WorldWideScience

Sample records for home environmental building

  1. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, S.

    Whenever we shop, the products we consider buying are labelled with the economical price we have to pay if we want to purchase them - an important parameter in our decisions as purchasers. The increrasing awareness for environmental limits and backlashes of human activities also in the building...... sector have fostered the wish to define 'the ecological price' of a building as a help for environmental conscious decision-making. In a social constructivist approach this Ph.D. thesis looks across and beyond the manifold existing approaches for environmental indicators for buildings. It acknowledges...... that among the relevant actors in the building sector the scientific view is only one perspective among others. This study combines natural-scientific knowledge with social-scientific knowledge, obtained in a close co-operation with actors in the building sector in Denmark and a research period...

  2. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven

    2004-01-01

    Environmental Indicators for Buildings are studied using two different perspectives: with a technological, environmental scientific departing point and with a social scientific departing point. Different relevant groups in the building sector are identified and analysed, using the Social...... Construction Of Technology theory as a frame for the studies. It is concluded that it is not possible to develop a common set of indicators that all the central actors in the building sector find acceptable - at least not in a near future. Different sets of solutions are, however, outlined in the thesis...

  3. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven

    Environmental Indicators for Buildings are studied using two different perspectives: with a technological, environmental scientific departing point and with a social scientific departing point. Different relevant groups in the building sector are identified and analysed, using the Social...... Construction Of Technology theory as a frame for the studies. It is concluded that it is not possible to develop a common set of indicators that all the central actors in the building sector find acceptable - at least not in a near future. Different sets of solutions are, however, outlined in the thesis...

  4. Building Transdisciplinary Environmental Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper

    We will in this paper approach the challenge of building integrated environmental studies by presenting a crude frame of analysis which take into account both the physical aspects and the social-discursive articulations of environmental problems. This framework partly mirrors the approach of our ...

  5. Building Transdisciplinary Environmental Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper

    We will in this paper approach the challenge of building integrated environmental studies by presenting a crude frame of analysis which take into account both the physical aspects and the social-discursive articulations of environmental problems. This framework partly mirrors the approach of our...... department (Dept. of Environment, Technology and Social Studies, Roskilde University), and has originally in another version been presented in the book “Miljøregulering - tværvidenskabelige studier (Environmental Regulation. Interdisciplinary Studies)” (Holm, Kjærgård & Pedersen eds. 1997, in Danish) written...

  6. Teaching Home Environmental Health to Resident Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Zickafoose, Joseph S.; Greenberg, Stuart; Dorr G Dearborn

    2011-01-01

    Healthy Homes programs seek to integrate the evaluation and management of a multitude of health and safety risks in households. The education of physicians in the identification, evaluation, and management of these home health and safety issues continues to be deficient. Healthy Homes programs represent a unique opportunity to educate physicians in the home environment and stimulate ongoing, specific patient-physician discussions and more general learning about home environmental health. The ...

  7. Lifetime environmental impact of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Mequignon, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work discusses the impact of the life of buildings on? sustainable development methods.?The study of the lifespan of the building is used to assess and?manage the environmental impacts associated?with all the stages of a product's life, from raw material extraction?through to repair, maintenance and?? 'end of life' scenarios. While several papers have discussed thegreenhouse gas emissions of buildings,?less research has been done on how these are affected by the lifespan?of the building. This book serves to?highlight the pertinence of this factor and contributes to providing?new ideas on

  8. Building Energy Model Development for Retrofit Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasar, David; McIlvaine, Janet; Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-09-30

    Based on previous research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Florida Solar Energy Center providing technical assistance to implement 22 deep energy retrofits across the nation, 6 homes were selected in Florida and Texas for detailed post-retrofit energy modeling to assess realized energy savings (Chandra et al, 2012). However, assessing realized savings can be difficult for some homes where pre-retrofit occupancy and energy performance are unknown. Initially, savings had been estimated using a HERS Index comparison for these homes. However, this does not account for confounding factors such as occupancy and weather. This research addresses a method to more reliably assess energy savings achieved in deep energy retrofits for which pre-retrofit utility bills or occupancy information in not available. A metered home, Riverdale, was selected as a test case for development of a modeling procedure to account occupancy and weather factors, potentially creating more accurate estimates of energy savings. This “true up” procedure was developed using Energy Gauge USA software and post-retrofit homeowner information and utility bills. The 12 step process adjusts the post-retrofit modeling results to correlate with post-retrofit utility bills and known occupancy information. The “trued” post retrofit model is then used to estimate pre-retrofit energy consumption by changing the building efficiency characteristics to reflect the pre-retrofit condition, but keeping all weather and occupancy-related factors the same. This creates a pre-retrofit model that is more comparable to the post-retrofit energy use profile and can improve energy savings estimates. For this test case, a home for which pre- and post- retrofit utility bills were available was selected for comparison and assessment of the accuracy of the “true up” procedure. Based on the current method, this procedure is quite time intensive. However, streamlined processing spreadsheets or

  9. Impact of tall buildings in environmental pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hayati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, tall building is a phenomenon that the world particularly large cities are facing. The tall buildings in order to exploit the land with having the negative affects in the environment create new problems including increasing congestion population, environmental pollution, reduce citizen access to fresh air and sunlight. However, regarding to population increasing and land shortage, tall buildings could not be avoided. This paper investigates the relationship of tall buildings with urban air pollution as well as the possible reducing of negative affects of tall building on environmental pollution with respect to geographical position, technicalrules, immunization, green space, direct of wind, appropriate distance to other buildings, design in terms of visibility and landscape and urban appearance were reviewed. The study showed that the tall buildings cause increasing the air pollution in large urban area due to changing in wind and its direction and also congestion of tall buildings as a pollution sources. Therefore some techniques to design the tall building must be considered to reduce the negative affects of the tall buildings on environmental pollution. Unfortunately the lack of the construction roles in term of environmental protection and also control of the rules in construction process causing the environmental pollution particularly air pollution. It is suggested that the re-evaluate of the rules with restricted control can improve the air quality in the large cities and also utilization of green spaces in floors and roofs of buildings as environmentally friendly buildings which are attempt to reduce environmental problems.

  10. Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Andresen, Inger; Perino, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Significant improvement have been achieved on efficiency improvements of specific building elements like the building envelope and building equipment and services and whilst most building elements still offer opportunities for efficiency improvements, the greatest future potential lie...... with technologies that promote the integration of responsive building elements and building services in integrated building concepts. In order to address some of these issues an international research effort, IEA-ECBCS Annex 44 has been initiated. The paper especially presents the annex activities regarding...... development of Energy and Environmental Building concepts including discussion of the selected design strategy and technical solutions, the integrated design approach and design methods and tools....

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    Building homes that are zero energy-ready is a goal of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America program and one embodied in Building America’s premier home certification program, the Challenge Home program. This case study describes several examples of successful zero energy-ready home projects completed by Building America teams and partner builders.

  12. The Home Depot Upgrades its Corporate Building Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    The Home Depot partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  13. Impact of tall buildings in environmental pollution

    OpenAIRE

    H. Hayati; M.H. Sayadi

    2012-01-01

    Today, tall building is a phenomenon that the world particularly large cities are facing. The tall buildings in order to exploit the land with having the negative affects in the environment create new problems including increasing congestion population, environmental pollution, reduce citizen access to fresh air and sunlight. However, regarding to population increasing and land shortage, tall buildings could not be avoided. This paper investigates the relationship of tall buildings with urban...

  14. Final report [Homes Tours and Green Building Program Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacRae, Lani

    2000-06-28

    The US Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs sponsored EcoTecture Solutions, Inc. (dba Sustainable Living Alliance {trademark}) in producing two home tours showcasing energy- and resource-efficient buildings in Austin, Texas, held on October 16, 1999, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, held on May 20, 2000. Lists are given of the notable building technologies, passive solar design features, and energy- and water-efficient technologies and design employed in the houses. There were over 1200 visitors to the 22 residential and 3 commercial buildings included in the tour.

  15. Building dynamic spatial environmental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    An environmental model is a representation or imitation of complex natural phenomena that can be discerned by human cognitive processes. This thesis deals with the type of environmental models referred to as dynamic spatial environmental models. The word ‘spatial’ refers to the geographic domain whi

  16. Better jobs, better care: building the home care work force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surpin, R; Haslanger, K; Dawson, S

    1994-08-01

    home health care practice. Part III Building the home care service around home care aide requires redesigning the paraprofessinal's job in 5 ways: 1. Make work pay, by providing a minimum of $7.50 per hour and a decent benefits package.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  17. Green home building workshop offered for homeowners, construction specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Cooperative Extension, the Department of Wood Science and Forest Products in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service will host an evening workshop entitled "Green Home Building for Homeowners, Construction Specialists, Entrepreneurs, and Educators" on April 8 in Abingdon, Va.

  18. Building characteristics that determine moisture in 105 Danish homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Sofie; Møller, Eva B.; Bräuner, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    that increase risk of indoor dampness and assess how well self-reported dampness correlates with measured values. Three methods of moisture assessment were undertaken in 105 houses and building characteristics and occupancy behaviour were determined. Around 25% of the homes had moisture problems. Geographical...

  19. Environmental Impact of Buildings--What Matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeren, Niko; Mutel, Christopher L; Steubing, Bernhard; Ostermeyer, York; Wallbaum, Holger; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2015-08-18

    The goal of this study was to identify drivers of environmental impact and quantify their influence on the environmental performance of wooden and massive residential and office buildings. We performed a life cycle assessment and used thermal simulation to quantify operational energy demand and to account for differences in thermal inertia of building mass. Twenty-eight input parameters, affecting operation, design, material, and exogenic building properties were sampled in a Monte Carlo analysis. To determine sensitivity, we calculated the correlation between each parameter and the resulting life cycle inventory and impact assessment scores. Parameters affecting operational energy demand and energy conversion are the most influential for the building's total environmental performance. For climate change, electricity mix, ventilation rate, heating system, and construction material rank the highest. Thermal inertia results in an average 2-6% difference in heat demand. Nonrenewable cumulative energy demand of wooden buildings is 18% lower, compared to a massive variant. Total cumulative energy demand is comparable. The median climate change impact is 25% lower, including end-of-life material credits and 22% lower, when credits are excluded. The findings are valid for small offices and residential buildings in Switzerland and regions with similar building culture, construction material production, and climate.

  20. Building better environmental risk assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eLayton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment is a reasoned, structured approach to address uncertainty based on scientific and technical evidence. It forms the foundation for regulatory decision making, which is bound by legislative and policy requirements, as well as the need for making timely decisions using available resources. In order to be most useful, environmental risk assessments (ERA for genetically modified (GM crops should provide consistent, reliable, and transparent results across all types of GM crops, traits, and environments. The assessments must also separate essential information from scientific or agronomic data of marginal relevance or value for evaluating risk and complete the assessment in a timely fashion. Challenges in conducting ERAs differ across regulatory systems – examples are presented from Canada, Malaysia, and Argentina. One challenge faced across the globe is the conduct of risk assessments with limited resources. This challenge can be overcome by clarifying risk concepts, placing greater emphasis on data critical to assess environmental risk (for example, phenotypic and plant performance data rather than molecular data, and adapting advances in risk analysis from other relevant disciplines.

  1. Environmental Radiation Hazards of Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal A. Nasser

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, the importance of studying the environmental impact of building material properties grew. The main focus was to study physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of building materials. Buildings are the environment that a human spend about 80% of his life. Human exposure to radiation doses emerging from natural and manufactured building materials caused serious diseases. The hazard of radiation doses on human body, especially Radon, was discovered. Radon is produced of the radioactive decay of Uranium and Thorium series. It is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. It inters human body by breathing and produces harmful radioactive elements. It has become a goal to know the limits of safety for building materials and to establish green buildings. Health and environmental risks have to take first command in the construction field to take proper precautions to ward off risks. Radon emission was investigated. The radioactive concentration of indoor air may be decreased under the permissible doses by the building geometry variation and other ways as reviewed in this investigation.

  2. Environmental impacts during the operational phase of residential buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    To date, the focus in the field of sustainable building has been on new building design. However, existing residential buildings inflict great environmental burden through three causes: continuous energy consumption, regular building maintenance and replacements. This publication analyses and compa

  3. Home Environmental Factors Influencing Performance and Progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Factors Influencing Performance and Progress of Primary School Pupils in ... found that parents' educational level and income level have a bearing on school ... on school progress and performance, however; home language did play a role.

  4. Environmental Aspects Of Home Composting Of Organic Household Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Andersen, Jacob Kragh; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Six composting units were monitored during a two-year long experimental campaign. Data regarding chemical compositions of waste inputs and outputs, gaseous emissions and leachate productions were collected, organized in mass balances and assessed by means of LCA. The management of the home...... composting unit was very relevant for the environmental performance of home composting, as the turning frequency influence the emissions of CH4 which is the main responsible for potential impacts on global warming. Results showed that overall home composting has low environmental impacts (between -2 and 16 m...

  5. Enhancements of G3-PLC Technology for Smart-Home/Building Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Di Bert; Salvatore D'Alessandro; Tonello, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    To enable the smart grid concept, it is fundamental to consider the in-home/building context where, beside the conventional home networking services, home automation and smart energy management services have to be offered. In this paper, we consider the in-home/building scenario, for which we propose a convergent network architecture to enhance the performance of the narrowband power line communication (PLC) G3-PLC technology through its integration with an Ethernet-based network....

  6. Framework for Detailed Comparison of Building Environmental Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Eriksson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how Building Environmental Assessments Tools (BEATs measure and define “environmental” building is of great interest to many stakeholders, but it is difficult to understand how BEATs relate to each other, as well as to make detailed and systematic tool comparisons. A framework for comparing BEATs is presented in the following which facilitates an understanding and comparison of similarities and differences in terms of structure, content, aggregation, and scope. The framework was tested by comparing three distinctly different assessment tools; LEED-NC v3, Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH, and EcoEffect. Illustrations of the hierarchical structure of the tools gave a clear overview of their structural differences. When using the framework, the analysis showed that all three tools treat issues related to the main assessment categories: Energy and Pollution, Indoor Environment, and Materials and Waste. However, the environmental issues addressed, and the parameters defining the object of study, differ and, subsequently, so do rating, results, categories, issues, input data, aggregation methodology, and weighting. This means that BEATs measure “environmental” building differently and push “environmental” design in different directions. Therefore, tool comparisons are important, and the framework can be used to make these comparisons in a more detailed and systematic way.

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development, Downers Grove, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This single-family home built in a peat bog has underground storage tanks and drainage tanks, blown fiberglass insulation, coated rigid polyisocyanurate, and flashing. The 3,600-square-foot custom home built by Weiss Building & Development LLC is the first home in Illinois certified to the DOE Challenge Home criteria, which requires that homes meet the EPA Indoor airPlus guidelines.The builder won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  8. Environmental effects and energy efficiency in building design - a green building approach. Pt. 2. Basic data for environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egle, C.; Pitts, G.C.

    1993-12-31

    A research report presents the basic data required when designing a building with minimal environmental impacts. Topics covered include the energy consumption of building elements during their lifetime, the environmental implications linked to the extraction and processing of building material and the energy consumed in buildings by the occupants. (UK)

  9. Life Cycle Assessment and the Environmental Certification Systems of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Bueno

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle assessment (LCA is an important methodology for the assessment of building components and systems and should be used within the building environmental performance certification systems. The present paper reports on the state of the art of LCA as a tool for the assessment of building components and analyzes its application in the environmental certification systems of building. The analysis of the existing systems for the environmental certification of buildings has revealed that among the four main and most employed systems of environmental certification of buildings currently used, Green Globes is the only one which uses the LCA methodology to evaluate the environmental performance of building components. The other systems use the assessment of building components by the recognition of product attributes, such as cost, durability, renewability and recycled content. The weakness of the attributes approach lies in the fact that these attributes are treated in isolation and lack the whole concept of impact.

  10. Home care aide retention: building team spirit to avoid employee walkouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, B M

    1996-08-01

    While home care agencies work to increase productivity and decrease costs, it is easy to lose sight of the value of employees. Because home care aides are seldom in the office, their value to the organization may get overlooked. In this article, one home care agency shares ways to build team spirit among the home care aides and empower them to be better employees. The result has been increased productivity, improved morale, and a more stable workforce.

  11. Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold,...

  12. Environmental implications of water efficient microcomponents in residential buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidar, A; Memon, F A; Butler, D

    2010-11-01

    The Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) in England sets out various water efficiency targets/levels, which form part of environmental performance criteria against which the sustainability of a building is measured. The code is performance based and requires reduction in per capita water consumption in households. The water efficiency related targets can be met using a range of water efficient microcomponents (WC, showers, kitchen taps, basin taps, dishwashers, washing machines, and baths). However, while the CSH aims at reducing the adverse environmental implications associated with the dwellings by promoting reduction in water consumption, little is known about the energy consumption and the environmental impacts (e. g. carbon emissions) resulting from water efficient end uses. This paper describes a methodology to evaluate the energy consumption and carbon emissions associated with the CSH's water efficiency levels. Key findings are that some 96% and 87% of energy use and carbon emissions, respectively associated with urban water provision are attributable to in-house consumption (principally related to hot water), and that achieving a defined water efficiency target does not automatically save energy or reduce carbon emissions.

  13. Environmental Health And Building Related Illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Chan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia has good environmental laws toprotect the outdoor environment and public health.However there are no laws governing indoor air quality(IAQ and the knowledge among the public about itsimportance is also lacking. Environmental professionalsthink it is not a priority and this influences the policydecisions in the country. Therefore there is a need tocreate awareness by way of research, education andother promotional activities. What is much needed atthis time is the establishment of standards for theconduct of risk assessment studies. To establishstandards we need reliable data which can be used todevelop appropriate guidelines for the purpose ofmitigation and adaptation programmes. IAQ can havesignificant influence on health resulting in drop inproductivity and economy of a country. It has beenestimated that in the US, building related illnesses(BRI symptoms have a relationship with decrease (3 to5% in work performance in an affected populationresulting in an annual loss of US$60 billion in revenue.However, based on efficient management programmesthey have also projected that the potential annualsavings can be in the region of US$10 to 30 billion. Thisestablishes that fact that good management programmesbased on efficient guidelines is of economic value to acountry and wellbeing of the population. The IMU hasembarked on a research programme to collect themuch-needed data for the framing of a good IAQguideline for Malaysia.

  14. Building America FY 2016 Annual Report: Building America Is Driving Real Solutions in the Race to Zero Energy Homes -- Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Sara [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rothgeb, Stacey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Polly, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Earle, Lieko [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Merrigan, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This document is a set of appendices presenting technical discussion and references as a companion to the 'Building America FY 2016 Annual Report: Building America Is Driving Real Solutions in the Race to Zero Energy Homes' publication.

  15. Building America FY 2016 Annual Report: Building America Is Driving Real Solutions in the Race to Zero Energy Homes -- Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sara Farrar, Stacey Rothgeb, Ben Polly, Lieko Earle, Tim Merrigan

    2017-01-01

    This document is a set of appendices presenting technical discussion and references as a companion to the 'Building America FY 2016 Annual Report: Building America Is Driving Real Solutions in the Race to Zero Energy Homes' publication.

  16. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings: student workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    This workbook parallels the basic manual, providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings consisting of three parts: understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings; determining amount of energy lost or gained in a building; and determining which practices are most efficient and installing materials. A teacher guide is available to answer questions in the student workbook related to these subjects.

  17. Environmental and Energy Aspects of Construction Industry and Green Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauskale, L.; Geipele, I.; Zeltins, N.; Lecis, I.

    2017-04-01

    Green building is an important component of sustainable real estate market development, and one of the reasons is that the construction industry consumes a high amount of resources. Energy consumption of construction industry results in greenhouse gas emissions, so green buildings, energy systems, building technologies and other aspects play an important role in sustainable development of real estate market, construction and environmental development. The aim of the research is to analyse environmental aspects of sustainable real estate market development, focusing on importance of green buildings at the industry level and related energy aspects. Literature review, historical, statistical data analysis and logical access methods have been used in the research. The conducted research resulted in high environmental rationale and importance of environment-friendly buildings, and there are many green building benefits during the building life cycle. Future research direction is environmental information process and its models.

  18. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 6: High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Steward, Heidi E.; Love, Pat M.

    2007-06-04

    This guide is was written by PNNL for the US Department of Energy's Building America program to provide information for residential production builders interested in building near zero energy homes. The guide provides indepth descriptions of various roof-top photovoltaic power generating systems for homes. The guide also provides extensive information on various designs of solar thermal water heating systems for homes. The guide also provides construction company owners and managers with an understanding of how solar technologies can be added to their homes in a way that is cost effective, practical, and marketable. Twelve case studies provide examples of production builders across the United States who are building energy-efficient homes with photovoltaic or solar water heating systems.

  19. Environmental indicators: Establishing a common language for green building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven; Elle, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Environmental indicators for buildings have the potential to serve as a means of making the environmental impacts (and possibly benefits) of buildings visible to all relevant actors. In addition, indicators facilitate the consideration and management of an array of environmental issues....... The objective of this study was to investigate if (and to what extent) consensus on environmental indicators for buildings as ‘a common language for green building’ can be reached among core actors in the Danish building sector and what such indicators could look like. Based on an analysis of current indicator...... systems and a qualitative investigation of the views of different actor groups on environmental indicators for buildings, the areas of consensus and lines of conflict between the actor groups were identified. Four different technological frames were used to identify four different perceptions...

  20. Building a peer mentor home health aide program: implications for home health aide retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiser, Athena Lu; Adamski, Tom; Gallagher, Bridget

    2010-09-01

    The Home Health Aide (HHA) industry is challenged with low wages, little possibility of career advancement, and high turnover rates. Jewish Home Lifecare, Home Assistance Personnel Inc. (HAPI) is a home care aide agency that has developed a Peer Mentor HHA program. Peer Mentor HHAs mentor newly hired/trained HHAs within our agency. This career path leads to higher paying work that allows for growth of our workforce for the identified growing care need and positively impacts HHA retention.

  1. Environmental sustainability modeling with exergy methodology for building life cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘猛; 姚润明

    2009-01-01

    As an important human activity,the building industry has created comfortable space for living and work,and at the same time brought considerable pollution and huge consumption of energy and recourses. From 1990s after the first building environmental assessment model-BREEAM was released in the UK,a number of assessment models were formulated as analytical and practical in methodology respectively. This paper aims to introduce a generic model of exergy assessment on environmental impact of building life cycle,taking into consideration of previous models and focusing on natural environment as well as building life cycle,and three environmental impacts will be analyzed,namely energy embodied exergy,resource chemical exergy and abatement exergy on energy consumption,resource consumption and pollutant discharge respectively. The model of exergy assessment on environmental impact of building life cycle thus formulated contains two sub-models,one from the aspect of building energy utilization,and the other from building materials use. Combining theories by ecologists such as Odum,building environmental sustainability modeling with exergy methodology is put forward with the index of exergy footprint of building environmental impacts.

  2. High Performance Homes That Use 50% Less Energy Than the DOE Building America Benchmark Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes lessons learned from designing, building, and monitoring five affordable, energy-efficient test houses in a single development in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) service area. This work was done through a collaboration of Habitat for Humanity Loudon County, the US Department of Energy (DOE), TVA, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The houses were designed by a team led by ORNL and were constructed by Habitat's volunteers in Lenoir City, Tennessee. ZEH5, a two-story house and the last of the five test houses to be built, provided an excellent model for conducting research on affordable high-performance houses. The impressively low energy bills for this house have generated considerable interest from builders and homeowners around the country who wanted a similar home design that could be adapted to different climates. Because a design developed without the project constraints of ZEH5 would have more appeal for the mass market, plans for two houses were developed from ZEH5: a one-story design (ZEH6) and a two-story design (ZEH7). This report focuses on ZEH6, identical to ZEH5 except that the geothermal heat pump is replaced with a SEER 16 air source unit (like that used in ZEH4). The report also contains plans for the ZEH6 house. ZEH5 and ZEH6 both use 50% less energy than the DOE Building America protocol for energyefficient buildings. ZEH5 is a 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2632 ft2 house with a home energy rating system (HERS) index of 43, which qualifies it for federal energy-efficiency incentives (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, and a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100). This report is intended to help builders and homeowners build similar high-performance houses. Detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 are compared with the Building America Benchmark building, and detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data gleaned

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Weiss Building & Development, LLC., System Home, River Forest, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    The Passive House Challenge Home located in River Forest, Illinois, is a 5-bedroom, 4.5-bath, 3,600 ft2 two-story home (plus basement) that costs about $237 less per month to operate than a similar sized home built to the 2009 IECC. For a home with no solar photovoltaic panels installed, it scored an amazingly low 27 on the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score.An ENERGY STAR-rated dishwasher, clothes washer, and refrigerator; an induction cooktop, condensing clothes dryer, and LED lighting are among the energy-saving devices inside the home. All plumbing fixtures comply with EPA WaterSense criteria. The home was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the "systems builder" category.

  4. Developing an environmental performance standard for the materials in buildings for the Dutch Building Decree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, N.P.M.; Groot-Van Dam, A. de; Kortman, J.G.M.; Huppes, G.; Ven, B. van der; Schuurmans, A.; Anink, D.

    2001-01-01

    After consulting the building industry the Dutch government decided in February 1998 to implement sustainability requirements in the Dutch Building Decree by the year 2001. Part of these requirements will be the material-based environmental performance of a building, mepb.. An energy performance

  5. Building lifespan: effect on the environmental impact of building components in a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2017-01-01

    solutions, covering all primary building components and based on contemporary practice. A full statistical analysis is carried out, which shows a significant statistical correlation between changes in building lifespan and environmental impact for all primary building components, except windows....../rooflights. On average, a building lifespan of 80 years reduces environmental impact by 29 %, 100 years by 38 %, and 120 years by 44 %, all in relation to a lifespan of 50 years. The results show that if construction professionals and policy makers use short building lifespans, then resource allocation to reduce...

  6. Building Lifespan: Effect on the Environmental Impact of Building Components in a Danish Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Construction professionals must now integrate environmental concerns with life cycle assessment (LCA) early in the procurement process. Building lifespan is important to LCA, since results must be normalized on an annualized basis for comparison. However, the scientific literature shows that issues...... of building lifespan are inadequately addressed. The aim of this research is therefore to explore how environmental impact from building components is affected by building lifespans of 50, 80, 100 and 120 years in a Danish context. LCAs are undertaken for 792 parametric variations of typical construction...... solutions, covering all primary building components and based on contemporary practice. A full statistical analysis is carried out, which shows a significant statistical correlation between changes in building lifespan and environmental impact for all primary building components, except windows...

  7. Building America FY 2016 Annual Report: Building America Is Driving Real Solutions in the Race to Zero Energy Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Sara; Rothgeb, Stacey; Polly, Ben; Earle, Lieko; Merrigan, Tim

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America Program enables the transformation of the U.S. housing industry to achieve energy savings through energy-efficient, high-performance homes with improved durability, comfort, and health for occupants. Building America bridges the gap between the development of emerging technologies and the adoption of codes and standards by engaging industry partners in applied research, development, and demonstration of high-performance solutions.

  8. Energy use and environmental impact of new residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adalberth, Karin

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the energy use and environmental impact of residential buildings. Seven authentic buildings built in the 1990s in Sweden are investigated. They are analysed according to energy use and environmental impact during their life cycle: manufacture of building materials, transport of building materials and components to the building site, erection to a building, occupancy, maintenance and renovation, and finally demolition and removal of debris. Results show that approx. 85 % of the total estimated energy use during the life cycle is used during the occupation phase. The energy used to manufacture building and installation materials constitutes approx. 15 % of the total energy use. 70-90 % of the total environmental impact arises during the occupation phase, while the manufacture of construction and installation materials constitutes 10-20 %. In conclusion, the energy use and environmental impact during the occupation phase make up a majority of the total. At the end of the thesis, a tool is presented which helps designers and clients predict the energy use during the occupation phase for a future multi-family building before any constructional or installation drawings are made. In this way, different thermal properties may be elaborated in order to receive an energy-efficient and environmentally adapted dwelling.

  9. Environmental value engineering (EVE): a green building performance assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudebush, W. H. [Bowling Green Univ., College of Technology, OH (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Establishing criteria for assessing green building performance is discussed. Performance criteria identified include building energy consumption, building material reduction, pollution minimization, indoor air quality, waste reduction, and occupant performance/output maximization. This paper specifically focuses on the use of an assessment methodology called environmental value engineering to maximize building performance at the least cost to the environment, i.e. the least quantity of inputs required per unit of building function. The inputs are grouped into four categories of: environment, fuel energy, goods, and services. The assessment is conducted at various points in the building`s life cycle (natural resource formation, exploration and extraction, material production, construction, use, demolition, natural resource recycling and disposal), with the four categories of inputs accounted for during each of the life cycle phases. Environmental value engineering is based on the EMERGY Analysis methodology developed at the University of Florida, and the ASTM (1993) UNIFORMAT of building subsystem organization. Total EMERGY per unit of function is considered to be the measure of building performance. The methodology can be used to compare traditional building performance to green building performance towards sustainable development. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Home Visit: Creating Connections & Building Relationships with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Melody

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important things teachers do is to create relationships and connections with the children and parents with whom they work. The strength of the individual relationships teachers have with parents and children affects the daily interactions with them and can act as a foundation later if difficult situations arise. Home visits (for…

  11. Environmental site assessments and audits: Building inspection requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, John H.; Kaiser, Genevieve; Thomulka, Kenneth W.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental site assessment criteria were originally developed by organizations that focused, almost exclusively, on surface, subsurface, and pollution source contamination. Many of the hazards associated with indoor environments and building structures were traditionally not considered when evaluating sources and entities of environmental pollution. Since a large number of building materials are potentially hazardous, careful evaluation is necessary. Until recently, little information on building inspection requirements of environmental problems has been published. Traditionally, asbestos has been the main component of concern. The ever-changing environmental standards have dramatically expanded the scope of building surveys. Indoor environmental concerns, for example, currently include formaldehyde, lead-based paint, polychlorinated biphenyls, radon, and indoor air pollution. Environmental regulations are being expanded and developed that specifically include building structures. These regulatory standards are being triggered by an increased awareness of health effects from indoor exposure, fires, spills, and other accidents that have resulted in injury, death, and financial loss. This article discusses various aspects of assessments for building structures.

  12. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa Mankikar; Carla Campbell; Rachael Greenberg

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes educati...

  13. Green building environmental control: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, D.A.; Schoichet, E.A. [Gottfried Technology, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Hart, M. [McParlane and Associates, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This article presents an overview of the City of San Diego`s Ridgehaven Green Building Demonstration Project. While there is no formal definition of green building, the term implies a structure that is friendlier to its occupants and to the environment and is more resource efficient. What this meant for this project will be brought out in the following discussion. The purpose of this article is to show the numerous successes at Ridgehaven, to provide others with insights on how to approach a green renovation project, and to present some of the difficulties that can be encountered.

  14. High Performance Home Building Guide for Habitat for Humanity Affiliates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey Marburger

    2010-10-01

    This guide covers basic principles of high performance Habitat construction, steps to achieving high performance Habitat construction, resources to help improve building practices, materials, etc., and affiliate profiles and recommendations.

  15. The environmental design of residential care facilities: A sense of home through the eyes of nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck-Heinen, C.J.M.L.; Wouters, E.J.M.; Janssen, B.M.; van Hoof, J.

    2014-01-01

    C.J.M.L. van Dijck-Heinen, E.J.M. Wouters, B.M. Janssen, J. van Hoof (2014) The environmental design of residential care facilities: A sense of home through the eyes of nursing home residents. International Journal for Innovative Research in Science & Technology 1(4): 57-69

  16. A second-generation environmental performance assessment system for buildings : green building challenge `98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, N.K. [Natural Resources Canada, ON (Canada); Cole, R.J. [University of British Columbia, BC (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    The issue of testing and labelling building materials and products and the criteria that should be used to describe their performance characteristics were discussed. The Green Building Challenge Project was established to develop a method for assessing building performance with an emphasis on energy and environmental performance. International and collaborative processes will be used to develop the method of assessment. The performance of more than 30 comparable buildings from the participating countries will be assessed in 1998 and results of the process will be reported at an international conference scheduled for Vancouver during October 1998. Equal focus will be placed on the performance of the buildings and the adequacy of the assessment framework. The assessment will focus on the following design features: land use, water use, materials, air borne emissions during building production and building operation, solid waste from building operations, liquid waste flows to municipal system, indoor air quality, thermal comfort, noise and acoustics, and longevity. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Building America Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, First DOE Zero Energy Ready Manufactured Home, Russellville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    Three side-by-side lab houses were built, instrumented and monitored in an effort to determine through field testing and analysis the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use in new manufactured homes.The lab houses in Russellville, Alabama compared the performance of three homes built to varying levels of thermal integrity and HVAC equipment: a baseline HUD-code home equipped with an electric furnace and a split system air conditioner; an ENERGY STAR manufactured home with an enhanced thermal envelope and traditional split system heat pump; and a house designed to qualify for Zero Energy Ready Home designation with a ductless mini-split heat pump with transfer fan distribution system in place of the traditional duct system for distribution. Experiments were conducted in the lab houses to evaluate impact on energy and comfort of interior door position, window blind position and transfer fan operation. The report describes results of tracer gas and co-heating tests and presents calculation of the heat pump coefficient of performance for both the traditional heat pump and the ductless mini-split. A series of calibrated energy models was developed based on measured data and run in three locations in the Southeast to compare annual energy usage of the three homes.

  18. Automation and information technology solutions for buildings and homes

    OpenAIRE

    Cuacos Encarnación, David

    2008-01-01

    This investigation is part of Master’s of Science degree in Industrial Engineering at the Universidad Carlos III of Madrid. The work has been carried out at Automation Technology Laboratory, of Helsinki University of Technology (TKK). This research is part of Assistive Automation project, which develops devices and systems assist independent living of elderly and disabled persons. The home automation system prototype is expected to increase the safety, comfort and independence of these people...

  19. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) Methodology: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.

    2011-11-01

    The test suite represents a set of cases applying the new Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) Methodology developed by NREL. (Judkoff et al. 2010a). The NREL team developed the test cases in consultation with the home retrofit industry (BESTEST-EX Working Group 2009), and adjusted the test specifications in accordance with information supplied by a participant with access to large utility bill datasets (Blasnik 2009).

  20. Environmental assessment and specification of green building materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froeschle, L. M.

    1998-12-01

    The central thesis of this paper is that building with environmentally friendly and `green` materials can lead to significant benefits in terms of improved indoor air quality and a healthy and more productive indoor environment. Recycled content and recyclable products can also help minimize the negative impact on the natural environment by keeping construction materials out of the waste stream, not to mention the cost savings that can be generated when specifying materials with recycled content. Savings in embodied energy is generally less when using recycled content as opposed to raw materials in the manufacture of building materials. The gradual depletion of raw materials will generate increased demand for `greener` products and may, in due course, replace traditional building products. Criteria for the assessment of environmental materials, the `greening` of project specifications, and a process for the environmental specification of building products is also described. 8 refs.

  1. Indoor environmental quality and building energy efficiency

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Reenen, T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available differences in skin temperature for different parts of the body are extreme but individually within the accepted comfort band. Also, where the indoor air temperature is above the radiant temperature, spaces tend to feel stuffy. This can occur with convective....R., Nishi, Y. & Gagge, A P., 1974). The effectiveness of the modes by which our bodies exchange heat changes with the environment. Similarly our capacity for thermo-regulation varies between different types of buildings and environments. The newer...

  2. Building America Case Study: BrightBuilt Home, Modular Zero Energy, Portland, Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer 'a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time.' For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, Maine, by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  3. Protection of historic buildings against environmental pollution of vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Koczwara Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historic buildings in Poland are largely neglected objects that small percentage is preserved in its original form. Unrelenting in the case of historic buildings is a time that brings with it the natural processes of aging of buildings, but also the history of the object which is often marked by military conflicts, fires or even incompetently carried out reconstruction. Nowadays historic buildings are also destroyed by the rapid development of infrastructure and residential construction. This development could lead to changes of water in the soil, make changes in the geologic al structure or cause exposure of the historic building to the new influences (eg. traffic vibrations, to which building has not been subjected so far. Vibrations are often omitted in environmental issues, although the protection against noise and vibration has its place in the Law on Environmental Protection. This article presents the methodology for the measurement and interpretation of vibration influence on historic buildings and the assessment methods of technical condition of historic building on the example of dynamic measurements made on St. Nicholas Church in Krakow. The importance of well-done crack-by-crack documentation and characterization of damages based on damage index is shown. Difficulties that can be encountered when determining the causes of technical condition of historic buildings are also shown. Based on the example of the Church in the article are also given the possible protection solutions of historic structures from vibrations.

  4. Thermal and acoustic environmental requirements for green buildings in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasaiah Purushothama Rao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Passive design concepts as a strategy for achieving energy efficiency as well as optimum indoor thermal comfort in workspaces are being increasingly applied with the increased awareness of Green Buildings. The challenging task for the building designers in the hot-humid tropics is the provision of indoor thermal comfort for the occupants of the building while reducing energy consumption in the office spaces. Acoustic quality is also an important element in ensuring a healthy working environment. One of the aims of a green building is to minimise its impact on health and performance of the occupants of the building. This has been emphasized in most green building rating systems under requirements for Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ, highlighting the four main points for achieving an improved indoor environment, viz., indoor air quality, acoustics, visual comfort (lighting and thermal comfort. Although acoustics was mentioned in the IEQ criteria, according to previous surveys and studies acoustic quality in green buildings are not improving. Acoustics performance is bound to be relegated unless it is considered early in design stage. This paper makes an attempt at how green building design strategies contribute to the degradation of acoustical environment in green office buildings. The design strategies implemented to cater for green building requirements such as provision of natural ventilation, daylight, reduction of finishes and office layout leads to an unintended decrease in the acoustical quality. This needs to be addressed and corrected by the building professionals.

  5. Major requirements for building Smart Homes in Smart Cities based on Internet of Things technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Terence K. L.; Sherratt, R. Simon; Diaz Sanchez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The recent boom in the Internet of Things (IoT) will turn Smart Cities and Smart Homes (SH) from hype to reality. SH is the major building block for Smart Cities and have long been a dream for decades, hobbyists in the late 1970s made Home Automation (HA) possible when personal computers started invading home spaces. While SH can share most of the IoT technologies, there are unique characteristics that make SH special. From the result of a recent research survey on SH and IoT technologies, th...

  6. WSN- and IOT-Based Smart Homes and Their Extension to Smart Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Gui, Xiang; Suryadevara, Nagender

    2015-05-04

    Our research approach is to design and develop reliable, efficient, flexible, economical, real-time and realistic wellness sensor networks for smart home systems. The heterogeneous sensor and actuator nodes based on wireless networking technologies are deployed into the home environment. These nodes generate real-time data related to the object usage and movement inside the home, to forecast the wellness of an individual. Here, wellness stands for how efficiently someone stays fit in the home environment and performs his or her daily routine in order to live a long and healthy life. We initiate the research with the development of the smart home approach and implement it in different home conditions (different houses) to monitor the activity of an inhabitant for wellness detection. Additionally, our research extends the smart home system to smart buildings and models the design issues related to the smart building environment; these design issues are linked with system performance and reliability. This research paper also discusses and illustrates the possible mitigation to handle the ISM band interference and attenuation losses without compromising optimum system performance.

  7. WSN- and IOT-Based Smart Homes and Their Extension to Smart Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Ghayvat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our research approach is to design and develop reliable, efficient, flexible, economical, real-time and realistic wellness sensor networks for smart home systems. The heterogeneous sensor and actuator nodes based on wireless networking technologies are deployed into the home environment. These nodes generate real-time data related to the object usage and movement inside the home, to forecast the wellness of an individual. Here, wellness stands for how efficiently someone stays fit in the home environment and performs his or her daily routine in order to live a long and healthy life. We initiate the research with the development of the smart home approach and implement it in different home conditions (different houses to monitor the activity of an inhabitant for wellness detection. Additionally, our research extends the smart home system to smart buildings and models the design issues related to the smart building environment; these design issues are linked with system performance and reliability. This research paper also discusses and illustrates the possible mitigation to handle the ISM band interference and attenuation losses without compromising optimum system performance.

  8. Building America System Research Results. Innovations for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-05-01

    This report provides a summary of key lessons learned from the first 10 years of the Building America program and also included a summary of the future challenges that must be met to reach the program’s long term performance goals.

  9. Home and Community Environmental Features, Activity Performance, and Community Participation among Older Adults with Functional Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Yu Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes relationships among home and community environmental features, activity performance in the home, and community participation potential to support aging in place. A subset of data on older adults with functional limitations (=122, sixty three (63 with mobility and 59 with other limitations, were utilized in this study from a larger project's subject pool. Results showed significant and positive correlations between environmental barriers, activity dependence and difficulty at home, and less community participation in the mobility limitation group. While kitchen and bathroom features were most limiting to home performance, bathtub or shower was the only home feature, and destination social environment was the only community feature, that explained community participation. Compared to environmental features, home performance explained much more community participation. Study results provide detailed information about environmental features as well as types of home activities that can be prioritized as interventions for aging in place.

  10. Home and Community Environmental Features, Activity Performance, and Community Participation among Older Adults with Functional Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiang-Yu; Sanford, Jon A

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes relationships among home and community environmental features, activity performance in the home, and community participation potential to support aging in place. A subset of data on older adults with functional limitations (N = 122), sixty three (63) with mobility and 59 with other limitations, were utilized in this study from a larger project's subject pool. Results showed significant and positive correlations between environmental barriers, activity dependence and difficulty at home, and less community participation in the mobility limitation group. While kitchen and bathroom features were most limiting to home performance, bathtub or shower was the only home feature, and destination social environment was the only community feature, that explained community participation. Compared to environmental features, home performance explained much more community participation. Study results provide detailed information about environmental features as well as types of home activities that can be prioritized as interventions for aging in place.

  11. Building systems, home systems, the convergence of networks; Immotique, domotique, la convergence des reseaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernay, J.P.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents the Konnex system, based on a single network (the power distribution network) used for the transmission of data for the management of energy inside a building or an industrial site. Konnex integrates three existing main European standards: Batibus (France), EIbus (Germany) and EHS (European home system). The data are centralized by the technical management system of the building and are shared with other services (instrumentation and control, maintenance, production management etc.). (J.S.)

  12. Development of an environmental relative moldiness index for US homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesper, Sephen J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Haugland, Richard A.; Wymer, Larry; Bradham, Karen; Ashley, Peter; Cox, David J.; DeWalt, Gary; Friedman, Warren

    2007-08-01

    As part of the HUD American Healthy Survey, dust samples were collected by vacuuming 2 m2 in the bedroom plus 2 m2 in the living room of a nationally representative 1096 homes in the USA using the Mitest™ sampler. Five mg of sieved (300 µ pore, nylon mesh) dust was analyzed by mold specific quantitative PCR for the 36 EPA Mold Panel Species. On this basis, an “environmental relative moldiness index” (ERMI) was created with values ranging from about -10 to 20 (lowest to highest). In order to try to reduce the cost of this analysis, the number of test species was reduced by selecting only those species with a national average concentration of 30 cell equivalents (CE) per mg dust or greater. Only 19 of 36 species met this criterion. (In 40% of the homes, an additional 46 species were quantified from the same dust sample. All of these species had average concentrations less than 30 CE per mg dust.) These 19 species were then categorized into two groups based on their coefficient of variation (CV). If the CV was > 9, the mold was placed in Category 1 (10/19) and the other molds were placed in Category 2 (9/19). Using these Categories, the sum of the log-transformed concentrations of three Category 2 molds (C. herbarum, A. alternata and C. cladosporioides Type 1) was subtracted from the sum of the log-transformed concentrations of the ten Category 1 molds (Aspergillus niger, A. ochraceus, A. penicillioides, A. restrictus, A. sydowii, Chaetomium globosum, Eurotium amsteldoami, Paecilomyces variotii, Penicillium chrysogenum and Wallemia sebi). Assembling these values for the 1096 AHHS homes from lowest to highest produced the “American relative moldiness index” (ARMI). The correlation between the ERMI and ARMI values was 0.88. The ERMI or ARMI scales may be useful as a standard for mold exposure estimates in epidemiological studies.

  13. Indoor Environmental Quality in Mechanically Ventilated, Energy-Efficient Buildings vs. Conventional Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Peter; Munoz, Ute; Tappler, Peter; Wanka, Anna; Kundi, Michael; Shelton, Janie F; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-06

    Energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, there are concerns that inadequate mechanical ventilation may lead to impaired indoor air quality. Using a semi-experimental field study, we investigated if exposure of occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation) differs with regard to indoor air pollutants and climate factors. We investigated living and bedrooms in 123 buildings (62 highly energy-efficient and 61 conventional buildings) built in the years 2010 to 2012 in Austria (mainly Vienna and Lower Austria). Measurements of indoor parameters (climate, chemical pollutants and biological contaminants) were conducted twice. In total, more than 3000 measurements were performed. Almost all indoor air quality and room climate parameters showed significantly better results in mechanically ventilated homes compared to those relying on ventilation from open windows and/or doors. This study does not support the hypothesis that occupants in mechanically ventilated low energy houses are exposed to lower indoor air quality.

  14. Indoor Environmental Quality in Mechanically Ventilated, Energy-Efficient Buildings vs. Conventional Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wallner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, there are concerns that inadequate mechanical ventilation may lead to impaired indoor air quality. Using a semi-experimental field study, we investigated if exposure of occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation differs with regard to indoor air pollutants and climate factors. We investigated living and bedrooms in 123 buildings (62 highly energy-efficient and 61 conventional buildings built in the years 2010 to 2012 in Austria (mainly Vienna and Lower Austria. Measurements of indoor parameters (climate, chemical pollutants and biological contaminants were conducted twice. In total, more than 3000 measurements were performed. Almost all indoor air quality and room climate parameters showed significantly better results in mechanically ventilated homes compared to those relying on ventilation from open windows and/or doors. This study does not support the hypothesis that occupants in mechanically ventilated low energy houses are exposed to lower indoor air quality.

  15. Environmental indicators: Establishing a common language for green building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven; Elle, Morten

    2006-01-01

    . The objective of this study was to investigate if (and to what extent) consensus on environmental indicators for buildings as ‘a common language for green building’ can be reached among core actors in the Danish building sector and what such indicators could look like. Based on an analysis of current indicator...... systems and a qualitative investigation of the views of different actor groups on environmental indicators for buildings, the areas of consensus and lines of conflict between the actor groups were identified. Four different technological frames were used to identify four different perceptions...... is unlikely. Instead, three likely scenarios are described for the future development of the indicator debate and the directions are identified into which different actors need to move in order to establish indicators that can serve as a common language for green building....

  16. "No Cosby Show": Single Black Mother Homes and How Black Men Build Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maia Niguel

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lives of 11 Black men to better understand how Black men who were raised in single Black mother homes build romantic relationships with Black women. One focus group and a series of individual in-person interviews were conducted with the participants who ranged between 23 and 43 years of age. Participants were…

  17. "No Cosby Show": Single Black Mother Homes and How Black Men Build Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maia Niguel

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lives of 11 Black men to better understand how Black men who were raised in single Black mother homes build romantic relationships with Black women. One focus group and a series of individual in-person interviews were conducted with the participants who ranged between 23 and 43 years of age. Participants were…

  18. 'Any style but gothic': Building a home for the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, H

    2016-06-01

    On 15 July 1864 the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland held its first business meeting in its newly built home at 6 Kildare Street, Dublin. Although the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland had been in existence for over 200 years this was the first occasion that a College meeting had been held in a building owned by the College. This paper looks at the history behind the construction of a home for the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. It will examine why it took over 200 years for the Physicians to find a permanent home, how they ended up with the building they did, and what they borrowed from the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh in the process.

  19. Building better oral health: a dental home for all Texans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Poor oral health affects more than just the mouth. It can seriously compromise a person's general health, quality of life and life expectancy. Oral diseases can and do lead to systemic problems--damaging other parts of the body and resulting in the need for expensive emergency department visits, hospital stays and medications. The consequences of poor oral health, however, go far beyond damaging medical effects. Oral disease can also wreak economic havoc--keeping children out of school and adults home from work--not to mention lower productivity of workers in pain. Untreated oral diseases can also drive up health care costs in general. The good news is that with proper oral health care, both at home and in professional settings, many of the negative consequences associated with poor oral health can be prevented. The State of Texas has a unique and unprecedented opportunity to significantly increase access to oral health care for all Texans. Complying with the Frew agreement is a key priority. However, there are additional ways that Texas policymakers can improve the oral health of the state. In an effort to begin a constructive dialogue about improving the oral health of all Texans, the Texas Dental Association (TDA) with grant funding from the American Dental Association (ADA) commissioned an independent third-party report on the issue of access to oral health care in Texas modeled after the 2000 groundbreaking surgeon general's report, Oral Health in America. The TDA assembled a team of five nationally recognized dentists from both academia and private practice to oversee the project. The dentists (hereafter called the editorial review board or ERB) were asked to identify the state's most pressing issues, needs and challenges associated with improving the oral health of all Texans, with a special focus on the state's most vulnerable. The ERB looked carefully at the economic, medical and social consequences of untreated oral disease in Texas. It reviewed the

  20. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-09-09

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children's asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013-2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term.

  1. Healthy Homes University: a home-based environmental intervention and education program for families with pediatric asthma in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, Thomas W; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L; Wahl, Robert L; Priem, Wesley F

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program-Healthy Homes University--for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%.

  2. Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%. PMID:21563708

  3. An Alternative Home? ASEAN and Pacific Environmental Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIL MARVEL PIANO TABUCANON

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An Alternative Home? ASEAN and Pacific Environmental Migration ASEAN is in a unique position to push for heightened global awareness and action for the vulnerable Pacific populations facing the possibility of relocation. Yet, it is strangely silent on the issue. ASEAN has both moral and legal obligation to not to turn its back on its Pacific neighbours. Morally, ASEAN – or at least most of it – is part of the western fringes of the Pacific region. It is proximate to many Pacific nations, and it has both the resources and landmass to help: two of the world’s largest archipelagos are ASEAN members. The obligations of humanity and justice require larger and more developed states aid and assist their more vulnerable neighbours. Legally, ASEAN may learn from the African Union (AU experience. While AU accepted the UN Refugee Convention definition of ‘refugee,’ it expanded it to include those compelled to leave their country owing to ‘events seriously disturbing public order.’ Many scholars believe this includes the environmentally displaced. ASEAN can choose to take on the easy path of insularity and parochialism as regards the looming issue on environmental migration, or it can take the high road by transforming itself into a dynamic regional actor pushing for clear policies on how to address it. Displacements are by nature traumatic and carry with them the impoverishments of landlessness, joblessness, homelessness, marginalization, increased morbidity and mortality, food insecurity, loss of access to common property resources, and social disarticulation. ASEAN can do much to help its vulnerable neighbors. As a bloc, it is a strong voice that can speak to the larger international community asking it to help address the issue.

  4. Parametric Design Strategy Aiming at Environmentally Sustainable Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Tine Ring; Knudstrup, Mary-Ann; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary conclusions from a PhD study about methodical approaches to environmentally sustainable architecture. The presented results are from a local sensitivity analysis focused on the energy consumption of a typical residential reference building, when it is subjected...

  5. Environmental performance of green building code and certification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Sangwon; Tomar, Shivira; Leighton, Matthew; Kneifel, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential life-cycle environmental impact reduction of three green building code and certification (GBCC) systems: LEED, ASHRAE 189.1, and IgCC. A recently completed whole-building life cycle assessment (LCA) database of NIST was applied to a prototype building model specification by NREL. TRACI 2.0 of EPA was used for life cycle impact assessment (LCIA). The results showed that the baseline building model generates about 18 thousand metric tons CO2-equiv. of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and consumes 6 terajoule (TJ) of primary energy and 328 million liter of water over its life-cycle. Overall, GBCC-compliant building models generated 0% to 25% less environmental impacts than the baseline case (average 14% reduction). The largest reductions were associated with acidification (25%), human health-respiratory (24%), and global warming (GW) (22%), while no reductions were observed for ozone layer depletion (OD) and land use (LU). The performances of the three GBCC-compliant building models measured in life-cycle impact reduction were comparable. A sensitivity analysis showed that the comparative results were reasonably robust, although some results were relatively sensitive to the behavioral parameters, including employee transportation and purchased electricity during the occupancy phase (average sensitivity coefficients 0.26-0.29).

  6. Pushing the Envelope: A Case Study of Building the First Manufactured Home Using Structural Insulated Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Sparkman, Ronald; Lubliner, Michael

    2002-06-01

    This paper for the ACEEE Summer Study describes construction of the first manufactured home ever produced from structural insulated panels. The home was built in July 2000 by Champion Enterprises at its Silverton, Oregon, plant. The house was completed on the assembly line in 9 days including a 300-mile road test. The paper examines the design and approval process leading to the project, the manufacturing process and its adjustment to SIPs, and the transportation and energy performance of the house after it was built. PNNL coordinated this project and conducted long-term monitoring on the house. The WSU Energy Program conducted building diagnostics testing once the house was occupied. PNNL’s and WSU’s involvement was funded by the U.S. DOE Building America Program. The Oregon Office of Energy conducted blower door and duct blaster tests. The completed home was estimated to reduce energy consumption by 50% and to have twice the structural strength required by HUD code for manufactured homes. The demonstration proved that the manufactured home production line could support SIPs production simultaneously with traditional construction and without major modifications, the line work in parallel with SIPs and traditional materials. The project revealed severl possibilities for further improving cost and time savings with SIPs construction, that might translate into increased capacity.

  7. Greenbelt Homes Pilot Program. Summary of Building Envelope Retrofits, Planned HVAC Equipment Upgrades, and Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [Home Innovation Research Labs, Marlboro, MD (United States); Del Bianco, M. [Home Innovation Research Labs, Marlboro, MD (United States); Mallay, D. [Home Innovation Research Labs, Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2015-05-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Partnership for Home Innovation wrote a report on Phase 1 of the project that summarized a condition assessment of the homes and evaluated retrofit options within the constraints of the cooperative provided by GHI. Phase 2 was completed following monitoring in the 2013–2014 winter season; the results are summarized in this report. Phase 3 upgrades of heating equipment will be implemented in time for the 2014–2015 heating season and are not part of this report.

  8. Building America Case Study: Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes; Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    ?This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH). The scope of this project involved building four HPMH prototypes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual % savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). The HPMH home is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.
    home is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  9. Comfort Indicators for the Assessment of Indoor Environmental Building Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Bendtsen, A.; Sørensen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor environmental building performance assessment requires efficient indicators of the indoor comfort. In order to be effective and useful the comfort indicators must be able to include the temporal variation of indoor comfort as well as the degree of discomfort perceived by the occupants....... This paper discusses and presents a number of comfort indicators that includes both the temporal variation and the degree of discomfort in the calculations. A test case comprising a ventilated office building is used to show the application of the various comfort indices. It is found that the new comfort...... indices provide substantially new information and constitute much better decision tools....

  10. Energy Saving Homes and Buildings, Continuum Magazine, Spring 2014 / Issue 6 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-03-01

    This issue of Continuum focuses on NREL's research to improve the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings. Heating, cooling, and lighting our homes and commercial structures account for more than 70% of all electricity used in the United States. That costs homeowners, businesses, and government agencies more than $400 billion annually, about 40% of our nation's total energy costs. Producing that energy contributes almost 40% of our nation's carbon dioxide emissions.By 2030, an estimated 900 billion square feet of new and rebuilt construction will be developed worldwide, providing an unprecedented opportunity to create efficient, sustainable buildings. Increasing the energy performance of our homes alone could potentially eliminate up to 160 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and lower residential energy bills by $21 billion annually by the end of the decade.

  11. Environmental Conditions and Occupant Perceptions in European Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoops, J.L. [Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Building Services Engineering

    2003-03-01

    This is a preliminary report regarding a portion of the environmental conditions and occupant comfort perceptions from a five nation, 26 building European field data collection effort. Approximately 1,000 participants were involved in this project which included twelve monthly visits to each building. Climate, building and cultural variation will be illustrated for the five countries involved - France, Greece, Portugal, Sweden and the United Kingdom (UK). Each country used identical instrumentation; questionnaires and experimental protocols imbedded in a custom hardware/software system. The comfort survey was based on the ASHRAE model. The physical measurements included air temperature, globe temperature, relative humidity, air movement, CO{sub 2}, light, and sound levels. Where possible, connections and explanations between variables are made. Potential energy and policy ramifications are illustrated. (The publication includes two reports from EU JOULE III projects JOE3CT970066 'Smart controls and thermal comfort project)

  12. Environmental and Architectural Influences on Homes. Environmental Ecological Education Project. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Verlin M.

    This unit, intended for grades four and five, focuses on houses and how they have influenced man and how man has influenced them. Among the 14 concepts discussed are the history of homes, home and the environment, homes and heritage, homes and human needs, the design of homes and available land. Besides the concepts, the unit includes behavioral…

  13. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Mankikar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children’s asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013–2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05 of children’s asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011, plumbing leaks (p = 0.019, and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001. Participants’ pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05 in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term.

  14. CISBAT 2003 proceedings. BuildingEnvelopes.org. Innovation in building envelopes and environmental systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scartezzini, J.-L.

    2003-07-01

    Hosted by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne and jointly organised by EPFL and the Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, the international conference 'Innovation in building envelopes and environmental systems' enjoyed the attendance of 140 participants from 14 countries all around the world. The conference proceedings include the 63 presentations grouped in 9 sections. The 3 keynote speakers addressed the following topics: Sustainable buildings, USA research; Nanostructured materials for solar energy conversion; From smart buildings to ambient intelligence. The 9 groups of topics were: Building envelopes design and renovation; Solar collectors and systems; Indoor environment quality and health; Daylighting and visual ergonomy; Advanced building control systems; New construction materials; Environmental impacts of construction; Cities, infrastructures and sustainable development; Software. Organised each second year for now 20 years, the international conference CISBAT is amongst the leading ones in its field. The 2003 edition closed with a video conference from the USA, entitled 'Cradle to cradle - A design revolution', presented by the architect W. Mc Donough, Winner of 1996 Presidential Prize for Sustainable Development.

  15. Indoor environmental quality in French dwellings and building characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Sarka; Ramalho, Olivier; Derbez, Mickaël; Ribéron, Jacques; Kirchner, Severine; Mandin, Corinne

    2016-03-01

    A national survey on indoor environmental quality covering 567 residences in mainland France was performed during 2003-2005. The measured parameters were temperature, relative humidity, CO2, and the indoor air pollutants: fourteen individual volatile organic compounds (VOC), four aldehydes and particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5. The measured indoor concentrations were analyzed for correlations with the building characteristics: type of dwelling, period of construction, dwelling location, type of ventilation system, building material, attached garage and retrofitting. The median night time air exchange rate (AER) for all dwellings was 0.44 h-1. The night time AER was higher in apartments (median = 0.49 h-1) than in single-family houses (median = 0.41 h-1). Concentration of formaldehyde was approximately 30% higher in dwellings built after 1990 compared with older ones; it was higher in dwellings with mechanical ventilation and in concrete buildings. The VOC concentrations depended on the building characteristics to various extents. The sampling season influenced the majority of the indoor climate parameters and the concentrations of the air pollutants to a higher degree than the building characteristics. Multivariate linear regression models revealed that the indoor-outdoor difference in specific humidity, a proxy for number of occupants and their indoor activities, remained a significant predictor for most gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The other strong predictors were outdoor concentration, smoking, attached garage and AER (in descending order).

  16. 78 FR 77427 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Building for Environmental and Economic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... for Environmental and Economic Sustainability (BEES) Please AGENCY: National Institute of Standards... performance of building products. Known as BEES (Building for Environmental and Economic Sustainability), the... in the life of a product are analyzed: Raw material acquisition, manufacture, transportation...

  17. 75 FR 78225 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Building for Environmental and Economic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... for Environmental and Economic Sustainability (BEES) Please AGENCY: National Institute of Standards... performance of building products. Known as BEES (Building for Environmental and Economic Sustainability), the... life of a product are analyzed: Raw material acquisition, manufacture, transportation, installation...

  18. Case Study: In-Home Environmental Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, or CHOP, case study is intended to offer providers, health insurers, public health departments and community-based organizations an overview of an asthma in-home intervention.

  19. Home and Community Environmental Features, Activity Performance, and Community Participation among Older Adults with Functional Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes relationships among home and community environmental features, activity performance in the home, and community participation potential to support aging in place. A subset of data on older adults with functional limitations ( = 1 2 2 ), sixty three (63) with mobility and 59 with other limitations, were utilized in this study from a larger project's subject pool. Results showed significant and positive correlations between environmental barriers, activity dependence and d...

  20. Wireless data management system for environmental monitoring in livestock buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gray

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The impact of air quality on the health, welfare and productivity of livestock needs to be considered, especially when livestock are kept in enclosed buildings. The monitoring of such environmental factors allows for the development of appropriate strategies to reduce detrimental effects of sub-optimal air quality on the respiratory health of both livestock and farmers. In 2009, an environmental monitoring system was designed, developed and tested that allowed for the monitoring of a number of airborne pollutants. One limitation of the system was the manual collection of logged data from each unit. This paper identifies limitations of the current environmental monitoring system and suggests a range of networking technologies that can be used to increase usability. Consideration is taken for the networking of environmental monitoring units, as well as the collection of recorded data. Furthermore, the design and development of a software system that is used to collate and store recorded environmental data from multiple farms is explored. In order to design such a system, simplified software engineering processes and methodologies have been utilised. The main steps taken in order to complete the project were requirements elicitation with clients, requirements analysis, system design, implementation and finally testing. The outcome of the project provided a potential prototype for improving the environmental monitoring system and analysis informing the benefit of the implementation.

  1. Selecting Materials for Environmental-Friendly Buildings: The Need for Improved Environmental Impact Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachawit T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings of the future need to be more environmental-friendly. Selecting environmentally-benign materials in design stage would partly help achieving such goal. Examination of existing environmental impact data of building materials reveals that the data differ greatly from one source to another. Comparisons of environmental impact values of selected materials are presented. The sources that give rise to data variation are identified and discussed. The applicability of existing data is assessed from the designers’ perspective. Limitations of current practice in data acquisition and presentation are also discussed. It is concluded that existing environmental impact data of building materials are inconsistent and perplexing to designers. An alternative approach to data acquisition and presentation is to break the life cycle of building materials into several phases and to calculate the total impact value as the sum of the impacts of all phases. This would make the determination of the full life cycle value feasible and increase external validity of research results.

  2. Building America Case Study: Indirect Solar Water Heating Systems in Single-Family Homes, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Solar water heating systems are not new, but they have not become prevalent in most of the U.S. Most of the country is cold enough that indirect solar thermal systems are required for freeze protection, and average installed cost of these systems is $9,000 to $10,000 for typical systems on single-family homes. These costs can vary significantly in different markets and with different contractors, and federal and regional incentives can reduce these up-front costs by 50% or more. In western Massachusetts, an affordable housing developer built a community of 20 homes with a goal of approaching zero net energy consumption. In addition to excellent thermal envelopes and PV systems, the developer installed a solar domestic water heating system (SDHW) on each home. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a research consortium funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program, commissioned some of the systems, and CARB was able to monitor detailed performance of one system for 28 months.

  3. Environmental impact on young children's participation in home-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Erin C; Khetani, Mary A

    2017-04-01

    To test the effect of child, family, and environmental factors on young children's participation in home-based activities. Caregivers of young children were recruited using convenience and snowball sampling. Participants were 395 caregivers of children (222 males, 173 females) aged from 1 month to 5 years and 11 months. Demographic items and the home section of the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure were administered online, followed by completion of the daily activities, mobility, and social/cognitive domains of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer Adaptive Test by telephone interview. A structural equation model fitted the data well (comparative fit index=0.91) and explained 31.2% of the variance in perceived environmental support and 42.5% of the variance in home involvement. Functional limitations and performance had an indirect effect on young children's participation through their effect on perceived environmental support. Specifically, fewer functional limitations and higher task performance were associated with greater environmental support, which in turn predicted higher levels of home involvement. Results suggest the importance of a young child's functional abilities and task performance on caregiver perceptions of environmental support at home, and the impact of environmental support on a child's participation in home-based activities during the early childhood period. Results warrant replication with more diverse samples to evaluate model generalizability. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press.

  4. Environmental and Economic Analysis of Thermal Active Building System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fabiano Reis Lessa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is regarding one promising technological solution – which is so called Thermal Active Building Systems (TABS –for one of the most critical problems both in environmental and economic aspects, which is the raising energy consumption. Buildings are the principal application target of the solution once that population spends most part of their time inside them. Therefore, more energy is required to supply an increasingly demand in lighting, air conditioning, heating, electronic devices and so on. In this context, TABS emerge like a possible solution. To ensure the system efficiency or, in other words, prove its viability, it will be applied an environmental management tool (SWOT Analysis weighting all the pros and comparing with its drawbacks, based on previous experiences in implantation of such system, available in literature. A basic theoretical background, which is extremely important to a better comprehension of the system, covering both engineering and environmental management areas, is presented on this paper. Results shown that TABS are efficient mechanisms in the reduction of power consumption, committed with sustainable development, and which worth the investments in a Life Cycle Cost evaluation

  5. The Teaching Green School Building: A Framework for Linking Architecture and Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    The "Teaching Green School Building" is an emergent type of school building that attempts to engage building users with environmental issues in buildings. Architectural interventions in these buildings range from signage to interactive touch screens to gardens and demonstration kitchens that foster educational programmes about…

  6. The Teaching Green School Building: A Framework for Linking Architecture and Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    The "Teaching Green School Building" is an emergent type of school building that attempts to engage building users with environmental issues in buildings. Architectural interventions in these buildings range from signage to interactive touch screens to gardens and demonstration kitchens that foster educational programmes about…

  7. Assessing the environmental impact of buildings in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, P.; Baldwin, R. [Building Research Establishment, Watford (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The protection of the environment is one of today`s key issues demanding international action. In the UK, the government has issued a {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} White Paper and two updating reviews, setting out its Agenda; businesses are also responding by developing environmental policy statements as part of their business strategy; general public concern is evident through changes in purchasing practices and an increasing interest in recycling waste such as paper, cans, and bottles. In Europe, initiatives are being taken to develop ecolabelling schemes specifically for assessing consumer products. Environmental management systems are being developed through BSI and internationally. Underlying these concerns is a perception that industrialised economies have significantly and irreversibly changed (or perhaps about to change) the planet`s climate, atmosphere and ecosystems. This perception is fuelled by reports in the media of rising pollution, poor air quality, threats to ecosystems such as historic hedgerows, and even graffiti and litter. This paper describes action taken by the BRE to set standards for environmentally friendlier buildings which uses market forces to bring about environmental sensitivity in the industry. BREEAM is an environmental assessment method, embodies in an accreditation scheme, which is enjoying considerable success in the UK. The paper describes its development and underlying philosophy and provides details of its content and operation.

  8. Technology Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Trade-Friendly Retrofit Insulated Panels for Existing Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-01

    For this project with the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Home Innovation Research Labs, the retrofit insulated panels relied on an enhanced expanded polystyrene (EPS) for thermal resistance of R-4.5/inch, which is an improvement of 10% over conventional (white-colored) EPS. EPS, measured by its life cycle, is an alternative to commonly used extruded polystyrene and spray polyurethane foam. It is a closed-cell product made up of 90% air, and it requires about 85% fewer petroleum products for processing than other rigid foams.

  9. Building America Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    Building cost effective, high performance homes that provide superior comfort, health, and durability is the goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Zero Energy Ready Homes (ZERH) program. Through Building America research and other innovative programs throughout the country, many of the technical challenges to building to the ZERH standard have been addressed. This case study describes the development of a 62-unit multifamily community constructed by nonprofit developer Mutual Housing at the Spring Lake subdivision in Woodland, CA. The Spring Lake project is expected to be the first ZERH-certified multifamily project nationwide. Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation worked with Mutual Housing throughout the project. The case study discusses challenges encountered, lessons learned, and how obstacles were overcome. An objective of this project was to gain a highly visible foothold for residential buildings built to the DOE ZERH specification that can be used to encourage participation by other California builders.

  10. Building the knowledge base for environmental action and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    “Knowledge is power” (Sir Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626), Religious Meditations, Of Heresis, 1597) “Science is organised knowledge. Wisdom is organised life” (Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804)) The 29th International Conference on Informatics for Environmental Protection and the third International...... was “Building the knowledge base for environmental action and sustainability”. The joint conference was designed to facilitate ‘within‐the‐domain’, as well as to create a space for developing synergies between the two communities. Altogether 125 research and applied papers (including extended abstracts) from 42...... abstracts of applied papers were published in the Adjunct Proceedings, together with abstracts of 26 poster submissions and 11 workshop descriptions. The conference aims at renewing and vitalizing the concept of scientific conferences with the help of a partly new design, tiled ”ConverStations”, sessions...

  11. Environmental Aspects Of Home Composting Of Organic Household Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Andersen, Jacob Kragh; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Six composting units were monitored during a two-year long experimental campaign. Data regarding chemical compositions of waste inputs and outputs, gaseous emissions and leachate productions were collected, organized in mass balances and assessed by means of LCA. The management of the home compos...

  12. Critical evaluation of environmental and economic performance of green buildings in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Cheuk-yi; 陳卓兒

    2015-01-01

    Due to the two key drivers, energy crisis and climate change, green buildings has become increasingly important around the world and many building environmental assessment methods have been developed to assess the performance of green buildings. However, it is sometimes criticized that the environmental performance of those certified green buildings may not be guaranteed in real situation. Some green technologies used in green buildings are found to be not cost effective. This study aims to c...

  13. Indoor environmental and air quality characteristics, building-related health symptoms, and worker productivity in a federal government building complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukcso, David; Guidotti, Tee Lamont; Franklin, Donald E; Burt, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Building Health Sciences, Inc. (BHS), investigated environmental conditions by many modalities in 71 discreet areas of 12 buildings in a government building complex that had experienced persistent occupant complaints despite correction of deficiencies following a prior survey. An online health survey was completed by 7,637 building occupants (49% response rate), a subset of whom voluntarily wore personal sampling apparatus and underwent medical evaluation. Building environmental measures were within current standards and guidelines, with few outliers. Four environmental factors were consistently associated with group-level building-related health complaints: physical comfort/discomfort, odor, job stress, and glare. Several other factors were frequently commented on by participants, including cleanliness, renovation and construction activities, and noise. Low relative humidity was significantly associated with lower respiratory and "sick building syndrome"-type symptoms. No other environmental conditions (including formaldehyde, PM10 [particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter indoor air quality standards, there is an identifiable population of occupants with a high prevalence of asthma and allergic disease who disproportionately report discomfort and lost productivity due to symptoms and that in "normal" buildings these outcome indicators are more closely associated with host factors than with environmental conditions. We concluded from the experience of this study that building-related health complaints should be investigated at the work-area level and not at a building-wide level. An occupant-centric medical evaluation should guide environmental investigations, especially when screening results of building indoor environmental and air quality measurements show that the building and its work areas are within regulatory standards and industry guidelines.

  14. Indoor environmental quality in non-residential buildings - experimental investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajc Tamara S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the part of the research that has been done at the Universities both in Belgrade and Thessaloniki, Greece, taking into account indoor environmental quality in office buildings and classrooms. The measurements that are presented were done in Process Equipment Design Laboratory at Aristotle University Thessaloniki, during March 2015. Indoor environmental quality regarding air temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 concentration in two representative offices is observed. The similar offices are located one on the north-east and the other one on the south-west side of the University building, so as to be representative of the orientation’s impact. Furthermore, the impact of natural ventilation on CO2 concentration and temperature is monitored, together with the offices’ occupancy. Recommended parameters for indoor air quality are compared and discussed on the base of several standards: SRPS EN 15251:2010, ASHRAE standards 55 and 62.1, and ISO 7730. The main objectives, as set from these standards are discussed, together with the investigation results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 33047

  15. Energy and environmental issues on building services engineering in the life-style of twenty-first century; 21 seiki no kankyo energy to life style no arikata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, N.

    2001-01-05

    The author discussed building services technologies that characterize twenty-first century in view of the energy, environment and life-style. Natural energy systems shall take a principal roll in this century from the energy and environmental point of view. Among building engineering issues, IT technologies such as BEMS and BOFD connected to the internet and backed by simulation technologies will become most important together with establishment of commissioning process. Home office will become the new life-style of the century and home environmental conditioning systems shall be further developed. As important social system issues, international relations and language matters, the education system of environmental system engineering and the licensing of professional engineers were discussed. Maintaining philosophy to seek for truth hidden behind the shadow was concluded as most important for environmental engineers. (author)

  16. Greenbelt Homes Pilot Program: Summary of Building Envelope Retrofits, Planned HVAC Equipment Upgrades, and Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [Partnership for Home Innovation, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Del Bianco, M. [Partnership for Home Innovation, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Mallay, D. [Partnership for Home Innovation, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2015-05-01

    In the fall of 2010, a multiyear pilot energy efficiency retrofit project was undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc, (GHI) a 1,566 home cooperative of circa 1930 and 1940 homes in Greenbelt, Maryland. GHI established this pilot project to serve as a basis for decision making for the rollout of a decade-long community-wide upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency improvements to the building envelope and mechanical equipment. It presents a unique opportunity to evaluate and prioritize the wide-range of benefits of high-performance retrofits based on member experience with and acceptance of the retrofit measures implemented during the pilot project. Addressing the complex interactions between benefits, trade-offs, construction methods, project management implications, realistic upfront costs, financing, and other considerations, serves as a case study for energy retrofit projects to include high-performance technologies based on the long-term value to the homeowner. The pilot project focused on identifying the added costs and energy savings benefits of improvements.

  17. Building Health Promotion into the Job of Home Care Aides: Transformation of the Workplace Health Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Naoko; Yin, Lijuan; Lin, Ting-Ti

    2017-04-05

    Home care aides (HCAs), predominantly women, constitute one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States. HCAs work in clients' homes that lack typical workplace resources and benefits. This mixed-methods study examined how HCAs' work environment was transformed by a pilot workplace health promotion program that targeted clients as well as workers. The intervention started with training HCAs to deliver a gentle physical activity program to their older clients in a Medicaid-funded home care program. Older HCAs aged 50+ reported increased time doing the types of physical activity that they delivered to their clients (stretching or strengthening exercise) (p = 0.027). Almost all (98%) HCAs were satisfied with the program. These quantitative results were corroborated by qualitative data from open-ended survey questions and focus groups. HCAs described how they exercised with clients and how the psychosocial work environment changed with the program. Building physical activity into HCAs' job is feasible and can effectively promote HCAs' health, especially among older HCAs.

  18. Building Health Promotion into the Job of Home Care Aides: Transformation of the Workplace Health Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Muramatsu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Home care aides (HCAs, predominantly women, constitute one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States. HCAs work in clients’ homes that lack typical workplace resources and benefits. This mixed-methods study examined how HCAs’ work environment was transformed by a pilot workplace health promotion program that targeted clients as well as workers. The intervention started with training HCAs to deliver a gentle physical activity program to their older clients in a Medicaid-funded home care program. Older HCAs aged 50+ reported increased time doing the types of physical activity that they delivered to their clients (stretching or strengthening exercise (p = 0.027. Almost all (98% HCAs were satisfied with the program. These quantitative results were corroborated by qualitative data from open-ended survey questions and focus groups. HCAs described how they exercised with clients and how the psychosocial work environment changed with the program. Building physical activity into HCAs’ job is feasible and can effectively promote HCAs’ health, especially among older HCAs.

  19. Building America Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings, Ithaca, New York; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, CARB monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  20. Sustainability of earth building materials - Environmental product declarations as an instrument of competition in building material industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Schroeder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the building process in terms of their environmental impact in all life cycle phases of a building leads to the key principle of sustainable building: the analysis of the life cycle of the materials used in a building. The goal of this analysis is to reduce waste and keep the environmental impact as low as possible by “closing” the cycle. During an inventory, the entire life cycle is assessed. This includes the sourcing and extracting of the raw material, the use of the raw material to produce building products, elements and structures, the use in finished buildings including emission of pollutants, decay and maintenance, and, finally, the demolition of the building and the recycling of the demolition materials. Transportation between the individual phases as well as production-related material and energy flows are also included in this evaluation. Several European and national norms and regulations define core rules and a special instrument for the evaluation of the sustainable quality of a building product based on a quantitative analysis of the life cycle of the materials used in a building: the Environmental Product Declaration EPD. These documents are voluntary standards, commitments or guarantees for building products. They are provided by producers, organizations and quality assurance associations in order to establish the “environmental performance” of buildings in the form of a certificate. Such declarations must fully include all phases of the life cycle of a product by describing the environmental impact during production and use as well as possible health hazards for the users. Until now, EPDs for earth building products do not exist. This paper will give current information about a project for developing EPDs for earth mortars and earth blocks started by the German Dachverband Lehm e.V. (DVL.

  1. Building dampness and mold in European homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, D; Zock, J-P; Plana, E; Heinrich, J; Tischer, C; Jacobsen Bertelsen, R; Sunyer, J; Künzli, N; Villani, S; Olivieri, M; Verlato, G; Soon, A; Schlünssen, V; Gunnbjörnsdottir, M I; Jarvis, D

    2017-02-11

    We studied dampness and mold in homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status (SES) across Europe, for 7127 homes in 22 centers. A subsample of 3118 homes was inspected. Multilevel analysis was applied, including age, gender, center, SES, climate, and building factors. Self-reported water damage (10%), damp spots (21%), and mold (16%) in past year were similar as observed data (19% dampness and 14% mold). Ambient temperature was associated with self-reported water damage (OR=1.63 per 10°C; 95% CI 1.02-2.63), damp spots (OR=2.95; 95% CI 1.98-4.39), and mold (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.04-4.67). Precipitation was associated with water damage (OR=1.12 per 100 mm; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) and damp spots (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Ambient relative air humidity was not associated with indoor dampness and mold. Older buildings had more dampness and mold (Pmanagerial/professional workers. There were correlations between reported and observed data at center level (Spearman rho 0.61 for dampness and 0.73 for mold). In conclusion, high ambient temperature and precipitation and high building age can be risk factors for dampness and mold in homes in Europe.

  2. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) - Better Buildings Neighborhood Program at Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training

  3. A Survey of Communications and Networking Technologies for Energy Management in Buildings and Home Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind Kailas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exploding power consumption in private households and increasing environmental and regulatory restraints, the need to improve the overall efficiency of electrical networks has never been greater. That being said, the most efficient way to minimize the power consumption is by voluntary mitigation of home electric energy consumption, based on energy-awareness and automatic or manual reduction of standby power of idling home appliances. Deploying bi-directional smart meters and home energy management (HEM agents that provision real-time usage monitoring and remote control, will enable HEM in “smart households.” Furthermore, the traditionally inelastic demand curve has began to change, and these emerging HEM technologies enable consumers (industrial to residential to respond to the energy market behavior to reduce their consumption at peak prices, to supply reserves on a as-needed basis, and to reduce demand on the electric grid. Because the development of smart grid-related activities has resulted in an increased interest in demand response (DR and demand side management (DSM programs, this paper presents some popular DR and DSM initiatives that include planning, implementation and evaluation techniques for reducing energy consumption and peak electricity demand. The paper then focuses on reviewing and distinguishing the various state-of-the-art HEM control and networking technologies, and outlines directions for promoting the shift towards a society with low energy demand and low greenhouse gas emissions. The paper also surveys the existing software and hardware tools, platforms, and test beds for evaluating the performance of the information and communications technologies that are at the core of future smart grids. It is envisioned that this paper will inspire future research and design efforts in developing standardized and user-friendly smart energy monitoring systems that are suitable for wide scale deployment in homes.

  4. Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and satisfaction aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design

    OpenAIRE

    Frontczak, Monika; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John; Arens, Edward A.; Zhang, Hui Ph.D; Wargocki, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    The paper examines which subjectively evaluated indoor environmental parameters and building features mostly affect occupants’ satisfaction in mainly US office buildings. The study analyzed data from a web-based survey administered to 52,980 occupants in 351 office buildings over ten years by the Center for the Built Environment. The survey uses 7-point ordered scale questions pertaining to satisfaction with indoor environmental parameters, workspace and building features. The average buildin...

  5. Green Template for Life Cycle Assessment of Buildings Based on Building Information Modeling: Focus on Embodied Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The increased popularity of building information modeling (BIM for application in the construction of eco-friendly green buildings has given rise to techniques for evaluating green buildings constructed using BIM features. Existing BIM-based green building evaluation techniques mostly rely on externally provided evaluation tools, which pose problems associated with interoperability, including a lack of data compatibility and the amount of time required for format conversion. To overcome these problems, this study sets out to develop a template (the “green template” for evaluating the embodied environmental impact of using a BIM design tool as part of BIM-based building life-cycle assessment (LCA technology development. Firstly, the BIM level of detail (LOD was determined to evaluate the embodied environmental impact, and constructed a database of the impact factors of the embodied environmental impact of the major building materials, thereby adopting an LCA-based approach. The libraries of major building elements were developed by using the established databases and compiled evaluation table of the embodied environmental impact of the building materials. Finally, the green template was developed as an embodied environmental impact evaluation tool and a case study was performed to test its applicability. The results of the green template-based embodied environmental impact evaluation of a test building were validated against those of its actual quantity takeoff (2D takeoff, and its reliability was confirmed by an effective error rate of ≤5%. This study aims to develop a system for assessing the impact of the substances discharged from concrete production process on six environmental impact categories, i.e., global warming (GWP, acidification (AP, eutrophication (EP, abiotic depletion (ADP, ozone depletion (ODP, and photochemical oxidant creation (POCP, using the life a cycle assessment (LCA method. To achieve this, we proposed an LCA method

  6. Does demolition or refurbishment of old and inefficient homes help to increase our environmental, social and economic viability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Anne [London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Sustainable Development Commission, Room 101, 55 Whitehall, c/o 3-8 Whitehall Place, London SW1A 2HH (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The issue of whether to demolish or refurbish older housing has been debated for over a century. It has been an active policy area since the late 1880s, when the Government first authorised the statutory demolition of insanitary slums. In the 1960s, revulsion at the scale of 'demolition blight' and new building caused a rethink, leading to a major reinvestment in inner city neighbourhoods of older housing. In the past 5 years, debate on demolition and new building has been intensified by the Government's Sustainable Communities Plan of 2003, with its proposals for large-scale clearance and building. Environmental arguments about renovating the existing stock have gained increasing prominence as people have sought to defend their communities from demolition. The evidence on whether demolition would reduce the amount of greenhouse gases we emit into the atmosphere is unclear and disputed. This paper summarises the evidence and arguments, and attempts to clarify the most realistic, achievable route to major reductions in energy use in homes. The arguments that apply to housing also apply to most other buildings and therefore to the overall built environment, which accounts for half of all carbon emissions. Three main sources of evidence have helped in the development of this paper, but there are many other studies we draw on in the discussion.

  7. Do Certified Buildings Enhance Indoor Environmental Quality and Performance of Office Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, Nuno Alexandre Faria; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of sustainability consciousness, the awareness of stakeholders for high performance buildings has also increased. The concept of green buildings has appeared. Several voluntary environmental rating schemes for buildings were created. Their focus has been energy conservation...... and environmental impacts. The schemes use different credit system for various variables and different approaches to rate indoor environmental quality (IEQ) (Figure 1). It is interesting to examine, whether human related factors are properly addressed in the schemes, especially considering the potential effects...

  8. Environmentally suitable building materials. Grey energy and sustainability of buildings; Umweltgerechte Baustoffe. Graue Energie und Nachhaltigkeit von Gebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueschel, Danny; Teller, Matthias (eds.)

    2013-02-01

    The editors of the book under consideration present a compilation of contributions on environmentally suitable building materials from different perspectives. It provides an overview of 'Grey Energy' and a total energy balance of buildings. The most contributions are based on lectures of a symposium in April, 2011, in the Knobelsdorff School in Berlin-Spandau (Federal Republic of Germany).

  9. Mountain home known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Mountain Home KGRA encompasses an area of 3853 hectares (ha) at the foot of the Mount Bennett Hills in Elmore County, Idaho. The site is associated with an arid climate and high winds that generate an acute dust problem. The KGRA lies adjacent to the northwest-southeast trending fault zone that reflects the northern boundary of the western Snake River Plain graben. Data indicate that a careful analysis of the subsidence potential is needed prior to extensive geothermal development. Surface water resources are confined to several small creeks. Lands are utilized for irrigated farmlands and rangeland for livestock. There are no apparent soil limitations to geothermal development. Sage grouse and mule deer are the major species of concern. The potential of locating significant heritage resources other than the Oregon Trail or the bathhouse debris appears to be relatively slight.

  10. Building Footprints, Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard Mitigation planning., Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Carroll County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Building Footprints dataset current as of 2010. Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard...

  11. Perceived Neighborhood and Home Environmental Factors Associated with Television Viewing among Taiwanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chun Hsueh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the associations between perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors and excessive television (TV viewing time among Taiwanese older adults. The sample data was collected by administering computer-assisted telephone interviewers to 980 Taiwanese older adults (aged ≥ 65 years living in two regions. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to examine the associations between self-reported perceived neighborhood and home environmental attributions and TV viewing time by using logistic regression analyses. The results showed that perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors were associated with excessive TV viewing time (≥2 h/day after adjusting for potential confounders. Compared with a reference group, older adults who perceived their neighborhoods to have unsafe traffic were more likely to report excessive TV viewing time (OR = 1.36, 95%CI = 1.02–1.82. Older adults who reported having two or more TV sets in the home (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.28–2.44 and having a TV in the bedroom (OR = 1.55, CI = 1.18–2.03 were also more likely to report excessive TV viewing time. Further longitudinal research can confirm these findings, and tailored interventions focusing on the perceptions of neighborhood traffic safety and TV access at home for older adults might be effective means of preventing excessive TV viewing time.

  12. Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

  13. Simulation Technology of Environmental Impacts by Zero-energy Residential Buildings Based on Emergy Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhou; XiaoLong Xue; WangShu Yang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation technology of environmental impact for the building. By emergy analysis method, emergy costs of building( or construction engineering) can be calculated in the life cycle. It includes the engineering cost, environmental cost and social cost of building. Through integrating GIS technology with multi-agent technology, life cycle substance and energy metabolism of building ( construction engineering) can be simulated and their environmental influence can be dynamically displayed. Based on the case study of entries works ‘Sunny Inside’ by Xiamen University in 2013 China International Solar Decathlon Competition, we discovered the changing pattern of surrounding environmental impact from waste streams of the zero-energy building and ordinary construction. The simulation results verified and showed the Odum principles of maximum power. This paper provides a new research perspective and integration approach for the environmental impact assessment in building and construction engineering. The result will help decision-making in design and construction engineering scheme.

  14. Shyness and Vocabulary: The Roles of Executive Functioning and Home Environmental Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion; Leerkes, Esther M.; Marcovitch, Stuart; Calkins, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Although shyness has often been found to be negatively related to vocabulary, few studies have examined the processes that produce or modify this relation. The present study examined executive functioning skills and home environmental stimulation as potential mediating and moderating mechanisms. A sample of 3 1/2-year-old children (N = 254) was…

  15. Environmental Relative Moldiness Index and Associations with Home Characteristics and Infant Wheeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possible relationships between mold contamination, as described by the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI), home characteristics, and the development of wheeze in the first year of life were evaluated among a cohort of urban infants (n = 103) in Syracuse, New York. Pre...

  16. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Zero Energy Ready Home Analysis, Elmsford, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Two multifamily buildings planned in Climate Zone 4 were analyzed to determine the cost, energy and performance implications of redesigning them to comply with Zero Energy Ready Home, a recognition program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Energy modeling was conducted on one representative apartment in each building using BEopt. Construction costs were obtained from the developer and subcontractors to determine savings and cost increases over ENERGY STAR. It was found that seven items would be necessary to change to comply with ZERH criteria when starting from the original design which was compliant with ENERGY STAR version 3.0. Design changes were made to the exterior walls, domestic water heating system, duct protection, duct design, garage ventilation, and pest control to comply with ZERH requirements. Energy impacts of upgrading from the original design to ZERH resulted in 2 to 8 percent reduction in modeled source energy consumption, or 1.7 to 10.4 MMBtu per year, although the original design was already about 8 percent better than a design configured to minimum ENERGY STAR criteria. According to the BEopt analysis, annualized energy related costs of the ZERH design were slightly higher for the apartment and slightly lower for the townhome when compared to the original design.

  17. Interprofessional team building in the palliative home care setting: Use of a conceptual framework to inform a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James; Kearney, Colleen; Glenns, Brenda; McKay, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Home-based palliative care is increasingly dependent on interprofessional teams to deliver collaborative care that more adequately meets the needs of clients and families. The purpose of this pilot evaluation was to qualitatively explore the views of an interprofessional group of home care providers (occupational therapists, nurses, personal support work supervisors, community care coordinators, and a team coordinator) regarding a pilot project encouraging teamwork in interprofessional palliative home care services. We used qualitative methods, informed by an interprofessional conceptual framework, to analyse participants' accounts and provide recommendations regarding strategies for interprofessional team building in palliative home health care. Findings suggest that encouraging practitioners to share past experiences and foster common goals for palliative care are important elements of team building in interprofessional palliative care. Also, establishing a team leader who emphasises sharing power among team members and addressing the need for mutual emotional support may help to maximise interprofessional teamwork in palliative home care. These findings may be used to develop and test more comprehensive efforts to promote stronger interprofessional teamwork in palliative home health care delivery.

  18. Students' Environmental Responsibility and Their Willingness to Pay for Green Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Sharmin; Celik, Bilge Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore environmental attitudes and how such attitudes, when combined with a specific cost, can affect environmental behavior. Environmental attitudes are important to study due to the rising belief by building occupants that they are owed safe, healthy, environmentally responsible, and comfortable living…

  19. Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frontczak, Monika Joanna; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines which indoor environmental parameters and building features contribute occupants’ satisfaction in office buildings. The study analyzed data from a web-based survey administered to 52,980 occupants in 351 office buildings over ten years at the Center for the Built Environment. T...

  20. Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and satisfaction aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frontczak, Monika Joanna; Schiavon, S.; Goins, J.

    2012-01-01

    The article examines which subjectively evaluated indoor environmental parameters and building features mostly affect occupants' satisfaction in mainly US office buildings. The study analyzed data from a web-based survey administered to 52 980 occupants in 351 office buildings over 10 years by th...

  1. Home transport and wastage: environmentally relevant household activities in the life cycle of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Ulf; Anteson, Frida; Davis, Jennifer; Sjödén, Per-Olow

    2005-06-01

    In environmental systems analysis of food production systems, the consumer phase (home transport, cooking, storing, and wastage) is an important contributor to the total life-cycle environmental impact. However, households are the least investigated part of the food chain. Information gathering about households involves difficulties; the number of households is large, and food-related activities are embedded in other household activities. In cooperation between researchers from environmental systems analysis and consumer research, Swedish households were surveyed by questionnaire, diary, and interviews. Data on home transport of food and wastage were collected. The average weekly driving distance was 28 to 63 km per household, depending on how trips made in conjunction with other errands are allocated. The wastage of prepared food ranged between 0 and 34% for different food categories, and wastage from storing between 0 and 164% (more food was discarded, e.g. by cleaning out a cupboard, than consumed). In both cases dairy products scored highest.

  2. The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris von Borgstede

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS. In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

  3. Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frontczak, Monika Joanna; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John

    2011-01-01

    . The survey uses 7-point scale questioning satisfaction with parameters related to the indoor environment, workspace and building features. Building occupants were generally satisfied with their workspaces and their buildings. Proportional odds ordinal logistic regression showed that satisfaction with all......The paper examines which indoor environmental parameters and building features contribute occupants’ satisfaction in office buildings. The study analyzed data from a web-based survey administered to 52,980 occupants in 351 office buildings over ten years at the Center for the Built Environment...

  4. Effect of a home intervention program on pediatric asthma in an environmental justice community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Zalika; Scott, Richard G; Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Johnson, John H; Williams, Ellen R; Hampton, Janiene; Ramprasad, Vatsala

    2015-03-01

    Asthma prevalence rates are at an all-time high in the United States with over 25 million persons diagnosed with asthma. African Americans and other minorities have higher asthma prevalence and higher exposure to environmental factors that worsen asthma as compared to Caucasians. This article describes the evaluation of an inner-city home-based asthma education and environmental remediation program that addressed both indoor and outdoor triggers through collaboration between a health system and local environmental justice organization. The program enrolled 132 children older than 2.5 years and centers on a 4- to 6-week intervention with peer counselors using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Asthma Home Environment Checklist and the You Can Control Asthma curriculum. Families receive asthma-friendly environmental home kits. Peer counselors reinforce key asthma management messages and facilitate the completion of Asthma Action Plans. The environmental justice community partner organized block cleanups to reduce outdoor triggers. The evaluation used a pretest-posttest design to assess changes in client behavior and asthma symptoms. Data were collected at baseline and during a 6-month postintervention period. Participants saw enhanced conditions on asthma severity and control. The improvement was greatest for children whose asthma was considered "severe" based on the validated Asthma Control Test. Other positive results include the following: greater completion of Asthma Action Plans, significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits (p = .006), and substantial decreases in school absenteeism (p = .008) and use of rescue medications (p = .049). The evaluation suggests that the program was effective in improving asthma self-management in a high-risk population living within an environmental justice community.

  5. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX); Phase 1 Test Procedure: Building Thermal Fabric Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, Ron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States; Polly, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States; Bianchi, Marcus [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States; Neymark, Joel [J. Neymark & Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This report documents the initial Phase 1 test process for testing the reliability of software models that predict retrofit energy savings of existing homes, including their associated calibration methods.

  6. Better Duct Systems for Home Heating and Cooling; Building Technologies Program (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    Duct systems used in forced-air space-conditioning systems are a vital element in home energy efficiency. How well a system works makes a big difference in the cost and the effectiveness of heating and cooling a home.

  7. Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Greenbelt Homes, Inc. Pilot Retrofit Program; Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    In the fall of 2010, a multiyear pilot energy efficiency retrofit project was undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc, (GHI) a 1,566 home cooperative of circa 1930 and 1940 homes in Greenbelt, Maryland. GHI established this pilot project to serve as a basis for decision making for the rollout of a decade-long community-wide upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency improvements to the building envelope and mechanical equipment. With the community upgrade fully funded by the cooperative through their membership without outside subsidies, this project presents a unique opportunity to evaluate and prioritize the wide-range of benefits of high-performance retrofits based on member experience with and acceptance of the retrofit measures implemented during the pilot project. Addressing the complex interactions between benefits, trade-offs, construction methods, project management implications, realistic upfront costs, financing, and other considerations, serves as a case study for energy retrofit projects to include high-performance technologies based on the long-term value to the homeowner. The pilot project focused on identifying the added costs and energy savings benefits of improvements. Phase 1: baseline evaluation for a representative set of 28 homes sited in seven buildings; Phase 2: installation of the building envelope improvements and continued monitoring of the energy consumption for the heating season and energy simulations supporting recommendations for HVAC and water heating upgrades to be implemented in Phase 3.

  8. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  9. Building heating technology in Smart Home using PI System management tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vanus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For comfortable remote monitoring of some operational and technical functions inside own Smart Home building, it is possible to use a lot of useful programmes and tools. However, not each programme or tool is suited to this purpose, or it does not offer required functionality. The aim of this paper is to describe using an appropriate software tool of PI System for a real-time monitoring of acquired data from real technology parts located at a training centre of the Moravian-Silesian Wood Cluster. Then a superior system including applications of PI Coresight and PI ProcessBook is used for analysis and processing of these acquired data (e.g. by using the Dynamic Time Warping method for specific technological quantities. Each application has own advantages and disadvantages, which are evaluated in conjunction with possibilities of manipulating the data. In an experimental part, there are also applied a technological communication standard of BACnet to controlling heating, cooling and forced ventilation, and a software tool of DESIGO Insight for visualising the data in forms of tables, multi-layer graphs, and screens for a certain technology.

  10. Using EnergyPlus to Perform Dehumidification Analysis on Building America Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Winkler, Jon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Dane [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This study used EnergyPlus to investigate humidity issues on a typical mid-1990s reference home, a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code home, and a high-performance home in a hot-humid climate; the study confirmed that supplemental dehumidification should be provided to maintain space relative humidity below 60% in a hot-humid climate.

  11. Specification of an Information Delivery Tool to Support Optimal Holistic Environmental and Energy Management in Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, James; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2008-07-01

    Building performance assessment for the operational phase of a building's life cycle is heuristic, typically working from available historical metered data and focusing on bulk energy assessment. Building Management Systems are used in the operational phase of the building to control the building's internal environment according to the design criteria outlined during the design phase. Recent developments in mechanisms that communicate building performance such as standardized building performance objectives and metrics enable the use of the output from whole building energy simulation tools by nontechnical personnel and all project stakeholders. This paper proposes to specify and demonstrate the utilization of an Information Delivery Tool that supports optimum holistic environmental and energy analysis aimed at an established profile of building managers utilizing standardized performance objectives and metrics.

  12. Environmental perceptions of residents of a multifunctional building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael L. Berger

    1977-01-01

    A multifunctional building in which residents could live, work, and entertain themselves without contact with the surrounding external urban environment is the subject of this study. To what extent do inhabitants of this structure perceive their thermal and acoustical environments within the building to be different from or similar to that outside? To what degree are...

  13. [The non-specific environmental syndromes MCS (Multiple Chemical Sensitivity), IEI (Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance) and SBS (Sick Building Syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csef, H

    1998-11-30

    This review starts with a clinical description of the most common unspecific environmental diseases, such as Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), Idiopathic Environmental Intolerances (IEI) and Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). These syndromes are very controversial discussed between scientific medicine and "clinical ecology". In addition, they have fundamental similarities to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia. Finally the spectrum of therapeutic approaches is discussed.

  14. Hybrid LCA model for assessing the embodied environmental impacts of buildings in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Minho, E-mail: minmin40@hanmail.net [Asset Management Division, Mate Plus Co., Ltd., 9th Fl., Financial News Bldg. 24-5 Yeouido-dong, Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul, 150-877 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Taehoon, E-mail: hong7@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Changyoon, E-mail: chnagyoon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The assessment of the embodied environmental impacts of buildings can help decision-makers plan environment-friendly buildings and reduce environmental impacts. For a more comprehensive assessment of the embodied environmental impacts of buildings, a hybrid life cycle assessment model was developed in this study. The developed model can assess the embodied environmental impacts (global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical ozone creation, abiotic depletion, and human toxicity) generated directly and indirectly in the material manufacturing, transportation, and construction phases. To demonstrate the application and validity of the developed model, the environmental impacts of an elementary school building were assessed using the developed model and compared with the results of a previous model used in a case study. The embodied environmental impacts from the previous model were lower than those from the developed model by 4.6–25.2%. Particularly, human toxicity potential (13 kg C{sub 6}H{sub 6} eq.) calculated by the previous model was much lower (1965 kg C{sub 6}H{sub 6} eq.) than what was calculated by the developed model. The results indicated that the developed model can quantify the embodied environmental impacts of buildings more comprehensively, and can be used by decision-makers as a tool for selecting environment-friendly buildings. - Highlights: • The model was developed to assess the embodied environmental impacts of buildings. • The model evaluates GWP, ODP, AP, EP, POCP, ADP, and HTP as environmental impacts. • The model presents more comprehensive results than the previous model by 4.6–100%. • The model can present the HTP of buildings, which the previous models cannot do. • Decision-makers can use the model for selecting environment-friendly buildings.

  15. Preparation and production of a home builders' guide. Building and selling energy-efficient homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keast, D. N.; Mahoney, J. M.; McMahon, N. M.; Troy, M. H.; Wood, E. W.

    1977-06-01

    Procedures used in the preparation of a manual on the construction of energy-saving one- and two-family houses are described. Prior to writing the manual, builders were interviewed and a bibliographic search was conducted to obtain information on the design, construction and marketing of energy conserving homes. The packaging and distribution of the manual was planned. When written FEA will publish the manual. (ERA citation 04:044977)

  16. Environmental and Sustainable Technology Evaluations (ESTE): Verification of Microbial Resistant Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an ESTE project summary brief. Many of the finished interior surfaces of homes and buildings are composed of materials that are prone to mold growth. These surfaces include gypsum board, wood flooring, insulation, and components of the heating and air conditioning system...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: GREEN BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techno...

  18. A Smart Green Building: An Environmental Health Control Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Ting Huang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the establishment of an environmental health information management platform providing residential users with a comfortable, healthy indoor environment. Taking the S House as an example, the study: (1 assigned environmental health performance indicators, (2 established constraints to maintain environmental conditions, and (3 provided optimized management control mechanisms and methods. The environmental health information management platform provides an optimized control and solution pathway ensuring the quality of the indoor health environment and equipment energy conservation.

  19. Building the knowledge base for environmental action and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    ) and its Special Interest group Environmental Informatics, Informatics for Environmental Protection, Sustainability and Risk Management, which has a longstanding tradition of discussing fundamental aspects in the field of Environmental Informatics.   ICT4S is a series of research conferences bringing...

  20. The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project: a successful and practical U.S.-Mexico border initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster-Cox, Susan C; Mangadu, Thenral; Jacquez, Benjamín; Fullerton, Lynne

    2010-05-01

    The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project (Proyecto de Salud Ambiental y Seguridad en el Hogar) has been developed in response to a wide array of severe and often preventable environmental health issues occurring in and around homes on the U.S.-Mexico border. Utilizing well-trained community members, called promotoras , homes are visited and assessed for potential environmental hazards, including home fire and food safety issues. Data analyzed from project years 2002 to 2005 shows a significant impact in knowledge levels and initial behavior change among targeted participants as it relates to fire and food safety issues. Since the initiation of the project in 1999, hundreds of participants have improved their quality of life by making their homes safer. The project has proven to be sustainable, replicable, flexible, and attractive to funders.

  1. Building America Case Study: Accelerating the Delivery of Home-Performance Upgrades Using a Synergistic Business Model, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Achieving Building America energy savings goals (40 percent by 2030) will require many existing homes to install energy upgrades. Engaging large numbers of homeowners in building science-guided upgrades during a single remodeling event has been difficult for a number of reasons. Performance upgrades in existing homes tend to occur over multiple years and usually result from component failures (furnace failure) and weather damage (ice dams, roofing, siding). This research attempted to: A) Understand the homeowner's motivations regarding investing in building science based performance upgrades. B) Determining a rapidly scalable approach to engage large numbers of homeowners directly through existing customer networks. C) Access a business model that will manage all aspects of the contractor-homeowner-performance professional interface to ensure good upgrade decisions over time. The solution results from a synergistic approach utilizing networks of suppliers merging with networks of homeowner customers. Companies in the $400 to $800 billion home services industry have proven direct marketing and sales proficiencies that have led to the development of vast customer networks. Companies such as pest control, lawn care, and security have nurtured these networks by successfully addressing the ongoing needs of homes. This long-term access to customers and trust established with consistent delivery has also provided opportunities for home service providers to grow by successfully introducing new products and services like attic insulation and air sealing. The most important component for success is a business model that will facilitate and manage the process. The team analyzes a group that developed a working model.

  2. Environmental Assessment Methodologies for Commercial Buildings: An Elicitation Study of U.S. Building Professionals’ Beliefs on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Kientzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary environmental programs (VEPs have become increasingly popular around the world to address energy efficiency issues that mandatory building codes have not been able to tackle. Even though the utility of voluntary schemes is widely debated, they have become a de facto reality for many professionals in the building and construction sector. One topic that is neglected, however, in both academic and policy discussions, relates to how professionals (architects, engineers, real estate developers, etc. perceive the rise of voluntary rating schemes. In order to fill this gap in the literature, the present study investigates beliefs underlying adoption behavior regarding one of the most prominent voluntary assessment and certification programs in the U.S. building industry, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED scheme. In this paper, an elicitation study, based on 14 semi-structured interviews with building professionals in the North East of the United States, was conducted to analyze this question. Building on the Reasoned Action Approach, this paper shows that, in addition to more conventional factors such as financial calculations and marketing aspects, the understanding of beliefs held by building professionals offers important insights into their decisions to work with Voluntary Environmental Assessment and Rating Programs.

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes a low-cost, low-tech attic insulation technique developed by the ARIES Building America team with help from Southern Energy Homes and Johns Manville. Increasing attic insulation in manufactured housing has been a significant challenge due to cost, production and transportation constraints. The simplicity of this dense-pack solution to increasing attic insulation R-value promises real hope for widespread industry adoption.

  4. Building America Case Study: Excavationless Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NorthernSTAR

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  5. Heavy rainfall: An underestimated environmental risk for buildings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golz Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Second, heavy rain may result in urban pluvial flooding due to sewer overflow that cause severe damage to buildings. A comprehensive study of the impacts and the consequences in Dresden (Germany, presented in the paper, revealed that the potential risks of flooding from sewers due to hydraulic overload can be estimated on building scale using the model approach IVART (Integrated Spatial Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Tool. Modelling results provide the basis to quantify the effectiveness and efficiency of flood resilience technologies.

  6. 24 CFR 570.205 - Eligible planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. 570.205 Section 570.205..., urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. (a) Planning... known or suspected environmental contamination. (5) (6) Policy—planning—management—capacity building...

  7. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part I. Understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parady, W. Harold; Turner, J. Howard

    1980-06-01

    This is a training program to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic guide, which contains three parts. Part I considers the following: understanding the importance of energy; developing a concern for conserving energy; understanding the use of energy in buildings; care and maintenance of energy-efficient buildings; and developing energy-saving habits. A bibliography is presented.

  8. Research on linguistic concept creation method applied to environmental comfort sensors in health smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Li; Wenxue, Hong; Jialin, Song; Jiannan, Kang

    2005-01-01

    We endeavor to provide a novel tool to evaluate environmental comfort level in Health Smart Home (HSH). HSH is regarded a good alternative for the independent life of elders and people with disability. Numerous intelligent devices, installed within a home environment, can provide the resident with continuous monitoring and comfortable environment. In this paper, a novel method of evaluating environmental comfort level is provided. An intelligent sensor is a fuzzy comfort sensor that can measure and fusion the environmental parameters. Based upon the results, it will further give a linguistic description about the environmental comfort level, in the manner of an expert system. The core of the sensor is multi-parameter information fusion. Similar to human behavior, the sensor makes all the evaluation about the surrounding environment's comfort level based on the symbolic measurement theory. We applied chart representation theory in multivariate analysis in the biomedical engineering field to complete the human comfortable sensor's linguistic concept creation. We achieved better performance when using this method to complete multi-parameter fusion and fuzziness. It is our belief that this method can be used in both biology intelligent sensing and many other areas, where the quantitative and qualitative information transform is needed.

  9. Green procurement of buildings: estimation of environmental impact and life-cycle cost

    OpenAIRE

    Sterner, Eva

    2002-01-01

    This thesis focuses on environmental impact reduction and life-cycle cost estimations in building procurement. The aim for the work presented in this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of whether costs and environmental impact of a building can be integrated in a, from the users perspective, practical model applied for tender evaluation. The model should also be able to use as a base of evaluating different solutions in the design phase. Specifically this means to: Increase knowledg...

  10. Making the Case for Green Building: Cataloging the Benefits of Environmentally Responsible Design & Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alex

    2008-01-01

    To those entrenched in the green building world, the benefits seem obvious. Why would anyone choose to build in a way that isn't comfortable, healthy, energy efficient, and environmentally responsible? Even within a single college or university project, different team members often have different reasons for promoting a green agenda. Architects…

  11. Higher Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) Values Measured in Homes of Asthmatic Children in Boston, Kansas City, and San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Stephen; Barnes, Charles; Ciaccio, Christina E.; Johanns, Alan; Kennedy, Kevin; Murphy, Johnna S.; Nunez-Alvarez, Arcela; Sandel, Megan T.; Cox, David; Dewalt, Gary; Ashley, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mold in water-damaged homes has been linked to asthma. Our objective was to test a new metric to quantify mold exposures in asthmatic children’s homes in three widely dispersed cities in the United States. Methods The Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) metric was created by the US Environmental Protection Agency, with assistance by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), to quantify mold contamination in US homes. The ERMI values in homes of asthmatic children were determined for the three widely dispersed cities of Boston, Kansas City, and San Diego. Results Asthmatic children in Boston (n = 76), Kansas City (n = 60), and San Diego (n = 93) were found to be living in homes with significantly higher ERMI values than were found in homes randomly selected during the 2006 HUD American Healthy Homes Survey (AHHS) from the same geographic areas (n = 34, 22, and 28, respectively). Taken together, the average ERMI value in the homes with an asthmatic child was 8.73 compared to 3.87 for the AHHS homes. In addition, Kansas City homes of children with “Mild, Moderate, or Severe Persistent Asthma” had average ERMI value of 12.4 compared to 7.9 for homes of children with only “Mild Intermittent Asthma.” Aspergillus niger was the only mold of the 36 tested which was measured in significantly greater concentration in the homes of asthmatic children in all three cities. Conclusion High ERMI values were associated with homes of asthmatic children in three widely dispersed cities in the United States. PMID:23137280

  12. Socio-demographic, psychosocial and home-environmental attributes associated with adults' domestic screen time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Neville

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sedentary behaviors (involving prolonged sitting time are associated with deleterious health consequences, independent of (lack of physical activity. To inform interventions, correlates of prevalent sedentary behaviors need to be identified. We examined associations of socio-demographic, home-environmental and psychosocial factors with adults' TV viewing time and leisure-time Internet use; and whether psychosocial and environmental correlates differed according to gender, age and educational attainment. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Ghent, Belgium, between March and May 2010. Respondents to a mail-out survey (n = 419; 20-65 years; mean age 48.5 [12.1] years; 47.3% men completed a questionnaire on sedentary behaviors and their potential socio-demographic, psychosocial and home environmental correlates. Statistical analyses were performed using multiple linear regression models. Results The independent variables explained 31% of the variance in TV viewing time and 38% of the variance in leisure-time Internet use. Higher education, greater perceived pros of and confidence about reducing TV time were negatively associated with TV viewing time; older age, higher body mass index, larger TV set size and greater perceived cons of reducing TV time showed positive associations. Perceived pros of and confidence about reducing Internet use were negatively associated with leisure-time Internet use; higher education, number of computers in the home, positive family social norms about Internet use and perceived cons of reducing Internet use showed positive associations. None of the socio-demographic factors moderated these associations. Conclusions Educational level, age, self-efficacy and pros/cons were the most important correlates identified in this study. If further cross-sectional and longitudinal research can confirm these findings, tailored interventions focusing on both psychosocial and environmental factors in

  13. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 4; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Mixed-Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the mixed-humid climate region.

  14. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Cold and Very Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-08-01

    The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates.

  15. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  16. An Analysis of the Most Adopted Rating Systems for Assessing the Environmental Impact of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bernardi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rating systems for assessing the environmental impact of buildings are technical instruments that aim to evaluate the environmental impact of buildings and construction projects. In some cases, these rating systems can also cover urban-scale projects, community projects, and infrastructures. These schemes are designed to assist project management in making the projects more sustainable by providing frameworks with precise criteria for assessing the various aspects of a building’s environmental impact. Given the growing interest in sustainable development worldwide, many rating systems for assessing the environmental impact of buildings have been established in recent years, each one with its peculiarities and fields of applicability. The present work is motivated by an interest in emphasizing such differences to better understand these rating systems and extract the main implications to building design. It also attempts to summarize in a user-friendly form the vast and fragmented assortment of information that is available today. The analysis focuses on the six main rating systems: the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology (BREEAM, the Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficiency (CASBEE, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltiges Bauen (DGNB, the Haute Qualité Environnementale (HQETM, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED, and the Sustainable Building Tool (SBTool.

  17. The environmental impact of the animal husbandry buildings (B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÎRBU Marcela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Microclimates parameters can be conducted by endowment with proper equipments and installations thatinside space is to satisfy animal’s biological needs, sometimes on economic ways. The aggressive environmentsfrom husbandry buildings react on building materials. The concrete is recommended to avoid cracking ofconcrete using the corrosion resistant iron like reinforcement. The brickwork - The non-corrodibility can beimproved with petroleum impregnation, bitumen or tar coal, obtaining black bricks resistant to acids and bases.The wood - The fungi constituted the most dangerous wood degradation agents, as much through the rottennesseffect as through attack quick extension. The fungi grow on wood in high humidity conditions from husbandryconstructions.

  18. Pigeon navigation: exposure to environmental odours prior to release is sufficient for homeward orientation, but not for homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardo, Anna; Pollonara, Enrica; Wikelski, Martin

    2016-08-15

    The role of environmental olfactory information in pigeon navigation has been extensively studied by analysing vanishing bearing distributions and homing performances of homing pigeons subjected to manipulation of their olfactory perception and/or the olfactory information they were exposed to during transportation and at the release site. However, their behaviour during the homing flight remains undocumented. In this experiment we report the analysis of tracks of birds made anosmic at the release site by washing their olfactory mucosa with zinc sulfate. We thus can assess the role of local odours at the release site as well as the role of environmental odours perceived on the way, far from the release site. We observed that pigeons transported and kept at the release site in purified air and made anosmic at the release site were unable to orient towards home and were impaired at homing. By contrast, pigeons allowed to smell environmental odours during transportation and at the release site, although made anosmic prior to release, displayed unimpaired homeward orientation, but nevertheless showed impaired homing performance. These results are consistent with the view that local odours at the release site are critical for determining the direction of displacement (olfactory map) and suggest that pigeons consult the olfactory map also during their homing flight in order to be able to find their way home.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Boulder, Colorado, that scored HERS 38 without PV and 0 with PV. This 2,504 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls, superior insulation a ground-source heat pump, ERV, and triple-pane windows.

  20. Embodied Germ Cell at Work: Building an Expansive Concept of Physical Mobility in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engestrom, Yrjo; Nummijoki, Jaana; Sannino, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a process of collective formation of a new concept of mobility between home care workers and their elderly clients, who are at risk of losing physical mobility and functional capacity. A new tool called mobility agreement was introduced to facilitate the inclusion of regular mobility exercises in home care visits and in the…

  1. Assessing the effects of building social intelligence in a robotic interface for the home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, B.E.R. de; Saini, P.; Markopoulos, P.; Breemen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports an exploration of the concept of social intelligence in the context of designing home dialogue systems for an Ambient Intelligence home. It describes a Wizard of Oz experiment involving a robotic interface capable of simulating several human social behaviours. Our results show tha

  2. A home automation based environmental sound alert for people experiencing hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Matthias; Bruck, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Different assistive technologies are available for deaf people (i.e. deaf, deafened, and hard of hearing). Besides the well-known hearing aid, devices for detection of sound events that occur at home or at work (e.g. doorbell, telephone) are available. Despite the technological progress in the last years and resulting new possibilities, the basic functions and concepts of such devices have not changed. The user still needs special assistive technology that is bound to the home or work environment. In this contribution a new concept for awareness of events in buildings is presented. In contrast to state-of-the-art assistive devices, it makes use of modern Information and Communication and home automation technology, and thus offers the prospect of cheap implementation and higher comfort for the user. In this concept events are indicated by notifications that are send over a Bluetooth Low Energy mesh network from a source to the user. The notifications are received by the user's smartwatch and the event is indicated by vibration and an icon representing its source.

  3. Satisfaction and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Frontczak, Monika; Schiavon, Stefano;

    2012-01-01

    The paper examines how satisfaction with indoor environmental parameters and building features affects satisfaction and self-estimated job performance. The analyses used subjective responses from around 50, 000 occupants collected mainly in US office buildings using a web-based survey administered...... by the Center for the Built Environment (CBE) over the period of ten years. Overall satisfaction with the workspace significantly improved self-estimated job performance; increased satisfaction with temperature was estimated to provide the greatest improvement in self-estimated job performance, followed...... environmental quality and building design are used, and that they should consider whether comfort or working morale are expected to be improved....

  4. Building an environmentally accountable medical curriculum through international collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walpole, Sarah Catherine; Vyas, Aditya; Maxwell, Janie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Global environmental change is associated with significant health threats. The medical profession can address this challenge through advocacy, health system adaptation and workforce preparedness. Stewardship of health systems with attention to their environmental impacts can contribute......: At the 2016 Association for Medical Education in Europe conference, medical educators, students and clinicians from six continents discussed these challenges in a participatory workshop. Here we reflect on emerging themes from the workshop and how to plan for curricular change. Firstly, we outline recent...

  5. Final Environmental Assessment: Demolish Buildings 1115, 1116, and 1125

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    groomed to a height of less than 3 inches (HAFB, 2011b). The existing site of Buildings 1115 and 1116 is a narrow flat site with landscaped grass...to minimize the potential for damage. Smaller trees and shrubs may be cleared incidental to other demolition activities. Existing grassy vegetation...may be cleared incidental to other demolition activities. Existing grassy vegetation related to the “swing space” area is also likely to be

  6. Occupants' satisfaction toward building environmental quality: structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruzzaman, Syahrul Nizam; Egbu, C O; Zawawi, Emma Marinie Ahmad; Karim, Saipol Bari Abd; Woon, Chen Jia

    2015-05-01

    It is accepted that occupants who are more satisfied with their workplace's building internal environment are more productive. The main objective of the study was to measure the occupants' level of satisfaction and the perceived importance of the design or refurbishment on office conditions. The study also attempted to determine the factors affecting the occupants' satisfaction with their building or office conditions. Post-occupancy evaluations were conducted using a structured questionnaire developed by the Built Environment Research Group at the University of Manchester, UK. Our questionnaires incorporate 22 factors relating to the internal environment and rate these in terms of "user satisfaction" and "degree of importance." The questions were modified to reflect the specific setting of the study and take into consideration the local conditions and climate in Malaysia. The overall mean satisfaction of the occupants toward their office environment was 5.35. The results were measured by a single item of overall liking of office conditions in general. Occupants were more satisfied with their state of health in the workplace, but they were extremely dissatisfied with the distance away from a window. The factor analysis divided the variables into three groups, namely intrusion, air quality, and office appearance. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was then used to determine which factor had the most significant influence on occupants' satisfaction: appearance. The findings from the study suggest that continuous improvement in aspects of the building's appearance needs to be supported with effective and comprehensive maintenance to sustain the occupants' satisfaction.

  7. Environmental Perceptions and Health before and after Relocation to a Green Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNaughton, Piers; Spengler, John; Vallarino, Jose; Santanam, Suresh; Satish, Usha; Allen, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Green buildings are designed to have low environmental impacts and improved occupant health and well-being. Improvements to the built environment including ventilation, lighting, and materials have resulted in improved indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in green buildings, but the evidence around occupant health is currently centered around environmental perceptions and self-reported health. To investigate the objective impact of green buildings on health, we tracked IEQ, self-reported health, and heart rate in 30 participants from green and conventional buildings for two weeks. 24 participants were then selected to be relocated to the Syracuse Center of Excellence, a LEED platinum building, for six workdays. While they were there, ventilation, CO2, and volatile organic compound (VOC) levels were changed on different days to match the IEQ of conventional, green, and green+ (green with increased ventilation) buildings. Participants reported improved air quality, odors, thermal comfort, ergonomics, noise and lighting and fewer health symptoms in green buildings prior to relocation. After relocation, participants consistently reported fewer symptoms during the green building conditions compared to the conventional one, yet symptom counts were more closely associated with environmental perceptions than with measured IEQ. On average, participants had 4.7 times the odds of reporting a lack of air movement, 1.4 more symptoms (p-value = 0.019) and a 2 bpm higher heart rate (p-value < 0.001) for a 1000 ppm increase in indoor CO2 concentration. These findings suggest that occupant health in green and conventional buildings is driven by both environmental perceptions and physiological pathways.

  8. Building America Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification, Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor. 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  9. Sick Building Syndrome Among Junior High School Students in Japan in Relation to the Home and School Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Motoko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Norbäck, Dan

    2015-06-12

    There is an increasing concern about sick building syndrome (SBS), especially in Asia. The aim of this study is to investigate associations between SBS and the home, school environment and personal factors among Japanese junior high school students. We investigated students in four junior high schools in Hyogo in Kansai area, Japan. A questionnaire study was performed among students (n=1056), 12-15 years old. Temperature and relative air humidity was measured in the classrooms and dust was collected from the classroom floors and air and was analysed for cat and dog allergens. Associations were analysed by multi-level logistic regression. Mucosal symptoms (45.4%), general symptoms (38.9%) and skin symptoms (22.6%) were common. Totally 8.8% reported cat allergy, 6.1% dog allergy, 6.0% mold allergy and 25.7% pollen allergy. Atopy, window pane condensation, floor dampness and odor at home and high relative air humidity in the classrooms were associated with SBS. The prevalence of SBS symptoms was high and associated with both home and school environment. Window pane condensation and floor dampness at home can increase the risk for SBS symptoms in students. Moreover high relative air humidity at school may increase the risk for SBS.

  10. Building America Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification, Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor. 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  11. Building America Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home and the Challenge of Hot Water on Demand, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    "This report outlines the steps a developer can use when looking to create and implement higher performance standards such as the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) standards in a community. The report also describes the specific examples of how this process was followed by a developer, Forest City, in the Stapleton community in Denver, Colorado. IBACOS described the steps used to begin to bring the DOE ZERH standard to the Forest City Stapleton community based on 15 years of community-scale development work done by IBACOS. As a result of this prior IBACOS work, the team gained an understanding of the various components that a master developer needs to consider and created strategies for incorporating those components in the initial phases of development to achieve higher performance buildings in the community. An automated scoring system can be used to perform an internal audit that provides a detailed and consistent evaluation of how several homes under construction or builders' floor plans compare with the requirements of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program. This audit can be performed multiple times at specific milestones during construction to allow the builder to make changes as needed throughout construction for the project to meet Zero Energy Ready Home standards. This scoring system also can be used to analyze a builder's current construction practices and design.

  12. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 13: Energy Performance Techniques and Technologies: Preserving Historic Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Michelle L.; Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Makela, Erin KB; Schneider, Elaine C.; Kaufman, Ned

    2011-03-01

    This guide is a resource to help contractors renovate historic houses, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. The best practices described in this document are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. Building America brings together the nation’s leading building scientists with over 300 production builders to develop, test, and apply innovative, energy-efficient construction practices. The guide is available for download from the DOE Building America website www.buildingamerica.gov.

  13. [Environmental health and inequalities: building indicators for sustainable development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Fernando Ferreira; Franco Netto, Guilherme; Corvalan, Carlos; de Freitas, Carlos Machado; Sales, Luiz Belino Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Despite its progress in terms of socio-economic indicators, Brazil is still unequal, which is due to an unequal and exclusionary historical process. In this paper we selected the Human Development Index - HDI and other social, economic, environmental and health indicators to exemplify this situation. We selected the municipalities that had the lowest HDI in the country in 2000 comparing their evolution over time between 2000 and 2010 by means of indicators linked to the economic, environmental and social pillars of sustainable development. These municipalities have an HDI classified as low (sustainable development with quality of life, the improvement of sanitation and education indicators should be a priority for Brazil.

  14. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile describes the Standard for Home Performance-Related Data Transfer (known as HPXML), developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, which facilitates smooth communication between program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software,

  15. Building America Energy Renovations. A Business Case for Home Performance Contracting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Antonopoulos, C. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevigny, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilbride, T. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hefty, M. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This research report gives an overview of the needs and opportunities that exist in the U.S. home performance contracting industry. The report discusses industry trends, market drivers, different business models, and points of entry for existing and new businesses hoping to enter the home performance contracting industry. Case studies of eight companies who successfully entered the industry are provided, including business metrics, start-up costs, and marketing approaches.

  16. Building up a Virtual Community for Home-Based Chronic Diseases Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yan; Bai, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    With the development of Internet, social networks get more and more popular, it brings us an idea of designing a virtual community for home-based chronic diseases healthcare. In this paper, we conduct a questionnaire to gather the requirements of the community and describe them with user stories. Afterwards, a conceptual prototype is developed based on the requirements. The proposed virtual community involves healthcare providers, healthcare recipients and other people relevant to the home-ba...

  17. Using EnergyPlus to Perform Dehumidification Analysis on Building America Homes: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2011-03-01

    A parametric study was conducted using EnergyPlus version 6.0 to investigate humidity issues on a typical mid-1990s reference home, a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code home, and a high-performance home in a hot-humid climate. The impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls are analyzed on the high performance home. The study examined the combined effects of infiltration and mechanical ventilation with balanced and unbalanced mechanical ventilation systems. Indoor relative humidity excursions were examined; specifically, the number of excursions, average excursion length, and maximum excursion length. Space relative humidity, thermal comfort, and whole-house source energy consumption were analyzed for indoor relative humidity set points of 50%, 55%, and 60%. The study showed and explained why similar trends of high humidity were observed in all three homes regardless of energy efficiency, and why humidity problems are not necessarily unique in high-performance homes. Thermal comfort analysis indicated that occupants are unlikely to notice indoor humidity problems. The study confirmed that supplemental dehumidification should be provided to maintain space relative humidity below 60% in a hot-humid climate.

  18. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-03-01

    The following activities were completed by the end of the quarter: (1) The CERT Executive Director invited a cross section of CERT member Tribes to participate in the project. By the end of the quarter, three Tribes had the invitation under active consideration, four Tribes expressed interest but wanted to see the detailed workplan prior to making a final decision and one Tribe, the Navajo Nation has accepted the invitation. (2) The CERT Board of Directors Executive Committee has endorsed two significant environmental policy priorities for consideration in the project. First, how does the federal Indian trust responsibility to land and natural resources as well as for the health, safety and political integrity of Indian Tribes affect the federal responsibility for facility cleanup and other statutory mandates under federal environmental statutes? And second, What are the protocols of government-to-government relations within a federal system of shared sovereignty and shared governmental responsibilities? And the corollaries to that question, What is the federal obligation for consultation with Tribes and how is that different and similar to consultation with states? And, What is the federal obligation to work cooperatively with Tribes and states in recognition of the three sovereigns of the American federal system? (3) The CERT consulted with political leaders and environmental staff of member and non-member Tribes. This consultation centered on three environmental policy priorities: issues concerning the intergovernmental interface between states, Tribes and federal government agencies and programs; Issues with the cleanup of federal facilities and activities that have damaged Tribal environmental resources; and issues concerning the DOE cleanup of federal facilities used in the production of nuclear weapons.

  19. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 1; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot and Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-12-01

    This Building America Best Practices guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot and humid climate.

  20. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 5; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Marine Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-10-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in the Marine climate region.

  1. Clues to Technical Intervention’s Role in New Home Market Transformation: A Measure of Penetration Rates Using Building America and ENERGY STAR Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Steward, Heidi E.; Elliott, Douglas B.

    2006-08-13

    An important part of transforming markets is motivating manufacturers to improve their products. In the case of housing, manufacturers consist of a complex mix of builders ranging from Fortune 500 companies building thousands of homes per year all over the country, to small local companies that may build less than ten homes per year. Motivating these diverse companies to adopt energy-efficient building practices requires a combination of technical development, education, and the creation of a market that clearly identifies efficiency as a preference. But, in order to participate, builders need to know what to build and how to build it. ENERGY STAR® for homes has successfully found niches in many of the most active building markets in the nation. This paper explores the relationship between ENERGY STAR’s success, especially in the early years, and the role of building research and education as undertaken by DOE’s Building America Program. Using an empirical review of builder participation databases maintained by these two programs, the paper will show that Building America was instrumental in establishing a nucleus of competent builders in key markets that went on to participate in the ENERGY STAR program. Building America’s activities involved design intervention and field instruction for production builders. The paper will show that these builders went on to actively participate in ENERGY STAR, building 50% of labeled homes in some years, in selected markets. At the same time, the ENERGY STAR program motivated builders not trained by Building America to build the other 50% of houses.

  2. Representations of environment and environmental education: a study with teachers from rural family homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edival Sebastião Teixeira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper results from a research aimed to analyse the social representations of environment held by teachers who work at Rural Family Homes located in the southwest of Paraná, Brazil. The data were collected using an instrument composed of three parts: the fi rst focused on identifi cation data; the second contained open-ended questions focused on teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development, education and pedagogy of alternation; the third consisted of a free-association question, based on the term environment. The results suggest that the social representation of environment held by the subjects is directly related with their work as rural educators and with the mediation provided by the pedagogy work being conducted according to the alternation pedagogy method. A certain perspective of environmental education that favours the change of people’s behaviour and attitude towards environmental issues could be identifi ed.

  3. Theoretical Explanations of Environmental Motivations and Expectations of Clients on Green Building Demand and Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheanyichukwu Joachim, Onuoha; Kamarudin, Norhaya; Uche Aliagha, Godwin; Ufere, Kalu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In building industry, green demand and investment creates a positive footprint on the environment. However, these environmental opportunities have not been adequately harnessed and explored by Clients of green building apparently because of poor understanding of the motivating drivers and benefits accruing from green building demand and investment. The decision to demand for or invest in green building is influenced by certain environmental motivating drivers and expectations which have not been fully examined by researchers and not well understood by stakeholders. Based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and Theory of Value Belief Norm (VBN) explanations, this study focused on the Clients, purchasers and users' motivations and intentions to go for green building. Based on the reviewed theories, we hypothesized that environmental motivations and expectations for green building demand and investment are embedded in the environmental quest for protection of eco-system and bio-diversity, improvement of water and air quality, reduction of solid waste, conservation of natural resources, reduction of societal costs of landfill creation and maintenance, minimization of site impact and reduction emission to air and enhanced energy efficiency. However, the predictive validity of these propositions depends on the client's beliefs, values, social pressure, and perceived behavioural control.

  4. Compatibility of global environmental assessment methods of buildings with an Egyptian energy code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kamal Mohamed Shamseldin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental assessment methods of buildings had emerged over the world to set environmental classifications for buildings, such as the American method “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design” (LEED the most widespread one. Several countries decided to put their own assessment methods to catch up with the previous orientation, such as Egypt. The main goal of putting the Egyptian method was to impose the voluntary local energy efficiency codes. Through a local survey, it was clearly noted that many of the construction makers in Egypt do not even know the local method, and whom are interested in the environmental assessment of buildings seek to apply LEED rather than anything else. Therefore, several questions appear about the American method compatibility with the Egyptian energy codes – that contain the most exact characteristics and requirements and give the outmost credible energy efficiency results for buildings in Egypt-, and the possibility of finding another global method that gives closer results to those of the Egyptian codes, especially with the great variety of energy efficiency measurement approaches used among the different assessment methods. So, the researcher is trying to find the compatibility of using non-local assessment methods with the local energy efficiency codes. Thus, if the results are not compatible, the Egyptian government should take several steps to increase the local building sector awareness of the Egyptian method to benefit these codes, and it should begin to enforce it within the building permits after a proper guidance and feedback.

  5. EQ builds environmental partnership featuring one stop shopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    A new ownership group and some exciting new service lines all add up to more options for customers of EQ-The Environmental Quality Company. PCB disposal was the first new item added to the EQ product line when the US EPA approved a permit under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) this spring, enabling the Wayne Disposal Hazardous Waste Landfill to accept PCB-contaminated wastes in concentrations above 50 ppm. The recycling and reuse of industrial wastes is a major them of two new product lines introduced by EQ earlier this year. Industrial Recycling Services is an EQ product line that serves as an effective link between targeted non-hazardous waste generators and cement kilns that use the waste in the production of cement clinker for industrial and commercial markets. IRS offers an environmentally sound recycling option that is cost effective for everyone involved, virtually eliminates long-term liability concerns and offers attractive public relations benefits.

  6. Building a Collaboratory in Environmental and Molecular Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, R.T.; Myers, J.D.; Devaney, D.M.; Dunning, T.H.; Wise, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    A Collaboratory is a meta-laboratory that spans multiple geographical areas with collaborators interacting via electronic means. Collaboratories are designed to enable close ties between scientists in a given research area, promote collaborations involving scientists in diverse areas, accelerate the development and dissemination of basic knowledge, and minimize the time-lag between discovery and application. PNL is developing the concept of an Environmental and Molecular Sciences Collaboratory (EMSC) as a natural evolution of the EMSL project. The goal of the EMSC is to increase the efficiency of research and reduce the time required to implement new environmental remediation and preservation technologies. The EMSC will leverage the resources (intellectual and physical) of the EMSL by making them more accessible to remote collaborators as well as by making the resources of remote sites available to local researchers. It will provide a common set of computer hardware and software tools to support remote collaboration, a key step in establishing a collaborative culture for scientists in the theoretical, computational, and experimental molecular sciences across the nation. In short, the EMSC will establish and support an `electronic community of scientists researching and developing innovative environmental preservation and restoration technologies.

  7. Building America Case Study: Lancaster County Career and Technology Center Green Home 3, Mt Joy, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction.This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  8. Effects of water-damaged homes after flooding: health status of the residents and the environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kenichi; Ikeda, Koichi; Kagi, Naoki; Yanagi, U; Hasegawa, Kenichi; Osawa, Haruki

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the health status of residents and the environmental risk factors of housing after flooding. Questionnaires were distributed to 595 selected households (one adult resident per household) in six areas in Japan which were severely flooded between 2004 and 2010. A total of 379 responses were obtained. Indoor dampness and visible mold growth significantly increased in homes with greater flood damage. The incidence of respiratory, dermal, ocular, and nasal symptoms one week after flooding was significantly higher in flooded homes compared with non-flooded homes, the incidence of psychological disorders was significantly high for six months after flooding, and the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder was significantly high six months after flooding. Significant risk factors for respiratory and nasal symptoms included proximity to industrial and waste incineration plants. Our results suggest that rapid action should be taken after flooding to ensure adequate public health and environmental hygiene in the water-damaged homes.

  9. An endpoint damage oriented model for life cycle environmental impact assessment of buildings in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU LiJing; LIN BoRong; GU DaoJin; ZHU YingXin

    2008-01-01

    The midpoint impact assessment methodology and several weighting methods that are currently used by most building Life cycle assessment (LCA) researchers in China, still have some shortcomings. In order to make the evaluation results have better temporal and spatial applicability, the endpoint impact assessment methodology was adopted in this paper. Based on the endpoint damage oriented concept, four endpoints of resource exhaustion, energy exhaustion, human health damage and ecosystem damage were selected according to the situation of China and the specialties of the building industry. Subsequently the formula for calculating each endpoint, the background value for normalization and the weighting factors were defined. Following that, an endpoint damage oriented model to evaluate the life cycle environmental impact of buildings in China was established. This model can produce an integrated indicator for environmental impact, and consequently provides references for directing the sustainable building design.

  10. JOMAR - A model for accounting the environmental loads from building constructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, Anne; Nereng, Guro; Vold, Mie; Bjoerberg, Svein; Lassen, Niels

    2008-07-01

    The objective for this project was to develop a model as a basis for calculation of environmental profile for whole building constructions, based upon data from databases and general LCA software, in addition to the model structure from the Nordic project on LCC assessment of buildings. The model has been tested on three building constructions; timber based, flexible and heavy as well as heavy. Total energy consumption and emissions contributing to climate change are calculated in a total life cycle perspective. The developed model and exemplifying case assessments have shown that a holistic model including operation phase is both important and possible to implement. The project has shown that the operation phase causes the highest environmental loads when it comes to the exemplified impact categories. A suggestion on further development of the model along two different axes in collaboration with a broader representation from the building sector is given in the report (author)(tk)

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-offs: Production Builders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how some energy-efficiency measure cost increases can balance against measures that reduce up-front costs: Advanced framing cuts lumber costs, right sizing can mean downsizing the HVAC, moving HVAC into conditioned space cuts installation costs, designing on a 2-foot grid reduces materials waste, etc.

  12. Building a design community for sustainable homes through configuration and open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Jespersen, Kristina Risom

    2009-01-01

    is a configurator where the users based on the produceres templates can design their own home at a selected address visualizing and estimating the energy consumption, total cost, CO2 emission etc. All the designs will be collected and rated in a design space creating transparency over the market and technologies....... Furthermore will an idea space collect and rate ideas from the users. Through a combination of technical and user driven innovation the design community will act as a learning tool for the users and producers and thereby facilitate the development of a market for sustainable homes....

  13. Final Environmental Assessment (EA) for Headquarters Building Construction and Main Gate Reconfiguration White Bluff, Spokane, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    falcon Falco peregrinus SOC S Mammals Long-eared myotis Myotis evotis SOC None Townsend’s big-eared bat Corynorhinus townsendii pallescens SOC C...noted during interviews with WB personnel. The underlayment and insulation in buildings that include flat gravel-style roofs was reported to include...Bluff Environmental Assessment (EA) Page 3-14 prove otherwise, it is generally considered that all building materials other than wood , steel, or glass

  14. Wood as a sustainable building material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Falk

    2009-01-01

    Few building materials possess the environmental benefits of wood. It is not only the most widely used building material in the United States but also one with characteristics that make it suitable for a wide range of applications. Efficient, durable, and useful wood products produced from trees range from a minimally processed log at a log-home building site to a...

  15. Building a Cloud Infrastructure for a Virtual Environmental Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-khatib, Y.; Blair, G. S.; Gemmell, A. L.; Gurney, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental science is often fragmented: data is collected by different organizations using mismatched formats and conventions, and models are misaligned and run in isolation. Cloud computing offers a lot of potential in the way of resolving such issues by supporting data from different sources and at various scales, and integrating models to create more sophisticated and collaborative software services. The Environmental Virtual Observatory pilot (EVOp) project, funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council, aims to demonstrate how cloud computing principles and technologies can be harnessed to develop more effective solutions to pressing environmental issues. The EVOp infrastructure is a tailored one constructed from resources in both private clouds (owned and managed by us) and public clouds (leased from third party providers). All system assets are accessible via a uniform web service interface in order to enable versatile and transparent resource management, and to support fundamental infrastructure properties such as reliability and elasticity. The abstraction that this 'everything as a service' principle brings also supports mashups, i.e. combining different web services (such as models) and data resources of different origins (in situ gauging stations, warehoused data stores, external sources, etc.). We adopt the RESTful style of web services in order to draw a clear line between client and server (i.e. cloud host) and also to keep the server completely stateless. This significantly improves the scalability of the infrastructure and enables easy infrastructure management. For instance, tasks such as load balancing and failure recovery are greatly simplified without the need for techniques such as advance resource reservation or shared block devices. Upon this infrastructure, we developed a web portal composed of a bespoke collection of web-based visualization tools to help bring out relationships or patterns within the data. The portal was

  16. A Framework for Building Efficient Environmental Permitting Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ulibarri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance as a tool for protecting air and water quality, and for mitigating impacts to protected species and ecosystems, the environmental permitting process is widely recognized to be inefficient and marked by delays. This article draws on a literature review and interviews with permitting practitioners to identify factors that contribute to delayed permit decisions. The sociopolitical context, projects that are complex or use novel technology, a fragmented and bureaucratic regulatory regime, serial permit applications and reviews, and applicant and permitting agency knowledge and resources each contribute to permitting inefficiency when they foster uncertainty, increase transaction costs, and allow divergent interests to multiply, yet remain unresolved. We then use the interviews to consider the potential of a collaborative dialogue between permitting agencies and applicants to mitigate these challenges, and argue that collaboration is well positioned to lessen permitting inefficiency.

  17. Building Equitable Literate Futures: Home and School Computer-Mediated Literacy Practices and Disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ilana; Angus, Lawrence; Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Examines the complex connections among literacy practices, the use of information, and communication technologies (ICTs) and disadvantage. Reports findings of a year-long Australian study, which investigated ways that four families use ICTs to engage in formal and informal literacy learning in home and school settings. (BT)

  18. Building Practice Evidence for Parent Mentoring Home Visiting in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajicek-Farber, Michaela L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A multidisciplinary preventive parent mentoring intervention was applied through home visiting with high-risk families receiving well-baby health care. Two implementations were examined for effectiveness. Method: The first implementation employed a quasiexperimental nonequivalent group design, whereas the second used a randomized…

  19. Building Opportunities for Environmental Education Through Student Development of Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Byrd, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is increasingly common to utilize simulations and games in the classroom, but learning opportunities can also be created by having students construct these cyberinfrastructure resources themselves. We outline two examples of such projects completed during the summer of 2014 within the NSF ACI sponsored REU Site: Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Collaborative Data Visualization Applications at Clemson University (Award 1359223). The first project focuses on the development of immersive virtual reality field trips of geologic sites using the Oculus Rift headset. This project developed a platform which will allow users to navigate virtual terrains derived from real-world data obtained from the US Geological Survey and Google Earth. The system provides users with the ability to partake in an interactive first-person exploration of a region, such as the Grand Canyon, and thus makes an important educational contribution for students without access to these environmental assets in the real world. The second project focused on providing players visual feedback about the sustainability of their practices within the web-based, multiplayer watershed management game Naranpur Online. Identifying sustainability indicators that communicate meaningful information to players and finding an effective way to visualize these data were a primary challenge faced by the student researcher working on this project. To solve this problem the student translated findings from the literature to the context of the game to develop a hierarchical set of relative sustainability criteria to be accessed by players within a sustainability dashboard. Though the REU focused on visualization, both projects forced the students to transform their thinking to address higher-level questions regarding the utilization and communication of environmental data or concepts, thus enhancing the educational experience for themselves and future students.

  20. Environmental loads of a sports building in the context of LCA; Liikuntahallin ympaeristoekuormitukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomela, S.; Sekki, T.; Saari, A.

    2003-07-01

    In this study the environmental load of a Finnish sports building generated by its essential building elements and energy consumption were calculated. The calculations were made by using a calculation method based on LCA methodology. Calculations were made of 50 years period. Surveying consumption of environmental resources of gymnastic hall and surveying environmental load in life cycle phases (new construction, maintenance, repair and demolition) were two life cycle phases most insignificant. Life cycle phases new construction, repair and demolition caused 10% of life cycle energy flow. Maintenance caused 90% of energy flow. 54% of total energy consumption of maintenance was heating energy. The most significant part of the heating energy was consumed by warming the air in the ventilation system. Maintenance caused also 93% of CO{sub 2} equivalents and 78% of SO{sub 2} equivalents. Mostly caused by using heating energy and electricity energy. When calculating the environmental load of the gymnastic hall most significant factors were looked for. Most building materials were in soil structure 34%, foundation 18% and base floor 17%. The calculations were also sensitivity tested. All the results in these tests were compared with original calculations of the gymnastic hall. The calculations of the environmental loads of sports building were most sensitive to changes in the solutions of ventilation system.

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home and the Challenge of Hot Water on Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-12

    Production builders in the Stapleton community of Denver, Colorado, now build 2,300-ft2 or larger homes that earn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR® through the Certified Homes Program, Version 3. These builders are repositioning to build comparably sized homes to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. Most ZERH criteria align closely with ENERGY STAR and are familiar to these builders.

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home and the Challenge of Hot Water on Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-12

    Production builders in the Stapleton community of Denver, Colorado, now build 2,300-ft2 or larger homes that earn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR® through the Certified Homes Program, Version 3. These builders are repositioning to build comparably sized homes to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. Most ZERH criteria align closely with ENERGY STAR and are familiar to these builders.

  3. Energy Innovations for Healthy Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogucz, Edward A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Healthy buildings provide high indoor environmental quality for occupants while simultaneously reducing energy consumption. This project advanced the development and marketability of envisioned healthy, energy-efficient buildings through studies that evaluated the use of emerging technologies in commercial and residential buildings. The project also provided resources required for homebuilders to participate in DOE’s Builders Challenge, concomitant with the goal to reduce energy consumption in homes by at least 30% as a first step toward achieving envisioned widespread availability of net-zero energy homes by 2030. In addition, the project included outreach and education concerning energy efficiency in buildings.

  4. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems; Volume 6 Building America Best Practices Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-06-01

    The sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series presents information that is useful throughout the U.S. for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in each of the volumes.

  5. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  6. Comparative analysis of environmental performance of an office building using BREEAM and GBL

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    With rapid economic growth and urban expansion in China, the Chinese building sector is now facing the huge challenge of balancing its energy demand and pollution. In order to minimize the environmental impact, the Ministry of Housing Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD) has set an ambitious energy reduction target requiring that 30% of all new constructions to be green by 2020. This paper presents comparative analysis of two environmental rating systems: the latest version of Chinese Green Bu...

  7. Geographic Distribution of Environmental Relative Moldiness Index Molds in USA Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Vesper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to quantify and describe the distribution of the 36 molds that make up the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI. Materials and Methods. As part of the 2006 American Healthy Homes Survey, settled dust samples were analyzed by mold-specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR for the 36 ERMI molds. Each species' geographical distribution pattern was examined individually, followed by partitioning analysis in order to identify spatially meaningful patterns. For mapping, the 36 mold populations were divided into disjoint clusters on the basis of their standardized concentrations, and First Principal Component (FPC scores were computed. Results and Conclusions. The partitioning analyses failed to uncover a valid partitioning that yielded compact, well-separated partitions with systematic spatial distributions, either on global or local criteria. Disjoint variable clustering resulted in seven mold clusters. The 36 molds and ERMI values themselves were found to be heterogeneously distributed across the United States of America (USA.

  8. Design and deployment of a new wireless sensor node platform for building environmental monitoring and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essa Jafer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly agreed that a 15–40% reduction of building energy consumption is achievable by efficiently operated buildings when compared with typical practice. Existing research has identified that the level of information available to Building Managers with existing Building Management Systems and Environmental Monitoring Systems is insufficient to perform the required performance-based building assessment. The majority of today’s buildings are insufficiently sensored to obtain an unambiguous understanding of performance. The cost of installing additional sensors and meters is extremely high, primarily due to the estimated cost of wiring and the needed labour. From these perspectives wireless sensors technology proves to have a greater cost-efficiency while maintaining high levels of functionality and reliability. In this paper, a wireless sensor network mote hardware design and implementation are introduced particularly for building deployment application. The core of the mote design is based on the 8-bit AVR microcontroller, Atmega1281 and 2.4 GHz wireless communication chip, CC2420. The sensors were selected carefully to meet both the building monitoring and design requirements. Beside the sensing capability, actuation and interfacing to external meters/sensors are provided to perform different management control and data recording tasks.

  9. Analysis of Environmental Contamination resulting from Catastrophic Incidents: Part two: Building Laboratory Capability by Selecting and Developing Analytical Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples with analytically diverse types including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface resid...

  10. Volume Home Building: The Provision of Sustainability Information for New Homebuyers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Warren-Myers

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The new residential housing sector is producing approximately 200,000 homes a year that could benefit from methods to increase sustainability and energy efficiency. Currently, there is limited implementation of sustainability measures beyond mandatory minimum requirements in Australia. New homebuyers are often the scapegoats for the poor sustainability adoption due to their perceived lack of interest and willingness to pay. However, their knowledge and engagement in sustainability is likely to be strongly guided by information provided by the volume builders. This paper investigates the sustainability information that homebuyers are provided by builders, as communicated through their websites. Web searching as an important means of information gathering in the preliminary stages of the process for new homebuyers. This paper reports on the analysis of Australia’s Home Industry Association’s top 100 volume builders’ websites and their provision of sustainability information. The results suggest the lack of sustainability-related information provided by builders is contributing to disengagement by consumers in the sustainability features available in new homes.

  11. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College's Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials that are local, non-toxic, and durable.

  12. Indoor environmental input parameters for the design and assessment of energy performance of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    The first international standard that dealtwith all indoor environmental parameters (thermal comfort, air quality, lightingand acoustic) was published in 2007 asEN15251. This standard prescribed inputparameters for design and assessment ofenergy performance of buildings and was apart of the set...

  13. The concentrations of phthalates in settled dust in Bulgarian homes in relation to building characteristic and cleaning habits in the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Naydenov, Kiril Georgiev;

    2008-01-01

    Phthalate esters are chemical compounds with a broad range of applications. Recently, we have shown that significantly higher dust concentration of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was found in Bulgarian homes of children with asthma or allergies compared to healthy children. The concentration...... of DEHP was found to be significantly associated with wheezing in the last 12 months as reported by parents. The objective of the current study was to examine the associations between concentrations of phthalates in settled dust collected in Bulgarian homes and building characteristics and cleaning habits...... habits were collected from parental reports in questionnaires and from inspectors' observations in the homes. Significantly higher concentrations of BBzP, DEHP and DnOP in indoor dust were found in homes where polishing agents were used, compared to homes where such products were not used. The highest...

  14. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 4; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Mixed-Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Z. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bartlett, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilbride, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hefty, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steward, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Love, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Palmer, J. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2005-09-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the mixed-humid climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builders team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  15. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS as a methodical approach to the development of design strategies for environmentally sustainable buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Tine Ring

    architecture through an integrated design approach. The findings of the literature study and the qualitative interview have directed the PhD project towards the importance of project specific design strategies and an integrated and multiprofessional approach to environmentally sustainable building design....... The project therefore focuses on the issue of design strategy development in an experimental application of sensitivity analysis as a methodical approach to the development of a design strategy for a new energy-efficient residential building in Denmark. The outset of the analysis is a single family reference...... building through which the sensitivity of parameters relating to energy and residential building design are analysed. In conclusion the PhD project discusses the strengths and weaknesses of sensitivity analysis as a methodical approach to design strategy development, and makes a suggestion...

  16. Byggmeister Test Home: Cold Climate Multifamily Masonry Building Condition Assessment and Retrofit Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wytrykowska, H.; Ueno, K.; Van Straaten, R.

    2012-09-01

    This report describes a retrofit project undertaken by Building Science Corporation and partner Byggmeister on a multifamily brick row house located in Jamaica Plain, MA. This project studied the row house to determine the right combination of energy efficiency measures that are feasible, affordable, and suitable for this type of construction and acceptable to homeowners.

  17. Byggmeister Test Home. Cold Climate Multifamily Masonry Building Condition Assessment and Retrofit Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wytrykowska, H. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Van Straaten, R. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report describes a retrofit project undertaken by Building Science Corporation and partner Byggmeister on a multifamily brick row house located in Jamaica Plain, MA. This project studied the row house to determine the right combination of energy efficiency measures that are feasible, affordable, and suitable for this type of construction and acceptable to homeowners.

  18. The Comparison of Chinese Green Building Evaluation Standard and British Code for Sustainable Home%中国绿色住宅评价标准和英国可持续住宅标准的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡芳芳; 王元丰

    2011-01-01

    Developing green building is an important method for China to deal with the challenge of climate change, which can promote energy and resource conservation and environmental protection. The standard of green buildings plays an important role in promoting the development of green building. In this paper, through the introduction of two green building evaluation systems of Green Building Evaluation Standard of China and the Code for Sustainable Home of Britain, the similarities and differences of evaluation indexes, evaluation criterions and evaluation methods of these two systems were studied. Some helpful conclusions for improving the Chinese green building evaluation system were obtained.%发展绿色建筑促进建筑业节约能源和资源、保护环境,是中国应对气候变化挑战、实现可持续发展的重要手段,而标准对于促进绿色建筑发展具有重要作用.本文介绍了中国(GB/T 50378-2006)与英国,并通过对比两国评价体系中评价指标、评价标准及评价方法的异同,得出了针对我国现有绿色建筑评价体系的一些改进性结论.

  19. Building inhabitant feedback: Creating a reflective practice for environmental design using activity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Dara Suzanne

    The way buildings are designed now, there is little feedback from use involved in the design process. Attempts to correct this problem have been made in the form of Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) for 50-years but have largely failed. POEs are the accepted method for environmental designers to collect feedback about buildings in use. They are infrequently conducted, after the building is built, in a one-time only evaluation, and not funded as part of the build process. Other products receive feedback about the design in use from online critiques. Online critiques could provide a platform for feedback from actors engaged with buildings in use for environmental designers to utilize in developing reflective design rationale to avoid adverse consequences in future designs or correct consequences in past and current designs. Since buildings constitute such a large part of the human environment, it's important to research the effects of buildings on their inhabitants. In order for environmental designers to act on feedback from situated use, designers need to have access to that feedback and all actors interacting with the building design need to have an easy, inexpensive, and accessible method to submit feedback. These needs can be addressed by utilizing modern networked and mobile computing to collect and access building feedback. The analysis presented in this dissertation is informed by a thorough evaluation of the theory of reflective practice, activity theory, environmental design, and cognitive science research. From this analysis, I developed the following contributions. First, I expanded Schon's reflective practice by combining his theory with a modified version of activity theory, using activity theory to enrich reflective practice and create Reflective Activity Systems Theory (RAST), which provides a new framework to develop design rationale based on feedback from use and a focus on the activity. Second, I suggest the design of an activity information system

  20. 24 CFR 1003.205 - Eligible planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. 1003.205 Section 1003.205... planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. (a... cost of such activities under §§ 1003.201 through 1003.204. (b) Policy—planning—management—capacity...

  1. Optimal environmental conditions to detect moisture in ancient buildings: case studies in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosina, Elisabetta; Ludwig, Nicola; Rosi, Lorenzo

    1998-03-01

    IR thermography allows to identify the thermal anomalies due to moisture in ancient walls. Wet zones can appear warmer or colder in IR images, according to the atmospheric conditions during the scanning; furthermore, thermal monitoring, even in qualitative thermography, allows to obtain a more effective diagnosis of the defects because it records thermal behaviors of the material in different environmental conditions. Thermographic system allows an accurate analysis of transpiration effects on buildings and precise measurements of water content starting from environmental temperature, relative balance and wind speed. These variables play a major role in the causes of damages in buildings. Particularly, the evaluation of transpiration is essential to determine the evaporative rate of water content within the wall. The research has been carried out on two ancient buildings during a period of several months. The main experimental tests were on the church of 'Guardia di Sotto', Corsico, a seventeenth century building on the bank of Pavese Canal. Five thermal scanning have been disposed in different seasons from March 14, 1996 to June 16, 1997. The causes of the wet zones were identified at the basis of the walls were rising damp and rain spread in the ground. The repeated thermographies and thermo-hygrometric test allowed to distinguish the size and the location of the areas damaged by the different causes. In other cases studied - Addolorate Church, Gessate the thermal scanning and the other supporting tests confirmed the list of optimal environmental condition required to detect humidity in walls by thermography.

  2. Innovative development of the building complex on the basis of environmental and energy-efficient technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kireeva Ekaterina E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to determine the priorities of innovative development of the building complex on the basis of the analysis of the environmental and energy-efficient technologies that were applied. Analysis of energy efficiency and environmental technologies in the construction industry showed that residential housing consumes 23% of the total primary energy supply in Russia. The construction sector is responsible for 30% of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Russia annually spends approximately 170 million tons of fuel equivalents for heating, ventilation and air conditioning of residential housing. Comparing Russia with the countries of similar climatic conditions it should be noted that energy consumption value in Russia is significantly higher (the excess ranges from 24 to 47% depending upon the building. Having analyzed the housing the authors offer the ways of building complex innovative development that mean the following: reindustrialization of material and technical resources of construction companies and the introduction of managerial innovations; the development and application of new high-tech building structures, products and materials that are to ensure the economic and environmental efficiency of buildings’ construction and operation.

  3. Environmental Exposures and the Risk of Central Venous Catheter Complications and Readmissions in Home Infusion Therapy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sara C; Williams, Deborah; Gavgani, Mitra; Hirsch, David; Adamovich, John; Hohl, Dawn; Krosche, Amanda; Cosgrove, Sara; Perl, Trish M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients are frequently discharged with central venous catheters (CVCs) for home infusion therapy. OBJECTIVE To study a prospective cohort of patients receiving home infusion therapy to identify environmental and other risk factors for complications. DESIGN Prospective cohort study between March and December 2015. SETTING Home infusion therapy after discharge from academic medical centers. PARTICIPANTS Of 368 eligible patients discharged from 2 academic hospitals to home with peripherally inserted central catheters and tunneled CVCs, 222 consented. Patients remained in the study until 30 days after CVC removal. METHODS Patients underwent chart abstraction and monthly telephone surveys while the CVC was in place, focusing on complications and environmental exposures. Multivariable analyses estimated adjusted odds ratios and adjusted incident rate ratios between clinical, demographic, and environmental risk factors and 30-day readmissions or CVC complications. RESULTS Of 222 patients, total parenteral nutrition was associated with increased 30-day readmissions (adjusted odds ratio, 4.80 [95% CI, 1.51-15.21) and CVC complications (adjusted odds ratio, 2.41 [95% CI, 1.09-5.33]). Exposure to soil through gardening or yard work was associated with a decreased likelihood of readmissions (adjusted odds ratio, 0.09 [95% CI, 0.01-0.74]). Other environmental exposures were not associated with CVC complications. CONCLUSIONS complications and readmissions were common and associated with the use of total parenteral nutrition. Common environmental exposures (well water, cooking with raw meat, or pets) did not increase the rate of CVC complications, whereas soil exposures were associated with decreased readmissions. Interventions to decrease home CVC complications should focus on total parenteral nutrition patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-8.

  4. Building America Case Study: Rehabilitation of USDA Multifamily Homes, Georgia (Climate Zones 2-4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Rea Ventures Group, LLC, (Rea Ventures) partnered with Southface Energy Institute (Southface) on the rehabilitation of 418 low-income rental multifamily apartments located at 14 different properties in Georgia (Climate Zones 2-4). These 22-year old, individually-metered units were arranged in rowhouse or townhouse style units. Rehabilitation plans were developed using a process prescribed by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development program, who partially funded the building upgrades. The USDA is responsible for building, upgrading, and subsidizing housing in rural areas nationwide. In 2012, over $100 million was allocated in grants and loans. Due to the unique financing mechanism as well as long-term ownership requirements, property owners are especially motivated to invest in upgrades that will increase durability and tenant retention. These buildings represent a large stock of rural affordable housing that have the potential for significant energy and cost savings for property owners and tenants. Southface analyzed the energy upgrade potential of one stereotypical property in the Rea Ventures portfolio. This study will provide insight into the most cost-effective, implementable energy efficiency and durability upgrades for this age multifamily housing, having an enormous impact not only on the portfolio of Rea Ventures but on the vast USDA and larger Federal portfolio. Additionally, Southface will identify gaps in the current capital needs assessment process, examine available audit and simulation tools and protocols, and evaluate additional auditor training or certification needs.

  5. Effect of environmental intervention on mouse allergen levels in homes of inner-city Boston children with asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Beth; Wood, Robert A.; Eggleston, Peyton A.; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Song, Leslie; Tachdjian, Raffi; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested that mouse allergen exposure and sensitization are common in urban children with asthma. The effectiveness of environmental intervention in reducing mouse allergen exposure has not been established. Objective: To evaluate whether environmental intervention of mouse extermination and cleaning results in a reduction in mouse allergen levels. Methods: Eighteen homes of children with positive mouse allergen skin test results and at least mild persistent asthma in urban Boston, MA, with evidence of mouse infestation or exposure were randomized in a 2:1 ratio (12 intervention and 6 control homes). The intervention homes received an integrated pest management intervention, which consisted of filling holes with copper mesh, vacuuming and cleaning, and using low-toxicity pesticides and traps. Dust samples were collected and analyzed for major mouse allergen (Mus m 1) and cockroach allergen (Bla g 1) at baseline and 1, 3, and 5 months after the intervention was started and compared with control homes. Results: Mouse allergen levels were significantly decreased compared with control homes by the end of the intervention period at month 5 in the kitchen and bedroom (kitchen intervention, 78.8% reduction; control, 319% increase; P = .02; bedroom intervention, 77.3% reduction; control, 358% increase; P < .01; and living room intervention, 67.6% reduction; control, 32% reduction; P = .07). Conclusions: Mouse allergen levels were significantly reduced during a 5-month period using an integrated pest management intervention. PMID:15104193

  6. Effect of environmental intervention on mouse allergen levels in homes of inner-city Boston children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipatanakul, Wanda; Cronin, Beth; Wood, Robert A; Eggleston, Peyton A; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Song, Leslie; Tachdjian, Raffi; Oettgen, Hans C

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mouse allergen exposure and sensitization are common in urban children with asthma. The effectiveness of environmental intervention in reducing mouse allergen exposure has not been established. To evaluate whether environmental intervention of mouse extermination and cleaning results in a reduction in mouse allergen levels. Eighteen homes of children with positive mouse allergen skin test results and at least mild persistent asthma in urban Boston, MA, with evidence of mouse infestation or exposure were randomized in a 2:1 ratio (12 intervention and 6 control homes). The intervention homes received an integrated pest management intervention, which consisted of filling holes with copper mesh, vacuuming and cleaning, and using low-toxicity pesticides and traps. Dust samples were collected and analyzed for major mouse allergen (Mus m 1) and cockroach allergen (Bla g 1) at baseline and 1, 3, and 5 months after the intervention was started and compared with control homes. Mouse allergen levels were significantly decreased compared with control homes by the end of the intervention period at month 5 in the kitchen and bedroom (kitchen intervention, 78.8% reduction; control, 319% increase; P = .02; bedroom intervention, 77.3% reduction; control, 358% increase; P < .01; and living room intervention, 67.6% reduction; control, 32% reduction; P = .07). Mouse allergen levels were significantly reduced during a 5-month period using an integrated pest management intervention.

  7. Satisfaction and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Frontczak, Monika; Schiavon, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The paper examines how satisfaction with indoor environmental parameters and building features affects satisfaction and self-estimated job performance. The analyses used subjective responses from around 50, 000 occupants collected mainly in US office buildings using a web-based survey administered...... by the Center for the Built Environment (CBE) over the period of ten years. Overall satisfaction with the workspace significantly improved self-estimated job performance; increased satisfaction with temperature was estimated to provide the greatest improvement in self-estimated job performance, followed...

  8. Characterization of Environmental Impact of Building Materials for the Purpose of Ecodesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skele, Agnese; Repele, Mara; Bazbauers, Gatis

    2011-01-01

    -The building material manufacturing sector is one of the sectors with the highest consumption of fossil fuel resources. The "cradle-to-gate" study of the ceramic bricks made in the Āne plant of JSC Lode, Latvia, is performed according to ISO standards 14044:2006. Life cycle inventory data have been collected at the factory site. Three different perspectives of the "Eco-Indicator'99" method are used to conduct an environmental characterization of the building materials to obtain the total impact indicator.

  9. A sustainable building promotes pro-environmental behavior: an observational study on food disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David W-L; DiGiacomo, Alessandra; Kingstone, Alan

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop a more sustainable society, the wider public will need to increase engagement in pro-environmental behaviors. Psychological research on pro-environmental behaviors has thus far focused on identifying individual factors that promote such behavior, designing interventions based on these factors, and evaluating these interventions. Contextual factors that may also influence behavior at an aggregate level have been largely ignored. In the current study, we test a novel hypothesis--whether simply being in a sustainable building can elicit environmentally sustainable behavior. We find support for our hypothesis: people are significantly more likely to correctly choose the proper disposal bin (garbage, compost, recycling) in a building designed with sustainability in mind compared to a building that was not. Questionnaires reveal that these results are not due to self-selection biases. Our study provides empirical support that one's surroundings can have a profound and positive impact on behavior. It also suggests the opportunity for a new line of research that bridges psychology, design, and policy-making in an attempt to understand how the human environment can be designed and used as a subtle yet powerful tool to encourage and achieve aggregate pro-environmental behavior.

  10. A sustainable building promotes pro-environmental behavior: an observational study on food disposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W-L Wu

    Full Text Available In order to develop a more sustainable society, the wider public will need to increase engagement in pro-environmental behaviors. Psychological research on pro-environmental behaviors has thus far focused on identifying individual factors that promote such behavior, designing interventions based on these factors, and evaluating these interventions. Contextual factors that may also influence behavior at an aggregate level have been largely ignored. In the current study, we test a novel hypothesis--whether simply being in a sustainable building can elicit environmentally sustainable behavior. We find support for our hypothesis: people are significantly more likely to correctly choose the proper disposal bin (garbage, compost, recycling in a building designed with sustainability in mind compared to a building that was not. Questionnaires reveal that these results are not due to self-selection biases. Our study provides empirical support that one's surroundings can have a profound and positive impact on behavior. It also suggests the opportunity for a new line of research that bridges psychology, design, and policy-making in an attempt to understand how the human environment can be designed and used as a subtle yet powerful tool to encourage and achieve aggregate pro-environmental behavior.

  11. The Development of a Home-stay Village for Providing the Environmental Conservation Tourism Services in Nongbua-Lamphu Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintana Kongpet

    2014-06-01

               In  conclusion,  the  developed  home-stay  village  for   environmental  conservation tourism services  could   develop  knowledge,  attitude,  and  behaviors  in  an  environmental conservation of  the people  with  home-stay service experiences. These  people  had  awareness  and  responsibility  in  sustainably  environmental conservation  in the  future.

  12. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory building related symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Apte, Michael G.

    2003-09-01

    Using the US EPA 100 office-building BASE Study dataset, they conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the relationship between indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (LResp) building related symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that certain environmentally-mediated health conditions (e.g., allergies and asthma) confer increased susceptibility to building related symptoms within office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependent associations (p < 0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100 ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average, reduce the prevalence of several building related symptoms by up to 70%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. Building occupants with certain environmentally-mediated health conditions are more likely to experience building related symptoms than those without these conditions (statistically significant ORs ranged from 2 to 11).

  13. Observations and first impressions of the environmental features in the Alberta sustainable home/office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowski, J.

    1995-12-31

    Progress of the Alberta Sustainable Home/Office development project was described. The project was designed and constructed gradually through three phases, from a sustainable home, through an autonomous phase to a state where it exported surplus energy to the electrical grid. All aspects of the home and their contribution to sustainability, autonomy and energy-credit stages were described. Performance statistics for a period of 18 months were provided. Market response and media coverage of the home`s development were described as very favorable. 1 fig.

  14. Home energy information measuring and managing energy consumption in residential buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Green, David

    2014-01-01

    The book contains the data required to measure and manage energy consumption in residential buildings. This book describes energy information in detail so that any homeowner can measure energy use on a continuing basis, make decisions regarding how to conserve energy, implement improvements, then monitor the results of those improvements. In the past, it has been difficult to collect residential energy consumption data in real-time. This book helps overcome that challenge by teaching readers how to use self-installed data collection devices that monitor consumption of circuits or appliances, a

  15. Integrating Medical and Environmental Sociology with Environmental Health: Crossing Boundaries and Building Connections through Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Phil

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the personal and professional processes of developing an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the complex issues of environmental health in their community, political-economic, social science, and scientific contexts. This interdisciplinary approach includes a synthesis of research, policy work, and advocacy. To examine…

  16. Environmental assessment of low-energy social housing, Boatemah Walk building, Brixton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Lidia Johansen

    interviews. There is a wide difference between tenants in terms of their environmental concern and attitudes, which is reflected in the overall performance of the building. One of the most successful aspects of this development is probably the effect it is having in the community. The tenants are highly satisfied with the building in various aspects, and the ones who used to live in Angell Town before the regeneration have experienced a very positive change in their quality of life and a sense of pride about their community.

  17. Energy and Environmental Research in the Building Area; Energie- und Umweltforschung im Bauwesen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afjei, T. [Institut Energie am Bau, Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (FHNW), Muttenz (Switzerland); Filleux, Ch. [Basler and Hofmann AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gutzwiller, L. [Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), Berne (Switzerland); Frank, T.; Zimmermann, M. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland); Gaegauf, Ch. [Oekozentrum Langenbruck, Langenbruck (Switzerland); Preisig, H. [Architekturbuero, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hartmann, P. [Ingenieur-Buero, Effretikon (Switzerland); Luzzi, A. [Institut fuer Solartechnik (SPF), HSR Hochschule fuer Technik, Rapperswil (Switzerland); Schwehr, P.; Zweifel, G. [brenet, building and renewable energies network of technology, HTA Luzern, Horw (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    These proceedings of the 15{sup th} Swiss Status Seminar held in September 2008 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, present a comprehensive overview of the two-day event on Swiss energy and environmental topics in the building area. A total of 69 lectures in up to three parallel sessions covered topics in the ten thematic areas of energy economics, pilot plant and demonstration of energy technologies, electricity and automation, building ventilation, building physics and building envelope, planning tools, sustainable building, renovation and renewal, building cooling systems, heat pumps and renewable forms of energy. A further 8 lectures covered general topics including Energy supply in the future - accent on buildings, climate change - a challenge for town and building planning, basics for the implementation of the 2000-Watt Society, building construction suited to climatic conditions, climate as a design factor, energy-related prerequisites in building norms, labels and strategies, energy certificates for buildings and the Solar Decathlon 2007 - buildings as 'power stations'. Energy economics topics covered include energy-related aspects of metropolitan areas and countryside villages, the effects of the various 'Minergie' standards on building costs, implementation and optimisation of heating and hot-water cost billing and the monitoring and analysis of electricity consumption in buildings. The 'Pilot and Demonstration' contributions include reports on the results obtained and experienced gained in the 'Forum Chriesbach' sustainable complex, a school building that attained 'Minergie-P' status, energy-efficient heating and cooling in a 'Minergie-P' apartment block, a practical example of 'Minergie-P' modernisation along with a report on cost-efficient 'Minergie-P' refurbishment. The 'Building services and automation' block includes

  18. Quantification of Improvement in Environmental Quality for Old Residential Buildings Using Life Cycle Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Mitterpach

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovakia, 35% of buildings are older than 50 years but most newer buildings built before 1990 have greater energy consumption. Some other countries also have similar problems. The growing importance of energy saving in buildings can be, in the case of new and old residential buildings (RB, achieved by lowering thermal energy consumption most often by application of polystyrene insulation on the external walls and roof and the exchange of wood window frames for PVC (polyvinyl chloride windows. The novelty of the article for Slovakia and some other central European countries consists in using the life cycle assessment (LCA method for the objective assessment of the environmental benefits of the selected systems of wall insulation, as well as of energy savings in various time intervals of insulation functionality (up to 20 years. LCA software SimaPro (LE Amersfoort, The Netherlands was used with ReCiPe and IMPACT 2002+ assessment methods to quantify the total environmental impact at selected endpoints and midpoints (IMPACT 2002+ of basic structural materials of an RB and its energy demand—heat consumption (hot water heating, central heating before the application of insulation and thermal energy saving (TES after application of insulation to its external walls, roof, and the exchange of windows. The data we obtained confirmed that the environmental impact of the polystyrene insulation of external walls, roof, and exchange of windows of one residential building (RB in the first year after insulation is higher than the reduction caused by achieving a TES of 39%. When taking a lifespan of 20 years into consideration, the impact over the life cycle of the building materials is reduced by 25% (global warming: −4792 kg CO2 eq; production of carcinogens: −2479 kg C2H3Cl eq; acidification: −12,045 kg SO2 eq; and aquatic eutrophication: −257 kg PO4 P-lim. The verified LCA methodology will be used for comparative analysis of different variants

  19. Standby Energy Conservation Plan No. 2: Building Temperature Restrictions Plan. Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    This report analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed Building Temperature Restrictions Plan. The Plan would result in fuel and energy savings which could be diverted to other areas. Environmental impacts, with emphasis on air quality, were analyzed and found to result in a very minor improvement in air quality. Public health impacts are also minimal, and although some individuals may experience discomfort, it can be minimized by adjustments in clothing. The change in temperature is insufficient to have any significant impact on persons suffering from most diseases.

  20. Molecular building blocks and their architecture in biologically/environmentally compatible soft matter chemical machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Taro; Banno, Taisuke; Nitta, Sachiko; Takinoue, Masahiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Natsume, Yuno; Matsumura, Shuichi; Fujinami, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent developments in the construction of biologically/environmentally compatible chemical machinery composed of soft matter. Since environmental and living systems are open systems, chemical machinery must continuously fulfill its functions not only through the influx and generation of molecules but also via the degradation and dissipation of molecules. If the degradation or dissipation of soft matter molecular building blocks and biomaterial molecules/polymers can be achieved, soft matter particles composed of them can be used to realize chemical machinery such as selfpropelled droplets, drug delivery carriers, tissue regeneration scaffolds, protocell models, cell-/tissuemarkers, and molecular computing systems.

  1. Architectural structure and environmental performance of the traditional buildings in Florina, NW Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, A. [Department of Architecture, University of Patras (Greece); Bougiatioti, F. [School of Architecture, National Technical University of Athens, 25, Iasonos Street, 166-71 Vouliagmeni, Athens (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents various aspects, which characterise the traditional architecture in the town of Florina, north-western Greece, and can be related to bioclimatic and environmental architecture. The study is based on the documentation and the analysis of the architectural and bioclimatic aspects of a sample of forty (40) remaining houses of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. The analysis of the architectural aspects concerns the building typology, the form, the materials and the construction techniques, whereas the analysis of bioclimatic aspects involves the thermal behaviour of the building shell, the thermal and the visual comfort conditions. The aim of the study is to document and assess, both qualitatively and quantitatively, all the afore-mentioned aspects in order to draw conclusions concerning the principles, which characterised this architecture and can be integrated to the refurbishment of existing buildings or the design of new ones in traditional surroundings. (author)

  2. Indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and building energy optimization through model predictive control (MPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldekidan, Korbaga

    This dissertation aims at developing a novel and systematic approach to apply Model Predictive Control (MPC) to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality in office buildings. Model predictive control is one of the advanced optimal control approaches that use models to predict the behavior of the process beyond the current time to optimize the system operation at the present time. In building system, MPC helps to exploit buildings' thermal storage capacity and to use the information on future disturbances like weather and internal heat gains to estimate optimal control inputs ahead of time. In this research the major challenges of applying MPC to building systems are addressed. A systematic framework has been developed for ease of implementation. New methods are proposed to develop simple and yet reasonably accurate models that can minimize the MPC development effort as well as computational time. The developed MPC is used to control a detailed building model represented by whole building performance simulation tool, EnergyPlus. A co-simulation strategy is used to communicate the MPC control developed in Matlab platform with the case building model in EnergyPlus. The co-simulation tool used (MLE+) also has the ability to talk to actual building management systems that support the BACnet communication protocol which makes it easy to implement the developed MPC control in actual buildings. A building that features an integrated lighting and window control and HVAC system with a dedicated outdoor air system and ceiling radiant panels was used as a case building. Though this study is specifically focused on the case building, the framework developed can be applied to any building type. The performance of the developed MPC was compared against a baseline control strategy using Proportional Integral and Derivative (PID) control. Various conventional and advanced thermal comfort as well as ventilation strategies were considered for the comparison. These

  3. Building spatial composite indicators to analyze environmental health inequalities on a regional scale

    OpenAIRE

    Saib, Mahdi-Salim; Caudeville, Julien; Beauchamp, Maxime; Carré, Florence; Ganry, Olivier; Trugeon, Alain; Cicolella, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background Reducing health inequalities involves the identification and characterization of social and exposure factors and the way they accumulate in a given area. The areas of accumulation then allow for prioritization of interventions. The present study aims to build spatial composite indicators based on the aggregation of environmental, social and health indicators and their inter-relationships. Method Preliminary work was carried out firstly to homogenize spatial coverage, and secondly t...

  4. Building America Case Study: Performance and Costs of Ductless Heat Pumps in Marine Climate High-Performance Homes: Habitat for Humanity -- The Woods, Tacoma, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    The Woods is a Habitat for Humanity (HFH) community of ENERGY STAR Homes (c) Northwest (ESHNW)-certified homes located in the marine climate of Tacoma/Pierce County, Washington. This research report builds on an earlier preliminary draft 2014 BA report, and includes significant billing analysis and cost effectiveness research from a collaborative, ongoing Ductless Heat Pump (DHP) research effort for Tacoma Public Utilities (TPU) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This report focuses on the results of field testing, modeling, and monitoring of ductless mini-split heat pump hybrid heating systems in seven homes built and first occupied at various times between September 2013 and October 2014. The report also provides WSU documentation of high-performance home observations, lessons learned, and stakeholder recommendations for builders of affordable high-performance housing such as HFH.

  5. Environmental impact of energy standards - Perspectives for Swiss building; Umweltwirkungen von Energiestandards. Perspektiven fuer den Gebaeudepark Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettli, R.; Baur, M.; Philippen, D. [Econcept AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Frischknecht, R.; Faist Emmenegger, M. [ESU-Services GmbH, Uster (Switzerland)

    2006-12-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with the effects energy standards have in the environmental area. First of all, the buildings examined, system limits and reference parameters and indicators are defined. The standards examined, types of building and energy systems used are dealt with, as are energy performance figures and Swiss standards such as SIA 380/1, MuKEn, Minergie and Minergie-P. The environmental loading caused by building activities is discussed both in general as well as for various particular standards. The influence of various factors such as the use of heat pumps, the electricity mix used and buildings with oil heating is discussed. The results for new and refurbished buildings are examined and future developments in the Swiss residential buildings area and their environmental impact are discussed. A comprehensive annex completes the report.

  6. Environmental Impact Analysis on Residential Building in Malaysia Using Life Cycle Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Faiz Abd Rashid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The building industry has a significant impact on the environment due to massive natural resources and energy it uses throughout its life cycle. This study presents a life cycle assessment of a semi-detached residential building in Malaysia as a case study and assesses the environmental impact under cradle-to-grave which consists of pre-use, construction, use, and end-of-life phases by using Centre of Environmental Science of Leiden University (CML 2001. Four impact categories were evaluated, namely, acidification, eutrophication, global warming potential (GWP, and ozone layer depletion (ODP. The building operation under use phase contributed the highest global warming potential and acidification with 2.41 × 103 kg CO2 eq and 1.10 × 101 kg SO2 eq, respectively. In the pre-use phase, concrete in the substructure has the most significant overall impact with cement as the primary raw material. The results showed that the residential building in Malaysia has a fairly high impact in GWP but lower in acidification and ODP compared to other studies.

  7. Non-Destructive Current Sensing for Energy Efficiency Monitoring in Buildings with Environmental Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Lia Toledo Moreira; Mota, Alexandre de Assis; Coiado, Lorenzo Campos

    2015-07-10

    Nowadays, buildings environmental certifications encourage the implementation of initiatives aiming to increase energy efficiency in buildings. In these certification systems, increased energy efficiency arising from such initiatives must be demonstrated. Thus, a challenge to be faced is how to check the increase in energy efficiency related to each of the employed initiatives without a considerable building retrofit. In this context, this work presents a non-destructive method for electric current sensing to assess implemented initiatives to increase energy efficiency in buildings with environmental certification. This method proposes the use of a sensor that can be installed directly in the low voltage electrical circuit conductors that are powering the initiative under evaluation, without the need for reforms that result in significant costs, repair, and maintenance. The proposed sensor consists of three elements: an air-core transformer current sensor, an amplifying/filtering stage, and a microprocessor. A prototype of the proposed sensor was developed and tests were performed to validate this sensor. Based on laboratory tests, it was possible to characterize the proposed current sensor with respect to the number of turns and cross-sectional area of the primary and secondary coils. Furthermore, using the Least Squares Method, it was possible to determine the efficiency of the air core transformer current sensor (the best efficiency found, considering different test conditions, was 2%), which leads to a linear output response.

  8. Non-Destructive Current Sensing for Energy Efficiency Monitoring in Buildings with Environmental Certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Toledo Moreira Mota

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, buildings environmental certifications encourage the implementation of initiatives aiming to increase energy efficiency in buildings. In these certification systems, increased energy efficiency arising from such initiatives must be demonstrated. Thus, a challenge to be faced is how to check the increase in energy efficiency related to each of the employed initiatives without a considerable building retrofit. In this context, this work presents a non-destructive method for electric current sensing to assess implemented initiatives to increase energy efficiency in buildings with environmental certification. This method proposes the use of a sensor that can be installed directly in the low voltage electrical circuit conductors that are powering the initiative under evaluation, without the need for reforms that result in significant costs, repair, and maintenance. The proposed sensor consists of three elements: an air-core transformer current sensor, an amplifying/filtering stage, and a microprocessor. A prototype of the proposed sensor was developed and tests were performed to validate this sensor. Based on laboratory tests, it was possible to characterize the proposed current sensor with respect to the number of turns and cross-sectional area of the primary and secondary coils. Furthermore, using the Least Squares Method, it was possible to determine the efficiency of the air core transformer current sensor (the best efficiency found, considering different test conditions, was 2%, which leads to a linear output response.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS IN GOVERNING RECYCLED MATERIAL STYROFOAM FOR BUILDING HUMAN HABITAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartini Aboo Talib Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Styrofoam is extensively used in food packaging businesses throughout the world. Its light weight makes it a favorite food package for entrepreneurs in food businesses. However, unlike its content, the food, which decomposed easily after some time, Styrofoam remains un-decomposed due to its oil-based structure. This study discusses the prospects of re-utilization of Styrofoam as environmentally friendly recycled material. This study uses the data from an exploratory survey on the usage of Styrofoam for food packaging-conducted in the district of Bangi, Malaysia-to highlight the magnitude of Styrofoam-waste generated in these activities. The study shows that Styrofoam can be used in combination of cement and concrete to produce a light weight, energy efficient and strong building can be built. Since there are a lot of supplies of waste Styrofoam, this material can be re-used in as part of construction material. In addition the use of Styrofoam in construction could be an innovative way for constructing termite’s free buildings. This study shows that recycling Styrofoam can assist in building environmentally friendly and cost efficient human habitat. Styrofoam can be channeled for a good cause and ways of governing the recycled materials. As such, the industrial waste generated by Styrofoam can be turned into other uses, thus reducing its environmental problems.

  10. Odors and sensations of humidity and dryness in relation to sick building syndrome and home environment in Chongqing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available The prevalence of perceptions of odors and sensations of air humidity and sick building syndrome symptoms in domestic environments were studied using responses to a questionnaire on the home environment. Parents of 4530 1-8 year old children from randomly selected kindergartens in Chongqing, China participated. Stuffy odor, unpleasant odor, pungent odor, mold odor, tobacco smoke odor, humid air and dry air in the last three month (weekly or sometimes was reported by 31.4%, 26.5%, 16.1%, 10.6%, 33.0%, 32.1% and 37.2% of the parents, respectively. The prevalence of parents' SBS symptoms (weekly or sometimes were: 78.7% for general symptoms, 74.3% for mucosal symptoms and 47.5% for skin symptoms. Multi-nominal regression analyses for associations between odors/sensations of air humidity and SBS symptoms showed that the odds ratio for "weekly" SBS symptoms were consistently higher than for "sometimes" SBS symptoms. Living near a main road or highway, redecoration, and new furniture were risk factors for perceptions of odors and sensations of humid air and dry air. Dampness related problems (mold spots, damp stains, water damage and condensation were all risk factors for perceptions of odors and sensations of humid air and dry air, as was the presence of cockroaches, rats, and mosquitoes/flies, use of mosquito-repellent incense and incense. Protective factors included cleaning the child's bedroom every day and frequently exposing bedding to sunshine. In conclusion, adults' perceptions of odors and sensations of humid air and dry air are related to factors of the home environment and SBS symptoms are related to odor perceptions.

  11. Comparison of environmental impacts of building structures with in situ cast floors and with precast concrete floors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Mesa, Belinda; Pitarch, Angel; Tomas, Ana; Gallego, Teresa [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction (ESTCE), Universitat Jaume I, Av. Sos Baynat s/n, Castellon 12071 (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, the environmental impacts of two types of slab systems are studied. The first type, a concrete-based one-way spanning slab, is the most common solution in residential buildings in Spain. The second type, a hollow core slab floor, is increasingly becoming more used in buildings, but is not being broadly used in residential buildings as yet. The study is undertaken through the Life Cycle Analysis methodology, applying the EPS 2000 method. The assessment shows that the environmental impact of a building structure with precast concrete floors is 12.2% lower than that with in situ cast floors for the defined functional unit. (author)

  12. The diversity of arthropods in homes across the United States as determined by environmental DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Anne A; Barberán, Albert; Bertone, Matthew A; Menninger, Holly L; Dunn, Robert R; Fierer, Noah

    2016-12-01

    We spend most of our lives inside homes, surrounded by arthropods that impact our property as pests and our health as disease vectors and producers of sensitizing allergens. Despite their relevance to human health and well-being, we know relatively little about the arthropods that exist in our homes and the factors structuring their diversity. As previous work has been limited in scale by the costs and time associated with collecting arthropods and the subsequent morphological identification, we used a DNA-based method for investigating the arthropod diversity in homes via high-throughput marker gene sequencing of home dust. Settled dust samples were collected by citizen scientists from both inside and outside more than 700 homes across the United States, yielding the first continental-scale estimates of arthropod diversity associated with our residences. We were able to document food webs and previously unknown geographic distributions of diverse arthropods - from allergen producers to invasive species and nuisance pests. Home characteristics, including the presence of basements, home occupants and surrounding land use, were more useful than climate parameters in predicting arthropod diversity in homes. These noninvasive, scalable tools and resultant findings not only provide the first continental-scale maps of household arthropod diversity, but our analyses also provide valuable baseline information on arthropod allergen exposures and the distributions of invasive pests inside homes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E.; Xiu, Brittany C.; Megdal, Sharon B.

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users.

  14. Influence of construction and demolition waste management on the environmental impact of buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify comparable environmental impacts within a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) perspective, for buildings in which the first (Materials) and last (End of Life) life cycle stages are adjusted to several waste/material management options. Unlike most LCAs, the approach is "top-down" rather than "bottom-up", which usually involves large amounts of data and the use of specific software applications. This approach is considered appropriate for a limited but expedient LCA designed to compare the environmental impacts of different life cycle options. Present results, based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities, show that shallow, superficial, selective demolition may not result in reduced environmental impacts. Calculations actually show an increase (generally less than 5%) in most impact categories for the Materials and End of Life stages because of extra transportation needs. However, core material separation in demolition operations and its recycling and/or reuse does bring environmental benefits. A reduction of around 77% has been estimated in the climate change impact category, 57% in acidification potential and 81% in the summer smog impact (for the life cycle stages referred).

  15. Scalable geocomputation: evolving an environmental model building platform from single-core to supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Oliver; de Jong, Kor; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-04-01

    There is an increasing demand to run environmental models on a big scale: simulations over large areas at high resolution. The heterogeneity of available computing hardware such as multi-core CPUs, GPUs or supercomputer potentially provides significant computing power to fulfil this demand. However, this requires detailed knowledge of the underlying hardware, parallel algorithm design and the implementation thereof in an efficient system programming language. Domain scientists such as hydrologists or ecologists often lack this specific software engineering knowledge, their emphasis is (and should be) on exploratory building and analysis of simulation models. As a result, models constructed by domain specialists mostly do not take full advantage of the available hardware. A promising solution is to separate the model building activity from software engineering by offering domain specialists a model building framework with pre-programmed building blocks that they combine to construct a model. The model building framework, consequently, needs to have built-in capabilities to make full usage of the available hardware. Developing such a framework providing understandable code for domain scientists and being runtime efficient at the same time poses several challenges on developers of such a framework. For example, optimisations can be performed on individual operations or the whole model, or tasks need to be generated for a well-balanced execution without explicitly knowing the complexity of the domain problem provided by the modeller. Ideally, a modelling framework supports the optimal use of available hardware whichsoever combination of model building blocks scientists use. We demonstrate our ongoing work on developing parallel algorithms for spatio-temporal modelling and demonstrate 1) PCRaster, an environmental software framework (http://www.pcraster.eu) providing spatio-temporal model building blocks and 2) parallelisation of about 50 of these building blocks using

  16. Model estimates of the contributions of environmental tobacco smoke to volatile organic compound exposures in office buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daisey, J.M.; Gadgil, A.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) in office buildings originate from multiple sources, such as outdoor air, building materials, occupants, office supplies, and office equipment. Many of the VOC found in office buildings are also present in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), e.g., benzene, toluene, formaldehyde. Measurements made to date in Office buildings have been interpreted by some to imply that the contributions to ETS to VOC exposures in office buildings are small. Four different ventilation-infiltration scenarios were modeled for a typical office building. The purpose of this investigation was to provide first-order estimate of the range of contributions of ETS to VOC contributions in office buildings under various ventilation conditions through the use of a mass-balance model and to evaluate the significance of such contributions relative to the VOC concentration measured in office buildings. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Socio-economic inequalities in children's snack consumption and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption: the contribution of home environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ansem, Wilke J C; van Lenthe, Frank J; Schrijvers, Carola T M; Rodenburg, Gerda; van de Mheen, Dike

    2014-08-14

    In the present study, we examined the association between maternal education and unhealthy eating behaviour (the consumption of snack and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB)) and explored environmental factors that might mediate this association in 11-year-old children. These environmental factors include home availability of snacks and SSB, parental rules about snack and SSB consumption, parental intake of snacks and SSB, peer sensitivity and children's snack-purchasing behaviour. Data were obtained from the fourth wave of the INPACT (IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT) study (2011), in which 1318 parent-child dyads completed a questionnaire. Data were analysed using multivariate regression models. Children of mothers with an intermediate educational level were found to consume more snacks than those of mothers with a high educational level (B= 1·22, P= 0·02). This association was not mediated by environmental factors. Children of mothers with a low educational level were found to consume more SSB than those of mothers with a high educational level (B= 0·63, Pchildren's SSB consumption was found to be mediated by parental intake of snacks and SSB and home availability of SSB. The home environment seems to be a promising setting for interventions on reducing socio-economic inequalities in children's SSB consumption.

  18. The Dutch Green Building Council (DGBC) and the Dutch version of the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM-NL). International label assesses sustainability of buildings; De DGBC en BREEAM-NL. Internationaal label beoordeelt duurzaamheid gebouwen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Uffelen, S. [Dutch Green Building Council, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The development of the DGBC (Dutch Green Building Council) and the first Dutch version of BREEAM-NL (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) are described. BREEAM-NL will be used as a label for the assessment of new buildings by completion. Specific versions for district development and for existing buildings are also under construction. [Dutch] Een overzicht wordt gegeven van de ontwikkelingen rondom de DGBC (Dutch Green Building Council) en de eerste, Nederlandse versie van BREEAM-NL (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method). BREEAM-NL zal worden gebruikt als label voor de beoordeling van nieuwe gebouwen bij oplevering. Er wordt tevens gewerkt aan een versie voor gebiedsontwikkeling en voor bestaande bouw.

  19. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, Alessio; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2012-01-01

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different....... The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of −2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg−1 wet waste (ww...... input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load...

  20. Medicaid capital reimbursement policy and environmental artifacts of nursing home culture change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Cohen, Neal; Lima, Julie C; Mor, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    To examine how Medicaid capital reimbursement policy is associated with nursing homes (NHs) having high proportions of private rooms and small households. Through a 2009/2010 NH national survey, we identified NHs having small households and high proportions of private rooms (≥76%). A survey of state Medicaid officials and policy document review provided 2009 policy data. Facility- and county-level covariates were from Online Survey, Certification and Reporting, the Area Resource File, and aggregated resident assessment data (minimum data set). The policy of interest was the presence of traditional versus fair rental capital reimbursement policy. Average Medicaid per diem rates and the presence of NH pay-for-performance (p4p) reimbursement were also examined. A total of 1,665 NHs in 40 states were included. Multivariate logistic regression analyses (with clustering on states) were used. In multivariate models, Medicaid capital reimbursement policy was not significantly associated with either outcome. However, there was a significantly greater likelihood of NHs having many private rooms when states had higher Medicaid rates (per $10 increment; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.13; 95% CI 1.049, 1.228), and in states with versus without p4p (AOR 1.78; 95% CI 1.045, 3.036). Also, in states with p4p NHs had a greater likelihood of having small households (AOR 1.78; 95% CI 1.045, 3.0636). Higher NH Medicaid rates and reimbursement incentives may contribute to a higher presence of 2 important environmental artifacts of culture change-an abundance of private rooms and small households. However, longitudinal research examining policy change is needed to establish the cause and effect of the associations observed.

  1. The healthy building intervention study: Objectives, methods and results of selected environmental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.; Sullivan, D. [and others

    1998-02-17

    To test proposed methods for reducing SBS symptoms and to learn about the causes of these symptoms, a double-blind controlled intervention study was designed and implemented. This study utilized two different interventions designed to reduce occupants` exposures to airborne particles: (1) high efficiency filters in the building`s HVAC systems; and (2) thorough cleaning of carpeted floors and fabric-covered chairs with an unusually powerful vacuum cleaner. The study population was the workers on the second and fourth floors of a large office building with mechanical ventilation, air conditioning, and sealed windows. Interventions were implemented on one floor while the occupants on the other floor served as a control group. For the enhanced-filtration intervention, a multiple crossover design was used (a crossover is a repeat of the experiment with the former experimental group as the control group and vice versa). Demographic and health symptom data were collected via an initial questionnaire on the first study week and health symptom data were obtained each week, for eight additional weeks, via weekly questionnaires. A large number of indoor environmental parameters were measured during the study including air temperatures and humidities, carbon dioxide concentrations, particle concentrations, concentrations of several airborne bioaerosols, and concentrations of several microbiologic compounds within the dust sampled from floors and chairs. This report describes the study methods and summarizes the results of selected environmental measurements.

  2. EPIQR - a decision making tool for apartment building refurbishment. [Energy Performance, Indoor Environmental Quality, Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccavelli, D. (Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, Cedex (France)); Balaras, C. (National Observatory of Athens, Athens (Greece)); Bluyssen, P. (TNO Building and Construction Research, Delft (Netherlands)); Flourentzou, F. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (France)); Jaggs, M. (Building Research Establishment, Watford (United Kingdom)); Wetzel, C. (Fraunhofer-Institut

    1999-01-01

    In a large majority of European countries, the amount of the maintenance and refurbishment works represents nearly 50% of the total amount spent in the building sector. New requirements are being added to the necessity of maintaining or re-establishing the building stock's usage value. They are linked to the determination to reduce energy consumption, pollutant emissions, work site wastes, to improve the Indoor Environment Quality and all the modern conveniences inside apartment. Aware of this matter, the European Community has launched a two-year European research project, entitled EPIQR (Energy Performance, Indoor Environmental Quality, Retrofit) involving seven research institutions in the frame of the JOULE III programme. The purpose is to give architects and contracting authorities a multimedia tool to enable them to simultaneously grasp the whole process of apartment building refurbishment or retrofit. It has a number of functions: Assess the building's degradation state based on a technical diagnosis after a standardised and complete inspection of the building; Prepare work proposals. These take into account not only the renovation of the building but also the improvement of the energy performance and IEQ; Estimate the costs corresponding to these works. A data base, containing the costs of 800 refurbishment works, provides a fast estimate of the total amount of the works being considered; Estimate the evolution of the degradation of the components if none of the works were to be carried out, as well as the refurbishment costs which would result. This paper provides an overview of the EPIQR methodology and the final deliverables of the project. (au)

  3. University Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design: How Postsecondary Institutions Use the LEEDRTM Green Building Rating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Shannon Massie

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive, exploratory study focused on how institutions of higher education have used the United States Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED[R]) Green Building Rating system. It employed statistical methods to assess which types of universities have used LEED, what ratings they earned, and…

  4. The Human Factor - Introducing Game Mechanics to Computerized Home Automation Systems: User experience as a method for reducing consumption in domestic buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, I.; Turrin, M.; Heinzelmann, F.; Welzner, I.

    2013-01-01

    A method of integration of game mechanics and game dynamics into a user interface for a home automation system as means of reducing the inhabitant’s environmental footprint is described and detailed up to the point of proof of concept. In detail, the paper describes the game framework and the method

  5. The Human Factor - Introducing Game Mechanics to Computerized Home Automation Systems: User experience as a method for reducing consumption in domestic buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, I.; Turrin, M.; Heinzelmann, F.; Welzner, I.

    2013-01-01

    A method of integration of game mechanics and game dynamics into a user interface for a home automation system as means of reducing the inhabitant’s environmental footprint is described and detailed up to the point of proof of concept. In detail, the paper describes the game framework and the method

  6. Economic, Environmental and Health Implications of Enhanced Ventilation in Office Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piers MacNaughton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Current building ventilation standards are based on acceptable minimums. Three decades of research demonstrates the human health benefits of increased ventilation above these minimums. Recent research also shows the benefits on human decision-making performance in office workers, which translates to increased productivity. However, adoption of enhanced ventilation strategies is lagging. We sought to evaluate two of the perceived potential barriers to more widespread adoption—Economic and environmental costs. Methods: We estimated the energy consumption and associated per building occupant costs for office buildings in seven U.S. cities, representing different climate zones for three ventilation scenarios (standard practice (20 cfm/person, 30% enhanced ventilation, and 40 cfm/person and four different heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC system strategies (Variable Air Volume (VAV with reheat and a Fan Coil Unit (FCU, both with and without an energy recovery ventilator. We also estimated emissions of greenhouse gases associated with this increased energy usage, and, for comparison, converted this to the equivalent number of vehicles using greenhouse gas equivalencies. Lastly, we paired results from our previous research on cognitive function and ventilation with labor statistics to estimate the economic benefit of increased productivity associated with increasing ventilation rates. Results: Doubling the ventilation rate from the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers minimum cost less than $40 per person per year in all climate zones investigated. Using an energy recovery ventilation system significantly reduced energy costs, and in some scenarios led to a net savings. At the highest ventilation rate, adding an ERV essentially neutralized the environmental impact of enhanced ventilation (0.03 additional cars on the road per building across all cities. The same change in ventilation

  7. Technological retrofit of existing buildings: dwelling quality, environmental sustainability, economic rising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Bellomo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Redevelopment can stand as an effective response to the converging ecological, energy and economic crises if the energy efficiency of the built heritage can be enhanced using renewable energy and innovative technologies with a low environmental impact. To this end, the Research Unit Technology and Environment, University of Naples Federico II, is undertaking a structured set of studies addressing the issue of retrofit technology of buildings in Campania put up in the second half of the 20th century to help in defining best practices for planning, design and production.

  8. Environmental Assessment Addressing the Privatization of Military Family Housing at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    maintain artificially moist conditions. Gopher snakes (Pituophis catenifer deserticola) and rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridus) are occasionally found on...level of lighting. Fireplace with gas logs and quality decorative mantel/ hearth that enhances the architectural style of the home is preferred

  9. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in Cold and Very Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-08-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  10. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 5; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Marine Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Steward, H.; Love, P. M.; Palmer, J. A.

    2006-10-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the Marine climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team--from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  11. Building a Web-Based Knowledge Repository on Climate Change to Support Environmental Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharl, Arno; Weichselbraun, Albert

    This paper presents the technology base and roadmap of the Climate Change Collaboratory, a Web-based platform that aims to strengthen the relations between scientists, educators, environmental NGOs, policy makers, news media and corporations - stakeholders who recognize the need for adaptation and mitigation, but differ in world-views, goals and agendas. The collaboratory manages expert knowledge and provides a platform for effective communication and collaboration. It aims to assist networking with leading international organizations, bridges the science-policy gap and promotes rich, self-sustaining community interaction to translate knowledge into coordinated action. Innovative survey instruments in the tradition of "games with a purpose" will create shared meaning through collaborative ontology building and leverage social networking platforms to capture indicators of environmental attitudes, lifestyles and behaviors.

  12. [Life history interview--an effective approach to building positive doctor-patient relations and guide to proper end of life home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Yamanashi, Irotomo; Miyamori, Tadashi

    2010-12-01

    The acclaimed psychiatrist, Arthur Kleinman, proposed Life History Interview as a way of enabling doctors to truly listen to a patient who is suffering from chronic disease. Two cases of terminally ill patients were carried out with Life History Interview. When speaking of the end of life home care, Life History Interview is an effective approach in building positive doctor-patient relations in the early stages. It truly allows for a good foundation for providing a proper care.

  13. Life-cycle thinking and the LEED rating system: global perspective on building energy use and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Sami G; Bilec, Melissa M

    2015-04-07

    This research investigates the relationship between energy use, geographic location, life cycle environmental impacts, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The researchers studied worldwide variations in building energy use and associated life cycle impacts in relation to the LEED rating systems. A Building Information Modeling (BIM) of a reference 43,000 ft(2) office building was developed and situated in 400 locations worldwide while making relevant changes to the energy model to meet reference codes, such as ASHRAE 90.1. Then life cycle environmental and human health impacts from the buildings' energy consumption were calculated. The results revealed considerable variations between sites in the U.S. and international locations (ranging from 394 ton CO2 equiv to 911 ton CO2 equiv, respectively). The variations indicate that location specific results, when paired with life cycle assessment, can be an effective means to achieve a better understanding of possible adverse environmental impacts as a result of building energy consumption in the context of green building rating systems. Looking at these factors in combination and using a systems approach may allow rating systems like LEED to continue to drive market transformation toward sustainable development, while taking into consideration both energy sources and building efficiency.

  14. Q & A with Kathleen M. Reilly, Author of "Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Kathleen M. Reilly, author of "Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself." Environmental awareness needs to begin in childhood, and, through this book, Kathleen M. Reilly encourages children to learn about ecology and ecosystems to begin conservation early in their lives. Children ages 9…

  15. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A.; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  16. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Taglialegna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Assessment of indoor environmental quality in existing multi-family buildings in North-East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liuliu; Prasauskas, Tadas; Leivo, Virpi; Turunen, Mari; Pekkonen, Maria; Kiviste, Mihkel; Aaltonen, Anu; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla

    2015-06-01

    Sixteen existing multi-family buildings (94 apartments) in Finland and 20 (96 apartments) in Lithuania were investigated prior to their renovation in order to develop and test out a common protocol for the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) assessment, and to assess the potential for improving IEQ along with energy efficiency. Baseline data on buildings, as well as data on temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radon, and microbial content in settled dust were collected from each apartment. In addition, questionnaire data regarding housing quality and health were collected from the occupants. The results indicated that most measured IEQ parameters were within recommended limits. However, different baselines in each country were observed especially for parameters related to thermal conditions and ventilation. Different baselines were also observed for the respondents' satisfaction with their residence and indoor air quality, as well as their behavior related to indoor environment. In this paper, we present some evidence for the potential in improving IEQ along with energy efficiency in the current building stock, followed by discussion of possible IEQ indicators and development of the assessment protocol.

  19. The effect of environmental regulation on firms' competitive performance: the case of the building & construction sector in some EU regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Iraldo, Fabio; Frey, Marco

    2011-09-01

    There is a considerable debate on the effects of environmental regulation on competitive performance. Based on survey data, this paper analyzes the two main research questions, derived from literature, on the links between environmental regulation and competitiveness, by focusing on firms operating in the building and construction sector, i.e.: 1) whether environmental policy stringency affects the competitive performance of firms in the building and construction sector 2) and how a specific form of environmental regulation (direct regulation, economic instruments and soft instruments) affects this performance? By applying a regression analysis, we find that a more stringent environmental regulation, measured by inspection frequency, provides a positive impulse for increasing investments in advanced technological equipment and innovative products and on business performance. Moreover, a well-designed "direct regulation" appears to be the most effective policy instrument for prompting the positive impact of environmental policies on innovation and intangible performance while economic instruments do negatively affect business performance.

  20. Our Buildings, Ourselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roodman, David Malin; Lenssen, Nicholas

    1994-01-01

    Reviews in detail environmental impacts associated with buildings. Discusses building construction, internal environments, building life spans, building materials, protection from climate, and amenities. (LZ)

  1. SOFIAS – Software for life-cycle assessment and environmental rating of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oregi Isasi, X.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development process of a new software tool, called SOFIAS (Software for a Sustainable Architecture, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitivenes. Following CEN/TC 350 standard on environmental assessment of buildings, the tool aims at assisting building professionals on reducing the life-cycle environmental impact through the design of new buildings and the refurbishment of existing ones. In addition, SOFIAS provides a rating system based on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA methodology. This paper explains the innovative aspects of this software, the working methodology and the different type of results that can be obtained using SOFIAS.Este artículo describe el proceso de desarrollo de la nueva herramienta informática SOFIAS (Software de Funciones Integradas para una Arquitectura Sostenible, financiado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad del Gobierno de España. En base al estandar de la evaluación ambiental de los edificios definido por el CEN/TC 350, esta nueva herramienta tiene como objetivo ayudar a los técnicos de la construcción en reducir el impacto ambiental durante el ciclo de vida a través del diseño optimizado de nuevos edificios o edificios rehabilitados. De forma paralela, SOFIAS proporciona un nuevo sistema de calificación basado en la metodología del Análisis de Ciclo de Vida (ACV. Este artículo expone los aspectos innovadores de esta herramienta informática, la metodología de trabajo y los diferentes tipos de resultados que se pueden obtener tras su aplicación.

  2. Papercrete brick as an alternate building material to control Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, J. S.; Ramesh, S.; Jothilingam, M.; Ramasamy, Vishalatchi; Rajan, Rajitha J.

    2017-07-01

    Utilization of concrete in the construction industry is increasing day by day. The increasing demand for concrete in the future is the major issue, for which an alternate option is to find out at a reduced or no additional cost and to reduce the environmental impact due to increase of cement industries that are important ingredient to economic development. It turns out urgent to find out alternate for the partial replacement of concrete and cement, as natural sources of aggregates are becoming exhausted. As large quantity of paper waste is generated from different countries all over the world which causes serious environmental problems, So in this present study abandoned paper waste was used as a partial replacement material in concrete,. Study indicates that 80% of the construction cost of a building was contributed by building material and still millions of people in developing countries like India are not able to afford the cost of construction of house. This study is based on potential use of light weight composite brick as a building material and potential use of paper waste for producing at low-cost. Experimental investigation was carried out to analyse optimization of mix for papercrete bricks depending upon the water absorption, compressive strength and unit weight. Papercrete bricks were prepared out of waste paper, and quarry dust with partial replacement of cement by another industrial by-product Fly Ash in varying proportions of 25%, 40% and 55%. The properties like mechanical strength, standard quality comparisons with the conventional bricks through standard tests like hardness, soundness, fire resistance and Cost-Benefit Analysis were performed and studied. The specimens of dimension 230mm x 110mm x 80mm were subjected to 7 Days and 28 days air curing and sun drying before tests were performed on them. Based on the study it was found that for non-load bearing walls papercrete bricks are best suited.

  3. Completion of Green Building by Korea Institute of Energy Research - Energy{center_dot}Conservation{center_dot}Environmental Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Dong [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), which was fully aware that the effective utilization of energy could not only save energy but also reduce the environmental pollution due to a combustion exhaust gas, has built and operated 'the Ultra Energy Saving Building' whose energy consumption was only a fifth of general buildings as a example. KIER has started to research the project for the technology development and spread of Green Building in 'Enertech 21' - the most important research program of 1994 year - and has constructed the central building of the Institute with only the current available technology since the early of 1997 year, via researches by a step. Finally, KIER held the ceremony for the completion of Green Building in March sixth. This building is not just the first green building in Korea but also the representative building of energy environment research center, which will be marked out for a model for the domestic construction and construction industry in future. Therefore, this building has functions of exhibition, publicity, education, and experimentation for the building researchers as well as the office and researching place that is original function of this building. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Comparison of the National Green Building Standard (ICC 700-2008) and LEED for Homes to the Residential Provisions of the 2009 IECC for the Delaware Green for Green Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Michelle L.; Makela, Eric J.

    2011-01-30

    Adhering to Delaware’s Green for Green program specifications results in homes being built to more energy-efficient levels than the 2009 IECC levels. Specifically: • Certifying at the Silver Performance Level for the ICC 700 standard using either the Prescriptive or Performance Paths will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC. • Certifying at the Silver level under LEED for Homes standard, including mandatory compliance with ENERGY STAR 2006 and earning two additional energy points will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC.

  5. Environmental effects and energy efficiency in building design - a green building approach. Pt. 1. Energy efficiency techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egle, C.; Pitts, G.C.

    1993-12-31

    A research report describes the energy efficiency techniques to be employed in designing a building which is ``green``. Topics covered include building fabric performance, ventilation and infiltration, passive solar design, heating systems and controls, hot and cold water provision, lighting and electrical appliances. (UK)

  6. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates.

  7. Test Methods and Protocols for Environmental and Safety Hazards Associated with Home Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cautley, D.; Viner, J.; Lord, M.; Pearce, M.

    2012-12-01

    A number of health hazards and hazards to the durability of homes may be associated with energy retrofitting and home renovation projects. Among the hazards associated with energy retrofit work, exposure to radon is thought to cause more than 15,000 deaths per year in the U.S., while carbon monoxide poisoning results in about 20,000 injuries and 450 deaths per year. Testing procedures have been developed for identifying and quantifying hazards during retrofitting. These procedures commonly include a battery of tests to screen combustion appliances for safe operation, including worst case depressurization measurement, backdrafting (spillage) under depressurized or normal conditions, and carbon monoxide production.

  8. Test Methods and Protocols for Environmental and Safety Hazards Associated with Home Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cautley, D. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Viner, J. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Lord, M. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States); Pearce, M. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2012-12-01

    A number of health hazards and hazards to the durability of homes may be associated with energy retrofitting and home renovation projects. Among the hazards associated with energy retrofit work, exposure to radon is thought to cause more than 15,000 deaths per year in the U.S., while carbon monoxide poisoning results in about 20,000 injuries and 450 deaths per year. Testing procedures have been developed for identifying and quantifying hazards during retrofitting. These procedures commonly include a battery of tests to screen combustion appliances for safe operation, including worst case depressurization measurement, backdrafting (spillage) under depressurized or normal conditions, and carbon monoxide production.

  9. Bridging Scales: Developing a Framework to Build a City-Scale Environmental Scenario for Japanese Municipalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, S.; Fujita, T.; Nakayama, T.; Xu, K.

    2007-12-01

    There is an ongoing project on establishing environmental scenarios in Japan to evaluate middle to long-term environmental policy and technology options toward low carbon society. In this project, the time horizon of the scenarios is set for 2050 on the ground that a large part of social infrastructure in Japan is likely to be renovated by that time, and cities are supposed to play important roles in building low carbon society in Japan. This belief is held because cities or local governments could implement various policies and programs, such as land use planning and promotion of new technologies with low GHG emissions, which produce an effect in an ununiform manner, taking local socio-economic conditions into account, while higher governments, either national or prefectural, could impose environmental tax on electricity and gas to alleviate ongoing GHG emissions, which uniformly covers their jurisdictions. In order for local governments to devise and implement concrete administrative actions equipped with rational policies and technologies, referring the environmental scenarios developed for the entire nation, we need to localize the national scenarios, both in terms of spatial and temporal extent, so that they could better reflect local socio-economic and institutional conditions. In localizing the national scenarios, the participation of stakeholders is significant because they play major roles in shaping future society. Stakeholder participation in the localization process would bring both creative and realistic inputs on how future unfolds on a city scale. In this research, 1) we reviewed recent efforts on international and domestic scenario development to set a practical time horizon for a city-scale environmental scenario, which would lead to concrete environmental policies and programs, 2) designed a participatory scenario development/localization process, drawing on the framework of the 'Story-and-Simulation' or SAS approach, which Alcamo(2001) proposed

  10. Building America Case Study: High Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    ?Ducts in conditioned space (DCS) represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. Various strategies exist for incorporating ducts within the conditioned thermal envelope. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of various DCS strategies. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, diagnostic testing, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into California's 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project complemented information collected in the California project with BEopt simulations of DCS performance in hot/dry climate regions.

  11. MARKAL-MACRO -- An integrated energy-environmental-economic decision tool: Evaluation of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights/Energy Star Buildings Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.C.; Goldstein, G.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Linkey, E. [Environmental Protection Agency, New York, NY (United States); Huang, J.I. [InfoLink, Inc., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1997-12-31

    The MARKAL-MACRO model is used to evaluate the cost effectiveness and market potential in Taiwan for technologies which are promoted by the US Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights and Energy Star Buildings Programs. Comparative analysis of the model results show that these technologies are economically more competitive than conventional technologies and are projected to be dominant in the market place in meeting retrofit and future energy demands in commercial buildings under least-cost energy planning strategies.

  12. En el seno del hogar. Experiencias familiares para desarrollar el alfabetismo (Right at Home. Family Experiences for Building Literacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Merrily P.; Armstrong, Gloria

    This publication, a Spanish translation of "Right at Home," is a family involvement program in the form of easy-to-read cartoon-style letters to be used at home by parents or other family members with their preschool or kindergarten-age children. The book is designed to be used independently by parents, or to be reproduced and distributed to…

  13. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  14. Rural-Urban Differences in End-of-Life Nursing Home Care: Facility and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. Data and Methods: We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used…

  15. Home and School Environmental Determinants of Science Achievement of South African Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Andrea; Visser, Mariette

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of educational achievement extend beyond the school environment to include the home environment. Both environments provide tangible and intangible resources to students that can influence science achievement. South Africa provides a context where inequalities in socio-economic status are vast, thus the environments from whence…

  16. Economical, environmental and technical analysis of building integrated photovoltaic systems in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seng, Lim Yun [Department of Physical Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tunku Abdul Rahman University, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Lalchand, G.; Sow Lin, Gladys Mak [Malaysia Energy Centre, Building Integrated Photovoltaic Project (Malaysia)

    2008-06-15

    Malaysia has identified photovoltaic systems as one of the most promising renewable sources. A great deal of efforts has been undertaken to promote the wide applications of PV systems. With the recent launch of a PV market induction programme known as SURIA 1000 in conjunction with other relevant activities undertaken under the national project of Malaysia Building Integrated Photovoltaic (MBIPV), the market of PV systems begins to be stimulated in the country. As a result, a wide range of technical, environmental and economic issues with regard to the connection of PV systems to local distribution networks becomes apparent. Numerous studies were therefore carried out in collaboration with Malaysian Energy Centre to address a number of those important issues. The findings of the studies are presented in the paper and can be served as supplementary information to parties who are directly and indirectly involved in the PV sector in Malaysia. (author)

  17. Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frontczak, Monika Joanna

    for overall comfort than acoustic and visual comfort and satisfaction with air quality. The data from the Danish residential buildings showed actually slightly different results, indicating that when the acceptability of thermal, acoustic, visual conditions and air quality are of a similar magnitude......, influence the perception of comfort. To meet the objective, the following actions were taken: (1) a literature survey exploring which indoor environmental parameters (thermal, acoustic, visual environment and air quality) predominantly determine overall comfort and whether other factors unrelated...... to the indoor environment influence the perception of comfort; the literature survey summarized 42 peer-reviewed and conference articles and 1 book covering the period from 1970 to 2009; (2) preparation, distribution and analysis of a questionnaire survey sent to 2499 addresses representing the most common...

  18. Evaluation of environmental contamination and estimated radiation doses for the return to residents' homes in Kawauchi Village, Fukushima prefecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Taira

    Full Text Available To evaluate the environmental contamination and radiation exposure dose rates due to artificial radionuclides in Kawauchi Village, Fukushima Prefecture, the restricted area within a 30-km radius from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP, the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples, tree needles, and mushrooms were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Nine months have passed since samples were collected on December 19 and 20, 2011, 9 months after the FNPP accident, and the prevalent dose-forming artificial radionuclides from all samples were (134Cs and (137Cs. The estimated external effective doses from soil samples were 0.42-7.2 µSv/h (3.7-63.0 mSv/y within the 20-km radius from FNPP and 0.0011-0.38 µSv/h (0.010-3.3 mSv/y within the 20-30 km radius from FNPP. The present study revealed that current levels are sufficiently decreasing in Kawauchi Village, especially in areas within the 20- to 30-km radius from FNPP. Thus, residents may return their homes with long-term follow-up of the environmental monitoring and countermeasures such as decontamination and restrictions of the intake of foods for reducing unnecessary exposure. The case of Kawauchi Village will be the first model for the return to residents' homes after the FNPP accident.

  19. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  20. Road building, land use and climate change: prospects for environmental governance in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz, Stephen; Brilhante, Silvia; Brown, Foster; Caldas, Marcellus; Ikeda, Santos; Mendoza, Elsa; Overdevest, Christine; Reis, Vera; Reyes, Juan Fernando; Rojas, Daniel; Schmink, Marianne; Souza, Carlos; Walker, Robert

    2008-05-27

    Some coupled land-climate models predict a dieback of Amazon forest during the twenty-first century due to climate change, but human land use in the region has already reduced the forest cover. The causation behind land use is complex, and includes economic, institutional, political and demographic factors. Pre-eminent among these factors is road building, which facilitates human access to natural resources that beget forest fragmentation. While official government road projects have received considerable attention, unofficial road building by interest groups is expanding more rapidly, especially where official roads are being paved, yielding highly fragmented forest mosaics. Effective governance of natural resources in the Amazon requires a combination of state oversight and community participation in a 'hybrid' model of governance. The MAP Initiative in the southwestern Amazon provides an example of an innovative hybrid approach to environmental governance. It embodies a polycentric structure that includes government agencies, NGOs, universities and communities in a planning process that links scientific data to public deliberations in order to mitigate the effects of new infrastructure and climate change.

  1. Indoor Environmental Quality of the first European ModelHome 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Peter; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Feifer, Lone

    House visionen tager netop denne udfordring op ved at kombinere energi, indeklima og miljø til at udvikle ideer og viden om vores fremtidige bygninger. ModelHome 2020 projektet tager udgangspunkt i Active House vision og materialiserer det ved at designe og konstruere seks bygninger som forslag til...... for at udforske kvaliteter og erfaring der skabes ved at bo i huset. Dette paper fokuserer på at udforske indeklimakvaliteten i det første ModelHome 2020 boligprojekt - enfamiliehuset Bolig for livet i Danmark. Huset er målt gennem et år, mens en test familie har boet i huset og har udført normale...

  2. Indoor Environmental Quality og the first European ModelHome 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Foldbjerg, Peter

    House visionen tager netop denne udfordring op ved at kombinere energi, indeklima og miljø til at udvikle ideer og viden om vores fremtidige bygninger. ModelHome 2020 projektet tager udgangspunkt i Active House vision og materialiserer det ved at designe og konstruere seks bygninger som forslag til...... for at udforske kvaliteter og erfaring der skabes ved at bo i huset. Dette paper fokuserer på at udforske indeklimakvaliteten i det første ModelHome 2020 boligprojekt - enfamiliehuset Bolig for livet i Danmark. Huset er målt gennem et år, mens en test familie har boet i huset og har udført normale...

  3. Representations of environment and environmental education: a study with teachers from rural family homes

    OpenAIRE

    Edival Sebastião Teixeira; Fernanda Luiza Algeri

    2011-01-01

    This paper results from a research aimed to analyse the social representations of environment held by teachers who work at Rural Family Homes located in the southwest of Paraná, Brazil. The data were collected using an instrument composed of three parts: the fi rst focused on identifi cation data; the second contained open-ended questions focused on teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development, education and pedagogy of alternation; the third consisted of a free-association question, base...

  4. Energy and Environmental Performance of Multi-Story Apartment Buildings Built in Timber Construction Using Passive House Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wall

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents energy and environmental performance analyses, a study of summer indoor temperatures and occupant behavior for an eight story apartment building, with the goal to combine high energy efficiency with low environmental impact, at a reasonable cost. Southern Portvakten building is built with prefabricated timber elements using passive house principles in the North European climate. Energy performance was analyzed through parametric studies, as well as monitored energy data, and complemented with analysis of occupant behavior during one year. Results show that airtight, low-energy apartment buildings can be successfully built with prefabricated timber elements in a cold climate. The monitored total energy use was 47.6 kWh/m2, excluding household electricity (revised to a normal year, which is considerably lower than of a standard building built today in Sweden—90 kWh/m2. However, the occupancy level was low during the analyzed year, which affects the energy use compared to if the building had been fully occupied. Environmental analysis shows that the future challenges lie in lowering the household and common electricity use, as well as in improving the choices of materials. More focus should also lie on improving occupant behavior and finding smart solar shading solutions for apartment buildings.

  5. Modeling Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Infiltration in Low-Income Multifamily Housing before and after Building Energy Retrofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Maria Patricia; Lee, Sharon Kitman; Underhill, Lindsay Jean; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Levy, Jonathan Ian

    2016-03-16

    Secondhand exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in multifamily housing remains a health concern despite strong recommendations to implement non-smoking policies. Multiple studies have documented exposure to ETS in non-smoking units located in buildings with smoking units. However, characterizing the magnitude of ETS infiltration or measuring the impact of building interventions or resident behavior on ETS is challenging due to the complexities of multifamily buildings, which include variable resident behaviors and complex airflows between numerous shared compartments (e.g., adjacent apartments, common hallways, elevators, heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, stack effect). In this study, building simulation models were used to characterize changes in ETS infiltration in a low income, multifamily apartment building in Boston which underwent extensive building renovations targeting energy savings. Results suggest that exterior wall air sealing can lead to increases in ETS infiltration across apartments, while compartmentalization can reduce infiltration. The magnitude and direction of ETS infiltration depends on apartment characteristics, including construction (i.e., level and number of exterior walls), resident behavior (e.g., window opening, operation of localized exhaust fans), and seasonality. Although overall ETS concentrations and infiltration were reduced post energy-related building retrofits, these trends were not generalizable to all building units. Whole building smoke-free policies are the best approach to eliminate exposure to ETS in multifamily housing.

  6. Modeling Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Infiltration in Low-Income Multifamily Housing before and after Building Energy Retrofits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Patricia Fabian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondhand exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS in multifamily housing remains a health concern despite strong recommendations to implement non-smoking policies. Multiple studies have documented exposure to ETS in non-smoking units located in buildings with smoking units. However, characterizing the magnitude of ETS infiltration or measuring the impact of building interventions or resident behavior on ETS is challenging due to the complexities of multifamily buildings, which include variable resident behaviors and complex airflows between numerous shared compartments (e.g., adjacent apartments, common hallways, elevators, heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC systems, stack effect. In this study, building simulation models were used to characterize changes in ETS infiltration in a low income, multifamily apartment building in Boston which underwent extensive building renovations targeting energy savings. Results suggest that exterior wall air sealing can lead to increases in ETS infiltration across apartments, while compartmentalization can reduce infiltration. The magnitude and direction of ETS infiltration depends on apartment characteristics, including construction (i.e., level and number of exterior walls, resident behavior (e.g., window opening, operation of localized exhaust fans, and seasonality. Although overall ETS concentrations and infiltration were reduced post energy-related building retrofits, these trends were not generalizable to all building units. Whole building smoke-free policies are the best approach to eliminate exposure to ETS in multifamily housing.

  7. Modeling Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Infiltration in Low-Income Multifamily Housing before and after Building Energy Retrofits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Maria Patricia; Lee, Sharon Kitman; Underhill, Lindsay Jean; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Levy, Jonathan Ian

    2016-01-01

    Secondhand exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in multifamily housing remains a health concern despite strong recommendations to implement non-smoking policies. Multiple studies have documented exposure to ETS in non-smoking units located in buildings with smoking units. However, characterizing the magnitude of ETS infiltration or measuring the impact of building interventions or resident behavior on ETS is challenging due to the complexities of multifamily buildings, which include variable resident behaviors and complex airflows between numerous shared compartments (e.g., adjacent apartments, common hallways, elevators, heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, stack effect). In this study, building simulation models were used to characterize changes in ETS infiltration in a low income, multifamily apartment building in Boston which underwent extensive building renovations targeting energy savings. Results suggest that exterior wall air sealing can lead to increases in ETS infiltration across apartments, while compartmentalization can reduce infiltration. The magnitude and direction of ETS infiltration depends on apartment characteristics, including construction (i.e., level and number of exterior walls), resident behavior (e.g., window opening, operation of localized exhaust fans), and seasonality. Although overall ETS concentrations and infiltration were reduced post energy-related building retrofits, these trends were not generalizable to all building units. Whole building smoke-free policies are the best approach to eliminate exposure to ETS in multifamily housing. PMID:26999174

  8. Norms to establish the most elementary environmental control system which ensures summer thermal comfort in office buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, W.; Mathews, E.H. (Pretoria Univ. (ZA). Centre for Experimental and Numerical Thermoflow)

    1992-01-01

    Various types of environmental control systems (ECS) such as natural ventilation, mechanical ventilation, evaporative cooling and full air-conditioning can be used to cool buildings in hot climates. It is not always clear which of these would be the most elementary ECS that would still ensure thermal comfort in a thermally efficient building for a specific climate. No method to establish norms describing a minimum acceptable ECS was found. This paper proposes a method and gives the norms for South African buildings. The norms are based on existing thermally efficient reference buildings. The minimum ECS to provide comfort in the reference building for a specific summer climate is established by means of a novel and easy to use thermal simulation procedure. The design must then ensure thermal comfort in new designs by utilizing this minimum ECS. (author).

  9. The US Green Building Council`s initiatives to improve the energy and environmental efficiency of the {open_quotes}whole building environment{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Italiano, M.

    1994-12-31

    Today, there is a strong public demand for environmental and energy efficiency in the built environment. According to EPA for at least the past three or four years, there has been one hundred twenty billion dollars annually spent on the environment. This is being done because there are some 30 federal statutes relating to environmental protection. On average there are about 10 separate statutes at every state level. This legislation has taken since the 1970`s to accumulate. They have been enacted because of strong public demand for environmental protection. Public opinion polls have shown for the last five years that support for environmental protections exceeds 90%. It is a very popular national commitment. There are no more debates over whether we need to stop pollution. Those have long gone, and this is being recognized by the building community. We need to recognize that there is a public demand for these issues to be evaluated, discussed and resolved. Buildings, productivity, energy and environmental efficiency are a huge investment in the country, and it is thought that a deliberative debate with decisions on a consensus basis in an expedited manner, is going to be very effective.

  10. Critical Aspects of the Inclusive Environmental for the Well-being of Building Occupant – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaruzzaman S.N

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the property, design and construction industry the main focus of sustainability has been seen to affect the environmental such as climate change and resource depletion. Even though building may meet the recommended standards overall, but yet occupants still complain about several aspects. Indoor environmental quality consequently affects health, productivity and well-being of building occupants as most of them spend their time in indoor space. Therefore they are at risks for air pollutant occurs in the indoor air of dwellings such as volatile organic compounds, paints, ventilation, and others environmental pollutant. This paper reviews the potential health consequences in changes of climates change whereby developed countries contributed in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. From the review search by 57 publications, the literature discussing about how thermal, acoustic and visual comfort as well as indoor air quality affects the satisfaction in indoor environmental quality and impacts to the human health. However, from the undertaken review most of the studies only highlighted on one aspects of indoor environmental quality. A number of critical aspects which give direct impacts to occupants have been identified. Subsequently, among all aspects such as lighting, ventilation, acoustics or humidity and thermal but thermal comfort perceived to influence overall satisfaction of occupants in the building. Thus, from the study revealed the critical aspects of indoor environment and contribute to the improvement for well-being and productivity of building occupants.

  11. Relationship between Quality of Building Maintenance Management Services for Indoor Environmental Quality and Occupant Satisfaction: Case Study of Bus Terminal Buildings in Penang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Full Chong Choon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance is often defined as the series of activities undertaken to take care of the building structure and services to ensure the intended functions and optimal performance of a building life cycle. The management department of a building is usually responsible for the enhancement of the indoor environment quality by service delivery and for boosting occupant productivity and satisfaction. Thus, a salient point of this study is to determine the current level of the building’s maintenance management service for indoor environmental quality in Penang bus terminals, along with its occupant satisfaction with regards to the services provided in the building. The assessment of the indoor environmental quality includes the evaluation of thermal comfort, lighting condition, air quality and cleanliness. Apart from that, qualitative and quantitative methodologies were applied during the process of data collection and analysis. A questionnaire survey was distributed to 500 of the targeted population for each bus terminal, including passengers and the staff. In this study, the conclusion was drawn in which the maintenance management service level of the bus terminal was directly proportional to occupant satisfaction. However, the current quality of maintenance management services in the bus terminals are still not up to the level of the occupants’ satisfaction.

  12. New roof for an old building. PV system on a historical single-family home; Altes Haus kraftvoll eingedeckt. PV-Anlage auf historischem Einfamilienhaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-03-15

    For hundreds of years, slated roofs and walls were the characteristic feature of the Thuringian-Franconian boundary region, where the ''Schieferstrasse'' - the road of historical houses with slated roofs and walls - is a major tourist attraction. Today, owners of buildings are interested in technologies orientated towards the future. After restoration of a single-family home at Lehestenbuilt in 1650, modern solar modules installed on the roof and combined with traditionally-looking aluminium roof tiles by Prefa make an aesthetically pleasing picture. (orig.)

  13. Environmental evaluation of societal industrial ecology - Case studies of its implementation in the Swedish transport and building sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, L.

    2001-08-01

    This thesis is a study of how to environmentally evaluate the Swedish concept 'kretsloppsanpassning', here termed Societal Industrial Ecology (SIE). The thesis is based on three case studies of its implementation in the transport and building sectors. The aim of the thesis is to study to what extent the implementation of SIE in the transport and building sectors leads to changes in material and energy flows and their management. The environmental management (solely in the transport sector) was studied in order to check implemented measures against the governmental goal definitions and validate the measures' inclusion and scope in the SIE concept. In order to environmentally analyse and discuss the changes in environmental management regarding material and energy flows, the industrial metabolism perspective was used. Then, measures were analysed as to how environmental evaluation could be applied and what the possible result would be. Finally, the implications of environmental evaluation for environmental management were discussed. The implementation of SIE in the transport and building sectors has generally lead to that the main part of measures are implemented on material outflows. However, the monitoring of material flows was mainly found on the inflow side. This means that the measures taken were not audited and the quantified information concerning material inflows seem not to influence planning of measures. implemented and planned SIE measures sometimes take place in a wider context than the internal organisation and thereby affect other actors in society. Compared with traditional environmental measuring, this makes other demands on how to environmentally evaluated these measures. Especially, wider system boundaries are a prerequisite to address and evaluate SIE measures. Environmental. evaluation in a systems approach would not result in a precise answer, even if the system studied were less complex than an industrial system. There are a lot

  14. Load Management in Residential Buildings Considering Techno-Economic and Environmental Aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abaravicius, Juozas

    2004-12-01

    Load problems in electricity markets occur both on the supply and demand side and can have technical, economic and even political causes. Commonly, such problems have been solved by expanding production and/or distribution capacity, importing electricity or by load management. Load management is a techno-economic measure for harmonizing the relations between supply and demand sides, optimizing power generation and transmission and increasing security of supply. Interest in load management differs depending on the perspective of the actors involved: from customer, utility, or producer to state policy maker. The problem of load demand and load management in residential sector is in this thesis approached from different perspectives, i.e. technical, economic, and environmental. The study does not go deep into detailed analyses of each perspective, but rather aims to establish and analyze the links between them. This trans-disciplinary approach is the key methodological moment used in the research work performed by the research group for load management in buildings at the Lund Institute of Technology. The key objective of this study is to analyze load demand variation and load management possibilities in residential sector, particularly detached and semi-detached houses, to experimentally test and analyze the conditions and potential of direct load management from customer and utility viewpoint. Techno-economic and environmental aspects are investigated. The study was performed in collaboration with one electric utility in Southern Sweden. Ten electric-heated houses were equipped with extra meters, enabling hourly load measurements for heating, hot water and total electricity use. Household heating and hot water systems were controlled by the utility using an existing remote reading and monitoring system. The residents noticed some of the control periods, although they didn't express any larger discomfort. The experiments proved that direct load management might

  15. Achieving environmentally friendly building envelope for Western Australia’s housing sector: A life cycle assessment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kumar Lawania

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth of Western Australia’s population and economy will affect the sustainability of its building sector. The energy consumption of all processes during mining to material production, transportation, construction plant and tools, and operation (heating, cooling, lighting, hot water and home appliances stages causes high greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and embodied energy (EE consumption. The literature review to date have confirmed that the building envelope consisting of exterior walls, windows, external doors, roof, and floor could significantly affect the energy consumption during operation stage. Australian construction industry could thus enhance the energy efficiency of the building envelope in order to achieve its GHG emissions reduction targets. This paper has assessed the GHG emissions and EE consumption associated with the construction and use of a typical house in Perth for sixty building envelope options using a life cycle assessment (LCA approach. The results show that the building envelope consisting of cast in situ sandwich wall with polyethylene terephthalate (PET foam core, double glazed windows, and concrete roof tiles has the lowest life cycle GHG emissions and embodied energy consumption.

  16. Urban environmental stewardship and changes in vegetative cover and building footprint in New York City neighborhoods (2000-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter H. Locke; Kristen L. King; Erika S. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell; Christopher Small; Nancy F. Sonti; Dana R. Fisher; Jacqueline W.T. Lu

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the connections between vegetation cover change, environmental stewardship, and building footprint change in New York City neighborhoods from the years 2000 to 2010. We use a mixed-methods multidisciplinary approach to analyze spatially explicit social and ecological data. Most neighborhoods lost vegetation during the study period. Neighborhoods...

  17. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  18. Environmental Assessment for Construction of Security Forces Facility/Demolition of Existing Building 528 MacDill AFB, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Gennarro and Tish Maddy MacDill Air Force Base Environmental Restoration Program 7621 Hillsborough Loop Dr. MacDill AFB, FL 33621-5207 Bryan...MacDill Air Force Base Maddy, Tish Lead-based Paint and Asbestos Records, Building 528. Verbal correspondence, February 1, 2005. Naval

  19. The relation between the adoption of sustainable measures and the composition of an environmental assessment tool for buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Brouwers, Jos

    2009-01-01

    Owing to a general perception of resource efficiency and due to the fact that the construction industry is traditionally a large user of natural resources, the necessity to design buildings with a low environmental impact is increasing. In the last decade many tools were developed to calculate the

  20. The Application Trend of Smart Sensing Technology in Home of Building: An Example of a Green and Smart Building for the Seniors Citizens Offered by Farglory Land Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hsien Hsieh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The living space of smart buildings requires three major applications: energy-saving and comfort, security and hazard prevention, and health care. These applications not only give rise to a market opportunity for advanced sensor fusion technologies including comfort sensing, infrared sensing, inertial sensing, and voice recognition, but also make proactive sensing, smart determination, and automatic control possible. The smart building project by Farglory Land Development, where senior citizens are able to live comfortably and be well taken care of, is presented here. The current trends visible from this project are also discussed.

  1. Activity and participation, quality of life and user satisfaction outcomes of environmental control systems and smart home technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Ase; Samuelsson, Kersti A M; Töytäri, Outi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine activity and participation, quality of life, and user satisfaction outcomes of environmental control systems (ECSs) and smart home technology (SHT) interventions for persons with impairments. METHOD: A systematic review. Seventeen databases, three conference proceedings...... were included. One study was on SHT and the remainder on ECS; functionalities were overlapping. The studies varied in most aspects, and no synthesis could be drawn. However, ECS/SHT tended to increase study participants' independence, instrumental activities of daily living, socialising, and quality...... of life. Two studies showed high user satisfaction. The level of evidence was regarded as low, mainly due to small study sizes, lacking confounder control, and a majority of descriptive studies. CONCLUSION: Due to few and small studies and study diversity, it was not possible to determine whether ECS...

  2. A road map to building ethics capacity in the home and community care and support services sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Renaud F; Ibarra, Kimberley; Wagner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    There are unique ethical issues that arise in home and community care because of its locus and range of service. However, the academic literature on ethical issues in the sector of home and community care and support remains minimal. Opportunities for education, collaboration and exchange among professionals and care providers are also severely limited. Although the proposed solution of developing ethics capacity in the home care setting is over 20 years old, only modest progress had been made until recently. This article introduces the Community Ethics Network (CEN), a replicable network of home and community care agencies in the Greater Toronto Area. Its achievements can be attributed to a commitment to work toward a common approach to ethical decision-making and to a focus on education, case reviews and policy development. CEN has produced numerous positive outcomes; key among these is the development and delivery of standardized training on ethics to more than 2,000 front-line staff of diverse backgrounds/professions and representing over 40 different organizations.

  3. Building the Bridge between Home and School: One Rural School's Steps to Interrogate and Celebrate Multiple Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Faith Beyer

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines one rural school's efforts to recognize and celebrate the multiple literacies of its students, by hosting a LINK Up family night that highlights the varied funds of knowledge of school, community and home. In dialogue with excerpts from Sherman Alexie's novel, "The Absolute True Diaries of a Part Time Indian," the paper…

  4. Habitat Metro Denver -- Perfecting Award-Winning Affordable Homes Using Building America's Integrated Design Approach; Building America (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-12-01

    Habitat for Humanity’s goal is to supply quality housing to poor families while reducing their energy cost burden, especially in light of ever-increasing energy prices. Habitat Metro Denver partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America P

  5. Internationalization and environmental disclosure: the role of home and host institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Fortanier, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The domestic institutional context has emerged as a key determinant of firms' environmental disclosure, but studies have hardly addressed the extent to which exposure to foreign institutional contexts plays a role in the occurrence and contents of non-financial disclosure, which are crucia

  6. Environmental Assessment for Phase 8 of Military Family Housing, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Peromyscus maniculatus), house mice (Mus musculus), badgers (Taxidea taxus), coyotes ( Canis latrans), and several species of bat. In addition...OF RESOURCES NEPA requires that environmental analysis include the identification of “…any irreversible and irretrievable commitments of...3 Parulidae G5 S5 Protected House Sparrow (Passer domesticus ) 60 Passeridae G5 Exotic Not Native Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus ) 10

  7. Internationalization and environmental disclosure: the role of home and host institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Fortanier, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The domestic institutional context has emerged as a key determinant of firms' environmental disclosure, but studies have hardly addressed the extent to which exposure to foreign institutional contexts plays a role in the occurrence and contents of non-financial disclosure, which are

  8. Intrinsic Optical Activity and Environmental Perturbations: Solvation Effects in Chiral Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemler, Paul M.; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The non-resonant interaction of electromagnetic radiation with an isotropic ensemble of chiral molecules, which causes the incident state of linear polarization to undergo a signed rotation, long has served as a metric for gauging the enantiomeric purity of asymmetric syntheses. While the underlying phenomenon of circular birefringence (CB) typically is probed in the condensed phase, recent advances in ultrasensitive circular-differential detection schemes, as exemplified by the techniques of Cavity Ring-Down Polarimetry (CRDP), have permitted the first quantitative analyses of such processes to be performed in rarefied media. Efforts to extend vapor-phase investigations of CB to new families of chiral substrates will be discussed, with particular emphasis directed towards the elucidation of intrinsic (e.g., solvent-free) properties and their mediation by environmental perturbations (e.g., solvation). Specific species targeted by this work will include the stereoselective building blocks phenylpropylene oxide and α-methylbenzyl amine, both of which exhibit pronounced solvent-dependent changes in measured optical activity. The nature of chiroptical response in different environments will be highlighted, with quantum-chemical calculations serving to unravel the structural and electronic provenance of observed behavior.

  9. Distributed Multi-Sensor Real-Time Building Environmental Parameters Monitoring System with Remote Data Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beinarts Ivars

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the advanced monitoring system of multiple environmental parameters is presented. The purpose of the system is a long-term estimation of energy efficiency and sustainability for the research test stands which are made of different building materials. Construction of test stands, and placement of main sensors are presented in the first chapter. The structure of data acquisition system includes a real-time interface with sensors and a data logger that allows to acquire and log data from all sensors with fixed rate. The data logging system provides a remote access to the processing of the acquired data and carries out periodical saving at a remote FTP server using an Internet connection. The system architecture and the usage of sensors are explained in the second chapter. In the third chapter implementation of the system, different interfaces of sensors and energy measuring devices are discussed and several examples of data logger program are presented. Each data logger is reading data from analog and digital channels. Measurements can be displayed directly on a screen using WEB access or using data from FTP server. Measurements and acquired data graphical results are presented in the fourth chapter in the selected diagrams. The benefits of the developed system are presented in the conclusion.

  10. Environmental labelling of buildings and construction products: lessons for South Africa from global trends

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ampofo-Anti, NL

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available principles to move from prescriptive towards performance-based standards. This new approach responds to and complements emerging policy trends towards “green” building regulations and mandatory energy labelling of buildings. Construction product certification...

  11. Building America Best Practices Series - High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilbride, Theresa L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cole, Pam C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hefty, Marye G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ruiz, Kathi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report identifies the climate region of each county in the United States. The report is intended as an aid in helping builders to identify the appropriate climate designation for the counties in which they are building.

  12. Environmental quickscans as a decision supporting tool: Scanning the embodied energy of different fibre treatments in the development of biocomposite building products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, E.E.; Stokes, E.; Perremans, D.; Grishchuk, S.; Tjeerdsma, B.; Heesbeen, C.; Lund, M.N.

    2013-01-01

    In this article the method of environmental quickscans is introduced. This method is developed in the EU-funded project 'BioBuild'. The goal of BioBuild is to develop biocomposite building products with 50% reduction of embodied energy and no increase in costs, compared to current alternatives. To

  13. European Home Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.

    2009-01-01

    An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes......An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes...

  14. European Home Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.

    2009-01-01

    An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes......An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes...

  15. Evaluation of an Intensive Intervention Programme to Protect Children Aged 1-5 Years from Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure at Home in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, U.; Öcek, Z. A.; Çiçeklioglu, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this randomized-controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive intervention to reduce children's environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure at their home compared with a minimal intervention. The target population of the study was the mothers of children aged 1-5 who lived in the Cengizhan district of Izmir in…

  16. Differential effects of the computer-tailored FATaintPHAT programme on dietary behaviours according to sociodemographic, cognitive and home environmental factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, N.P.M.; Burg, J.; Borsboom, G.; Empelen, P.van; Oenema, A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether the effects on dietary behaviours of a computer-tailored intervention aimed to prevent excessive weight gain among adolescents, FATaintPHAT, were moderated by sociodemographic, cognitive and home environmental factors. DESIGN: A two-group cluster randomized trial. Poten

  17. Energy related environmental impact of buildings; Oekoinventar der Entsorgungsprozesse von Baumaterialien; Grundlagen zur Integration der Entsorgung in Oekobilanzen von Gebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doka, G.

    2000-07-01

    Ecological assessments of buildings, constructions, and building materials are often focussed on the production and use phase. Disposal is mostly disregarded. This study within the IEA Annex 31 'Energy related environmental impact of buildings' shows that excluding disposal is not generally justified. A life cycle assessment of the disposal of various common building materials in Switzerland was conducted. It heeds energy consumption as well as directly or indirectly emitted pollutants. Valuation methods were Eco-indicator95+ and UBP (ecological scarcity). The study specifies disposal inventories for about 50 building materials. They are fit to complement inventory data for the production of materials. Unlike production, the disposal can only be assessed in the light of a specific building or construction. The potential for recycling is influenced by type of construction, application, and site-specific logistics. Durability of a material determines what proportion will be disposed of in renovation activities. Wherever possible and likely, disposal options with or without re-utilization are considered in the assessment. Building wastes are divided in construction wastes, renovation wastes, and demolition wastes, that can have quite different impact even for identical materials. The system boundary in the assessment includes expenditures on the building site like demolition energies, transports, expenditures in a sorting plant and the final disposal in an incinerator or landfill. According to the Swiss Agency for the Environment, Forests and Landscape, 46% of all burnable building wastes in Switzerland are disposed of illegally. Hence, in one scenario the disposal in an open fire was assessed for burnable wastes. The assessments of the disposal processes are material-specific, i.e. the post use-phase composition of the materials is heeded. The data applies to the situation in Switzerland. The results of the study are compared to the impacts of the

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St. Paul, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    For this project, Amaris worked with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team, NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, to develop the first Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) in Minnesota's cold climate using reasonable, cost-effective, and replicable construction materials and practices. The result is a passive solar, super-efficient 3542-ft2 walkout ranch-style home with all the creature comforts. Along with meeting ZERH standards, Amaris also achieved certifications for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design for Homes v4, MN Green Path Emerald, and a Builders Association of the Twin Cities Reggie Award of Excellence. The home achieves a HERS score of 41 without photovoltaics; with PV, the home achieves a HERS score of 5.

  19. Environmental Impact Assessment of a School Building in Iceland Using LCA-Including the Effect of Long Distance Transport of Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Nargessadat Emami; Björn Marteinsson; Jukka Heinonen

    2016-01-01

    Buildings are the key components of urban areas and society as a complex system. A life cycle assessment was applied to estimate the environmental impacts of the resources applied in the building envelope, floor slabs, and interior walls of the Vættaskóli-Engi building in Reykjavik, Iceland. The scope of this study included four modules of extraction and transportation of raw material to the manufacturing site, production of the construction materials, and transport to the building site, as d...

  20. Indoor environmental quality in school buildings, and the health and wellbeing of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Mari; Toyinbo, Oluyemi; Putus, Tuula; Nevalainen, Aino; Shaughnessy, Richard; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla

    2014-09-01

    Poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in classrooms may be a risk for health symptoms and cause absence from school. We conducted a comprehensive study in order to assess the connection between IEQ in Finnish elementary school buildings and the health and academic performance of sixth grade students. The specific aim of the present paper was to study the school- or grade-level prevalence of symptoms in relation to IEQ. The school- or grade-level (i.e. group level) prevalence of self-reported symptoms and perceived IEQ was studied using data collected by a health questionnaire comprising 37 questions. The health questionnaire was sent to all 6th grade students in a stratified random sample of 355 elementary schools in Finland. Indoor environmental conditions were assessed with measurements of ventilation rate and thermal conditions of classrooms in a subsample of 56 schools. Altogether 297 elementary schools participated in the health questionnaire study and a total of 4248 questionnaires were returned (estimated response rate 62.6%). The most common weekly symptoms in the spring semester were fatigue (7.7%), stuffy nose (7.3%), and headache (5.5%). However, both mean prevalence values for different symptoms among all 6th grade students and group-level prevalence values for specific symptoms varied considerably. On the group level, the prevalence values most frequently found above 95% CI (calculated for N=15) were wheezing, cough with wheezing, and fever over 37°C. The most frequently reported IEQ factors causing daily inconvenience in classrooms were noise (11.0%) and stuffy air/poor indoor air quality (IAQ) (7.0%), which were also found most frequently above 95% CI on the group level (calculated for N=15), together with self-reported high indoor temperature and dust or dirtiness. Self-reported daily stuffiness/poor IAQ was significantly correlated with measured mean temperatures and ventilation rates in classrooms. High prevalence of students' self

  1. Environmental exposure to TiO 2 nanomaterials incorporated in building material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossa, Nathan; Chaurand, Perrine; Levard, Clément; Borschneck, Daniel; Miche, Hélène; Vicente, Jérôme; Geantet, Christophe; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Michel, F. Marc; Rose, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used to improve the properties and functions of common building materials. A new type of self-cleaning cement incorporating TiO2 nanomaterials (TiO2-NMs) with photocatalytic properties is now marketed. This promising cement might provide air pollution-reducing properties but its environmental impact must be validated. During cement use and aging, an altered surface layer is formed that exhibits increased porosity. The surface layer thickness alteration and porosity increase with the cement degradation rate. The hardened cement paste leaching behavior has been fully documented, but the fate of incorporated TiO2-NMs and their state during/after potential release is currently unknown. In this study, photocatalytic cement pastes with increasing initial porosity were leached at a lab-scale to produce a range of degradation rates concerning the altered layer porosity and thickness. No dissolved Ti was released during leaching, only particulate TiO2-NM release was detected. The extent of release from this batch test simulating accelerated worst-case scenario was limited and ranged from 18.7 ± 2.1 to 33.5 ± 5.1 mg of Ti/m2 of cement after 168 h of leaching. TiO2-NMs released into neutral aquatic media (simulate pH of surface water) were not associated or coated by cement minerals. The TiO2-NM release mechanism is suspected to start from freeing of TiO2-NMs in the altered layer pore network due to partial cement paste dissolution followed by diffusion into the bulk pore solution to the surface. The extent of TiO2-NM release was not solely related to the cement degradation rate.

  2. Home Environment and School Performance: A Ten-Year Follow-up and Examination of Three Models of Environmental Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines home environments of children aged ten and eleven when they were six months and two years old. Significant correlations were observed between the home environments at two and ten years, children's achievement test scores, and classroom behavior. Home environment at six months was related to a minimal number of classroom behaviors. (RJC)

  3. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  4. Building a "National Civilization" at Home and Abroad: International Students and Changing U.S. Political Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Fanta

    2011-01-01

    The research study examines the relationship of international students to changing U.S. political economy. The research attempts to move international students from the periphery to the center of understanding the changing U.S. political economy in the twenty-first century. I argue that international students play an important role in building a…

  5. Technical, economic and environmental investigation of using district heating to prepare domestic hot water in Chinese multi-storey buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xia, Jianjun; Thorsen, Jan Eric;

    2016-01-01

    utilizes the industrial waste heat to prepare DHW via the DH network. A building model of a multi-storey building in Beijing was developed to investigate the technical feasibility. An economic evaluation was made using net present value to compare the annualized cost for individual water heaters and flat......The development of DH (District Heating) is an environmentally friendly and energy-efficient strategy in China. Currently, the vast majority of DH systems are SH (Space Heating) only and do not provide DHW (Domestic Hot Water). DHW is mainly produced by individual water heaters due to the cost......-effective issues of the centralized DHW systems. From the perspective of long-term development, DHW produced via DH systems would be more sustainable because DH is an important precondition for an environmental safe use of domestic waste fuels. This paper presents an approach that uses flat stations meanwhile...

  6. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  7. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  8. Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: BrightBuilt Home, Modular Zero Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-04-11

    When done well, modular home production can provide lower costs and excellent quality control (QC)—compared to conventional home building methods— while still allowing a great deal of customization. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) is a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team that worked with three Maine companies to compare standard codecompliant modular homes with a modular zero energy home. Those companies were BrightBuilt Home (BBH), Black Bros. Builders, and Keiser Homes.

  9. Building America Case Study: The Impact of Thermostat Placement in Low-Load Homes in Sunny Climates, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    Modern, energy-efficient homes conforming to the Zero Energy Ready Home standard face the challenge of meeting high customer expectations for comfort. Traditional heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) sizing and control strategies may be insufficient to adequately condition each zone due to unique load patterns in each room caused by a number of factors. These factors include solar heat gains, occupant-related gains, and gains associated with appliances and electronics. Because of shrinking shell loads, these intermittent factors are having an increasingly significant impact on the thermal load in each zone. Consequently, occupant comfort can be compromised. To evaluate the impact of climate and house geometry, as well as HVAC system and control strategies on comfort conditions, IBACOS analyzed the results of 99 TRNSYS multiple-zone simulations. The results of this analysis indicate that for simple-geometry and single-story plans, a single zone and thermostat can adequately condition the entire house. Demanding house geometry and houses with multiple stories require the consideration of multiple thermostats and multiple zones.

  10. Building, testing and validating a set of home-made von Frey filaments: a precise, accurate and cost effective alternative for nociception assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Marcelo Victor Pires; Ferraresi, Cleber; de Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-07-30

    A von Frey filament (vFF) is a type of aesthesiometer usually made of nylon perpendicularly held in a base. It can be used in paw withdrawal pain threshold assessment, one of the most popular tests for pain evaluation using animal models. For this test, a set of filaments, each able to exert a different force, is applied to the animal paw, from the weakest to the strongest, until the paw is withdrawn. We made 20 low cost vFF using nylon filaments of different lengths and constant diameter glued perpendicularly to the ends of popsicle sticks. They were calibrated using a laboratory balance scale. Building and calibrating took around 4h and confirmed the theoretical prediction that the force exerted is inversely proportional to the length and directly proportional to the width of the filament. The calibration showed that they were precise and accurate. We analyzed the paw withdrawal threshold assessed with the set of home-made vFF and with a high quality commercial set of 5 monofilaments vFF (Stoelting, Wood Dale, USA) in two groups (n=5) of healthy mice. The home-made vFF precisely and accurately measured the hind paw withdrawal threshold (20.3±0.9 g). The commercial vFF have different diameters while our set has the same diameter avoiding the problem of lower sensitivity to larger diameter filaments. Building a set of vFF is easy, cost effective, and depending on the kind of tests, can increase precision and accuracy of animal nociception evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interim progress report addendun - environmental geophysics: Building E5032 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground, January 1994 resurvey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Benson, M.A.; Borden, H.M.; Padar, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Geophysical surveying around Building E5032 using three new continuously recording geophysical instruments - two types of electromagnetic induction instruments and a cesium vapor magnetometer that were unavailable at the time of the original survey - has provided additional information for defining the location of buried debris, vaults, tanks, and the drainage/sump system near the building. The dominant geophysical signature around Building E5032 consists of a complex pattern of linear magnetic, electrical-conductivity, and electromagnetic field anomalies that appear to be associated with drainage/sewer systems, ditches, past railway activity, the location for Building T5033 (old number 99A), and the probable location of Building 91. Integrated analysis of data acquired using the three techniques, plus a review of the existing ground-penetrating-radar data, allow a more thorough definition of the sources for the observed anomalies.

  12. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  13. CEMS: Building a Cloud-Based Infrastructure to Support Climate and Environmental Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, P. J.; Curtis, M.; Pechorro, E.

    2012-04-01

    CEMS, the facility for Climate and Environmental Monitoring from Space, is a new joint collaboration between academia and industry to bring together their collective expertise to support research into climate change and provide a catalyst for growth in related Earth Observation (EO) technologies and services in the commercial sector. A recent major investment by the UK Space Agency has made possible the development of a dedicated facility at ISIC, the International Space Innovation Centre at Harwell in the UK. CEMS has a number of key elements: the provision of access to large-volume EO and climate datasets co-located with high performance computing facilities; a flexible infrastructure to support the needs of research projects in the academic community and new business opportunities for commercial companies. Expertise and tools for scientific data quality and integrity are another essential component, giving users confidence and transparency in its data, services and products. Central to the development of this infrastructure is the utilisation of cloud-based technology: multi-tenancy and the dynamic provision of resources are key characteristics to exploit in order to support the range of organisations using the facilities and the varied use cases. The hosting of processing services and applications next to the data within the CEMS facility is another important capability. With the expected exponential increase in data volumes within the climate science and EO domains it is becoming increasingly impracticable for organisations to retrieve this data over networks and provide the necessary storage. Consider for example, the factor of o20 increase in data volumes expected for the ESA Sentinel missions over the equivalent Envisat instruments. We explore the options for the provision of a hybrid community/private cloud looking at offerings from the commercial sector and developments in the Open Source community. Building on this virtualisation layer, a further core

  14. RETROKIT- retrofitting residential multi-family building - Evaluation of effects on indoor environmental quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluizenaar, Y. de; Jong, P. de; Vliet, M.R.A. de

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency retrofitting of post war multi-family homes provides a great opportunity not only in terms of energy saving potential, but also in terms of improvement of IEQ, comfort and quality of living. However, insight is needed in potential unexpected adverse effects that may occur, for the

  15. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where plaque builds up. ...

  16. Study of glazed building ceramics from central Europe (Budapest, Hungary) in aspect of deterioration by environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricza, Ágnes; Bajnóczi, Bernadett; Tóth, Mária; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-05-01

    The Zsolnay products are one of the most famous Hungarian ceramics. The glazed building ceramics, which were produced by this factory, were often applied in Hungary and the surrounding countries. Since their outplacements the ceramics have suffered from numerous environmental and human influences. There is no profound knowledge about deterioration of these building materials. Beside the characterization of the Zsolnay ceramics, our purpose is to attempt to explain the deterioration caused by environmental factors considering that these ceramics have never been studied in this aspect before. Other goal is to reveal if there is any influence on the deterioration depending on the location of building covered by Zsolnay ceramics. The studied objects were used on buildings of the Museum of Applied Arts (in the center with high traffic) and the Hungarian Geological and Geophysical Institute in Budapest (in a quarter with moderate traffic). We examined the physical and chemical features of the glaze and the ceramic body (e.g., phase composition, texture, microstructure, alteration) and the depositions on the glazed and the unglazed sides of some selected ceramics. Based on the results, three different types of ceramics were used as building materials. We observed several kinds of damage (e.g. cracks, pitting corrosions), black deposition layer and alterations in different extent. Natural and artificial particles (e.g. iron-oxide, mica, calcite and glauberithe) and spherules were deposited on the surface. Traces of biological activity were also found and connected to these organic residues calcium-oxalate was detected. On some objects of the Museum the glaze has started to weather and its lead was leached glaze by rainfall. Weathering also occurs along cracks in the glaze interior together with precipitation of lead-rich phases. Gypsum layer frequently covers the ceramics. In conclusions, the ceramics from the Museum are in worse condition than the ceramics from the

  17. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 1. Building and sustaining capacity in laboratory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Ernst, Hiba; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Smith, Terry; Hedrick, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents, such as natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and industrial accidents, can occur suddenly and have high impact. However, they often occur at such a low frequency and in unpredictable locations that planning for the management of the consequences of a catastrophe can be difficult. For those catastrophes that result in the release of contaminants, the ability to analyze environmental samples is critical and contributes to the resilience of affected communities. Analyses of environmental samples are needed to make appropriate decisions about the course of action to restore the area affected by the contamination. Environmental samples range from soil, water, and air to vegetation, building materials, and debris. In addition, processes used to decontaminate any of these matrices may also generate wastewater and other materials that require analyses to determine the best course for proper disposal. This paper summarizes activities and programs the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has implemented to ensure capability and capacity for the analysis of contaminated environmental samples following catastrophic incidents. USEPA's focus has been on building capability for a wide variety of contaminant classes and on ensuring national laboratory capacity for potential surges in the numbers of samples that could quickly exhaust the resources of local communities. USEPA's efforts have been designed to ensure a strong and resilient laboratory infrastructure in the United States to support communities as they respond to contamination incidents of any magnitude. The efforts include not only addressing technical issues related to the best-available methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants, but also include addressing the challenges of coordination and administration of an efficient and effective response. Laboratory networks designed for responding to large scale contamination incidents can be sustained by applying

  18. Errata, nursing homes. Budget percentiles for baseline and redesigned commercial type buildings: cities with try weather tapes; based on resource utilization factors (RUF); based on price weighting factors (PWF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-22

    Corrected data are presented for the P50 Redesign figure for nursing homes in the following documents in the series entitled Budget Percentiles for Baseline and Redesigned Commercial Type Buildings: For Cities with TRY Weather Tapes, Based on Price Weighing Factors (PWF), and Based on Resource Utilization Factors (RUF). (MCW)

  19. Do Certified Buildings Enhance Indoor Environmental Quality and Performance of Office Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, Nuno Alexandre Faria; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    on productivity and that an average employee cost can be >10-100 times higher than the rental operation and maintenance costs (Morrell, 2005; Persramet al., 2007). There is however lack of consistent and systematic data benchmarking benefits of green building, in particular as regards IEQ and the effects...... on humans. Health, comfort and work performance outcomes are more difficult to quantify than the effects on energy. As a result, it may be expected that credits for IEQ in the schemes be traded with other credits. If so, although claimed to have an outstanding IEQ as compared with conventional buildings...... there is any systematic evidence that these buildings outperform conventional buildings as regards IEQ either through actual IEQ measurements, subjective assessments made by occupants and/or objectively and self-estimated work performance....

  20. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Imagine Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-01-01

    Imagine Homes, working with the DOE's Building America research team member IBACOS, has developed a system that can be replicated by other contractors to build affordable, high-performance homes. Imagine Homes has used the system to produce more than 70 Builders Challenge-certified homes per year in San Antonio over the past five years.

  1. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  2. Psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia : influence of environmental correlates and staff distress on physicians' prescription behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine whether staff distress and aspects of the nursing home environment were associated with psychotropic drug use (PDU) in patients with dementia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 1289 nursing home patients with dementia from 56 Dementia Specia

  3. Development, production and promotion of energy-saving and environmentally correct fixtures for private homes; Udvikling, produktion of markedsfoering af energi- og miljoerigtige armaturer til boligmarkedet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velk, A.; Munck, K. [Lysteknisk Selskab (Denmark)

    2006-08-31

    A design competition for environmentally correct and energy-saving fixtures for private homes was arranged in 2004. There were 88 entries and three were awarded with a prize. The purpose of the project was to produce and promote two or three proposals in a campaign for the use of environmentally correct and energy-saving fixtures. Three manufacturers of fixtures had given prior notice that they would produce the fixtures, but with certain conditions. Despite the many entries, the manufacturers assessed that none of them possessed the necessary qualities to commence product development. A group of designers were offered the possibility to find other manufacturers, but they did not succeed. (au)

  4. Building on the Past, Shaping the Future: The Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    In late 2012 the members of the Environmental Mutagen Society voted to change its name to the Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society. Here we describe the thought process that led to adoption of the new name, which both respects the rich history of a Society founded in 19...

  5. The "Natural Start Alliance": Building Collective Impact for Early Childhood Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Christy

    2014-01-01

    Last year, the North American Association for Environmental Education launched the "Natural Start Alliance," a new initiative to advance environmental education for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Natural Start provides an opportunity for key players to convene, share ideas and resources, and move together toward shared goals. This…

  6. Final Environmental Assessment: Replacement Joint Force Headquarters Building, Hanscom Air Force Base Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    occupies building 1503 with the State Medical Command (Med Com). Med Com plans, programs, provides, and sustains health force protection and medical/ dental ...Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine (USACHPPM) Dempsey, Judith; Polyak , Lisa; Tushek, Stephen. Technical Guide for Preparing a... Polyak , Lisa; Tushek, Stephen. Technical Guide for Preparing a Record of Nonapplicability for the General Conformity Rule. November 2003. USEPA. AP 42

  7. Polychlorinated Biphenyl Sources, Emissions, and Environmental Levels in school Buildings (PCB Workshop presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measure PCB emission rates from primary sources in laboratory chambersMeasure transport and sorption by materials and dust in laboratory chambersCharacterize PCBs in school building materialsEstimate PCB emission rates from sources in schoolsExamine congener patterns in sources a...

  8. Comparative assessment of environmental performance tools and the role of the Green Building Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, J.A.; Crawley, D.; Geissler, S.; Lindsey, G.

    2001-09-01

    Green Building Challenge (GBC) was intended to advance the state-of-the-art of building performance assessment, through the development, testing, and discussion of an assessment framework, criteria and tool. The contributions of GBC to building performance assessment are considered through comparing similarities and differences with a selection of available assessment tools. Unlike national or proprietary assessment systems, GBC was not designed for application to specific commercial markets. Instead, it emphasized research and involved researchers and practitioners from many countries. Consequently, GBC has been in a unique position to test and adopt new ideas and implement step changes. GBC's roles over the past five years have been to provide a reference framework, method and tools that can be used to develop new systems or improve existing systems; provide a forum for discussion among researchers and practitioners worldwide; and raise awareness and credibility of assessment systems. GBC's role has evolved as the context in which it operates has changed. Based on the analysis on GBC's specific characteristics and strengths, its potential future roles are found to reside in a unique position. Its role as a reference system has become less important to many participants as they implement their own national assessment systems. However, GBC's role as a forum and catalyst for change has taken on greater importance as researchers and practitioners continue to wrestle with the most difficult issues in building performance assessment. (author)

  9. INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ON THE GROWTH OF BUILDING DETERIORATING FUNGI: ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS AND PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Singh* and Mamta Chauhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of whole building depends on many factors: structure, coating, environment, climate, type of use, service etc. Fungi are essential for the survival of our global ecology but they may pose a significant threat to the health of occupants when they grow in our buildings. The most important factor that affect microbial growth on buildings materials are temperature, moisture and nutrients. The moisture conditions connected with temperature and exposure time are the most important factor for the development of biological problems and damage in buildings. In vitro studies were conducted on the effect of temperature, pH levels and moisture on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Penicillium chrysogenum. Maximum growth was observed on pH level 6 and 7 against A. flavus and P. chrysogenum respectively after 12 days. The most suitable temperature for the growth of A. flavus and P. chrysogenum was observed on 25°C and 30°C respectively. The fungus showed maximum growth at 90% relative humidity.

  10. Building Alternative Agri-Food Networks: Certification, Embeddedness and Agri-Environmental Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Vaughan; Dibden, Jacqui; Cocklin, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the role of certification in alternative agri-food networks (AAFNs), which are "in the process" of building markets for their produce outside conventional supply chains. Drawing upon recent writing on "embeddedness", we argue that certification provides an important focus for exploring the relationship and…

  11. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  12. Energy efficiency in buildings - environmental value for money; Energieffektivisering i bygninger - mye miljoe for pengene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokka, Tor Helge; Hauge, Guro; Thyholt, Marit; Klinski, Michael; Kirkhus, Anders

    2009-07-01

    Several international studies have shown that energy efficiency is the simplest and cheapest measure for improving the climate. Energy efficiency in buildings will be an important contribution from Norway in order to develop a sustainable energy system thus meeting the country's international obligations concerning the greenhouse gas emissions during the next decades. Analyses in this report show that energy efficiency in the building trade may contribute to several advantages: There is a potential for saving 12 TWh within 2020, where only just 10 TWh is released energy. The potential amount saved is estimated to be the equivalent of approximately 10 milliard EUROs during the period 2010 to 2020. This commercial potential of 10 milliard EUROs is estimated to generate approximately 10.0000 new workplaces during the next period of four years, and nearly 20.000 workplaces within 2020. This is important for a trade which has been strongly affected by the financial crisis. A national scenario shows that if energy released from the building trade is transferred to the electrification of the transportation sector and offshore activities in addition to the total phase out of oil heaters Norway will be able to reduce it's greenhouse gas emissions by 6 million metric tonnes. This constitutes practically 40% of of the climate agreement's objective on the reduction of internal national greenhouse gas emissions within 2020. Energy efficiency in the building trade will probably also be of decisive importance to enable Norway to meet the obligations in the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) and the EU European Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD). Analyses estimate that the Government will be able to release the potential of 12 TWh within 2020 by investing 200 million EUROs annually from 2010, increasing the amount gradually to 300 million EUROs towards 2020. (EW)

  13. Building of Environmental Literacy among Middle School Students: The Role of In-School, Out of School, and Psychological Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn Tate

    Solving environmental challenges will require an environmentally literate citizenry, equipped with ecological knowledge, pro-environmental attitudes, problem-solving skills, and motivation toward environmentally responsible behaviors. This dissertation addresses three approaches to building environmental literacy (EL) among middle school students: through schools (Chapter 1), through activities outside of school (Chapter 2), and through understanding psychological factors that affect environmental perceptions (Chapter 3). Chapter 1. This study examined school-wide EE programs among middle schools in North Carolina, including the use of published EE curricula and time outdoors while controlling for teacher education level and experience, student demographics, and school attributes. Our sample included an EE group selected from schools with registered schoolwide EE programs, and a control group randomly selected from NC middle schools that were not registered as EE schools. Students were given an EL survey at the beginning and end of the spring 2012 semester. Use of published EE curricula, time outdoors, and having teachers with advanced degrees and mid-level teaching experience (between 3 and 5 years) were positively related with EL whereas minority status (Hispanic and black) was negatively related with EL. Results suggest that though school-wide EE programs may vary in effectiveness, the use of published EE curricula paired with time outdoors represents a promising strategy. Further, investments in both new and veteran teachers to build and maintain enthusiasm for EE may help to boost student EL levels. Middle school represents a pivotal time for influencing EL, as improvement was slower among older students. Differences in EL levels based on gender suggest boys and girls may possess complementary skills sets when approaching environmental issues. Our findings suggest ethnicity related disparities in EL levels may be mitigated by time spent in nature, especially

  14. Environmental assessment in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-09-01

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. In this report, the scope, objectives, and approach of this EA are presented.

  15. Sex Away from Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Harold

    1971-01-01

    The reasons why people who are normally truthful to their spouses engage in sex away from home are discussed. These reasons can include loneliness, ego building or the opportunity to have homosexual relations. Sex away from home is likely to increase since the number of people traveling is increasing. (Author/CG)

  16. Effects of environmental amenities and locational disamenities on home values in the Santa Cruz watershed: a hedonic analysis using census data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Gaurav; Frisvold, George; Norman, Laura

    2014-01-01

    For this study, we used the hedonic pricing method to measure the effects of natural amenities on home prices in the U.S-side of the Santa Cruz Watershed. We employed multivariate spatial regression techniques to estimate how difference factors affect median home values in 613 census block groups of the 2000 Census, accounting for spatial autocorrelation, spatial lags, and/or spatial heterogeneity in the data. Diagnostic tests suggest that failure to account for the hedonic model can be classified as (1) physical features of the housing stock, (2) neighborhood characteristics, and (3) environmental attributes. Census data was combined with GIS data for vegetation and land cover, land administration, measures of species richness and open space, and proximity to amenities and disamenities. Census block groups close to the US-Mexico border of airports/air bases were negative. Results suggest that policies to maintain biodiversity and open space provide economic benefits to homeowners, reflected in higher home values. Future research will quantify the marginal effects of regression explanatory variables on home values to assess their economic and policy significant. These marginal effects will be used as input indicators to discern potential economic impacts of various scenarios in the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM). Future research will also expand this effort into the Mexican-portion of the watershed.

  17. Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

  18. Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

  19. Environmental Assessment: Construct Airfield Lighting Vault and Demolish Building 531 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included...in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous plants...These are buildings 313, 606, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, and 714. 3.9 LAND USE Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops

  20. Rethinking environmental peace-building in the context of resource extraction in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Maisto, Juliana Sporsheim

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I seek to explain the links between the governance of resources and the peace process in Colombia. To meet this aim, I explore the role of civil society movements in struggles related to extractive projects in the country. In a first section of the thesis, I explore how extractive operations tend to reinforce the previous dynamics of violence that inhibit the peace-building process, and explain that the government is purposively leaving out issues related to the extractive ...

  1. An embodied GHG emissions auditing and benchmarking model for assessing the environmental impacts of buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuan; 陳源

    2013-01-01

    Climate change constitutes one of the greatest challenges facing the world today, as it will influence the way we live and work in future decades. Excessive greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are recognized as the key contributor to climate change, and the construction sector has an indispensable role to play in emission reduction, as building facilities are energy- and emission-intensive to construct and operate. Previous research indicates that up to 30 percent of buildings’ lifecycle emissions...

  2. A Process for the Implementation of New Renewable Energy Systems in a Building by Considering Environmental and Economic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Joong Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The excessive use of fossil fuels has led to global warming and air pollution. To solve these problems, interest in new renewable energy system (NRE system has increased in recent years. In particular, photovoltaic, solar thermal heating, fuel cell and ground source heating system are actively implemented for achieving the zero energy building. Since the initial investment cost of the NRE system is quite expensive, it is necessary to conduct a feasibility study from the life cycle perspective. Therefore, this study aimed to develop the process for the implementation of NRE system in a building for the optimal design. This study was conducted with four steps: (i establishing the basic information for the system installation; (ii selecting key factors affecting system performances; (iii making possible alternatives of the system installation; and (iv selecting optimal system by considering environmental and economic effect. The proposed process could enable the final decision-maker to easily and accurately determine the optimal design of the NRE systems from the economic and environmental efficiency in the early design phase. The process could also be applied to any other NRE system and could be extended to any other country in the global environment.

  3. An Economic and Environmental Assessment Model for Selecting the Optimal Implementation Strategy of Fuel Cell Systems—A Focus on Building Energy Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeho Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Considerable effort is being made to reduce the primary energy consumption in buildings. As part of this effort, fuel cell systems are attracting attention as a new/renewable energy systems for several reasons: (i distributed generation system; (ii combined heat and power system; and (iii availability of various sources of hydrogen in the future. Therefore, this study aimed to develop an economic and environmental assessment model for selecting the optimal implementation strategy of the fuel cell system, focusing on building energy policy. This study selected two types of buildings (i.e., residential buildings and non-residential buildings as the target buildings and considered two types of building energy policies (i.e., the standard of energy cost calculation and the standard of a government subsidy. This study established the optimal implementation strategy of the fuel cell system in terms of the life cycle cost and life cycle CO2 emissions. For the residential building, it is recommended that the subsidy level and the system marginal price level be increased. For the non-residential building, it is recommended that gas energy cost be decreased and the system marginal price level be increased. The developed model could be applied to any other country or any other type of building according to building energy policy.

  4. Home Sweet Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A family-run nursing home that gives elderly people the feel of a real of a real home Jiang Shaoju’s three-year-old family-run nursing home for the elderly in Dalian breaks all stereotypes people might attach to traditional homes for the aged.There are no nurses in uniforms,no numbered bedding and there is a lot of laughter. Jiang,56,has given almost every one of the 12 elderly women in her nursing home a nickname.She calls 92-year-old Xuan Shoulan"vice principal"because Xuan likes giving orders to others in the house and

  5. [Development of green hospitals home and abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiju; Zeng, Na; Shen, Minxue; Sun, Zhenqiu

    2013-09-01

    Green hospital construction is a new challenge for medical industry after global sustainable development strategy was put forward. The core connotation of green hospital includes green building, green healthcare, patient safety, and doctor-patient harmony. Many countries have established green building evaluation system to deal with energy crisis. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Green Guide for Health Care (GGHC) in the U.S., and Evaluation System for Green Hospital Building (CSUS/GBC 2-2011) in China have guiding significance for the development of green hospitals in China. The evaluation system of green hospitals home and abroad still focuses on green building, and establishment of suitable synthesis evaluation system of green hospitals in China needs further research.

  6. Building Environmental Literacy through Participation in GIS and Multimedia Assisted Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Affolter, James M.; Reeves, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A Learning Support System (LSS) that emphasizes experiential research in natural environments using the cutting-edge technologies of GIS and multimedia has been developed for teaching environmental literacy to undergraduate students at the University of Georgia. Computers are used as cognitive tools to create a context in which students become…

  7. The Role of Scientific Studies in Building Consensus in Environmental Decision Making: a Coral Reef Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a new approach for characterizing the potential of scientific studies to reduce conflict among stakeholders in an analytic-deliberative environmental decision-making process. The approach computes a normalized metric, the Expected Consensus Index of New Research (ECINR...

  8. Role of Significant Life Experiences in Building Environmental Knowledge and Behavior among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn T.; Peterson, M. Nils; Carrier, Sarah J.; Strnad, Renee L.; Bondell, Howard D.; Kirby-Hathaway, Terri; Moore, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant life experience research suggests that the presence of role models, time outdoors, and nature-related media foster pro-environmental behavior, but most research is qualitative. Based on a random sample of middle school students in North Carolina, USA, we found limited positive associations between presence of a role model and time…

  9. The Role of Scientific Studies in Building Consensus in Environmental Decision Making: a Coral Reef Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a new approach for characterizing the potential of scientific studies to reduce conflict among stakeholders in an analytic-deliberative environmental decision-making process. The approach computes a normalized metric, the Expected Consensus Index of New Research (ECINR...

  10. Building Environmental Literacy through Participation in GIS and Multimedia Assisted Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Affolter, James M.; Reeves, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A Learning Support System (LSS) that emphasizes experiential research in natural environments using the cutting-edge technologies of GIS and multimedia has been developed for teaching environmental literacy to undergraduate students at the University of Georgia. Computers are used as cognitive tools to create a context in which students become…

  11. Smart emission: Building a spatial data infrastructure for an environmental citizen sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grothe, M.; Broecke, J. Vanden; Carton, L.J.; Volten, H.; Kieboom, R.

    2016-01-01

    Smart Emission is a citizen sensor network using low-cost sensors that enables citizens to gather data about environmental quality, like air quality, noise load, vibrations, light intensities and heat stress. This paper introduces the design and development of the data infrastructure for the Smart E

  12. The role of Transnational Environmental Organizations in Local Institution Building for the Russian Forest Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tysiachniouk, M.S.; Reisman, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyze in-depth the interactions between global actors, such as Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), multinational logging companies, transnational environmental organizations, and Russia¿s forest players within the context of Russia¿s post-Soviet transition period. Through the analysis of

  13. Environmental building policy by the use of microalgae and decreasing of risks for Canadian oil sand sector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Armen B

    2017-08-10

    Environmental building recommendations aimed towards new environmental policies and management-changing decisions which as example demonstrated in consideration of the problems of Canadian oil sands operators. For the implementation of the circular economic strategy, we use an in-depth analysis of reported environmental after-consequence on all stages of the production process. The study addressed the promotion of innovative solutions for greenhouse gas emission, waste mitigation, and risk of falling in oil prices for operators of oil sands with creating market opportunities. They include the addition of microalgae biomass in tailings ponds for improvement of the microbial balance for the water speedily cleaning, recycling, and reusing with mitigation of GHG emissions. The use of food scraps for the nutrition of microalgae will reduce greenhouse gas emission minimally, on 0.33 MtCO2eq for Alberta and 2.63 MtCO2eq/year for Canada. Microalgae-derived biofuel can reduce this emission for Alberta on 11.9-17.9 MtCO2eq and for Canada on 71-106 MtCO2eq/year, and the manufacturing of other products will adsorb up to 135.6 MtCO2 and produce 99.2 MtO2. The development of the Live Conserve Industry and principal step from non-efficient protection of the environment to its cultivation in a large scale with mitigation of GHG emission and waste as well as generating of O2 and value-added products by the use of microalgae opens an important shift towards a new design and building of a biological system.

  14. Predicted and actual indoor environmental quality: Verification of occupants' behaviour models in residential buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rune Korsholm; Fabi, Valentina; Corgnati, Stefano P.

    2016-01-01

    performance using building energy performance simulations (BEPS). However, the validity of these models has only been sparsely tested. In this paper, stochastic models of occupants' behaviour from literature were tested against measurements in five apartments. In a monitoring campaign, measurements of indoor...... station close by. The stochastic models of window opening and heating set-point adjustments were implemented in the BEPS tool IDA ICE. Two apartments from the monitoring campaign were simulated using the implemented models and the measured weather data. The results were compared to measurements from...

  15. Guidelines for Environmental Health Management in Children’s Homes in Sub-Sahara Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Muruka

    2007-12-01

    effects of the catastrophe, charitable organizations have sprung up to establish homes for such children, especially those orphaned by AIDS or those infected with HIV. It is important to ensure that environmental health hazards and risks are minimized in these children’s homes. By use of a conceptual synthesis approach, the authors attempt to generate guidelines from literature for environmental health management in children’s homes in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Z. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bartlett, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilbride, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hefty, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Love, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2005-09-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team—from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  17. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration.

  18. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs

  19. Lessons for South Africa from global trends in environmental labelling of buildings and construction products

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ampofo-Anti, NL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The consumption choices of individuals shape consumer markets and drive production patterns. Environmental labelling serves as a means of communication, from the producer 1 , to the consumer 2 , of the consequences of consumption choices... and production (SCP), the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (2002) of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) calls for a number of critical actions. These include the development of tools and policies founded on Life-Cycle Analysis...

  20. Reflexive Research Ethics for Environmental Health and Justice: Academics and Movement-Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordner, Alissa; Ciplet, David; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Community-engaged research on environmental problems has reshaped researcher-participant relationships, academic-community interaction, and the role of community partners in human subjects protection and ethical oversight. We draw on our own and others' research collaborations with environmental health and justice social movement organizations to discuss the ethical concerns that emerge in community-engaged research. In this paper we introduce the concept of reflexive research ethics: ethical guidelines and decision-making principles that depend on continual reflexivity concerning the relationships between researchers and participants. Seeing ethics in this way can help scientists conduct research that simultaneously achieves a high level of professional conduct and protects the rights, well-being, and autonomy of both researchers and the multiple publics affected by research. We highlight our research with community-based organizations in Massachusetts, California, and Alaska, and discuss the potential impacts of the community or social movement on the research process and the potential impacts of research on community or social movement goals. We conclude by discussing ways in which the ethical concerns that surface in community-engaged research have led to advances in ethical research practices. This type of work raises ethical questions whose answers are broadly relevant for social movement, environmental, and public health scholars.

  1. Are school and home environmental characteristics associated with oral health-related quality of life in Brazilian adolescents and young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwadi, Maram Ali M; Vettore, Mario Vianna

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the association of contextual school and home environmental characteristics and individual factors with oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in a representative sample of Brazilian adolescents and young adults. Individual-level data from 3854 fifteen- to nineteen-year-olds who participated in the Brazilian Oral Health Survey were pooled with contextual city-level data. The dependent variable was the frequency of impacts of oral disorders on daily performances (OIDP extent), as a measure of OHRQoL. Contextual school and home environmental characteristics were categorized into three equal groups according to tertiles of the contextual variable's scores (low, moderate and high). Individual demographic, socioeconomic and oral clinical measures were the covariates. The association between contextual and individual characteristics and OIDP extent was estimated using multilevel Poisson regression models. The mean of OIDP extent was 0.9 (standard error 0.1). Adolescents and young adults living in the cities with high levels of lack of security at school (RR 1.33; 95% CI=1.02-1.74), moderate levels of bullying at school (RR 1.56; 95% CI=1.20-2.03) and moderate levels of low maternal schooling (RR 1.43; 95% CI=1.06-1.92) had a higher mean OIDP extent. Male sex, higher age, skin colour, poor individual socioeconomic status and worse oral clinical measures were also associated with higher mean of OIDP extent. Poor school and home environmental characteristics were independently associated with poor OHRQoL in individuals aged between 15 and 19 years. Our findings suggest the place where they study and the maternal level of education are meaningful aspects for their oral health. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    their homes. These policy measures include building regulations, energy tax and different types of incentives and information dissemination. The conclusion calls for new and innovative policy measures to cope with the realities of renovations of owner-occupied houses and how energy efficiency improvement...

  3. Safety assessment document for the environmental test complex (Building 834) at Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odell, B.N.; Pfeifer, H.E.

    1981-03-03

    A safety assessment was performed to determine if accidents occurring at the 834 Complex at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, personnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The credible accidents that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequences were considered. These were earthquake, extreme wind (including missiles), lightning, flood, criticality, high explosive (HE) detonation that disperses uranium and beryllium, spontaneous oxidation of plutonium, explosions due to finely divided particles, and a fire. Seismic and extreme wind (including missiles) analyses indicate that the buildings are basically sound. (However, there are a few recommendations to further enhance the structural integrity of these facilities). Additional lightning protection for these facilities is being installed. These buildings are located high above the dry creek bed so that a flood is improbable. A criticality or a high explosive detonation involving plutonium is very remote since the radioactive materials are encased and plutonium and HE are not permitted concurrently in the same area at Site 300. (The exceptions to this policy are that explosive actuating devices are sometimes located in assemblies containing fissile materials. However, a planned or accidental actuation will not effect the safe containment of the fissile material within the assembly). Even though the possibility of an HE explosion involving uranium and beryllium is remote, the off-site lung doses were calculated and found to be below the accepted standards. It was determined that a fire was unlikely due to the low fire loading and the absence of ignition sources. It was also determined that the consequences of any accidents were reduced by the remote location of these facilities, their design, and by administrative controls.

  4. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  5. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  6. Environmental Discourse: Helping Graduate Students Build Effective Deliberation and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, D. N.; Downard, J.; Nielsen, E.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental sciences are at the forefront of critical issues facing society in the coming decades. As a result, many graduates in the environmental sciences find themselves working with the public to help inform the democratic process of making reasonable public policies. In order to be successful, students need to be confronted with the same kinds of questions and problems that practicing scientists face when they are working at the intersection of science and public policy. Otherwise, they lack the skills and confidence needed to work effectively with the public—especially on hotly contested environmental issues when the skills are needed the most. As part of a new Professional Science Master's (PSM) Program in Climate Science and Solutions at Northern Arizona University we have developed a three-semester course series focused on framing discussions on climate change mitigation and adaptation. Each semester, students use a deliberative model to design, frame, and facilitate a public discussion on a targeted issue of regional and local interest. The deliberative model is built around an approach to practical dilemmas that enables students to isolate and clarify the various sources of conflict around the issue. Working in an iterative manner, students learn to identify and untangling some of the sources of disagreement (e.g., policy, ethics and ideals, difference in scientific understanding) around and issue. As a result, students are in a much better position to clarify the key questions and sort through the competing solutions. The course series helps to improve the communication skills of students and promote productive public discourse with individuals from diverse backgrounds within the community. This type of experiential learning provides unique training to our students that not only broadens there understanding of complex issues surrounding climate change, but also provides them with professional skills that are transferrable to their careers.

  7. Evaluating economic and environmental aspects of using solar panels on multi-angled facades of office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannoudi, Loay Akram; Lauring, Gert Michael; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with using solar panels as high-tech cladding materials on multi-angled facades for office buildings. The energy produced by the solar panels will be consumed inside the office rooms by cooling compressors, ventilation, lighting and office equipment. Each multi-angled facade...... unit is directed into two different orientations on a vertical axis (right and left), but not tilted up and down. The different facade orientations will optimize the use of solar radiation to produce the needed energy from the solar panels when placing them on the parapets of these facades......, PVBAT to calculate the cost of the electricity produced by the solar panels and evaluate the total amount of energy produced from these panels along with the ratio to the energy bought directly from the electricity grid. There is also an environmental evaluation for the system by calculating the CO2...

  8. Environmental factors and traits that drive plant litter decomposition do not determine home-field advantage effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Sundqvist, Maja K.; Wardle, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA) hypothesis predicts that plant litter is decomposed faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates (‘home’) than underneath other plants (‘away’), because decomposer communities are specialized to break down litter from the plants they associate w

  9. Rethinking Diffusion Theory in an Applied Context: Role of Environmental Values in Adoption of Home Energy Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Susanna Hornig; Greenhalgh, Ted; Neill, Helen R.; Young, Gabriel Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion theory, developed and popularized within communication research by Everett Rogers, is a venerable approach with much to recommend it as a theoretical foundation for applied communication research. In developing an applied project for a home energy conservation (energy efficiency retrofit) program in the state of Nevada, we utilized key…

  10. Evaluating economic and environmental aspects of using solar panels on multi-angled facades of office buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoudi, Loay Akram; Lauring, Michael; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2017-09-01

    This paper is concerned with using solar panels as high-tech cladding materials on multi-angled facades for office buildings. The energy produced by the solar panels will be consumed inside the office rooms by cooling compressors, ventilation, lighting and office equipment. Each multi-angled facade unit is directed into two different orientations on a vertical axis (right and left), but not tilted up and down. The different facade orientations will optimize the use of solar radiation to produce the needed energy from the solar panels when placing them on the parapets of these facades. In this regard, four scenarios with different facade configurations and orientations are evaluated and discussed. The method for the simulations and calculations depends on two main programs: first, IDA ICE program to calculate the energy consumption and evaluate the indoor climate of the building; and second, PVBAT to calculate the cost of the electricity produced by the solar panels and evaluate the total amount of energy produced from these panels along with the ratio to the energy bought directly from the electricity grid. There is also an environmental evaluation for the system by calculating the CO2 emissions in the different scenarios.

  11. Mesoscale variation in the photophysiology of the reef building coral Pocillopora damicornis along an environmental gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Timothy F.; Ulstrup, Karin E.

    2009-06-01

    Spatial variation in the photophysiology of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) of the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis was examined along an environmental gradient in the Whitsunday Islands (Great Barrier Reef) at two depths (3 m and 6 m). Chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII) and PAR-absorptivity measurements were conducted using an Imaging-PAM (pulse-amplitude-modulation) fluorometer. Most photophysiological parameters correlated with changes in environmental conditions quantified by differences in water quality along the gradient. For example, maximum quantum yield ( Fv/ Fm) increased and PAR-absorptivity decreased as water quality improved along the gradient from nearshore reefs (low irradiance, elevated nutrients and sediments) to outer islands (high irradiance, low nutrients and sediments). For apparent photosynthetic rate (PS max) and minimum saturating irradiance ( Ek), the direction of change differed depending on sampling depth, suggesting that different mechanisms of photo-acclimatisation operated between shallow and deep corals. Deep corals conformed to typical patterns of light/shade acclimatisation whereas shallow corals exhibited reduced PS max and Ek with improving water quality coinciding with greater heat dissipation (NPQ 241). Furthermore, deep corals on nearshore reefs exhibited elevated Q241 in comparison to outer islands possibly due to effects of sedimentation and/or pollutants rather than irradiance. These results highlight the importance of mesoscale sampling to obtain useful estimates of the variability of photophysiological parameters, particularly if such measures are to be used as bioindicators of the condition of coral reefs.

  12. Pilot Test of a New Personal Health System Integrating Environmental and Wearable Sensors for Telemonitoring and Care of Elderly People at Home (SMARTA Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigini, Lucia; Bovi, Gabriele; Panzarino, Claudia; Gower, Valerio; Ferratini, Maurizio; Andreoni, Giuseppe; Sassi, Roberto; Rivolta, Massimo W; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy is accompanied by a growing number of elderly subjects affected by chronic comorbidities, a health issue which also implies important socioeconomic consequences. Shifting from hospital or community dwelling care towards a home personalized healthcare paradigm would promote active aging with a better quality of life, along with a reduction in healthcare-related costs. The aim of the SMARTA project was to develop and test an innovative personal health system integrating standard sensors as well as innovative wearable and environmental sensors to allow home telemonitoring of vital parameters and detection of anomalies in daily activities, thus supporting active aging through remote healthcare. A first phase of the project consisted in the definition of the health and environmental parameters to be monitored (electrocardiography and actigraphy, blood pressure and oxygen saturation, weight, ear temperature, glycemia, home interaction monitoring - water tap, refrigerator, and dishwasher), the feedbacks for the clinicians, and the reminders for the patients. It was followed by a technical feasibility analysis leading to an iterative process of prototype development, sensor integration, and testing. Once the prototype had reached an advanced stage of development, a group of 32 volunteers - including 15 healthy adult subjects, 13 elderly people with cardiac diseases, and 4 clinical operators - was recruited to test the system in a real home setting, in order to evaluate both technical reliability and user perception of the system in terms of effectiveness, usability, acceptance, and attractiveness. The testing in a real home setting showed a good perception of the SMARTA system and its functionalities both by the patients and by the clinicians, who appreciated the user interface and the clinical governance system. The moderate system reliability of 65-70% evidenced some technical issues, mainly related to sensor integration, while the patient

  13. The energetic concept in the administration building of the Federal Environmental Agency in Dessau. Technical innovation for a sustainable operation; Das energetische Konzept im Dienstgebaeude des Umweltbundesamtes in Dessau. Technische Innovationen fuer einen nachhaltigen Betrieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The new office building of the Federal Environmental Agency (Dessau-Rosslau, Federal Republic of Germany) was implemented as a pilot project for environmentally sustainable construction with high-energy targets. In order to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels significantly, the building should have a very low power consumption and enable a sustainable operation. A mostly compact form of the building and a highly insulated building envelope are a first prerequisite.

  14. Proceedings of the workshop on the dynamic response of environmental control processes in buildings, Lafayette, Indiana, March 13-15, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tree, D.R.; McBride, M.F. (eds.)

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to consider how energy use in buildings can be reduced while maintaining the comfort of the occupants. It was postulated that optimization of energy use in buildings can be achieved through the use of operating strategies which consider the dynamic characteristics of comfort, the design and construction of the building, and the environmental control system. Working sessions were presented on equipment, controls, structures, human factors, circulation/distribution, design, operation and use pattern, management and codes, and energy storage. (LCL)

  15. The quarries’ landscape: environmental and productional valorization, between extraction and building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Paolo Bagnato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The essay suggests an interpretation on the topic of relationship between landscape and places of extraction, through the declination of re-cycling as an approach at different scales, to define strategies and metodological activities, which allow to update and innovate the principles upon which is based the relationship between exploitation, transformation and disposal of the quarries. The case of Apulia represents a significant field, considering at least for two issues: the role assumed by the activity of stone extraction in the regional economy, although nowdays is not implemented by activities of transformation of the matter in loco; also for the dimensional relevance of the landscapes of quarries, mainly connected to private interests, and for the activities, and resulting environmental implications (1.

  16. Improvement of the Sustainability of Existing School Buildings According to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED® Protocol: A Case Study in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Dall'O'

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available School-age students spend much of their time in school buildings. The sustainability of these buildings should be a priority as better comfort with a high indoor air quality contributes to an improvement in the conditions for learning. Although new school buildings are often built with high standards of sustainability and energy efficiency, the existing school building stock is generally characterised by very poor quality. The energy retrofit of existing school buildings in recent years is part of the policies of the European Union and, consequently, of the Member States. However, rarely do these measures consider aspects other than energy. This paper proposes and discusses a feasibility study which provides a considerable improvement in the environmental quality of 14 school buildings located in northern Italy: the objective is to ensure the requirements for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED® certification. The analysis considers both the technical and economic aspects. The study shows that there is a technical feasibility: the credits are between 42 and 54, moreover the major cost (the cost of building envelope and heating systems retrofit is 82.9% of the total cost is due to the improvement of energy efficiency. The improvement of sustainability is therefore a reasonable strategy even if the application of the LEED Protocol in the Italian context involves some critical issues that are discussed in the paper.

  17. Health Begins at Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-30

    Clean and well-maintained homes can prevent many illnesses and injuries. This podcast discusses how good health begins at home.  Created: 3/30/2009 by Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention (CCEHIP).   Date Released: 3/30/2009.

  18. Symbiodinium genotypic and environmental controls on lipids in reef building corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy F Cooper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipids in reef building corals can be divided into two classes; non-polar storage lipids, e.g. wax esters and triglycerides, and polar structural lipids, e.g. phospholipids and cholesterol. Differences among algal endosymbiont types are known to have important influences on processes including growth and the photobiology of scleractinian corals yet very little is known about the role of symbiont types on lipid energy reserves. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ratio of storage lipid and structural lipid fractions of Scott Reef corals were determined by thin layer chromatography. The lipid fraction ratio varied with depth and depended on symbiont type harboured by two corals (Seriatopora hystrix and Pachyseris speciosa. S. hystrix colonies associated with Symbiodinium C1 or C1/C# at deep depths (>23 m had lower lipid fraction ratios (i.e. approximately equal parts of storage and structural lipids than those with Symbiodinium D1 in shallow depths (<23 m, which had higher lipid fraction ratios (i.e. approximately double amounts of storage relative to structural lipid. Further, there was a non-linear relationship between the lipid fraction ratio and depth for S. hystrix with a modal peak at ∼23 m coinciding with the same depth as the shift from clade D to C types. In contrast, the proportional relationship between the lipid fraction ratio and depth for P. speciosa, which exhibited high specificity for Symbiodinium C3 like across the depth gradient, was indicative of greater amounts of storage lipids contained in the deep colonies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study has demonstrated that Symbiodinium exert significant controls over the quality of coral energy reserves over a large-scale depth gradient. We conclude that the competitive advantages and metabolic costs that arise from flexible associations with divergent symbiont types are offset by energetic trade-offs for the coral host.

  19. Heat protection in summer for wooden residential buildings - Measurements on 'Minergie' single-family homes; Sommerlicher Waermeschutz bei Wohngebaeuden in Holzbauweise - Messungen in acht MINERGIE Einfamilienhaeusern - Entwurf Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, M.; Nutt, M. [Lemon Consult GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland); Keller, P. [Hochschule Luzern, Technik und Architektur, Horw (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    This draft final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results obtained from measurements made in eight single-family homes built to the Swiss 'Minergie' standard. The project served to validate partly simplified simulations concerning the summertime thermal behaviour of low energy consumption buildings built of wood. The eight various 'Minergie' houses are described, as is the measurement concept chosen. The results obtained and the conclusions drawn are presented in detail and discussed, as is the implementation of measures derived from the project. Heat storage effects in the various building components are discussed. The results of the measurements are compared with the theoretical values obtained from calculations. Recommendations are presented. The report is augmented with a comprehensive appendix which includes the detailed measurement results for the buildings examined.

  20. CHP plants in residential buildings: Environmental potential and economic feasibility when combined with thermal solar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sicre, B.; Buehring, A.; Vetter, M. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The expected high fuel conversion factor of residential combined heat and power plants (rCHP) means that they present a more environmentally friendly option for heating and simultaneous electricity generation than separate systems with decentralised heat generation, e.g. with a gas-fuelled boiler, and electricity from central power stations. As the investment costs for rCHP plants are still high, measures such as investment subsidies and/or higher tariffs for the exported electricity are needed to support the market introduction, as are the longest possible operating times. The consequence is that simultaneous investment in a thermal solar system becomes less attractive, as the heat that it provides shortens the operation time for the rCHP, so that the price paid for electric power increases. Provided that investments have been made in both a thermal solar system and a rCHP, an operation mode which is strongly determined by the electricity generation profile can dramatically reduce the heating energy yield from the solar system. Within a joint project, Fraunhofer ISE has investigated the possible displacement mechanisms concerning thermal applications of solar energy, and has identified ways of financially supporting decentralised rCHP plants without hindering the thermal use of solar energy. The most important results of this work will be presented in this paper. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of environmentally-friendly alkali activated slag cements and ancient building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard

    Alternative cement technologies are an area of increasing interest due to growing environmental concerns and the relatively large carbon footprint of the cement industry. Many new cements have been developed, but one of the most promising is that made from granulated, ground blast furnace slag activated by a high-pH solution. Another is related to the discovery that some of the pyramid limestone blocks may have been cast using a combination of diatomaceous earth activated by lime which provides the high pH needed to dissolve the diatomaceous earth and bind the limestone aggregate together. The emphasis of this thesis is not on the latter---which was explored elsewhere---but on the results supplying further evidence that some of the pyramid blocks were indeed reconstituted limestone. The goal of this work is to chemically and mechanically characterize both alkali-activated slag cements as well as a number of historic materials, which may be ancient analogues to cement. Alkali activated slag cements were produced with a number of additives; concretes were made with the addition of a fine limestone aggregate. These materials were characterized mechanically and by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA. Samples from several Egyptian pyramids, an 'ancient floor' in Colorado, and the 'Bosnian Pyramids' were investigated. In the cements, it has been unequivocally shown that C-S-H, the same binding phase that is produced in ordinary portland cement, has been produced, as well as a variety of mineral side products. Significant recarbonation occurs during the first 20 months, but only for the Na2CO3-activated formulae. Radiocarbon dating proves that the 'Bosnian Pyramids' and 'ancient floors' are not made from any type of recarbonated lime; however, Egyptian pyramid limestones were finite, thus suggesting that they are of a synthetic nature. XRD and FTIR results were inconclusive, while TGA results indicate the limestones are identical to naturally occurring limestones, and SEM

  2. Final Environmental Assessment for the Naval Weapons Station Concord Port Terminal Operations and Administration Building, Concord, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Significant Land Use (Clyde Site) As currently configured, the building would be constructed over two water pipelines . Relocate the building... water pipelines that transect the building site, the location of which is constrained by the nearby ESQD arcs. This impact can be avoided through...personnel. Two water pipelines transect the actual building site; constructing the building over these pipelines would preclude access to them, and the

  3. Best Practices Case Study: Urbane Homes - Crestwood, KY, Various Locations, Greater Louisville, KY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    Case study of Urbane Homes, who worked with Building America to build market rate homes with HERS scores of 57 to 62. Despite a down market they’ve sold every home within 3 weeks of listing, without any advertising.

  4. METHODOLOGICAL DISCUSSION AND PILOTING OF LCA-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS FOR PRODUCT STAGE ASSESSMENT OF BRAZILIAN BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Ruschi Mendes Saade

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The International Energy Agency (IEA’s Annex 57 was established to advance on evaluation of embodied energy and GHG emissions for building construction. Its activities include recommendation of common calculation methods and disclosure of regional benchmarks. Process-based, input-output or hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA can support such calculations. Identification of the major products that describe key building typologies plays a strategic role in the tasks of streamlining indicators’ monitoring scope and LCI data gathering in contexts with little LCA practice consolidation. Given these motivations and backdrops, our main goals are (i to calculate a selected set of LCA-based indicators to synthetically describe environmental performance of construction products for three functionally equivalent case studies; (ii to detect the major contributors to embodied energy (EE and emissions (EGWP; and (iii to examine the implications of considering embodied CO2 versus total GHG emissions. The selected metrics include – besides EE and EGWP targeted by Annex 57 – the blue water footprint (bWF, non-renewable primary material consumption (NRc and volatile organic compounds (VOC emissions. Production cycle modeling used previously collected national data, as well as secondary data extracted from national and international literature or adapted from international databases whenever considered as reasonably similar to Brazilian processes. EE and EGWP results were calculated using the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED method and the CML 2001 baseline v. 2.05 method, respectively, and are presented for the top contributing products. NRc, bWF and VOC calculations were directly derived from the inventories and discussed in more detail for cement and concrete. Around 80% of the total embodied energy was related to seven construction products, while four of them also responded for around 80% of embodied GWP. Enlarging the database to encompass ten core

  5. Environmental Assessment of the Demolition of Building 78 and Construction of New Hazardous Materials and Hazardous Waste Storage Buildings, Los Angeles Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    hazardous wastes and the scope of its operations. 3.10.4 Asbestos-Containing Material Asbestos-containing material ( ACM ) is any material containing more...transported by a registered hazardous waste hauler to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility. ACM is assumed or known to be present in all older...LAAFB buildings and in some Fort MacArthur buildings, given bui lding age and the results of limited asbestos surveys completed in the past. ACM is

  6. Impact of environmental factors in home rehabilitation--a qualitative study from the perspective of older persons using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to describe facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randström, Kerstin Björkman; Asplund, Kenneth; Svedlund, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore older people's experience of environmental factors that impact on their activity and participation in home rehabilitation. Older people aged between 68 and 93 years and receiving home rehabilitation were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed on the interview text using the predetermined structure of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) environmental domain. The text was linked to the closest ICF category. The results identified environmental facilitators and barriers that influenced activity and participation among older people receiving home rehabilitation. Approaches that provided a facilitative environment were access to assistive products and technologies, alterations to the physical environment, social support and relationships, and adjusted health and social care services. A qualitative study using ICF-listed environmental factors contributed a holistic view of facilitators and barriers in home rehabilitation for older people. Awareness of the importance of the impact of the social environment on activities and participation could improve home rehabilitation services for older people. The study represents an important step towards a holistic approach using the ICF, which aims to enable all health care professionals to describe, plan and evaluate rehabilitation services together with older people across the health and social care sectors.

  7. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Can prefabrication contribute to the development of high performance homes? To answer this question, this chapter defines high performance in more broadly inclusive terms, acknowledging the technical, architectural, social and economic conditions under which energy consumption and production occur....... Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy...

  8. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Can prefabrication contribute to the development of high performance homes? To answer this question, this chapter defines high performance in more broadly inclusive terms, acknowledging the technical, architectural, social and economic conditions under which energy consumption and production occur....... Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy...

  9. Effectiveness of a nurse-led intensive home-visitation programme for first-time teenage mothers (Building Blocks): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Robling, Michael Richard; Bekkers, Marie; Bell, Kerry; Butler, Christopher Collett; Cannings-John, Rebecca Louise; Channon, Susan Jane; Martin, Belen Corbacho; Gregory, John Welbourn; Hood, Kerenza; Kemp, Alison Mary; Kenkre, Joyce; Montgomery, Alan A; Moody, Gwenllian; Owen-Jones, Catrin Eleri; Pickett, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Many countries now offer support to teenage mothers to help them to achieve long-term socioeconomic stability and to give a successful start to their children. The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a licensed intensive home-visiting intervention developed in the USA and introduced into practice in England that involves up to 64 structured home visits from early pregnancy until the child's second birthday by specially recruited and trained family nurses. We aimed to assess t...

  10. Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-08-01

    The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

  11. Home ranges of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida: environmental correlates and implications for management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoil, Marilyn; Reif, John S; Youngbluth, Marsh; Murdoch, M Elizabeth; Bechdel, Sarah E; Howells, Elisabeth; McCulloch, Stephen D; Hansen, Larry J; Bossart, Gregory D

    2008-09-01

    Photo-identification surveys conducted between 2002 and 2005 were used to determine dolphin home ranges and site fidelity within the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida. The IRL was divided into six segments based on hydrodynamics and geographic features for purposes of characterization. Among the 615 dolphins with identifiable dorsal fins, 339 had > or =6 sightings and were used in segment and linear range analyses. The majority (98%) of dolphins were seen in River). However, the highest density of dolphins was found in segment 2 (North-Central Indian River). Re-sighting rates for dolphins with > or =6 sightings ranged from 2.8 to 8.7 times observed. The mean linear home range varied from 22 to 54 km. Distributional analyses indicated that at least three different dolphin communities exist within the IRL: Mosquito Lagoon, and the North and South Indian River. No statistically significant correlations were found between the total number or density per km(2 )of dolphins and surface water area, salinity, or contaminant loads within segments of the lagoon. These results suggest that dolphins do not selectively avoid areas with relatively unfavorable water quality. IRL dolphins should be studied on smaller spatial scales than currently practiced, and potential anthropogenic impacts should be evaluated based on geographic partitioning.

  12. Ecoprofile of building elements. A tool for an early selection concerning their environmental sustainability; Ecoprofilo di componenti edilizi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccali, G.; Cellura, M.; La Gennusa, M.; Rizzo, G. [Palermo Univ., Palermo (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica ed Applicazioni di Fisica

    2001-10-01

    The application of the requirements suggested by the Agenda 21 at a local level calls for the availability of suitable methods for the evaluation of the environmental sustainability of systems and technological realisations. The eco-profile method is presently considered as one of the most promising tool, in this aim, for the building sector. Through this work the eco-profile methodology will be described and its present constraints will be spotlighted. These limits essentially refer to the poor availability, at least for the Italian context, of data concerning the embodied energy into materials and the emission factors of pollutants during the realisation of these materials. At this regard, an indirect assessment of the emission factors is here proposed. The suitability of the method is also depicted by means of an example. [Italian] L'applicazione dell'Agenda 21 a livello comunale presuppone la disponibilita' di metodi di valutazione quantitativa della sostenibilita' ambientale dei sistemi, di componenti tecnologici e dei manufatti. L'ecoprofilo appare al momento come una delle metodologie piu' promettenti, in tal senso, per il settore dell'edilizia, almeno per quanto attiene alle emissioni gassose. Nel corso del lavoro viene descritto tale metodo, i suoi limiti e le sue assunzioni, e ne vengono segnalate le difficolta' di applicazione ancora presenti. A tal proposito, viene qui suggerita una originale procedura indiretta di valutazione dei fattori di emissione.

  13. Condensation in insulated homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, R A

    1978-05-28

    A research proposal on condensation in insulated homes is presented. Information is provided on: justification for condensation control; previous work and present outlook (good vapor barrier, condensation and retrofit insulation, vapor barrier decreases condensation, brick-veneer walls, condensation in stress-skin panels, air-conditioned buildings, retrofitting for conservation, study on mobile homes, high indoor relative humidity, report on various homes); and procedure (after funding has been secured). Measures are briefly described on opening walls, testing measures, and retrofitting procedures. An extensive bibliography and additional informative citations are included. (MCW)

  14. Home automation on the move:

    OpenAIRE

    Imperl, Bojan; Jeřabek, Boro; Šoštarič, Andrej

    2003-01-01

    In this article we would like to show how an arbitrary home and building electronic system based on the home automation standards such as Xl0 might be addressed and controlled by an appropriate mobile technology. Urge for mobility of users, which may be at the same time either the inhabitants of these homes or even administrators and supporters, is growing. The possibility to control and observe the status of home appliances while being on the move away from home using our mobile phones is be...

  15. Evaluation of environmental sustainability in the construction and management of buildings in Mexico; Evaluacion de la sustentabilidad ambiental en la construccion y administracion de edificios en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Buen Rodriguez, Odon [Energia, Tecnologia y Educacion, S.C., ENTE, S.C. (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of the present work is to establish a methodology for assessing the sustainability of buildings in Mexico, which can be standardized and comparable with the rest of North America. For this purpose three building assessment systems in North America were first analyzed: (a) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), (b) Living Building Challenge (LBC); and (c) Energy Star for Buildings. In addition, the analysis included Spain's Green Building Council (GBCe), to have a different comparison point with the North American systems. The analysis of the four systems suggests the use of the Energy Star system due to the following reasons: 1) For all systems, the Energy Star system is the basis for comparison in terms of energy consumption and therefore emissions of greenhouse gases, 2) It is the system requiring the simplest description of the building (construction surface, occupancy and energy consumption) and does not require (unlike other systems) data on the location of the buildings, 3) For the LEED, LBC and GBCe systems, the evaluation must be performed by professionals accredited, while for the Energy Star certification is less restrictive A database of public buildings, managed by the Comision Nacional para el Uso Eficiente de la Energia (CONUEE), was used. It integrates a significant number of office buildings occupied by departments and agencies of the federal government in Mexico. This database holds information on annual energy consumption and area occupied. Such database was complemented with available information on Degree Day data provided by the Asociacion de Empresas para el Ahorro de Energia en la Edificacion (AEAEE); it allowed to include information on weather in the same terms as the proposed methodology by Energy Star system. From the analysis, some suggestions are presented below. First, it is suggested to strengthen the collection and integration of information related to commercial buildings in Mexico to implement a

  16. Building America Case Study: Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level, Cold-Climate Home, Westport, Connecticut; Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    ??National programs such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) and numerous other utility air sealing programs have brought awareness to homeowners of the benefits of energy efficiency retrofits. Yet, these programs tend to focus on the low-hanging fruit: air-sealing the thermal envelope and ductwork where accessible, switch to efficient lighting, and low-flow fixtures. At the other end of the spectrum, deep-energy retrofit programs are also being encouraged by various utilities across the country. While deep energy retrofits typically seek 50% energy savings, they are often quite costly and most applicable to gut-rehab projects. A significant potential for lowering energy usage in existing homes lies between the low hanging fruit and deep energy retrofit approaches - retrofits that save approximately 30% in energy over the existing conditions. A key is to be non-intrusive with the efficiency measures so the retrofit projects can be accomplished in occupied homes. This cold climate retrofit project involved the design and optimization of a home in Connecticut that sought to improve energy savings by at least 30% (excluding solar PV) over the existing home's performance. This report documents the successful implementation of a cost-effective solution package that achieved performance greater than 30% over the pre-retrofit - what worked, what did not, and what improvements could be made. Confirmation of successfully achieving 30% source energy savings over the pre-existing conditions was confirmed through energy modeling and comparison of the utility bills pre- and post- retrofit.

  17. Stir bar sorptive extraction approaches with a home-made portable electric stirrer for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in environmental water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiangju; Hu, Bin; He, Man; Fan, Wenying

    2012-10-19

    In this study, novel off/on-site stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) approaches with a home-made portable electric stirrer have been developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). In these approaches, a miniature battery-operated electric stirrer was employed to provide agitation of sample solutions instead of the commonly used large size magnetic stirrer powered by alternating current in conventional SBSE process, which could extend the SBSE technique from the conventional off-site analysis to the on-site sampling. The applicability of the designed off/on-site SBSE sampling approaches was evaluated by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating SBSE-high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) analysis of six target PAHs in environmental water. The home-made portable electric stirrer is simple, easy-to-operate, user friendly, low cost, easy-to-be-commercialized, and can be processed in direct immersion SBSE, headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) and continuous flow (CF)-SBSE modes. Since the stir bar was fixed onto the portable device by magnetic force, it is very convenient to install, remove and replace the stir bar, and the coating friction loss which occurred frequently in conventional SBSE process could be avoided. The parameters affecting the extraction of six target PAHs by the home-made portable SBSE sampling device with different sampling modes were studied. Under the optimum extraction conditions, good linearity was obtained by all of three SBSE extraction modes with correlation coefficient (R) higher than 0.9971. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were 0.05-3.41 ng L(-1) for direct immersion SBSE, 0.03-2.23 ng L(-1) for HSSE and 0.09-3.75 ng L(-1) for CF-SBSE, respectively. The proposed portable PDMS-SBSE-HPLC-FLD method was applied for the analysis of six target PAHs in East Lake water, and the analytical results obtained by on-site SBSE sampling were in good agreement with that obtained by off

  18. Environmental Impact Assessment of a School Building in Iceland Using LCA-Including the Effect of Long Distance Transport of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargessadat Emami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are the key components of urban areas and society as a complex system. A life cycle assessment was applied to estimate the environmental impacts of the resources applied in the building envelope, floor slabs, and interior walls of the Vættaskóli-Engi building in Reykjavik, Iceland. The scope of this study included four modules of extraction and transportation of raw material to the manufacturing site, production of the construction materials, and transport to the building site, as described in the standard EN 15804. The total environmental effects of the school building in terms of global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, human toxicity, acidification, and eutrophication were calculated. The total global warming potential impact was equal to 255 kg of CO2 eq/sqm, which was low compared to previous studies and was due to the limited system boundary of the current study. The effect of long-distance overseas transport of materials was noticeable in terms of acidification (25% and eutrophication (31% while it was negligible in other impact groups. The results also concluded that producing the cement in Iceland caused less environmental impact in all five impact categories compared to the case in which the cement was imported from Germany. The major contribution of this work is that the environmental impacts of different plans for domestic production or import of construction materials to Iceland can be precisely assessed in order to identify effective measures to move towards a sustainable built environment in Iceland, and also to provide consistent insights for stakeholders.

  19. Energy Cloud: Services for Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja

    2018-01-01

    Energy consumption in buildings is responsible for a significant portion of the total energy use and carbon emissions in large cities. One of the main approaches to reduce energy consumption and its environmental impact is to convert buildings into smart buildings using computer, software, sensor......, and network technologies. Using smart building energy management systems provides intelligent procedures to control buildings’ equipment such as HVAC (heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning) systems, home and office appliances, and lighting systems to reduce energy consumption while maintaining...... the required quality of living in all of the building’s spaces. This chapter discusses and reviews utilizing cloud computing to provide energy-related services to enhance the operations of smart buildings’ energy management systems. Cloud computing can provide many advantages for smart buildings’ energy...

  20. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  1. Building with Wood :The Analysis of Integrated Environmental Footprint on Timber Building%筑屋于木——木质结构建筑的综合环境足迹分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何礼平; 陈钰

    2012-01-01

    建筑业对资源、能源的巨大消耗,造成的严重环境污染等.该文用生命周期分析方法,对木质结构建筑在全生命周期内(包括建材物化阶段和建筑运行阶段)的能耗进行理论分析,从而确定选择合适的建筑材料和形式对环境的综合影响,为木结构建筑的发展提供一些思路.%The huge consumption of the resources and energy of the construction results in serious environmental pollution. This paper anallzed energy comsumption of timber buildings in the whole life cycle (building-materials materialized phase and building operational phase) by life cycle assessment, to determine the effects on combination of appropriate form and building materials on the environment, in order to provide some ideas for the development of the wood building structure .

  2. Low home ventilation rate in combination with moldy odor from the building structure increase the risk for allergic symptoms in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägerhed-Engman, L.; Sigsgaard, T.; Samuelson, I.

    2009-01-01

    There are consistent findings on associations between asthma and allergy symptoms and residential mold and moisture. However, definitions of 'dampness' in studies are diverse because of differences in climate and building construction. Few studies have estimated mold problems inside the building ...

  3. Danish building typologies and building stock analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    enough to meet the government’s plan to make Danish buildings free from use of fossil fuels by 2035. This will probably require around 50 % energy savings in the Danish building stock as a whole. However, the project has proven that dedicated engagement of locals can speed up market penetration...... energy savings in residential buildings. The intension with this analysis was to investigate the possible energy reduction in Denmark if the same approach had been taken for the entire Danish building stock. The report concludes that the ZeroHome initiative clearly results in energy savings, but far from...... for energy savings in the existing Building stock....

  4. Danish building typologies and building stock analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    energy savings in residential buildings. The intension with this analysis was to investigate the possible energy reduction in Denmark if the same approach had been taken for the entire Danish building stock. The report concludes that the ZeroHome initiative clearly results in energy savings, but far from...... enough to meet the government’s plan to make Danish buildings free from use of fossil fuels by 2035. This will probably require around 50 % energy savings in the Danish building stock as a whole. However, the project has proven that dedicated engagement of locals can speed up market penetration...... for energy savings in the existing Building stock....

  5. Integrating Responsive Building Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Matthias; Amato, Alex; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    There is a global need for a more sustainable building development. About 50% of energy is used in buildings indicating that buildings provide a considerable potential for operational energy savings. Studies were conducted with the following objectives: to perform a state-of-the-art review...... energy strategies to develop guidelines and procedures for estimation of environmental performance of responsive building elements and integrated building concepts This paper introduces the ideas of this collaborative work and discusses its usefulness for Hong Kong and China. Special focus was put...... of responsive building elements, of integrated building concepts and of environmental performance assessment methods to improve and optimize responsive building elements to develop and optimize new building concepts with integration of responsive building elements, HVAC-systems as well as natural and renewable...

  6. 基于建筑节能技术的智能家居系统设计%The Design of Smart Home System Based on Building Energy Efficiency Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华威; 孙国玺; 刘晋胜

    2014-01-01

    针对民用建筑节能技术的要求,利用嵌入式系统设计并实现了一种智能家居系统。该系统采用Arm9内核的S3c2440处理器为控制芯片,以Linux作为系统内核,通过手机、PC机来对家电进行本地和远程控制,从而达到智能控制和建筑节能的目的。应用性能测试表明,该系统控制准确、稳定,节能效果良好。%Aimed at energy efficiency technology required by civil buildings ,embedded system is used to accomplish a smart home system , which adopts Arm9 kernel S3c2440 processor as the control chip ,Linux as system kernel ,and use MT and PC to control home appliances to realize intelligent control and to save energy for building .Application performance test shows that the system has accurate control ,strong stability ,evident effect of energy saving .

  7. The Way to Strengthen Enterprise Trade Union Workers'Home Building%浅析加强企业工会建家工作建设的途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘旭升

    2012-01-01

    在当前新形势下,企业转型发展等新的背景逐步形成,致使建家活动在企业出现了不少新的矛盾和问题,因此,不断研究分析问题的因应对策,保证建家工作持续、健康、和谐发展,是当前工会组织势在必行的重要工作任务。%Under the current new situation, the transtormation ot company development has gradually formed, which makes the building home activities in enterprise appear many new contradictions and prob-lems. Therefore, continuously research and analysis of the corresponding countermeasures to guarantee the home building work to make a sustainable, healthy, harmonious development, is an important task that the trade union organizations must carry out at present.

  8. Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

    2006-07-31

    This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

  9. Dampness in buildings and health. Dampness at home as a risk factor for symptoms among 10 851 Swedish children (DBH-Step 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Sundell, Jan; Hagerhed, L.;

    2002-01-01

    -sectional questionnaire study on 14 077 children (1-6 years) focusing on their health and their home environment. There were strong and consistent associations between different "dampness"-indicators and symptoms among children. The combination of floor moisture problems and PVC as flooring material significantly...

  10. Sustainable Home Renovation for Canadians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKellar, G.

    2011-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. There is a staggering amount of existing buildings in Canada which were not built to e efficient, sustainable homes. This manual gives openings for renovating your home efficiently by providing practical info

  11. Rapid energy modeling for existing buildings: Testing the business and environmental potential through an experiment at Autodesk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deodhar, Aniruddha; Stewart, Emma; Young, Rahul; Khan, Haider

    2010-09-15

    Retrofits of existing buildings represent a huge, growing market and an opportunity to achieve some of the most sizable and cost-effective carbon reductions in any sector of the economy. More 'zero energy' and 'carbon neutral' buildings are being conceived daily by combining energy efficiency measures with renewable energy technologies. However, for all the progress, the building industry faces technical and cost challenges in identifying the highest potential retrofit candidates. This presentation investigates one potential solution, a technology driven workflow called rapid energy modeling, to accelerate and scale the process of analyzing performance for existing buildings in prioritizing improvements.

  12. [Microbiological quality of indoor air at the School of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butarewicz, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of microbiological rate of indoor air pollution on Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology were made by sedimentation method in accordance with Polish standards (PN-89/Z-04111/01,02,03). Six series of measurements were carried out from autumn 2002 to spring 2003. The results show bad microbiological quality of indoor air on Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology. It was found that the number of Staphylococcus, Actinomycetales as well as the total count of bacteria were too high and broke the Polish regulations of the clear air. Because of the students' and other workers' safety, monitoring of microbiological pollution of the indoor air must be done and existing emergency to improve the quality of the air must be lead.

  13. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  14. Homing oneself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2009-01-01

    expands on the notion that home indicates more than a house, but also responds to the overuse of the concept home. The aim of this article is to examine how home is done, stretched between everyday life, practices, dreams, loss and cultural ideas of home. My intention is not to remove home......, but to revitalize it to prevent it from turning into a pell-mell or a zombie (Beck 1999). This is important because we are moving away from the hegemonic idea of one home to the tactics of feeling at home, even in more mobile ways. The study is cross-disciplinary, drawing on cultural phenomenology, the history...

  15. CISBAT 2005 proceedings. Renewables in a changing climate - Innovation in building envelopes and environmental systems; CISBAT 2005 proceedings. Energies renouvelables et climat - Enveloppes et systemes environnementaux innovatifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scartezzini, J. L. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    These proceedings include the contributions presented at the 2005 CISBAT conference, held in Lausanne, Switzerland. Hosted by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne and jointly organised by the Solar Energy and Buildings Physics Laboratory at the EPFL, Cambridge University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), this international conference looked at 'Innovation in building envelopes and environmental systems'. Along with three keynote presentations on climate change, the use of renewables in the European Union and Swiss policies on solar energy, these 632-page conference proceedings include the conference's 106 presentations grouped in 10 sections. These cover the following topics: Design and renovation of building envelopes (33 contributions); solar collectors (16 contributions); active and passive cooling (9 contributions); indoor environment quality and health (10 contributions); optimisation of daylighting and electric lighting (5 contributions); advanced building control systems (2 contributions); environmental impacts of construction (4 contributions); networks and decentralised energy production (1 contribution); sustainable urban development (12 contributions) and software and new information technologies (14 contributions). Organised each second year, the two-day CISBAT international conference 2005 attracted more than 200 participants from all over the world.

  16. System and scenario choices in the life cycle assessment of a building – changing impacts of the environmental profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Freja; Birgisdóttir, Harpa; Birkved, Morten

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) case study of an office building. The case study investigates how the setting of free parameters (adopted from the CEN/TC 350 standards) influences the results of the building’s LCA in the DGNB certification scheme for sustainable buildings...

  17. Influence of occupant's heating set-point preferences on indoor environmental quality and heating demand in residential buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabi, Valentina; Corgnati, Stefano Paolo; Andersen, Rune Korsholm

    2013-01-01

    . The methodology was based on probabilistic evaluation of both input and output variables of building energy simulations. The developed methodology can be applied in all aspects of occupant's interactions with building controls, such as window openings, shading devices, etc., to achieve more realistic predictions...

  18. Squaring the circle. Social and environmental implications of pre-pottery neolithic building technology at Tell Qarassa (South Syria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Balbo

    Full Text Available We present the results of the microstratigraphic, phytolith and wood charcoal study of the remains of a 10.5 ka roof. The roof is part of a building excavated at Tell Qarassa (South Syria, assigned to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (PPNB. The Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPN period in the Levant coincides with the emergence of farming. This fundamental change in subsistence strategy implied the shift from mobile to settled aggregated life, and from tents and huts to hard buildings. As settled life spread across the Levant, a generalised transition from round to square buildings occurred, that is a trademark of the PPNB period. The study of these buildings is fundamental for the understanding of the ever-stronger reciprocal socio-ecological relationship humans developed with the local environment since the introduction of sedentism and domestication. Descriptions of buildings in PPN archaeological contexts are usually restricted to the macroscopic observation of wooden elements (posts and beams and mineral components (daub, plaster and stone elements. Reconstructions of microscopic and organic components are frequently based on ethnographic analogy. The direct study of macroscopic and microscopic, organic and mineral, building components performed at Tell Qarassa provides new insights on building conception, maintenance, use and destruction. These elements reflect new emerging paradigms in the relationship between Neolithic societies and the environment. A square building was possibly covered here with a radial roof, providing a glance into a topologic shift in the conception and understanding of volumes, from round-based to square-based geometries. Macroscopic and microscopic roof components indicate buildings were conceived for year-round residence rather than seasonal mobility. This implied performing maintenance and restoration of partially damaged buildings, as well as their adaptation to seasonal variability.

  19. Squaring the circle. Social and environmental implications of pre-pottery neolithic building technology at Tell Qarassa (South Syria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Andrea L; Iriarte, Eneko; Arranz, Amaia; Zapata, Lydia; Lancelotti, Carla; Madella, Marco; Teira, Luis; Jiménez, Miguel; Braemer, Frank; Ibáñez, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of the microstratigraphic, phytolith and wood charcoal study of the remains of a 10.5 ka roof. The roof is part of a building excavated at Tell Qarassa (South Syria), assigned to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (PPNB). The Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPN) period in the Levant coincides with the emergence of farming. This fundamental change in subsistence strategy implied the shift from mobile to settled aggregated life, and from tents and huts to hard buildings. As settled life spread across the Levant, a generalised transition from round to square buildings occurred, that is a trademark of the PPNB period. The study of these buildings is fundamental for the understanding of the ever-stronger reciprocal socio-ecological relationship humans developed with the local environment since the introduction of sedentism and domestication. Descriptions of buildings in PPN archaeological contexts are usually restricted to the macroscopic observation of wooden elements (posts and beams) and mineral components (daub, plaster and stone elements). Reconstructions of microscopic and organic components are frequently based on ethnographic analogy. The direct study of macroscopic and microscopic, organic and mineral, building components performed at Tell Qarassa provides new insights on building conception, maintenance, use and destruction. These elements reflect new emerging paradigms in the relationship between Neolithic societies and the environment. A square building was possibly covered here with a radial roof, providing a glance into a topologic shift in the conception and understanding of volumes, from round-based to square-based geometries. Macroscopic and microscopic roof components indicate buildings were conceived for year-round residence rather than seasonal mobility. This implied performing maintenance and restoration of partially damaged buildings, as well as their adaptation to seasonal variability.

  20. Squaring the Circle. Social and Environmental Implications of Pre-Pottery Neolithic Building Technology at Tell Qarassa (South Syria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Andrea L.; Iriarte, Eneko; Arranz, Amaia; Zapata, Lydia; Lancelotti, Carla; Madella, Marco; Teira, Luis; Jiménez, Miguel; Braemer, Frank; Ibáñez, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of the microstratigraphic, phytolith and wood charcoal study of the remains of a 10.5 ka roof. The roof is part of a building excavated at Tell Qarassa (South Syria), assigned to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (PPNB). The Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPN) period in the Levant coincides with the emergence of farming. This fundamental change in subsistence strategy implied the shift from mobile to settled aggregated life, and from tents and huts to hard buildings. As settled life spread across the Levant, a generalised transition from round to square buildings occurred, that is a trademark of the PPNB period. The study of these buildings is fundamental for the understanding of the ever-stronger reciprocal socio-ecological relationship humans developed with the local environment since the introduction of sedentism and domestication. Descriptions of buildings in PPN archaeological contexts are usually restricted to the macroscopic observation of wooden elements (posts and beams) and mineral components (daub, plaster and stone elements). Reconstructions of microscopic and organic components are frequently based on ethnographic analogy. The direct study of macroscopic and microscopic, organic and mineral, building components performed at Tell Qarassa provides new insights on building conception, maintenance, use and destruction. These elements reflect new emerging paradigms in the relationship between Neolithic societies and the environment. A square building was possibly covered here with a radial roof, providing a glance into a topologic shift in the conception and understanding of volumes, from round-based to square-based geometries. Macroscopic and microscopic roof components indicate buildings were conceived for year-round residence rather than seasonal mobility. This implied performing maintenance and restoration of partially damaged buildings, as well as their adaptation to seasonal variability. PMID:22848723

  1. Building Footprints, Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard Mitigation planning., Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Carroll County, Iowa.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Building Footprints dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2010. It is described as...

  2. Asthma, allergy and eczema among adults in multifamily houses in Stockholm (3-HE study)--associations with building characteristics, home environment and energy use for heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Lampa, Erik; Engvall, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings) were invited (one subject/dwelling) and 7,554 participated (73%). Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74) and mould odour (OR = 1.79). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45) and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48) and mould odour (OR = 2.35). Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75) and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76) and mould odour (OR = 2.36). Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07) and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85) and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47), humid air (OR = 1.73) and mould odour (OR = 2.01). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.82). Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.11). In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness. Energy saving may have consequences for allergy and eczema. More

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: One Sky Homes — Cottle Zero Net Energy Home, San Jose, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder took home the Grand Winner prize in the Custom Builder category in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards for its high performance building science approach. The builder used insulated concrete form blocks to create the insulated crawlspace foundation for its first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home, the first net zero energy new home certified in the state of California.

  4. 生态建筑中的节能环保措施研究%Energy Saving and Environmental Protection Measures of Ecological Building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锡琴

    2011-01-01

    由于现代建筑大规模修建,功能复杂多样,需要消耗各种大量的能源和资源,给人类赖以生存的环境带来了很大的负担。发展生态建筑是解决目前建筑物能耗大、污染严重的必然途径。从生态建筑的围护结构、建筑设备、楼宇自控系统等方面提出了诸多节能措施,能有效减低能耗、减少对环境的污染,使人类与环境能持续发展。%As large-scale construction of modem buildings, functional complex and diverse, consume a variety of large amounts of energy and resources, the environment for human survival is a big burden. Development of eco-building is the solution to the current building energy consumption and serious pollution of the inevitable way. From the ecological building envelope, construction equipment, building automation systems and other aspects of the many energy-saving measures can effectively reduce energy consumption, reduce environmental pollution, so that human beings and the environment to sustainable development.

  5. European home systems: an open technology for home integrated systems; European home systems: une technologie ouverte pour la domotique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, J.Y. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    Energy savings in buildings can be performed by home integrated systems and remote control applications. The European Home Systems data transmission protocol enables remote controls through entire buildings, in order to control energy consumption. Pilot plants have been performed in hostels by Horbit project. (D.L.)

  6. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Page Brochures & Fact Sheets Environmental Health Topics Science Education Kids Environment | Kids Health Research Home Page At NIEHS ... Health & Education Brochures & Fact Sheets Environmental Health Topics Science Education Kids Environment | Kids Health Research Home Research At NIEHS ...

  7. The MaSe decision support system: Development of an integrated information system for the selection of environmentally preferable materials and products in the building process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Sigrid Melby

    2003-07-01

    New building regulations and increased focus on building related environmental burdens have created a need for guidance to design more sustainable buildings. The main objective in this thesis is to develop a decision support system, to guide decision-makers to a better selection of building materials and products, based on environmental prioritisation. The system is focused on building materials and products, but the structure of the system can be adapted to other types of decision problems. No tool is found that satisfy the identified needs for a material selection system. By studying existing methods, however important information and possible solutions are gathered, that partly could be used in a new tool. Key decision makers with respect to material and product selection are the client, the architects, the technical consultants, and the contractors when they decide on specific brands. The user of the MaSe system first identifies the materials acceptable in the specific project, based on the technical requirements. These pre-selected materials are then scored and ranked through the procedures in the MaSe system. The alternative ranking is then the basis for the selection of construction elements, materials or products. Seeing the building and real estate industry as a part of our society, it is clear that the use of material resources and pollution are areas that need improvement. The MaSe system includes environmental aspects under the headlines Resources, Ecology and Human health. When selecting building materials, factors like recycling and reuse needs to be considered. Renewability, energy and waste are other aspects included in the Resource area. Toxic substances are clearly important when it comes to building materials. Factors to be included under the headline Ecology are global warming, acidification, and photochemical oxidant formation. The emissions of toxics to air, water and soil will have effect on human health. Aspects that should be included in

  8. Designing a place called home reordering the suburbs

    CERN Document Server

    Wentling, James

    2017-01-01

    This insightful volume shares design ideas to help builders, planners and architects create mass-produced affordable housing that pushes suburban development in more sustainable, liveable directions. The author argues that improving the quality of design in our new homes and communities for greater resiliency, sustainability, and equality, we can build neighborhoods and communities where residents feel more connected t their homes and to one another. Through text, photographs and illustrations, the book reviews prototypical American housing design, then suggest ways to both learn from the past as well as adapt for new environmental imperatives, demographic changes and lifestyle needs. Written by a practicing architect with 25+ years of experience optimizing residential design, this pioneering approach to suburban building will inspire readers to view mass produced housing through a new, modern lens.

  9. The Environmental Awareness and Environmental Behavior Research of Inhabitants in Yongding Earth Building%福建永定土楼居民的环境意识与环保行为特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春程; 陈桂煌; 林明水

    2014-01-01

    The environmental conditions of scenic spots are the basis and important factors of scenic attraction. As a na-tional level of scenic spot and a world cultural heritage site, earth building's tourism environmental quality and protection are the most important. And its residents' awareness of environmental protection has played an indispensable role in it. To study the residents' environmental awareness and environmental behavior of the earth buildings in Yongding, the research was carried based on a questionnaire investigation of the local people in Hongkeng spot of Yongding Earth Building. The questionnaire results were analysed by SPSS and EXcellsoftware. The research showed that, these inhabitants' environmen-tal consciousness score was 3.60 (by 5 cents), which was slightly less than Dunlap and Van Liere’s data measured in 1978, but much higher than city residents environmental consciousness measured by Dayong Hong in 2003, and higher than the score of respondents self. The environmental behavior score is 2.44 points (by 3 points) of the people. Environmental behav-ior effect is good. The environmental awareness and environmental behavior have a significantly positive correlation. There-fore, it is necessary to make environmental education through multi-channel, and raise the environmental awareness of the inhabitants of earth building, so as to promote their environmental behavior.%旅游景区环境状况是景区吸引力的基础和重要因素.土楼作为世界文化遗产地的国家5A级景区,其旅游环境的质量和对旅游环境的保护尤为重要.土楼居民的环境意识在保护中发挥了不可替代的作用.为了研究永定土楼居民的环境意识与环保行为,文章就以永定土楼洪坑景区的居民作为调查对象,进行问卷调查.问卷结果使用SPSS和EXCEL软件进行数据分析.研究发现,永定土楼居民的环境意识得分为3.60(5分制),比Dunlap和Van Liere1978年测量的分值3.0(4

  10. Futuragua: Fostering Cross-Scale Knowledge to Inform Social-Environmental Decision Processes for Building Drought Resilience in Highly Seasonal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniels, T.; Steyn, D. G.; Johnson, M. S.; Small, M.; Leclerc, G.; Vignola, R.; Chan, K.; Grossmann, I.; Wong-Parodi, G.

    2014-12-01

    Improving resilience to drought in complex social-environmental systems (SES) is extraordinarily important, particularly for rural tropical locations where small changes in climate regimes can have dramatic SES impacts. Efforts to build drought resilience must necessarily be planned and implemented within SES governance systems that involve linkages in water and land use administration from local to national levels. These efforts require knowledge and understanding that links climate and weather forecasts to regional and local hydrology, to social-economic and environmental systems, and to governance processes. In order to provide structure for such complex choices and investments, we argue that a focus on structured decision processes that involve linkages among science, technological perspectives, and public values conducted with agencies and stakeholders will provide a crucial framework for comparing and building insight for pursuing alternative courses of action to build drought resilience. This paper focuses on a regional case study in the seasonally-dry northwest region of Costa Rica, in watersheds rated as most threatened in the country in terms of drought. We present the overall framework guiding the transdisciplinary efforts to link scientific and technical understanding to public values, in order to foster civil society actions that lead to improved drought resilience. Initial efforts to characterize hydrological and climate regimes will be reported along with our approach to linking natural science findings, social inventories in terms of perspectives on SES, and the psychology and patterns of reliance on forecast information that provide the basis for characterizing public understanding. The overall linkage of technical and value information is focused on creating and comparing alternative actions that can potentially build resilience in short and long time frames by building decision making processes involving stakeholders, agencies and interested

  11. Buildings behaving badly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Student, Jillian; Papyrakis, Elissaios; Beukering, van Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Heating buildings contributes to approximately 36 % of Europe’s energy demand and several EU member states have adopted mandatory energy labels to improve energy efficiency by promoting home weatherization investments. This paper focuses on the perception of the energy label for residential building

  12. Buildings behaving badly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Student, Jillian; Papyrakis, Elissaios; Beukering, van Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Heating buildings contributes to approximately 36 % of Europe’s energy demand and several EU member states have adopted mandatory energy labels to improve energy efficiency by promoting home weatherization investments. This paper focuses on the perception of the energy label for residential building

  13. Building Services Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinzi, Michele; Romeo, Carlo; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2015-01-01

    This guideline on Building Services Systems is one of four guidelines produced by the School of the Future project. The other three guidelines cover: Building Construction Elements, Improved Indoor Environmental Quality and Concepts for Zero Emission Schools. This guideline consists...

  14. Building Services Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinzi, Michele; Romeo, Carlo; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2015-01-01

    This guideline on Building Services Systems is one of four guidelines produced by the School of the Future project. The other three guidelines cover: Building Construction Elements, Improved Indoor Environmental Quality and Concepts for Zero Emission Schools. This guideline consists...

  15. Product-oriented environmental management : a study of capability-building, stakeholder orientation and continuous improvement regarding products' environmental characteristics in firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, de Frank G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Companies are increasingly giving attention to the environmental characteristics of their products. This book focuses on the ways in which large, proactive, firms could develop and maintain product-oriented environmental management (POEM), both at the strategic and the operational level. POEM is def

  16. 国内外累积性环境风险评估研究进展%Research Progress of Cumulative Environmental Risk Assessment at Home and Abroad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁鹏; 李文秀; 彭剑峰; 宋永会; 许伟宁

    2015-01-01

    随着环境风险评估的重点由单一源、单一传播途径、单受体转向多来源、多传播途径、多受体的评估,累积性环境风险评估逐渐成为当前研究热点。通过概念辨析和文献调研的方法,综述了美国累积性环境风险评估的发展历史、评估流程,并对国内外累积性环境风险评估方法、应用研究进展进行了评述。指出了目前国内开展累积性环境风险评估存在的方法不完善、基础科研工作不足、宏观环境管理政策亟待加强等问题。建议应尽快明确累积性环境风险评估概念与管理要求,制订累积性环境风险评估的流程、框架与技术指南,加强基础数据库建立和实践探索,为长效的环境风险管理提供决策依据。%With the focuses of environmental risk assessment gradually evolving from assessment of single source or stressor, single exposure route and single risk receptor toward integrated assessment involving several sources or stressors, multiple exposure routes and multiple receptors in recent years, the cumulative risk assessment has become a study hot spot.Through concepts discrimination and literatures search, the development history and assessment procedure in the US, and the methods and practices of cumulative risk assessment both at home and abroad were reviewed.It was pointed out that there were several problems in conducting cumulative risk assessment in China, such as lack of assessment methods, lack of basic scientific data and urgent need of reinforcement of macro-environmental management policy and so on.It was suggests that the concept and management requirements of cumulative environmental risk assessment should be defined, the evaluation process, framework and technical guide be formulated, and the construction of foundational databases and practical explorations be reinforced as soon as possible,which can provide the decision support for the long-term effective environmental

  17. A three perspective study of the sense of home of nursing home residents: the views of residents, care professionals and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, J; Verbeek, H; Janssen, B M; Eijkelenboom, A; Molony, S L; Felix, E; Nieboer, K A; Zwerts-Verhelst, E L M; Sijstermans, J J W M; Wouters, E J M

    2016-10-03

    The sense of home of nursing home residents is a multifactorial phenomenon which is important for the quality of living. This purpose of this study is to investigate the factors influencing the sense of home of older adults residing in the nursing home from the perspective of residents, relatives and care professionals. A total of 78 participants (n = 24 residents, n = 18 relatives and n = 26 care professionals) from 4 nursing homes in the Netherlands engaged in a qualitative study, in which photography was as a supportive tool for subsequent interviews and focus groups. The data were analyzed based on open ended coding, axial coding and selective coding. The sense of home of nursing home residents is influenced by a number of jointly identified factors, including the building and interior design; eating and drinking; autonomy and control; involvement of relatives; engagement with others and activities; quality of care are shared themes. Residents and relatives stressed the importance of having a connection with nature and the outdoors, as well as coping strategies. Relatives and care professionals emphasized the role the organization of facilitation of care played, as well as making residents feel like they still matter. The sense of home of nursing home residents is influenced by a multitude of factors related to the psychology of the residents, and the social and built environmental contexts. A holistic understanding of which factors influence the sense of home of residents can lead to strategies to optimize this sense of home. This study also indicated that the nursing home has a dual nature as a place of residence and a place where people are supported through numerous care strategies.

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, First DOE Zero Energy Ready Manufactured Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-01

    The country’s first Zero Energy Ready manufactured home that is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is up and running in Russellville, Alabama. The manufactured home was built by a partnership between Southern Energy Homes and the Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), which is a DOE Building America team. The effort was part of a three-home study including a standard-code manufactured home and an ENERGY STAR® manufactured home. Cooling-season results showed that the building used half the space-conditioning energy of a manufactured home built to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards. These standards are known collectively as the HUD Code, which is the building standard for all U.S. manufactured housing.

  19. Home hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar, John W; Perkins, Anthony; Heaf, James G

    2015-01-01

    We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use....

  20. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed dramatically over the past several ... how accessible are they? How close is the nursing home to family members? How close ... much do basic services cost? What services are covered? What additional ...