional pediatric palliative care team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojean, N; Strub, C; Kuhn, P; Calvel, L

    2017-02-01

    The "patients' rights and end-of-life care" act, known as the Leonetti law, has allowed implementation of palliative care in neonatology as an alternative to unreasonable therapeutic interventions. A palliative care project can be offered to newborns suffering from intractable diseases. It must be focused on the newborn's quality of life and comfort and on family support. Palliative care for newborns can be provided in the delivery room, in the neonatal unit, and also at home. Going home is possible but requires medical support. Here we describe the potential benefits of the intervention of a regional team of pediatric palliative care for newborns, both in the hospital and at home. Two clinical situations of palliative care at home started in the neonatal period and the neonatal unit are presented. They are completed by a retrospective national survey focusing on the type of support to newborns in palliative care in 2014, which was conducted in 22 French regional pediatric palliative care teams. It shows that 26 newborns benefited from this support at home in 2014. Sixteen infants were born after a pregnancy with a palliative care birth plan and ten entered palliative care after a decision to limit life-sustaining treatments. Twelve of them returned home before the 20th day of life. Sixteen infants died, six of them at home. The regional pediatric palliative care team first receives in-hospital interventions: providing support for ethical reflection in the development of the infant's life project, meeting with the child and its family, helping organize the care pathway to return home. When the child is at home, the regional pediatric palliative care team can support the caregiver involved, provide home visits to continue the clinical monitoring of the infant, and accompany the family. The follow-up of the bereavement and the analysis of the practices with caregivers are also part of its tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A Home-Based Palliative Care Consult Service for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Adam G; Antoni, Charles; Gammonley, Denise

    2016-11-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a home-based palliative care consult service for Veterans with advanced illness. A retrospective chart review was performed on 73 Veterans who received a home-based palliative care consult. Nearly one-third were 80 years of age or older, and nearly one-third had a palliative diagnosis of cancer. The most common interventions of the consult team included discussion of advance directives, completion of a "do not resuscitate" form, reduction/stoppage of at least 1 medication, explanation of diagnosis, referral to home-based primary care program, referral to hospice, and assessment/support for caregiver stress. The home-based consult service was therefore able to address clinical and psychosocial issues that can demonstrate a direct benefit to Veterans, families, and referring clinicians. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  1. Redefining "Medical Care."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lauren R

    President Donald J. Trump has said he will repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and replace it with health savings accounts (HSAs). Conservatives have long preferred individual accounts to meet social welfare needs instead of more traditional entitlement programs. The types of "medical care" that can be reimbursed through an HSA are listed in section 213(d) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) and include expenses "for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, or for the purpose of affecting any structure or function of the body." In spite of the broad language, regulations and court interpretations have narrowed this definition substantially. It does not include the many social factors that determine health outcomes. Though the United States spends over seventeen percent of gross domestic product (GDP) on "healthcare", the country's focus on the traditional medicalized model of health results in overall population health that is far beneath the results of other countries that spend significantly less. Precision medicine is one exceptional way in which American healthcare has focused more on individuals instead of providing broad, one-size-fits-all medical care. The precision medicine movement calls for using the genetic code of individuals to both predict future illness and to target treatments for current illnesses. Yet the definition of "medical care" under the Code remains the same for all. My proposal for precision healthcare accounts involves two steps-- the first of which requires permitting physicians to write prescriptions for a broader range of goods and services. The social determinants of health are as important to health outcomes as are surgical procedures and drugs--or perhaps more so according to many population health studies. The second step requires agencies and courts to interpret what constitutes "medical care" under the Code differently depending on the taxpayer's income level. Childhood sports programs and payments

  2. Integrating home care services in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Katalin, E.; Boerma, W.; Hutchinson, A.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Naiditch, M.; Lamura, G.; Chlabicz, S.; Gulácsi, L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Bolibar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A key feature of home care is its divided nature. Conditions for coordination are poor. A variety of professionals provides a coherent mix of services. The social care system is in general local, less professionalised and usually more poorly financed than the health care system. These

  3. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient's at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient's symptoms and improve the individual's quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Literature review was done by using the keywords "home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing" from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015.

  4. Teaching Home-Based Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Ornstein, Katherine A; Wajnberg, Ania; Kopke, M Victoria; DeCherrie, Linda V

    Despite the growing homebound population and the development of innovative models of care that work to bring care to people in their homes, home visits are not a routine part of education for many healthcare providers. This manuscript describes the experience of Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors teaching home-based primary care to learners of various disciplines and reports the results of a survey performed to assess trainee experience. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors is the largest academic home-based primary care program in the country and trainees of various disciplines have nearly 1,700 contact days annually of directly supervised clinical teaching. In order to improve trainee education and meet our practice needs, trainees: 1) independently conduct urgent visits, 2) carry longitudinal panels of homebound patients, and 3) perform subspecialist consultations. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors has exposed thousands of trainees to home-based primary care in the past 20 years and trainees report positive reviews of their experiences. As the need to train future providers in home-based primary care grows, we will be challenged to provide trainees with adequate exposure to multidisciplinary teams and to teach about the importance of continuity of care.

  5. Hospital information technology in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    The utilization of hospital information technology (HIT) as a tool for home care is a recent trend in health science. Subjects gaining benefits from this new endeavor include middle-aged individuals with serious chronic illness living at home. Published data on the utilization of health care information technology especially for home care in chronic illness patients have increased enormously in recent past. The common chronic illnesses reported in these studies were primarily on heart and lung diseases. Furthermore, health professionals have confirmed in these studies that HIT was beneficial in gaining better access to information regarding their patients and they were also able to save that information easily for future use. On the other hand, some health professional also observed that the use of HIT in home care is not suitable for everyone and that individuals cannot be replaced by HIT. On the whole it is clear that the use of HIT could complement communication in home care. The present review aims to shed light on these latest aspects of the health care information technology in home care.

  6. Caregivers Create a Veteran-Centric Community in VHA Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverhals, Leah M; Manheim, Chelsea E; Gilman, Carrie V; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari

    2016-01-01

    The Veteran's Health Administration's Medical Foster Home program offers a unique long-term care option for veterans who require nursing-home- or assisted-living-level care. Veterans in a medical foster home reside with community-based caregivers who provide 24-hr-a-day care and monitoring. The veterans often remain in the medical foster home until end of life. Support and oversight is provided to the caregiver from the Veteran's Health Administration's community-based medical team. This qualitative descriptive study is based on secondary analysis of interviews with 20 medical foster home caregivers from 7 programs across the United States. The study's research aims are to describe and explain (a) the type of care backgrounds and skills these caregivers possess, (b) caregivers' primary motivations to open their homes to veterans who often have complex medical and social needs, and (c) how caregivers function in their role as primary caregiver for veterans. Findings indicated that caregivers interviewed had worked in long-term care settings and/or cared for family members. A strong desire to serve veterans was a primary motivation for caregivers, rather than financial gain. The caregivers' long-term care skills aided them in building and sustaining the unique medical foster home family-like community.

  7. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  8. [Home care for the high-risk newborn infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, M

    2010-06-01

    With increased survival of extremely low birth weigh (ELBW) and very ill infants, a lot of them are discharged with unresolved medical issues that complicate their subsequent care. Infants born preterm with low birth weight who require neonatal intensive care experience a much higher rate of hospital readmission and death during the first year after birth compared with healthy term infants. Despite initial hospital care which is one of the most expensive of all kind of hospitalization, home care services are sometimes still sparse though the high risk of this group for failure to thrive, respiratory problems, developmental delays, parenting problems. In addition, societal and economic forces have come to bear on the timing and process of discharge and home care. Moreover it takes time for the family of a high-risk infant to prepare to care for their infant in a home setting and to obtain the necessary support services and mobilize community resources. Careful preparation for discharge, good follow-up and medical home after discharge may reduce these risks.

  9. Palliative Home Care: A Designer's Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhatnagar, Tigmanshu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development...

  10. Staph infections -- self-care at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000686.htm Staph infections - self-care at home To use the ... used to treat other staph germs. How Does Staph Spread? Many healthy people normally have staph on ...

  11. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit: a phenomenological hermeneutical interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellenmark-Blom, Michaela; Wigert, Helena

    2014-03-01

    A descriptive study of parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit. As survival rates improve among premature and critically ill infants with an increased risk of morbidity, parents' responsibilities for neonatal care grow in scope and degree under the banner of family-centred care. Concurrent with medical advances, new questions arise about the role of parents and the experience of being provided neonatal care at home. An interview study with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Parents from a Swedish neonatal (n = 22) home care setting were extensively interviewed within one year of discharge. Data were collected during 2011-2012. The main theme of the findings is that parents experience neonatal home care as an inner emotional journey, from having a child to being a parent. This finding derives from three themes: the parents' experience of leaving the hospital milieu in favour of establishing independent parenthood, maturing as a parent and processing experiences during the period of neonatal intensive care. This study suggests that neonatal home care is experienced as a care structure adjusted to incorporate parents' needs following discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal home care appears to bridge the gap between hospital and home, supporting the family's adaptation to life in the home setting. Parents become empowered to be primary caregivers, having nurse consultants serving the needs of the whole family. Neonatal home care may therefore be understood as the implementation of family-centred care during the transition from NICU to home. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help-Se...

  14. Nursing home policies regarding advance care planning in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gendt, C.; Bilsen, J.; van der Stichele, R.; Deliens, L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to discover how many nursing homes (NHs) in Flanders (Belgium) have policies on advance care planning (ACP) and their content regarding different medical end-of-life decisions. Methods: A structured mail questionnaire was sent to the NH administrators of all 594

  15. Nurse Delegation in Home Care: Research Guiding Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; Farnham, Jennifer; Reinhard, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    The current study evaluated nurse delegation in home care, a pilot program introduced in 2007 in New Jersey to promote home care options for consumers needing assistance with medical/nursing tasks. Findings on readiness for the program, barriers and facilitating factors, experience with the program, and recommendations are summarized and presented. Methods included surveys and interviews with participants in nurse delegation, observations of planning and implementation meetings, and review meeting minutes. Major findings were no negative outcomes for consumers, improvements in quality of life and quality of care for consumers, high readiness and increasing satisfaction with experience in delegation, perception of nurse delegation in home care as a valued option, and the challenges of ensuring adequate staffing. Subsequent changes in regulation in New Jersey are underway, translating this research into policy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 7-15.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Parents’ Preferences for Enhanced Access in the Pediatric Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickafoose, Joseph S.; DeCamp, Lisa R.; Prosser, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Efforts to transform primary care through the medical home model may have limited effectiveness if they do not incorporate families’ preferences for different primary care services. OBJECTIVE To assess parents' relative preferences for different categories of enhanced access services in primary care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Internet-based survey that took place with a national online panel from December 8, 2011, to December 22, 2011. Participants included 820 parents of children aged 0 to 17 years. Hispanic and black non-Hispanic parents were each oversampled to 20% of the sample. The survey included a discrete choice experiment with questions that asked parents to choose between hypothetical primary care practices with different levels of enhanced access and other primary care services. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We estimated parents’ relative preferences for different enhanced access services using travel time to the practice as a trade-off and parents’ marginal willingness to travel in minutes for practices with different levels of services. RESULTS The response rate of parents who participated in the study was 41.2%. Parents were most likely to choose primary care offices that guaranteed same-day sick visits (coefficient, 0.57 [SE, 0.05]; P preferences among parents with different sociodemographic characteristics. Parents' marginal willingness to travel was 14 minutes (95% CI, 11–16 minutes) for guaranteed same-day sick visits and 44 minutes (95% CI, 37–51 minutes) for an office with idealized levels of all services. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE As primary care practices for children implement aspects of the medical home model, those that emphasize same-day sick care and professional continuity are more likely to meet parents’ preferences for enhanced access. Practices should seek to engage families in prioritizing changes in practice services as part of medical home implementation. PMID:25643000

  17. Is it time for a comprehensive approach in older home care clients' care planning in Finland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjamaa, Riitta; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Kangasniemi, Mari; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2015-06-01

    Home-care services require access to high quality information. Apart from the provision of right-time organised planning of care and to document information about clients' needs, in home care, the care planning is intended to facilitate continuity and individual nursing through nursing documentation of the assessment of the client. The aim was to describe the contents of older (+75 years) home-care clients' electronic care and service plans and to evaluate how the clients' resources have been taken into account. The data were collected from the care and service plans (n = 437) of home-care services during July 2010. The data were analysed by quantitative methods and by thematic content analysis. Based on the analysis, medication was the most reported component in all plans (92.7%); other commonly reported components were self-care (85.4%) and coping (78.0%). Components within respiratory, follow-up treatment, life cycle and health behaviour were forgotten. Most of the care and service plans were designed from the home-care professionals' point of view but the plans lacked the perspective of older clients. To be able to promote older home clients' ability to live at home, home-care planning needs to be individually designed and must take into account clients' needs and their perspectives regarding meaningful activities and social relationships. In addition, there is a need to develop a more comprehensive care planning system, based on the clients' individual needs and standards of care planning. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Patients' perceptions of palliative care quality in hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2016-08-24

    Patients' perceptions of care quality within and across settings are important for the further development of palliative care. The aim was to investigate patients' perceptions of palliative care quality within settings, including perceptions of care received and their subjective importance, and contrast palliative care quality across settings. A cross-sectional study including 191 patients in late palliative phase (73 % response rate) admitted to hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care was conducted, using the Quality from the Patients' Perspective instrument-palliative care (QPP-PC). QPP-PC comprises four dimensions and 12 factors; "medical-technical competence" (MT) (2 factors), "physical-technical conditions" (PT) (one factor), "identity-orientation approach" (ID) (4 factors), "sociocultural atmosphere" (SC) (5 factors), and three single items (S); medical care, personal hygiene and atmosphere. Data were analysed using paired-samples t-test and analysis of covariance while controlling for differences in patient characteristics. Patients' perceptions of care received within settings showed high scores for the factors and single items "honesty" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings and low scores for "exhaustion" (MT) in three out of four settings. Patients' perceptions of importance scored high for "medical care" (S), "honesty" (ID), "respect and empathy" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings. No aspects of care scored low in all settings. Importance scored higher than perceptions of care received, in particular for receiving information. Patients' perceptions of care across settings differed, with highest scores in hospice inpatient care for the dimensions; ID, SC, and "medical care" (S), the SC and "atmosphere" (S) for hospice day care, and "medical care" (S) for palliative units in nursing homes. There were no differences in subjective importance across settings. Strengths of services related to

  19. Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Ortiz1, Len Fromer21Pediatric Pulmonary Services, El Paso, TX; 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH, which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.Keywords: Patient-Centered Medical Home, chronic care model, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, patient education, physician assistants, nurse practitioners

  20. First things first: foundational requirements for a medical home in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jane; Harrod, Molly; Robinson, Claire; Annis-Emeott, Ann; Ott, Jessica; Saffar, Darcy; Krein, Sarah L; Greenstone, Clinton L

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementation of its medical home, Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT), in 900 primary care clinics nationwide, with 120 located in academically affiliated medical centers. The literature on Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) implementation has focused mainly on small, nonacademic practices. To understand the experiences of primary care leadership, physicians and staff during early PACT implementation in a VHA academically affiliated primary care clinic and provide insights to guide future PCMH implementation. We conducted a qualitative case study during early PACT implementation. Primary care clinical leadership, primary care providers, residents, and staff. Between February 2011 and March 2012, we conducted 22 semi-structured interviews, purposively sampling participants by clinic role, and convenience sampling within role. We also conducted observations of 30 nurse case manager staff meetings, and collected data on growth in the number of patients, staff, and physicians. We used a template organizing approach to data analysis, using select constructs from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Establishing foundational requirements was an essential first step in implementing the PACT model, with teamlets able to do practice redesign work. Short-staffing undermined development of teamlet working relationships. Lack of co-location of teamlet members in clinic and difficulty communicating with residents when they were off-site hampered communication. Opportunities to educate and reinforce PACT principles were constrained by the limited clinic hours of part-time primary care providers and residents, and delays in teamlet formation. Large academic medical centers face special challenges in implementing the medical home model. In an era of increasing emphasis on patient-centered care, our findings will inform efforts to both improve patient care and train clinicians to move from physician

  1. [Home care services and the role of "caregivers"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, L

    2001-06-01

    The care of children and adolescents with cancer continues to grow in complexity. While in most cases we are winning the fight, now quality of life (QoL) is becoming a problem to face and a challenge. Pediatric total care policy includes also home care to deliver in any stage of the disease. This can become very useful in the terminal stage, when QoL is the primary goal. The WHO has defined palliative care as integrating the psychologic and spiritual aspects of patient care; affirming life, and regarding dying as a normal process; neither hastening nor postponing death, offering a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death; and offering a support system to help the family cope during the patient's illness and their own bereavement&. Recently this aim is considered also for children. The home care team is usually composed by a physician responsible, few physicians, several nurses, social workers, psychologists plus the family/home caregiver. In most countries health professionals now rely on family/home caregivers, who can play an important role in the team. The American College of Physicians has recently edited useful Guidelines. The Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center suggests four key ideas which make the word COPE in order to succeed in solving problems: C for Creativity, O for Optimism, P for Planning, E for Expert information. Not everywhere in Europe home care is included as a part of the Health Care System, even if there are increasing pressures from shrinking budgets. As hospitals can be upsetting for the child, is hospital care always necessary during the long course of the disease? Home care, when feasible, can be an alternative approach. Strong motivations support pediatric home care. The life rhythms are better preserved if the whole family is at home. Parents must be taught how to cope and how to talk with their children, the sick one and his/her siblings. The dialogue is easier at home. Home care respects the

  2. Home sweet home? Community care for older people in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emily J; Caplan, Gideon A

    2008-02-01

    Community care provision for older Australians is growing in places and options, based on older people's preference to stay in their own homes, coupled with its cost efficiency compared to long-term residential care. Australia's aging population, cultural diversity, and dispersed population in rural and remote areas presents significant challenges in meeting these care needs. The objective of this review is to provide a critical overview of community care services in Australia, from its origin in the 1940s through to the current array of programs that deliver care. Barriers to access for these programs, growth in funding and expenditure, evidence of client satisfaction and the problems of workforce provision are presented. It is not clear how the growing future demands for care programs, resulting from greater client expectation, increasingly complex care needs and a diminishing workforce of paid and unpaid carers, will be met. However, the economic burden is anticipated to be manageable. Despite seemingly well-structured programs, the current multiplicity and rigidity of services means care provided is sometimes unsatisfactory at the point of delivery. It remains to be seen therefore if services can be expanded, modified and developed to address current deficiencies and meet future demands. The reality of timely and equitable care for all older Australians living in the community is elusive at present. The ongoing rationing of residential care beds coupled with people's desires to stay in their own homes means community care is here to stay. The future inevitably presents huge challenges to those planning, implementing and providing care in this setting.

  3. Doctors? learning experiences in end-of-life care ? a focus group study from nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-01

    Background Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors? learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. Methods House offi...

  4. Patient satisfaction with home-birth care in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the necessary elements in an obstetric system of home confinements is well-organized postnatal home care. In The Netherlands home care assistants assist midwives during home delivery, they care for the new mother as well as the newborn baby, instruct the family on infant health care and carry

  5. A systematic review of integrated working between care homes and health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Sue L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK there are almost three times as many beds in care homes as in National Health Service (NHS hospitals. Care homes rely on primary health care for access to medical care and specialist services. Repeated policy documents and government reviews register concern about how health care works with independent providers, and the need to increase the equity, continuity and quality of medical care for care homes. Despite multiple initiatives, it is not known if some approaches to service delivery are more effective in promoting integrated working between the NHS and care homes. This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Methods A systematic review was conducted using Medline (PubMed, CINAHL, BNI, EMBASE, PsycInfo, DH Data, Kings Fund, Web of Science (WoS incl. SCI, SSCI, HCI and the Cochrane Library incl. DARE. Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of integrated working between primary health care professionals and care homes, or identified barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Studies were quality assessed; data was extracted on health, service use, cost and process related outcomes. A modified narrative synthesis approach was used to compare and contrast integration using the principles of framework analysis. Results Seventeen studies were included; 10 quantitative studies, two process evaluations, one mixed methods study and four qualitative. The majority were carried out in nursing homes. They were characterised by heterogeneity of topic, interventions, methodology and outcomes. Most quantitative studies reported limited effects of the intervention; there was insufficient information to evaluate cost. Facilitators to integrated working included care home managers' support and protected time for staff training. Studies with the potential for

  6. A systematic review of integrated working between care homes and health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sue L; Goodman, Claire; Bunn, Frances; Victor, Christina; Dickinson, Angela; Iliffe, Steve; Gage, Heather; Martin, Wendy; Froggatt, Katherine

    2011-11-24

    In the UK there are almost three times as many beds in care homes as in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Care homes rely on primary health care for access to medical care and specialist services. Repeated policy documents and government reviews register concern about how health care works with independent providers, and the need to increase the equity, continuity and quality of medical care for care homes. Despite multiple initiatives, it is not known if some approaches to service delivery are more effective in promoting integrated working between the NHS and care homes. This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working. A systematic review was conducted using Medline (PubMed), CINAHL, BNI, EMBASE, PsycInfo, DH Data, Kings Fund, Web of Science (WoS incl. SCI, SSCI, HCI) and the Cochrane Library incl. DARE. Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of integrated working between primary health care professionals and care homes, or identified barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Studies were quality assessed; data was extracted on health, service use, cost and process related outcomes. A modified narrative synthesis approach was used to compare and contrast integration using the principles of framework analysis. Seventeen studies were included; 10 quantitative studies, two process evaluations, one mixed methods study and four qualitative. The majority were carried out in nursing homes. They were characterised by heterogeneity of topic, interventions, methodology and outcomes. Most quantitative studies reported limited effects of the intervention; there was insufficient information to evaluate cost. Facilitators to integrated working included care home managers' support and protected time for staff training. Studies with the potential for integrated working were longer in duration. Despite evidence

  7. Palliative care in home care: perceptions of occupational therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séfora Gomez Portela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at understanding and reflecting on the perceptions of occupational therapists regarding the implementation of palliative care in home care. This is an exploratory, qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews, conducted in the second semester of 2012 with eight occupational therapists with experience in palliative care in the city of São Paulo. Content analysis identified four themes: characterization and professional trajectory in the field, understanding the concepts of palliative care, home care and palliative care, and occupational therapy and palliative care in home care. The results suggest that the role of the occupational therapist in this field has taken place at different levels of health care, being addressed to people with varying needs. The use of the concept of palliative care by the interviewees exceeds the notion of end of life, following the changes in the epidemiological transition. They understand that professional services follow the trend of national palliative care services with focus on specialized levels, but manifest the importance of its implementation in primary and home care. Among the barriers to practice, they identified the complexity of “being at home “, peculiarities of palliative care with high cost demands, lack of infrastructure and implementation of the current policy. Professional training and scientific roduction in the area were viewed as inadequate, although they identified a call for change. The interviewees recognized palliative care in home care as a strong professional field, but one still requiring study and discussions regarding its limits and conditions of implementation, especially in the Unified Health System.

  8. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  9. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  10. Evaluation of patient centered medical home practice transformation initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Benjamin F; Chase, Sabrina M; Wise, Christopher G; Schiff, Gordon D; Schmidt, Laura A; Goyzueta, Jeanette R; Malouin, Rebecca A; Payne, Susan M C; Quinn, Michael T; Nutting, Paul A; Miller, William L; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has become a widely cited solution to the deficiencies in primary care delivery in the United States. To achieve the magnitude of change being called for in primary care, quality improvement interventions must focus on whole-system redesign, and not just isolated parts of medical practices. Investigators participating in 9 different evaluations of Patient Centered Medical Home implementation shared experiences, methodological strategies, and evaluation challenges for evaluating primary care practice redesign. A year-long iterative process of sharing and reflecting on experiences produced consensus on 7 recommendations for future PCMH evaluations: (1) look critically at models being implemented and identify aspects requiring modification; (2) include embedded qualitative and quantitative data collection to detail the implementation process; (3) capture details concerning how different PCMH components interact with one another over time; (4) understand and describe how and why physician and staff roles do, or do not evolve; (5) identify the effectiveness of individual PCMH components and how they are used; (6) capture how primary care practices interface with other entities such as specialists, hospitals, and referral services; and (7) measure resources required for initiating and sustaining innovations. Broad-based longitudinal, mixed-methods designs that provide for shared learning among practice participants, program implementers, and evaluators are necessary to evaluate the novelty and promise of the PCMH model. All PCMH evaluations should as comprehensive as possible, and at a minimum should include a combination of brief observations and targeted qualitative interviews along with quantitative measures.

  11. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  12. Estimating Associations Between Medical Home Adoption, Utilization, and Quality: A Comparison of Evaluation Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, Grant R; Kandrack, Ryan; Baird, Matthew; Friedberg, Mark W

    2018-01-01

    Methodological differences between evaluations of medical home adoption might complicate readers' ability to draw conclusions across studies. To study whether associations between medical home adoption and patient care are affected by methodological choices. Among 71 practices participating in the Pennsylvania Chronic Care Initiative (a medical home pilot), we estimated cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between 4 definitions of "medical home adoption" [National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) recognition in year 3, Medical Home Index scores at baseline and 3, and within-practice changes in Medical Home Index scores between baseline and year 3] and utilization and quality. Six utilization and 6 quality measures. In cross-sectional analyses at year 3, NCQA recognition was associated with higher rates of nephropathy monitoring (7.23 percentage points; confidence interval, 0.45-14.02), breast cancer screening (7.48; 2.11-12.86), and colorectal cancer screening (8.43; 2.44-14.42). In longitudinal analyses, NCQA recognition was associated with increases in hospitalization rates (2.75 per 1000 patient-months; 0.52-4.98). In baseline cross-sectional analyses, higher Medical Home Index scores were associated with fewer ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations (-0.61 per 1000 patient per month; -1.11 to -0.11), all-cause emergency department visits (-6.80; -12.28 to -1.32), and ambulatory care-sensitive emergency department visits (-5.60; 10.32 to -0.88). There were no statistically significant associations between any other measure of medical home adoption and quality or utilization. The findings of medical home evaluations are sensitive to methodological choices. Meta-analyses, narrative reviews, and other syntheses of medical home studies should consider subdividing their findings by analytic approach.

  13. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women) had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102), and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308), performance status of 3-4 (n = 261), and dementia (n = 121). At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712). 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109), change of attending physicians (n = 8), and others (n = 5). The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03), the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02), women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02), and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02). Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing. PMID:22044683

  14. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodama Yuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102, and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308, performance status of 3-4 (n = 261, and dementia (n = 121. At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712. 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109, change of attending physicians (n = 8, and others (n = 5. The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03, the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02, women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02, and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02. Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing.

  15. [A Study on problems associated with a patient's death during home care, based on the duration of home care and patient's age-why terminal home care is difficult for a patient's family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Hiroo; Okabe, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Kana

    2012-12-01

    When a patient receives home care, an important factor is how the family accepts the patient's death. In this study, we observed that the number of long-term in-home terminal care cases increased, as well as the number of short-term in-home care cases. Moreover, the number of cancer cases among the young population is also increasing. Consequently, how to acceptance of a patient's death varies among their family. When tending to patients, suitable support from the medical staff is required. Additionally, various options need to be provided for terminal care.

  16. Medical decisions for troubled breathing in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Lipson, Steven

    2002-07-01

    This paper aims to gain insight into the medical decision-making processes undergone in a nursing home in response to troubled breathing. Participants were 20 residents of a large, nonprofit nursing home, six of whom died by the time of data collection. The mean age was 88 yr, and 70% were female. Diagnostic tests and medication were the most frequently used treatments. The most important considerations reported were the resident's quality of life, family wishes, and the relative effectiveness of alternative treatment options. In 45% of the cases, the physicians reported family involvement. In 30% of cases, the physicians would have wanted less treatment if they were in the resident's condition. Troubled breathing emerges as an end-of-life symptom for many residents. An analysis of the decision-making process and its evaluation could foster improved care of these symptoms.

  17. Medically dependent severe motor and intellectual disabilities: Time study of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubasa, Tadashi; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Kimura, Akihiko; Shinohara, Makoto; Endo, Fumio

    2017-06-01

    Improvements in neonatal medicine and pediatric emergency medicine have led to an increasing number of children with severe disabilities requiring medical care, such as tracheal suction, on a daily basis. Most of these children, discharged directly from hospitals to their parents' homes, need home medical support. To provide data for the establishment of appropriate support systems, we analyzed the care for such children in a time study conducted at an institution. A minute-by-minute time study of the work of 33 staff members in a ward for patients (medically dependent severe motor and intellectual disabilities [SMID]) requiring frequent medical care was carried out over 48 h. Data were compared with those from a ward for ordinary non-medically dependent SMID patients. Time of life care for medically dependent SMID and ordinary SMID was almost identical, but the time for medical care for the former was 10-fold longer than that of the latter. Also, tasks involving information exchange and recording of the time of care were performed fourfold more frequently in the medically dependent SMID than in the ordinary SMID ward. Medically dependent SMID children and adults, predominantly with tracheostomies, needed much more medical care and more concentrated involvement of the staff compared with ordinary SMID. This study provides valuable data for the development of support systems for medically dependent SMID children being cared for at home. In addition, it sheds light on the situation faced by non-SMID children requiring frequent medical care. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ2 tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( pclusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  19. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    services. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate how the intercultural communication is used during digital home visits in a Copenhagen community when caring for older patients with a minority ethnic background. Methods: document analysis teaching material including two video cases combined...... home visits due to expected communication difficulties. Included patients with a minority ethnic background are younger, relative independent from the start point and drop out before completed care plan. In addition, the screen visit seems to appeal to some patients with a minority ethnic background....... Surprisingly, we found that screen visits might help some patients with major language communication difficult ies to care for their health in better ways than they were able to when helped though a traditional home visit. It is our hope that this study will contribute with new knowledge to promote cultural...

  20. Possibilities and problems in the development of home care technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekum, T. van; Banta, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Limited resources for health care and increasing health care costs have led to proposals to expand home care services. Presently, home care technology is rather primitive. Its development and use have been largely unplanned. Nonetheless, home care technology is growing in response to obvious needs,

  1. Seniors' use of and unmet needs for home care, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Melanie; Rotermann, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this article provides current information about home care use and unmet home care needs of community-dwelling seniors aged 65 or older. Home care is assistance received at home for a health-related reason in the 12 months before the interview. It includes formal care provided by paid workers or volunteer organizations and informal care provided by family, friends and/or neighbours. In 2009, 25% of seniors received home care services. The percentage receiving home care increased with age and ill health. As well, seniors who lived alone were more likely to have received home care than were those who lived with others. Housework and transportation were the most common types of care reported. Family, friends and neighbours provided the majority of care across all care types. Nearly 180,000 seniors (4%) reported having unmet needs for professional home care.

  2. Relationship between home hazards and falling among community-dwelling seniors using home-care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, B-S; Bégin, C; Cadieux, E; Goulet, L; Allaire, J-F; Meloche, J; Leduc, N; Kergoat, M-J

    2010-02-01

    Evidence linking home hazards to falls has not been well established. The evidence-based approach to fall-risk assessment in longitudinal studies becomes difficult because of exposures that change during follow-up. We conducted a cohort study to determine the prevalence of hazards and to resolve whether they are linked to the risk of falls among 959 seniors receiving home-care services. A home hazards assessment was completed at entry and every six months thereafter using a standardized form. The adjusted (for a number of confounding factors) relationship between home hazards and falls was estimated using a survival model taking into account updated time-varying exposures and multiple events. Falls leading to a medical consultation were examined as a secondary outcome, hypothesized as a measure of severity. Home environmental hazards were found in 91% of homes, with a mean of 3.3 risks per individual. The bathroom was the most common place for hazards. The presence of hazards was significantly associated with all falls and fall-related medical consultations, and showed relatively constant effects from one fall to another. The current study is innovative in its approach and useful in its contribution to the understanding of the interaction between home environmental hazards and falls. Our results indicate that inattention to changes in exposure masks the statistical association between home hazards and falls. Each environmental hazard identified in the home increases the risk of falling by about 19%. These findings support the positive findings of trials that demonstrate the effectiveness of this home hazard reduction program, particularly for at-risk people.

  3. Care maps for children with medical complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sherri; Nicholas, David; Mahant, Sanjay; Weiser, Natalie; Kanani, Ronik; Boydell, Katherine; Cohen, Eyal

    2017-12-01

    Children with medical complexity require multiple providers and services to keep them well and at home. A care map is a patient/family-created diagram that pictorially maps out this complex web of services. This study explored what care maps mean for families and healthcare providers to inform potential for clinical use. Parents (n=15) created care maps (hand drawn n=10 and computer-generated n=5) and participated in semi-structured interviews about the process of developing care maps and their perceived impact. Healthcare providers (n=30) reviewed the parent-created care maps and participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed for themes and emerging theory using a grounded theory analytical approach. Data analysis revealed 13 overarching themes that were further categorized into three domains: features (characteristics of care maps), functions (what care maps do), and emerging outcomes (benefits of care map use). These domains further informed a definition and a theoretical model of how care maps work. Our findings suggest that care maps may be a way of supporting patient- and family-centred care by graphically identifying and integrating experiences of the family as well as priorities for moving forward. Care maps were endorsed as a useful tool by families and providers. They help healthcare providers better understand parental priorities for care. Parents can create care maps to demonstrate the complex burden of care. They are a unique visual way to incorporate narrative medicine into practice. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Older Adults and Management of Medical Devices in the Home: Five Requirements for Appropriate Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sara C; Gurses, Ayse P; Werner, Nicole; Hohl, Dawn; Hughes, Ashley; Leff, Bruce; Arbaje, Alicia I

    2017-08-01

    Medical devices, or instruments or tools to manage disease, are increasingly used in the home, yet there have been limited evaluations of how older adults and caregivers safely use these devices. This study concerns a qualitative evaluation of (1) barriers and facilitators of appropriate use, and (2) outcomes of inappropriate use, among older adults at the transition from hospital to home with skilled home health care (SHHC). Guided by a human factors engineering work system model, the authors (1) conducted direct observations with contextual inquiry of the start-of-care or resumption-of-care SHHC provider visit, and (2) semi-structured interviews with 24 older adults and their informal caregivers, and 39 SHHC providers and administrators. Five requirements for the appropriate use of home medical devices were identified. A systems approach integrating the hospital with the SHHC agency is needed to make the use of home medical devices safer.

  5. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Intervention Development and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Sheeran, Thomas; Raue, Patrick J.; Reilly, Catherine F.; Greenberg, Rebecca L.; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Johnston, Christine L.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed for managing depression as part of ongoing care for medical and surgical patients. The intervention provides Home Health Agencies the resources needed to implement depression care management as part of routine clinical practice. PMID:21716043

  6. [Role of Visiting Nursing Care in Japanese Home Healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Taiwan's rapidly aging society is expected to make it a super-aged society in 2026. By 2060, people aged 65 or older will account for 40% of the population, a ratio that will approximate that in Japan. In Japan, the elderly population was 27.3% in 2016. By 2025, when the baby-boomers become 75 years old in Japan, issues of long-term care and end-of-life care will be more important and challenging. Since 1976, more Japanese have died in hospital settings than in home settings. Although the percentage of people dying at home increased slightly to 12.7% in 2016, after the recent introduction and promotion of home healthcare, Japan will face a significant challenge to deal with the healthcare 'tsunami' of high natural death rates, which is expected to impose a heavy death burdened on society by 2040, when the death rate is expected to reach 1,670,000/year. Therefore, the Japanese authorities have begun to promote the Community-based Integrated Care System, in which home healthcare and visiting nursing play crucial roles. This article summarizes the historical trend and current situation of visiting nursing in Japan. Japan uses a hybrid payment system for visiting nursing that is financially supported both through private medical insurance policies and Kaigo insurance (Japanese long-term care insurance). The total of 8613 visiting nursing stations that were active in community settings in 2016 cooperated with 14,000 support clinics for home healthcare and cared for 570,000 patients in home settings. We believe that visiting nursing will play an important role in home healthcare in Taiwan in the future.

  7. Nursing home care trajectories for older adults following in-hospital palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joan G; Berry, Patricia H; Ersek, Mary

    2017-04-27

    Palliative care consultation (PCC) during hospitalization is increasingly common for older adults with life-limiting illness discharged to nursing homes. The objective of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the care trajectories and experiences of older adults admitted to a nursing home following a PCC during hospitalization. Twelve English-speaking adults, mean age 80 years, who received a hospital PCC and discharge to a nursing home without hospice. Data were collected from medical records at five time points from hospital discharge to 100 days after nursing home admission and care trajectories were mapped. Interviews (n = 15) with participants and surrogates were combined with each participant's medical record data. Content analysis was employed on the combined dataset. All PCC referrals were for goals of care conversations during which the PCC team discussed poor prognosis. All participants were admitted to a nursing home under the Medicare skilled nursing facility benefit. Seven were rehospitalized; six of the 12 died within 6 weeks of initial nursing home admission. The two care trajectories were Focus on Rehabilitative Care and Comfort Care Continuity. There was a heavy emphasis on recovering functional status through rehabilitation and skilled nursing care, despite considerable symptom burden and poor prognosis. Regardless of PCC with recommendations for palliative interventions, frail older adults with limited life expectancy and their family caregivers often perceive that rehabilitation will improve physical function. This perception may contribute to inappropriate, ineffective care. More emphasis is needed to coordinate care between PCC recommendations and post-acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Depression and increased short-term hospitalization risk among geriatric patients receiving home health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Thomas; Byers, Amy L; Bruce, Martha L

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between depression and hospitalization among geriatric home care patients. A sample of 477 patients newly admitted to home care over two years was assessed for depression. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses examined the likelihood of hospitalization during a 60-day home care episode. The hospitalization rate was similar for the 77 depressed patients and 400 nondepressed patients (about 7%). However, mean time to hospitalization was 8.4 versus 19.5 days after start of care, respectively. Hospitalization risk was significantly higher for depressed patients during the first few weeks. A main effect for depression and a depression-by-time interaction was found when analyses controlled for medical comorbidity, cognitive status, age, gender, race, activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, and referral to home care after hospitalization. Depression appears to increase short-term risk of hospitalization for geriatric home care patients immediately after starting home care.

  9. Leadership philosophy of care home managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, Daniel; James, Ian Andrew

    Care home managers have a significant influence on staff morale and care delivery. Training methods underpinned by transformational leadership theory (TLT) have been used successfully to develop leaders in healthcare services. The aim of this preliminary study was to establish which aspects of TLT were apparent in care home managers' philosophies of leadership. A qualitative research design was used and 25 care home managers in the north-east of England took part. Participants were asked to provide their philosophies of leadership by completing a questionnaire; a thematic analysis of the responses was then conducted. Development of philosophy, enablement and interpersonal impact emerged as key themes. The findings suggested that elements of TLT were apparent in the participants' philosophies of leadership. However, the importance of gaining the support of senior management when attempting to apply a philosophy of eadership in practice was lacking. Aspects of TLT, such as supporting frontline employees to engage in education and establishing trust, were embedded in care home managers' philosophies. To develop leadership skills, managers may benefit from training programmes that involve both structured teaching and guided learning through experience.

  10. Medical Home Finds Real Estate in a Children’s Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee M. Turchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Center for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia is one such model and has grown steadily over the last 10 years. The medical home model embraced by the Center for CYSHCN focuses on care coordination, patient- and family-centered care, and integrated communication tools (such as care plans and medical summaries. The vast majority of CYSHCN treated at the Center during this study ranged in age from 6 to 12 years. Of those children, 82% had public insurance, 17% required home-nursing services, 24% required mobility aids, and 16% required enteral nutritional/feeding tubes. The most common diagnoses included developmental delay, intellectual disability, and cerebral palsy. When compared with CYSHCN enrolled in a statewide medical home program, the severity of the medical conditions of CYSHCN cared for at the Center was statistically significantly higher/more complex.

  11. Fixing the broken image of care homes, could a 'care home innovation centre' be the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, Jo; Harrison, Jennifer Kirsty; Watson, Julie; Randall, Marion; Murray, Scott

    2017-03-01

    The UK has many excellent care homes that provide high-quality care for their residents; however, across the care home sector, there is a significant need for improvement. Even though the majority of care homes receive a rating of 'good' from regulators, still significant numbers are identified as requiring 'improvement' or are 'inadequate'. Such findings resonate with the public perceptions of long-term care as a negative choice, to be avoided wherever possible-as well as impacting on the career choices of health and social care students. Projections of current demographics highlight that, within 10 years, the part of our population that will be growing the fastest will be those people older than 80 years old with the suggestion that spending on long-term care provision needs to rise from 0.6% of our Gross Domestic Product in 2002 to 0.96% by 2031. Teaching/research-based care homes have been developed in the USA, Canada, Norway, the Netherlands and Australia in response to scandals about care, and the shortage of trained geriatric healthcare staff. There is increasing evidence that such facilities help to reduce inappropriate hospital admissions, increase staff competency and bring increased enthusiasm about working in care homes and improve the quality of care. Is this something that the UK should think of developing? This commentary details the core goals of a Care Home Innovation Centre for training and research as a radical vision to change the culture and image of care homes, and help address this huge public health issue we face. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The invisible homebound: setting quality-of-care standards for home-based primary and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Bruce; Carlson, Charlotte M; Saliba, Debra; Ritchie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Approximately four million adults in the United States are homebound, and many of them cannot access office-based primary care. Home-based medical care can improve outcomes and reduce health care costs, but this care operates in a quality measurement desert, having been largely left out of the national conversation on care quality. To address this shortcoming, two of the authors created the National Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care Network, an organization whose members include exemplary home-based medical practices, professional societies, and patient advocacy groups. This article describes the current status of home-based medical care in the United States and offers a brief narrative of a fictional homebound patient and the health events and fragmented care she faces. The article then describes the network's quality-of-care framework, which includes ten quality-of-care domains, thirty-two standards, and twenty quality indicators that are being tested in the field. The same two authors also developed a practice-based registry that will be used for quality-of-care benchmarking, practice-based quality improvement, performance reporting, and comparative effectiveness research. Together, these steps should help bring home-based medical care further into the mainstream of US health care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  13. Caring for home-based care workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    independence and achieve the best possible quality of life through physical, psychosocial, spiritual and ... compensated for their participation with lunch and a pen. QUANTITATIVE COMPONENT. A survey was ... Participating care workers were divided into small groups and asked four questions relating to VCT and.

  14. Evaluating the potential for primary care to serve as a mental health home for people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Lexie R; Olesiuk, William J; Ellis, Alan R; Lichstein, Jesse C; DuBard, C Annette; Farley, Joel F; Jackson, Carlos T; Beadles, Christopher A; Morrissey, Joseph P; Domino, Marisa Elena

    2017-07-01

    Primary care-based medical homes could improve the coordination of mental health care for individuals with schizophrenia and comorbid chronic conditions. The objective of this paper is to examine whether persons with schizophrenia and comorbid chronic conditions engage in primary care regularly, such that primary care settings have the potential to serve as a mental health home. We examined the annual primary care and specialty mental health service utilization of adult North Carolina Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia and at least one comorbid chronic condition who were in a medical home during 2007-2010. Using a fixed-effects regression approach, we also assessed the effect of medical home enrollment on utilization of primary care and specialty mental health care and medication adherence. A substantial majority (78.5%) of person-years had at least one primary care visit, and 17.9% had at least one primary care visit but no specialty mental health services use. Medical home enrollment was associated with increased use of primary care and specialty mental health care, as well as increased medication adherence. Medical home enrollees with schizophrenia and comorbid chronic conditions exhibited significant engagement in primary care, suggesting that primary-care-based medical homes could serve a care coordination function for persons with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A pharmacy's journey toward the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Steven; Hambleton, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To describe the integration of a clinic pharmacy with a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Primary care clinic in Monroe, WA, from 1981 to January 2011. Pharmacists and physicians with a previous working relationship in a family practice residency program established colocated practices in 1981. In addition to traditional pharmacy services, collaborative practice agreements were developed and clinical pharmacy services expanded over time. Reimbursement challenges for clinical pharmacy services existed in the fee-for-service environment. The acquisition of the clinic and pharmacy by Providence Health and Services created a new financial alignment with additional opportunities for collaboration. An internally funded grant established a PCMH pilot that included pharmacist participation. PCMH pharmacists and the care provider team identified areas to improve physician and clinic efficiencies and to enhance patient care. Clinical pharmacy services expanded under the PCMH model. Pharmacist activities included value-added refill authorization services, coordinated patient visits with the PCMH pharmacist and physicians, medication therapy management, diabetes and anticoagulation services, hospital discharge medication reconciliation, and participation in the shared medical appointment. Clinical pharmacy services are woven into the PCMH fabric of this clinic. New pharmacists will be challenged and rewarded in this evolving health care model.

  16. Medical Care and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Drinks for Kids Medical Care and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your Newborn Print A A A What's in this article? ... as when he or she will see your newborn for the first time, office hours and on- ...

  17. Client Involvement in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone

    2013-01-01

    from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a homecare setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural...

  18. Human resources in home care in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Lamura, G.; Boerma, W.; Hutchinson, A.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Naiditch, M.; Chlabicz, S.; Ersek, K.; Gulácsi, L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Bolibar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing old-age dependency ratio implies future reduction of human resources available to provide services. Little information is available about the level of qualification, contractual aspects, payment and working conditions of home care workers and the existence of staff

  19. 3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... served populations with limited access to health care, treating all patients regardless of ability to pay... offered by the medical homes approach. In general, this approach emphasizes the patient's relationship with a primary care provider who coordinates the patient's care and serves as the patient's principal...

  20. Merging systems: integrating home visitation and the family-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudy, Megan M; Toomey, Sara L; Cheng, Tina L

    2013-11-01

    To improve the health of children and bend the health care cost curve we must integrate the individual and population approaches to health and health care delivery. The 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health laid out the continuum for integration of primary care and public health stretching from isolation to merging systems. Integration of the family-centered medical home (FCMH) and home visitation (HV) would promote overall efficiency and effectiveness and help achieve gains in population health through improving the quality of health care delivered, decreasing duplication, reinforcing similar health priorities, decreasing costs, and decreasing health disparities. This paper aims to (1) provide a brief description of the goals and scope of care of the FCMH and HV, (2) outline the need for integration of the FCMH and HV and synergies of integration, (3) apply the IOM's continuum of integration framework to the FCMH and HV and describe barriers to integration, and (4) use child developmental surveillance and screening as an example of the potential impact of HV-FCMH integration.

  1. Palliative Care Development in European Care Homes and Nursing Homes: Application of a Typology of Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Katherine; Payne, Sheila; Morbey, Hazel; Edwards, Michaela; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Gambassi, Giovanni; Pasman, H Roeline; Szczerbińska, Katarzyna; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-06-01

    The provision of institutional long-term care for older people varies across Europe reflecting different models of health care delivery. Care for dying residents requires integration of palliative care into current care work, but little is known internationally of the different ways in which palliative care is being implemented in the care home setting. To identify and classify, using a new typology, the variety of different strategic, operational, and organizational activities related to palliative care implementation in care homes across Europe. We undertook a mapping exercise in 29 European countries, using 2 methods of data collection: (1) a survey of country informants, and (2) a review of data from publically available secondary data sources and published research. Through a descriptive and thematic analysis of the survey data, we identified factors that contribute to the development and implementation of palliative care into care homes at different structural levels. From these data, a typology of palliative care implementation for the care home sector was developed and applied to the countries surveyed. We identified 3 levels of palliative care implementation in care homes: macro (national/regional policy, legislation, financial and regulatory drivers), meso (implementation activities, such as education, tools/frameworks, service models, and research), and micro (palliative care service delivery). This typology was applied to data collected from 29 European countries and demonstrates the diversity of palliative care implementation activity across Europe with respect to the scope, type of development, and means of provision. We found that macro and meso factors at 2 levels shape palliative care implementation and provision in care homes at the micro organizational level. Implementation at the meso and micro levels is supported by macro-level engagement, but can happen with limited macro strategic drivers. Ensuring the delivery of consistent and high

  2. Setting a new standard of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, Kathleen; Lamont, Lori; Krishnan, Preetha

    2009-11-01

    The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority's introduction of a full-time nurse practitioner in a 116-bed non-profit nursing home provided an opportunity to explore a collaborative relationship between an NP acting as the primary care provider and a single physician serving as the consultant for complex care and after-hours care. The outcomes were measured in terms of resident and family satisfaction, quality of care indicators and cost effectiveness. Data were collected from pre-existing quality indicators, including a resident/family satisfaction survey, transfers to acute care, and medication use statistics. Unstructured interviews were also conducted with nursing staff and members of the interdisciplinary team. Dramatic improvements in medication use were observed, including a 17 per cent reduction in overall drug costs, a 55 per cent decrease in polypharmacy rates and a 63 per cent reduction in antipsychotic drug use. Transfers to emergency decreased by 20 per cent. Family satisfaction with the quality of health care provided to residents increased by 24 per cent. The collaborative practice of an NP with physician consultation is an effective way of delivering quality care to nursing home residents.

  3. Opioid use in palliative care | Hosking | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Opioid use in palliative care. M Hosking. Abstract.

  4. Quality Reforms in Danish Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Despite relatively generous coverage of the over-65 population, Danish home help services receive regular criticism in the media and public opinion polls. Perhaps as a consequence, reforms of Danish home care policy for senior citizens have placed strong emphasis on quality since the 1990s....... This reform strategy represents a shift from the welfare state modernisation program of the 1980s, which built mainly on economic strategies of cost-efficiency and New Public Management (NPM) princi-ples, including contract management and performance management. Recent reforms have instead attempted...... to increase the overall quality of care by increasing the transparency at the political, administrative and user levels. However, reforms have revolved around conflicting principles of standardisation and the individualisation of care provision and primarily succeeded in increasing the political and ad...

  5. A nationwide survey of patient centered medical home demonstration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina; Landon, Bruce E

    2010-06-01

    The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified--consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows.

  6. Low use of medication in home deliveries in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirm, E; Tobi, H; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: In view of the growing concern for de-medicalizing childbirth, the aim of this study is to give detailed figures on the use of medication during home deliveries in the Netherlands. Methods: A prospective study of medication use by 68 community midwives during 716 home births in the

  7. Voicing Ageism in Nursing Home Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Shaw, Clarissa; Lee, Alexandria; Kim, Sohyun; Dinneen, Emma; Turk, Margaret; Jao, Ying-Ling; Liu, Wen

    2017-09-01

    Elderspeak (i.e., infantilizing communication) is a common form of ageism that has been linked to resistiveness to care in nursing home residents with dementia. Nursing home staff use elderspeak by modifying speech with older residents based on negative stereotypes, which results in patronizing communication that provides a message of incompetence. The purpose of the current secondary analysis was to describe communication practices used by nursing home staff that reflect ageism. Transcripts of 80 video recordings of staff-resident communication collected during nursing home care activities were re-analyzed to identify specific elderspeak patterns, including diminutives, collective pronouns, tag questions, and reflectives. Elderspeak was used in 84% of transcripts, and specifically during bathing, dressing, oral care, and other activities. Collective pronoun substitution occurred most frequently-in 69% of recorded conversations. Subgroup analysis of the inappropriate terms of endearment found that "honey"/"hon" and "sweetheart"/"sweetie" were most commonly used. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(9), 16-20.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. [Creating a good relationship between hospital and clinic for the support of end-of-life home care patients-usefulness of questionnaires to indicate the capacity of home care-supporting clinics for palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Kato, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Kazuko; Chiba, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Motoko; Iwadare, Midori

    2012-12-01

    We have been practicing palliative care for terminal cancer patients at outpatient sections, patient wards, by home care, and by visiting nursing stations for the last 4 years. After the establishment of our palliative care unit in June 2011, it became difficult for us to provide sufficient home care support by ourselves, because of the increasing number of the patients and their widespread locations. It is therefore necessary to cooperate with regional medical clinics in order to support the patients who need home care even after their condition deteriorates. To determine the extent to which the home care-supporting clinics perform palliative care, we used an original questionnaire. Twenty-five clinics agreed to the publication of their names as our cooperating clinics. The number of patients who received palliative care at home from home care clinics after visiting our hospital increased from 8% to 14%, and the rate of patients who died at home also increased from 10% to 13%. Information about cooperating with home care clinics is very important and the improvement of palliative care skills necessary for home care doctors to continue their support for End-Of-Life cancer patients. Furthermore, the hospital should offer a strict and timely backup when the condition of patients treated at home suddenly deteriorates.

  9. Electronic Technology in Home Medical Equipment in Chinese Market

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Mincheng

    2016-01-01

    Home medical equipment has been an emerging industry in recent years, possessing small bulk, agile operation and relative inexpensive price. In the essay, the principle and classification of home medical equipment are introduced through the principle and structure of four types of essential home medical equipment: pulse oximeter, electronic sphygmomanometer, electronic thermometer and glucose meter. Then the application of photodiode, pressure sensor, biosensor, temperature sensor, amplifiers...

  10. Present Conditions and Problems of Home Care Education in Pharmaceutical Education: Through the Activities of "the Working Group to Create Home Clinical Cases for Education".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuke, Yuko

    2017-01-01

    In the pharmaceutical education model core curriculums revision, "basic qualities required as a pharmacist" are clearly shown, and "the method based on learning outcomes" has been adopted. One of the 10 qualities (No. 7) is "Practical ability of the health and medical care in the community". In the large item "F. Pharmaceutical clinical" of the model core curriculums, "participation in the home (visit) medical care and nursing care" is written in "participation in the health, medical care, and welfare of the community", and it is an important problem to offer opportunities of home medical care education at university. In our university, we launched a working group to create "home clinical cases for education" from the educational point of view to pharmacy students to learn home medical care, in collaboration with university faculty members and pharmacists, who are practitioners of home care. Through its working group activities, we would like to organize the present conditions and problems of home care education in pharmaceutical education and to examine the possibility of using "home clinical case studies" in home care education at university.

  11. Electronic business in the home medical equipment industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, June; Graham, Michael J; Liu, Lai C

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at developing electronic business solutions to increase value for the home medical equipment industry. First, an electronic strategic value chain model was developed for the home medical equipment industry. Second, electronic business solutions were mapped from this model. Third, the top 20 dominant companies in the home medical equipment industry were investigated to see the current adoption patterns of these electronic business solutions. The solutions will be beneficial to decision-makers in the information technology adoptions in the home medical equipment industry to increase the business values.

  12. The effect of organizational climate on patient-centered medical home implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok; Shea, Judy A; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Organizational climate is a key determinant of successful adoption of innovations; however, its relation to medical home implementation is unknown. This study examined the association between primary care providers' (PCPs') perception of organization climate and medical home implementation in the Veterans Health Administration. Multivariate regression was used to test the hypothesis that organizational climate predicts medical home implementation. This analysis of 191 PCPs found that higher scores in 2 domains of organizational climate (communication and cooperation, and orientation to quality improvement) were associated with a statistically significantly higher percentage (from 7 to 10 percentage points) of PCPs implementing structural changes to support the medical home model. In addition, some aspects of a better organizational climate were associated with improved organizational processes of care, including a higher percentage of patients contacted within 2 days of hospital discharge (by 2 to 3 percentage points) and appointments made within 3 days of a patient request (by 2 percentage points). © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Provider en español Atención médica durante el embarazo Why Is Prenatal Care Important? Millions of American ... for sugar (glucose)and protein. Protein may indicate preeclampsia, a condition that develops in late pregnancy and ...

  14. A disease management program for heart failure: collaboration between a home care agency and a care management organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Lisa A; Johnson, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative approach to manage patients with heart failure between a home care agency and a care management agency. The resulting disease management program used a combination of home visits and phone contact. Care management plans emphasized patient education on increasing adherence to medical and diet regimens, and recognizing early symptoms of exacerbation that could lead to rehospitalization. Clinician activities and patient outcomes are described.

  15. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals – predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv W Sørbye

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Liv W Sørbye1, Torunn Hamran2, Nils Henriksen2, Astrid Norberg2,31Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway; 3Umeå University, Umeå, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC project conducted in 2001–2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0 was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%. In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9 years for men and 84.0 (6.6 for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7–7.8; P < 0.001. In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.Keywords: aged, home care, cross-sectional study, self-rated health, level of care, care burden, comprehensive assessment, RAI, Nordic

  16. Integrating home-based medication therapy management (MTM) services in a health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidt, Shannon; Holtan, Haley; Stender, Jennifer; Salvatore, Toni; Thompson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    To describe the integration of home-based Medication Therapy Management (MTM) into the ambulatory care infrastructure of a large urban health system and to discuss the outcomes of this service. Minnesota from September 2012 to December 2013. The health system has more than 50 primary care and specialty clinics. Eighteen credentialed MTM pharmacists are located in 16 different primary care and specialty settings, with the greatest number of pharmacists providing services in the internal medicine clinic. Home-based MTM was promoted throughout the clinics within the health system. Physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, and pharmacists could refer patients to receive MTM in their homes. A home visit had the components of a clinic-based visit and was documented in the electronic health record (EHR); however, providing the service in the home allowed for a more direct assessment of environmental factors affecting medication use. Number of home MTM referrals, reason for referral and type of referring provider, number and type of medication-related problems (MRPs). In the first 15 months, 74 home visits were provided to 53 patients. Sixty-six percent of the patients were referred from the Internal Medicine Clinic. Referrals were also received from the senior care, coordinated care, and psychiatry clinics. Approximately 50% of referrals were made by physicians. More referrals (23%) were made by pharmacists compared with advanced practice providers, who made 21% of referrals. The top 3 reasons for referral were: nonadherence, transportation barriers, and the need for medication reconciliation with a home care nurse. Patients had a median of 3 MRPs with the most common (40%) MRP related to compliance. Home-based MTM is feasibly delivered within the ambulatory care infrastructure of a health system with sufficient provider engagement as demonstrated by referrals to the service. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. The Caring Home Program: In-Home Interventions for Alzheimer's Disease Patients and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynoos, Jon; Ohta, Russell J.

    The home is clearly the major setting in which care is provided to individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The Caring Home Program was a multi-disciplinary program designed to complement existing efforts to assist caregivers (N=12) with the in-home care of Alzheimer's disease patients. The program components consisted of an assessment of…

  18. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Medication as Infrastructure: Decentring Self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Danholt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on science and technology studies (STS, and specifically the concept of infrastructure as conceptualised by Bowker and Star (2000; Star 1999, this paper argues and empirically demonstrates that self-care may be considered a practice that is thoroughly sociotechnical, material, distributed and de-centred. Comparing the practices related to medication in the treatment of asthma, type 2 diabetes and haemophilia, we show that in practice there is no ‘self’ in self-care. More specifically, the ‘self’ in self-care is an actor who is highly dependent on, and intertwined with infrastructures of care, in order to be self-caring. Infrastructures of care are the more or less embedded ‘tracks’ along which care may ‘run’, shaping and being shaped by actors and settings along the way. Obtaining prescriptions, going to the pharmacy, bringing medication home and administering it as parts of daily life are commonplace activities embedded in the fabric of life, especially for those living with a chronic condition. However, this procurement and emplacement of medication involves the establishment and ongoing enactment of infrastructures of care, that is, the connections between various actors and locations that establish caring spaces and caring selves. Locations and actors are included as allies in treating chronic conditions outside the clinical setting, but these infrastructures may also be ambiguous, with respect to their effects; they may simultaneously contribute to the condition’s management and neglect. Particularly precarious is management at the fringes of healthcare infrastructure, where allies, routines and general predictability are scarce. We conclude by arguing that these insights may induce a greater sensitivity to existing infrastructures and practices, when seeking to introduce new infrastructures of care, such as those promoted under the headings of ‘telemedicine’ and ‘healthcare IT’.

  20. [Current State of Medical Support by Nurses to Guide Cancer Patients to at Home Death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, Mitsuru; Hoshina, Kaori; Tsuda, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the palliative care support in home-based settings for patients with end-stage cancer. Fifty patients who died at home were analyzed. MSC nurses listened to the patients and informal caregivers for their preferences for place of death. Home death was selected by 30%of participants prior to the environment adjustment support and by 68% after. The period leading up to home care that started with the adjustment assistance by MSC was 5 days(median). Nurse support by the MSC is intended to promote decision making regarding the place of end-of-life care. The dialogue between the hospital and local medical institutions is accelerating the period until the start of home care.

  1. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  3. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, J.L.P. van; Selm, M. van; Leeuwen, E. van; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  4. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling appointments for outpatient medical...

  5. End-of-life care in nursing and care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, John; Johnson, Malcolm

    More than 70,000 people die each year in nursing and residential care homes, yet comparatively little attention has been paid to end-of-life care practice and its challenges in this setting. We conducted interviews and group discussions in 12 homes, involving 73 residents, 97 members of staff and 16 relatives. These revealed that personalised care, dignity and respect, making time, talking about death, relatives' roles, and staff support were priorities for all concerned. Training is vital in helping staff to engage sensitively, respectfully and creatively with dying residents. Staffing levels must be sufficient so staff can sit with residents and care in a way that is attuned to their personality, life history and wishes. relatives help to ensure a "civilised death".

  6. Bellco Formula Domus Home Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewin, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    There are certain characteristics in a dialysis machine that would be desirable for use in home and limited care environments. These features relate to safety, ease of use, consideration of physical space, and reliability. The Bellco Formula Domus Home Care System was designed to meet all these requirements. Bellco's philosophy of patient treatment centers on global biocompatibility. This is evident in the design of the Formula Domus Home Care System. It has the smallest hydraulic fluid pathway of any dialysis machine on the market. Formula is capable of preparing ultrapure dialysate. The ultrafiltration measurement mechanism, the patented Coriolis flow meter, measures the mass of the dialysate, not the volume. For this reason it is the only dialysis machine that detects actual backfiltration, not just the theoretical possibility of it based on transmembrane pressure. The Coriolis flow meter also ensures that dialysate flow is a true single pass. The operator interface is a single window operating control. It is possible to select up to 14 different languages. There is an online help key to assist patients with troubleshooting. Programmable start-up and shutdown times save time for the patient. Formula is the only dialysis machine to offer a backup battery feature. Formula is capable of communicating with any software available. The focus on global biocompatibility ensures the best quality dialysis treatments for a population of patients who will likely remain on dialysis for a longer period of time than conventional dialysis patients.

  7. Developing future nursing home medical directors: a curriculum for geriatric medicine fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2013-03-01

    Long term care facilities are important sites of care for elderly adults. Despite a growing need and interest in medical direction in nursing homes, there have been limited educational opportunities in this area for geriatric medicine fellows. This article describes a novel medical director's curriculum for first-year geriatric medicine fellows to prepare them for the role of nursing home medical director. This novel curriculum has been integrated into the Department of Geriatric Medicine's Fellowship training program at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii. The curriculum consists of seven seminars that have been integrated into the didactic sessions during the first year of fellowship. Core content areas include: (1) roles and responsibilities of the medical director, (2) infection control, (3) physician documentation, (4) federal regulations and state surveys, (5) quality improvement, (6) culture change in nursing homes, and (7) transitions in care. All topics were discussed using the framework described by the American Medical Directors Association's position statement on the roles and responsibilities of the nursing home medical director. To our knowledge, this is the first curriculum in the medical literature that is designed to prepare geriatric medicine fellows for roles as medical directors in nursing homes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The Role of ICT in Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Sofie; Vimarlund, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    With an ageing population and limited resources, ICT is often mentioned as a solution to support elderly people in maintaining an independent and healthy lifestyle. In this paper, we describe how ICT can support access to information and rationalization of work processes in a home care context. We do this by modelling the workflow and identifying the possible impact of ICT. The results show a complex process and indicate that the available resources are not used in the best possible way. The introduction of ICT could increase patient safety by reducing the risk of misplacing information about the care recipients and at the same time provide real time information about the care recipients' needs and health at the point of care. However, to rationalize the work processes there is a need to combine ICT with a changed procedure for handling keys.

  9. Factors related to the provision of home-based end-of-life care among home-care nursing, home help, and care management agencies in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Kurinobu, Takeshi; Ko, Ayako; Okamoto, Yuko; Matsuura, Shino; Feng, Mei; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    ...) care and consider strategies to deal with this process. This study aims to clarify institution-related factors associated with the provision of home-based EOL care cases, and to compare them among three different types of home-care agencies...

  10. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagerström Cecilia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more

  11. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Nadine; Boerma, Wienke Gw; Kringos, Dionne S; Bouman, Ans; Francke, Anneke L; Fagerström, Cecilia; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Cosetta; Devillé, Walter

    2011-08-30

    Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the state of home care in Europe requires the

  12. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the

  13. The Growth of Retail Clinics and the Medical Home: Two Trends in Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Gidengil, Courtney; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2012-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the patient-centered medical home as a way to provide coordinated, high quality primary care. At the same time the number of retail clinics has increased dramatically. Many are concerned that retail clinics undermine the medical home by fragmenting care. In this piece we explore the juxtaposition of these trends, highlighting shared characteristics and sources of tension. We describe three types of relationships between retail clinics and primary care providers. With some relationships we argue that there is no conflict, while we describe areas of potential concern for other relationships. PMID:20439897

  14. The growth of retail clinics and the medical home: two trends in concert or in conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Craig E; Gidengil, Courtney; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2010-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the patient-centered medical home as a way to provide coordinated, high-quality primary care. At the same time, the number of retail clinics has increased dramatically. Many are concerned that retail clinics undermine the medical home by fragmenting care. In this article we explore the juxtaposition of these trends, highlighting shared characteristics and sources of tension. We describe three types of relationships between retail clinics and primary care providers. We argue that for some relationships there is no conflict, and we describe areas of potential concern for others.

  15. Debt and Foregone Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Most American households carry debt, yet we have little understanding of how debt influences health behavior, especially health care seeking. We examined associations between foregone medical care and debt using a population-based sample of 914 southeastern Michigan residents surveyed in the wake of the late-2000s recession. Overall debt and…

  16. Hospital-Level Care at Home for Acutely Ill Adults: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David M; Ouchi, Kei; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Diamond, Keren; Licurse, Adam; Pu, Charles T; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-06

    Hospitals are standard of care for acute illness, but hospitals can be unsafe, uncomfortable, and expensive. Providing substitutive hospital-level care in a patient's home potentially reduces cost while maintaining or improving quality, safety, and patient experience, although evidence from randomized controlled trials in the US is lacking. Determine if home hospital care reduces cost while maintaining quality, safety, and patient experience. Randomized controlled trial. Adults admitted via the emergency department with any infection or exacerbation of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or asthma. Home hospital care, including nurse and physician home visits, intravenous medications, continuous monitoring, video communication, and point-of-care testing. Primary outcome was direct cost of the acute care episode. Secondary outcomes included utilization, 30-day cost, physical activity, and patient experience. Nine patients were randomized to home, 11 to usual care. Median direct cost of the acute care episode for home patients was 52% (IQR, 28%; p = 0.05) lower than for control patients. During the care episode, home patients had fewer laboratory orders (median per admission: 6 vs. 19; p Home patients were more physically active (median minutes, 209 vs. 78; p home patients, one occurred in control patients. Median direct cost for the acute care plus 30-day post-discharge period for home patients was 67% (IQR, 77%; p home-care services (22% vs. 55%; p = 0.08) and fewer readmissions (11% vs. 36%; p = 0.32). Patient experience was similar in both groups. The use of substitutive home-hospitalization compared to in-hospital usual care reduced cost and utilization and improved physical activity. No significant differences in quality, safety, and patient experience were noted, with more definitive results awaiting a larger trial. Trial Registration NCT02864420.

  17. Predictors of Home Care Expenditures and Death at Home for Cancer Patients in an Integrated Comprehensive Palliative Home Care Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Doris M.; Abernathy, Tom; Cockerill, Rhonda; Brazil, Kevin; Wagner, Frank; Librach, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Empirical understanding of predictors for home care service use and death at home is important for healthcare planning. Few studies have examined these predictors in the context of the publicly funded Canadian home care system. This study examined predictors for home care use and home death in the context of a “gold standard” comprehensive palliative home care program pilot in Ontario where patients had equal access to home care services. Methods: Secondary clinical and administrative data sources were linked using a unique identifier to examine multivariate factors (predisposing, enabling, need) on total home care expenditures and home death for a cohort of cancer patients enrolled in the HPCNet pilot. Results: Subjects with gastrointestinal symptoms (OR: 1.64; p=0.03) and those with higher income had increased odds of dying at home (OR: 1.14; phome care expenditures. Conclusions: Predictors of home death found in earlier studies appeared less important in this comprehensive palliative home care pilot. An income effect for home death observed in this study requires examination in future controlled studies. Relevance: Access to palliative home care that is adequately resourced and organized to address the multiple domains of issues that patients/families experience at the end of life has the potential to enable home death and shift care appropriately from limited acute care resources. PMID:22294993

  18. Do medical residents perform patient-centered medical home tasks? A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Lauren; LaVine, Nancy; Verbsky, Jennifer; Sagar, Ankita; Smith, Miriam A; Lane, Susan; Conigliaro, Joseph; Chaudhry, Saima A

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, residents are being trained in Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) settings. A set of PCMH entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for residents has been defined but not evaluated in practice. To understand whether residents trained at PCMH sites reported higher likelihood of engaging in PCMH tasks than those training in non-PCMH sites. Survey and nominal group data from post-graduate trainees at three residency programs. A total of 179 residents responded (80% response). Over half (52%) cared for patients at PCMH sites. Residents at PCMH sites were more likely to report engaging in tasks in the NCQA domains of enhancing access and continuity (p office inefficiencies as barriers to care. Residents trained at PCMH sites were more likely to engage in tasks in several NCQA domains, but not care coordination and quality assessment. Similar facilitators and barriers to trainee provision of patient-centered care were cited regardless of PCMH status. Curricula on PCMH principles and workflows that foster continuity and communication may help to inform residents on PCMH tenets and incorporate residents into team-based care. EPA: Entrustable professional activity; GIM: General Internal Medicine; NCQA: National Center for Quality Assurance; PCMH: Patient-centered medical home.

  19. Dependents’ Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-04-25

    ment of nasal respiratory physiology. (e) Skeletal defects (e.g. club foot , congenital dislocated hip)--surgical treatment is authorized only when...reading, or orthoptic training. 27 (c) Child guidance therapy. e. Domiciliary care. (See Section 1-103.J.( 4 )) f. Treatment or procedures normally

  20. A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jay I; Anthony, Melody; Crawford, Steven A; Arky, Ronald A; Bitton, Asaf; Splinter, Garth L

    2014-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a team-based model of care that seeks to improve quality of care and control costs. The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) directs Oklahoma's Medicaid program and contracts with 861 medical home practices across the state in one of three tiers of operational capacity: Tier 1 (Basic), Tier 2 (Advanced) and Tier 3 (Optimal). Only 13.5% (n = 116) homes are at the optimal level; the majority (59%, n = 508) at the basic level. In this study, we sought to determine the barriers that prevented Tier 1 homes from advancing to Tier 3 level and the incentives that would motivate providers to advance from Tier 1 to 3. Our hypotheses were that Tier 1 medical homes were located in smaller practices with limited resources and the providers are not convinced that the expense of advancing from Tier 1 status to Tier 3 status was worth the added value. We analyzed OHCA records to compare the 508 Tier 1 (entry-level) with 116 Tier 3 (optimal) medical homes for demographic differences with regards to location: urban or rural, duration as medical home, percentage of contracts that were group contracts, number of providers per group contract, panel age range, panel size, and member-provider ratio. We surveyed all 508 Tier 1 homes with a mail-in survey, and with focused follow up visits to identify the barriers to, and incentives for, upgrading from Tier 1 to Tier 2 or 3. We found that Tier 1 homes were more likely to be in rural areas, run by solo practitioners, serve exclusively adult panels, have smaller panel sizes, and have higher member-to-provider ratios in comparison with Tier 3 homes. Our survey had a 35% response rate. Results showed that the most difficult changes for Tier 1 homes to implement were providing 4 hours of after-hours care and a dedicated program for mental illness and substance abuse. The results also showed that the most compelling incentives for encouraging Tier 1 homes to upgrade their tier status were less

  1. PALLIATIVE CARE AND MEDICAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anca COLIBABA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines learners’ difficulty in acquiring and practicing palliative medical skills necessary in medical procedures due to limited technologically state-of-the art language learning support to facilitate optimum access for medical students to the European medicine sector and offers as a potential solution the Palliative Care MOOC project (2014-1-RO01-KA203-002940. The project is co-financed by the European Union under the Erasmus+ program and coordinated by the Gr.T.Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi, Romania. The article describes the project idea and main objectives, highlighting its focus and activities on developing innovative guidelines on standardized fundamental medical procedures, as well as clinical language and communication skills. The project thus helps not only medical lecturers and language teachers who teach medical students, but also the medical students themselves and the lay people involved in causalities.

  2. Does Continuous Hospice Care Help Patients Remain at Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David; Harrold, Joan; Harris, Pamela S; Bender, Laura; Farrington, Sue; Smither, Eugenia; Ache, Kevin; Teno, Joan

    2015-09-01

    In the U. S., hospices sometimes provide high-intensity "continuous care" in patients' homes. However, little is known about the way that continuous care is used or what impact continuous care has on patient outcomes. To describe patients who receive continuous care and determine whether continuous care reduces the likelihood that patients will die in an inpatient unit or hospital. Data from 147,137 patients admitted to 11 U.S. hospices between 2008 and 2012 were extracted from the electronic medical records. The hospices are part of a research-focused collaboration. The study used a propensity score-matched cohort design. A total of 99,687 (67.8%) patients were in a private home or nursing home on the day before death, and of these, 10,140 (10.2%) received continuous care on the day before death. A propensity score-matched sample (n = 24,658) included 8524 patients who received continuous care and 16,134 patients who received routine care on the day before death. Using the two matched groups, patients who received continuous care on the day before death were significantly less likely to die in an inpatient hospice setting (350/8524 vs. 2030/16,134; 4.1% vs. 12.6%) (odds ratio [OR] 0.29; 95% CI 0.27-0.34; P < 0.001). When patients were cared for by a spouse, the use of continuous care was associated with a larger decrease in inpatient deaths (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.09-0.16; P < 0.001) compared with those patients cared for by other family members (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.32-0.42; P < 0.001). It is possible that unmeasured covariates were not included in the propensity score match. Use of continuous care on the day before death is associated with a significant reduction in the use of inpatient care on the last day of life, particularly when patients are cared for by a spouse. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. From home to 'home': Mapping the caregiver journey in the transition from home care into residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainstock, Taylor; Cloutier, Denise; Penning, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    Family caregivers play a pivotal role in supporting the functional independence and quality of life of older relatives, often taking on a wide variety of care-related activities over the course of their caregiving journey. These activities help family members to remain in the community and age-in-place for as long as possible. However, when needs exceed family capacities to provide care, the older family member may need to transition from one care environment to another (e.g., home care to nursing home care), or one level of care to another (from less intense to more intensive services). Drawing upon qualitative interview data collected in a populous health region in British Columbia, Canada, this study explores the roles and responsibilities of family caregivers for family members making the care transition from home care to residential care. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts resulted in the development of a conceptual framework to characterize the "Caregiver Journey" as a process that could be divided into at least three phases: 1) Precursors to transition - recognizing frailty in family members and caregivers prior to transition; 2) Preparing to transition into residential nursing home care (RC) and 3) Post-transition: Finding a new balance - where caregivers adjust and adapt to new caregiving responsibilities. Our analyses revealed that the second phase is the most complex involving a consideration of the various activities, and roles that family caregivers take on to prepare for the care transition including: information gathering, advocacy and system navigation. We conclude that there is a need for family caregivers to be better supported during care transitions; notably through ongoing and enhanced investments in strategies to support caregiver communication and education. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Medication management interventions in patients enrolled in GRACE Team Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Kofi K; Counsell, Steven R; Schubert, Cathy C; Weiner, Michael

    GRACE targets home-based, geriatrics team management, primary care collaboration, and protocols for common conditions. GRACE can improve outcomes and reduce acute-care utilization. We aimed to characterize medication-related GRACE recommendations. Medical record review of Indiana University Health Physicians GRACE patients (June 2012 to September 2013), with six months' follow-up was conducted. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and recommendations were summarized. Mean age (N = 156) was 82 years; 71% were women, 24% black, and 34% living alone, with a mean of 12 medications. Medication management was activated in 99%. Implementation occurred in 96% of 924 recommendations, including reviewing medication lists (N = 153) and purposes (N = 109) with patients, and providing medication lists to providers (N = 119). GRACE recommended and implemented medication-related interventions, facilitating medication reconciliation, education, communication, and coordination of care. Medication management, a key GRACE component, may contribute to reducing hospitalization rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The characteristics of residents in extra care housing and care homes in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, Robin; Bäumker, Theresia; Callaghan, Lisa; Holder, Jacquetta; Netten, Ann; Towers, Ann-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Extra care housing aims to meet the housing, care and support needs of older people, while helping them to maintain their independence in their own private accommodation. It has been viewed as a possible alternative, or even a replacement for residential care. In 2003, the Department of Health announced capital funding to support the development of extra care housing and made the receipt of funding conditional on participating in an evaluative study. This paper presents findings on the characteristics of the residents at the time of moving in, drawing on information collected from the 19 schemes in the evaluation, and a recent comparable study of residents who moved into care homes providing personal care. Overall, the people who moved into extra care were younger and much less physically and cognitively impaired than those who moved into care homes. However, the prevalence of the medical conditions examined was more similar for the two groups, and several of the schemes had a significant minority of residents with high levels of dependence on the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. In contrast, levels of severe cognitive impairment were much lower in all schemes than the overall figure for residents of care homes, even among schemes designed specifically to provide for residents with dementia. The results suggest that, although extra care housing may be operating as an alternative to care homes for some individuals, it is providing for a wider population, who may be making a planned move rather than reacting to a crisis. While extra care supports residents with problems of cognitive functioning, most schemes appear to prefer residents to move in when they can become familiar with their new accommodation before the development of more severe cognitive impairment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Assessment of status of patients receiving palliative home care and services provided in a rural area-Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishnan Thayyil

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The service could address most of the medical, psychosocial, and supportive needs of the patients and reduce their pain and symptoms. The interface between institutional-based care and home care needs more exploration and prospective studies.

  7. Is informal care a substitution for home care among migrants in the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.T.; Foets, M.; Devillé, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Among migrants the level of home care use seems to be lower than among the native population. As migrants may prefer informal care for several reasons, they possibly use these sources of care instead of home care. We therefore, examined the use of home care in relation to household

  8. Organization and financing of home care in Europe: an overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkstra, A.; Hutten, J.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the organization and financing of home nursing in the 15 member states in the European Union. Home nursing was defined as the nursing care provided at the patients' home by professional home nursing organizations. Data were gathered by means of

  9. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-11-13

    Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of 'corporate culture' as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff's perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing homes in Norway with long-term care residents was included in the study. Data were collected by participant observation including informal conversation with the staff, and in-depth interviews with 15 residents using a narrative approach. The main findings were that organizational cultures could be seen as relatively stable corporate cultures described as 'personalities' with characteristics that were common for all nursing homes (conformity) and typical traits that were present in some nursing homes, but that they were also like no other nursing home (distinctiveness). Conformity ('Every nursing home is like all other nursing homes') meant that nursing home organizations formed their services according to a perception of what residents in general need and expect. Trait ('Every nursing home is like some other nursing homes') expressed typologies of nursing homes: residency, medical, safeguard or family orientation. The distinctness of each nursing home ('Every nursing home is like no other nursing home') was expressed in unique features of the nursing home; the characteristics of the nursing home involved certain patterns of structure, cultural assumptions and interactions that were unique in each nursing home. Nursing home residents experienced quality of care as 'The nursing home as my home' and 'Interpersonal care quality'. The resident group in the different types of nursing homes were unique, and the experience of quality of care seemed to depend on whether their unique needs and expectations

  10. Questioning Care in Mental Health: Professionalization of Home Health Care Based on In Home Therapeutic Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gouveia Passos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present how to operate home health care practices. It describes  the influence of the experience given by the Italian psychiatric reform in democratic societies, with emphasis on the intervening dimensions and replacement services. The study indicates the guidelines and strategies established for the promotion of health care in individuals under psychological distress in the deinstitutionalization process. It also addresses the professionalization and the performance of caretakers in home services. Based on a review of the literature, this paper poses some questions to guide the ways outlined for the construction and establishment of professional practices by mental health caregivers.

  11. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, Nadine; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; Kringos, Dionne S.; Bouman, Ans; Francke, Anneke L.; Fagerström, Cecilia; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Cosetta; Devillé, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the

  12. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Bouman, A.; Francke, A.L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Melchiorre, M.G.; Greco, C.; Devillé, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe

  13. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Bouman, A.; Francke, A.L.; Fagerström, C.; Melchiorre, M.G.; Greco, C.; Devillé, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in

  14. Social Workers in Home Care: The Israeli Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    In Israel, the government partially supports personal home care services (grooming, feeding, assistance with transfers) as a means to maintain frail individuals in their home environment for as long as possible. Social workers capture a prominent position in these arrangements as initiators and supervisors of personal home care services. This…

  15. An Overview of Home-Based Primary Care: Learning from the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sarah; Hostetter, Martha; McCarthy, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    ISSUE: Homebound and functionally limited individuals are often unable to access office-based primary care, leading to unmet needs and increased health care spending. GOAL: Show how home-based primary care affects outcomes and costs for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries with complex care needs. METHODS: Qualitative synthesis of expert perspectives and the experiences of six case-study sites. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Successful home-based primary care practices optimize care by: fielding interdisciplinary teams, incorporating behavioral care and social supports into primary care, responding rapidly to urgent and acute care needs, offering palliative care, and supporting family members and caregivers. Practices participating in Medicare's Independence at Home Demonstration saved $3,070 per beneficiary on average in the first year, primarily by reducing hospital use under this shared-savings program. The experience of a risk-based medical group that contracts with health plans and health systems to provide home-based care suggests similar potential to reduce health care spending under capitated or value-based payment arrangements. Making effective home-based primary care more widely available would require a better-prepared workforce, appropriate financial incentives to encourage more clinicians to provide house calls to their home-limited patients, and relevant quality measures to ensure that value-based payment is calibrated to meet the needs of patients and their families.

  16. The Relationship Between the Use of a Worksite Medical Home and ED Visits or Hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Stroo BS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Worksite medical homes may be a good model for improving employee health. The aim of this study was to compare the likelihood of being seen in the emergency department (ED or being hospitalized by level of use (no use, occasional use, or primary care of a worksite medical home, overall and by type of user (employee, adult dependent, or pediatric dependent. This was a retrospective analysis of claims data, using covariate-adjusted logistic regression models for ED visits and inpatient hospitalizations. Secondary data for the years 2006 to 2008 from a company that offers an on-site health care center (HCC were used. Analyses were based on a data set that combines health plan claims and human resources demographic data. Overall, people who did not use the HCC were more likely to be seen in the ED (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval or CI [1.06, 1.37], P = .005 or to be hospitalized (adjusted OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.34, 1.86]; P < .0001 compared with those who used the HCC for primary care. Both ED visits and hospitalizations for employees and dependents in this study were lower among those who used the worksite medical home for primary care. Worksite medical homes can improve chronic disease management and thus reduce ED visits and hospitalizations. These findings contribute to growing evidence that worksite medical homes are potentially cost-effective.

  17. Unlocking the black box: supporting practices to become patient-centered medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Katie; Phillips, Kathryn E; Van Borkulo, Nicole; Daniel, Donna M; Johnson, Karin E; Wagner, Edward H; Sugarman, Jonathan R

    2014-11-01

    Despite widespread interest in supporting primary care transformation, few evidence-based strategies for technical assistance exist. The Safety Net Medical Home Initiative (SNMHI) sought to develop a replicable and sustainable model for Patient-centered Medical Home practice transformation. This paper describes the multimodal technical assistance approach used by the SNMHI and the participating practices' assessment of its value and helpfulness in supporting their transformation. Components of the technical assistance framework included: (1) individual site-level coaching provided by local medical home facilitators and supplemented by expert consultation; (2) regional and national learning communities of participating practices that included in-person meetings and field trips; (3) data monitoring and feedback including longitudinal feedback on medical home implementation as measured by the Patient-centered Medical Home-A; (4) written implementation guides, tools, and webinars relating to each of the 8 Change Concepts for Practice Transformation; and (5) small grant funds to support infrastructure and staff development. Overall, practices found the technical assistance helpful and most valued in-person, peer-to-peer-learning opportunities. Practices receiving technical assistance from membership organizations with which they belonged before the SNMHI scored higher on measures of medical home implementation than practices working with organizations with whom they had no prior relationship. There is an important role for both local and national organizations to provide nonduplicative, mutually reinforcing support for primary care transformation. How (in-person, between-peers) and by whom technical assistance is provided may be important to consider.

  18. [Analysis of the security risk in home medical equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaolong; Xu, Honglei; Tian, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    The popularization of home medical equipment facilitates the treatment and management of many diseases, improving the patient compliance. However, due to the absence of medical background, most of their users have various security risk in the course of reorganization, choosing, using and maintenance of the products. This paper analyzed the property of security risk in home medical equipment, and described the matters needing attention in the using of several common products.

  19. Quality of care in European home care programs using the second generation interRAI Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foebel, A.D.; van Hout, H.P.J.; van der Roest, H.G.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Jonsson, P.V.; Hirdes, J.P.; Bernabei, R.; Onder, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the quality of care provided to older individuals is a key step to ensure that needs are being met and to target interventions to improve care. To this aim, interRAI's second-generation home care quality indicators (HCQIs) were developed in 2013. This study assesses the

  20. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-12-01

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (P<.05). Each additional oral solid medication in the bingo card packaging nursing home increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid

  1. Relaying experiences for care home design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses organizational planning and decision making as situated material-semiotic practices in which various local and non-local meaningful elements (e.g. texts and photos) are invocated and resemiotized. The discussion is based on an analysis of a seminar meeting where different...... stakeholders (researchers, family members, etc.) could put forward their ideas and wishes about the facilities of a soon-to-be-built care home for people with brain injury. In other words, the seminar was part of a wider diagnostic endeavor that was to be started in a specially designed building. The future...

  2. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period.

  3. Medical Secretaries’ Care of Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Witt, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    We describe the cooperative work of medical secretaries at two hospital departments, during the implementation of an electronic health record system. Medical secretaries' core task is to take care of patient records by ensuring that also do information gatekeeping and articulation work. The EHR...... implementation stressed their importance to the departments' work arrangements, coupled their work more tightly to that of other staff, and led to task drift among professions. information is complete, up to date, and correctly coded. Medical secretaries While medical secretaries have been relatively invisible...... to health informatics and CSCW, this case study identifies their importance, and suggests that they and other non-clinical groups should be considered, when developing health care IT. We propose the term 'boundary-object trimming', to conceptualize their contributions to hospitals' cooperative work...

  4. Discontinuing Inappropriate Medication Use in Nursing Home Residents: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Hans; Scheper, Jessica; Koning, Hedi; Brouwer, Chris; Twisk, Jos W; van der Meer, Helene; Boersma, Froukje; Zuidema, Sytse U; Taxis, Katja

    2017-11-07

    Inappropriate prescribing is a well-known clinical problem in nursing home residents, but few interventions have focused on reducing inappropriate medication use. To examine successful discontinuation of inappropriate medication use and to improve prescribing in nursing home residents. Pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial, with clustering by elder care physicians and their wards. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01876095). 59 Dutch nursing home wards for long-term care. Residents with a life expectancy greater than 4 weeks who consented to treatment with medication. Multidisciplinary Multistep Medication Review (3MR) consisting of an assessment of the patient perspective, medical history, critical appraisal of medications, a meeting between the treating elder care physician and the pharmacist, and implementation of medication changes. Successful discontinuation of use of at least 1 inappropriate drug (that is, without relapse or severe withdrawal symptoms) and clinical outcomes (neuropsychiatric symptoms, cognitive function, and quality of life) after 4 months of follow-up. Nineteen elder care physicians (33 wards) performed the 3MR, and 16 elder care physicians (26 wards) followed standard procedures. A total of 426 nursing home residents (233 in the intervention group and 193 in the control group) were followed for an average of 144 days (SD, 21). In an analysis of all participants, use of at least 1 inappropriate medication was successfully discontinued for 91 (39.1%) residents in the intervention group versus 57 (29.5%) in the control group (adjusted relative risk, 1.37 [95% CI, 1.02 to 1.75]). Clinical outcomes did not deteriorate between baseline and follow-up. The 3MR was done only once. Some withdrawal symptoms or relapses may have been missed. The 3MR is effective in discontinuing inappropriate medication use in frail nursing home residents without a decline in their well-being. Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development.

  5. Cost of physician-led home visit care (Zaitaku care) compared with hospital care at the end of life in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Kentaro; Sairenji, Tomoko; Koga, Hidenobu; Osugi, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shin; Ichinose, Hidefumi; Nagai, Yasunori; Imura, Hiroshi; South-Paul, Jeannette E; Meyer, Mark; Honda, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-17

    Physician-led home visit care with medical teams (Zaitaku care) has been developed on a national scale to support those who wish to stay at home at the end of life, and promote a system of community-based integrated care in Japan. Medical care at the end of life can be expensive, and is an urgent socioeconomic issue for aging societies. However medical costs of physician-led home visits care have not been well studied. We compared the medical costs of Zaitaku care and hospital care at the end of life in a rapidly aging community in a rural area in Japan. A cross-sectional study was performed to compare the total medical costs during patients' final days of life (30 days or less) between Zaitaku care and hospital care from September 2012 to August 2013 in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Thirty four patients died at home under Zaitaku care, and 72 patients died in the hospital during this period. The average daily cost of care during the last 30 days did not differ significantly between the two groups. Although Zaitaku care costs were higher than hospital care costs in the short-term (≦10 days, Zaitaku care $371.2 vs. Hospital care $202.0, p = 0.492), medical costs for Zaitaku care in the long-term care (≧30 days) were less than that of hospital care ($155.8 vs. $187.4, p = 0.055). Medical costs of Zaitaku care were less compared with hospital care if incorporated early for long term care, but it was high if incorporated late for short term care. For long term care, medical costs for Zaitaku care was 16.7% less than for hospitalization at the end of life. This physician-led home visit care model should be an available option for patients who wish to die at home, and may be beneficial financially over time.

  6. Family Satisfaction With Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Tetyana P; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Gaugler, Joseph E; Held, Robert; Kane, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the factor structure of a new family satisfaction with nursing home care instrument and determines the relationship of resident quality of life (QOL) and facility characteristics with family satisfaction. Data sources include (1) family satisfaction interviews ( n = 16,790 family members), (2) multidimensional survey of resident QOL ( n = 13,433 residents), and (3) facility characteristics ( n = 376 facilities). We used factor analysis to identify domains of family satisfaction and multivariate analyses to identify the role of facility-level characteristics and resident QOL on facility-mean values of family satisfaction. Four distinct domains were identified for family satisfaction: "care," "staff," "environment," and "food." Chain affiliation, higher resident acuity, more deficiencies, and large size were all associated with less family satisfaction, and resident QOL was a significant (albeit weak) predictor of family satisfaction. Results suggest that family member satisfaction is distinct from resident QOL but is associated with resident QOL and facility characteristics.

  7. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care... solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities... services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day health care to...

  8. Needs of family caregivers in home care for older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cristiane Becker Kottwitz Bierhals

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to reveal the felt and normative needs of primary family caregivers when providing instrumental support to older adults enrolled in a Home Care Program in a Primary Health Service in the South of Brazil. Methods: using Bradshaw's taxonomy of needs to explore the caregiver's felt needs (stated needs and normative needs (defined by professionals, a mixed exploratory study was conducted in three steps: Descriptive quantitative phase with 39 older adults and their caregiver, using a data sheet based on patient records; Qualitative exploratory phase that included 21 caregiver interviews, analyzed by content analysis; Systematic observation, using an observation guide with 16 caregivers, analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: the felt needs were related to information about instrumental support activities and subjective aspects of care. Caregivers presented more normative needs related to medications care. Conclusion: understanding caregivers' needs allows nurses to plan interventions based on their particularities.

  9. Landscape of Medication Management in the Minnesota Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald L. Uden, PharmD, FCCP

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the landscape of medication management within the patient-centered medical homes (PCMH in the state of Minnesota. Methods: An electronic survey of care coordinators within PCMHs certified with the Department of Health in state of Minnesota was conducted. The survey and follow up were distributed by the Minnesota Department of Health. At the time the survey was distributed, there were 161 certified PCMHs in the state. Results: The final analysis included 21 respondents. Size, setting, and time as a certified PCMH varied between practices. PCMHs reported a higher percentage of patients enrolled at lower complexity tiers (35.0 percent at tier I and 40.4 percent enrolled at tier II, with PCMHs with clinical pharmacist services reporting slightly increased frequency of higher complexity patients. The composition of the care team varied from clinic to clinic, but all clinics were multidisciplinary with a mean of 5.8 different provider types listed for each clinic. Physicians were the most common providers of medication management across all settings, and one respondent reported that medication management services are not formally provided in his/her clinic. The presence or absence of a clinical pharmacist did not significantly influence care coordination time dedicated to medication-related activities. Respondents residing in a clinic with clinical pharmacist services reported a high level of satisfaction with pharmacist-provided services. Conclusion: The implementation of the PCMH model in many of the participating clinics was relatively recent and there remains much to be learned regarding the landscape of comprehensive medication management in the PCMH. The reported distribution of patients in complexity tiers suggests that clinics may use different strategies to determine resource allocation. Although the presence of a clinical pharmacist did not influence care coordination time dedicated, care coordinators valued services

  10. Testing of the voice communication in smart home care

    OpenAIRE

    Vaňuš, Jan; Smolon, Marek; Martinek, Radek; Koziorek, Jiří; Žídek, Jan; Bilík, Petr

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed to describe the method of testing the implementation of voice control over operating and technical functions of Smart Home Come. Custom control over operating and technical functions was implemented into a model of Smart Home that was equipped with KNX technology. A sociological survey focused on the needs of seniors has been carried out to justify the implementation of voice control into Smart Home Care. In the real environment of Smart Home Care, there are usually unwa...

  11. Shortening a Patient Experiences Survey for Medical Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy H. Ng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems—Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS PCMH Survey assesses patient experiences reflecting domains of care related to general patient experience (access to care, communication with providers, office staff interaction, provider rating and PCMH-specific aspects of patient care (comprehensiveness of care, self-management support, shared decision making. The current work compares psychometric properties of the current survey and a proposed shortened version of the survey (from 52 to 26 adult survey items, from 66 to 31 child survey items. The revisions were based on initial psychometric analysis and stakeholder input regarding survey length concerns. A total of 268 practices voluntarily submitted adult surveys and 58 submitted child survey data to the National Committee for Quality Assurance in 2013. Mean unadjusted scores, practice-level item and composite reliability, and item-to-scale correlations were calculated. Results show that the shorter adult survey has lower reliability, but still it still meets general definitions of a sound survey for the adult version, and resulted in few changes to mean scores. The impact was more problematic for the pediatric version. Further testing is needed to investigate approaches to improving survey response and the relevance of survey items in informing quality improvement.

  12. Aspects of family-managed care at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik

    More and more care, for example of older adults, is performed at home. Municipality home-care workers and novel technologies support this translocation of care. At home, an important care provider is also the immediate family. A recent trend is to formalize this volunteer-, and family-based care....... However, this formalization requires new support systems for collaboration and communication. Also, when informal care turns formal there is a risk that a caring family-member might have to give up professional goals such as a career, or suffer economically as one may not be able to work fulltime while...

  13. Organizational home care models across Europe: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eenoo, Liza; van der Roest, Henriëtte; Onder, Graziano; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Jonsson, Palmi V; Draisma, Stasja; van Hout, Hein; Declercq, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Decision makers are searching for models to redesign home care and to organize health care in a more sustainable way. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize home care models within and across European countries by means of structural characteristics and care processes at the policy and the organization level. At the policy level, variables that reflected variation in health care policy were included based on a literature review on the home care policy for older persons in six European countries: Belgium, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, and the Netherlands. At the organizational level, data on the structural characteristics and the care processes were collected from 36 home care organizations by means of a survey. Data were collected between 2013 and 2015 during the IBenC project. An observational, cross sectional, quantitative design was used. The analyses consisted of a principal component analysis followed by a hierarchical cluster analysis. Fifteen variables at the organizational level, spread across three components, explained 75.4% of the total variance. The three components made it possible to distribute home care organizations into six care models that differ on the level of patient-centered care delivery, the availability of specialized care professionals, and the level of monitoring care performance. Policy level variables did not contribute to distinguishing between home care models. Six home care models were identified and characterized. These models can be used to describe best practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Current situation of available back-up beds for terminal home care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Shimizu, Kazuko; Chiba, Yasuko

    2014-12-01

    The Palliative Care Unit at Heiwa Hospital has 16 beds, and offers inpatient support in general wards, as well as back-up beds in emergencies in collaboration with local home care support clinics. For two years from January 2012 to December 2013, there were 1,213 cases where patients were seen for initial outpatient visits at the Department of Palliative Care. At the time of the initial visit, visiting medical care had been introduced for 25% of the cases. Although 59% of the patients who visited our department are hospitalized, 20% of inpatients have been hospitalized at the request of their home care physician. The availability of back-upbeds offers patients and their families, as well as related medical institutions, a sense of security, and enables home care to continue. The significance of back-upbeds will become even more important in the future.

  15. Use of medication by nursing home residents nearing end of life: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chun; Liu, May-Lien; Twu, Fuh-Chour; Yuan, Chia-Hei

    2010-09-01

    Nursing home residents usually suffer from a variety of medical conditions and are prescribed a wider variety of medications than any other subpopulation. Polypharmacy is associated with the occurrence of adverse events. The purposes of this study were to describe the medication prescription patterns of residents who died in a nursing home, to examine how this pattern changed as residents progressed toward death, and to identify correlates of increased medication prescriptions. Thirty-one residents who had lived at one nursing home for more than 6 months before death were included in the study. Medication records for participants were obtained at four data collection points: on admission, 6 months before death, 3 months before death, and at death. The mean number of medications prescribed immediately before death was 7.90 (SD = 3.27), and there was an upward trend in number of prescriptions written as patients neared death. The most frequent prescription was for medication for constipation, pulmonary care, and hypertension. There was a significant correlation between residents with heart disease and increased medication use. Medication prescribed for pulmonary care and hypertension increased from admission to death, but a decreased use of medication for pain relief in the time before death in these cases was found. This study surveyed and described the pattern of medication use in nursing home residents from admission to the end of life. Results can be used to reinforce clinician and nursing staff awareness of prescription frequency, amounts of medication, and change over time for elderly residents under their care. In addition to safer prescribing practices for the older people, nonpharmacological strategies (e.g., lifestyle modification and physiotherapy for function training) may be used to address common symptoms and complaints during chronic care.

  16. Ethics and safety in home care: perspectives on home support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Janet; Curry, Cherie Geering; Stevenson, Lynn; Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella

    2014-03-01

    Home support workers (HSWs) encounter unique safety issues in their provision of home care. These issues raise ethical concerns, affecting the care workers provide to seniors and other recipients. This paper is derived from a subproject of a larger Canada-wide study, Safety at Home: A Pan-Canadian Home Care Safety Study, released in June 2013 by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Semi-structured, face-to-face, audiotaped interviews were conducted with providers, clients and informal caregivers in British Columbia, Manitoba and New Brunswick to better understand their perceptions of patient safety in home care. Using the BC data only, we then compared our findings to findings of other BC studies focusing on safety in home care that were conducted over the past decade. Through our interviews and comparative analyses it became clear that HSWs experienced significant inequities in providing home care. Utilizing a model depicting concerns of and for HSWs developed by Craven and colleagues (2012), we were able to illustrate the physical, spatial, interpersonal and temporal concerns set in the context of system design that emphasized the ethical dilemmas of HSWs in home care. Our data suggested the necessity of adding a fifth domain, organizational (system design). In this paper, we issue a call for stronger advocacy for home care and improved collaboration and resource equity between institutional care and community care.

  17. Development of Quality Indicators to Address Abuse and Neglect in Home-Based Primary Care and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Orla C; Ritchie, Christine S; Fathi, Roya; Garrigues, Sarah K; Saliba, Debra; Leff, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    To develop candidate quality indicators (QIs) for the quality standard of "addressing abuse and neglect" in the setting of home-based medical care. Systematic literature review of both the peer-reviewed and gray literature. Home-based primary and palliative care practices. Homebound community-dwelling older adults. Articles were identified to inform the development of candidate indicators of the quality by which home-based primary and palliative care practices addressed abuse and neglect. The literature guided the development of patient-level QIs and practice-level quality standards. A technical expert panel (TEP) representing exemplary home-based primary care and palliative care providers then participated in a modified Delphi process to assess the validity and feasibility of each measure and identify candidate QIs suitable for testing in the field. The literature review yielded 4,371 titles and abstracts that were reviewed; 25 publications met final inclusion criteria and informed development of nine candidate QIs. The TEP rated all but one of the nine candidate indicators as having high validity and feasibility. Translating the complex problem of addressing abuse and neglect into QIs may ultimately serve to improve care delivered to vulnerable home-limited adults who receive home-based medical care. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and...

  19. Attitudes of palliative home care physicians towards palliative sedation at home in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home. One hundred and fifty participants responded. A large heterogeneity of home care organizations that generate some problems was found. Indications, intention and monitoring of PS seem to be appropriate, although some cultural and logistic conditions were limiting the use of PS. Specialized home care physicians are almost involved to start PS at home. Midazolam was seldom available at home and opioids were more frequently used. These data should prompt health care agencies to make a minimal set of drugs easily available for home care. Further research is necessary to compare attitudes in countries with different sociocultural profiles.

  20. [Reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina Sáez, Celia; Urbieta Sanz, Elena; Madrigal de Torres, Manuel; Piñera Salmerón, Pascual; Pérez Cárceles, María D

    2016-03-01

    To quantify and to evaluate the reliability of Primary Care (PC) computerised medication records of as an information source of patient chronic medications, and to identify associated factors with the presence of discrepancies. A descriptive cross-sectional study. General Referral Hospital in Murcia. Patients admitted to the cardiology-chest diseases unit, during the months of February to April 2013, on home treatment, who agreed to participate in the study. Evaluation of the reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records by analysing the concordance, by identifying discrepancies, between the active medication in these records and that recorded in pharmacist interview with the patient/caregiver. Identification of associated factors with the presence of discrepancies was analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. The study included a total of 308 patients with a mean of 70.9 years (13.0 SD). The concordance of active ingredients was 83.7%, and this decreased to 34.7% when taking the dosage into account. Discrepancies were found in 97.1% of patients. The most frequent discrepancy was omission of frequency (35.6%), commission (drug added unjustifiably) (14.6%), and drug omission (12.7%). Age older than 65 years (1.98 [1.08 to 3.64]), multiple chronic diseases (1.89 [1.04 to 3.42]), and have a narcotic or psychotropic drug prescribed (2.22 [1.16 to 4.24]), were the factors associated with the presence of discrepancies. Primary Care computerised medication records, although of undoubted interest, are not be reliable enough to be used as the sole source of information on patient chronic medications when admitted to hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategies and innovative models for delivering palliative care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Melissa D A; Lim, Betty; Meier, Diane E

    2011-02-01

    The goals of palliative care address critical issues for individuals with complex and serious illness residing in nursing homes, including pain and symptom management, communication, preparation for death, decisions about treatment preferences, and caregiver support. Because of the uncertain prognosis associated with chronic nonmalignant diseases such as dementia, many nursing home residents are either not referred to hospice or have very short or very long hospice stays. The integration of palliative care into nursing homes offers a potential solution to the challenges relating to hospice eligibility, staffing, training, and obtaining adequate reimbursement for care that aligns with resident and surrogate's preferences and needs. However, the delivery of palliative care in nursing homes is hindered by both regulatory and staffing barriers and, as a result, is rare. In this article, we draw on interviews with nursing home executives, practitioners, and researchers to describe the barriers to nursing home palliative care. We then describe 3 existing and successful models for providing nonhospice palliative care to nursing home residents and discuss their ongoing strengths and challenges. We conclude with specific policy proposals to expedite the integration of palliative care into the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Early Childhood Home Visiting to Prevent Medically Attended Unintentional Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Alonzo T; Bowers, Katherine A; Dexheimer, Judith W; Sa, Ting; Hall, Eric S; Van Ginkel, Judith B; Ammerman, Robert T

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated the influence of home visiting on the risk for medically attended unintentional injury during home visiting (0 to 3 years) and subsequent to home visiting (3 to 5 years). A retrospective, quasi-experimental study was conducted in a cohort of mother-child pairs in Hamilton County, OH. The birth cohort (2006 to 2012) was linked to administrative home visiting records and data from a population-based injury surveillance system containing records of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to compare medically attended unintentional injury risk (0 to 2, 0 to 3, and 3 to 5 years) in a home-visited group versus a propensity score-matched comparison group. The study population was composed of 2,729 mother-child pairs who received home visiting and 2,729 matched mother-child pairs in a comparison group. From birth to 2 years, 17.2% of the study population had at least one medically attended unintentional injury. The risk for medically attended unintentional injury from aged 0 to 2 and 0 to 3 years was significantly higher in the home-visited group relative to the comparison group (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.35; hazard ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.31, respectively). Additional injuries in the home-visited group were superficial, and the increased risk for medically attended unintentional injury was observed for ED visits and not hospitalizations. Home-visited children were more likely to have a medically attended unintentional injury from birth to aged 3 years. This finding may be partially attributed to home visitor surveillance of injuries or greater health care-seeking behavior. Implications and alternative explanations are discussed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Challenges and Opportunities for Collaborative Technologies for Home Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Grönvall, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This article offers an exploration of home care work and the design of computational devices in support of such work. We present findings from a field study and four participatory design workshops. Themes emerging from the findings suggest that home care work may be highly cooperative in nature....... The themes emerging are used to elicit a number of design implications and to promote some illustrative design concepts for new devices in support of cooperative home care work....

  4. Impact of a patient-centered medical home clerkship curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren; Sato, Rino; LaNoue, Marianna; Michaluk, Lisa; Verma, Manisha

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum introduced in a family medicine clerkship in 2011--2012. This new curriculum introduced third-year students to the PCMH using a variety of interactive educational formats, including case-based, online, and experiential PCMH activities. Qualitative analysis of student reflection essays explored themes based on PCMH experiences during family medicine clerkships. Pre-curricular needs assessment revealed an important gap in students' exposure to and knowledge of PCMH concepts consistent with existing literature. Qualitative thematic analysis examined students' perceptions of patient experiences in PCMH practices but also revealed rich, unprompted, and very positive perceptions of student and provider roles and system-based changes in the PCMH model. Only 2.3% of coded references (n=10, out of 435) described "negative" emotional reactions to PCMH experiences. More than half of student essays described important changes in self-assessed knowledge, skills, and attitudes, another significant and unexpected result. Successful implementation of innovative PCMH curricula is key to preparing a workforce ready to practice in a new model of health care delivery. This qualitative study demonstrates that an experiential PCMH curriculum can enhance third-year medical student self-assessed knowledge of and attitudes toward the PCMH and may improve perceptions of a career in primary care.

  5. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  6. Horizon's patient-centered medical home program shows practices need much more than payment changes to transform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Urvashi B; Rathjen, Carl; Rubin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    ...' accountability for care coordination and outcomes. Horizon Healthcare Services, Inc., New Jersey's oldest and largest health insurance company, developed medical home programs that include financial incentives with essential support tools...

  7. Unique program aims to connect frequent ED utilizers with medical homes, resources to meet complex needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Sinai Hospital of Baltimore in Baltimore, MD, is partnering with HealthCare Access Maryland, a non-profit organization in the state, to link patients who frequent the ED for care with medical homes and other resources that can better meet their medical and social needs. Under the Access Health Program, ED-based care coordinators intervene with patients who meet program criteria, linking them with medical homes and other resources that address their complex needs. The hospital has devised a flag to notify the ED when a frequent-utilizing patient presents in the department for care. Care coordinators then meet with these patients and get their consent to participate in the program. Within a week of the ED visit, care coordinators schedule a home visit with the patient to establish a care plan containing specific goals and a time frame to carry out these goals. Patients remain in the program for 90 days as care coordinators work to hand them off to longer-term resources. Many of the patients enrolled in the program have substance abuse and mental health problems. Patients are also often uninsured and/or homeless. Within two months of launching the program, care coordinators enrolled 74 patients, with the goal of eventually bringing that number to 200.

  8. Impact of Pharmacists in a Community-Based Home Care Service: A Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walus, Ashley N; Woloschuk, Donna M M

    2017-01-01

    Historically, pharmacists have not been included on home care teams, despite the fact that home care patients frequently experience medication errors. Literature describing Canadian models of pharmacy practice in home care settings is limited. The optimal service delivery model and distribution of clinical activities for home care pharmacists remain unclear. The primary objective was to describe the impact of a pharmacist based at a community home care office and providing home visits, group education, and telephone consultations. The secondary objective was to determine the utility of acute care clinical pharmacy key performance indicators (cpKPIs) in guiding home care pharmacy services, in the absence of validated cpKPIs for ambulatory care. The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority hired a pharmacist to develop and implement the pilot program from May 2015 to July 2016. A referral form, consisting of consultation criteria used in primary care practices, was developed. The pharmacist also reviewed all patient intakes and all patients waiting in acute care facilities for initiation of home care services, with the goal of addressing issues before admission to the Home Care Program. A password-protected database was built for data collection and analysis, and the data are presented in aggregate. A total of 197 referrals, involving 184 patients, were received during the pilot program; of these, 62 were excluded from analysis. The majority of referrals (95 [70.4%]) were for targeted medication reviews, and 271 drug therapy problems were identified. Acceptance rates for the pharmacist's recommendations were 90.2% (74 of 82 recommendations) among home care staff and 47.0% (55 of 117 recommendations) among prescribers and patients. On average, 1.5 cpKPIs were identified for each referral. The pilot program demonstrated a need for enhanced access to clinical pharmacy services for home care patients, although the best model of service provision remains unclear. More research

  9. Challenges of improving oral health for adults in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Victoria

    2017-08-31

    In 2016 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a guideline on oral health for adults in care homes in England. The author was a co-opted member of the NICE oral health for adults in care homes public health advisory committee. This article reviews the NICE guideline as it applies to care homes, and relates it to the results of a survey of oral care practice undertaken in a large care home organisation and the available research literature from the past 20 years. The literature and survey results suggest that, if translated into practice, the NICE guideline could do much to improve oral health for adults in care homes. The survey highlighted that 85% of residents required support from carers to undertake mouth care. It also found that care homes experienced significant difficulties in accessing dental services for residents. The author concludes that providers need to equip staff with the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake mouth care and to give this area of personal care greater priority. Finally, the author suggests that the Care Quality Commission could ensure that the NICE guideline is translated into practice in care homes.

  10. How home hospice care facilitates patient and family engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Ellis C

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how patient and family engagement manifests in home hospice care. This qualitative study included interviews and observation of home hospice care with 18 patients, 11 caregivers, and 26 hospice workers in the United States. Structural factors (e.g., home setting, ample time, personal relationships), hospice worker strategies (e.g., patient education and presenting choices), and family member support facilitated engagement. Barriers to engagement included difficult relationships and unavailable or unwilling family members. Home hospice care demonstrates potential strategies for continuous, informed, and holistic engagement. These engagement strategies may translate to other arenas of health care.

  11. Pediatric Critical Care Transport as a Conduit to Terminal Extubation at Home: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Bernier, Meghan L; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Kudchadkar, Sapna R

    2017-01-01

    To present our single-center's experience with three palliative critical care transports home from the PICU for terminal extubation. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients transported between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014. All cases were identified from our institutional pediatric transport database. Patients were terminally ill children unable to separate from mechanical ventilation in the PICU, who were transported home for terminal extubation and end-of-life care according to their families' wishes. Patients underwent palliative care transport home for terminal extubation. The rate of palliative care transports home for terminal extubation during the study period was 2.6 per 100 deaths. The patients were 7 months, 6 years, and 18 years old and had complex chronic conditions. The transfer process was protocolized. The families were approached by the PICU staff during multidisciplinary goals-of-care meetings. Parental expectations were clarified, and home hospice care was arranged pretransfer. All transports were performed by our pediatric critical care transport team, and all terminal extubations were performed by physicians. All patients had unstable medical conditions and urgent needs for transport to comply with the families' wishes for withdrawal of life support and death at home. As such, all three cases presented similar logistic challenges, including establishing do-not-resuscitate status pretransport, having limited time to organize the transport, and coordinating home palliative care services with available community resources. Although a relatively infrequent practice in pediatric critical care, transport home for terminal extubation represents a feasible alternative for families seeking out-of-hospital end-of-life care for their critically ill technology-dependent children. Our single-center experience supports the need for development of formal programs for end-of-life critical care transports to include patient screening tools

  12. Variations in quality of home care between sites across Europe, as measured by Home Care Quality Indicators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.T.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Wagner, C.; Carpenter, I.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Henrard, J.C.; Jonsson, P.V.; Sorbye, l.; Ljunggren, G.; Schroll, M.; Gambassi, G.; Bernabei, R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in the proportion of elderly people and a consequent increase in the demand for care have caused healthcare systems to become overloaded. This paper describes the use of Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs), derived from the Minimum Data Set for Home Care, for

  13. Variations in quality of Home Care between sites across Europe, as measured by Home Care Quality Indicators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.T.; Frijters, D.H.; Wagner, C.; Carpenter, G.I.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Henrard, J.C.; Jonsson, P.V.; Sorbye, L.; Ljunggren, G.; Schroll, M.; Gambassi, G.; Bernabei, R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in the proportion of elderly people and a consequent increase in the demand for care have caused healthcare systems to become overloaded. This paper describes the use of Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs), derived from the Minimum Data Set for Home Care, for

  14. Hospital-in-the-Home — essential to an integrated model of paediatric care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hensey, CC

    2017-01-01

    The National Clinical Programme for Paediatrics and Neonatology is proposing a model of care that will determine the future delivery of children’s health services in Ireland1. The focus is on the provision of an integrated service with improved co-ordination between primary, secondary, and tertiary level facilities. A parallel goal is improvements in chronic care and medical care in the home. An expanded role for ambulatory care and hospital at home schemes with a reduced reliance on inpatient care is proposed in line with international best practice. Achieving these goals requires a paradigm shift in delivery of children’s health care, and reconfiguration of current services to deliver multidisciplinary care in hospital and at home. The recently approved planning application for the new children’s hospital provides an opportunity and heralds a change in the structure of paediatric services in Ireland. It will act as the nexus of paediatric care throughout Ireland; supporting paediatric services nationally through outreach programmes, and ensuring children are treated as close to home as possible. A Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) program would help meet these objectives; and could provide home based acute paediatric care, leading to economic benefits, and the delivery of quality family-centred care.

  15. Accuracy of the Distress Thermometer for home care patients with palliative care needs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüller, Johannes; Küttner, Stefanie; Foldenauer, Ann Christina; Rolke, Roman; Pastrana, Tania

    2017-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the accuracy of the German version of the Distress Thermometer (DT) compared with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patients with palliative care needs living at home. Ours was a 15-month cross-sectional study beginning in September of 2013 in Germany with consecutive patients cared for by a palliative home care service. The survey was implemented during the initial visit by a home care team. Patients were excluded if they were under 18 years of age, mentally or physically unable to complete the assessment questionnaires as judged by their healthcare worker, or unable to understand the German language. During the first encounter, the DT and HADS were applied, and sociodemographic and medical data were collected. A total of 89 persons completed both the HADS and DT questionnaires (response rate = 59.7%; mean age = 67 years; female = 55.1%; married = 65.2%; living home with relatives = 73.0%; oncological condition = 92.1%; Karnofsky Performance Scale [KPS] score: 0-40 = 30.3%, 50-70 = 57.3%, >80 = 6.7%). The mean DT score was 6.3 (±2.3), with 84.3% of participants scoring above the DT cutoff (≥4). The mean HADStotal score was 17.9 (±7.8), where 64% of participants had a total HADS score (HADStotal) ≥15, 51.7% reported anxiety (HADSanxiety ≥ 8), and 73% reported depression (HADSdepression ≥ 8). Using the HADS as a gold standard, a DT cutoff score ≥5 was optimal for identifying severe distress in patients with palliative care needs, with a sensitivity of 93.0%, a specificity of 34.4%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 73.3%, and likelihood ratios LR+ = 1.42 (home with palliative care needs in order to offer adequate support.

  16. Pervasive Home Care - Technological support for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo

    2006-01-01

    approach that I outline in this dissertation. Furthermore I describe the results of the project contributing to three related scientific fields: home care technologies, telemedicine and computer supported cooperative work (CSCW). The main conclusion towards home care technologies is that the many visionary...... the need arises for moving treatment and care involving specialised knowledge from the hospital to the home. In this dissertation I use the term Home Care" for the multidisciplinary investigation of how this movement can be supported with technology enabling the expert to carry on a treatment in the home...... of the patient in collaboration with patient and home care clinicians. My main research method has been qualitative analysis of the empirical results generated during an experimental project using Participatory Design (PD) to investigate potential futures in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers...

  17. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  18. Medical foster care: what happens when children with medical complexity cannot be cared for by their families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Rebecca R; Henderson, Carrie M; Boss, Renee D

    2016-01-01

    Medical interventions for life-threatening pediatric conditions often oblige ongoing and complex medical care for survivors. For some children with medical complexity, their caretaking needs outstrip their parents' resources and abilities. When this occurs, the medical foster care system can provide the necessary health care and supervision to permit these children to live outside of hospitals. However, foster children with medical complexity experience extremes of social and medical risk, confounding their prognosis and quality of life beyond that of similar children living with biologic parents. Medical foster parents report inadequate training and preparation, perpetuating these health risks. Further, critical decisions that weigh the benefits and burdens of medical interventions for these children must accommodate complicated relationships involving foster families, caseworkers, biologic families, legal consultants, and clinicians. These variables can delay and undermine coordinated and comprehensive care. To rectify these issues, medical homes and written care plans can promote collaboration between providers, families, and agencies. Pediatricians should receive specialized training to meet the unique needs of this population. National policy and research agendas could target medical and social interventions to reduce the need for medical foster care for children with medical complexity, and to improve its quality for those children who do.

  19. Changes in symptoms and pain intensity of cancer patients after enrollment in palliative care at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumitrescu, Luminita; van den Heuvel-Olaroiu, Marinela; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the activities and interventions carried out by an at-home palliative care team treating cancer patients who died within two years of being enrolled in a palliative care program. It analyzes which changes in symptoms and pain occurred and which sociodemographic and medical

  20. Aims and tasks in parental caregiving for children receiving palliative care at home: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Kars, Marijke C.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; Bosman, Diederik K.; Colenbrander, Derk A.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.

    2017-01-01

    In paediatric palliative care (PPC), parents are confronted with increasing caregiving demands. More children are cared for at home, and the need for PPC of children is lengthened due to technical and medical improvements. Therefore, a clear understanding of the content of parental caregiving in PPC

  1. Aims and tasks in parental caregiving for children receiving palliative care at home : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Kars, Marijke C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/28486711X; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; Bosman, Diederik K; Colenbrander, Derk A; Grootenhuis, Martha A; van Delden, Johannes J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086541331

    In paediatric palliative care (PPC), parents are confronted with increasing caregiving demands. More children are cared for at home, and the need for PPC of children is lengthened due to technical and medical improvements. Therefore, a clear understanding of the content of parental caregiving in PPC

  2. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M.; Goncalves-Bradley, Daniela C.; Quinn, Terry J.; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C.; Stott, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce

  3. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M.; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C.; Quinn, Terry J.; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C.; Stott, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this

  4. Inclusive design for a care home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Nordic Conference on Activity Theory and the Forth Finnish Conference on Cultural and Activity Research (FISCAR10) Proceedings ISBN 987-952-60-0021-3 p. 160 INCLUSIVE DESIGN FOR A CARE HOME Pirkko Raudaskoski The paper discusses the methodological challenges of both theorizing and implementing...... communication skills with language or by other means. Instead, others will have to mediate their experiences. These accounts are necessarily (value-laden) transformations that can be problematic also due to the sudden identity change for the occupant from a ‘normal’ person to a ‘disabled’ person and the wish...... for the people around to restore the ‘old version’ of the person. Is there space for disability advocacy in this environment? Büscher, M., O’Neille, J., Rooksby, J. 2009. Designing for diagnosing. CSCW 18. Keinonen, T. 2007. Immediate, product and remote design. IASDR07....

  5. Practices of Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home Health Clinician Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Sheeran, Thomas F; Bruce, Martha L

    2015-12-01

    The study assessed gaps between published best practices and real-world practices of treating depression in home health care (HHC) and barriers to closing gaps. The qualitative study used semistructured interviews with nurses and administrators (N=20) from five HHC agencies in five states. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed by a multidisciplinary team using grounded theory method to identify themes. Routine HHC nursing overlapped with all functional areas of depression care. However, gaps were noted between best and real-world practices. Gaps were associated with perceived scope of practice by HHC nurses, knowledge gaps and low self-efficacy in depression treatment, stigma attached to depression, poor quality of antidepressant management in primary care, and poor communication between HHC and primary care clinicians. Strategies to close gaps between typical and best practices include enhancing HHC clinicians' knowledge and self-efficacy with depression treatment and improving the quality of antidepressant management and communication with primary care.

  6. The use of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) with cardiac patients receiving home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia Stocker; Slowik, Linda Haynes

    2009-01-01

    To identify Nursing Interventions Classification interventions (NICs) commonly provided to cardiac home care patients and to explore differences among patients with coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and patients with other cardiac disorders. The NICs provided to cardiac home care patients were recorded and analyzed to determine differences in frequencies across cardiac diagnoses. Frequent NICs provided in cardiac home care are similar across diagnoses, and include tissue perfusion management and patient education NICs. Variations can be detected and involve fluid monitoring/management, exercise promotion/teaching, and cardiac care NICs. Differences in nursing care among patients with similar medical diagnoses can be detected using NIC. Relevant knowledge of nursing care can be gleaned from analyzing NIC data generated in practice and can be used to plan, evaluate, and determine the effectiveness of nursing care.

  7. Interventions to optimise prescribing for older people in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldred, David P; Raynor, David K; Hughes, Carmel; Barber, Nick; Chen, Timothy F; Spoor, Pat

    2013-02-28

    There is a substantial body of evidence that prescribing for care home residents is suboptimal and requires improvement. Consequently, there is a need to identify effective interventions to optimise prescribing and resident outcomes in this context. The objective of the review was to determine the effect of interventions to optimise prescribing for older people living in care homes. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012); Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012); MEDLINE OvidSP (1980 on); EMBASE, OvidSP (1980 on); Ageline, EBSCO (1966 on); CINAHL, EBSCO (1980 on); International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, OvidSP (1980 on); PsycINFO, OvidSP (1980 on); conference proceedings in Web of Science, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - SSH & Science, ISI Web of Knowledge (1990 on); grey literature sources and trial registries; and contacted authors of relevant studies. We also reviewed the references lists of included studies and related reviews (search period November 2012). We included randomised controlled trials evaluating interventions aimed at optimising prescribing for older people (aged 65 years or older) living in institutionalised care facilities. Studies were included if they measured one or more of the following primary outcomes, adverse drug events; hospital admissions;mortality; or secondary outcomes, quality of life (using validated instrument); medication-related problems; medication appropriateness (using validated instrument); medicine costs. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts, assessed studies for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. A narrative summary of results was presented. The eight included studies involved 7653 residents in 262 (range 1 to 85) care homes in six countries. Six studies were cluster

  8. Shared Caregiving: Comparisons between Home and Child-Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Lieselotte; Rickert, Heike; Lamb, Michael E.

    2000-01-01

    Described experiences of 84 German toddlers enrolled or not enrolled in child care. Found total amount of care per weekday did not differ by child-care status; child-care toddlers received lower care levels from center providers; their mothers engaged in more social interactions during nonworking hours than did mothers of home-only toddlers; and…

  9. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home

  10. Telemedicine for rural cancer care in North Queensland: bringing cancer care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Sabe; Larkins, Sarah; Evans, Rebecca; Varma, Suresh; Andrews, Athena; Beuttner, Petra; Brennan, Sean; Young, Michael

    2012-10-01

    To describe the use of telemedicine in cancer care (teleoncology model of care) for rural patients in North Queensland. This is a descriptive study. Data on demographical and clinical factors were retrieved from the teleoncology database of Townsville Hospital and review of medical records for the period between May 2007 and May 2011. The medical oncologists at the Townsville Cancer Centre, a regional cancer centre in North Queensland, have been providing their services to rural hospitals in Townsville and Mt Isa districts via videoconferencing since 2007.   Cancer care delivery to rural sites via Townsville teleoncology model. The ability of the teleoncology model to provide the following services to rural towns: (i) specialist consultations; (ii) urgent specialist medical care; (iii) care for Indigenous patients; and (iv) remote supervision of chemotherapy administration. Between May 2007 and May 2011, 158 patients from 18 rural towns received a total of 745 consultations. Ten of these patients were consulted urgently and treatment plans initiated locally, avoiding interhospital transfers. Eighteen Indigenous patients received consultative services, being accompanied by more than four to six family members. Eighty-three patients received a range of intravenous and oral chemotherapy regimens in Mt Isa and oral agents in other towns through remote supervision by medical oncologists from Townsville. Teleoncology model of care allows rural and Indigenous cancer patients to receive specialist consultations and chemotherapy treatments closer to home, thus minimising the access difficulties faced by the rural sector. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  11. Enriching Patient-Centered Medical Homes Through Peer Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Fisher, Edwin B

    2015-08-01

    Peer supporters are recognized by various designations-community health workers, promotores de salud, lay health advisers-and are community members who work for pay or as volunteers in association with health care systems or nonprofit community organizations and often share ethnicity, language, and socioeconomic status with the mentees that they serve. Although emerging evidence demonstrates the efficacy of peer support at the community level, the adoption and implementation of this resource into patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is still under development. To accelerate that integration, this article addresses three major elements of peer support interventions: the functions and features of peer support, a framework and programmatic strategies for implementation, and fiscal models that would support the sustained viability of peer support programs within PCMHs. Key functions of peer support include assistance in daily management of health-related behaviors, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and longitudinal or ongoing support. An organizational model of innovation implementation provides a useful framework for determining how to implement and evaluate peer support programs in PCMHs. Programmatic strategies that can be useful in developing peer support programs within PCMHs include peer coaching or mentoring, group self-management training, and programs designed around the telephone and information technology. Fiscal models for peer support programs include linkages with hospital or health care systems, service- or community-based nonprofit organizations, and partnerships between health care systems and community groups. Peer support promises to enrich PCMHs by activating patients in their self-care, providing culturally sensitive outreach, and opening the way for partnerships with community-based organizations. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  12. Technology and medication errors: impact in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; St-Pierre, Liette; Lagacé, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study a medication distribution technology's (MDT) impact on medication errors reported in public nursing homes in Québec Province. The work was carried out in six nursing homes (800 patients). Medication error data were collected from nursing staff through a voluntary reporting process before and after MDT was implemented. The errors were analysed using: totals errors; medication error type; severity and patient consequences. A statistical analysis verified whether there was a significant difference between the variables before and after introducing MDT. The results show that the MDT detected medication errors. The authors' analysis also indicates that errors are detected more rapidly resulting in less severe consequences for patients. MDT is a step towards safer and more efficient medication processes. Our findings should convince healthcare administrators to implement technology such as electronic prescriber or bar code medication administration systems to improve medication processes and to provide better healthcare to patients. Few studies have been carried out in long-term healthcare facilities such as nursing homes. The authors' study extends what is known about MDT's impact on medication errors in nursing homes.

  13. Racial And Ethnic Disparities Persist At Veterans Health Administration Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Donna L; Steers, W Neil; Huynh, Alexis K; Frayne, Susan M; Uchendu, Uchenna S; Riopelle, Deborah; Yano, Elizabeth M; Saechao, Fay S; Hoggatt, Katherine J

    2017-06-01

    Patient-centered medical homes are widely promoted as a primary care delivery model that achieves better patient outcomes. It is unknown if their benefits extend equally to all racial/ethnic groups. In 2010 the Veterans Health Administration, part of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), began implementing patient-centered medical homes nationwide. In 2009 significant disparities in hypertension or diabetes control were present for most racial/ethnic groups, compared with whites. In 2014 hypertension disparities were similar for blacks, had become smaller but remained significant for Hispanics, and were no longer significant for multiracial veterans, whereas disparities had become significant for American Indians/Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians/other Pacific Islanders. By contrast, in 2014 diabetes disparities were similar for American Indians/Alaska Natives, blacks, and Hispanics, and were no longer significant for Native Hawaiians/other Pacific Islanders. We found that the modest benefits of the VA's implementation of patient-centered medical homes were offset by competing multifactorial external, health system, provider, and patient factors, such as increased patient volume. To promote health equity, health care innovations such as patient-centered medical homes should incorporate tailored strategies that account for determinants of racial/ethnic variations. Evaluations of patient-centered medical homes should monitor outcomes for racial/ethnic groups. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Home-based chronic care. An expanded integrative model for home health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Harrison, Gregory; Fagan, Martha; Norman, Barbara; Suter, W Newton

    2008-04-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) developed by is an influential and accepted guide for the care of patients with chronic disease. Wagner acknowledges a current healthcare focus on acute care needs that often circumvents chronic care coordination. He identifies the need for a "division of labor" to assist the primary care physician with this neglected function. This article posits that the role of chronic care coordination assistance and disease management fits within the purview of home healthcare and should be central to home health chronic care delivery. An expanded Home-Based Chronic Care Model (HBCCM) is described that builds on Wagner's model and integrates salient theories from fields beyond medicine. The expanded model maximizes the potential for disease self-management success and is intended to provide a foundation for home health's integral role in chronic disease management.

  15. The care home activity project: does introducing an occupational therapy programme reduce depression in care homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, C G; Schneider, J; Cordingley, L; Molineux, M; Duggan, S; Hart, C; Stoker, B; Williamson, R; Lovegrove, R; Cruickshank, A

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that depression severity in care homes for older people would be reduced by an occupational therapy programme. This was a feasibility study for a cluster randomised controlled trial and involved four intervention and four control homes in northern England. In each intervention home a registered occupational therapist worked full-time for one year delivering an individualised programme to participants. Pre- and post-intervention data for the Geriatric Mental State-Depression Scale (primary outcome measure) were obtained for 143 participants. Secondary outcomes included dependency and quality of life. No significant intervention effects were found in any of the quantitative outcome measures, though qualitative interviews showed the intervention was valued by many participants, staff and relatives. Therapist ratings and qualitative interviews suggested that the intervention was beneficial to some participants but no distinctive characteristics were found that might enable prediction of likely benefit on initial assessment. This exploratory study provides no evidence that this intervention produced benefits in terms of depression, dependency or quality of life. Lack of prior power calculations means these are not definitive findings; but numbers were sufficient to perform the required analyses and data did not suggest effects that would have reached statistical significance with a larger sample. This study highlights issues for consideration in providing such services in care homes.

  16. Home care nursing orientation model. Justification and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, C J; Milone-Nuzzo, P

    1992-01-01

    An orientation program for new nurses in a home care agency can be an effective tool that increases job satisfaction, alleviates a potentially high employee attrition rate, boosts morale, and thereby improves overall quality of patient care.

  17. Information persistence services designed to support home care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocha, Nelson Pacheco; Queirós, Alexandra; Augusto, Filipe; Rodríguez, Yosvany Llerena; Cardoso, Carlos; Grade, José Miguel; Quintas, João

    2015-01-01

    Due to the challenges faced by health and social care systems, in particular those related to actual demographic trends, home care emerges as a potentially cost-effective solution to answer the needs...

  18. Hospital at home; a review of the literature on the effects of a form of transmural care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, AJ; Schuling, J; Meyboom-De Jong, B

    2002-01-01

    Hospital at home; a review of the literature on the effects of a form of transmural care Objective. To evaluate the effects of hospital at home on health outcomes and quality of life of patients and carers; to evaluate the costs of this form of care and the experiences of the (para)medics involved.

  19. Integration home care in the care chain: results from the EURHOMAP study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Demand for home care is expected to rise sharply across Europe as a result of trends of reduced institutional care and the ageing of populations. The increased volume and complexity in home care will challenge the coordination of services delivered in the home situation and the

  20. Home care in Austria: the interplay of family orientation, cash-for-care and migrant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österle, August; Bauer, Gudrun

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses the development of the home care sector in Austria. It analyses what impacts the interplay of the traditional family orientation to care, a universal cash-for-care scheme (reaching about 5% of the population) and a growing migrant care sector have on formal home care in Austria. The article is based on an analysis of research papers, policy documents and statistical data covering the period from the introduction of the cash-for-care scheme in 1993 up to 2011. Some authors have argued that generous cash benefits with no direct link to service use - as in the case of Austria - limit the development of home care, particularly in countries with a traditionally strong family orientation towards long-term care. Additionally, a tradition of family care and an emphasis on cash benefits may be conducive to the employment of migrant carers in private households, as a potential substitute for both family care and formal care. Despite this context, Austria has seen a substantial increase in formal home care over the past two decades. This has been driven by clients using their increased purchasing power and by policy priorities emphasising the extension of home care. Migrant care work was regularised in 2007, and the analysis suggests that while migrant care has usually worked as a substitute for other care arrangements, migrant care can also become a more integral element of care schemes. The article concludes that family orientation, unconditional cash benefits and the use of migrant carers do not necessarily preclude the development of a strong social service sector. However, there is a risk that budgetary limitations will primarily affect social service development. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of Home Health Care Devices: Remote Usability Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortum, Philip; Peres, S Camille

    2015-06-05

    An increasing amount of health care is now performed in a home setting, away from the hospital. While there is growing anecdotal evidence about the difficulty patients and caregivers have using increasingly complex health care devices in the home, there has been little systematic scientific study to quantify the global nature of home health care device usability in the field. Research has tended to focus on a handful of devices, making it difficult to gain a broad view of the usability of home-care devices in general. The objective of this paper is to describe a remote usability assessment method using the System Usability Scale (SUS), and to report on the usability of a broad range of health care devices using this metric. A total of 271 participants selected and rated up to 10 home health care devices of their choice using the SUS, which scores usability from 0 (unusable) to 100 (highly usable). Participants rated a total of 455 devices in their own home without an experimenter present. Usability scores ranged from 98 (oxygen masks) to 59 (home hormone test kits). An analysis conducted on devices that had at least 10 ratings showed that the effect of device on SUS scores was significant (Pusability of these devices was on the low end when compared with other commonly used items in the home, such as microwave ovens and telephones. A large database of usability scores for home health care devices collected using this remote methodology would be beneficial for physicians, patients, and their caregivers.

  2. Building Brains, Forging Futures: A Call to Action for the Family-Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    The family-centered medical home describes an approach to providing comprehensive primary care. Research advances in developmental neuroscience, genetics, and epigenetics offer a framework for understanding the dynamic process of brain development. It is this process that sets the life-course trajectory for an individual; in turn, a child's…

  3. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  4. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  5. [Private practice nurse and palliative care in the home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daydé, Marie-Claude

    2017-11-01

    The development of palliative care in the home, requested by patients and recommended in the 2015-2018 national plan, requires the home to be considered as a specific place of care. Private practice nurses have an important role to play with the patient and their relatives, in the assessment of needs, coordination, relational care as well as in providing the care required for maintaining and continuing life, an increasingly technical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Asperger's syndrome and medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hironobu

    2007-03-01

    Asperger's syndrome has been recognized recently. Diagnosis is done by DSM-IV-TR, ICD-10 or Autistic Spectrum Diagnosis. Medical care is performed by adjustment of environmental atmosphere, educational treatment and/or medication. Patients are cured by parents or teachers who can understand their thinking or behavior pattern. Educational treatment is important to compensate the lack of "mind of theory", of integration of central nervous system and of executive functioning. Medication is applied only secondary symptoms, such as hallucinated or delusional complaints or change of mood or compulsive behavior. Some of this syndrome's patients have excellent abilities and will accomplish great achievement in adult. We need protect them from bullying or secondary social withdrawal in adolescent age.

  7. The home care teaching and learning process in undergraduate health care degree courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ana Paula; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Maftum, Mariluci Alves; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Mello, Ana Lúcia Schaefer Ferreira de

    2017-07-01

    Home care, one of the services provided by the health system, requires health practitioners who are capable of understanding its specificities. This study aimed to build a substantive theory that describes experiences of home care teaching and learning during undergraduate degree courses in nursing, pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, dentistry and occupational therapy. A qualitative analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach based on the results of 63 semistructured interviews conducted with final year students, professors who taught subjects related to home care, and recent graduates working with home care, all participants in the above courses. The data was analyzed in three stages - open coding, axial coding and selective coding - resulting in the phenomenon Experiences of home care teaching and learning during the undergraduate health care degree courses. Its causes were described in the category Articulating knowledge of home care, strategies in the category Experiencing the unique nature of home care, intervening conditions in the category Understanding the multidimensional characteristics of home care, consequences in the category Changing thinking about home care training, and context in the category Understanding home care in the health system. Home care contributes towards the decentralization of hospital care.

  8. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  9. The prevalence, incidence and risk factors for delirium in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, M.; Joling, K.J.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Nijpels, G.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate and compare the prevalence and incidence of delirium and its risk factors in residents of Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes. Methods Data were extracted from the Long-Term Care Facility (inter RAI-LTCF) version of the Resident Assessment Instrument, which was

  10. Assessment of Anxiety in Older Home Care Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Tolin, David F.; Meunier, Suzanne A.; Gilliam, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined the psychometric properties of a variety of anxiety measures administered to older adults receiving home care services. Design and Methods: Data were collected from 66 adults aged 65 years and older who were receiving home care services. Participants completed self-report and clinician-rated measures of anxiety and…

  11. Factors influencing home care nurse intention to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Patterson, Erin; Rowe, Alissa; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; MacDonald, Geraldine; Cranley, Lisa; Squires, Mae

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors affecting Canadian home care nurse intention to remain employed (ITR). In developed nations, healthcare continues to shift into community settings. Although considerable research exists on examining nurse ITR in hospitals, similar research related to nurses employed in home care is limited. In the face of a global nursing shortage, it is important to understand the factors influencing nurse ITR across healthcare sectors. A qualitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Focus groups were conducted with home care nurses. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Six categories of influencing factors were identified by home care nurses as affecting ITR: job characteristics; work structures; relationships/communication; work environment; nurse responses to work; and employment conditions. Findings suggest the following factors influence home care nurse ITR: having autonomy; flexible scheduling; reasonable and varied workloads; supportive work relationships; and receiving adequate pay and benefits. Home care nurses did not identify job satisfaction as a single concept influencing ITR. Home care nursing management should support nurse autonomy, allow flexible scheduling, promote reasonable workloads and create opportunities for team building that strengthen supportive relationships among home care nurses and other health team members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Technological advances and hospital-at-home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, Vittoria; Aimonino Ricauda, Nicoletta; Rocco, Maurizio; Bertone, Paola; Fanton, Giordano; Isaia, Giancarlo

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the miniaturization and portability of diagnostic technologies, information technologies, remote monitoring, and long-distance care have increased the viability of home-based care, even for patients with serious conditions. Telemedicine and teleradiology projects are active at the Hospital at Home Service of Torino.

  13. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  14. Medical Home Implementation: A Sensemaking Taxonomy of Hard and Soft Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Context The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of care is currently a central focus of U.S. health system reform, but less is known about the model's implementation in the practice of everyday primary care. Understanding its implementation is key to ensuring the approach's continued support and success nationally. This article addresses this gap through a qualitative examination of the best practices associated with PCMH implementation for older adult patients in primary care. Methods I used a multicase, comparative study design that relied on a sensemaking approach and fifty-one in-depth interviews with physicians, nurses, and clinic support staff working in six accredited medical homes located in various geographic areas. My emphasis was on gaining descriptive insights into the staff's experiences delivering medical home care to older adult patients in particular and then analyzing how these experiences shaped the staff's thinking, learning, and future actions in implementing medical home care. Findings I found two distinct taxonomies of implementation best practices, which I labeled “hard” and “soft” because of their differing emphasis and content. Hard implementation practices are normative activities and structural interventions that align well with existing national standards for medical home care. Soft best practices are more relational in nature and derive from the existing practice social structure and everyday interactions between staff and patients. Currently, external stakeholders are less apt to recognize, encourage, or incentivize soft best practices. Conclusions The results suggest that there may be no standardized, one-size-fits-all approach to making medical home implementation work, particularly for special patient populations such as the elderly. My study also raises the issue of broadening current PCMH assessments and reward systems to include implementation practices that contain heavy social and relational components of care

  15. The innovative use of Six Sigma in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberfeld, Adrienne; Bennis, Sandra; Ritzius, Jeannie; Yhlen, David

    2007-01-01

    The Prospective Payment System had significant impact on home healthcare agencies throughout the nation. Virtua Home Care, located in Southern New Jersey, realized the need for process improvement in order to remain viable. Six Sigma was introduced to the agency and the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control processes were initiated to achieve sustainable results, and within 9 months, Virtua Home Care improved regulatory compliance, experienced a deficiency-free survey, and recognized a 1.2 million dollars financial gain.

  16. Adverse Events in Home Care: Identifying and Responding with interRAI Scales and Clinical Assessment Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Chi-Ling Joanna; Betini, Raquel Souza Dias; Wright, Jennifer; Eckler, Lorri; Chang, Byung Wook; Hogeveen, Sophie; Turcotte, Luke; Hirdes, John P

    2018-03-01

    Outcomes of adverse events in home care are varied and multifactorial. This study tested a framework combining two health measures to identify home care recipients at higher risk of long-term care placement or death within one year. Both measures come from the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care (RAI-HC), a standardized comprehensive clinical assessment. Persons scoring high in the Method for Assigning Priority Levels (MAPLe) algorithm and Changes in Health, End-stage disease, Signs and Symptoms (CHESS) scale were at the greatest risk of placement or death and more than twice as likely to experience either outcome earlier than others. The target group was more likely to trigger mood, social relationship, and caregiver distress issues, suggesting mental health and psychosocial interventions might help in addition to medical care and/or personal support services. Home care agencies can use this framework to identify home care patients who may require a more intensive care coordinator approach.

  17. Quality of care in European home care programs using the second generation interRAI Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foebel, Andrea D; van Hout, Hein P; van der Roest, Henriëtte G; Topinkova, Eva; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Frijters, Dinnus; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Jónsson, Pálmi V; Hirdes, John P; Bernabei, Roberto; Onder, Graziano

    2015-11-14

    Evaluating the quality of care provided to older individuals is a key step to ensure that needs are being met and to target interventions to improve care. To this aim, interRAI's second-generation home care quality indicators (HCQIs) were developed in 2013. This study assesses the quality of home care services in six European countries using these HCQIs as well as the two derived summary scales. Data for this study were derived from the Aged in Home Care (AdHOC) study - a cohort study that examined different models of community care in European countries. The current study selected a sub-sample of the AdHOC cohort from six countries whose follow-up data were complete (Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands). Data were collected from the interRAI Home Care instrument (RAI-HC) between 2000 and 2002. The 23 HCQIs of interest were determined according to previously established methodology, including risk adjustment. Two summary measures, the Clinical Balance Scale and Independence Quality Scale were also determined using established methodology. A total of 1,354 individuals from the AdHOC study were included in these analyses. Of the 23 HCQIs that were measured, the highest proportion of individuals experienced declines in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) (48.4 %). Of the clinical quality indicators, mood decline was the most prevalent (30.0 %), while no flu vaccination and being alone and distressed were the most prevalent procedural and social quality indicators, respectively (33.4 and 12.8 %). Scores on the two summary scales varied by country, but were concentrated around the median mark. The interRAI HCQIs can be used to determine the quality of home care services in Europe and identify areas for improvement. Our results suggest functional declines may prove the most beneficial targets for interventions.

  18. Sustainable ubiquitous home health care--architectural considerations and first practical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschollek, Michael; Wolf, Klaus-H; Bott, Oliver-J; Geisler, Mirko; Plischke, Maik; Ludwig, Wolfram; Hornberger, Andreas; Haux, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    Despite the abundance of past home care projects and the maturity of the technologies used, there is no widespread dissemination as yet. The absence of accepted standards and thus interoperability and the inadequate integration into transinstitutional health information systems (tHIS) are perceived as key factors. Based on the respective literature and previous experiences in home care projects we propose an architectural model for home care as part of a transinstitutional health information system using the HL7 clinical document architecture (CDA) as well as the HL7 Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Systems. In two short case studies we describe the practical realization of the architecture as well as first experiences. Our work can be regarded as a first step towards an interoperable - and in our view sustainable - home care architecture based on a prominent document standard from the health information system domain.

  19. Scheduling Optimization of Home Health Care Service Considering Patients’ Priorities and Time Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Du

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available As a new service model, home health care can provide effective health care by adopting door-to-door service. The reasonable arrangements for nurses and their routes not only can reduce medical expenses, but also can enhance patient satisfaction. This research focuses on the home health care scheduling optimization problem with known demands and service capabilities. Aimed at minimizing the total cost, an integer programming model was built in this study, which took both the priorities of patients and constraints of time windows into consideration. The genetic algorithm with local search was used to solve the proposed model. Finally, a case study of Shanghai, China, was conducted for the empirical analysis. The comparison results verify the effectiveness of the proposed model and methodology, which can provide the decision support for medical administrators of home health care.

  20. Substitute consent for nursing home residents prescribed psychotropic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, Nicola; Brodaty, Henry; Draper, Brian; Peisah, Carmelle; Brugue, Esteve

    2009-03-01

    Prescribing psychotropic medications for persons with dementia who lack capacity to give informed consent requires proxy consent under NSW Guardianship legislation. To survey current practice in complying with legislation and regulations in prescribing psychotropic medications for nursing home residents. In three Sydney nursing homes, the files of 77 residents identified as having dementia, being on a psychotropic medication and not having capacity to give informed consent, were audited. In only 6.5% of cases were all regulations adhered to; a further 6.5% attempted and partially completed substitute consent requirements. The problem and the nature of the treatment were documented in 70.1% of cases. In 16.9% of files the only documentation of the prescribed medication was in the medication chart. Doses of medications prescribed were within accepted guidelines. Current regulations and legislation are not being observed. Recommendations are made as to how to make them more practicable.

  1. Patient satisfaction with medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sadovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients’ evaluation of medical care is becoming more and more important due to expanding patient-centered care. For this purpose a complex index of patient satisfaction with healthcare is used. This parameter reflects the correspondence of actual healthcare services to patient’s expectations that were formed under the influence of cultural, social, economic factors, and personal experience of each patient. Satisfaction is a subjective parameter, thus, a grade of satisfaction is barely connected with quality of healthcare services itself. Moreover, medical organizations should always take into account specific features of each patient, since they can have an influence on customer attitude to medical services.This article comprises the review of publications studying determinants of patient satisfaction. In the course of the study, we analyzed data received by research teams from different countries.According to the review, we made some conclusions. First, determinants of patient satisfaction with healthcare can be divided in two groups. The first group of factors includes patients’ characteristics such as age, gender, ethnical and cultural features. However, researches from different countries revealed that there is a difference in the importance of factors belonging to this group and their influence on satisfaction of certain patient cohorts. The second group includes factors that belong to the process of healthcare services delivery and its organization. Moreover, it was found that patient satisfaction level is changing in a waveform. Thus, medical organization should not only try to increase patient satisfaction level but also maintain it. AS a result, it necessary to monitor patient satisfaction with healthcare services. That is why there is a distinct need for the development of a new tool or adaptation of existing instrument of satisfaction measurement, which would be unitized for all medical organizations in the Russian Federation 

  2. End-of-life care preferences of nursing home residents: Results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charis Wei Ling; Cheong, S K; Govinda Raj, A; Teo, Wsk; Leong, Iyo

    2016-10-01

    Palliative care services were not available in nursing homes in Singapore. Project CARE (Care At the end-of-life for Residents in homes for the Elderly) was a pilot programme that aimed to promote advance care planning and improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. We aimed to examine end-of-life care preferences among nursing home residents, and identify factors associated with preference for medical intervention, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and place of death. A cross-sectional study using data from advance care planning discussions was conducted from September 2009 to April 2012 across seven nursing homes. The advance care planning discussion was conducted with the resident (with a prognosis of 6 months or 1 year), their families and staff from the nursing home and hospital. A total of 600 residents and their families completed the advance care planning discussion. Majority (93.2%) preferred not to proceed with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 52.3% opted for limited additional intervention at the nursing home with escalation to the hospital if necessary and 77.0% preferred to die at the nursing home. Residents 85+ years (relative risk ratio: 3.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-9.93, p = 0.030) were more likely to prefer medical intervention at the nursing home only. No associations were found with the preference for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Residents who were single, or who were Christians or Catholics (adjusted odds ratio: 2.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-4.19, p = 0.039), were more likely to prefer to die at the nursing home. Preferences for medical interventions in nursing homes provide support to extend palliative care services to nursing homes, which may benefit residents who are older, single, or Christians or Catholics. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Advantages and Disadvantages of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: A Critical Analysis and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budgen, Jacqueline; Cantiello, John

    This article provides a detailed examination of the pros and cons associated with patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). Opinions and findings from those who have studied PCMHs and those who have been directly involved with this type of health care model are outlined. Key lessons from providers are detailed, and critical success factors are highlighted. This synthesized analysis serves to lend evidence to health care managers and providers who are considering implementation of the PCMH model.

  4. Palliative Care in New York State Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Paula E; Kawai, Fernando; Rodrigues, Lucan; Lolis, James; Martins-Welch, Diana; Shalshin, Alexander; Fazzari, Melissa J; Pan, Cynthia X

    2017-01-01

    To describe the current landscape of palliative care (PC) in nursing homes (NHs) in New York State (NYS). A statewide survey was completed by 149 respondents who named 61 different NHs as their workplace. Questions were related to presence, type, and composition of PC programs; perceptions of PC; barriers to implementing PC; and qualifying medical conditions. Hospice is less available than palliative or comfort care programs, with three-fourths of NYS NH responded providing a PC program. In general, medical directors and physicians were more similar in perspective about the role/impact of PC compared to nursing and others. There was general agreement about the positive impact and role of PC in the NH. Funding and staffing were recognized as barriers to implementing PC. There is growing penetration of PC programs in NH facilities in NYS, with good perception of the appropriate utilization of PC programs. Financial reimbursement and staffing are barriers to providing PC in the NH and need to be addressed by the health-care system.

  5. A measure of palliative care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Bott, Marjorie; Boyle, Diane; Gajewski, Byron; Tilden, Virginia P

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to improve care for nursing home residents stand to be enhanced by measures to assess the degree to which staff provide palliative care. As the incidence of death in nursing homes increases with the aging population, the gap in measurement must be addressed. To that end, we report the development and psychometric testing of a nursing home palliative care survey. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Palliative Care Survey (PCS) for use in nursing homes. Psychometric evaluation of the instrument was completed in two phases. Phase 1 focused on individual item analyses and subsequent revision or deletion of items, and Phase 2 evaluated evidence for reliability and validity. Phase 1 included 26 nursing homes and staff (n=717), and Phase 2 included 85 nursing homes and staff (n=2779). Data were analyzed using item-total correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analysis, and analysis of variance. Support was obtained for a 51-item PCS made up of two constructs, Palliative Care Practice and Palliative Care Knowledge. The PCS measures the extent to which the nursing home staff engage in palliative care practices and have knowledge consistent with good end-of-life care. Both practice and knowledge are an essential foundation to providing good end-of-life care to nursing home residents. Efforts to improve care for the dying in nursing homes have been slowed by an absence of measurement tools that capture care processes, a gap that the PCS reported here helps fill. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Essential newborn care after home delivery in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Målqvist, Mats; Pun, Asha; Kc, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    Postnatal care of the newborn is essential in order to reduce neonatal mortality. Nepal has made great efforts to improve maternal and child health by focusing on accessibility and outreach over the past decades. This study aims to examine trends, over the past decade, in levels and equity of facility delivery rates and the provision of newborn care after home delivery in Nepal. Household-level data from the Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) 2006 and 2011 and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS5) from 2014 performed in Nepal was sourced for the study. Coverage rates of facility delivery and newborn care after home delivery were calculated and logistic regression models were used to ascertain inequity. Home delivery rate dropped from 79.2% in 2006 to 46.5% in 2014, a development showing an inequitable distribution, with a larger share of better-off families shifting to facility delivery. For those who still delivered at home there was an increased rate of early initiation of breastfeeding and adequate temperature control, but only 2.2% of women delivering at home received a home visit by a health professional in the first week of delivery. No inequity in receiving newborn care after home delivery could be detected. There have been significant improvements in facility delivery rates over the last 10 years in Nepal and postnatal care at home has improved. There is, however, an alarmingly low level of home visits during an infant's first week.

  7. Realising dignity in care home practice: an action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ann; Curtis, Katherine; Dunn, Michael; Baillie, Lesley

    2017-06-01

    More than 400,000 older people reside in over 18,000 care homes in England. A recent social care survey found up to 50% of older people in care homes felt their dignity was undermined. Upholding the dignity of older people in care homes has implications for residents' experiences and the role of Registered Nurses. The study aimed to explore how best to translate the concept of dignity into care home practice, and how to support this translation process by enabling Registered Nurses to provide ethical leadership within the care home setting. Action research with groups of staff (Registered Nurses and non-registered caregivers) and groups of residents and relatives in four care homes in the south of England to contribute to the development of the dignity toolkit. Action research groups were facilitated by 4 researchers (2 in each care home) to discuss dignity principles and experiences within care homes. These groups reviewed and developed a dignity toolkit over six cycles of activity (once a month for 6 months). The Registered Nurses were individually interviewed before and after the activity. Hard copy and online versions of a dignity toolkit, with tailored versions for participating care homes, were developed. Registered Nurses and caregivers identified positive impact of making time for discussion about dignity-related issues. Registered Nurses identified ongoing opportunities for using their toolkit to support all staff. Nurses and caregivers expressed feelings of empowerment by the process of action research. The collaborative development of a dignity toolkit within each care home has the potential to enable ethical leadership by Registered Nurses that would support and sustain dignity in care homes. Action research methods empower staff to maintain dignity for older people within the care home setting through the development of practically useful toolkits to support everyday care practice. Providing opportunities for caregivers to be involved in such

  8. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced...... by 91 %, mainly due to improvement in symptom management, 'security', and accessibility of specialists in palliative care. After one month, 57% of the participants reported to have learnt aspects of palliative care, primarily symptom control, and 89% of them found cooperation satisfactory...

  9. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved.

  10. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  11. Advance Care Planning: Medical Issues to Consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Working Through Grief About Us Advance Care Planning: Medical Issues to Consider By Cheryl Arenella, MD, ... proxy designation, known as a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care or a Health Care Proxy : ...

  12. A systematic review of different models of home and community care services for older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodaty Henry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Costs and consumer preference have led to a shift from the long-term institutional care of aged older people to home and community based care. The aim of this review is to evaluate the outcomes of case managed, integrated or consumer directed home and community care services for older persons, including those with dementia. Methods A systematic review was conducted of non-medical home and community care services for frail older persons. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AgeLine, Scopus and PubMed were searched from 1994 to May 2009. Two researchers independently reviewed search results. Results Thirty five papers were included in this review. Evidence from randomized controlled trials showed that case management improves function and appropriate use of medications, increases use of community services and reduces nursing home admission. Evidence, mostly from non-randomized trials, showed that integrated care increases service use; randomized trials reported that integrated care does not improve clinical outcomes. The lowest quality evidence was for consumer directed care which appears to increase satisfaction with care and community service use but has little effect on clinical outcomes. Studies were heterogeneous in methodology and results were not consistent. Conclusions The outcomes of each model of care differ and correspond to the model's focus. Combining key elements of all three models may maximize outcomes.

  13. A Study of the Association Between Multidisciplinary Home Care and Home Death Among Thai Palliative Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaviroj, Kittiphon; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2017-06-01

    Many terminally ill patients would prefer to stay and die in their own homes, but unfortunately, some may not be able to do so. Although there are many factors associated with successful home deaths, receiving palliative home visits from the multidisciplinary care teams is one of the key factors that enable patients to die at home. Our study was aimed to find whether there was any association between our palliative home care program and home death. A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Family Medicine at Ramathibodi Hospital between January 2012 and May 2014. All of the patients who were referred to multidisciplinary palliative care teams were included. The data set comprised of patient's profile, disease status, functional status, patient's symptoms, preferred place of death, frequency of home visits, types of team interventions, and patient's actual place of death. Multiple logistic regression was applied in order to determine the association between the variables and the probability of dying at home. A total of 142 patients were included into the study. At the end of the study, 50 (35.2%) patients died at home and 92 (64.8%) patients died in the hospital. The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a strong association between multidisciplinary home care and home death (odds ratio 6.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.48-17.38). Palliative home care was a significant factor enabling patients who want to die at home. We encourage health policy makers to promote the development of community-based palliative care programs in Thailand.

  14. Study on the factors determining home death of patients during home care: a historical cohort study at a home care support clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Seiji; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Associations between markedly low activities of daily living (ADL) at the start of home visit care and patient home death were analyzed using data from a home care support clinic in Japan that has a low rate of home deaths. The study was a historical cohort study. It involved patients who began to receive home visit care from a home visit care support clinic between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2011. Using home death as a dependent variable and presence/absence of markedly low ADL and other parameters (cancer, the patient's desire for home death, etc.) as independent variables, the adjusted hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Markedly low ADL were associated with home death even after adjustment for factors that influence home death (adjusted hazard ratio 4.40; 95% CI 2.37-8.16). Cancer and the patient's desire for home death were statistically significant factors involved in home death. In a subgroup analysis according to the presence/absence of cancer, the association between markedly low ADL and home death was stronger in the cancer-free group (adjusted hazard ratio 10.78; 95% CI 2.89-40.26) than in the cancer group (adjusted hazard ratio 5.58; 95% CI2.39-13.05). Patients' desire for home death could be fulfilled if home care support clinics provide home visit services to not only terminal-stage cancer patients, but also bedridden cancer-free patients. We must establish systems for older adults to remain at home during the terminal period of their lives. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Home-based primary care practices in the United States: current state and quality improvement approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Bruce; Weston, Christine M; Garrigues, Sarah; Patel, Kanan; Ritchie, Christine

    2015-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of home-based primary care practices: staffing, administrative, population served, care practices, and quality of care challenges. Survey of home-based primary care practices. Home-based primary care practices in the United States. Members of the American Academy of Home Care Medicine and nonmember providers identified by surveyed members. A 58-item questionnaire that assessed practice characteristics, care provided by the practice, and how the quality of care that the practice provided was assessed. Survey response rate was 47.9%, representing 272 medical house calls practices. Mean average daily census was 457 patients (median 100 patients, range 1-30,972 patients). Eighty-eight percent of practices offered around-the-clock coverage for urgent concerns, 60% held regularly scheduled team meetings, 89% used an electronic medical record, and one-third used a defined quality improvement process. The following factors were associated with practices that used a defined quality improvement process: practice holds regularly scheduled team meetings to discuss specific patients (odds ratio (OR)=2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02-4.21), practice conducts surveys of patients (OR=8.53, 95% CI=4.07-17.88), and practice is involved in National Committee for Quality Assurance patient-centered medical home (OR=3.27, 95% CI=1.18-9.07). Ninety percent of practices would or might participate in quality improvement activities that would provide them timely feedback on patient and setting-appropriate quality indicators. There is a substantial heterogeneity of home-based primary care practice types. Most practices perform activities that lend themselves to robust quality improvement efforts, and nearly all indicated interest in a national registry to inform quality improvement. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Family carers/next-of-kin perceptions of home-care technology: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smithard DG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available David G Smithard1,2 1Royal Victoria Hospital, Kent Community Health NHS Trust, Folkestone, UK; 2Department of Electronics and Digital Arts, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK Abstract: As the global population increases in age and the pressures on hospital resources increase, with a defined budget, the management of people in their own home environment is increasingly being accepted as a viable alternative to hospital admission. Evidence from the US and Australian health care systems has shown that acute care at home for older people is safe and the outcomes are at times better than when older people are admitted. Caring of people at home, particularly older people, puts an increased burden of expectation on the next of kin (family members; however, this burden appears to be offset by the reduction in the inconvenience that admission to hospital brings. In many cases, family members highlight the positives of home-based care, such as the convenience, increased contact, and in the case of people with long-term conditions, return of independence and socialization. However, we know little about the perceptions of family members to the ever-increasing possibilities of medically managing people at home, and future research needs to take this into account and to consider their views, as well as those of the people in receipt of care. Keywords: telehealth, health care, acute care, hospital at home

  17. Raising The Standard: Palliative Care In Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meier, Diane E; Lim, Betty; Carlson, Melissa D.A

    2010-01-01

    ... from palliative care. Indeed, we would argue that the growing acceptance of the culture-change movement centered on elder-directed goals in nursing homes is promising evidence of the goodness-of-fit of palliative care principles in the long-term care setting. More than 70 percent of long-stay residents in nursing homes are elderly and have moderate-t...

  18. Integrated planning tool for optimisation in municipal home care

    OpenAIRE

    Røhne, Mette; Sandåker, Torjus; Ausen, Dag; Grut, Lisbet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to improve collaboration and enhance quality of care services in municipal, home care services by implementing and developing an integrated planning tool making use of optimisation technology for better decision support. The project will through piloting and action based research establish knowledge on change in work processes to improve collaboration and efficiency. Context: A planning tool called Spider has been piloted in home care in Horten municipality since 201...

  19. Home-based care for reducing morbidity and mortality in people infected with HIV/AIDS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Young, TN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available differences in HIV stigma, worry and physical functioning but no differences in depressive symptoms, mood, general health, and overall functioning. Comprehensive case management by trans- professional teams compared to usual care by primary care nurses had... computers with brochures/nothing/standard medical care found no significant effect on health status, and decision-making confidence and skill, but a reduction in social isolation after controlling for depression. Two trials evaluating home exercise...

  20. Medical Care International: turning around.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerone, J R

    1987-01-01

    Medical Care International operates the largest chain of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers in the United States. The company's ambitious expansion program during its 1981-2 start-up stage had to be scaled back drastically when extended deep losses were experienced. Centers with the highest losses were sold, and improvements in the management of the remaining units were implemented in 1984 and 1985. These measures, including forging sounder relationships with local physicians, effected a turnaround leading to the company's first year of profitable operations in 1986. Recent favorable developments in Medicare reimbursement practices and industry trends paint a bright picture for the company's future.

  1. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Haeson Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions.Description of integrated practice: An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues.Early results: The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased.Conclusion: Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients.

  2. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients' health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Fraser Health's case manager-general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients.

  3. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Haeson Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice: An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results: The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased. Conclusion: Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients.

  4. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  5. Technology Solutions to Support Care Continuity in Home Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn W; Russell, David; Onorato, Nicole; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2017-09-01

    Elevated hospital readmission rates from home care are an indicator of poor care quality, and rates are particularly high for patients with heart failure. Readmissions may be avoided by optimizing continuity of care. To explore perceptions among home care clinicians of the barriers they face and the information they need to improve care continuity for patients with heart failure. Focus groups were conducted with teams of home care clinicians at a large certified home healthcare agency in the Northeastern United states. In total, there were 61 participants across 6 focus groups. Three overarching themes emerged: continuity of care and communication on care transitions, maintaining continuity of care during a home care episode (with subthemes tracking signs and symptoms and patient teaching), and health information technology (HIT) characteristics to support communication and care continuity. Our study highlights areas of improvement for HIT solutions that could support care delivery for patients with heart failure in a home care setting. Home care agencies planning to introduce technology can use these findings to assess if and how potential systems can support nurses to provide continuity of care across healthcare organizations and home care visits.

  6. Home care as change of the technical-assistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kênia Lara; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; Feuerwerker, Laura Camargo Macruz; Merhy, Emerson Elias

    2010-02-01

    To analyze home care practices of outpatient and hospital services and their constitution as a substitute healthcare network. A qualitative study was carried out using tracer methodology to analyze four outpatient home care services from the Municipal Health Department and one service from a philanthropic hospital in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. The following procedures were carried out: interviews with the home care services' managers and teams, analysis of documents and follow-up of cases, holding interviews with patients and caregivers. The analysis was guided by the analytical categories home care integration into the healthcare network and technical-assistance model. Home care implementation was preceded by a political-institutional decision, both with a rationalizing orientation, intending to promote cost reduction, and also with the aim of carrying out the technical-assistance rearrangement of the healthcare networks. These two types of orientation were found to be in conflict, which implies difficulties for conciliating interests of the different players involved in the network, and also the creation of shared management spaces. It was possible to identify technological innovation and families' autonomy in the implementation of the healthcare projects. The teams proved to be cohesive, constructing, in the daily routine, new forms of integrating different perspectives so as to transform the healthcare practices. Challenges were observed in the proposal of integrating the different substitutive healthcare services, as the home care services' capacity to change the technical-assistance model is limited. Home care has potential for constituting a substitutive network by producing new care modalities that cross the projects of users, family members, social network, and home care professionals. Home care as a substitute healthcare modality requires political, conceptual and operational sustainability, as well as

  7. Dementia Home Care Resources: How Are We Managing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Ward-Griffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the number of people living with dementia expected to more than double within the next 25 years, the demand for dementia home care services will increase. In this critical ethnographic study, we drew upon interview and participant data with persons with dementia, family caregivers, in-home providers, and case managers in nine dementia care networks to examine the management of dementia home care resources. Three interrelated, dialectical themes were identified: (1 finite formal care-inexhaustible familial care, (2 accessible resources rhetoric-Iinaccessible resources reality, and (3 diminishing care resources-increasing care needs. The development of policies and practices that provide available, accessible, and appropriate resources, ensuring equitable, not necessarily equal, distribution of dementia care resources is required if we are to meet the goal of aging in place now and in the future.

  8. [Terminal patient home care: the family caregivers perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Quintana, Alberto Manuel; Denardin-Budó, Maria de Lourdes; de Moraes, Natália de Andrade; Lüdtke, Manoela Fonseca; Cassel, Paula Argemi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at getting to know the relationships built among patients, family caregivers and the health care team, during home care,from the perspective of the family caregiver It is a qualitative study with 11 family caregivers of terminal patients, registered on a home care service of a university hospital in the South of Brazil. Data collection was carried out through narrative interviews that were recorded transcribed and analyzed through content analysis. Three categories were built from data analysis: relationships among the family caregiver, the patient and the health care team; awareness of the patient's terminal condition. the caregiver's perspective; and situation in which patients are unaware of their terminal condition. They approach how the home care relationships are established among the caregivers, such as health care professionals and family caregivers, and the people who are taken care of such as the patients, highlighting the importance of communication in such care related context.

  9. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes [Beschreibung und Bewertung der fachärztlichen Versorgung von Pflegeheimbewohnern in Deutschland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balzer, Katrin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate.[german] Es wird die Versorgung in Pflegeheimen auf Basis wissenschaftlicher Studien untersucht. Schwerpunkte der Analyse sind Demenz und Diabetes. Es gibt Hinweise auf fachärztliche Versorgungsmängel bei Pflegeheimbewohnern mit diesen Krankheiten in Deutschland. Verglichen mit entsprechenden Leitlinien bestehen mögliche Unter- bzw. Fehlversorgungen.

  10. Developing an Adapted Cardiac Rehabilitation Training for Home Care Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Mola, Ana; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Lipman, Terri H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: There is limited evidence that home care clinicians receive education on the core competencies of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). This article describes the development and implementation of a CR training program adapted for home care clinicians, which incorporated the viewpoints of homebound patients with cardiovascular disease. Methods: Literature and guideline reviews were performed to glean curriculum content, supplemented with themes identified among patients and clinicians. Semistructured interviews were conducted with homebound patients regarding their perspectives on living with cardiovascular disease and focus groups were held with home care clinicians regarding their perspectives on caring for these patients. Transcripts were analyzed with the constant comparative method. A 15-item questionnaire was administered to home care nurses and rehabilitation therapists pre- and posttraining, and responses were analyzed using a paired sample t test. Results: Three themes emerged among patients: (1) awareness of heart disease; (2) motivation and caregivers' importance; and (3) barriers to attendance at outpatient CR; and 2 additional themes among clinicians: (4) gaps in care transitions; and (5) educational needs. Questionnaire results demonstrated significantly increased knowledge posttraining compared with pretraining among home care clinicians (pretest mean = 12.81; posttest mean = 14.63, P Home care clinicians respond well to an adapted CR training to improve care for homebound patients with cardiovascular disease. Clinicians who participated in the training demonstrated an increase in their knowledge and skills of the core competencies for CR. PMID:28033165

  11. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  12. A declaration of healthy dependence: the case of home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Elin

    2014-12-01

    Aging populations have become a major concern in the developed world and are expected to require novel care strategies. Public policies, health-care regimes and technology developers alike stress the need for a more individualized care to meet the increased demand for care services in response to demographic change. Increasingly, care services are offered to individuals with diseases and or disabilities in their homes by means of Personalized Health-Monitoring (PHM) technologies. PHM-based home care is typically portrayed as the key to a cost-effective future care that better can accommodate the needs of an aging population and promote care recipients' independence. In light of the emerging technology-based home care, this article sets forth to investigate the significance and implications of a strong emphasis on independence in relation to this novel care form. Notions of independence as used by care planners, care providers and technology developers are examined in relation to ICT-based home care and the reasonableness of independence as an aim for future health-care is critically discussed. In conclusion, the need for a shift from a strong emphasis on independence to a right to healthy dependence is advocated.

  13. Medication administration and interruptions in nursing homes: A qualitative observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odberg, Kristian Ringsby; Saetre Hansen, Britt; Aase, Karina; Wangensteen, Sigrid

    2017-10-27

    To contribute in-depth knowledge of the characteristics of medication administration and interruptions in nursing homes. The following research questions guided the study: How can the medication administration process in nursing homes be described? How can interruptions during the medication administration process in nursing homes be characterized? Medication administration is a vital process across health care settings, and earlier research in nursing homes is sparse. The medication administration process is prone to interruptions that may lead to adverse drug events. On the other hand, interruptions may also have positive effects on patient safety. A qualitative observational study design was applied. Data were collected using partial participant observations. An inductive content analysis was performed. Factors that contributed to the observed complexity of medication administration in nursing homes were the high number of single tasks, varying degree of linearity, the variability of technological solutions, demands regarding documentation, and staff's apparent freedom as to how and where to perform medication-related activities. Interruptions during medication administration are prevalent and can be characterized as passive (e.g., alarm and background noises), active (e.g., discussions), or technological interruptions (e.g., use of mobile applications). Most interruptions have negative outcomes, while some have positive outcomes. A process of normalization has taken place whereby staff put up with second-rate technological solutions, noise and interruptions when they are performing medication-related tasks. Before seeking to minimize interruptions during the medication administration process, it is important to understand the interconnectivity of the elements using a systems approach. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship among health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Ülkü; Bayrak Kahraman, Burcu; Kaynak, İlknur; Görgülü, Ümit

    2016-11-01

    The present descriptive study was carried out to determine the relationship between health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services among elderly patients. Patients aged 65 years or older staying at the surgery and internal medicine clinics were included in the study. The "Patient Introduction Form," "Short Form-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire" and "Geriatric Depression Scale" were utilized in the collection of data. In the present study, it was determined that only approximately half of elderly patients (54.9%) knew the concept of home care, most of them had not previously received home care and requested home care related to medical care. The mean scores were lower in some areas of the quality of life questionnaire in some factors that could influence home care awareness. These factors were determined as: female sex, history of falling, chronic illness, functionally, moderately or severely dependent, no previous receipt of home care and wishing to receive home care. The home care requirement of elderly patients can be influenced by many physiological, psychological and social factors that can affect their quality of life. Thus, it is of utmost importance that medical professionals evaluate the quality of life of elderly individuals and its influencing factors. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1211-1219. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Engagement of Primary Care Physicians in Home Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shiraz; Goldman, Russell; Kevork, Nanor; Wentlandt, Kirsten; Husain, Amna; Merrow, Nancy; Le, Lisa W; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    To describe prevalence and characteristics associated with family physician and general practitioner (FP/GP) provision of home palliative care (HPC). We surveyed FP/GPs in an urban health region of Ontario, Canada, to determine their current involvement in HPC, the nature of services provided, and perceived barriers and enablers. A total of 1439 surveys were mailed. Of the 302 FP/GP respondents, 295 provided replies regarding engagement in HPC: 101 of 295 (33%) provided HPC, 76 (26%) were engageable with further support, and 118 (40%) were not engageable regardless of support. The most substantial barrier was time to provide home visits (81%). Engaged FP/GPs were most likely to be working with another physician providing HPC ( P < .0001). Engageable FP/GPs were younger ( P = .007) and placed greater value on improved remuneration ( P < .001) than the other groups. Nonengageable physicians were most likely to view time as a barrier ( P < .0001) and to lack interest in PC ( P = .03). One-third of FP/GPs provide HPC. A cohort of younger physicians could be engageable with adequate support. Integrated practices including collaboration with specialist PC colleagues should be encouraged and supported.

  16. "Could We Hold Hands?" Older Lesbian and Gay Couples' Perceptions of Long-Term Care Homes and Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlotte, Charles; Gladstone, James W; Cosby, Robert F; Fitzgerald, Kerri-Ann

    2016-12-01

    This qualitative study describes expectations, concerns, and needs regarding long-term care (LTC) homes and home care services of 12 older lesbian and gay couples living in Canada. Our findings reflect four major themes: discrimination, identity, expenditure of energy, and nuanced care. Discrimination involved concerns about covert discrimination; loss of social buffers as one ages; and diminished ability to advocate for oneself and one's partner. Identity involved anticipated risk over disclosing one's sexual identity; the importance of being identified within a coupled relationship; and the importance of access to reference groups of other gay seniors. We conclude that partners were burdened by the emotional effort expended to hide parts of their identity, assess their environments for discrimination, and to placate others. Nuanced care involved a mutual level of comfort experienced by participants and their health care providers. These themes inform understandings of LTC homes and home care services for lesbian and gay older couples.

  17. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care

    OpenAIRE

    Nils Olof Hedman; Roine Johansson; Urban Rosenqvist

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Method: Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289). Results: Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The mode...

  18. User friendliness aspects of home care telematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzouranis, E C

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease with a high number of admissions and emergency room visits in pediatric hospitals. Treatment of asthmatic patients is best done by asthma specialists and requires the chronic use of prophylactic medications, additional treatment for acute exacerbations and regular check-ups. In Crete, a Greek island, there are many children with asthma who are not receiving care by an asthma specialist. The only specialty clinic for asthmatic children in Crete is in Heraklion, a city in the center of the island. We attempted to use telemedicine in order to reach and follow children with asthma who live in distant areas in Crete. We set up a pilot telemedicine program with 10 asthmatic children already followed at the Specialty Clinic. Using teleconferencing techniques, we were able to obtain the medical history, examine the patients, educate them about the disease and adjust the treatment. The parents of patients accepted the telemedicine service with a percentage of 90% and showed a special interest in this new service. We conclude that telemedicine for asthmatic children performed by their specialist is feasible and accepted by the majority of patients.

  19. Patient Health Goals Elicited During Home Care Admission: A Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Chou, Edgar Y; Wojciechowicz, Christine

    2017-11-01

    Home care agencies are initiating "patient health goal elicitation" activities as part of home care admission planning. We categorized elicited goals and identified "clinically informative" goals at a home care agency. We examined patient goals that admitting clinicians documented in the point-of-care electronic health record; conducted content analysis on patient goal data to develop a coding scheme; grouped goal themes into codes; assigned codes to each goal; and identified goals that were in the patient voice. Of the 1,763 patient records, 16% lacked a goal; only 15 goals were in a patient's voice. Nurse and physician experts identified 12 of the 20 codes as clinically important accounting for 82% of goal occurrences. The most frequent goal documented was safety/falls (23%). Training and consistent communication of the intent and operationalization of patient goal elicitation may address the absence of patient voice and the less than universal recording of home care patients' goals.

  20. Institutional versus at-home long term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, P; Pitkala, K; Lees, C

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of functionally dependent older people require care and medical treatment. Increasingly governments are shifting resources into community care expecting both reduction in costs and improvement in the quality of care. However, it is difficult to establish the costs and benefits of institutional and the alternative at-home care. To assess the effects of institutional versus at-home care for functionally dependent older people on health outcomes, satisfaction (of functionally dependent older people, relatives and health care professionals), quality of care and costs. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (1999), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), Best Evidence (1990 to 1999), Ageline (1982 to 1999), Cinahl (1982 to 1999), EconLit (1969 to 1999), PsycInfo (1887 to 1999), NTIS (1980 to 1999), Scisearch (1980 to 1999), Sigle (1980 to 1999), and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. We contacted authors working in the field in an attempt to identify unpublished studies. Randomised trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies where functionally dependent older people were assigned to either institutional or at-home care. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. No meta analysis was conducted as only one trial was identified. One study was included involving 112 people. This evaluated a community care programme (CCP) organising foster care versus nursing home care. No studies were found where functionally dependent older people returned to their own homes. The included trial was small and of poor methodological quality. No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing functioning (ADL and IADL), mental status, attitudes to perceived health, life satisfaction or mortality. There is

  1. WITHDRAWN: Institutional versus at-home long term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, P; Pitkala, K; Lees, C

    2007-10-17

    An increasing number of functionally dependent older people require care and medical treatment. Increasingly governments are shifting resources into community care expecting both reduction in costs and improvement in the quality of care. However, it is difficult to establish the costs and benefits of institutional and the alternative at-home care. To assess the effects of institutional versus at-home care for functionally dependent older people on health outcomes, satisfaction (of functionally dependent older people, relatives and health care professionals), quality of care and costs. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (1999), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), Best Evidence (1990 to 1999), Ageline (1982 to 1999), Cinahl (1982 to 1999), EconLit (1969 to 1999), PsycInfo (1887 to 1999), NTIS (1980 to 1999), Scisearch (1980 to 1999), Sigle (1980 to 1999), and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. We contacted authors working in the field in an attempt to identify unpublished studies. Randomised trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies where functionally dependent older people were assigned to either institutional or at-home care. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. No meta analysis was conducted as only one trial was identified. One study was included involving 112 people. This evaluated a community care programme (CCP) organising foster care versus nursing home care. No studies were found where functionally dependent older people returned to their own homes. The included trial was small and of poor methodological quality. No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing functioning (ADL and IADL), mental status, attitudes to perceived health, life satisfaction or mortality. There is

  2. A study on development of a home health care support information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Horio, H; Nakazawa, K; Ishikawa, K; Tashiro, Y; Matsumura, K; Aso, S; Hosaka, H

    1998-01-01

    As the need for home health care has been increasing with the rising number of the elderly in Japan, the application of medical informatics to home health care delivery is considered to be useful. Therefore, development of a home health care support information system was planned. The system can collect patient's PHD (Personal Health Data) such as data of ECG, complaints, etc. at patient's home and can send the PHD to medical facilities. We designed and constructed two subsystems on a trial basis. One subsystem has function of gathering, recording and transmitting vital signs of the aged such as ECG, physical activity rate, oxygen saturation rate in arterial blood. Another subsystem can collect and send image data of the old people at their home. Experiments for trial use of the system was conducted and it was recognized that the PHD can be smoothly collected and recorded at home of the elderly and can be sent to the medical facilities with good success by using the system.

  3. [Utility of Smartphone in Home Care Medicine - First Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshige, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Chiho; Nakagawa, Midori; Yoshioka, Rentaro

    2015-12-01

    The use of video calls for home care can reduce anxiety and offer patients peace of mind. The most suitable terminals at facilities to support home care have been iPad Air and iPhone with FaceTime software. However, usage has been limited to specific terminals. In order to eliminate the need for special terminals and software, we have developed a program that has been customized to meet the needs of facilities using Web Real Time Communication(WebRTC)in cooperation with the University of Aizu. With this software, video calls can accommodate the large number of home care patients.

  4. [A consideration of the support for terminal care at the private skilled nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arao, Yuki; Sasabe, Mayako; Yamada, Yukari; Motoyama, Yuki; Morita, Katsuko; Kawazoe, Masahiro; Ono, Yoshiharu

    2009-12-01

    The increase in the number of residents in elderly care facilities has developed into a growing demand for home-based terminal care rather than treatments at medical institutions. Like many others, the Active Life Toyonaka (private skilled nursing home) has received more requests from its residents for adequate terminal care. It is unfortunate, however, that quite a few residents are obliged to be hospitalized for medical reasons that result in death. The purpose of our study is to determine what a terminal care should be like in a private skilled nursing home. The study has been conducted with the focuse on the successful case of a 90-year-old male resident diagnosed as having prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Our study has concluded that the crucial factors for a better terminal care should go as follows: (1) Having good coordination with medical institutions, (2) Reporting every change in residents' condition and administering an immediate treatment for alleviating pains of the residents, (3) Providing the residents with comfortable life of less restraint on activities in home-based care, (4) Sharing the same information among the staff of all divisions who is in charge of residents (doctors, nurses, caregivers, etc.) and (5) Establishing relationships of mutual trust with residents and their families. Nurses, especially, need to play important roles as coordinators among all the personnel concerned.

  5. The economies of scale for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wu; Shea, Dennis G

    2004-03-01

    Using a modified hybrid short-term operating cost function and a national sample of nursing homes in 1994, the authors examined the scale economies of nursing home care. The results show that scale economies exist for Medicare postacute care, with an elasticity of -0.15 and an optimal scale of around 4,000 patient days annually. However, more than 68 percent of nursing homes in the analytic sample produced Medicare days at a level below the optimal scale. The financial pressures resulting from the implementation of a prospective payment system for Medicare skilled nursing facilities may further reduce the quantity of Medicare days served by nursing homes. In addition, the results show that chain-owned nursing homes do not have lower short-term operating costs than do independent facilities. This indicates that the rationale behind recent increasing horizontal integration among nursing homes may not be seeking greater cost efficiency but some other consideration.

  6. Supersmart homes: a new meaning for home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S; Larsen, L

    1999-10-01

    In 1908, when four nurses first began to deliver inhome nursing services in Toronto, Ontario, no one realized the organization would experience so much change and opportunity to enhance the care provided to clients and their families. Now, almost a century later, information and communications technologies are enabling an entirely different way of providing health services and supports, including information that promotes self management and more control for clients over their own health and health care.

  7. Home Care of Children With Diarrhea in Bangui's Therapeutic Landscape (Central African Republic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles-Vernick, Tamara; Bainilago, Louis; Fofana, Moussa; Bata, Petulla; Vray, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore how the therapeutic landscape of Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic, shaped and reflected caregivers' home care of childhood diarrhea. Using interviews, group discussions, and participant observation, we found that caregivers described several categories of diarrhea, but in practice, adopted an experimental approach to home diarrheal care. Many managed incertitude by initially dosing children with street medicines and herbal infusions; they delayed seeking professional medical care to avoid expenses, observed their children's symptoms, consulted social networks, and used therapeutic foods. The logics underpinning these practices emerged from caregivers' conviction that diarrhea necessitated medical therapy and restricted choices within Bangui's therapeutic landscape, a consequence of lengthy political economic crisis. This crisis impoverished Bangui populations, eroded formal health care, and sharpened religious differences, discouraging care seeking from traditional healers. Analyses of therapeutic landscapes illuminate why caregivers embraced specific practices and logics and should guide the elaboration of more effective public health interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Home care technology through an ability expectation lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbring, Gregor; Lashewicz, Bonnie

    2014-06-20

    Home care is on the rise, and its delivery is increasingly reliant on an expanding variety of health technologies ranging from computers to telephone "health apps" to social robots. These technologies are most often predicated on expectations that people in their homes (1) can actively interact with these technologies and (2) are willing to submit to the action of the technology in their home. Our purpose is to use an "ability expectations" lens to bring together, and provide some synthesis of, the types of utility and disadvantages that can arise for people with disabilities in relation to home care technology development and use. We searched the academic databases Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO ALL, IEEE Xplore, and Compendex to collect articles that had the term "home care technology" in the abstract or as a topic (in the case of Web of Science). We also used our background knowledge and related academic literature pertaining to self-diagnosis, health monitoring, companionship, health information gathering, and care. We examined background articles and articles collected through our home care technology search in terms of ability expectations assumed in the presentation of home care technologies, or discussed in relation to home care technologies. While advances in health care support are made possible through emerging technologies, we urge critical examination of such technologies in terms of implications for the rights and dignity of people with diverse abilities. Specifically, we see potential for technologies to result in new forms of exclusion and powerlessness. Ableism influences choices made by funders, policy makers, and the public in the development and use of home health technologies and impacts how people with disabilities are served and how useful health support technologies will be for them. We urge continued critical examination of technology development and use according to ability expectations, and we recommend increasing incorporation of

  9. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged...... to their home before they have sufficiently recovered, but knowledge within this area is sparse. In particular the experience of older people is yet to be explored. The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experiences of being back home after a stay in an IC unit. Data were drawn from 12 interviews....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...

  10. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  11. HOME BASED CARE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of poor practice of Home Based. Care and hospital re-admission of PLWHA ... Therefore HBC Training is important for family members who are taking care of their relatives ..... Relationships of believed attitude of HBC among family care givers and Hospital re- admission of PLWHA. Hospital re-admission.

  12. Medication kits for managing symptomatic emergencies in the home: a survey of common hospice practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Margaret F; Stephens, Lisa; Goodrich, Martha; Byock, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Alleviation of symptoms associated with advanced illness and dying is a fundamental goal and core principle of palliative care. Little research exists regarding hospice programs' practices for prescribing, dispensing, and utilizing medication kits in the home for management of uncontrolled symptoms. We conducted a telephone survey of all 22 agencies in New Hampshire providing home hospice care. The survey inquired about the timing of medication kit ordering and availability, characteristics of prescribers and pharmacies, kit contents, costs, frequency of use, and perceived impact of kits. All programs' kits contained medications to treat pain and dyspnea, 81% for nausea and vomiting, and 76% for seizures. Eighty-six percent of agencies (18/21) reported that a medication within the kits was used in more than 50% of cases. Eighty-six percent reported the kits often averted hospital or emergency department visits. Oral, sublingual, and rectal routes of administration were common as was topical preparations of combination medications. Three programs included parenteral morphine in kits. Kits cost less than $50 for the majority of programs. Hospice programs commonly utilize kits containing prescription medications for the purpose of managing uncontrolled symptoms in the home. There is considerable variation in kit contents and practice. Programs believe that kits diminish emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Research is needed to more fully describe and study the outcomes of these practices.

  13. Association of Healthy Home Environments and Use of Patient-Centered Medical Homes by Children of Low-Income Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Phillips, Victoria L; Gaydos, Laura M; Joski, Peter

    Medicaid agencies have been promoting the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. Most caregivers choose physician practices for their children, and we hypothesized that those following healthier childrearing practices are more likely to seek care in a PCMH. We selected children with public insurance plans (n = 20,801) from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. We used generalized ordinal logistic regression with state fixed effects to assess the association between home environments and children's use of PCMHs. Children living in the healthiest homes were 1.33 times (p = .001) more likely to receive care from the highest level of PCMH. In states with early PCMH implementation, the odds increased to 2.11 times (p = .001). Our results show a significant, sizeable relationship between healthier home environments and the use of PCMH by children from low-income families. They provide implications for assessing the effect of PCMH use on health outcomes and use patterns. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical help summoned quickly. Consider keeping a patient journal near your child's bed so that nurses and family members can communicate about various issues. previous continue Types of Medical Equipment Various medical ...

  15. Negotiating and valuing spaces: The discourse of space and 'home' in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkmann, Andrea; Poland, Fiona; Burns, Diane; Hyde, Paula; Killett, Anne

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how space in care homes is experienced and negotiated by people who live and work in them. The analysis of qualitative data of five in-depth case studies of care homes in England revealed three key ways in which space is negotiated: a) the way in which values affect interactions inside versus outside the care home environment, b) the negotiation of boundaries and domains within the homes, and c) the sense of being at 'home'. The paper illuminates how the design of the buildings and organisational factors can reinforce or bridge dichotomies between inside and outside spaces. Residents' abilities to re-negotiate boundaries, domains and communal spaces within homes are shown to be affected by organisational factors such as priorities of staff members. Despite 'home' being a common discourse, the spaces within care homes were often organised, ordered and experienced as two distinct, co-present worlds: the dwelling place of residents and the workplace of staff. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The incidence of depression and its risk factors in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, M.; Joling, K.J.; Dussel, M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Frijters, D.H.M.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Nijpels, G.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is known that depression is highly prevalent in institutionalized older adults, little is known about its incidence and risk factors in nursing homes and residential care homes. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the incidence and associated risk factors for

  17. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeden, Karin; Moeke, Dennis; Bekker, René

    2016-09-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible for the daily care of the residents and account for a significant proportion of the total labor expenses. In practice, the lack of reliable data makes it difficult for nursing home managers to make informed staffing decisions. The focus of this study lies on the 'care on demand' process in a Belgian nursing home. Based on the analysis of real-life 'call button' data, a queueing model is presented which can be used by nursing home managers to determine the number of care workers required to meet a specific service level. Based on numerical experiments an 80/10 service level is proposed for this nursing home, meaning that at least 80 percent of the clients should receive care within 10 minutes after a call button request. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to develop a quantitative model for the 'care on demand' process in a nursing home.

  18. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  19. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only)

  20. Handbook of Smart Homes, Health Care and Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; George Demiris; Eveline Wouters

    2017-01-01

    Smart homes, home automation and ambient-assisted living are terms used to describe technological systems that enrich our living environment and provide means to support care, facilitate well-being and improve comfort. This handbook provides an overview of the domain from the perspective of health

  1. Veterans Medical Care: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    construction of state- owned nursing homes and domiciliary facilities and collaborates with the Department of Defense (DOD) in sharing health care ... domiciliary care , or travel for family members of veterans receiving mental health services from the VA except for such travel performed beyond a 100-mile...institutional respite care , geriatric evaluation, adult day healthcare - $15 per day; domiciliary care - $5 per day) Priority Group 1 (service

  2. Restraint Use in Older Adults Receiving Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepmans, Kristien; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Paquay, Louis; Van Gansbeke, Hendrik; Milisen, Koen

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence, types, frequency, and duration of restraint use in older adults receiving home nursing care and to determine factors involved in the decision-making process for restraint use and application. Cross-sectional survey of restraint use in older adults receiving home care completed by primary care nurses. Homes of older adults receiving care from a home nursing organization in Belgium. Randomized sample of older adults receiving home care (N = 6,397; mean age 80.6; 66.8% female). For each participant, nurses completed an investigator-constructed and -validated questionnaire collecting information demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics and aspects of restraint use. A broad definition of restraint was used that includes a range of restrictive actions. Restraints were used in 24.7% of the participants, mostly on a daily basis (85%) and often for a long period (54.5%, 24 h/d). The most common reason for restraint use was safety (50.2%). Other reasons were that the individual wanted to remain at home longer, which necessitated the use of restraints (18.2%) and to provide respite for the informal caregiver (8.6%). The latter played an important role in the decision and application process. The physician was less involved in the process. In 64.5% of cases, there was no evaluation after restraint use was initiated. Use of restraints is common in older adults receiving home care nursing in Belgium. These results contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of use of restraints in home care, a situation that may be even more complex than in nursing homes and acute hospital settings. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care - a focus group study from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-31

    Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice. Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance. There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.

  4. Examining satisfaction with live-in foreign home care in Israel from the perspectives of care recipients, their family members, and their foreign home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2011-04-01

    This pilot study evaluates satisfaction with foreign home care arrangement from the perspectives of older adults, their family members, and their foreign home care workers. A matched cross-sectional sample of 148 family members and foreign home care workers and 90 older care recipients completed a satisfaction survey in the years 2007-2008. Foreign home care workers' satisfaction was directly associated with family members' and care recipients' satisfaction. In addition, the well-being of older care recipients and foreign home care workers was directly associated with their satisfaction with this arrangement. Finally, there was an inverse association between care recipients' cognitive functioning and family members' satisfaction. This study demonstrates the complex associations between the various stakeholders involved in this caregiving arrangement. It is possible that better working conditions would result in improved satisfaction with services of all parties involved.

  5. Palliative home care: A designer′s perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tigmanshu Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development...

  6. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment......, as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory...

  7. Invisible Elderly in Danish and Swedish Residential Care Home Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E Andersson, Jonas; Grangaard, Sidse

    2015-01-01

    This study of two architectural competitions suggests that the fit between architectural design and older users, who depend on regular caregiving due to cognitive or functional disabilities, requires a particular consideration when designing new residential care homes....

  8. [The Home Care Doctor Today is "STRIKE" - Considering Care of Terminal Stage Patients with Cancer through a Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Miyoko; Yamaoka, Keita; Fujimaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsuko; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2015-12-01

    Although many patients wish to remain in their familiar home environment while undergoing cancer treatment, many obstacles prevent a patient from receiving cancer care at home. With early-stage cancer, the patients may better accept the diagnosis and have a greater will to fight the illness. However as time proceeds, progression or recurrence of cancer may occur, and eventually, proactive treatments will not be available. This progression results in great physical and mental strain on the patients and their family. At all stages of such progression, opportunities exist for a care provider to assist with overcoming potential obstacles by openly communicating with the patients, talking through the patients' experiences, and understanding their feelings. However, on diagnosis, cancer patients must often face the reality that they have very little time left to live. When transiting medical care from their long-trusted hospital to a home care base, a new physician must be selected and other decisions related to their care must be quickly made. Transferring responsibility to a good home care provider can greatly influence a patient's emotional state. This paper reports one such case in which the patients died in their homes with the best comfort and possible outcome.