WorldWideScience

Sample records for home care nursing

  1. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leadership positions are very important to maintaining quality care in the nursing home. Here are some things to look for ... symptoms, and health problems. May 2013 Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in ...

  2. FastStats: Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Nursing Home Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ...

  3. Nurse Physiotherapy in Medical Home Care

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlářová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis is centred on theme medical home care, importace of nurse physiotherapy and significance nurse physiotherapy by patiens in medical home care. It look on wide of use at illnies cerebral apoplexy, the theses of nurse physiotherapy and some suggestions and tips how the nurse physiotherapy instruments use for patients by cerebral apoplexy. Substance of the bachelor's thesis make research of use nurse physioterapy by medical workers and of knowledge how utilize in medical home ca...

  4. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  6. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ2 tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( pclusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  7. Integrating Advanced Practice Nurses in Home Care. Recommendations for a Teaching Home Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Mezey, Mathy

    1998-01-01

    A telephone survey of home care agencies and providers revealed a need for the following: evidence of the effectiveness of nurse practitioners in home care, regulatory and financial support for nurse practitioner home care, and development of home care agencies as clinical sites for training. (SK)

  8. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Voicing Ageism in Nursing Home Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Shaw, Clarissa; Lee, Alexandria; Kim, Sohyun; Dinneen, Emma; Turk, Margaret; Jao, Ying-Ling; Liu, Wen

    2017-09-01

    Elderspeak (i.e., infantilizing communication) is a common form of ageism that has been linked to resistiveness to care in nursing home residents with dementia. Nursing home staff use elderspeak by modifying speech with older residents based on negative stereotypes, which results in patronizing communication that provides a message of incompetence. The purpose of the current secondary analysis was to describe communication practices used by nursing home staff that reflect ageism. Transcripts of 80 video recordings of staff-resident communication collected during nursing home care activities were re-analyzed to identify specific elderspeak patterns, including diminutives, collective pronouns, tag questions, and reflectives. Elderspeak was used in 84% of transcripts, and specifically during bathing, dressing, oral care, and other activities. Collective pronoun substitution occurred most frequently-in 69% of recorded conversations. Subgroup analysis of the inappropriate terms of endearment found that "honey"/"hon" and "sweetheart"/"sweetie" were most commonly used. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(9), 16-20.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. [Psychology of nursing personnel in home care nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergler, R

    1995-04-01

    In a random survey questions were put to 100 employees of home care centers (51 qualified nursing staff, 28 assistants and/or trainees, 21 young people doing community service as an alternative to military service). (1) The job motivation is primarily of a private nature: social commitment, achievement motivation, being responsible for solving diverse human problems are at the centre of job orientation. (2) Huge disappointments (neglect of patients, stress, arrangement of working hours, bureaucracy, lack of self-responsibility) are in 62% of the cases the reasons for changing from a clinic to the home care centre. (3) The psychological results of home care nursing are only positive in 62% of the cases; 26% have thought of giving notice, 37% would not choose their job again. (4) The training qualification for home care nursing is only adequate for 60% of those questioned; deficiencies are experienced with regard to consulting competence, gerontopsychiatry, specific knowledge about illnesses, legal questions. Essential further training is neglected. Also initial instruction in the home care service is to a great extent unsatisfactory. (5) For economic reasons it is frequently necessary to limit daily care to basic nursing; the patients' communicative needs have to ignored. One's occupational self-importance dwindles away; the job increasingly becomes an everyday stress factor. (6) The high risk of infection in the case of home-care patients is considered to be above-average (bedsores, infection risks with regard to changing bandages/catheters, anuspraeter aids, incontinence, fungal diseases, food risks: not keeping to diets, food not suitable for the elderly, lack of appropriate storage for leftovers. (7) Nursing staff, as well as patients, regard soap, cleansing lotion, shampoo, tooth brushes and toothpaste as the main items for personal hygiene, for the prevention and treatment of bedsores. Beyond that, compared with nursing staff, patients have a greater need for

  11. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  12. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  13. Factors influencing home care nurse intention to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Patterson, Erin; Rowe, Alissa; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; MacDonald, Geraldine; Cranley, Lisa; Squires, Mae

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors affecting Canadian home care nurse intention to remain employed (ITR). In developed nations, healthcare continues to shift into community settings. Although considerable research exists on examining nurse ITR in hospitals, similar research related to nurses employed in home care is limited. In the face of a global nursing shortage, it is important to understand the factors influencing nurse ITR across healthcare sectors. A qualitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Focus groups were conducted with home care nurses. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Six categories of influencing factors were identified by home care nurses as affecting ITR: job characteristics; work structures; relationships/communication; work environment; nurse responses to work; and employment conditions. Findings suggest the following factors influence home care nurse ITR: having autonomy; flexible scheduling; reasonable and varied workloads; supportive work relationships; and receiving adequate pay and benefits. Home care nurses did not identify job satisfaction as a single concept influencing ITR. Home care nursing management should support nurse autonomy, allow flexible scheduling, promote reasonable workloads and create opportunities for team building that strengthen supportive relationships among home care nurses and other health team members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing homes are set up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each ...

  15. Efficacy of integrated interventions combining psychiatric care and nursing home care for nursing home residents: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Janine; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Verhey, Frans R J; Schols, Jos M G A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing home residents needing both psychiatric care and nursing home care for either somatic illness or dementia combined with psychiatric disorders or severe behavioural problems are referred to as Double Care Demanding patients, or DCD patients. Integrated models of care seem to be necessary in order to improve the well-being of these residents. Two research questions were addressed. First, which integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are described in the research literature? And second, which outcomes of integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are reported in the literature? A critical review of studies was done that involved integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care on psychiatric disorders and severe behavioural problems in nursing home patients. A systematic literature search was performed in a number of international databases. Eight intervention trials, including four RCTs (2b level of evidence), were identified as relevant studies for the purpose of this review. Seven studies, three of which were RCTs, showed beneficial effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach combining medical, psychiatric and nursing interventions on severe behavioural problems in DCD nursing home patients. Important elements of a successful treatment strategy for DCD nursing home patients include a thorough assessment of psychiatric, medical and environmental causes as well as programmes for teaching behavioural management skills to nurses. DCD nursing home patients were found to benefit from short-term mental hospital admission.This review underlines the need for more rigorously designed studies to assess the effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach towards DCD nursing home residents. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  17. Family Satisfaction With Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Tetyana P; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Gaugler, Joseph E; Held, Robert; Kane, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the factor structure of a new family satisfaction with nursing home care instrument and determines the relationship of resident quality of life (QOL) and facility characteristics with family satisfaction. Data sources include (1) family satisfaction interviews ( n = 16,790 family members), (2) multidimensional survey of resident QOL ( n = 13,433 residents), and (3) facility characteristics ( n = 376 facilities). We used factor analysis to identify domains of family satisfaction and multivariate analyses to identify the role of facility-level characteristics and resident QOL on facility-mean values of family satisfaction. Four distinct domains were identified for family satisfaction: "care," "staff," "environment," and "food." Chain affiliation, higher resident acuity, more deficiencies, and large size were all associated with less family satisfaction, and resident QOL was a significant (albeit weak) predictor of family satisfaction. Results suggest that family member satisfaction is distinct from resident QOL but is associated with resident QOL and facility characteristics.

  18. The economies of scale for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wu; Shea, Dennis G

    2004-03-01

    Using a modified hybrid short-term operating cost function and a national sample of nursing homes in 1994, the authors examined the scale economies of nursing home care. The results show that scale economies exist for Medicare postacute care, with an elasticity of -0.15 and an optimal scale of around 4,000 patient days annually. However, more than 68 percent of nursing homes in the analytic sample produced Medicare days at a level below the optimal scale. The financial pressures resulting from the implementation of a prospective payment system for Medicare skilled nursing facilities may further reduce the quantity of Medicare days served by nursing homes. In addition, the results show that chain-owned nursing homes do not have lower short-term operating costs than do independent facilities. This indicates that the rationale behind recent increasing horizontal integration among nursing homes may not be seeking greater cost efficiency but some other consideration.

  19. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  20. Caring in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Maria; Häggström, Elisabeth; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Pöder, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    Autonomy and participation are threatened within the group of older people living in nursing homes. Evidence suggests that healthcare personnel act on behalf of older people but are still excluding them from decision-making in everyday care. The purpose was to describe registered nurses' experience of caring for older people in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation. A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach was used. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. Analysis was inspired by Giorgi's method. Participants and research context: A total of 13 registered nurses from 10 nursing homes participated. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Regional Research Ethics Committee. Informed consent was achieved and confidentiality guaranteed. The essence of caring for older people in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation consisted of registered nurses' awareness of older people's frailty and the impact of illness to support health and well-being, and awareness of acknowledgement in everyday life and trusting relationships. Paying attention to older people by being open to the persons' wishes were aspects that relied on registered nurses' trusting relationships with older people, their relatives and surrounding healthcare personnel. The awareness reflected challenges in caring to promote older people's right to autonomy and participation in nursing homes. Registered nurses' strategies, hopes for and/or concerns about development of everyday life in nursing homes were revealed and mirrored their engagement in caring for older people. Awareness of older people's frailty in nursing homes and the importance of maintained health and well-being were described as the main source for promoting autonomy and participation. Everyday life and care in nursing homes needs to be addressed from both older people's and healthcare personnel's perspectives, to promote autonomy and participation for residents

  1. Home care nursing orientation model. Justification and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, C J; Milone-Nuzzo, P

    1992-01-01

    An orientation program for new nurses in a home care agency can be an effective tool that increases job satisfaction, alleviates a potentially high employee attrition rate, boosts morale, and thereby improves overall quality of patient care.

  2. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  3. A measure of palliative care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Bott, Marjorie; Boyle, Diane; Gajewski, Byron; Tilden, Virginia P

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to improve care for nursing home residents stand to be enhanced by measures to assess the degree to which staff provide palliative care. As the incidence of death in nursing homes increases with the aging population, the gap in measurement must be addressed. To that end, we report the development and psychometric testing of a nursing home palliative care survey. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Palliative Care Survey (PCS) for use in nursing homes. Psychometric evaluation of the instrument was completed in two phases. Phase 1 focused on individual item analyses and subsequent revision or deletion of items, and Phase 2 evaluated evidence for reliability and validity. Phase 1 included 26 nursing homes and staff (n=717), and Phase 2 included 85 nursing homes and staff (n=2779). Data were analyzed using item-total correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analysis, and analysis of variance. Support was obtained for a 51-item PCS made up of two constructs, Palliative Care Practice and Palliative Care Knowledge. The PCS measures the extent to which the nursing home staff engage in palliative care practices and have knowledge consistent with good end-of-life care. Both practice and knowledge are an essential foundation to providing good end-of-life care to nursing home residents. Efforts to improve care for the dying in nursing homes have been slowed by an absence of measurement tools that capture care processes, a gap that the PCS reported here helps fill. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nursing homes and end-of-life care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2013-10-01

    To describe end-of-life care in Japanese nursing homes by comparing facility and characteristics of residents dying in nursing homes with those who had been transferred and had died in hospitals, and by comparing the quality of end-of-life care with hospitals and with their respective counterparts in the United States. National sample of 653 nursing homes with responses from 371 (57%) on their facility characteristics, 241 (37%) on their resident characteristics, and 92 (14%) on the residents' quality of life. All 5 hospitals in a city 80 miles from Tokyo cooperated. Nursing home staff answered questionnaires on facility and resident characteristics. Resident level data were obtained from 1158. The questionnaire on the quality of care was responded to by 256 (63%) of the decedents' families in nursing homes and 205 (48%) in hospitals. Facility characteristics included items on physicians, nurse staffing, and the facility's end-of-life care policy. Resident characteristics included basic demographics, level of dementia, and resident's and family's preference for the site of death. The Toolkit was used to measure the quality of end-of-life care. The proportion of those dying within the nursing home was related to the facility's policy on end-of-life care and the family's preference. The quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes was generally better than in hospitals, and than in their respective counterparts in the United States. Financial incentives by the Japanese government to promote end-of-life care in nursing homes may have contributed to increasing the proportion of deaths within the facility. The quality of care in nursing homes was evaluated as being better than hospitals. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only)

  6. Raising The Standard: Palliative Care In Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meier, Diane E; Lim, Betty; Carlson, Melissa D.A

    2010-01-01

    ... from palliative care. Indeed, we would argue that the growing acceptance of the culture-change movement centered on elder-directed goals in nursing homes is promising evidence of the goodness-of-fit of palliative care principles in the long-term care setting. More than 70 percent of long-stay residents in nursing homes are elderly and have moderate-t...

  7. Nursing delegation. Implications for home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Janet A; Tripp, Emily

    2002-09-01

    Consumers are advocating for client-directed care and are influencing legislation that regulates delegation within nurse practice acts. Almost 18 months ago, the Visiting Nurse Association of Texas implemented the delegation of insulin administration for appropriate patients. Results indicate that the program is a success and the time invested in developing the program was well spent.

  8. Evaluating home health care nursing outcomes with OASIS and NOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia Stocker; Barkauskas, Violet; Keenan, Gail

    2008-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and responsiveness of the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) to the effects of home healthcare nursing interventions. A quasi-experimental before-after study was conducted using a sample of 106 home healthcare participants referred to one of seven participating Midwest home healthcare agencies for treatment of a cardiac condition. Patient outcomes data were collected at home healthcare admission and discharge using OASIS and NOC. Nursing intervention data were collected at each visit using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Intervention intensity was calculated by totaling the number of NIC interventions provided over the episode of care. Neither OASIS nor NOC were sensitive to the effects of home healthcare nursing as measured by intervention intensity. The OASIS was not responsive to clinically discernable changes in patient outcomes; while the NOC was responsive to patient status change in the outcome categories including activities of daily living, cardiopulmonary status, coping, and illness management behavior. Outcome measures that are more condition-specific and discipline-specific are more responsive to the effects of home healthcare nursing. Further research is needed to identify and refine outcome measures that are sensitive and responsive to the effects of nursing care in home health and other nursing settings. The use of outcome measures that are more sensitive and responsive to nursing are more effective in guiding nursing practice.

  9. End-of-life care in nursing and care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, John; Johnson, Malcolm

    More than 70,000 people die each year in nursing and residential care homes, yet comparatively little attention has been paid to end-of-life care practice and its challenges in this setting. We conducted interviews and group discussions in 12 homes, involving 73 residents, 97 members of staff and 16 relatives. These revealed that personalised care, dignity and respect, making time, talking about death, relatives' roles, and staff support were priorities for all concerned. Training is vital in helping staff to engage sensitively, respectfully and creatively with dying residents. Staffing levels must be sufficient so staff can sit with residents and care in a way that is attuned to their personality, life history and wishes. relatives help to ensure a "civilised death".

  10. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Havig Anders; Skogstad Anders; Kjekshus Lars; Romøren Tor

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used ...

  11. Nursing Leadership in Home and Community Care: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Gail

    2017-01-01

    There is agreement across all provinces that there is transformation needed in the area of home and community care. Yet, where is the collective voice of nurse leaders in this transformation? The guest editor calls on nurses to respond to this unique opportunity to shape the transformation of our health system, and improve care for patients and their caregivers.

  12. Culture change and nursing home quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; O'Malley, A James; Afendulis, Christopher C; Caudry, Daryl J; Elliot, Amy; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2014-02-01

    Culture change models are intended to improve the quality of life for nursing home residents, but the impact of these models on quality of care is unknown. We evaluated the impact of the implementation of nursing home culture change on the quality of care, as measured by staffing, health-related survey deficiencies, and Minimum Data Set (MDS) quality indicators. From the Pioneer Network, we have data on whether facilities were identified by experts as "culture change" providers in 2004 and 2009. Using administrative data, we employed a panel-based regression approach in which we compared pre-post quality outcomes in facilities adopting culture change between 2004 and 2009 against pre-post quality outcomes for a propensity score-matched comparison group of nonadopters. Nursing homes that were identified as culture change adopters exhibited a 14.6% decrease in health-related survey deficiency citations relative to comparable nonadopting homes, while experiencing no significant change in nurse staffing or various MDS quality indicators. This research represents the first large-scale longitudinal evaluation of the association of culture change and nursing home quality of care. Based on the survey deficiency results, nursing homes that were identified as culture change adopters were associated with better care although the surveyors were not blind to the nursing home's culture change efforts. This finding suggests culture change may have the potential to improve MDS-based quality outcomes, but this has not yet been observed.

  13. Nurse Delegation in Home Care: Research Guiding Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; Farnham, Jennifer; Reinhard, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    The current study evaluated nurse delegation in home care, a pilot program introduced in 2007 in New Jersey to promote home care options for consumers needing assistance with medical/nursing tasks. Findings on readiness for the program, barriers and facilitating factors, experience with the program, and recommendations are summarized and presented. Methods included surveys and interviews with participants in nurse delegation, observations of planning and implementation meetings, and review meeting minutes. Major findings were no negative outcomes for consumers, improvements in quality of life and quality of care for consumers, high readiness and increasing satisfaction with experience in delegation, perception of nurse delegation in home care as a valued option, and the challenges of ensuring adequate staffing. Subsequent changes in regulation in New Jersey are underway, translating this research into policy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 7-15.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeden, Karin; Moeke, Dennis; Bekker, René

    2016-09-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible for the daily care of the residents and account for a significant proportion of the total labor expenses. In practice, the lack of reliable data makes it difficult for nursing home managers to make informed staffing decisions. The focus of this study lies on the 'care on demand' process in a Belgian nursing home. Based on the analysis of real-life 'call button' data, a queueing model is presented which can be used by nursing home managers to determine the number of care workers required to meet a specific service level. Based on numerical experiments an 80/10 service level is proposed for this nursing home, meaning that at least 80 percent of the clients should receive care within 10 minutes after a call button request. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to develop a quantitative model for the 'care on demand' process in a nursing home.

  15. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care... solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities... services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day health care to...

  16. Incontinence care in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Manuela; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2015-09-01

    To describe the quality of incontinence care in nursing homes. Main outcome measures were: (1) availability of structural quality indicators on ward and institutional levels; (2) use of nursing interventions as quality indicators on a process level; (3) prevalence of incontinence as an outcome indicator. Incontinence in older people is a major problem in nursing care that presents a high workload for nurses, increases costs and places a high burden on affected individuals. The availability of structural indicators, and the use of nursing interventions, is recommended to improve the quality of care. Only limited amounts of reliable and valid data are available regarding the quality of incontinence care in nursing homes. A cross-sectional multicentre study in 16 nursing homes (N = 1302) in 2013. A standardized and validated questionnaire was used for data collection. Each resident was assessed by two trained nurses. The primary outcome of the study indicated that structural indicators, such as the availability of information brochures, are limited in nursing homes. On a process level, the provision of body worn pads or underlay pads to protect beds or chairs were most frequently used and training interventions were only delivered to a small proportion of residents with incontinence. The prevalence of all types of incontinence, particularly double incontinence, was high (69·2%). Due to the high prevalence of double incontinence and low rate of training interventions regarding this type of incontinence, ongoing efforts to improve the quality of incontinence care are warranted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Private practice nurse and palliative care in the home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daydé, Marie-Claude

    2017-11-01

    The development of palliative care in the home, requested by patients and recommended in the 2015-2018 national plan, requires the home to be considered as a specific place of care. Private practice nurses have an important role to play with the patient and their relatives, in the assessment of needs, coordination, relational care as well as in providing the care required for maintaining and continuing life, an increasingly technical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Mobile computing and the quality of home care nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Nahas, Georgette; Templier, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the introduction of mobile computing on the quality of home care nursing practice in Québec. The software, which structured and organized the nursing activities in patients' homes, was installed sequentially in nine community health centres. The completeness of the nursing notes was compared in 77 paper records (pre-implementation) and 73 electronic records (post-implementation). Overall, the introduction of the software was associated with an improvement in the completeness of the nursing notes. All 137 nurse users were asked to complete a structured questionnaire. A total of 101 completed questionnaires were returned (74% response rate). Overall, the nurses reported a very high level of satisfaction with the quality of clinical information collected. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews were conducted and most nurses believed that the new software represented a user-friendly tool with a clear and understandable structure. A postal questionnaire was sent to approximately 1240 patients. A total of 223 patients returned the questionnaire (approximately 18% response rate). Overall, patients felt that the use of mobile computing during home visits allowed nurses to manage their health condition better and, hence, provide superior care services. The use of mobile computing had positive and significant effects on the quality of care provided by home nurses.

  19. Preparing tomorrow's nursing home nurses: the wisconsin long term care clinical scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This article reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working both with older adults and in nursing homes, while increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience.

  20. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  1. Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Allocca Hernandez, Giacomo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Getting old involves a lot of changes in life. Family and social relations change and mobility can decrease. These variations require new settings, and of course special care. A nursing home is a place dedicated to help with this situation. Sometimes nursing homes can be perceived as mere institutions by society, and even by future residents. Inside, senior citizens are suppose to spend the rest of their lives doing the same activities day after day. How can we improve these days? Archite...

  2. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  3. [Coordinating home assistance and nursing care for global patient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Enabling patients to remain in their home is only possible when the different services, both from within and outside the hospital are able to communicate and when the recommended actions are properly coordinated. Entrusting the coordination of the care to the Spasad (polyvalent service for home assistance and nursing care) enables the expectations of the patients and family carers to be analysed. This allows the team to put in place the appropriate actions both in terms of assistance and nursing care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Nursing Home Physician Specialists: A Response to the Workforce Crisis in Long-Term Care

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Marginalization of physicians in the nursing home threatens the overall care of increasingly frail nursing home residents who have medically complex illnesses. The authors propose that creating a nursing home medicine specialty, which recognizes the nursing home as a unique practice site, would go a long way toward remedying existing problems with care in skilled nursing facilities and would best serve the needs of the 1.6 million nursing home residents in the United States. Reviewing what is...

  5. Examining pediatric emergency home ventilation practices in home health nurses: Opportunities for improved care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Sheila S; Beas, Virginia N; Keens, Thomas G; Ward, Sally S L; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2015-07-01

    To assess the pediatric home health nurses' knowledge in tracheostomy and ventilator emergency care on home mechanical ventilation (HMV). Emergencies are frightening experiences for solo home health nurses and require advanced skills in emergency response and care, especially in pediatric patients who pose unique challenges. Nurses with greater years of nursing experience would perform better on emergency HMV case-based scenarios than nurses with less years of experience. An exploratory online survey was used to evaluate emergency case-based pediatric scenarios. Demographic and professional experiences were profiled. Seventy-nine nurses had an average of 6.73 (SD = 1.41) years in pediatric nursing. Over 70% received their HMV training in their agency, 41% had less than 4 years of experience, and 30.4% had encountered at least one emergency situation at home. The online survey was distributed by managers of 22 home health agencies to nurses providing pediatric HMV care. Nurses scored an average of 4.87 out of 10 possible points. There were no significant differences between nurses with nurses favored more training in HMV from a variety of settings (e.g., agency, on-line training). Nurses did not perform well in case-based ventilator alarm scenarios. Length of nursing experience did not differentiate greater knowledge. It is clear that nurses require and want more training in emergency-based HMV. Recommendations for an enhanced curriculum are suggested. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Anders Kvale; Skogstad, Anders; Kjekshus, Lars Erik; Romøren, Tor Inge

    2011-11-28

    Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r=0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is complex. Increasing staffing levels or the

  7. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havig Anders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78. Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses

  8. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  9. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  10. Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gawon

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

  11. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eeden, K.; Moeke, D.; Bekker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible

  12. Care Plan Improvement in Nursing Homes: An Integrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariani, E.; Chattat, R.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Koopmans, R.T.; Engels, Y.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Care planning nowadays is a key activity in the provision of services to nursing home residents. A care plan describes the residents' needs and the actions to address them, providing both individualized and standardized interventions and should be updated as changes in the residents'

  13. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and...

  14. Competence for older people nursing in care and nursing homes: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljunen, Outi; Välimäki, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi; Partanen, Pirjo

    2017-09-01

    People living in care and nursing homes are vulnerable individuals with complex needs; therefore, a wide array of nursing competence is needed to ensure their well-being. When developing the quality of care in these units, it is essential to know what type of competence is required for older people nursing. The aim of this integrative review was to identify the competence needed for older people nursing in licensed practical nurses' and registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes. Integrative literature review. We performed an integrative review using Whittemore and Knafl's method. The CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Scopus databases were searched for studies published from 2006 to April 2016. We assessed the quality of the studies using Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools and analysed the data by applying qualitative content analysis. Ten articles were included in the review. Most of the studies focused on registered nurses' work. We identified five competence areas that are needed for older people nursing in registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes: attitudinal and ethical, interactional, evidence-based care, pedagogical, and leadership and development competence. Empirical evidence of competence requirements related to licensed practical nurses' work in these facilities was scarce. The competence required for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses should be clearly identified to support competence management in the care and nursing home context. Well-educated nursing staff are needed in care and nursing homes to provide high-quality care because comprehensive and advanced nurse competence is required to meet the needs of older people. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    . Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health...... care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. METHOD: Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge...

  16. [Role of Visiting Nursing Care in Japanese Home Healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Taiwan's rapidly aging society is expected to make it a super-aged society in 2026. By 2060, people aged 65 or older will account for 40% of the population, a ratio that will approximate that in Japan. In Japan, the elderly population was 27.3% in 2016. By 2025, when the baby-boomers become 75 years old in Japan, issues of long-term care and end-of-life care will be more important and challenging. Since 1976, more Japanese have died in hospital settings than in home settings. Although the percentage of people dying at home increased slightly to 12.7% in 2016, after the recent introduction and promotion of home healthcare, Japan will face a significant challenge to deal with the healthcare 'tsunami' of high natural death rates, which is expected to impose a heavy death burdened on society by 2040, when the death rate is expected to reach 1,670,000/year. Therefore, the Japanese authorities have begun to promote the Community-based Integrated Care System, in which home healthcare and visiting nursing play crucial roles. This article summarizes the historical trend and current situation of visiting nursing in Japan. Japan uses a hybrid payment system for visiting nursing that is financially supported both through private medical insurance policies and Kaigo insurance (Japanese long-term care insurance). The total of 8613 visiting nursing stations that were active in community settings in 2016 cooperated with 14,000 support clinics for home healthcare and cared for 570,000 patients in home settings. We believe that visiting nursing will play an important role in home healthcare in Taiwan in the future.

  17. Staffing subsidies and the quality of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrew D; Lee, Yong Suk

    2015-05-01

    Concerns about the quality of state-financed nursing home care has led to the wide-scale adoption by states of pass-through subsidies, in which Medicaid reimbursement rates are directly tied to staffing expenditure. We examine the effects of Medicaid pass-through on nursing home staffing and quality of care by adapting a two-step FGLS method that addresses clustering and state-level temporal autocorrelation. We find that pass-through subsidies increases staffing by about 1% on average and 2.7% in nursing homes with a low share of Medicaid patients. Furthermore, pass-through subsidies reduce the incidences of pressure ulcer worsening by about 0.9%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nursing care for patients on the edge of life in nursing homes: obstacles are overshadowing opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Reidun; Hedelin, Birgitta; Athlin, Elsy

    2013-03-01

    Patients in nursing homes have comprehensive needs for nursing care and medical treatment. Most patients benefit from the treatment, but some are 'on the edge of life'-in a borderland between living and dying with an unpredictable outcome, and questions are sometimes raised whether to withhold/withdraw curative treatment. The aim was to describe nurses' conceptions of good nursing care, and how this could be carried out for patients on the edge of life in nursing homes. In order to discover variations in the nurses' understandings a phenomenographic approach was chosen. Phenomenography is concerned with qualitatively different ways of conceiving a phenomenon. Methods.  Fourteen nurses from two nursing homes were individually interviewed twice. A phenomenographic analysis was used. The outcome-space included two main categories. The first, 'good nursing care is to meet patients' needs for dignity,' included three description-categories: needs for 'preparedness', 'human relationship' and 'bodily comfort and safety'. The second, 'opportunities were overshadowed by obstacles' in carrying out nursing care encompassed three description-categories: 'organisational factors,''relational factors' and 'personal factors'. This study shows nurses' conceptions of the importance of good nursing care for comforting patients on the edge of life. Several obstacles related to resources, communication, cooperation and nurses' professional strength and power need to be overcome if good nursing care can be performed. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Utilization of palliative care principles in nursing home care: Educational interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Larsson, Lise-Lotte Franklin; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Österlind, Jane

    2015-12-01

    This study is part of the overarching PVIS (Palliative Care in Nursing Homes) project aimed at building competence in palliative care for nursing home staff. Our objective was to describe nursing home staff's attitudes to competence-building programs in palliative care. Three different programs were developed by specialist staff from three local palliative care teams. In all, 852 staff at 37 nursing homes in the greater Stockholm area participated. Staff from 7 nursing homes participated in 11 focus-group discussions. Variation in size between the seven nursing homes initiated purposeful selection of staff to take part in the discussions, and descriptive content analysis was used. The results suggest that staff reported positive experiences as they gained new knowledge and insight into palliative care. The experiences seemed to be similar independent of the educational program design. Our results also show that staff experienced difficulties in talking about death. Enrolled nurses and care assistants felt that they carried out advanced care without the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge. Further, the results also suggest that lack of support from ward managers and insufficient collaboration and of a common language between different professions caused tension in situations involved in caring for dying people. Nursing home staff experienced competence-building programs in palliative care as useful. Even so, further competence is needed, as is long-term implementation strategies and development of broader communication skills among all professions working in nursing homes.

  20. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for any...

  1. 'High-tech' home care: overview of professional care in patients on home parenteral nutrition and implications for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Achterberg, Theo; Jansen, Jan; Wanten, Geert; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the quality, quantity and content of care given to home parenteral nutrition-dependent patients by various professionals in the Netherlands and to detect potential shortcomings. Home parenteral nutrition is a lifesaving treatment for patients who cannot eat or cannot eat sufficiently. Very little is known about follow-up care after hospital stay. Yet this is an important aspect of care as patients must cope with high-tech skills at home. Also, complications and psychosocial complaints can occur. Survey. A patient questionnaire was used to assess contacts with professionals and possible shortcomings in care. Nursing files from home parenteral nutrition nurses were reviewed for information from all contact moments. Home parenteral nutrition nurses and home care teams were interviewed to assess nursing care and to detect bottlenecks. The nutrition support team was primarily responsible for the home parenteral nutrition care. Physical complaints like abdominal pain or nausea and venous access problems like fever were discussed most often. Patients were satisfied about the nutrition support team, but both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial problems. Furthermore, the included patients visited their General Practitioner 11 times per year on average (range 1-104). Patients experienced a bottleneck with respect to the general practitioner's knowledge of home parenteral nutrition-related matters. Home parenteral nutrition patients visit the nutrition support team and their general practitioner most frequently and much attention is paid to medical and physical problems. Psychosocial problems, however, were only discussed in a minority of patients, and this was experienced as a shortcoming. Relevance to clinical practice.  Both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial

  2. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. Methods The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and...

  3. Lack of ear care knowledge in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solheim J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jorunn Solheim,1 Olga Shiryaeva,1 Kari J Kvaerner2 1Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, 2C3 Centre for Connected Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Background: Rising life expectancy means an increase in the number of elderly people with hearing loss in the population. Many elderly people live in nursing homes, with varying care needs. A substantial proportion of these people will need help with their hearing aids and other hearing devices. Objective: The objective of the study has been to assess the knowledge, experience, skills, competence, and need for information of staff at nursing homes in relation to residents’ hearing loss and hearing aids. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-five employees at seven nursing homes participated in the study. The main approach was a descriptive study, using questionnaires. Results: The main findings are that 73% of informants found that many residents need help with their hearing aids. Only one-tenth report that they know enough about the residents’ hearing aids. Almost four out of five informants find that the residents become socially isolated as a result of hearing loss. Seventy-eight percent agree to some extent that more residents would benefit from hearing aids. Conclusion: Staff at nursing homes have insufficient knowledge about hearing loss and hearing aids. Increased focus on the elderly with hearing impairment in nursing homes is needed. Contact between nursing homes and audiological specialists should be improved to best follow-up hearing loss and hearing aids. Keywords: hearing aids, nursing staff, hearing impairment, institutionalized elderly

  4. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  5. Nursing home policies regarding advance care planning in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gendt, C.; Bilsen, J.; van der Stichele, R.; Deliens, L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to discover how many nursing homes (NHs) in Flanders (Belgium) have policies on advance care planning (ACP) and their content regarding different medical end-of-life decisions. Methods: A structured mail questionnaire was sent to the NH administrators of all 594

  6. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  7. The prevalence, incidence and risk factors for delirium in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, M.; Joling, K.J.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Nijpels, G.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate and compare the prevalence and incidence of delirium and its risk factors in residents of Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes. Methods Data were extracted from the Long-Term Care Facility (inter RAI-LTCF) version of the Resident Assessment Instrument, which was

  8. Ethics and quality care in nursing homes: Relatives' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Rita; Sellevold, Gerd Sylvi; Egede-Nissen, Veslemøy; Sørlie, Venke

    2017-01-01

    A total of 71,000 people in Norway suffer from some form of dementia in 2013, of whom approximately 30,000 are in nursing homes. Several studies focus on the experiences of those who have close relatives and who are staying in a nursing home. Results show that a greater focus on cooperation between nursing staff and relatives is a central prerequisite for an increased level of care. Benefits of developing systematic collaboration practices include relief for nursing staff, less stress, and greater mutual understanding. Going through studies focusing on the experiences of nursing home patients' relatives, negative experiences are in the majority. In this study, relatives are invited to share positive experiences regarding the care of their loved ones; a slightly different perspective, in other words. The aim of the study is to investigate relatives of persons with dementia's experiences with quality care in nursing homes. The study is a part of a larger project called Hospice values in the care for persons with dementia and is based on a qualitative design where data are generated through narrative interviews. The chosen method of analysis is the phenomenological-hermeneutical method for the study of lived experiences. Participants and research context: Participants in the project were eight relatives of persons with dementia who were living in nursing homes, long-term residences. The sampling was targeted, enrolment happened through collective invitation. All relatives interested were included. Ethical considerations: The Norwegian Regional Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services approve the study. Findings show that relatives have certain expectations as to how their loved ones ought to be met and looked after at the nursing home. The results show that in those cases where the expectations were met, the relatives' experiences were associated with engagement, inclusion and a good atmosphere. When the expectations were not met, the relatives

  9. Nurses' experiences of caring encounters with older people living in Swedish nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, Lars; Danielson, Ella

    2006-03-01

    Aim.  The aim of the study was to describe and interpret the meaning of nurses' experiences of caring encounters with residents in nursing homes. Background.  Life for residents in nursing homes can be characterized as a process of decreased physical and psychological resources. Therefore, encounters with nurses are important activities for providing meaning and security for the residents. Research in this field has previously focused on communication, attitudes and job satisfaction, but gives limited knowledge about what the human encounters in this context mean for the nurses. Method.  A hermeneutic method was used in this study. Interviews were conducted with 14 nurses from two nursing homes about their experiences of caring encounters. The transcribed interview texts were interpreted as a whole. Results.  In the interpretation of the text concerning the meaning of nurses' experiences of encounters with resident's four themes and 11 subthemes emerged. The comprehensive interpretation mainly showed possible ways available being present, being significant and being aware of opportunities for the nurse to find meaning in the encounter with the resident, but impossible ways as being inadequately were also revealed. Conclusion.  This study shows the importance of caring encounters between nurses and residents in nursing homes. The good encounters provide various possible ways for nurses to find meaning and a sense of communion with residents. However, bad encounters, described as being inadequate, were found to inhibit nurses from finding meaning in their encounters with residents. Relevance to clinical practice.  Meeting the needs of older people in nursing homes requires special knowledge about the importance of the caring encounter. Therefore, nurses in this care context need supervision and continuous education in order to gain relevant knowledge about the meaning of caring encounters for themselves and residents.

  10. Setting a new standard of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, Kathleen; Lamont, Lori; Krishnan, Preetha

    2009-11-01

    The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority's introduction of a full-time nurse practitioner in a 116-bed non-profit nursing home provided an opportunity to explore a collaborative relationship between an NP acting as the primary care provider and a single physician serving as the consultant for complex care and after-hours care. The outcomes were measured in terms of resident and family satisfaction, quality of care indicators and cost effectiveness. Data were collected from pre-existing quality indicators, including a resident/family satisfaction survey, transfers to acute care, and medication use statistics. Unstructured interviews were also conducted with nursing staff and members of the interdisciplinary team. Dramatic improvements in medication use were observed, including a 17 per cent reduction in overall drug costs, a 55 per cent decrease in polypharmacy rates and a 63 per cent reduction in antipsychotic drug use. Transfers to emergency decreased by 20 per cent. Family satisfaction with the quality of health care provided to residents increased by 24 per cent. The collaborative practice of an NP with physician consultation is an effective way of delivering quality care to nursing home residents.

  11. The provision of diabetes care in nursing homes in Galway city and county: a survey of nursing homes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Lorna

    2014-03-01

    In addition to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, our population is growing older and living longer. This survey aimed to determine the care provided to residents with diabetes in Nursing Homes.\\r\

  12. [Nursing Home Care Index. Development and validation of a new instrument to evaluate care quality in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppitz, A; Dreizler, J; Hediger, H; Voss, J; Imhof, L

    2013-08-01

    There is currently no adequate tool in the literature for assessing the quality of care in nursing homes. Therefore, we developed and tested a new instrument the Nursing Home Care Index (NCI). Quality of care is defined in the literature by 8 dimensions. An instrument with 42 questions of 12 validated scales was implemented. The new instrument was tested on 320 staff members in 15 nursing homes. The data were examined with the help of factor analysis and Cronbach's α, which reduced the factors to 3 and the questions to 16. Finally the revised scale was tested in a further pilot study with 136 staff members. The revised scale consists of 16 items. Based on the factor analysis, a 3-factor structure, namely social relationships, personal well-being, and self-determination were identified. These 3 factors explained 51.2% of total variance. Overall Cronbach's α was 0.87. The α reliability for the subscales was 0.86 (self-determination), 71 personal well-being, and 0.78 social relationship, respectively. Based on the NCI score, quality of care can be categorized into 3 classes: good, adequate, and urgent need for action. The NCI has a double function. Nursing staff and management can now use the NCI to conduct internal quality assurance regarding their caring efforts. In the future, the NCI can become a useful tool for families and residents to compare the quality of care in different nursing homes.

  13. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Barbara-Beate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices

  14. Complexity of occupational exposures for home health-care workers: nurses vs. home health aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittle, Beverly; Agbonifo, Noma; Suarez, Rassull; Davis, Kermit G; Ballard, Tangela

    2016-11-01

    To identify occupational exposures for home health-care nurses and aides. Home health-care workers' occupational injury rates in the USA are higher than the national average, yet research on causative exposures and hazards is limited. Participants were interviewed about annual frequency of occupational exposures and hazards. Exposure and hazard means were compared between home health-care nurses and aides using a Wilcoxon two-sample test. A majority of the sample was over 40 years old and obese, potentially increasing injury risks. Home health-care nurses performed more clinical tasks, increasing exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Home health-care aides performed more physical tasks with risk for occupational musculoskeletal injuries. They also dispensed oral medications and anti-cancer medications, and were exposed to drug residue at a frequency comparable to home health-care nurses. Both groups were exposed to occupational second-hand smoke. Establishing employee safety-related policies, promoting healthy lifestyle among staff, and making engineered tools readily available to staff can assist in decreasing exposures and hazards. Implications for nursing management include implementation of health-promotion programmes, strategies to reduce exposure to second-hand smoke, ensuring access to and education on assistive and safety devices, and education for all staff on protection against drug residue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Integrating a palliative care approach into nursing care homes for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Brown, Sarah

    2017-10-02

    Societies throughout the world are ageing and the proportion of people over 85 years of age is increasingly rapidly. In many countries a significant number of frail older people live in nursing care homes and will develop palliative care needs as they approach the end of their lives. In the United Kingdom around one fifth of those who die each year do so in a care home. Many of these will be cared for by generalist nurses and doctors without specific skills and knowledge in end-of-life care. Following a one-year pilot of the introduction of a nursing home facilitator post to introduce the principles of a palliative care approach into three nursing care homes for older people, the number of residents dying in hospital reduced by 25%.

  16. The incidence of depression and its risk factors in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, M.; Joling, K.J.; Dussel, M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Frijters, D.H.M.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Nijpels, G.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is known that depression is highly prevalent in institutionalized older adults, little is known about its incidence and risk factors in nursing homes and residential care homes. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the incidence and associated risk factors for

  17. Regulation and mindful resident care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Plowman, Donde; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth

    2010-09-01

    Regulatory oversight is intended to improve the health outcomes of nursing home residents, yet evidence suggests that regulations can inhibit mindful staff behaviors that are associated with effective care. We explored the influence of regulations on mindful staff behavior as it relates to resident health outcomes, and offer a theoretical explanation of why regulations sometimes enhance mindfulness and other times inhibit it. We analyzed data from an in-depth, multiple-case study including field notes, interviews, and documents collected in eight nursing homes. We completed a conceptual/thematic description using the concept of mindfulness to reframe the observations. Shared facility mission strongly impacted staff perceptions of the purpose and utility of regulations. In facilities with a resident-centered culture, regulations increased mindful behavior, whereas in facilities with a cost-focused culture, regulations reduced mindful care practices. When managers emphasized the punitive aspects of regulation we observed a decrease in mindful practices in all facilities.

  18. Doctors? learning experiences in end-of-life care ? a focus group study from nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-01

    Background Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors? learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. Methods House offi...

  19. Long-term care for the elderly. The future of nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Vladeck, B C

    1989-01-01

    Continuing growth in the number of impaired elderly persons necessitates a continued reliance on nursing homes to care for at least those who are most impaired or most lacking in other supports, despite dissatisfaction over the quality of nursing home services and anxiety about the costs. Nursing home care now costs more than $30 billion annually, half of which comes from governmental sources. The Medicaid program, in particular, is central to all aspects of the nursing home industry. Private...

  20. Licensed practical nurse scope of practice and quality of nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine; Thorpe, Joshua M; McConnell, Eleanor S

    2013-01-01

    Although higher levels of registered nurse (RN) staffing in nursing homes are related to better care quality, licensed practical nurses (LPNs) provide most licensed-nursing care; prior research is mixed regarding how this influences quality. The nature of LPN practice, and RN direction of that practice, follows in part from state nurse practice acts (NPAs). Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the aims of this study were to describe regulatory differences in how LPNs contribute to nursing assessment, care planning, delegation and supervision, and RN practice in these domains and to explore how these regulatory differences relate to quality of care in nursing homes. The study design was a sequential explanatory mixed-methods design of NPAs and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid quality measures of long-stay nursing home residents. In the qualitative strand, 51 NPAs and related administrative code were analyzed to classify guidance on RN and LPN practice; then, the coded data were transformed to quantitative indicators of specificity regarding LPN and RN scope of practice. In the quantitative strand, state NPA data were linked to facility-level Centers for Medicare and Medicaid staffing and quality measures (N = 12,698 facilities) for cross-sectional, quantitative analyses. States varied considerably in how NPAs guided LPN and RN scope of practice. NPA differences were related to quality indicators of resident pain, catheter use, weight loss, and restraints, even when accounting for nursing home staff mix. Care quality was better in states where the NPA clearly described LPN scope, but only when there was also greater RN availability (p nursing practice regulations moves beyond traditional staffing measures to inform understanding of the effects of the RN-to-LPN staffing ratio on quality of care in nursing homes.

  1. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... projection of demand for nursing home and domiciliary care by veterans who at such time are 65 years of age... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans...

  2. Caring Relationships in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person’s genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses’ experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person’s position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology. PMID:23894261

  3. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  4. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses quality...

  5. Geriatric Palliative Care in Long-Term Care Settings with a Focus on Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joan G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Almost 1.7 million older Americans live in nursing homes, representing a large proportion of the frailest, most vulnerable elders needing long-term care. In the future, increasing numbers of older adults are expected to spend time and to die in nursing homes. Thus, understanding and addressing the palliative care needs of this population are critical. The goals of this paper are to describe briefly the current state of knowledge about palliative care needs, processes, and outcomes for nursing home residents; identify gaps in this knowledge; and propose priorities for future research in this area. PMID:23984636

  6. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care Contract...

  7. Indicators of the quality of nursing home residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Debra; Schnelle, John F

    2002-08-01

    To identify quality indicators (QIs) that can be used to measure nursing home (NH) residential care processes. Modified-delphi panel process to rate potential QIs that were identified through reported interviews with residents and families and through a review of the scientific literature. Meetings of panel of experts. A national panel of nine experts in NH care rated potential QIs. A content expert and a clinical oversight committee performed external reviews. Panelists' median validity and importance ratings for each QI choice. The panel considered 64 choices for QI content and rated 28 of these as valid and important for measuring residential care quality. These 28 choices translated into 18 QIs. The external review process resulted in the addition of one QI that was not considered by the NH panel. The 19 indicators address areas identified as important by residents and proxies. Ten of these QIs were rated feasible to implement with current resources in average community NHs, and nine were rated feasible only in better NHs. The panelists identified nine as being measured most reliably by direct observations of care. Experts identified 19 specific care processes as valid and important measures of the quality of NH residential care. Nine of these QIs may be measured best by direct observation of NH care, rather than by interviews or review of existing NH records. Almost half of the QIs were viewed as discriminating between better and average NHs. The panel deemed that only well-staffed nursing homes could consistently implement nine of the QIs.

  8. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-11-13

    Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of 'corporate culture' as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff's perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing homes in Norway with long-term care residents was included in the study. Data were collected by participant observation including informal conversation with the staff, and in-depth interviews with 15 residents using a narrative approach. The main findings were that organizational cultures could be seen as relatively stable corporate cultures described as 'personalities' with characteristics that were common for all nursing homes (conformity) and typical traits that were present in some nursing homes, but that they were also like no other nursing home (distinctiveness). Conformity ('Every nursing home is like all other nursing homes') meant that nursing home organizations formed their services according to a perception of what residents in general need and expect. Trait ('Every nursing home is like some other nursing homes') expressed typologies of nursing homes: residency, medical, safeguard or family orientation. The distinctness of each nursing home ('Every nursing home is like no other nursing home') was expressed in unique features of the nursing home; the characteristics of the nursing home involved certain patterns of structure, cultural assumptions and interactions that were unique in each nursing home. Nursing home residents experienced quality of care as 'The nursing home as my home' and 'Interpersonal care quality'. The resident group in the different types of nursing homes were unique, and the experience of quality of care seemed to depend on whether their unique needs and expectations

  9. Attractiveness of working in home care: an online focus group study among nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, K. de; Maurits, E.E.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2018-01-01

    Many western countries are experiencing a substantial shortage of home-care nurses due to the increasing numbers of care-dependent people living at home. In-depth knowledge is needed about what home-care nurses find attractive about their work in order to make recommendations for the recruitment and

  10. Attractiveness of working in home care: an online focus group study among nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, K. de; Maurits, E.E.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Many western countries are experiencing a substantial shortage of home-care nurses due to the increasing numbers of care-dependent people living at home. In-depth knowledge is needed about what home-care nurses find attractive about their work in order to make recommendations for the recruitment and

  11. The incidence of depression and its risk factors in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorsma, Marijke; Joling, Karlijn; Dussel, Martine; Ribbe, Miel; Frijters, Dinnus; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Nijpels, Giel; van Hout, Hein

    2012-11-01

    Although it is known that depression is highly prevalent in institutionalized older adults, little is known about its incidence and risk factors in nursing homes and residential care homes. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the incidence and associated risk factors for depression in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes. Data on depression were extracted from the Vrije Universiteit naturalistic cohort on routine care monitoring with the Minimum Data Set of the Resident Assessment Instrument. A total of 1,324 residents in six nursing homes and 1,723 residents in 23 residential care homes with an average follow-up of 1.2 years. Depression was defined as a clinical diagnosis according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria and the use of antidepressants. Residents with prevalent depression at baseline were excluded. The incidence rate was 13.6 per 100 person years in the nursing homes and 10.2 per 100 person years in the residential care homes. The independent risk factors for in-home depression for residents in nursing homes included dementia (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.02-2.95) and a score of 3 or more on the Depression Rating Scale (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-3.70). A protective effect was seen on the use of a hearing aid (OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.12-0.80). In the residential care homes, being male (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.27-3.30), having cancer (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.64-4.95), and a score of 2 or higher on the Cognitive Performance Scale (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.05-2.22) increased the risk to develop depression. Age greater than 85 years (OR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.31-0.67) and hearing impairment (OR: 0.8; 95% CI: 0.60-1.00) appeared to be protective. The incidence rate for depression in residents of Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes was high and the associated risk factors found may have important implications for staff. 2012 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

  12. Rheumatologic care of nursing home residents with rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the year before and after nursing home admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Ramos, Andres; Albrecht, Katinka; Zink, Angela; Hoffmann, Falk

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate health care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after admission to nursing homes. Data of a German health insurance fund from persons with diagnostic codes of RA, aged ≥65 years, admitted to a nursing home between 2010 and 2014 and continuously insured 1 year before and after admission were used. The proportion of patients with ≥1 rheumatologist visit and ≥1 prescription of biologic or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs or csDMARDs), glucocorticoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the year before and after admission were calculated. Predictors of rheumatologic care after admission were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. Of 75,697 nursing home residents, 2485 (3.3%) had RA (90.5% female, mean age 83.8). Treatment by rheumatologists and prescription of antirheumatic drugs decreased significantly in the year after admission (rheumatologic visits: 17.6 to 9.1%, bDMARDs: 2.1 to 1.5%, csDMARDs: 22.5 to 16.5%, glucocorticoids: 46.5 to 43.1%, NSAIDs: 47.4 to 38.5%). 60.2% of patients in rheumatologic care received csDMARDs compared with 14.5% without rheumatologic care. Rheumatologic care before admission to a nursing home strongly predicted rheumatologic care thereafter (OR 33.8, 95%-CI 23.2-49.2). Younger age and lower care level (reflecting need of help) were also associated with a higher chance of rheumatologic care. Rheumatologic care is already infrequent in old patients with RA and further decreases after admission to a nursing home. Patients without rheumatologic care are at high risk of insufficient treatment for their RA. Admission to a nursing home further increases this risk.

  13. Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Lillestø, Britt

    2017-01-01

    Background: Physical impairment and dependency on others may be a threat to dignity. Research questions: The purpose of this study was to explore dignity as a core concept in caring, and how healthcare personnel focus on and foster dignity in nursing home residents. Research design: This study has...... a hermeneutic design. Participants and research context: In all, 40 healthcare personnel from six nursing homes in Scandinavia participated in focus group interviews in this study. Ethical considerations: This study has been evaluated and approved by the Regional Ethical Committees and the Social Science Data...... personnel, maintaining human dignity requires slow caring in nursing homes, as an essential approach....

  14. Medical Foster Homes: Can the Adult Foster Care Model Substitute for Nursing Home Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    To compare characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of care of veterans in the rapidly expanding Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical foster home (MFH) with those of three other VHA long-term care (LTC) programs. Descriptive, unmatched study. VHA MFHs, home-based primary care (HBPC), community living centers (CLCs), and community nursing homes (CNHs). Veterans newly enrolled in one of the four LTC settings in calendar years 2010 or 2011. Using VA and Medicare data from fiscal years 2010 and 2011, demographic characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of 388 veterans in MFHs were compared with 26,037 of those in HBPC, 5,355 in CLCs, and 5,517 in CNHs in the year before and the year after enrollment. Veterans enrolled in the MFH program were more likely to be unmarried than those in other LTC programs and had higher levels of comorbidity and frailty than veterans receiving HBPC but had similar levels of comorbidity, frailty, and healthcare use as those in CLCs and CNHs. MFH veterans incurred lower costs than those in CNHs and CLCs. MFHs served a distinct subset of veterans with levels of comorbidity and frailty similar to those of veterans cared for in CLCs and CNHs at costs that were comparable to or lower than those of the VHA. Propensity-matched comparisons will be necessary to confirm these findings. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. 38 CFR 17.47 - Considerations applicable in determining eligibility for hospital, nursing home or domiciliary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in determining eligibility for hospital, nursing home or domiciliary care. 17.47 Section 17.47... Nursing Home Care § 17.47 Considerations applicable in determining eligibility for hospital, nursing home... hospital or nursing home care under § 17.47(a), a veteran will be determined unable to defray the expenses...

  16. Nursing home care trajectories for older adults following in-hospital palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joan G; Berry, Patricia H; Ersek, Mary

    2017-04-27

    Palliative care consultation (PCC) during hospitalization is increasingly common for older adults with life-limiting illness discharged to nursing homes. The objective of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the care trajectories and experiences of older adults admitted to a nursing home following a PCC during hospitalization. Twelve English-speaking adults, mean age 80 years, who received a hospital PCC and discharge to a nursing home without hospice. Data were collected from medical records at five time points from hospital discharge to 100 days after nursing home admission and care trajectories were mapped. Interviews (n = 15) with participants and surrogates were combined with each participant's medical record data. Content analysis was employed on the combined dataset. All PCC referrals were for goals of care conversations during which the PCC team discussed poor prognosis. All participants were admitted to a nursing home under the Medicare skilled nursing facility benefit. Seven were rehospitalized; six of the 12 died within 6 weeks of initial nursing home admission. The two care trajectories were Focus on Rehabilitative Care and Comfort Care Continuity. There was a heavy emphasis on recovering functional status through rehabilitation and skilled nursing care, despite considerable symptom burden and poor prognosis. Regardless of PCC with recommendations for palliative interventions, frail older adults with limited life expectancy and their family caregivers often perceive that rehabilitation will improve physical function. This perception may contribute to inappropriate, ineffective care. More emphasis is needed to coordinate care between PCC recommendations and post-acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  18. Attractiveness of working in home care: An online focus group study among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Kim; Maurits, Erica E M; Francke, Anneke L

    2018-01-01

    Many western countries are experiencing a substantial shortage of home-care nurses due to the increasing numbers of care-dependent people living at home. In-depth knowledge is needed about what home-care nurses find attractive about their work in order to make recommendations for the recruitment and retention of home-care nursing staff. The aims of this explorative, qualitative study were to gain in-depth knowledge about which aspects home-care nurses find attractive about their work and to explore whether these aspects vary for home-care nurses with different levels of education. Discussions were conducted with six online focus groups in 2016 with a total of 38 Dutch home-care nurses. The transcripts were analysed using the principles of thematic analysis. The findings showed that home-care nurses find it attractive that they are a "linchpin", in the sense of being the leading professional and with the patient as the centre of care. Home-care nurses also find having autonomy attractive: autonomy over decision-making about care, freedom in work scheduling and working in a self-directed team. Variety in patient situations and activities also makes their work attractive. Home-care nurses with a bachelor's degree did not differ much in what they found attractive aspects from those with an associate degree (a nursing qualification after completing senior secondary vocational education). It is concluded that autonomy, variety and being a "linchpin" are the attractive aspects of working in home care. To help recruit and retain home-care nursing staff, these attractive aspects should be emphasised in nursing education and practice, in recruitment programmes and in publicity material. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. End-of-life care in U.S. nursing homes: nursing homes with special programs and trained staff for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Han, Beth

    2008-07-01

    The degree to which nursing homes have internal programs for hospice and palliative care is unknown. We used self-reported data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) to estimate the prevalence of special programs and (specially) trained staff (SPTS) for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care in U.S. nursing homes. Factors associated with the presence of SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care were identified. We merged 2004 NNHS data for 1174 nursing homes to county-level data from the 2004 Area Resource File and to Nursing Home 2004 Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data. chi(2) tests and logistic regression models were applied. Twenty-seven percent of U.S. nursing homes reported (internal) SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care. After controlling for covariates, we found nonprofit status, being in the southern region of the United States, having an administrator certified by the American College of Health Care Administrators, contracting with an outside hospice provider, and having other specialty programs to be associated with a greater likelihood of nursing homes having SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care. The largest effects were observed for nursing homes with programs for behavioral problems (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.40, 5.37) and for pain management (AOR 5.92; 95% CI 4.09, 8.57). The presence of internal SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care is prevalent in U.S. nursing homes, and may be preceded by hospice contracting and/or the implementation of specialty programs that assist nursing homes in developing the expertise needed to establish their own palliative care programs.

  20. Advance Directives and Care Received by Older Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manu, Erika R; Mody, Lona; McNamara, Sara E; Vitale, Caroline A

    2017-03-01

    Research shows variable success as to whether care provided aligns with individual patient preferences as reflected in their advance directives (AD). We aimed to study AD status and subsequent care received in older nursing home (NH) residents deemed at risk for infections and care transitions: those with a urinary catheter (UC), feeding tube (FT), or both. Design/participants/measurements: A subgroup analysis of a prospective cohort of 90 residents with a UC and/or FT from 15 NHs in southeast Michigan. Outcomes assessed at enrollment and at 30-day intervals were hospitalizations and antibiotic use. The ADs were divided as follows: (1) comfort oriented: comfort measures only, no hospital transfer; (2) palliative oriented: comfort focused, allowing hospital transfer (except intensive care unit), antibiotic use, but no cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (3) usual care: full code, no limitations to care. We calculated incidences for these outcomes. Seventy-eight (87%) residents had ADs: 18 (23%) comfort oriented, 32 (41%) palliative oriented, and 28 (36%) usual care. The groups did not differ regarding demographics, comorbidity, function, device presence, or time in study. Using the usual care group as comparison, the comfort-oriented group was hospitalized at a similar rate (Incidence rate [IR] = 15.6/1000 follow-up days vs IR = 8.8/1000 follow-up days, Incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.6 [95% confidence interval, CI, 0.3 -1.1], P value .09) but received fewer antibiotics (IR = 18.9/1000 follow-up days vs IR = 7.5/1000 follow-up days, IRR 0.4 [95% CI, 0.2-0.8], P value .005). Nursing home residents with comfort-oriented ADs were hospitalized at a rate similar to those with usual-care ADs but received fewer antibiotics, although the small sample size of this analysis suggests these findings deserve further study.

  1. Nurse Staffing and Quality of Care of Nursing Home Residents in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Juh Hyun; Hyun, Ta Kyung

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between nurse staffing and quality of care in nursing homes in Korea. This study used a cross-sectional design to describe the relationship between nurse staffing and 15 quality-of-care outcomes. Independent variables were hours per resident day (HPRD), skill mix, and turnover of each nursing staff, developed with the definitions of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the American Health Care Association. Dependent variables were prevalence of residents who experienced more than one fall in the recent 3 months, aggressive behaviors, depression, cognitive decline, pressure sores, incontinence, prescribed antibiotics because of urinary tract infection, weight loss, dehydration, tube feeding, bed rest, increased activities of daily living, decreased range of motion, use of antidepressants, and use of restraints. Outcome variables were quality indicators from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid and 2013 nursing home evaluation manual by the Korean National Health Insurance Service. The effects of registered nurse (RN) HPRD was supported in fall prevention, decreased tube feeding, decreased numbers of residents with deteriorated range of motion, and decreased aggressive behavior. Higher turnover of RNs related to more residents with dehydration, bed rest, and use of antipsychotic medication. Study results supported RNs' unique contribution to resident outcomes in comparison to alternative nurse staffing in fall prevention, decreased use of tube feeding, better range of motion for residents, and decreased aggressive behaviors in nursing homes in Korea. More research is required to confirm the effects of nurse staffing on residents' outcomes in Korea. We found consistency in the effects of RN staffing on resident outcomes acceptable. By assessing nurse staffing levels and compositions of nursing staffs, this study contributes to more effective long-term care insurance by reflecting on appropriate policies, and ultimately

  2. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    ) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus......Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). Methods An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters...... was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by...

  3. End of life care in nursing homes: Palliative drug prescribing and doctors' existential vulnerability

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Nursing homes are the main arena for end-of-life (EOL) care in Norway. Patients, their informal caregivers and academics alike have called for doctors more involved in EOL care, but the nursing home doctor’s role has been given relatively little attention in research. This thesis explores the doctor’s work with EOL care in nursing homes from the perspectives of EOL prescription changes (paper I); the effectiveness and safety of palliative prescriptions (paper II); and from...

  4. Peculiarities in Dementia Treatment and Care in the Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Carlos Roca Socarrás

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a long and debilitating illness characterized by gradual loss of autonomy and abilities, reaching a point of marked cognitive impairment and dependence. In different stages of its progression, a considerable number of elderlies with dementia are admitted in Nursing Homes. The objective of this article is to highlight some elements in relation to the epidemiology, institutionalization predictors, diagnostic, comorbidity and specific aspects of the care and treatment that allow personalizing its management in these residences. Thus, knowledge levels on this disease will be increased and the treatment and life quality of aged population with dementia will be improved.

  5. Does hospice have a role in nursing home care at the end of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, D J; Hirschman, K B; Henry, M R

    2001-11-01

    To assess the possible benefits and challenges of hospice involvement in nursing home care by comparing the survival and needs for palliative care of hospice patients in long-term care facilities with those living in the community. Retrospective review of computerized clinical care records. A metropolitan nonprofit hospice. The records of 1,692 patients were searched, and 1,142 patients age 65 and older were identified. Of these, 167 lived in nursing homes and 975 lived in the community. Patient characteristics, needs for palliative care, and survival. At the time of enrollment, nursing home residents were more likely to have a Do Not Resuscitate order (90% vs 73%; P home residents also had different admitting diagnoses, most notably a lower prevalence of cancer (44% vs 74%; P home residents, including constipation (1% vs 5%; P = .02), pain (25% vs 41%; P home residents had fewer needs for care (median 0, range 0-3 vs median 1, range 0-5; rank sum test P home residents had a significantly shorter survival (median 11 vs 19 days; log rank test of survivor functions P home residents who are referred to hospice, although nursing home residents may have fewer identifiable needs for care than do community-dwelling older people. However, the finding that nursing home residents' survival is shorter may be of concern to hospices that are considering partnerships with nursing homes. An increased emphasis on hospice care in nursing homes should be accompanied by targeted educational efforts to encourage early referral.

  6. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Correlates of Capacity and Possession of Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca S.; DeLaine, Shermetra R.; Chaplin, William F.; Marson, Daniel C.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Burgio, Louis D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The identification of nursing home residents who can continue to participate in advance care planning about end-of-life care is a critical clinical and bioethical issue. This study uses high quality observational research to identify correlates of advance care planning in nursing homes, including objective measurement of capacity. Design…

  7. Rethinking Teaching Nursing Homes: Potential for Improving Long-Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Mathy D.; Mitty, Ethel L.; Burger, Sarah Green

    2008-01-01

    To meet the special needs of and provide quality health care to nursing home residents, the health care workforce must be knowledgeable about the aging process. Health professionals are minimally prepared in their academic programs to care for older adults, and few programs have required rotations in geriatrics. Teaching nursing homes (TNHs) have…

  8. Making Difficult Decisions: The Role of Quality of Care in Choosing a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Charles E.; Temkin-Greener, Helena; Spector, William D.; Veazie, Peter; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated how quality of care affects choosing a nursing home. Methods. We examined nursing home choice in California, Ohio, New York, and Texas in 2001, a period before the federal Nursing Home Compare report card was published. Thus, consumers were less able to observe clinical quality or clinical quality was masked. We modeled nursing home choice by estimating a conditional multinomial logit model. Results. In all states, consumers were more likely to choose nursing homes of high hotel services quality but not clinical care quality. Nursing home choice was also significantly associated with shorter distance from prior residence, not-for-profit status, and larger facility size. Conclusions. In the absence of quality report cards, consumers choose a nursing home on the basis of the quality dimensions that are easy for them to observe, evaluate, and apply to their situation. Future research should focus on identifying the quality information that offers the most value added to consumers. PMID:23488519

  9. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to time. At least one-third of nursing home residents have problematic behaviors. These behaviors may include verbal and physical abuse, ... accessible are they? How close is the nursing home to family members? How close is it to the ... is the food like? How much do basic services cost? What ...

  10. Evaluating the impact of palliative or hospice care provided in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Nina M; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Palliative and hospice care are increasingly being provided in nursing home settings. The current article reviews the existing evidence relevant to nursing homes to provide practitioners with a greater understanding of the impact of palliative and hospice care on clinical care outcomes (e.g., pain, symptom management), processes of care outcomes (e.g., hospitalizations, cost of care), and family member or health care proxy perceptions of care. Overall, the provision of hospice or palliative care in nursing facilities can improve the clinical care residents receive, reduce hospitalizations, and improve family members' perception of care. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Evaluation of an advance care planning education programme for nursing homes: A Longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kirsten; Hodgson, Aruna; Walshe, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the success of a programme of Advance Care Planning education for nursing homes by examining the effect on staff knowledge, Advance Care Planning practice within the home and end-of-life hospital admission rates. Three longitudinal questionnaires assessing staff knowledge, Advance Care Planning Practice and hospital deaths completed before and after the initiation of the Advance Care Planning education programme by homes that had completed the training and those yet to undergo the training. Superior Advance Care Planning knowledge was evident in those staff that had completed the training. There was an increase of 85% in the number of Advance Care Plans completed in the training homes and an overall reduction in hospital deaths of 25% for residents from training homes. A programme of Advance Care Planning education for nursing homes is successful in improving nursing home staff knowledge, increasing Advance Care Planning practice and reducing hospital deaths. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Work-related factors influencing home care nurse intent to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann E; Patterson, Erin; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; Cranley, Lisa

    Health care is shifting out of hospitals into community settings. In Ontario, Canada, home care organizations continue to experience challenges recruiting and retaining nurses. However, factors influencing home care nurse retention that can be modified remain largely unexplored. Several groups of factors have been identified as influencing home care nurse intent to remain employed including job characteristics, work structures, relationships and communication, work environment, responses to work, and conditions of employment. The aim of this study was to test and refine a model that identifies which factors are related to home care nurse intentions to remain employed for the next 5 years with their current home care employer organization. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented to test and refine a hypothesized model of home care nurse intent to remain employed. Logistic regression was used to determine which factors influence home care nurse intent to remain employed. Home care nurse intent to remain employed for the next 5 years was associated with increasing age, higher nurse-evaluated quality of care, having greater variety of patients, experiencing greater meaningfulness of work, having greater income stability, having greater continuity of client care, experiencing more positive relationships with supervisors, experiencing higher work-life balance, and being more satisfied with salary and benefits. Home care organizations can promote home care nurse intent to remain employed by (a) ensuring nurses have adequate training and resources to provide quality client care, (b) improving employment conditions to increase income stability and satisfaction with pay and benefits, (c) ensuring manageable workloads to facilitate improved work-life balance, and (d) ensuring leaders are accessible and competent.

  13. Pathway to better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, Olga F; Kang, Youjeong; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-06-02

    Unlike the Magnet Recognition Program, the newer Pathway to Excellence Program designed to improve work environments in a broader range of organizations has not yet been the focus of substantial research. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of Pathway to Excellence Program Standards with better patient care quality and workforce outcomes in home care. Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses yielded informants from 871 home care agencies in the United States. Variables representing each of the 12 Pathway Standards were entered into logistic regression models to determine associations with better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. All Pathway Standards are strongly and significantly associated with better patient care and better workforce outcomes. Home care agencies with better-rated professional work environments consistently had better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. This study validates the Pathway to Excellence Standards as important to patient care quality and nursing workforce outcomes in home care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Raising awareness among freelance nurses of infection prevention in home health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Fabienne; Touati, Samia

    2013-02-01

    An alternative to conventional hospitalisation, home health care involves technical procedures which can carry a high risk of infection. In the home, infection prevention is a central element of safety of care. A home health care structure in the Lille region is working to raise awareness among freelance nursing partners and encourage them to follow a quality improvement approach.

  15. [Palliative care in nursing homes : Results of a survey about knowledge and self-efficacy of nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, O; Janig, H; Pinter, G; Cernic, K; Likar, R

    2017-08-01

    Nursing homes are confronted more and more with palliative care patients, which present a challenge for nursing and medical personnel. Deficits in the palliative care of geriatric patients have been repeatedly demonstrated and many nursing home residents, especially those suffering from dementia, are undersupplied regarding pain management. The present study was carried out to measure the knowledge and self-efficacy of nursing staff in the province of Carinthia (Austria) regarding palliative care of nursing home residents. A total of 330 nursing personnel were surveyed using the Bonn test for knowledge in palliative care (BPW), which measures knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing home personnel. In addition to descriptive analyses, the effects of the professional group (registered nurses vs. nursing assistants) and working experience were tested. On average a little more than half of the knowledge items were answered correctly. Nurses' self-efficacy was high. Registered nurses exhibited more knowledge and higher self-efficacy compared to nursing assistants. Effects of working experience could only be demonstrated regarding self-efficacy. The results are to a large extent in line with results from Germany and indicate the necessity of interventions for improving nurses' knowledge as a major basis for adequate palliative care in nursing home residents.

  16. Palliative Care in New York State Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Paula E; Kawai, Fernando; Rodrigues, Lucan; Lolis, James; Martins-Welch, Diana; Shalshin, Alexander; Fazzari, Melissa J; Pan, Cynthia X

    2017-01-01

    To describe the current landscape of palliative care (PC) in nursing homes (NHs) in New York State (NYS). A statewide survey was completed by 149 respondents who named 61 different NHs as their workplace. Questions were related to presence, type, and composition of PC programs; perceptions of PC; barriers to implementing PC; and qualifying medical conditions. Hospice is less available than palliative or comfort care programs, with three-fourths of NYS NH responded providing a PC program. In general, medical directors and physicians were more similar in perspective about the role/impact of PC compared to nursing and others. There was general agreement about the positive impact and role of PC in the NH. Funding and staffing were recognized as barriers to implementing PC. There is growing penetration of PC programs in NH facilities in NYS, with good perception of the appropriate utilization of PC programs. Financial reimbursement and staffing are barriers to providing PC in the NH and need to be addressed by the health-care system.

  17. Creating a Child Care Center in a Nursing Home and Implementing an Intergenerational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Karen B.

    The success of the Champaign County Nursing Home Child Care Center (CCNHCCC) in Illinois provides a model for the establishment of child care centers in nursing homes. Needs assessment, financial support, licensing, staff hiring and training are all important factors that need to addressed in the start up and running of such a program. The…

  18. Ethical issues in palliative care for nursing homes: Development and testing of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preshaw, Deborah Hl; McLaughlin, Dorry; Brazil, Kevin

    2017-10-20

    To develop and psychometrically assess a survey instrument identifying ethical issues during palliative care provision in nursing homes. Registered nurses and healthcare assistants have reported ethical issues in everyday palliative care provision. Identifying these issues provides evidence to inform practice development to support healthcare workers. Cross-sectional survey of Registered nurses and healthcare assistants in nursing homes in one region of the UK. A survey instrument, "Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes", was developed through the findings of qualitative interviews with Registered nurses and healthcare assistants in nursing homes and a literature review. It was reviewed by an expert panel and piloted prior to implementation in a survey in 2015 with a convenience sample of 596 Registered nurses and healthcare assistants. Descriptive and exploratory factor analyses were used to assess the underlying structure of the Frequency and Distress Scales within the instrument. Analysis of 201 responses (response rate = 33.7%) revealed four factors for the Frequency Scale and five factors for the Distress Scale that comprise the Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes. Factors common to both scales included "Processes of care," "Resident autonomy" and "Burdensome treatment." Additionally, the Frequency Scale included "Competency," and the Distress Scale included "Quality of care" and "Communication." The Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes instrument has added to the palliative care knowledge base by considering the ethical issues experienced specifically by Registered nurses and healthcare assistants within the nursing home. This research offers preliminary evidence of the psychometric properties of the Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes survey instrument. The two largest factors highlight the need to address the organisational aspects of caring and provide training in negotiating conflicting

  19. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  20. Nutritional Care in a Nursing Home in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Lorenzo Maria; Neri, Barbara; De Chiara, Stefania; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition is a clinical condition due to the imbalance among needs, intake and use of nutrients, leading to the increase of morbidity and mortality, and to the impairment of quality of life. Even in industrialized countries undernutrition is becoming an alarming phenomenon, especially involving elderly institutionalized subjects. A multicentric study called PIMAI (Project Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy), was carried out in Italy over 2005. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitals and in nursing care homes (NH), to assess the level of nutritional attention and to measure the perceived quality in food and nutritional care. This paper represents a preliminary analysis of data collected in a NH included in the PIMAI project. Materials and methods A total of 100 subjects (29 males and 71 females, aged 80.2±10 years), were recruited from January to June 2005 at the Clinical Rehabilitation Institute “Villa delle Querce” in Nemi (Rome), among patients in the NH facility. All the participants underwent a multidimensional geriatric evaluation (considering nutritional, clinical, functional and cognitive parameters), and a survey on “perceived quality” of nutritional care. Results and discussion According to nutritional status defined by the Mini Nutritional Assessment®, data analysis showed a high prevalence of malnutrition (36%) especially related to advanced age, chewing, cognitive and functional impairments. Patients seemed to consider nutrition to be important for their health; on the other hand, they were not thoroughly satisfied with the quality of food. Particularly, it was observed scarce attention to nutritional status from medical and nursing staff. Conclusions Our study confirms the need to pay greater attention to nutritional status in elderly institutionalized subjects. Medical and nursing teams need to be aware of the importance to perform an evaluation of nutritional status in these subset

  1. Nutritional care in a nursing home in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Maria Donini

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malnutrition is a clinical condition due to the imbalance among needs, intake and use of nutrients, leading to the increase of morbidity and mortality, and to the impairment of quality of life. Even in industrialized countries undernutrition is becoming an alarming phenomenon, especially involving elderly institutionalized subjects. A multicentric study called PIMAI (Project Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy, was carried out in Italy over 2005. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitals and in nursing care homes (NH, to assess the level of nutritional attention and to measure the perceived quality in food and nutritional care. This paper represents a preliminary analysis of data collected in a NH included in the PIMAI project. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 100 subjects (29 males and 71 females, aged 80.2±10 years, were recruited from January to June 2005 at the Clinical Rehabilitation Institute "Villa delle Querce" in Nemi (Rome, among patients in the NH facility. All the participants underwent a multidimensional geriatric evaluation (considering nutritional, clinical, functional and cognitive parameters, and a survey on "perceived quality" of nutritional care. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: According to nutritional status defined by the Mini Nutritional Assessment®, data analysis showed a high prevalence of malnutrition (36% especially related to advanced age, chewing, cognitive and functional impairments. Patients seemed to consider nutrition to be important for their health; on the other hand, they were not thoroughly satisfied with the quality of food. Particularly, it was observed scarce attention to nutritional status from medical and nursing staff. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the need to pay greater attention to nutritional status in elderly institutionalized subjects. Medical and nursing teams need to be aware of the importance to perform an evaluation of nutritional status in

  2. Malpractice Litigation and Nursing Home Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Park, Jeongyoung; Ellis, Robert; Abbo, Elmer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the potential deterrent effect of nursing home litigation threat on nursing home quality. Data Sources/Study Setting. We use a panel dataset of litigation claims and Nursing Home Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1995 to 2005 in six states: Florida, Illinois, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Missouri, and Delaware, for a total of 2,245 facilities. Claims data are from Westlaw's Adverse Filings database, a proprietary legal database, on all malpractice, negligence, and personal injury/wrongful death claims filed against nursing facilities. Study Design. A lagged 2-year moving average of the county-level number of malpractice claims is used to represent the threat of litigation. We use facility fixed-effects models to examine the relationship between the threat of litigation and nursing home quality. Principal Findings. We find significant increases in registered nurse-to-total staffing ratios in response to rising malpractice threat, and a reduction in pressure sores among highly staffed facilities. However, the magnitude of the deterrence effect is small. Conclusions. Deterrence in response to the threat of malpractice litigation is unlikely to lead to widespread improvements in nursing home quality. This should be weighed against other benefits and costs of litigation to assess the net benefit of tort reform. PMID:23741985

  3. Strategies and Innovative Models for Delivering Palliative Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Melissa D. A.; Lim, Betty; Meier, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    The goals of palliative care address critical issues for individuals with complex and serious illness residing in nursing homes, including pain and symptom management, communication, preparation for death, decisions about treatment preferences, and caregiver support. Because of the uncertain prognosis associated with chronic nonmalignant diseases such as dementia, many nursing home residents are either not referred to hospice or have very short or very long hospice stays. The integration of palliative care into nursing homes offers a potential solution to the challenges relating to hospice eligibility, staffing, training, and obtaining adequate reimbursement for care that aligns with resident and surrogate’s preferences and needs. However, the delivery of palliative care in nursing homes is hindered by both regulatory and staffing barriers and, as a result, is rare. In this article, we draw on interviews with nursing home executives, practitioners, and researchers to describe the barriers to nursing home palliative care. We then describe 3 existing and successful models for providing nonhospice palliative care to nursing home residents and discuss their ongoing strengths and challenges. We conclude with specific policy proposals to expedite the integration of palliative care into the nursing home setting. PMID:21266284

  4. Strategies and innovative models for delivering palliative care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Melissa D A; Lim, Betty; Meier, Diane E

    2011-02-01

    The goals of palliative care address critical issues for individuals with complex and serious illness residing in nursing homes, including pain and symptom management, communication, preparation for death, decisions about treatment preferences, and caregiver support. Because of the uncertain prognosis associated with chronic nonmalignant diseases such as dementia, many nursing home residents are either not referred to hospice or have very short or very long hospice stays. The integration of palliative care into nursing homes offers a potential solution to the challenges relating to hospice eligibility, staffing, training, and obtaining adequate reimbursement for care that aligns with resident and surrogate's preferences and needs. However, the delivery of palliative care in nursing homes is hindered by both regulatory and staffing barriers and, as a result, is rare. In this article, we draw on interviews with nursing home executives, practitioners, and researchers to describe the barriers to nursing home palliative care. We then describe 3 existing and successful models for providing nonhospice palliative care to nursing home residents and discuss their ongoing strengths and challenges. We conclude with specific policy proposals to expedite the integration of palliative care into the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. The quality of nursing home care : do the opinions of family members change after implementation of emotion-oriented care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E; de Lange, J; Droes, RM; Ribbe, M; van Tilburg, W

    Objective. The present study focuses on opinions on the quality of nursing home care of family members of nursing home residents with dementia. Furthermore, we examined whether family members' appreciation of the care increased as a result of the implementation of emotion-oriented care. Design.

  7. Psychosexual needs and sexual behaviors of nursing care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Bożena; Kurpas, Donata; Gronowska, Małgorzata; Kotwas, Artur; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze psychosexual needs of nursing care home residents in Poland. The authors attempted to answer the question 'how do residents satisfy their psychosexual needs?' This survey-based study was performed with respect to the residents' right to privacy and intimacy. The residents were also informed that they could withdraw from the study at any stage. The history was taken from 85 subjects (60% women, 40% men). The mean age was 74.2±11.2. The most important psychosexual needs included: conversation, tenderness, emotional closeness (empathy, understanding), sexual contacts and physical closeness. As the most important elements of the relationship, respondents mentioned mutual respect and conviction that they can rely on their partners. Most respondents felt sexual tension occasionally, others once a week or less frequently. They relieved sexual tension through intimate contacts with their long-term partners, watching erotic films, masturbation, walking and diverting attention to other activities. Every fourth respondent was satisfied with his/her sexual life. The majority of seniors repeated stereotypes about sexuality of the elderly. Almost 71% claimed that sex in elderly people was taboo, 64% said that sex was for young people only, and 51% thought that sex was not important in life. Old age makes little difference to psychosexual needs. Most seniors need closeness manifesting as tenderness and conversations. Many old people are sexually active. Thus, it is worth considering whether people living in cohabitation should not have the possibility of staying together in nursing care home. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of care in Norwegian nursing homes - typology of family perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinsnes, Anne G; Nakrem, Sigrid; Harkless, Gene E; Seim, Arnfinn

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the understandings and beliefs about quality held by family members of residents of Norwegian nursing homes. The objective reported in the study considers how family member judge factors that enhance or hamper high care quality. The percentage of those who will require care in a nursing home some time before the end of their lives will increase dramatically in the next 20 years. Therefore, anticipating this pressure to expand nursing home availability, it is urgent that these services are developed from a keen understanding of what creates the best value. Care quality from the family's perspective is just one piece of the nursing home experience that must be understood for optimal value in care to be realised. Qualitative methodology. Three focus group interviews; purposive sampling was used to recruit the 16 family members of residents in nursing homes. Three domains emerged that served as anchors for a typology of family perceptions of the quality care continuum: resident contentment, suitability of staff and environmental context. Each domain was developed with categories describing high- to low-quality markers, which were then clarified by enhancing and hindering factors. This typology provides a family perspective framework that may be useful to nursing leadership at all levels of the nursing home organisation to identify important quality of care strengths as well as markers of poor care. Overall, the typology is offered to expand nurses' understanding of quality, both practically and conceptually, to provide the best value in nursing care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Nutrition and dementia care: developing an evidence-based model for nutritional care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane L; Holmes, Joanne; Brooks, Cindy

    2017-02-14

    There is a growing volume of research to offer improvements in nutritional care for people with dementia living in nursing homes. Whilst a number of interventions have been identified to support food and drink intake, there has been no systematic research to understand the factors for improving nutritional care from the perspectives of all those delivering care in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to develop a research informed model for understanding the complex nutritional problems associated with eating and drinking for people with dementia. We conducted nine focus groups and five semi-structured interviews with those involved or who have a level of responsibility for providing food and drink and nutritional care in nursing homes (nurses, care workers, catering assistants, dietitians, speech and language therapists) and family carers. The resulting conceptual model was developed by eliciting care-related processes, thus supporting credibility from the perspective of the end-users. The seven identified domain areas were person-centred nutritional care (the overarching theme); availability of food and drink; tools, resources and environment; relationship to others when eating and drinking; participation in activities; consistency of care and provision of information. This collaboratively developed, person-centred model can support the design of new education and training tools and be readily translated into existing programmes. Further research is needed to evaluate whether these evidence-informed approaches have been implemented successfully and adopted into practice and policy contexts and can demonstrate effectiveness for people living with dementia.

  10. The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care in nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. De; Baat, C. de; Meyer, L.; Putten, G.J. van der; Peeters, B.; Soderfelt, B.; Vanobbergen, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study explored barriers and enabling factors to the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: Oral health care in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium) is inadequate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Qualitative data were obtained from nurses employed

  11. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service. (a) In furnishing...

  12. Home health nursing care services in Greece during an economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakidou, T; Kalokerinou-Anagnostopoulou, A

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review was to describe public home healthcare nursing services in Greece. The effectiveness and the efficiency of home healthcare nursing are well documented in the international literature. In Greece, during the current financial crisis, the development of home healthcare nursing services is the focus and interest of policymakers and academics because of its contribution to the viability of the healthcare system. A review was conducted of the existing legislation, the printed and electronic bibliography related to the legal framework, the structures that provide home health care, the funding of the services, the human resources and the services provided. The review of the literature revealed the strengths and weaknesses of the existing system of home health care and its opportunities and threats, which are summarized in a SWOT analysis. There is no Greek nursing literature on this topic. The development of home health nursing care requires multidimensional concurrent and combined changes and adjustments that would support and strengthen healthcare professionals in their practices. Academic and nursing professionals should provide guidelines and regulations and develop special competencies for the best nursing practice in home health care. At present, in Greece, which is in an economic crisis and undergoing reforms in public administration, there is an undeniable effort being made to give primary health care the position it deserves within the health system. There is an urgent need at central and academic levels to develop home healthcare services to improve the quality and efficiency of the services provided. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  13. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  14. Specialty Palliative Care Consultations for Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Martin, Edward; Bull, Janet; Hanson, Laura C

    2017-07-01

    U.S. nursing home (NH) residents with dementia have limited access to specialty palliative care beyond Medicare hospice. The objective of this study was to examine the value of expanded palliative care access for NH residents with moderate-to-very severe dementia. We merged palliative care consultation data in 31 NHs in two states to Medicare data to identify residents with consultations, moderate-to-very severe dementia, and deaths in 2006-2010. Initial palliative consultations were identified as occurring later and earlier (1-30 days and 31-180 days before death, respectively). Three controls for each consultation recipient were selected using propensity score matching. Weighted multivariate analyses evaluated the effect of consultations on hospital or acute care use seven and 30 days before death and on (potentially) burdensome transitions (i.e., hospital or hospice admission three days before death or two plus acute care transitions 30 days before death). With earlier consultation (vs. no consultation), hospitalization rates in the seven days before death were on average 13.2 percentage points lower (95% confidence interval [CI] -21.8%, -4.7%) and with later consultation 5.9 percentage points lower (95% CI -13.7%, +4.9%). For earlier consultations (vs. no consultations), rates were 18.4 percentage points lower (95% CI -28.5%, -8.4%) for hospitalizations and 11.9 lower (95% CI -20.7%, -3.1%) for emergency room visits 30 days before death; they were 20.2 percentage points lower (95% CI -28.5%, -12.0%) for burdensome transitions. Consultations appear to reduce acute care use and (potentially) burdensome transitions for dying residents with dementia. Reductions were greater when consultations were earlier. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  16. The relation between quality of co-ordination of nursing care and quality of life in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Ribbe, M.W.; Campen, C. van; Ooms, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    Quality of life of nursing home residents is a critical consideration in international health care policies and health care decisions. Yet, there is little relevant research to support decisions about client-tailored and effective nursing care for this population. Because of the permanency of their

  17. Private equity investment and nursing home care: is it a big deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, David G; Grabowski, David C

    2008-01-01

    Private equity investors have recently targeted nursing home chains as investment opportunities. Media attention has raised quality-of-care concerns, but little has been published in the research literature on the topic. Using a multivariate framework, we assessed how private equity purchases of nursing homes affected a range of outcomes. Although some transactions are quite recent, we found little evidence to suggest that nursing home quality worsens significantly following purchase by private equity companies. Nonetheless, recent nursing home ownership trends raise important questions about oversight and accountability, whose answers extend beyond private equity ownership.

  18. Palliative Care Development in European Care Homes and Nursing Homes: Application of a Typology of Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Katherine; Payne, Sheila; Morbey, Hazel; Edwards, Michaela; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Gambassi, Giovanni; Pasman, H Roeline; Szczerbińska, Katarzyna; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-06-01

    The provision of institutional long-term care for older people varies across Europe reflecting different models of health care delivery. Care for dying residents requires integration of palliative care into current care work, but little is known internationally of the different ways in which palliative care is being implemented in the care home setting. To identify and classify, using a new typology, the variety of different strategic, operational, and organizational activities related to palliative care implementation in care homes across Europe. We undertook a mapping exercise in 29 European countries, using 2 methods of data collection: (1) a survey of country informants, and (2) a review of data from publically available secondary data sources and published research. Through a descriptive and thematic analysis of the survey data, we identified factors that contribute to the development and implementation of palliative care into care homes at different structural levels. From these data, a typology of palliative care implementation for the care home sector was developed and applied to the countries surveyed. We identified 3 levels of palliative care implementation in care homes: macro (national/regional policy, legislation, financial and regulatory drivers), meso (implementation activities, such as education, tools/frameworks, service models, and research), and micro (palliative care service delivery). This typology was applied to data collected from 29 European countries and demonstrates the diversity of palliative care implementation activity across Europe with respect to the scope, type of development, and means of provision. We found that macro and meso factors at 2 levels shape palliative care implementation and provision in care homes at the micro organizational level. Implementation at the meso and micro levels is supported by macro-level engagement, but can happen with limited macro strategic drivers. Ensuring the delivery of consistent and high

  19. Administration of care to older patients in transition from hospital to home care services: home nursing leaders' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale,1 Sigrun Hvalvik21Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, NorwayBackground: Older persons in transition between hospital and home care services are in a particularly vulnerable situation and risk unfortunate consequences caused by organizational inefficiency. The purpose of the study reported here was to elucidate how home nursing leaders experience the administration of care to older people in transition from hospital to their own homes.Methods: A qualitative study design was used. Ten home nursing leaders in two municipalities in southern Norway participated in individual interviews. The interview texts were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by use of a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.Results: Three main themes and seven subthemes were deduced from the data. The first main theme was that the home nursing leaders felt challenged by the organization of home care services. Two subthemes were identified related to this. The first was that the leaders lacked involvement in the transitional process, and the second was that they were challenged by administration of care being decided at another level in the municipality. The second main theme found was that the leaders felt that they were acting in a shifting and unsettled context. Related to this, they had to adjust internal resources to external demands and expectations, and experienced lack of communication with significant others. The third main theme identified was that the leaders endeavored to deliver care in accordance with professional values. The two related subthemes were, first, that they provided for appropriate internal systems and routines, and, second, that they prioritized available professional competence, and made an effort to promote a professional

  20. Psychometric Properties of a Korean Measure of Person-Directed Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Lee, Minhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the validity and reliability of a person-directed care (PDC) measure for nursing homes in Korea. Method: Managerial personnel from 223 nursing homes in 2010 and 239 in 2012 were surveyed. Results: Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis for the first sample generated a 33-item PDC measure with eight factors.…

  1. The caring behaviors of the home health nurse and influence on medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rhoda A

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the caring behaviors of the home health nurse toward the patient influence the patient's medication adherence. The study focused on what effects the verbal and nonverbal caring behaviors of the nurse toward the patient have on the patient's medication adherence. How is the patient's perception of caring by the nurse related to his or her medication adherence? The study was conducted in a Midwestern home health agency over a 4-week period. Findings indicated an improvement in the use of verbal and nonverbal caring behaviors by the nurses with their patients. The patients perceived an increased use of these caring behaviors by the nurses with them. The patients' medication adherence and barriers to adherence improved. Other significant findings indicated that the verbal and nonverbal caring behaviors of the nurses and the patients' perception of the caring behaviors influenced and improved the patients' medication adherence by week 4.

  2. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day...

  3. From hospital to home after cardiac surgery: evaluation of a community nursing care management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Diane; Aubin, Michele; Vezina, Lucie; Gagnon, Johanne; Racine, Sandra; Reinharz, Daniel; Paradis, Michele; Dallaire, Clemence; Aubin, Karine

    2009-01-01

    This quasi-experimental research aims to (1) evaluate the implementation process of a community nursing care management model and (2) assess the effects of this model on patients followed at home. Two community healthcare centers had introduced a community nursing care management model in their practice (experimental groups), whereas another health community care center with no experience with such a model served as a control group. The community nursing care management model included clinical pathways designed for a clientele who had been hospitalized for cardiac surgery. Even though the implementation process was challenging, the community nursing care management model was found useful enough to be integrated into routine nursing home care practice after cardiac surgery. Although the effects produced by this systematic home care program on the clientele did not differ significantly from those produced by usual nursing care, there was a positive effect for the clientele recorded on all measurement indicators used. The introduction of the nursing care management model enabled nurses to structure the care provided and reduced interindividual variation. The application of this program also proved to be an opportunity to initiate and assimilate new professional roles. Additional studies should be conducted to assess its effectiveness in home care for other health problems.

  4. Family members' expectations regarding nurses' competence in care homes: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljunen, Outi; Kankkunen, Päivi; Partanen, Pirjo; Välimäki, Tarja

    2017-11-22

    Structural and cultural changes in the care of older people have influenced nursing practice, creating a need to identify current competency requirements for nurses working in care homes. Family members have an important role in ensuring the well-being of older people living in care homes, and family members' can provide valuable information about competence requirements. To explore the expectations of the care home residents' family members regarding the competence of nurses in care homes for older people. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 care home residents' family members between March and September 2016. Participants were recruited with help from regional associations and member associations of The Central Association of Carers in Finland and from regional associations of The Alzheimer's Society of Finland. The snowball technique was also used. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Ethics committee approval was obtained from the university committee on research ethics, and written informed consent was obtained from participants. The care home residents' family members expected that nurses would be able to interact with and treat people respectfully. Reflective collaboration between the nurse and a family member was also emphasised. Family members expected nurses to provide high-quality basic care and nursing and support residents' well-being individually and holistically. Family members' expectations reflect the need for ethical and interactional competence in the care home. In addition, evidence-based practice competencies are required to provide high-quality care. Nurses' ability to provide person-centred, individual and holistic care is vital to ensure care home residents' well-being. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  5. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team: expectations and evaluations of GPs and district nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced...... by 91 %, mainly due to improvement in symptom management, 'security', and accessibility of specialists in palliative care. After one month, 57% of the participants reported to have learnt aspects of palliative care, primarily symptom control, and 89% of them found cooperation satisfactory...

  6. Mexican American elders' use of skilled home care nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Janice D

    2002-01-01

    Hispanic elders use skilled home care nursing (SHCN) services less often than Anglo elders. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence whether disabled Mexican American elders decide to use SHCN services. The research process included reviewing the historical context in one Mexican American community, interviewing key and primary informants, presenting a report to the community and getting feedback, and assessing whether the community perceived a need for increased use of SHCN services by their disabled elders. Seven barriers to the use of SHCN services were identified: expectations of discrimination, lack of knowledge about services, expectations embedded in familism, lack of sense of prevention, lack of health insurance, preference for traditional remedies, and neglect/abuse. A community advisory committee validated the barriers identified during interviews and the need for increased use of SHCN services. Results provide new insight into the sociopolitical and cultural complexities that influence health care utilization decisions by Mexican American elders and their families and uncover traditional, oversimplified beliefs and practices by mainstream professionals and policymakers. Interventions that decrease inequities in a southern Arizona community may be transferable to other vulnerable populations in the United States and globally.

  7. The impact of work culture on quality of care in nursing homes--a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Beate; Sjøvold, Endre; Rannestad, Toril; Ringdal, Gerd I

    2014-09-01

    The main aim of this review study was to identify which factors that characterise the relationship between work culture and quality of care in nursing homes. This review study was structured through systematic search methods to identify articles that describe the relationship between work culture and quality of care in nursing homes. The database search yielded 14510 hits. Closer examination showed that 10401 of these hits were duplicates. Of the remaining 4109 articles, only 10 were related to our aim for the study. A qualitative method were used to explain and understand phenomena of work culture and quality if care in nursing homes. Nine out of 10 articles in this review study emphasise the importance of leadership style and supportive management to increase quality of care in nursing homes. Increased empowerment, participation and influence were important factors for improving quality of care. Significant associations between work culture and quality of care and between empowerment and quality of care were reported. Nursing management and leaders must take in consideration that work culture is crucial for improving quality of care in nursing homes, and this study can be used to increase the focus on the work culture among healthcare personnel in nursing homes. Changes are necessary to increase healthcare personnel's job satisfaction, empowerment, autonomy and influence in nursing homes. Giving empowerment to the healthcare personnel working in nursing homes is both an organisational and an interpersonal issue. Being given empowerment and influence over their own work situation, the healthcare workers can be more committed and involved in the goal of obtaining best possible care to the residents. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  8. Residents' experiences of interpersonal factors in nursing home care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid; Vinsnes, Anne Guttormsen; Seim, Arnfinn

    2011-11-01

    With life expectancy lengthening, the number of those who will require care in a nursing home will increase dramatically in the next 20 years. Nursing home residents are frail older adults with complex needs, dependent on advanced nursing care. Long-term residents in nursing homes have long-term relationships with the nurses, which require a unique approach to the interpersonal aspects of nursing care. Understanding what is experienced as care quality, including quality of interpersonal processes, requires insight into the residents' perspectives for best value in care to be realized. Main objective was to describe the nursing home residents' experience with direct nursing care, related to the interpersonal aspects of quality of care. A descriptive, exploratory design was used. Four public municipal nursing homes in Norway with long-term residents were purposely selected for the study. Fifteen mentally lucid residents were included. The inclusion criteria were aged 65 and over, being a resident of the nursing home for one month or longer, and physical and mental capacity to participate in the interview. In-depth interviews with the residents were performed. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using meaning categorizing. The residents emphasized the importance of nurses acknowledging their individual needs, which included need for general and specialized care, health promotion and prevention of complications, and prioritizing the individuals. The challenging balance between self-determination and dependency, the altered role from homeowner to resident, and feelings of indignity and depreciation of social status were key issues in which the residents perceived that their integrity was at risk in the patient-nurse interaction and care. Psychosocial well-being was a major issue, and the residents expressed an important role of the nursing staff helping them to balance the need for social contact and to be alone, and preserving a social network. Quality nursing

  9. Intersectional perspectives on family involvement in nursing home care: rethinking relatives' position as a betweenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jessica; Emami, Azita; Eriksson, Lars E; Eriksson, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    This study seeks to understand, in the context of intersectional theory, the roles of family members in nursing home care. The unique social locus at which each person sits is the result of the intersection of gender, status, ethnicity and class; it is situational, shifting with the context of every encounter. A content analysis of 15 qualitative interviews with relatives of nursing home residents in Sweden was used to gain a perspective on the relationships between relatives and residents, relatives and the nursing home as an institution, and relatives and the nursing home staff. We sought to understand these relationships in terms of gendered notions of the family and the residents, which are handed down from generation to generation and thus condition who and how relatives should be involved in care, and the ways in which relationships change as care moves from home to nursing home. It requires knowledge and awareness that the nursing home culture is based on intersectional power structures in order for relatives to be involved in nursing home care in alternative and individual ways. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Caring About Residents' Experiences and Symptoms (CARES) Program: A Model of Palliative Care Consultation in the Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Deborah A; Galicia-Castillo, Marissa

    2017-06-01

    To describe the CARES program, a model of palliative care for nursing home residents. Descriptive analysis of the Caring About Residents' Experiences and Symptoms (CARES) Program that provides palliative care services to nursing home residents. The CARES Program serves as an example of collaborative efforts to meet community needs. To evaluate the program, we document the services provided as well as process outcomes (changes to care plans, hospitalizations, location of death, and hospice utilization) for residents referred. 170 nursing home residents were seen by CARES Program between February 2013 to December 2015, 48% for skilled services, and 52% for long term care. Majority of referrals were for goals of care and concurrent symptom management. Following consultation, 67% of residents had a change in code status. Of residents desiring a palliative course 90% were never hospitalized. Overall, 53% of residents died; and those in long term care dying more often with hospice. The CARES program of palliative consultation addresses the needs of nursing home residents. The model has potential to be reproducible in in other communities.

  11. The use of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) with cardiac patients receiving home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia Stocker; Slowik, Linda Haynes

    2009-01-01

    To identify Nursing Interventions Classification interventions (NICs) commonly provided to cardiac home care patients and to explore differences among patients with coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and patients with other cardiac disorders. The NICs provided to cardiac home care patients were recorded and analyzed to determine differences in frequencies across cardiac diagnoses. Frequent NICs provided in cardiac home care are similar across diagnoses, and include tissue perfusion management and patient education NICs. Variations can be detected and involve fluid monitoring/management, exercise promotion/teaching, and cardiac care NICs. Differences in nursing care among patients with similar medical diagnoses can be detected using NIC. Relevant knowledge of nursing care can be gleaned from analyzing NIC data generated in practice and can be used to plan, evaluate, and determine the effectiveness of nursing care.

  12. The economics of dementia-care mapping in nursing homes: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertje van de Ven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dementia-care mapping (DCM is a cyclic intervention aiming at reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms in people with dementia in nursing homes. Alongside an 18-month cluster-randomized controlled trial in which we studied the effectiveness of DCM on residents and staff outcomes, we investigated differences in costs of care between DCM and usual care in nursing homes. METHODS: Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training, a DCM organizational briefing day and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. A single DCM cycle consists of observation, feedback to the staff, and action plans for the residents. We measured costs related to health care consumption, falls and psychotropic drug use at the resident level and absenteeism at the staff level. Data were extracted from resident files and the nursing home records. Prizes were determined using the Dutch manual of health care cost and the cost prices delivered by a pharmacy and a nursing home. Total costs were evaluated by means of linear mixed-effect models for longitudinal data, with the unit as a random effect to correct for dependencies within units. RESULTS: 34 units from 11 nursing homes, including 318 residents and 376 nursing staff members participated in the cost analyses. Analyses showed no difference in total costs. However certain changes within costs could be noticed. The intervention group showed lower costs associated with outpatient hospital appointments over time (p = 0.05 than the control group. In both groups, the number of falls, costs associated with the elderly-care physician and nurse practitioner increased equally during the study (p<0.02. CONCLUSIONS: DCM is a cost-neutral intervention. It effectively reduces outpatient hospital appointments compared to usual care. Other considerations than costs, such as nursing homes' preferences, may determine whether they

  13. Relationship between care staff generativity and perceived job competence in elderly nursing homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Araki, Mariko

    2011-01-01

    .... The present study aimed to characterize the relationship between staff member generativity and perceived job competence in elderly nursing homes, and to determine the professional value of elderly care...

  14. End of life care in nursing homes: Translating focus group findings into action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bükki, Johannes; Neuhaus, Petra M; Paal, Piret

    Therapeutic options for nursing home residents focus on functional improvement, while inadequate hospital admissions in the dying phase are frequent. The aim of this study was to explore views, attitudes, and concerns among staff and to embark on a process that facilitates end-of-life care on an institutional level. Three focus group interviews were conducted with nursing home staff (nurses, care managers, physicians). The discussants (22) expressed the following issues: workload; ethical conflicts; additional resources; "living palliative care"; deleterious effect of restorative aims; lack of training; fear; knowledge and skills; rituals; lack of attachment, frustration, and abuse; team; discouragement; resilience enhanced by good care; style of communication; avoidance; the "palliative status"; legal concerns and hospital admissions. Nursing home staff expressed willingness to care for the dying. Providing good end of life care may promote professional resilience and personal integrity. Therefore, team issues, fears, and avoidance should be addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of nursing care services on self-efficacy perceptions and healthy lifestyle behaviors of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakçi, Hülya; Emiroğlu, Oya Nuran

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of tailored individualized nursing care services on the self-efficacy perceptions and healthy lifestyle behaviors of older adults living in a nursing home in Turkey. This outcomes evaluation research used a quasi-experimental study design in which outcomes evaluations were repeated within time intervals in a single group. The study sample included 30 older adults. Nursing diagnoses and interventions were identified using the Omaha System. The impact of implemented nursing care services was evaluated using the Self-Efficacy Scale and Healthy Life-Style Behaviours Scale II. A total of 3,024 nursing interventions were performed, and self-efficacy perceptions and healthy lifestyle behaviors of older nursing home residents were significantly increased in a positive manner (p healthy lifestyle behaviors of older adults and that nursing care services directed at health promotion of older adults should be maintained. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Care dependency in nursing home : a psychometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohrmann, C; Balzer, K; Dijkstra, Ate; Dassen, T

    The Dutch Care Dependency Scale, an instrument for the assessment of a patient's care dependency, has been translated into German. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the German version of the scale. The 15-item scale has been developed for the use in nursing

  17. The epidemiology of skin care provided by nurses at home: a multicentre prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Boronat, Xavier; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Lahmann, Nils; Suhr, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the frequencies and patterns of skin care and applied skin care products in the home care nursing setting in Germany. Skin care belongs to the core activities of nursing practice. Especially in aged and long-term care settings, clients are vulnerable to various skin conditions. Dry skin is one of the most prevalent problems. Using mild skin cleansers and the regular application of moisturizing leave-on products is recommended. Until today, there are no quantitative empirical data about nursing skin care practice at home in the community. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2012. Home care clients from the German home care nursing setting were randomly selected. Instructed nurse raters performed the data collection using standardized forms. Variables included demographics, skin care needs and skin caring activities. Approximately 60% of home care clients received skin care interventions. The majority were washed and two-thirds received a leave-on product once daily. There was large heterogeneity in cleansing and skin care product use. Most often the product labels were unknown or product types were selected haphazardly. Skin care interventions play a significant role in home care and nurses have a considerable responsibility for skin health. Skin care provided does not meet recent recommendations. The importance of targeted skin cleansing and care might be underestimated. There are a confusing variety of skin care products available and often the labels provide little information regarding the ingredients or guidance about how they affect skin health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Burnout in the nursing home health care aide: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Sarah L.; Carleton, Heather L.; Chamberlain, Stephanie A.; Cummings, Greta G; Bambrick, William; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the evidence on factors that influence burnout in health care aides working in nursing homes. Design: Systematic literature review. Data sources: Two search engines (Google and EBSCO Discovery Service) and five databases (MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Proquest Dissertations & Theses) through to August 2013. Keywords: nursing home, health care aide and burnout (all synonyms were included). Methods: Two authors independently assessed methodol...

  19. Community end-of-life care among Chinese older adults living in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Leung-Wing; So, Jason C; Wong, Lai-Chin; Luk, James K H; Chiu, Patrick K C; Chan, Cherry S Y; Kwan, Fiona S M; Chau, June; Hui, Elsie; Woo, Jean; McGhee, Sarah M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the preference and willingness-to-pay (WTP) of older Chinese adults for community end-of-life care in a nursing home rather than a hospital. A total of 1540 older Chinese adults from 140 nursing homes were interviewed. Four hypothetical questions were asked to explore their preferences for end-of-life care. Using a discrete choice approach, specific questions explored acceptable trade-offs between three attributes: availability of doctors onsite, attitude of the care staff and additional cost of care per month. Approximately 35% of respondents preferred end-of-life care in the nursing home, whereas 23% of them would consider it in a better nursing home. A good attitude of staff was the most important attribute of the care site. Respondents were willing to pay an extra cost of US$5 (HK$39) per month for more coverage of doctor's time, and US$49 (HK$379) for a better attitude of staff in the nursing home. The marginal WTP for both more coverage of doctor's time and better attitude of staff amounted to US$54 (HK$418). Respondents on government subsidy valued the cost attribute more highly, as expected, validating the hypothesis that those respondents would be less willing to pay an additional cost for end-of-life care. Older Chinese adults living in nursing homes are willing to pay an additional fee for community end-of-life care services in nursing homes. Both the availability of the doctor and attitudes of nursing home staff are important, with the most important attribute being the staff attitudes. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2013; 14: 273-284. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. FastStats: Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... Centers Hospice Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare ...

  1. Community Palliative Care Nurses' Challenges and Coping Strategies on Delivering Home-Based Pediatric Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, LeeAi; Abdullah, Adina

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experience of community palliative care nurses providing home care to children. A qualitative study was conducted at the 3 community palliative care provider organizations in greater Kuala Lumpur from August to October 2014. Data were collected with semistructured interviews with 16 nurses who have provided care to children and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Two categories were identified: (1) challenges nurses faced and (2) coping strategies. The themes identified from the categories are (1) communication challenges, (2) inadequate training and knowledge, (3) personal suffering, (4) challenges of the system, (5) intrapersonal coping skills, (6) interpersonal coping strategies, and (7) systemic supports. These results reinforces the need for integration of pediatric palliative care teaching and communication skills training into all undergraduate health care programs. Provider organizational support to meet the specific needs of the nurses in the community can help retain them in their role. It will also be important to develop standards for current and new palliative care services to ensure delivery of quality pediatric palliative care.

  2. 'I try to make a net around each patient': home care nursing as relational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2017-05-24

    As a result of restructuring, home care is increasingly defined in a narrow, task-based way, undermining the holistic nature of practice. Recent practice theories can aid us in articulating the nature of this important, yet often invisible practice. My aim in this article was to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the nature of home care nursing practice. The approach was ethnographic, involving extensive fieldwork and formal interviews with members of five home care nursing teams and 15 older persons receiving care at home in a metropolitan area of Iceland. The study was approved by the National Bioethics Committee. As a net of services, home care was enacted through relational, but often invisible care practices, relating different actors - patient, family and health-care and social-care workers - in doing the work needed for the older persons to live comfortably at home. The work was collective in that it was shared by different actors and motivated by a common understanding that had developed and was preserved in conversations in the teams. Although the findings are limited in that they only reflect home care as practiced in one neighbourhood, they can be seen as providing important insights into what is needed for home care services to work. Home care practice can be understood as relational, aimed at creating a net of needed assistance. This work is a collective accomplishment of the teams and shaped by ideals and values shared among team members. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. [The actual conditions and problems of terminal home nursing care at our hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kawashiri, Hiroaki; Hirakata, Makoto; Yamasaki, Misaki; Sato, Mariko; Miura, Hiroshi; Murata, Tsuneari; Takagi, Hiroaki

    2009-12-01

    In 2006, we reconfirmed Suwachuo hospital slogan as "When there is a need of community, we will do our best to meet it" and the department of home nursing care is officially established in our hospital next spring. A death rate at home is generally used to evaluate a home nursing care, and this rate at our department was 60.8% in 2008. However, community needs various options in addition to death at home. Keeping an eye on community opinions is of great importance.

  4. Caring Connections - Compassionate mutuality in the organizational life of a nursing home

    OpenAIRE

    Martela, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Connections with others make up the fabric of daily life within organizations. Caregiving – understood broadly – takes place on a daily basis. Engagement in such caring situations has been found to be highly beneficial for both the caregiver and the cared-for. A nursing home is an especially good place to study caregiving. Accordingly, the data for this dissertation consists of semi-structured interviews with 26 nurses, five residents, and nine head nurses (altogether 27 hours, transcribe...

  5. Care home managers' views of dental services for older people living in nursing and residential homes in inner city London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsi, A; Gonzalez-Maffe, J; Jones, K; Wright, D; Gallagher, J E

    2013-06-01

    To investigate care home managers' views on the provision of dental care (current and future; urgent, check-up and follow-up) for their residents, barriers to care and the impact of policy changes, by type of home (nursing vs residential), with a view to informing the planning and provision of care. A cross sectional postal questionnaire survey and follow-up semi-structured interviews. Care homes in South East London. PARTCIPANTS: All care home managers in three south east London boroughs. A 72% response rate (n=152) was achieved, 140 of which were designated as nursing and/or residential homes (92%). Almost all managers reported that the care homes had arrangements in place for residents to access some elements of dental care (99%, n=148). Reported barriers to care included residents' fear of treatment (53%), patients' limited mobility (45%) and waiting times for services (42%). Limited mobility (p=0.01) and transport issues (p=0.01) were more significant barriers for nursing homes, whereas fear (p=0.02) was more significant for residential homes. Access to a range of dental services and modes of service delivery were requested for the future; most notable were the demands for domiciliary services to be available to nursing homes and for residential homes to access local general dental practitioners to meet the needs of their residents. Managers report having arrangements in place for residents to access dental services; however, there was a clear view that future arrangements should be more appropriate to the needs and vulnerabilities of their residents.

  6. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Christensen, Annette Gøgsig; Hansen, Birthe Stenbæk; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Møller, Tina Kreinfeldt Skovgaard

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by means of EuroQol-5D-3L), physical performance (30-seconds chair stand), nutritional status (weight and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (participants from home-care), and mortality. Respectively, 55 (46 from 2 home-care clusters) and 40 (18 from 1 home-care cluster) were identified with the EVS and comprised the intervention and control group. A difference after 11 wk in quality of life (0.758 [0.222] versus 0.534 [0.355], P = 0.001), 30-seconds chair stand (47% versus 17% improved, P = 0.005) and oral care (1.1 [0.3] versus 1.3 [0.5], P = 0.021) was observed. There was a almost significant difference in mortality (2% versus 13%, P = 0.079). Multidisciplinary nutritional support in older adults in nursing home and home-care could have a positive effect on quality of life, muscle strength, and oral care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Evaluating the quality of care in nursing homes: comparison of three International models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Alessandro; Leigheb, Fabrizio; Rinaldi, Carmela; Di Dio, Angelo; Knesse, Sanita; Donnarumma, Chiara; Panella, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this observational descriptive study was to identify the main international models evaluating the quality of nursing homes for non self-sufficient elderly persons, and to apply them in the Italian health system. Firstly, a bibliographic search of institutional websites and Pubmed-Medline was performed to identify the main international models. Secondly, three variables were chosen to evaluate the level of implementability of the models: (1) frequency of use of quality indicators in the international models; (2) degree of constructability of the models in two Italian nursing homes; (3) perceived relevance of the indicators used by the chosen models, by nursing home workers. Thirdly, the chosen models were evaluated. Three international models were identified, respectively used in USA, Canada and Australia. About 80% of the indicators used by the three models were constructable in the two Italian nursing homes that were evaluated. The two nursing homes were "promoted" according to the Canadian model, "better than sufficient" according to the Australian model, but "failed" when US model indicators were applied. The poorest performances in the two Italian nursing homes, with respect to international quality standards, were related to indicators of incontinence, physical restraints (1,1% for USA and 13% for Canada and Australia, versus 55% in one of the nursing homes and 30% in the second home), diagnosis of depressive symptoms, and antipneumococcical vaccination (0% in the two nursing homes, in comparison with the 93,8% in the USA). A low level of performance in prevention and safety matters was identified, while performance was higher for aspects warranted by law. The survey also revealed thatnursing home workers' perceptions of the utility of specific indicators were often based on habit rather than on the actual relevance of care indicators. The development of a model of quality of care that offers a multidimensional evaluation of the level of performance

  8. Cooperation in the care for patients with home enteral tube feeding throughout the care trajectory: nurses' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjuresäter, Kaisa; Larsson, Maria; Nordström, Gun; Athlin, Elsy

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how the planning, daily care and follow-up procedures work in the care trajectory for patients treated with home enteral tube feeding, from the perspective of hospital and community care nurses. Discharge planning for patients in need of home enteral tube feeding is a complex process. Several studies have described routines for discharge and care of patients with home enteral tube feeding in the care trajectory, but few studies have investigated how this really works. A qualitative method with a phenomenographic approach was used. Interviews, with open-ended questions, with ten nurses from both hospitals and communities were performed. One main category, 'cooperation', emerged, which describes an hierarchical relationship to three description categories: 'nurses' knowledge', 'nurses' view of responsibility' and 'nurses' professional awareness and commitment'. Each of these contained two sub-categories showing a positive and a negative pole. Cooperation in the care of patients with home enteral tube feeding throughout the care trajectory was influenced by the nurses' knowledge about enteral tube feeding, the discharge-planning process, and whether their responsibility was clearly distributed. Whether nurses had a patient- or task-oriented attitude was also important. Inefficient cooperation was considered having negative effects on the quality of care regarding home enteral tube feeding. This study has stressed the need for improving cooperation and communication between nurses at hospitals and in communities, as well as for increasing nurses' level of knowledge, to make home enteral tube feeding work in a safe way. It also has illuminated the urgent need to clarify responsibility distribution at the workplace, which is a question for nurse managers. Discussions should be undertaken among nurses about guidelines for tube feeding care and discharge process, as this is the responsibility of all professional nurses.

  9. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  10. Care dependency and nursing care problems in nursing home residents with and without dementia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler, Sandra; Dassen, Theo; Lohrmann, Christa

    2016-10-01

    Chronic diseases, like dementia, can lead to care dependency and nursing care problems. This study aims to compare the degree of care dependency and the prevalence of nursing care problems (pressure ulcer, incontinence, malnutrition, falls, restraints) between residents with and without dementia and between the stages of dementia. A cross-sectional design was chosen and a total of 277 residents with and 249 residents without dementia from nine Austrian nursing homes were assessed by staff using standardized instruments. Significantly more residents with than without dementia are completely or to a great extent care dependent (54.5 vs. 16.9 %). The comparison of care dependency between the stages of dementia indicates a large difference between moderate and severe dementia (completely care dependent: 9.3 vs. 44.3 %). The comparison of the assessed nursing care problems between residents with and without dementia reveals a significant difference only with regard to incontinence (urinary: 84.2 vs. 53.2 %, fecal: 50.9 vs. 17.7 %, double: 49.1 vs. 14.9 %). Urinary incontinence is high even in early dementia at 64 %, reaching 94 % in severe dementia. Fecal- and double incontinence are comparatively much lower in early dementia (both types 12 %) and rise to more than 80 % (both types) in severe dementia. These results highlight areas in which dementia care needs further improvements. The authors suggest maximizing residents' independence to stabilize care dependency and improve incontinence care. Furthermore, longitudinal studies are recommended to deepen insight into the development of care dependency and nursing care problems in dementia residents.

  11. Testing an app for reporting health concerns-Experiences from older people and home care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Carina; Eriksson, Irene; Ziegert, Kristina; Wengström, Yvonne; Langius-Eklöf, Ann; Brovall, Maria; Kihlgren, Annica; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-12-05

    To explore the experiences of using an app among older people with home-based health care and their nurses. Few information and communication technology innovations have been developed and tested for older people with chronic conditions living at home with home-based health care support. Innovative ways to support older people's health and self-care are needed. Explorative qualitative design. For 3 months to report health concerns, older people receiving home-based health care used an interactive app, which included direct access to self-care advice, graphs and a risk assessment model that sends alerts to nurses for rapid management. Interviews with older people (n = 17) and focus group discussions with home care nurses (n = 12) were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. The findings reveal that a process occurs. Using the app, the older people participated in their care, and the app enabled learning and a new way of communication. The interaction gave a sense of security and increased self-confidence among older people. The home care nurses viewed the alerts as appropriate for the management of health concerns. However, all participants experienced challenges in using new technology and had suggestions for improvement. The use of an app appears to increase the older people's participation in their health care and offers them an opportunity to be an active partner in their care. The app as a new way to interact with home care nurses increased the feeling of security. The older people were motivated to learn to use the app and described potential use for it in the future. The use of an app should be considered as a useful information and communication technology innovation that can improve communication and accessibility for older people with home-based health care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care - a focus group study from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-31

    Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice. Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance. There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.

  13. Does Person-Centered Care Improve Residents' Satisfaction With Nursing Home Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poey, Judith L; Hermer, Linda; Cornelison, Laci; Kaup, Migette L; Drake, Patrick; Stone, Robyn I; Doll, Gayle

    2017-11-01

    Person-centered care (PCC) is meant to enhance nursing home residents' quality of life (QOL). Including residents' perspectives is critical to determining whether PCC is meeting residents' needs and desires. This study examines whether PCC practices promote satisfaction with QOL and quality of care and services (QOC and QOS) among nursing home residents. A longitudinal, retrospective cohort study using an in-person survey. Three hundred twenty nursing homes in Kansas enrolled or not enrolled in a pay-for-performance program, Promoting Excellent Alternatives in Kansas (PEAK 2.0), to promote PCC in nursing homes. A total of 6214 nursing home residents in 2013-2014 and 5538 residents in 2014-2015, with a Brief Interview for Mental Status score ≥8, participated in face-to-face interviews. Results were aggregated to the nursing home level. My InnerView developed a Resident Satisfaction Survey for Kansas composed of 32 questions divided into QOL, QOC, QOS, and global satisfaction subdomains. After controlling for facility characteristics, satisfaction with overall QOL and QOC was higher in homes that had fully implemented PCC. Although some individual measures in the QOS domain (eg, food) showed greater satisfaction at earlier levels of implementation, high satisfaction was observed primarily in homes that had fully implemented PCC. These findings provide evidence for the effectiveness of PCC implementation on nursing home resident satisfaction. The PEAK 2.0 program may provide replicable methods for nursing homes and states to implement PCC systematically. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. German nursing home professionals' knowledge and specific self-efficacy related to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, David; Markett, Sebastian; Müller, Monika; Müller, Sigrun; Grützner, Felix; Rolke, Roman; Kern, Martina; Schmidt-Wolf, Gabriele; Radbruch, Lukas

    2013-07-01

    In Germany, more and more terminally ill patients spend their last days of life in nursing homes, and this presents a challenge for these institutions. Even though palliative care is a growing domain in health care, no quantitative in-depth evaluations of the status quo in nursing homes has been conducted so far in Germany, partly because of lacking measuring tools. This study used a new questionnaire to assess German health care professionals' theoretical knowledge of palliative care and their perceived self-efficacy. Both variables have been proven to be indicators for the quality of the implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. We used the Bonn Palliative Care Knowledge Test (Bonner Palliativwissenstest, BPW) questionnaire to measure knowledge of palliative care in the domains of medicine, care, and psychosocial care and to measure self-efficacy relating to palliative care. Care workers (N=130) in five nursing homes in the region of Aachen in western Germany answered the questionnaires. The results show low knowledge (on average 52.8% correct answers) and self-efficacy relating to palliative care, although work with dying people is their daily challenge. While general knowledge correlated with work experience, a negative correlation of specific self-efficacy with age and working experience was observed. Lower self-efficacy of care workers experienced in palliative care probably implies that the difficulty of palliative care skills is underestimated by inexperienced care workers. Palliative care training is urgently needed to improve knowledge and self-efficacy. Guidance to assist care professionals involved in palliative care in nursing homes needs to be developed and provided.

  15. Assessing Quality of Care and Elder Abuse in Nursing Homes via Google Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowery, Jared; Andrei, Amanda; Le, Elizabeth; Jian, Jing; Ward, Megan

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to assess the quality of care and detect elder abuse in nursing homes, since patients may be incapable of reporting quality issues or abuse themselves, and resources for sending inspectors are limited. This study correlates Google reviews of nursing homes with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) inspection results in the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) data set, to quantify the extent to which the reviews reflect the quality of care and the presence of elder abuse. A total of 16,160 reviews were collected, spanning 7,170 nursing homes. Two approaches were tested: using the average rating as an overall estimate of the quality of care at a nursing home, and using the average scores from a maximum entropy classifier trained to recognize indications of elder abuse. The classifier achieved an F-measure of 0.81, with precision 0.74 and recall 0.89. The correlation for the classifier is weak but statistically significant: = 0.13, P Google reviews of nursing homes can be used to detect indications of elder abuse with high precision and to assess the quality of care, but only when a sufficient number of reviews are available.

  16. Ethical challenges in the provision of end-of-life care in Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Førde, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar; Bollig, Georg

    2010-08-01

    As in other Western countries, most Norwegian nursing home patients are suffering from multi-pathological conditions and a large majority of them will die in the nursing home. End-of-life care represents many challenges, and it is a widespread concern that several nursing homes lack both resources and competence to ensure good quality care. This article examines the types and prevalence of ethical challenges in end-of-life care as nursing home staff consider them, as well as what they believe can help them to better cope with the ethical challenges. It is based on a national survey probing Norwegian nursing homes' end-of-life care at the ward level conducted in 2007. 664 respondents from 364 nursing homes answered the questionnaire, representing 68% of the patients and 76% of the nursing home sample. Inadequate care due to lack of resources and breaches of the patient's autonomy and integrity were the ethical challenges reported most often. Conflicts with the next of kin regarding nursing care and termination of life-prolonging treatment were reported more seldom. However, when asking the respondents to outline one of the most recent ethical dilemmas they had encountered, the majority of the respondents described ethical dilemmas concerning limitation of life-prolonging treatment, often mixed with disagreements between the wish of the family and that of the patient, or between the wish of the next of kin and what the staff consider to be right. Ethical dilemmas associated with breaches of the patient's autonomy and integrity were also thoroughly described. According to the staff, better ethical knowledge along with more time to reflect on ethical dilemmas were the initiatives most desired to improve the staff's way of handling ethical challenges. Furthermore, to have an opportunity to consult with a person holding ethical competence was emphasised by more than half of the respondents. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Support at the end of life in care homes by nursing assistants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croyère, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    In nursing homes, the nursing assistant supports patients at the end of life, notably as they move into palliative care. This involves team work to relieve pain, limit treatments considered disproportionate and improve comfort. Relations with the residents and their families are particularly important in this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Nursing interventions in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, J.; Dassen, T.WN; Dingemans, T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in The Netherlands are moving out of residential mental health institutions and are pioneering home care for the acutely and chronically mentally ill. The purpose of this study was to identify the interventions nurses currently use and to describe the differences between

  19. Top Management Leadership Style and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Decker, Frederic H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of Nursing Home Administrator (NHA) leadership style and Director of Nursing (DON) leadership style with quality of care. Design and Methods: Leaders were categorized into 4 groups: consensus managers, consultative autocrats, shareholder managers, or autocrats. This leadership style…

  20. Caring for people with dementia and challenging behaviors in nursing homes: A needs assessment geriatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Jeanette M; Bay, Camden P; Levy, Barcey T; Carnahan, Ryan M

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 50% of nursing home residents have a dementia diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to conduct a needs assessment of directors of nursing (DON) in Iowa nursing homes in relation to caring for patients with Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia. DON responses were linked to Online Survey Certification and Reporting/Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting (OSCAR/CASPER) data to examine how facility characteristics may be associated with use of and confidence in non-drug management strategies. From 431 questionnaires mailed to DONs, 160 (37%) were returned. Regression analysis showed that those who were more confident in managing challenging behavior were more likely to have satisfaction with current training on managing challenging behaviors and had a psychiatrist available to visit the facility. Facilities with a larger proportion of patients with challenging behaviors being treated with non-drug approaches instead of antipsychotics had DONs who were more likely to be confident in non-drug management strategies and have knowledge about the FDA antipsychotic medications risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nursing home and nursing home physician: the Dutch experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.M.G.A.; Crebolder, H.F.J.M.; Weel, C. van

    2004-01-01

    Dutch nursing home care today includes a broad range of institutional and outreaching care functions. Medical care is an essential part of this care. Nursing home medicine in The Netherlands has developed as an officially acknowledged medical specialty. This is unique because The Netherlands is the

  2. The quality of paper-based versus electronic nursing care plan in Australian aged care homes: A documentation audit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David

    2015-08-01

    The nursing care plan plays an essential role in supporting care provision in Australian aged care. The implementation of electronic systems in aged care homes was anticipated to improve documentation quality. Standardized nursing terminologies, developed to improve communication and advance the nursing profession, are not required in aged care practice. The language used by nurses in the nursing care plan and the effect of the electronic system on documentation quality in residential aged care need to be investigated. To describe documentation practice for the nursing care plan in Australian residential aged care homes and to compare the quantity and quality of documentation in paper-based and electronic nursing care plans. A nursing documentation audit was conducted in seven residential aged care homes in Australia. One hundred and eleven paper-based and 194 electronic nursing care plans, conveniently selected, were reviewed. The quantity of documentation in a care plan was determined by the number of phrases describing a resident problem and the number of goals and interventions. The quality of documentation was measured using 16 relevant questions in an instrument developed for the study. There was a tendency to omit 'nursing problem' or 'nursing diagnosis' in the nursing process by changing these terms (used in the paper-based care plan) to 'observation' in the electronic version. The electronic nursing care plan documented more signs and symptoms of resident problems and evaluation of care than the paper-based format (48.30 vs. 47.34 out of 60, Pquality score. The electronic care plan contained fewer problem or diagnosis statements, contributing factors and resident outcomes than the paper-based system (Pnursing care plan were weak in documenting measurable and concrete resident outcomes. The overall quality of documentation content for the nursing process was no better in the electronic system than in the paper-based system. Omission of the nursing problem

  3. A palliative care educational intervention for frontline nursing home staff: the IMPRESS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Aida; Gatchell, Greg; Tachibana, Yukako; Tin, Maung Maung; Bell, Christina; Koijane, Jeannette; Zeri, Kenneth; Masaki, Kamal

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine nursing home staff perceptions of end-of-life (EOL) care skills after an educational intervention. IMPRESS (IMproving PRofessional Education and Sustaining Support) was a quality improvement EOL care educational intervention (six lectures on core palliative care concepts) for frontline nursing home staff at five community nursing homes. Questionnaires were completed to evaluate frequency of application of palliative care skills before and after the educational series. Nursing home staff reported applying palliative care skills significantly more frequently after the intervention. A significant dose-response association was noted between number of inservice sessions attended and improvement in scores: Scores increased 0.04 points for staff who attended two of the six sessions, 0.12 for four sessions attended, and 0.46 for five to six sessions attended (p = 0.03). The results indicate that frontline nursing home staff who attend inservice sessions on core palliative care topics can significantly increase self-reported application of palliative care skills. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. The Influence of Nurse Staffing Levels on Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Kathryn; Thomas, Kali S.; Branch, Laurence G.; Harman, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Christopher E.; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the relationship between increasing certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and licensed nurse staffing ratios and deficiencies in Florida nursing homes over a 4-year period. Methods: Data from Florida staffing reports and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting database examine the relationship among staffing…

  5. How Do People Make Continence Care Happen? An Analysis of Organizational Culture in Two Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although nursing homes (NHs) are criticized for offering poor quality continence care, little is known about the organizational processes that underlie this care. This study investigated the influence of organizational culture on continence care practices in two NHs. Design and Methods: This ethnographic study explored continence care…

  6. Structural and process indicators of nutritional care: a comparison between Austrian hospitals and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Silvia; Halfens, Ruud J G; Meijers, Judith M M; Schols, Jos M G A; Lohrmann, Christa

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare structural and process indicators of nutritional care in Austrian hospitals and nursing homes. A multicenter, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized and tested questionnaire. Data were collected on patient and institutional levels of hospitals and nursing homes. Data from 18 Austrian hospitals (n = 2326 patients) and 18 Austrian nursing homes (n = 1487 residents) were collected. The prevalence of malnutrition was 23.2% in hospitals and 26.2% in nursing homes. All hospitals and 83.3% of the nursing homes employed dietitians. Guidelines for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition were used infrequently. Nutritional screening at admission was performed in 62.6% of the hospitalized patients and 93.4% of the nursing home residents. Nutritional screening tools were used in 28.9% of the nursing home residents and 14.5% of the hospitalized patients. Oral nutritional support was preferred to enteral and parenteral nutrition in the two settings. Dietitians were consulted in 27.5% of the malnourished hospitalized patients and 74.7% of the malnourished nursing home residents. The study demonstrated that nursing homes fulfilled more structural indicators and performed nutritional screening at admission more often than hospitals. Nevertheless, the prevalence of malnutrition was high in the two settings and a substantial number of malnourished patients/residents received no nutritional intervention at all. These results show the necessity for improvements in the nutritional care in Austria, for instance, through the routine use of nutritional screening tools followed by tailored nutritional interventions in patients/residents in need. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Japanese booklet about palliative care for advanced dementia in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Miyamoto, Yuki; Long, Carol O; Arcand, Marcel

    2015-08-01

    A Canadian guide for nursing home staff on comfort care for dementia has been translated and adapted for use in Japan. The present study piloted educational intervention for nursing home staff using the Japanese comfort care booklet. Some 61 nursing home staff (nurses and other care workers) completed a session that included pre-assessment, a 30-minute seminar using the comfort care booklet, post-assessment, and a one-hour debriefing meeting. A Japanese version of the questionnaire on palliative care for advanced dementia (qPAD) scale was used to assess knowledge and attitudes toward palliative care for advanced dementia. The participants demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge (mean score, 14.3 to 15.1/23, t (60) = 2.35, p=0.011) and attitudes (43.8 to 45.2/60, t (60) = 2.51, p = 0.015) toward palliative care for advanced dementia from pre-assessment to post-assessment. The educational intervention using the Japanese comfort care booklet may have improved nursing home staff's perspectives on palliative care for advanced dementia.

  8. Factors associated with end-of-life by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Niimura, Junko; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Home-visit nursing-care services in Japan are expected to provide home hospice services for older patients with non-cancer diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine factors that contribute to the provision of end-of-life care by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan. The present retrospective study was carried out using nationally representative cross-sectional data from the 2007, 2010, and 2013 Survey of Institutions and Establishments for Long-Term Care. A total of 138 008 randomly sampled home-visit nursing-care service users were included in this analysis. End-of-life care (study outcome) was defined as the provision of nursing-care within the last month of life. Of the 138 008 patients at home, 2280 (1.7%) received home-based nursing care within the last month of life, and end-of-life care was offered primarily to cancer patients (n = 1651; 72.4%). After accounting for patient characteristics, patients were more likely to receive end-of-life care when they used home-visit nursing-care providers that had a greater number of nursing staff or were located in a region with fewer hospital beds. Among home-visit nursing-care providers, the nursing staff ratio and the availability of hospital beds were related to the provision of end-of-life care. Home-visit nursing-care providers should establish specialist hospice care teams with enhanced staffing ratios to allow for the adequate provision of home-based end-of-life care. A community-based network between home-visit nursing-care providers and hospitals should also be established to attain an integrated end-of-life care system for elderly populations in regions with more hospital beds. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 991-998. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. [Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: Characteristics and Specificities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremaud, Grégoire; Mazzocato, Claudia

    2015-02-25

    Elderly patients in palliative situations residing in a nursing home present characteristics and specificities that clearly distinguish them from patients with advanced cancer. Besides the difficulty to define a precise prognosis, their many comorbidities, their communication difficulties because of cognitive disorders, their high sensitivity to primary and secondary effects of drugs render their management a real challenge for physician and caregivers. Accompanying these patients at the end of their life also raises many ethical problems, especially when they are no longer able to express their wishes and have not previously expressed advance directives.

  10. Asian and native Hawaiian family caregiver satisfaction with palliative care services in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; McFarlane, Sandra; Kealoha, May; Sy, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gauge Asian and native Hawaiian family satisfaction with palliative care services in two nursing homes in Hawaii, US. This is a mixed-method study using a convergent design. Nine nursing home family caregivers who had received palliative care services took part. They completed a Famcare-2 satisfaction survey and participated in a 1-hour interview. Descriptive analyses and directed content analysis were completed and results were compared. The Famcare-2 results indicated that family caregivers were satisfied with palliative care services. The interviews provided in-depth information on the major areas discussed in the survey-management of patient physical symptoms and comfort, information, family support, and patient psychological care. There is a need to address family caregiver and interdisciplinary nursing home staff communication based on culturally appropriate approaches for palliative as well as end of-life care services among Asians and native Hawaiians.

  11. Leading end-of-life care: an action learning set approach in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewison, Alistair; Badger, Frances; Swani, Tina

    2011-03-01

    If the end-of-life care needs of people living in nursing homes are to be met, effective leadership is necessary. This in turn requires that appropriate training and support are provided for nursing home managers. To meet this need, an action learning set (ALS) involving nursing home managers was developed, and as a result of the continuous process of learning and reflection that characterizes ALS work the managers brought about a number of improvements in end-of-life care. These included more consistent use of care plans, increased involvement of clients and their families in planning end-of-life care, more training for staff, and the use of events and techniques to create opportunities for discussing the end of life. The managers set specific individual objectives focused on improving end-of-life care and were supported in meeting them through their membership of the set.

  12. [Influence of in-home nursing care on the weight of the early discharged preterm newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Miró, R; Lluch Canut, M T; Figueras Aloy, J; Esqué Ruiz, M T; Arroyo Gili, L; Bella Rodríguez, J; Carbonell Estrany, X

    2014-12-01

    In-Home nursing care of the preterm newborn helps to bring the family situation to normal, promotes breastfeeding and development of the newborn, and enables the reorganization of health care resources. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that in-home nursing care of the preterm newborn leads to an increase in weight and a similar morbidity. A total of 65 cases and 65 controls (matched by weight, age and sex) were studied, all of them preterm newborns born in hospital and weighing less than 2100 g at discharge. In-home nursing care was carried out by a pediatrician neonatologist, as well as two nurses specialized in neonatology who made several visits to the home. Weight gain was calculated as g/day and g/Kg/day, comparing the first week of the study with the week prior to the beginning of the study. The groups were comparable. Weight gain in the group with home nursing care was 38 g per day, significantly higher than the weight gain in the control group (31 g/day). The independent predictive variables of the increase in g/Kg/day during the study were in-home nursing care, male gender, breastfeeding less, and not having suffered from a peri-intraventricular hemorrhage. Neonatal morbidity was similar in both groups. In-home care was associated with a greater weight gain of the newborn at home than during their stay in the hospital, and can be considered safe because neonatal morbidity was not increased. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care: a critical analysis of power relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, Abram; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol

    2007-08-01

    To elicit an in-depth understanding of the sources of power and how power is exercised within client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care. As in all social relations, power is present within client-nurse relationships. Although much research has focused on interpersonal relationships in nursing, the concept of power within the client-nurse relationship in palliative care settings has not been extensively investigated. Applying a critical lens, secondary qualitative data analysis was conducted. Seventeen nurse and 16 client transcripts from a primary study were selected for secondary data analysis. These 33 transcripts afforded theme saturation, which allowed for both commonalities and differences to be identified. Data analysis involved analytic coding. Study findings help make explicit the underlying power present in the context of home-based palliative care and how this power is used and potentially abused. In analysing the sources and exercise of power, the linkage between macro and micro levels of power is made explicit, as nurses functioned within a hierarchy of power. The findings suggest that educational/occupational status continues to be a source of power for nurses within the relationship. However, nurses also experience powerlessness within the home care context. For clients, being able to control one's own life is a source of power, but this power is over-shadowed by the powerlessness experienced in relationships with nurses. The exercise of power by clients and nurses creates experiences of both liberation and domination. Nurses who are willing to reflect on and change those disempowering aspects of the client-nurse relationship, including a harmful hierarchy, will ultimately be successful in the health promotion of clients in home-based palliative care. Additionally, it should be recognized that nurses work within a specific health system context and, therefore, their practice is influenced by policies and funding models implemented at

  14. Esthetic abilities: a way to describe abilities of expert nurses in palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, Elisabeth; Wikström, Britt-Maj; Andershed, Birgitta

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to focus on the abilities needed to create the caring relation in palliative home care and to find ways to describe these abilities and skills from an esthetic perspective. Nurses in Palliative home care have to create a functioning relationship between themselves the patient and the patient's next of kin, this puts special demands on the nurse. A number of abilities, such as creativity, intuition, empathy and self-knowledge are mentioned in literature related to the caring relation. Many nursing theorists have referred to the art and esthetic of nursing when trying to describe these abilities. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with eight expert nurses in palliative home care. The transcribed interviews were analysed using qualitative content analyses. Three main categories where found: The will to do good, Knowledge and Perceptiveness. Subcategories that can be seen as abilities where found in the main categories knowledge and perceptiveness. The main categories can be seen as expressions for abilities, personal qualities and skills needed to create the caring relation in palliative home care. We found interesting connections between the three main categories and the concepts of esthetics, ethics and science. We also found that nurses develop in a way, i.e. similar to an artist. The concepts brought forward in this paper could be used in clinical supervision and education as well as in clinical practice. If nurses think about the three aspects: Knowledge, the will to do good and perceptiveness, the chance for a positive relation between the nurse and the patient, and the patient's next of kin might increase. One could speculate that perceptiveness is a vital ability in order to achieve the expert level of nursing and that this perspective should be taken in consideration when recruiting nurses and in curriculum development.

  15. Do public nursing home care providers deliver higher quality than private providers? Evidence from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winblad, Ulrika; Blomqvist, Paula; Karlsson, Andreas

    2017-07-14

    Swedish nursing home care has undergone a transformation, where the previous virtual public monopoly on providing such services has been replaced by a system of mixed provision. This has led to a rapidly growing share of private actors, the majority of which are large, for-profit firms. In the wake of this development, concerns have been voiced regarding the implications for care quality. In this article, we investigate the relationship between ownership and care quality in nursing homes for the elderly by comparing quality levels between public, for-profit, and non-profit nursing home care providers. We also look at a special category of for-profit providers; private equity companies. The source of data is a national survey conducted by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in 2011 at 2710 nursing homes. Data from 14 quality indicators are analyzed, including structure and process measures such as staff levels, staff competence, resident participation, and screening for pressure ulcers, nutrition status, and risk of falling. The main statistical method employed is multiple OLS regression analysis. We differentiate in the analysis between structural and processual quality measures. The results indicate that public nursing homes have higher quality than privately operated homes with regard to two structural quality measures: staffing levels and individual accommodation. Privately operated nursing homes, on the other hand, tend to score higher on process-based quality indicators such as medication review and screening for falls and malnutrition. No significant differences were found between different ownership categories of privately operated nursing homes. Ownership does appear to be related to quality outcomes in Swedish nursing home care, but the results are mixed and inconclusive. That staffing levels, which has been regarded as a key quality indicator in previous research, are higher in publicly operated homes than private is consistent with earlier

  16. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and one home-based care facility in Norway. We examined the reliability and content and construct validity of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test. The items in both the general diabetes subscale and the insulin-use subscale were considered relevant and appropriate. The instrument showed satisfactory properties for distinguishing between groups. Item response theory-based measurements and item information curves indicate maximum information at average or lower knowledge scores. Internal consistency and the item-total correlations were quite weak, indicating that the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a set of items related to various relevant knowledge topics but not necessarily related to each other. The Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a broad range of topics relevant to diabetes care. It is an appropriate instrument for identifying individual and distinct needs for diabetes education among nursing personnel. The knowledge gaps identified by the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test could also provide useful input for the content of educational activities. However, some revision of the test should be considered.

  17. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-03-01

    A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies in geriatric medicine. This study explores what students perceive as the main learning outcomes of a geriatric medicine clerkship in a hospital or a nursing home, and explicitly addresses factors that may stimulate or hamper the learning process. This qualitative study falls within a constructivist paradigm: it draws on socio-cultural learning theory and is guided by the principles of constructivist grounded theory. There were two phases of data collection. Firstly, a maximum variation sample of 68 students completed a worksheet, giving brief written answers on questions regarding their geriatric medicine clerkships. Secondly, focus group discussions were conducted with 19 purposively sampled students. We used template analysis, iteratively cycling between data collection and analysis, using a constant comparative process. Students described a broad range of learning outcomes and formative experiences that were largely distinct from their learning in previous clerkships with regard to specific geriatric knowledge, deliberate decision making, end-of-life care, interprofessional collaboration and communication. According to students, the nursing home differed from the hospital in three aspects: interprofessional collaboration was more prominent; the lower resources available in nursing homes stimulated students to be creative, and students reported having greater autonomy in nursing homes compared with the more extensive educational guidance provided in hospitals. In both hospitals and nursing homes, students not only learn to care for older patients, but also describe various broader learning outcomes necessary to become good doctors. The results of our study, in particular the

  18. Green Care Farms as Innovative Nursing Homes, Promoting Activities and Social Interaction for People With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Bram; Hamers, Jan P H; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Tan, Frans E S; Beerens, Hanneke C; Verbeek, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Innovative care environments are developed for people with dementia to encourage person-centered care. This study aims to investigate whether residents of green care farms that provide 24-hour nursing care participate more in (physical) activities and social interaction compared with residents of other nursing homes. Longitudinal observation study. Nursing homes in the Netherlands (green care farms, traditional nursing homes, and regular small-scale living facilities). A total of 115 nursing home residents at baseline, 100 at follow-up. Ecological momentary assessments (n = 16,860) were conducted using the Maastricht Electronic Daily Life Observation Tool. Residents living at green care farms were compared with residents living in traditional nursing homes and regular small-scale living facilities. The following aspects were collected for this study: the activity performed by the participant or occurring in his or her vicinity, the engagement in the activity, the level of physical activity during the activity, the physical environment (location where the activity occurred), and the level of social interaction during the activity. In total, 9660 baseline observations and 7200 follow-up observations were conducted. Analyses showed that residents of green care farms significantly more often participated in domestic activities (P = .004, SE = 1.6) and outdoor/nature-related activities (P = .003, SE = 0.9), and significantly less often engaged in passive/purposeless activities (P social interaction (P = .006, SE = 1.1), and came outside significantly more (P = .010, SE = 1.1) than residents of traditional nursing homes. Residents of green care farms were significantly more physically active (P = .013, SE = 0.8) than were residents of regular small-scale living facilities. No other significant differences were found. Green care farms can be a valuable alternative to traditional nursing homes. They provide an attractive, homelike environment and

  19. Positive effects of experience in terminal care on nursing home staff in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Koji; Ohashi, Akira

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychological effects of terminal care experience on nursing home staff and analyze the differences between staff who are experienced and those who are inexperienced in providing terminal care. A mailed survey was conducted in 2007. A total of 37% (N = 72) of the participants had experience in terminal care in nursing homes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the professional efficacy (a subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey [MBI-GS]) and tenure (duration of service) of the experienced staff were significantly higher than those of the inexperienced staff. The high professional efficacy noted among the experienced staff suggests that the provision of terminal care in nursing homes does not necessarily lead to burnout among caregivers and may in fact serve as an important motivational factor.

  20. Caring for gay men and lesbians in nursing homes in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGabhann, Patricia

    2015-12-10

    This article examines the literature relating to the attitudes of nurses currently practicing in nursing homes towards caring for gay men and lesbians in Ireland. Nurses' knowledge of and attitudes towards the sexuality of those in their care can potentially have an impact on the quality of care they deliver and the patient experience. There is a consensus in the literature regarding the expression of sexuality as a lifelong need and integral element of quality of life. Research to date focusing on the needs of older gay or lesbian individuals has been virtually non-existent, despite increases in life expectancy and increasing numbers of older people, and therefore older gay and lesbian people requiring nursing home care.

  1. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals – predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv W Sørbye

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Liv W Sørbye1, Torunn Hamran2, Nils Henriksen2, Astrid Norberg2,31Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway; 3Umeå University, Umeå, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC project conducted in 2001–2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0 was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%. In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9 years for men and 84.0 (6.6 for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7–7.8; P < 0.001. In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.Keywords: aged, home care, cross-sectional study, self-rated health, level of care, care burden, comprehensive assessment, RAI, Nordic

  2. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  3. Call to action: APRNs in U.S. Nursing homes to improve care and reduce costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Birtley, Nancy M; Flesner, Marcia; Crecelius, Charles; Murray, Cathy

    2017-09-21

    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation Center sponsored the initiative to reduce avoidable hospitalizations among nursing facility residents. Missouri Quality Initiative (MOQI) designed inter-professional model in nursing homes with advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). MOQI APRN model was implemented for 4 years in 16 nursing homes in a metro area of the Midwest. Hospitalizations were reduced (40% all-cause, 58% potentially avoidable), emergency room visits (54% all-cause, 65% potentially avoidable), Medicare expenditures for hospitalizations (34% all-cause, 45% potentially avoidable), and Medicare expenditures for emergency room visits (50% all-cause, 60% potentially avoidable) for long-stay nursing home residents. Success of the MOQI model reinforces decades of research demonstrating that care provided by APRNs is cost-effective, safe, and associated with positive health outcomes and patient satisfaction. Nursing homes can implement and benefit by hiring APRNs. However, changes in the Code of Federal Regulation (CFR 483.40) are necessary to improve patient access to care and encourage hiring APRNs in US nursing homes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of a "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention in a home care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald; Godin, Lori

    2015-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of a unique "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention for community-dwelling elderly individuals in a home care program. A combined propensity-based covariate-matching procedure was used to pair each individual who received the intervention ("treatment" condition, nT = 930) to a similar individual who did not receive the intervention ("control" condition, nC1 = 930) from among a large pool of potential control individuals (nC0 = 4656). The intervention consisted of regularly scheduled telephone calls from a surveillance nurse to proactively assess the individual's well-being, care plan status, use of and need for services (home support, adult day program, physiotherapy, etc.) and home environment (e.g., informal caregiver support). Treatment and control conditions were compared with respect to four service utilization outcomes: (1) rate of survival in the community before institutionalization in an assisted living or nursing home facility or death, (2) rate of emergency room registrations, (3) rate of acute care hospitalizations, and (4) rate of days in hospital, during home care enrollment. Results indicated a beneficial effect of the surveillance nurse intervention on reducing rate of service utilization by increasing the duration of the home care episode. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcomes related to effective nurse supervision in long-term care homes: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Chu, Charlene H; Shaw, Alexander C; Wong, Rosalind; Ploeg, Jenny

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this integrative review was to describe the organisational, unregulated nurse, and resident outcomes associated with effective supervisory performance of regulated nurses (registered nurses or registered practical nurses) in long-term care homes. While there are data on the influence of regulated nurse staffing levels on resident outcomes, the influence of effective supervisory performance of regulated nurses on resident and organisational outcomes, nursing assistant outcomes have yet to be comprehensively explored. A search of six databases was made for articles dating from 2000 to 2015. Twenty-four articles were selected and an integrative review was performed. Effective nurse supervision had statistically significant positive associations (P nurse and resident outcomes: nurse assistant job satisfaction, turnover/intention to leave, effectiveness, decision making, job stress and consumer satisfaction. Qualitative analyses corroborate these findings. There appear to be some associations between effective supervisory performance of regulated nurses with positive organisational, unregulated nursing and resident outcomes. Nursing managers and leaders in long-term care may promote improvements in effective nurse supervision performance as a way of reducing turnover and improving resident outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-08-03

    Medication management is the most challenging component of a successful transition from hospital to home, a challenge of growing complexity as the number of older persons living with chronic conditions grows, along with increasingly specialised and accelerated hospital treatment plans. Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge. Data consisted of field notes and photographs from the patients' homes, medication lists and medical records. Field notes were analysed in four steps. The analysis showed 12 stages in medication management in which nurses strove to adjust medication management to the patients' actual health status by mediating on knowledge of the patient, information to the patient and on rules and regulations and by establishing order in medication lists and medications in the home. The nurse-patient relationship, the integration of care and the context of care challenged patient safety in visiting nurses' medication management in patients' homes after hospital discharge. The implications for practice were the following: to ensure nurses' opportunities to continuously evolve their observation skills and skills in making sound clinical judgements; to establish interprofessional working processes which support the continuous assessment of patients' needs and the adjustment of care and treatment; to clarify expectations to nurses' responsibility and patients' privacy. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. When care situations evoke difficult emotions in nursing staff members: an ethnographic study in two Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvoll, Anne Marie; Grov, Ellen Karine; Kristoffersen, Kjell; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Caring practice in nursing homes is a complex topic, especially the challenges of meeting the basic needs of residents when their behaviour evokes difficult emotions. Cognitive and physical changes related to aging and disability can contribute to behaviours considered to be unacceptable. For example, resident behaviours such as spitting, making a mess with food or grinding teeth are behaviours that most people do not want to see, hear or experience. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how nursing home staff members deal with such behaviours in care situations. This article draws on ethnographic data to describe how nursing home staff members manage unpleasant resident behaviours. The study was based on two long-term units in two Norwegian public nursing homes. The Region's Medical Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services granted approval. In total, 45 participants (37 nursing aides and eight nurses) agreed to participate in this study. Ten of the participants were interviewed at the end of the field study. This study indicates that nursing home staff members experience difficult emotions related to some residents' behaviours. However, they found these feelings difficult to express and rarely verbalized them openly. In addition, they were characterized by a strong obligation to help all residents, despite their own feelings. Therefore, it appears that an inner struggle occurs as a part of everyday practice. Despite these difficult emotions, nursing staff members believed that they needed to manage their responses and continued to offer good care to all residents. These findings extend our understanding of this unarticulated part of nursing home practice.

  8. Registered nurses' experience of delegating the administration of medicine to unlicensed personnel in residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa; Grape, Charlotte; Ringnell, Katarina; Westerbotn, Margareta

    2016-11-01

    The aim was to describe registered nurses' experience in the context of delegating the administration of medication to unlicensed personnel in residential care homes. The residents in residential care homes have a need for extensive care and nursing, and large amounts of medicines are common practice. Registered nurses' workload and difficulties in fulfilling their duties, such as administration of medicines, have led to frequent delegation of this task between the registered nurses and unlicensed assisting personnel. It is, of course, a great responsibility to ensure that the care of the older people remains safe while maintaining quality in the prevailing situation. A qualitative inductive descriptive study. Data were collected using audio-recorded semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of 18 registered nurses and interpreted using manifest content analysis. The study was approved by the ethical research committee. Registered nurses found the organisation unsupportive with regard to nursing interventions. The delegation context was experienced as a grey zone; the rules and regulations were not in line with the unspoken expectation to delegate the administration of medicine to unlicensed personnel, in order to be able to manage their daily work. The slimmed organisation of residential care homes relies upon registered nurses' use of delegation of medicine administration to unlicensed assistant personnel. It becomes an inevitable assignment entailing a challenging responsibility for patient safety and the quality of care. The results of this study may contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of caring for older people in residential care homes and to improving the work environment of all healthcare personnel. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nurses speak out for home care: winning the last great civil rights battle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamandaris, Val J

    2009-06-01

    In closing, it is clear that home care nurses are a very special breed. They are missionaries, committed to the goal of helping vulnerable Americans manage their health care needs and to preserving the freedoms and the independence that everyone cherishes. As is clear from the vignettes above, their first and last thoughts each day are for the well-being of their patients. They are so busy providing sophisticated care for a raft of complex medical problems common to their patients and filling out Medicare forms that they sometimes forget to take care of themselves. There is no doubt that they make a difference in the lives of patients and their families. Historically, nurses have been reluctant to take time away from caring for patients to take part in politics. As is evident from the summaries above and the stories of nurses from all 50 states that follow, nurses have had a change of heart. They have reached the conclusion that they must advocate for the aged, infirm, disabled and dying patients because patients cannot speak out for themselves. More and more nurses are becoming involved. One out of every 44 voters today is a nurse. Nurses show up at the polls; home care nurses have made it their responsibility to help make sure that homebound person vote by absentee ballot. They are also committed to march, to speak out for home care and hospice in what more and more are coming to call The Last Great Civil Rights Battle. They are also pushing for the inclusion of home and community based long-term care as part of national health care reform. They believe that home care is the answer to keeping the 12 percent of Americans who suffer from multiple chronic diseases and generate 75 percent of U.S. health care costs out of the hospital. The historian Arnold Toynbee put all these issues in perspective when he wrote that it is possible to measure the longevity and the accomplishment of any society by a common yardstick. I heard President John F. Kennedy quote Toynbee in

  10. Ethics and gender issues in palliative care in nursing homes: an Austrian participatory research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitinger, Elisabeth; Heimerl, Katharina

    2014-06-01

    The development of palliative care in nursing homes in German-speaking countries has gained in importance within the past 15-20 years. Ethical and gender issues are core aspects of a palliative care culture and should therefore be better understood. The aim of this study was to highlight insights regarding ethical and gender issues, based on the experiences of professionals in nursing homes. A 2-year participatory action research study was performed in collaboration with three nursing homes in Austria. The article focusses on 10 group discussions with interdisciplinary professional teams that were conducted to generate ethical narratives. Thematic and narrative analysis was undertaken both individually and within the interdisciplinary research team. Findings and interpretations were validated with practitioners and researchers. A total of 36 narratives were collected and summarised within eight themes concerning the theoretical journey of a nursing home resident with relatives from entry into the house until death. The most burdensome ethical dilemmas are not the ones around death and dying but rather those relating to small-scale everyday work/life issues. Sharing experiences and feelings in ethical discussions provides relief. Emotions are important facilitators of insight into ethical dilemmas. Gender issues can be observed in care situations as well as in the organisational structure of nursing homes. Opportunities to share experiences and perspectives around ethical questions in interdisciplinary group discussions help professionals to better understand difficult issues and find appropriate ways of managing them. There is a need for communication structures such as facilitated ethical discussions that enable nursing home staff to reflect their everyday decisions. Expression of emotions should be encouraged in ethical decision-making processes in nursing homes. Gender-sensitive reflection supports the development of palliative care as organisational culture.

  11. Efficiency and quality of care in nursing homes: an Italian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Giulia; Lettieri, Emanuele; Agasisti, Tommaso; Lopez, Silvano

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates efficiency and quality of care in nursing homes. By means of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), the efficiency of 40 nursing homes that deliver their services in the north-western area of the Lombardy Region was assessed over a 3-year period (2005-2007). Lombardy is a very peculiar setting, since it is the only Region in Italy where the healthcare industry is organised as a quasi-market, in which the public authority buys health and nursing services from independent providers-establishing a reimbursement system for this purpose. The analysis is conducted by generating bootstrapped DEA efficiency scores for each nursing home (stage one), then regressing those scores on explanatory variables (stage two). Our DEA model employed two input (i.e. costs for health and nursing services and costs for residential services) and three output variables (case mix, extra nursing hours and residential charges). In the second-stage analysis, Tobit regressions and the Kruskall-Wallis tests of hypothesis to the efficiency scores were applied to define what are the factors that affect efficiency: (a) the ownership (private nursing houses outperform their public counterparts); and (b) the capability to implement strategies for labour cost and nursing costs containment, since the efficiency heavily depends upon the alignment of the costs to the public reimbursement system. Lastly, even though the public institutions are less efficient than the private ones, the results suggest that public nursing homes are moving towards their private counterparts, and thus competition is benefiting efficiency.

  12. [Facilitators and barriers regarding end of life care at nursing homes: A focus group study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, María Remedios; Moreno-Rodríguez, Marina; Hueso-Montoro, César; Campos-Calderón, Concepción; Varella-Safont, Ana; Montoya-Juárez, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    To identify the facilitators and barriers experienced by professional related to end of life care in nursing homes. Descriptive qualitative research with phenomenological orientation, through content analysis. Nursing Homes at Primary Care District in Granada (Spain). Fifteen clinical professionals with, at least 6 months of experience in nursing homes, without specific background in palliative care. Three focus groups were undertaken with professionals of different disciplines and nursing homes. Interviews were recorded and transcribed literally. An open and axial coding was performed to identify relevant categories. Professionals identified difficulties in the communication with families related to relatives' feelings of guilt, difficulty in understanding the deterioration of their relative, and addressing too late the issue of death. Regarding decision making, professionals recognized that they do not encourage participation of patients. Advance directives are valued as a necessary tool, but they do not contemplate implementing them systematically. Other difficulties that professionals highlighted are lack of coordination with other professionals, related to misunderstanding of patients' needs, as well as lack of training, and lack of material and human resources. Facilitators include relationships with primary care teams. It is necessary to improve communication among nursing homes professionals, families, patients and other health workers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. IAGG/IAGG GARN International Survey of End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallace, C.L.; Swagerty, D.; Barbagallo, M.; Vellas, B.; Cha, H.B.; Holmerova, I.; Dong, B.; Koopmans, R.T.; Cruz-Jentoft, A.J.; Gutierrez Robledo, L.M.; Moreno, J.C.; Hajjar, R.; Woo, J.; Arai, H.; Okochi, J.; Visvanathan, R.; Abdul-Rahman, S.A.; Goel, A.; Moser, A.; Rolland, Y.; Abbatecola, A.M.; Russo, M.; Morley, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey on end-of-life (EOL) care in nursing homes of 18 long-term care experts across 15 countries. The experts were chosen as a convenience-based sample of known experts in each country. The survey was administered in 2016 and included both open-ended

  14. Advance Care Planning and Dying in Nursing Homes in Flanders, Belgium: A Nationwide Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gendt, C.; Bilsen, J.; van der Stichele, R.; Deliens, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: In Belgium, data on actual advance care planning (ACP) in nursing homes (NHs) are scarce. Objectives: To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of documented advance directives and physicians' orders for end-of-life care in NHs, and the authorization of a legal representative in

  15. Patient Care Assisting. A Curriculum for Career Entry in the Nursing Homes of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sharon; Bailey, Nancy

    This curriculum guide contains 16 units aimed at training entry-level workers as patient care assistants in nursing homes. The units cover the following topics: the role of patient care assistants; psychosocial needs of geriatric patients; work ethics; legal issues; communication skills; infection control; safety issues; patient hygiene; patient…

  16. [Intervention of mobile palliative care team on nursing homes: retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piot, Elise; Leheup, Benoît F; Losson, Séverine; Gédor, Lorène; Domina, Lucie; Béhem, Chantal; Amanzouggarene, Malika

    2014-12-01

    Interventions of mobile palliative care teams in nursing homes have been the subject special consideration, however very little data are available on this subject. To determine the proportion of patients followed and consultations conducted in nursing homes for the dependent elderly by a mobile palliative care team, to describe the patients followed and to analyze the various aspects of this intervention. Retrospective study on the interventions carried out by a mobile palliative care team in nursing homes between January 1st and December 31st, 2012. The interventions in nursing homes targeted, 7.2% of the followed patients and represented 8.7% of the total activity of the mobile team. Intervention requests were made primarily by the family physician. The followed patients were mostly women (63%), with a mean age of 84 years, presenting non-cancerous diseases (78.2%), and had an average of 4.4 consultations. Half of the patients died during follow-up. Three quarters of the patients presented pain, neuro-psychological symptoms and verbal communication disorders. Four out of ten patients met with the occupational therapist and one of ten, the psychologist. The activity of mobile palliative care teams remains marginal, although steadily (on the rise. The collected data illustrate the specificity of geriatric palliative care, while certain characteristics inherent to nursing homes require establishing appropriate therapy proposals. Although quantitatively limited, the activity of mobile palliative care teams in nursing homes appears important as these interventions are likely meet the needs of both patients and staff in addition to enabling patients in palliative care to remain at their current place of residence.

  17. Associations Between Family Ratings on Experience With Care and Clinical Quality-of-Care Measures for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Li, Qinghua; Tang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Several states are currently collecting and publicly reporting nursing home resident and/or family member ratings of experience with care in an attempt to improve person-centered care in nursing homes. Using the 2008 Maryland nursing home family survey reports and other data, this study performed both facility- and resident-level analyses, and estimated the relationships between family ratings of care and several long-term care quality measures (pressure ulcers, overall and potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and mortality) after adjustment for resident characteristics. We found that better family evaluations of overall and specific aspects of care may be associated with reduced rates of risk-adjusted measures at the facility level (range of correlation coefficients: -.01 to -.31). Associations of overall experience ratings tended to persist after further adjustment for common nursing home characteristics such as nurse staffing levels. We conclude that family ratings of nursing home care complement other types of performance measures such as risk-adjusted outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Internet-based learning programme to increase nurses' knowledge level about venous leg ulcer care in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylönen, Minna; Viljamaa, Jaakko; Isoaho, Hannu; Junttila, Kristiina; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2017-11-01

    To test the effectiveness of an Internet-based education programme about venous leg ulcer nursing care on perceived and theoretical knowledge levels and attitudes among nurses working in home health care. Nurses have been shown to have knowledge gaps in venous leg ulcer nursing care. Internet-based learning could offer a means for flexible continuing education for home healthcare environment. Quasi-experimental study with pre- and postmeasurements and nonequivalent intervention and comparison groups. Nurses (n = 946) in home health care in two Finnish municipalities were invited to participate in the study and divided into intervention and comparison groups. The intervention group received education programme about venous leg ulcer nursing care, while the comparison group did not. Data were collected at baseline, at six weeks and at 10 weeks to test the hypotheses: nurses using education programme about venous leg ulcer nursing care will have higher level of knowledge and more positive attitudes than those not using education programme about venous leg ulcer nursing care. An analysis of variance and mixed models with repeated measures were used to test differences in knowledge and attitudes between and within the groups. There were statistically significant increases in knowledge levels in the intervention group from baseline to the first and second follow-up measurements. In the comparison group, the knowledge levels remained unchanged during the study. Attitude levels remained unchanged in both groups. Nurses' perceived and theoretical knowledge levels of venous leg ulcer nursing care can be increased with Internet-based education. However, this increase in knowledge levels is short-lived, which emphasises the need for continuous education. Internet-based education about venous leg ulcer nursing care is recommended for home healthcare nurses. Education programme about venous leg ulcer nursing care provides flexible method for nurses' learning with feasible

  19. Advance Care Planning in Norwegian nursing homes-Who is it for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Lisbeth; Ahlzén, Rolf; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-08-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is an international concept for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. In a preparatory conversation, health care professionals facilitate one or more conversations where nursing home residents are invited to reflect on, and articulate wishes and preferences concerning future medical treatment and end-of-life care. Our aim with this study was to increase knowledge of existing ACP practices in Norwegian nursing homes. We wanted to know how nursing home residents, relatives and nursing home staff take part in the conversations, and to what extent these conversations can be regarded as promoting autonomy, legal rights and individual needs for the residents. We conducted participant observation of seven preparatory conversations, followed by interviews with health care staff (together) and resident and relative (together). In the result section, we present an informative case example of an ACP conversation where common and important characteristics running through our data are present. These are further elaborated under the following headings: Life critical questions, Residents' quiet participation in the conversations, the Dying phase - a clinical issue, Nurses and physicians; different domains and Timing. We find that nursing home staff in our study wants to contribute to open awareness, autonomy and a good death, but there are little reflections about the purpose and content of the conversations, how they should be carried out and when, and what frail nursing home residents are able to understand and express in ACP conversations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Palliative Care in Your Nursing Home: Program Development and Innovation in Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Each year in the United States, 31% of elders who die do so in hospitals, accounting for over half a million deaths often involving expensive and unnecessary treatments (Zhao & Encinosa, 2010 ). Re-hospitalizations of frail elders with end-stage illnesses are a concern for the hospitals that have discharged them and for the facilities in which they live. In 2011, Schervier Nursing Care Center, a 364-bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility in the Bronx, NY, looked at its re-hospitalization rates. It was discovered that a large percentage of the residents being sent to the hospital were from the long-term and subacute populations with end-stage diseases that were no longer responding to treatment. This article describes the development of two innovative programs whose goals were to increase the number of residents receiving palliative care, increase the number of completed advance directives, reduce re-hospitalizations, and increase hospital referrals to the nursing home for palliative care. The key components of both programs and their outcomes are described. The development and implementation of these programs were the author's capstone project for the Zelda Foster Social Work Leadership Fellowship in Palliative and End-of-Life Care.

  1. Preconditions for successful advance care planning in nursing homes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilissen, Joni; Pivodic, Lara; Smets, Tinne; Gastmans, Chris; Vander Stichele, Robert; Deliens, Luc; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence of the potential effectiveness of advance care planning. Yet important knowledge gaps remain regarding the preconditions for successful implementation of advance care planning in the nursing home setting. We aim to identify the preconditions related to successful advance care planning in the nursing home setting. By specifying those, we would be able to make well-founded choices for the future design and planning of advance care planning intervention programs. A systematic review. PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL. Two authors independently screened publications. One author assessed methodological quality and extracted textual data, which was double-checked for a random sample. We extracted textual data and used thematic synthesis to identify "preconditions", defined as requirements, conditions and elements necessary to achieve the desired outcome of advance care planning, i.e. attaining concordance between residents' preferences and actual care or treatment received at the end of life. Based on 38 publications, we identified 17 preconditions at five different levels: resident, family, health-care professional, facility and community. Most preconditions were situated on multiple levels but the majority addressed professionals and the nursing home itself. We summarized preconditions in five domains: to have sufficient knowledge and skills, to be willing and able to participate in advance care planning, to have good relationships, to have an administrative system in place, and contextual factors supporting advance care planning within the nursing home. There are multiple preconditions related to successfully implementing advance care planning in the complex nursing home setting that operate at micro, meso and macro level. Future interventions need to address these multiple domains and levels in a whole-system approach in order to be better implementable and more sustainable, while simultaneously target the important role of the health-care

  2. First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Sandberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes. The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested.

  3. First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Sandberg, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers’ views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes. The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested. PMID:25628769

  4. Improving palliative care through teamwork (IMPACTT) in nursing homes: Study design and baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Ladwig, Susan; Ye, Zhiqiu; Norton, Sally A; Mukamel, Dana B

    2017-05-01

    The 2014 Institute of Medicine report recommended that healthcare providers caring for individuals with advanced illness have basic palliative care competencies in communication, inter-professional collaboration, and symptom management. Nursing homes, where one in three American decedents live and die, have fallen short of these competency goals. We implemented an intervention study to examine the efficacy of nursing home-based integrated palliative care teams in improving the quality of care processes and outcomes for residents at the end of life. This paper describes the design, rationale, and challenges of a two-arm randomized controlled trial of nursing home-based palliative care teams in 31 facilities. The impact of the intervention on residents' outcomes is measured with four risk-adjusted quality indicators: place of death (nursing home or hospital), number of hospitalizations, and self-reported pain and depression in the last 90-days of life. The effect of the intervention is also evaluated with regard to staff satisfaction and impact on care processes (e.g. palliative care competency, communication, coordination). Both secondary (e.g. the Minimum Data Set) and primary (e.g. staff surveys) data are employed to examine the effect of the intervention. Several challenges in conducting a complex, nursing home-based intervention have been identified. While sustainability of the intervention without research funding is not clear, we surmise that without changes to the payment model that put palliative care services in this care setting on par with the more "skilled" care, it will not be reasonable to expect any widespread efforts to implement facility-based palliative care services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving end-of-life care in nursing homes: implementation and evaluation of an intervention to sustain quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Anne M; Stevenson, Barbara; Moyes, Rhona; Oxenham, David; Murray, Scott A

    2013-09-01

    Internationally, policy calls for care homes to provide reliably good end-of-life care. We undertook a 20-month project to sustain palliative care improvements achieved by a previous intervention. To sustain a high standard of palliative care in seven UK nursing care homes using a lower level of support than employed during the original project and to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention. Two palliative care nurse specialists each spent one day per week providing support and training to seven care homes in Scotland, United Kingdom; after death audit data were collected each month and analysed. During the sustainability project, 132 residents died. In comparison with the initial intervention, there were increases in (a) the proportion of deceased residents with an anticipatory care plan in place (b) the proportion of those with Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation documentation in place and (c) the proportion of those who were on the Liverpool Care Pathway when they died. Furthermore, there was a reduction in inappropriate hospital deaths of frail and elderly residents with dementia. However, overall hospital deaths increased. A lower level of nursing support managed to sustain and build on the initial outcomes. However, despite increased adoption of key end-of-life care tools, hospital deaths were higher during the sustainability project. While good support from palliative care nurse specialists and GPs can help ensure that key processes remain in place, stable management and key champions are vital to ensure that a palliative care approach becomes embedded within the culture of the care home.

  6. Nurses' Use of iPads in Home Care-What Does It Mean to Patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup, Dorte Lindstrøm; Madsen, Esben Elholm; Hansen, Christl Fandt

    2017-01-01

    , aged 62 to 90 years, with different backgrounds and experiences with technology. Participants viewed nurses' use of iPads as an everyday occurrence, reflecting societal growth in the use of technology, and some perceived it as a sign of professionalism with the potential to enhance care......Although the use of technology is growing, little is known about how patients perceive technology in the form of tools used by health professionals. The prevailing view in the literature is that technology is cold, compared with the warm hands of nurses, but research regarding nurses' use...... of technology such as tablets is scarce. Even scarcer is research on how patients perceive the use of technological tools. This study examines patients' perspectives on the use of iPads by home care nurses. Semistructured interviews were conducted with seven participants who were receiving home care in Denmark...

  7. End-of-life care preferences of nursing home residents: Results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charis Wei Ling; Cheong, S K; Govinda Raj, A; Teo, Wsk; Leong, Iyo

    2016-10-01

    Palliative care services were not available in nursing homes in Singapore. Project CARE (Care At the end-of-life for Residents in homes for the Elderly) was a pilot programme that aimed to promote advance care planning and improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. We aimed to examine end-of-life care preferences among nursing home residents, and identify factors associated with preference for medical intervention, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and place of death. A cross-sectional study using data from advance care planning discussions was conducted from September 2009 to April 2012 across seven nursing homes. The advance care planning discussion was conducted with the resident (with a prognosis of 6 months or 1 year), their families and staff from the nursing home and hospital. A total of 600 residents and their families completed the advance care planning discussion. Majority (93.2%) preferred not to proceed with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 52.3% opted for limited additional intervention at the nursing home with escalation to the hospital if necessary and 77.0% preferred to die at the nursing home. Residents 85+ years (relative risk ratio: 3.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-9.93, p = 0.030) were more likely to prefer medical intervention at the nursing home only. No associations were found with the preference for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Residents who were single, or who were Christians or Catholics (adjusted odds ratio: 2.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-4.19, p = 0.039), were more likely to prefer to die at the nursing home. Preferences for medical interventions in nursing homes provide support to extend palliative care services to nursing homes, which may benefit residents who are older, single, or Christians or Catholics. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Measuring end-of-life care and outcomes in residential care/assisted living and nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, S.; Cohen, L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Reed, D.; Soest-Poortvliet, M.C. van; Hanson, L.C.; Sloane, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been

  9. Measuring End-of-Life Care and Outcomes in Residential Care/Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, S.; Cohen, L.; van der Steen, J.T.; Reed, D.; van Soest-Poortvliet, M.C.; Hanson, L.C.; Sloane, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Context The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been

  10. Geographic Disparities in Access to Nursing Home Services: Assessing Fiscal Stress and Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Joo; Martin, Erika G

    2017-11-12

    We test whether nursing homes serving predominately low-income and racial minority residents (compositional explanation) or located in neighborhoods with higher concentrations of low-income and racial minority residents (contextual explanation) have worse financial outcomes and care quality. Healthcare Cost Report Information System, Nursing Home Compare, Online Survey Certification and Reporting Certification, and American Community Survey. A cross-sectional study design of nursing homes within U.S. metropolitan areas. Data were obtained from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and U.S. Census Bureau. Medicaid-dependent nursing homes have a 3.5 percentage point lower operating ratio. Those serving primarily racial minorities have a 2.64-point lower quality rating. A 1 percent increase in the neighborhood population living in poverty is associated with a 1.20-point lower quality rating, on a scale from 10 to 50, and a 1 percent increase in the portion of neighborhood black residents is associated with a 0.8 percentage point lower operating ratio and a 0.37 lower quality rating. Medicaid dependency (compositional effect) and concentration of racial minority residents in neighborhoods (contextual effect) are associated with higher fiscal stress and lower quality of care, indicating that nursing homes' geographic location may exacerbate long-term care inequalities. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Schedule Control and Nursing Home Quality: Exploratory Evidence of a Psychosocial Predictor of Resident Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, David A; Berkman, Lisa F; Buxton, Orfeu M; Okechukwu, Cassandra A

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether nursing homes' quality of care was predicted by schedule control (workers' ability to decide work hours), independently of other staffing characteristics. Prospective ecological study of 30 nursing homes in New England. Schedule control was self-reported via survey in 2011-2012 (N = 1,045). Quality measures included the prevalence of decline in activities of daily living, residents' weight loss, and pressure ulcers, indicators systematically linked with staffing characteristics. Outcomes data for 2012 were retrieved from Medicare.gov. Robust Linear Regressions showed that higher schedule control predicted lower prevalence of pressure ulcers (β = -0.51, p quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. An examination of quality of care in Norwegian nursing homes - a change to more activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjøs, Bente Ø; Havig, Anders K

    2016-06-01

    Studies on Norwegian nursing homes have shown that the general care is at a relatively high level, while the level of physical and social activities is relatively low. As a response to these findings, the Norwegian government has stressed the importance of activities in various white papers and circulars and, in recent years, has launched several campaigns specifically aimed at increasing the level of activities. The aim of the study was to examine the following: (i) how the government has succeeded in increasing the level of physical and social activities in Norwegian nursing homes; (ii) how the level of activities compares to the general care; and (iii) how the level of activities and the general care are influenced by the following facility characteristics: residents' mobility level, total staffing levels, ratio of RNs, ratio of unlicensed staff and ward size. A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. On a scale ranging from 1 to 7, the staff members assess the activity dimension to be 4.31 and the general care dimension to be 5.66. The activity dimension was significantly negatively correlated with the ratio of unlicensed staff, the ratio of Registered Nurses and the residents' mobility level, while the general care dimension was significantly negatively correlated with the ratio of unlicensed staff. The study shows that the level of physical and social activities offered to the residents is relatively low, while the general care level is significantly higher, in line with earlier studies. Consequently, the government has not succeeded with its current policy to increase the level of activities in nursing homes. The relationship between the two quality dimensions and the explanatory variables shows that nursing home quality is a complicated phenomenon. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. Patients' perceptions of palliative care quality in hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2016-08-24

    Patients' perceptions of care quality within and across settings are important for the further development of palliative care. The aim was to investigate patients' perceptions of palliative care quality within settings, including perceptions of care received and their subjective importance, and contrast palliative care quality across settings. A cross-sectional study including 191 patients in late palliative phase (73 % response rate) admitted to hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care was conducted, using the Quality from the Patients' Perspective instrument-palliative care (QPP-PC). QPP-PC comprises four dimensions and 12 factors; "medical-technical competence" (MT) (2 factors), "physical-technical conditions" (PT) (one factor), "identity-orientation approach" (ID) (4 factors), "sociocultural atmosphere" (SC) (5 factors), and three single items (S); medical care, personal hygiene and atmosphere. Data were analysed using paired-samples t-test and analysis of covariance while controlling for differences in patient characteristics. Patients' perceptions of care received within settings showed high scores for the factors and single items "honesty" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings and low scores for "exhaustion" (MT) in three out of four settings. Patients' perceptions of importance scored high for "medical care" (S), "honesty" (ID), "respect and empathy" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings. No aspects of care scored low in all settings. Importance scored higher than perceptions of care received, in particular for receiving information. Patients' perceptions of care across settings differed, with highest scores in hospice inpatient care for the dimensions; ID, SC, and "medical care" (S), the SC and "atmosphere" (S) for hospice day care, and "medical care" (S) for palliative units in nursing homes. There were no differences in subjective importance across settings. Strengths of services related to

  14. [A consideration of the support for terminal care at the private skilled nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arao, Yuki; Sasabe, Mayako; Yamada, Yukari; Motoyama, Yuki; Morita, Katsuko; Kawazoe, Masahiro; Ono, Yoshiharu

    2009-12-01

    The increase in the number of residents in elderly care facilities has developed into a growing demand for home-based terminal care rather than treatments at medical institutions. Like many others, the Active Life Toyonaka (private skilled nursing home) has received more requests from its residents for adequate terminal care. It is unfortunate, however, that quite a few residents are obliged to be hospitalized for medical reasons that result in death. The purpose of our study is to determine what a terminal care should be like in a private skilled nursing home. The study has been conducted with the focuse on the successful case of a 90-year-old male resident diagnosed as having prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Our study has concluded that the crucial factors for a better terminal care should go as follows: (1) Having good coordination with medical institutions, (2) Reporting every change in residents' condition and administering an immediate treatment for alleviating pains of the residents, (3) Providing the residents with comfortable life of less restraint on activities in home-based care, (4) Sharing the same information among the staff of all divisions who is in charge of residents (doctors, nurses, caregivers, etc.) and (5) Establishing relationships of mutual trust with residents and their families. Nurses, especially, need to play important roles as coordinators among all the personnel concerned.

  15. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, F.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care

  16. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, F.M. de; Francke, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care

  17. Burnout in the nursing home health care aide: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Cooper

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Factors associated with burnout in health care aides are similar to those reported among nurses, although the level of evidence and low methodological rigor of these studies suggest more robust study designs are warranted. Our findings suggest research focused on this important but largely invisible group of care providers could yield important advances in understanding burnout in this group and yield potential interventions to buffer burnout and its consequences. Without mitigating the effects of burnout on nursing home health care aides, vulnerable older adults in residential care are at risk.

  18. End-of-life care in nursing homes: the high cost of staff turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Virginia P; Thompson, Sarah A; Gajewski, Byron J; Bott, Marjorie J

    2012-01-01

    Nursing home staff turnover results in high cost--both economic and personal--and has a negative impact on the quality of care provided to residents at the end of life. Reducing staff turnover in nursing homes would benefit both the cost to the U.S. health care system, and, most importantly, the care residents receive in the vulnerable period leading to death. There is rising pressure on nursing homes to improve their palliative and end-of-life care practices and reduce transfers to hospital for situations and conditions that can be safely managed on site. Nursing care staff deserve an investment in the specific training necessary for them to give the highest quality care to dying residents. This training should be multifaceted and include the physiological, psychological, spiritual, interpersonal, and cultural (including ethnic) aspects of dying. Empowerment with these necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes will not only result in better care for residents but likely also will reduce the burnout and frustration staff experience in caring for residents near death.

  19. [Cooperation between nursing homes and intellectual disability care services : State of affairs in Flanders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campens, J; Schiettecat, T; Vervliet, M; Van Heck, L; Lesseliers, J; Goethals, I; De Witte, N

    2017-10-01

    Considering the increasing life expectancy of people with intellectual disabilities (ID), the importance of cooperation between services for people with ID and elderly care services has been stressed in Flanders and the Netherlands, as well as internationally. However, the prevalence, intensity and content of such a cooperation are yet unknown. In order to gain information to address this issue, an online-survey was delivered to directors of all nursing homes in Flanders (n = 781). 229 surveys were completed.In more than 75% of the nursing homes, people with ID were among the residents over the past decade. However, at the same time a lack of expertise has been identified as a barrier to provide them optimal care and support. Hence, the respondents point out that a cooperation with ID care services could be beneficial. Nevertheless, those partnerships only arose in a quarter of the nursing homes so far, primarily for the purpose of exchange of expertise. Intersectoral multidisciplinary consultations and intersectoral care team consultations have been taking place as well, be it mainly in the context of a persons' transition from an ID care service to a nursing home. Until now, radical cooperations which involve an exchange of staff, seem to be rather rare.

  20. Quality of care in nursing homes: an analysis of relationships among profit, quality, and ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ciaran; Harrington, Charlene; Kitchener, Martin; Saliba, Debra

    2003-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted a negative correlation between proprietary status and nursing home quality of care. This relationship might be explained by the context in which proprietary homes operate. However, another possible explanation is that some proprietary homes take excessive profit to the detriment of care quality. To examine the relationship between profit levels and quality in proprietary and nonproprietary nursing homes (NHs), accounting for resident and market characteristics. Data on 1098 free-standing NHs were taken from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the On-line Survey Certification and Reporting System, and California licensing and statistical reports for 1998 and 1999. Tobit multivariate techniques were used to examine the relationship between deficiency citations and a range of explanatory variables, including profit. Proprietary homes in California had significantly lower quality of care than nonproprietary homes. A stratified analysis revealed that, controlling for resident, facility, and market characteristics, profits located within the highest 14% of the proprietary sector's profit distribution were associated with significantly more total deficiencies and serious deficiencies. This relationship was not found in nonproprietary facilities. Other factors related to deficiencies included the ethnic mix of residents and facility size. Within the context in which proprietary homes operate, profit above a given threshold is associated with a higher number of deficiencies. Given this and the role of the proprietary sector in NH care, careful monitoring of profit levels in this sector appears warranted.

  1. [Current Status of Medical Care for Nursing Home Residents in Germany - Results of an Empirical Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleina, T; Horn, A; Suhr, R; Schaeffer, D

    2017-05-01

    Following recent studies revealing deficits in general and specialised medical care of nursing home residents in Germany, the discussion on the quality of medical care of residents in residential care facilities has intensified in the past years. As a result, political efforts have been undertaken to facilitate improvements in this context. We collected data on the health status and medical care of 778 residents from 8 nursing homes in order to investigate the current situation regarding medical care for nursing home residents in Germany. Most of them were multimorbid, taking several prescribed medications. Our results showed that about 91% of the residents had personal contact to general practitioners or internists quarterly and only 1.3% had no such contacts within a year. The frequency of contacts to other medical specialists was comparably low. For example, within a year, only 18.9% of the residents had contact to urologists; only 16.7% had contact to ophthalmologists; only 39.6% had contact to dentists and only 10.6% of the female residents had contact to gynaecologists. Despite the fact that many of the residents showed specific medical care needs, these rates were below the utilisation rates of older population groups not living in long-term care homes. This leads to the conclusion that previous efforts to optimise medical care in nursing homes were only partially successful. Well known deficits are still remaining. Considering potential consequences for residents, further and consequent actions are required to improve the general and specialised medical care in institutionalised long-term care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Changes in the relationship between nursing home financial performance and quality of care under public reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongyoung; Werner, Rachel M

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between financial performance and quality of care in nursing homes is not well defined and prior work has been mixed. The recent focus on improving the quality of nursing homes through market-based incentives such as public reporting may have changed this relationship, as public reporting provides nursing homes with increased incentives to engage in quality-based competition. If quality improvement activities require substantial production costs, nursing home profitability may become a more important predictor of quality under public reporting. This study explores the relationship between financial performance and quality of care and test whether this relationship changes under public reporting. Using a 10-year (fiscal years 1997-2006) panel data set of 9444 skilled nursing facilities in the US, this study employs a facility fixed-effects with and without instrumental variables approach to test the effect of finances on quality improvement and correct for potential endogeneity. The results show that better financial performance, as reflected by the 1-year lagged total profit margin, is modestly associated with higher quality but only after public reporting is initiated. These findings have important policy implications as federal and state governments use market-based incentives to increase demand for high-quality care and induce providers to compete based on quality. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaff Fuusje M; Francke Anneke L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Methods Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of t...

  4. Health of health care workers in Canadian nursing homes and pediatric hospitals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Knopp-Sihota, Jennifer A; Nesari, Maryam; Chamberlain, Stephanie A; Squires, Janet E; Norton, Peter G; Cummings, Greta G; Stevens, Bonnie J; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2017-11-21

    Poor health of health care workers affects quality of care, but research and health data for health care workers are scarce. Our aim was to compare physical/mental health among health care worker groups 1) within nursing homes and pediatric hospitals, 2) between the 2 settings and 3) with the physical/mental health of the Canadian population. Using cross-sectional data collected as part of the Translating Research in Elder Care program and the Translating Research on Pain in Children program, we examined the health of health care workers. In nursing homes, 169 registered nurses, 139 licensed practical nurses, 1506 care aides, 145 allied health care providers and 69 managers were surveyed. In pediatric hospitals, 63 physicians, 747 registered nurses, 155 allied health care providers, 49 nurse educators and 22 managers were surveyed. After standardization of the data for age and sex, we applied analyses of variance and general linear models, adjusted for multiple testing. Nursing home workers and registered nurses in pediatric hospitals had poorer mental health than the Canadian population. Scores were lowest for registered nurses in nursing homes (mean difference -4.4 [95% confidence interval -6.6 to -2.6]). Physicians in pediatric hospitals and allied health care providers in nursing homes had better physical health than the general population. We also found important differences in physical/mental health for care provider groups within and between care settings. Mental health is especially poor among nursing home workers, who care for a highly vulnerable and medically complex population of older adults. Strategies including optimized work environments are needed to improve the physical and mental health of health care workers to ameliorate quality of patient care. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  5. [Using interaction-intensive therapeutic nursing measures and "home remedies" in nursing care. An explorative study as a plea for integrated nursing practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, E M; Höhmann, U; Linhart, M; Kohan, D; Saller, R

    2001-06-01

    Until today there existed no major studies about the wide range of currently utilized methods or potential sociodemographic and institutional influences on utilization despite an immense interest among nurses in alternative nursing methods (in this study referred to as home remedies). In this study, from standardized questionnaires with a convenience sample of three different settings of nursing practice, i.e. acute-care, nursing homes, and home health care were analyzed using the statistical program SPSS. Our analysis showed that a wide range of traditional home remedies is being utilized, e.g. application of heat and cold or herbal infusion (herbal teas). Furthermore, lay approaches such as aromatherapy were also commonly used. The statistical analysis revealed complex influences of age, duration of nursing practice and institutional setting in the utilization of home remedies. There is need for more systematic studies to further examine the alternative methods or home remedies so popular among nurses and their patients. Regarding a more consistent naming of the variety of different methods coming from naturopathy, folk and lay medicine, the authors suggest the term "integrative nursing care".

  6. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    OpenAIRE

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to...

  7. Rural-Urban Differences in End-of-Life Nursing Home Care: Facility and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. Data and Methods: We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used…

  8. A Framework for Categorizing Social Interactions Related to End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Almost half of people age 85 and older who die annually in the United States die as nursing home residents, yet because it is not always clear who is close to death, not all residents who might benefit from end-of-life care receive it. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for organizing social interactions related to…

  9. Family Perspectives on End-of-Life Care Experiences in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetle, Terrie; Shield, Renee; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C.; Welch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand knowledge regarding end-of-life care received in nursing homes through the use of narrative interviews with family members close to the decedents. Design and Methods: We conducted follow-up qualitative interviews with 54 respondents who had participated in an earlier national survey of 1,578…

  10. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Rooij, S.E. De; Diepstraten, A.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Helmich, E.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies

  11. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies in

  12. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  13. Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home health care nurses and aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Margaret M; Markkanen, Pia K; Galligan, Catherine J; Kriebel, David; Chalupka, Stephanie M; Kim, Hyun; Gore, Rebecca J; Sama, Susan R; Laramie, Angela K; Davis, Letitia

    2009-11-01

    We quantified risks of sharp medical device (sharps) injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home health care nurses and aides, identified risk factors, assessed the use of sharps with safety features, and evaluated underreporting in workplace-based surveillance. We conducted a questionnaire survey and workplace-based surveillance, collaborating with 9 home health care agencies and 2 labor unions from 2006 to 2007. Approximately 35% of nurses and 6.4% of aides had experienced at least 1 sharps injury during their home health care career; corresponding figures for other blood and body fluid exposures were 15.1% and 6.7%, respectively. Annual sharps injuries incidence rates were 5.1 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) nurses and 1.0 per 100 FTE aides. Medical procedures contributing to sharps injuries were injecting medications, administering fingersticks and heelsticks, and drawing blood. Other contributing factors were sharps disposal, contact with waste, and patient handling. Sharps with safety features frequently were not used. Underreporting of sharps injuries to the workplace-based surveillance system was estimated to be about 50%. Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures are serious hazards for home health care nurses and aides. Improvements in hazard intervention are needed.

  14. Relatedness, autonomy, and competence in the caring relationship: The perspective of nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, A.F.J.; Westerhof, Gerben Johan; Kuin, Y.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on self-determination theory and person-environment congruence models, this study investigated the importance and experiences of relatedness, autonomy, and competence in the caring relationship from the perspective of residents of somatic nursing homes. Furthermore, discrepancies between the

  15. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection...

  16. Sharps Injuries and Other Blood and Body Fluid Exposures Among Home Health Care Nurses and Aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Pia K.; Galligan, Catherine J.; Kriebel, David; Chalupka, Stephanie M.; Kim, Hyun; Gore, Rebecca J.; Sama, Susan R.; Laramie, Angela K.; Davis, Letitia

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We quantified risks of sharp medical device (sharps) injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home health care nurses and aides, identified risk factors, assessed the use of sharps with safety features, and evaluated underreporting in workplace-based surveillance. Methods. We conducted a questionnaire survey and workplace-based surveillance, collaborating with 9 home health care agencies and 2 labor unions from 2006 to 2007. Results. Approximately 35% of nurses and 6.4% of aides had experienced at least 1 sharps injury during their home health care career; corresponding figures for other blood and body fluid exposures were 15.1% and 6.7%, respectively. Annual sharps injuries incidence rates were 5.1 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) nurses and 1.0 per 100 FTE aides. Medical procedures contributing to sharps injuries were injecting medications, administering fingersticks and heelsticks, and drawing blood. Other contributing factors were sharps disposal, contact with waste, and patient handling. Sharps with safety features frequently were not used. Underreporting of sharps injuries to the workplace-based surveillance system was estimated to be about 50%. Conclusions. Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures are serious hazards for home health care nurses and aides. Improvements in hazard intervention are needed. PMID:19890177

  17. The relationship of staffing and work environment with implicit rationing of nursing care in Swiss nursing homes--A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Hamers, Jan P H; Engberg, Sandra; Simon, Michael; Schwendimann, René

    2015-09-01

    Implicit rationing of nursing care refers to the withdrawal of or failure to carry out necessary nursing care activities due to lack of resources, in the literature also described as missed care, omitted care, or nursing care left undone. Under time constraints, nurses give priority to activities related to vital medical needs and the safety of the patient, leaving out documentation, rehabilitation, or emotional support of patients. In nursing homes, little is known about the occurrence of implicit rationing of nursing care and possible contributing factors. The purpose of this study was (1) to describe levels and patterns of self-reported implicit rationing of nursing care in Swiss nursing homes and (2) to explore the relationship between staffing level, turnover, and work environment factors and implicit rationing of nursing care. Cross-sectional, multi-center sub-study of the Swiss Nursing Home Human Resources Project (SHURP). Nursing homes from all three language regions of Switzerland. A random selection of 156 facilities with 402 units and 4307 direct care workers from all educational levels (including 25% registered nurses). We utilized data from established scales to measure implicit rationing of nursing care (Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care), perceptions of leadership ability and staffing resources (Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index), teamwork and safety climate (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire), and work stressors (Health Professions Stress Inventory). Staffing level and turnover at the unit level were measured with self-developed questions. Multilevel linear regression models were used to explore the proposed relationships. Implicit rationing of nursing care does not occur frequently in Swiss nursing homes. Care workers ration support in activities of daily living, such as eating, drinking, elimination and mobilization less often than documentation of care and the social care of nursing homes residents. Statistically

  18. Documentation and communication of nutritional care for elderly hospitalized patients: perspectives of nurses and undergraduate nurses in hospitals and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Kristin; Eide, Helene Kjøllesdal; Sortland, Kjersti; Almendingen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional care is a basic human right for all people. Nevertheless, undernourishment is known to be a frequent and serious health care problem among elderly hospitalized patients in Western Europe. Nutritional documentation contributes to ensuring proper nutritional treatment and care. Only a few studies have explored how nurses document nutritional care in hospitals, and between hospitals and nursing homes. Available research suggests that documentation practices are unsatisfactory. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses document nutritional treatment and care for elderly patients in hospitals and how nurses and undergraduate nurses communicate information about patients' nutritional status when elderly patients are transferred between hospital and nursing homes. A qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Data was collected in focus group interviews with 16 nurses in one large university hospital, and 11 nurses and 16 undergraduate nurses in five nursing homes associated with the university hospital. Participants from the university hospital represented a total of seven surgical and medical wards, all of which transferred patients to the associated nursing homes. The catchment area of the hospital and the nursing homes represented approximately 10% of the Norwegian population in heterogenic urban and rural municipalities. Data were coded and analysed thematically within the three contexts: self-understanding, critical common sense, and theoretical understanding. The results were summarized under three main themes 1) inadequate documentation of nutritional status on hospital admission, 2) inadequate and unsystematic documentation of nutritional information during hospital stay, 3) limited communication of nutritional information between hospital and nursing homes. The three main themes included seven sub-themes, which reflected the lack of nutritional screening and unsystematic documentation on admission and during

  19. Effect of oral healthcare education on knowledge, attitude and skills of care home nurses: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lugt-Lustig, Kersti H M E; Vanobbergen, Jacques N O; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; De Visschere, Luc M J; Schols, Jos M G A; de Baat, Cees

    2014-02-01

    To systematically review the literature on the effect of providing oral healthcare education to care home nurses on their oral healthcare knowledge and attitude and their oral hygiene care skills. A literature search was obtained for relevant articles on oral healthcare education of nurses in care homes, using five electronic retrieval systems and databases. The search was limited to human studies, articles published in English and articles published during the period January 1990 to December 2011. The methodological quality of an article was assessed on the basis of criteria published by the Cochrane Collaboration. For articles not meeting all methodological quality criteria, relevance criteria were used to determine how much scientific evidence could be assigned to the study findings. In accordance with the methodological quality criteria, two randomized controlled trials were included. Additionally, four studies were included after determining the scientific evidence of the study findings. The studies included revealed some scientific evidence and indications that an oral healthcare education programme for care home nurses may improve the nurses' oral healthcare knowledge and attitude. Any effect of oral healthcare education to care home nurses' oral hygiene care skills could not be determined. Oral healthcare education may have a positive effect on care home nurses' oral healthcare knowledge and attitude and on care home residents' oral hygiene, whereas any effect on care home nurses' oral hygiene care skills could not be found. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Current Status of Home Medical Care Waste Collection by Nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2017-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the current status of home medical care (HMC) waste collection by nurses for individual items and whether the collection rate differs with city size. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,022 nursing offices, of which 645 offices provided valid responses. Offices were classified into three groups according to the local population size. Responses indicated that used syringes and needles, except for pen-type self-injection needles, were collected by >50% of HMC nurses. On the other hand, enteral nutrients, nutritional adjustment diet vessels, feeding tubes, portable injectors, ventilator masks, endotracheal suction catheters, tracheal cannulas, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) bags, and urinary catheters and bags had a low collection rate in comparison with syringes or needles. The collection percentage of used syringes, needles, and infusion needles (p nurses. On the contrary, nonhazardous HMC waste should be collected by municipalities. This paper illustrates the status of waste collection of individual home medical care (HMC) items by HMC nurses. Infectious waste, such as needles and syringes, is collected by nurses. The collection rate of infectious waste by nurses in large cities was low compared with that in small cities. Although municipalities are responsible for collecting all HMC waste, sharp or infectious items should be collected by HMC doctors or nurses, whereas nonhazardous HMC waste should be collected by the municipalities.

  1. The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care in nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visschere, Luc; de Baat, Cees; De Meyer, Lize; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; Peeters, Bart; Söderfelt, Bjorn; Vanobbergen, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    This qualitative study explored barriers and enabling factors to the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. Oral health care in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium) is inadequate. Qualitative data were obtained from nurses employed in 13 nursing homes involved in two randomised controlled trials in Flanders-Belgium. Data were collected by focus group and face-to-face interviews during April 2005 and December 2009. All transcripts were analysed with support of NVivo 8 (Version 2008). Transcripts were intuitively analysed in a two-step method. Most revealed barriers were consistent with previous findings in the literature. Newly reported barriers were respect for residents' self-determination, experience based oral health care by nurses, residents' oral health status and nurses' inability to notice residents' oral health status. Demand-driven oral health care was found to be a strong enabling factor. The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care seems to be a major problem due to a multitude of barriers. In future implementation innovations in oral health care an a priori assessment of influencing factors is recommended. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Improving dementia care in nursing homes: experiences with a palliative care symptom-assessment tool (MIDOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Norbert; Larkin, Philip; Connolly, Michael; Rode, Peter; Elsner, Frank

    2014-04-01

    In the past decade, the palliative care approach has been used in the care of frail older people living with debilitating chronic conditions, including dementia. To describe health professionals' experiences of assessing the symptoms of people with dementia using a cancer-patient-oriented symptom-assessment tool from a palliative care context. This was a qualitative study that used semi-structured interviews (n=13) with clinical staff in three nursing homes prior to and following the implementation of the Minimal Documentation system for Palliative care (MIDOS) tool for assessing symptoms over a period of 6 weeks. Baseline interviews showed specific concerns about symptom assessment, such as uncertainty about underlying symptoms in residents who appeared to be in distress. After the implementation of the MIDOS tool, participants reported that daily use of the tool was perceived as helpful in evaluating symptoms other than pain and improved internal communication between staff regarding clinical decision making. The MIDOS tool was perceived as a helpful and valuable complement to existing tools. Participants expressed some concerns regarding the subjective nature of perceiving symptoms and clinical decision making. The use of tools such as the MIDOS tool has the potential to enhance the quality of palliative care in dementia care.

  3. Guidelines for audiology service delivery in nursing homes. Ad Hoc Committee on Audiology Service Delivery in Home Care and Institutional Settings. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing number of older adults in society as well as changing consumer preference and health care delivery systems have led to more frequent activity of audiologists in the delivery of services in nursing homes. The nursing home setting presents a number of challenges for the audiologist. It is anticipated that this document will provide audiologists with a comprehensive hearing management protocol and facilitate audiologists to confront the numerous challenges of the nursing home setting and provide quality audiology services.

  4. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; van Tilburg, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. Design: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. Setting: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  5. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  6. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women) had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102), and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308), performance status of 3-4 (n = 261), and dementia (n = 121). At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712). 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109), change of attending physicians (n = 8), and others (n = 5). The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03), the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02), women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02), and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02). Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing. PMID:22044683

  7. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodama Yuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102, and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308, performance status of 3-4 (n = 261, and dementia (n = 121. At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712. 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109, change of attending physicians (n = 8, and others (n = 5. The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03, the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02, women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02, and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02. Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing.

  8. Safety Risks Among Home Infusion Nurses and Other Home Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Catherine; Quinn, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, home health care (HHC) is a rapidly growing industry and home infusion therapy is a rapidly growing market. HHC can present substantial occupational safety and health (OSH) risks. This article summarizes major OSH risks relevant to home infusion therapy by illustrating them through real-life scenarios collected systematically using qualitative research methods by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-funded research projects at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. The need for home infusion therapy will continue to grow in the future, and safety interventions to prevent or minimize OSH risks are essential. PMID:28683000

  9. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and respiratory ), social workers, personal care aides, home medical equipment suppliers, and most importantly, informal caregivers (e.g., ... also available to help with home assessment. Assistive Technology to improve home safety can also be an ...

  10. Hospice family members' perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-10-01

    Even though more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had 2 research questions; (1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared with family members of community dwelling hospice patients? (2) What are family members' perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family members of hospice patients residing in the community. Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n = 176) with family members of community-dwelling hospice patients (n = 267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life; however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents, concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for residents. This study suggests that nursing

  11. Advance Directives and End-of-Life Care among Nursing Home Residents Receiving Maintenance Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Hall, Yoshio N; Katz, Ronit; O'Hare, Ann M

    2017-03-07

    Little is known about the relation between the content of advance directives and downstream treatment decisions among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. In this study, we determined the prevalence of advance directives specifying treatment limitations and/or surrogate decision-makers in the last year of life and their association with end-of-life care among nursing home residents. Using national data from 2006 to 2007, we compared the content of advance directives among 30,716 nursing home residents receiving dialysis to 30,825 nursing home residents with other serious illnesses during the year before death. Among patients receiving dialysis, we linked the content of advance directives to Medicare claims to ascertain site of death and treatment intensity in the last month of life. In the last year of life, 36% of nursing home residents receiving dialysis had a treatment-limiting directive, 22% had a surrogate decision-maker, and 13% had both in adjusted analyses. These estimates were 13%-27%, 5%-11%, and 6%-13% lower, respectively, than for decedents with other serious illnesses. For patients receiving dialysis who had both a treatment-limiting directive and surrogate decision-maker, the adjusted frequency of hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, intensive procedures, and inpatient death were lower by 13%, 17%, 13%, and 14%, respectively, and hospice use and dialysis discontinuation were 5% and 7% higher compared with patients receiving dialysis lacking both components. Among nursing home residents receiving dialysis, treatment-limiting directives and surrogates were associated with fewer intensive interventions and inpatient deaths, but were in place much less often than for nursing home residents with other serious illnesses. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Public reporting and the quality of care of German nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Annika; Nguyen, Thu-Van; Schmitz, Hendrik

    2016-10-01

    Since 2009, German nursing homes have been evaluated regularly by an external institution with quality report cards published online. We follow recent debates and argue that most of the information in the report cards does not reliably measure quality of care. However, a subset of up to seven measures does. Do these measures that reflect "risk factors" improve over time? Using a sample of more than 3000 German nursing homes with information on two waves, we assume that the introduction of public reporting is an exogenous institutional change and apply before-after-estimations to obtain estimates for the relation between public reporting and quality. We find a significant improvement of the identified risk factors. Also, the two employed outcome quality indicators improve significantly. The improvements are driven by nursing homes with low quality in the first evaluation. To the extent that this can be interpreted as evidence that public reporting positively affects the (reported) quality in nursing homes, policy makers should carefully choose indicators reflecting care-sensitive quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobbing among care workers in nursing homes: A cross-sectional secondary analysis of the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resources Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Myriam; Schwendimann, René; Zúñiga, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    As a category of bullying, mobbing is a form of violence in the workplace that damages the employing organization as well as the targeted employee. In Europe, the overall prevalence of mobbing in healthcare is estimated at 4%. However, few studies have explored mobbing among long-term care workers. This study aims to examine the frequency of mobbing in Swiss nursing homes and its relationships with care workers' (i.e. registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, assistant nurse, nurse aide) health status, job satisfaction, and intention to leave, and to explore the work environment as a contributing factor to mobbing. A cross-sectional, multi-center sub-study of the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resource Project (SHURP). Nursing homes in Switzerland's three language regions. A total of 162 randomly selected nursing homes with 20 or more beds, including 5311 care workers with various educational levels. Controlling for facility and care worker characteristics, generalized estimation equations were used to assess the relationships between mobbing and care workers' health status, job satisfaction, and intention to leave as well as the association of work environment factors with mobbing. In Swiss nursing homes, 4.6% of surveyed care workers (n=242) reported mobbing experiences in the last 6 months. Compared to untargeted persons, those directly affected by mobbing had higher odds of health complaints (Odds Ratios (OR): 7.81, 95% CI 5.56-10.96) and intention to leave (OR: 5.12, 95% CI 3.81-6.88), and lower odds of high job satisfaction (OR: 0.19, 95% CI 0.14-0.26). Odds of mobbing occurrences increased with declining teamwork and safety climate (OR: 0.41, 95% CI 0.30-0.58), less supportive leadership (OR: 0.42, 95% CI 0.30-0.58), and higher perceived inadequacy of staffing resources (OR: 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.92). Mobbing experiences in Swiss nursing homes are relatively rare. Alongside teamwork and safety climate, risk factors are strongly associated with superiors

  14. Geospatial analysis and distribution patterns of home nursing care in a metropolitan area - a large-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Reinhard, Julia; Boll, Michael; Groneberg, David

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on home nursing care distribution in an urban setting in Germany. A shortage of nursing care workforce is present in Germany. A geospatial analysis was performed to examine distribution patterns at the district level in Frankfurt, Germany (n = 46 districts) and factors were analysed influencing the location choice of home nursing care providers (n = 151). Furthermore, within the analysis we focused on the population aged over 65 years to model the demand for nursing care. The analysis revealed a tendency of home nursing care providers to be located near the city centre (centripetal distribution pattern). However, the demand for care showed more inconsistent patterns. Still, a centripetal distribution pattern of demand could be stated. Compared with the control groups (e.g. acute hospitals and pharmacies) similar geographical distribution patterns were present. However, the location of home nursing care providers was less influenced by demand compared with the control groups. The supply of nursing care was unevenly distributed in this metropolitan setting, but still matched the demand for nursing care. Due to the rapidly changing health care environments policy, regulations must be (re-)evaluated critically to improve the management and delivery of nursing care provision. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used for...

  16. Outcomes from the work of registered nurses working with older people in UK care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Hazel

    2010-06-01

    This research sought to illuminate the distinct contributions made by Registered Nurses (RNs) and Care Assistants (CAs) to outcomes for older people in UK (nursing) care homes and to identify the outcomes of their work. This paper reports on aspects relevant to RNs. Older people living in long-term residential care settings around the world are among the most vulnerable individuals within their communities and those with the most complex needs. Nursing has historically been fundamental in the delivery of these services but, in some countries, the role of Registered Nurses in residential care is coming under increasing scrutiny, particularly in the context of escalating costs and funding restrictions, a questioning of the need for a 24-hour 'health' professional presence in a 'social care' service and a lack of evidence on the distinct contribution that RNs make to outcomes in these settings. A multi-method qualitative interpretive approach, adopting a structure-process-outcome framework and grounded in the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer (2003). For Phase 1 of the study, RNs and CAs from care homes around the UK contributed examples of their work, which they identified as having made a 'significant' difference to older individuals. Phase 2 comprised researcher fieldwork (observations, interviews and documentary analysis) in three care homes around UK. Research participants included RNs, CAs, older residents, relatives, home managers and professionals working in the homes. RN roles in care homes are broad and multifaceted. Distinct outcomes of RN work are consequent to their caring and their knowledge and skills developed through broad experience in a range of healthcare settings. Outcomes for residents from RN work include enhanced personhood and wellbeing, improved health and function, the prevention of problems/adverse outcomes and enhanced quality of life. RN outcomes have positive impact on relatives, staff and the homes in general. There is

  17. Promoting nursing students' understanding and reflection on cultural awareness with older adults in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Diana R; Grossman, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    It is important for nursing programs to use culturally focused activities to increase student preparation in caring for diverse older adults in their homes. The purpose of this study was to examine strategies that promote students' reflection on cultural awareness using home care-focused case studies, simulations, and self-reflective writing activities. Cases and simulations were designed to depict diverse patients living at home with a variety of demographic characteristics, such as health history, age, culture, religion, dietary preferences, marital status, family involvement, and socioeconomic status. Qualitative data regarding student perceptions of cultural awareness was gathered via written surveys, and findings suggest that junior- and senior-year nursing students enhanced the depth and breadth of how they defined "cultural competence" after participating in culturally focused classroom and clinical laboratory activities. Levels of reflective writing using framework also improved by the semester's end for both groups of students.

  18. Racial Segregation and Quality of Care Disparity in US Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine the contributions of travel distance and preferences for racial homogeneity as sources of nursing home segregation and racial disparities in nursing home quality. We first theoretically characterize the distinctive implications of these mechanisms for nursing home racial segregation. We then use this model to structure an empirical analysis of nursing home sorting. We find little evidence of differential willingness to pay for quality by race among first-time nursing home entrants, but do find significant distance and race-based preference effects. Simulation exercises suggest that both effects contribute importantly to racial disparities in nursing home quality. PMID:25461895

  19. Racial segregation and quality of care disparity in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the contributions of travel distance and preferences for racial homogeneity as sources of nursing home segregation and racial disparities in nursing home quality. We first theoretically characterize the distinctive implications of these mechanisms for nursing home racial segregation. We then use this model to structure an empirical analysis of nursing home sorting. We find little evidence of differential willingness to pay for quality by race among first-time nursing home entrants, but do find significant distance and race-based preference effects. Simulation exercises suggest that both effects contribute importantly to racial disparities in nursing home quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Meals in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik; Birkemose, A.

    2004-01-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. in the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type...... of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home....... This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20...

  1. Interactions between drugs and geriatric syndromes in nursing home and home care: results from Shelter and IBenC projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Graziano; Giovannini, Silvia; Sganga, Federica; Manes-Gravina, Ester; Topinkova, Eva; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Garms-Homolová, Vjenka; Declercq, Anja; van der Roest, Henriëtte G; Jónsson, Pálmi V; van Hout, Hein; Bernabei, Roberto

    2018-01-16

    Drugs may interact with geriatric syndromes by playing a role in the continuation, recurrence or worsening of these conditions. Aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of interactions between drugs and three common geriatric syndromes (delirium, falls and urinary incontinence) among older adults in nursing home and home care in Europe. We performed a cross-sectional multicenter study among 4023 nursing home residents participating in the Services and Health for Elderly in Long-TERm care (Shelter) project and 1469 home care patients participating in the Identifying best practices for care-dependent elderly by Benchmarking Costs and outcomes of community care (IBenC) project. Exposure to interactions between drugs and geriatric syndromes was assessed by 2015 Beers criteria. 790/4023 (19.6%) residents in the Shelter Project and 179/1469 (12.2%) home care patients in the IBenC Project presented with one or more drug interactions with geriatric syndromes. In the Shelter project, 288/373 (77.2%) residents experiencing a fall, 429/659 (65.1%) presenting with delirium and 180/2765 (6.5%) with urinary incontinence were on one or more interacting drugs. In the IBenC project, 78/172 (45.3%) participants experiencing a fall, 80/182 (44.0%) presenting with delirium and 36/504 (7.1%) with urinary incontinence were on one or more interacting drugs. Drug-geriatric syndromes interactions are common in long-term care patients. Future studies and interventions aimed at improving pharmacological prescription in the long-term care setting should assess not only drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, but also interactions involving geriatric syndromes.

  2. Process Evaluation to Explore Internal and External Validity of the "Act in Case of Depression" Care Program in Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontjevas, R.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Smalbrugge, M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A multidisciplinary, evidence-based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents was implemented and tested using a stepped-wedge design in 23 nursing homes (NHs): " Act in case of Depression" (AiD). Objective: Before effect analyses, to evaluate AiD

  3. Process evaluation to explore internal and external validity of the "Act in Case of Depression" care program in nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontjevas, R.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Smalbrugge, M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multidisciplinary, evidence-based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents was implemented and tested using a stepped-wedge design in 23 nursing homes (NHs): "Act in case of Depression" (AiD). OBJECTIVE: Before effect analyses, to evaluate AiD

  4. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Fuusje M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Methods Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of these migrants are living. 93 nurses and 78 GPs provided information about their experiences and opinions regarding home care for this group of patients. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results GPs refer relatively few patients from these migrant groups to home care. They often find it difficult to assess the needs of these patients and their families. In 40% of the GPs' cases in which terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants were not referred to home care, the GP regretted this afterwards: the patients had not received sufficient qualified care, and their informal carers had often become overburdened. In addition, home care nurses often express dissatisfaction with the home care given to terminally ill Turkish or Moroccan patients, because of communication problems, the patients' lack of knowledge of the disease, or difficulties in making suitable appointments with the patient or with the family. Conclusion Nurses and GPs cite chiefly similar factors influencing access to and use of home care as family members did in a previous study. However, according to GPs and nurses, the main barrier to the use of home care concerns communication problems, while relatives cited the preference for family care as the main reason for abstaining from the use of home care.

  5. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Fuusje M; Francke, Anneke L

    2009-01-26

    Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of these migrants are living. 93 nurses and 78 GPs provided information about their experiences and opinions regarding home care for this group of patients. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. GPs refer relatively few patients from these migrant groups to home care. They often find it difficult to assess the needs of these patients and their families. In 40% of the GPs' cases in which terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants were not referred to home care, the GP regretted this afterwards: the patients had not received sufficient qualified care, and their informal carers had often become overburdened.In addition, home care nurses often express dissatisfaction with the home care given to terminally ill Turkish or Moroccan patients, because of communication problems, the patients' lack of knowledge of the disease, or difficulties in making suitable appointments with the patient or with the family. Nurses and GPs cite chiefly similar factors influencing access to and use of home care as family members did in a previous study. However, according to GPs and nurses, the main barrier to the use of home care concerns communication problems, while relatives cited the preference for family care as the main reason for abstaining from the use of home care.

  6. Real teams and their effect on the quality of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Anders Kvale; Skogstad, Anders; Veenstra, Marijke; Romøren, Tor Inge

    2013-12-01

    Use of teams has shown to be an important factor for organizational performance. However, research has shown that a team has to meet certain criteria and operate in a certain way to realize the potential benefits of team organizing. There are few studies that have examined how teams operate in the nursing home sector and their effect on quality of care. This study investigates the relationship between teams that meet an academic definition of the team concept and quality of care in nursing homes. A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilized to test our research question: (1) self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, (2) interviews with 40 ward managers, (3) self-report questionnaires to 40 ward managers, (4) telephone interviews with 378 relatives, and (5) 900 hours of field observations. Use of teams in nursing home wards was assessed by field observations and by interviews with ward mangers. Quality of care was assessed by data from surveys and interviews with relatives and staff and through field observations. All data were aggregated to the ward level and two-level analyses were used to assess the relationships. The multi-level analyses showed that teams - as operationalized in the present study - were significantly positively related to two out of the three quality of care indices when controlled for ward size, days of sick leave and care level. One significant interaction effect was found between teams and days of sick leave, implying that the effect of teams decreased with higher numbers of days of sick leave. The results suggest that teams are related to higher levels of quality of care in nursing homes. However, the study shows that there is a substantial difference between real, functional teams that meet an academic definition of the concept and quasi teams, the latter having a significantly lower effect on quality of care. Hence, nursing home leaders

  7. Prevalence and Description of Palliative Care in US Nursing Homes: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Paula E; Stefanacci, Richard G; Feuerman, Martin

    2016-03-01

    To describe rates and policies in U.S. Nursing Homes (NH) related to palliative care, comfort care, and hospice care based on a nationwide survey of directors of nursing. A national survey was distributed online and was completed by 316 directors of nursing of NHs (11% response rate). The directors of nursing were asked about availability and policies in their facilities. Specifically, questions were related to policies, referral patterns, discussion about such care, and types of medical conditions qualifying for such services. Hospice is significantly more available than palliative or comfort care programs; also, for-profit facilities, compared to non-profits, are significantly more likely to have palliative care programs and medical directors for palliative care. Social workers and nurses were most likely to suggest palliative type programs. Only 42% of facilities with palliative program provide consultation by a palliative certified physician. Residents with non-healing pressure ulcers, frequent hospitalizations, or severe/uncontrolled pain or non-pain symptoms were less likely to be referred. There is limited availability of palliative type programs in NH facilities and underutilization in those NH with programs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. The meaning of dignity in nursing home care as seen by relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Lindwall, Lillemor; Lohne, Vibeke; Lillestø, Britt; Slettebø, Åshild; Heggestad, Anne Kari T; Aasgaard, Trygve; Råholm, Maj-Britt; Caspari, Synnøve; Høy, Bente; Sæteren, Berit; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2014-08-01

    As part of an ongoing Scandinavian project on the dignity of care for older people, this study is based on 'clinical caring science' as a scientific discipline. Clinical caring science examines how ground concepts, axioms and theories are expressed in different clinical contexts. Central notions are caring culture, dignity, at-home-ness, the little extra, non-caring cultures versus caring cultures and ethical context - and climate. This study investigates the individual variations of caring cultures in relation to dignity and how it is expressed in caring acts and ethical contexts. Three assumptions are formulated: (1) the caring culture of nursing homes influences whether dignified care is provided, (2) an ethos that is reflected on and appropriated by the caregiver mirrors itself in ethical caring acts and as artful caring in an ethical context and (3) caring culture is assumed to be a more ontological or universal concept than, for example, an ethical context or ethical person-to-person acts. The methodological approach is hermeneutic. The data consist of 28 interviews with relatives of older persons from Norway, Denmark and Sweden. The principles of voluntariness, confidentiality and anonymity were respected during the whole research process. Three patterns were revealed: dignity as at-home-ness, dignity as the little extra and non-dignifying ethical context. Caring communion, invitation, at-home-ness and 'the little extra' are expressions of ethical contexts and caring acts in a caring culture. A non-caring culture may not consider the dignity of its residents and may be represented by routinized care that values organizational efficiency and instrumentalism rather than an individual's dignity and self-worth. An ethos must be integrated in both the organization and in the individual caregiver in order to be expressed in caring acts and in an ethical context that supports these caring acts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Effectiveness of an Internet-based learning program on venous leg ulcer nursing care in home health care--study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylönen, Minna; Viljamaa, Jaakko; Isoaho, Hannu; Junttila, Kristiina; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2015-10-01

    To describe the study protocol for a study of the effectiveness of an internet-based learning program on venous leg ulcer nursing care (eVLU) in home health care. The prevalence of venous leg ulcers is increasing as population age. The majority of these patients are treated in a municipal home healthcare setting. However, studies show nurses' lack of knowledge of ulcer nursing care. Quasi-experimental study with pre- and postmeasurements and non-equivalent intervention and comparison groups. During the study, nurses taking care of patients with a chronic leg ulcer in home health care in one Finnish municipality will use the eVLU. Nurses working in home health care in another Finnish municipality will not use it providing standard care. Nurses will complete three questionnaires during the study and they will also be observed three times at patients' homes. Nurses' perceived and theoretical knowledge is the primary outcome of the study. Funding for this study was received from the Finnish Foundation for Nursing Education in 2014. Data from this study will provide information about the effectiveness of an internet-based educational program. After completing the program nurses will be accustomed to using internet-based resources that can aid them in the nursing care of patients with a VLU. Nurses will also have better knowledge of VLU nursing care. This study is registered with the International Clinical Trials Registry, identifier NCT02224300. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factors related to the provision of home-based end-of-life care among home-care nursing, home help, and care management agencies in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Kurinobu, Takeshi; Ko, Ayako; Okamoto, Yuko; Matsuura, Shino; Feng, Mei; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    ...) care and consider strategies to deal with this process. This study aims to clarify institution-related factors associated with the provision of home-based EOL care cases, and to compare them among three different types of home-care agencies...

  11. End-of-life care bonus promoting end-of-life care in nursing homes: An 11-year retrospective longitudinal prefecture-wide study in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nishiguchi, Sho; Sugaya, Nagisa; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Mizushima, Shunsaku

    2017-01-01

    The end-of-life (EOL) care bonus introduced by the Japanese government works as a financial incentive and framework of quality preservation, including advance care planning, for EOL care among nursing home residents...

  12. Nursing competencies for palliative care in home care/Competências do enfermeiro para o cuidado paliativo na atenção domiciliar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janaina Meirelles Sousa; Elioenai Dornelles Alves

    2015-01-01

    ...%, and Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.7 for all the listed competencies. The favorable consensus about the proposed competencies indicates the recognition of palliative care as a nursing care practice in home care...

  13. Assisted Living Facilities - CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN: Residential Care Facilities, Nursing Homes, and Hospices in Indiana in 2007 (Indiana State Department of Health, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 86 residential care facilities, 525 long-term care facilities (nursing homes), and 81...

  14. A comparative analysis of comprehensive geriatric assessments for nursing home residents receiving palliative care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; De Almeida Mello, Johanna; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2014-07-01

    Nursing homes become important locations for palliative care. By means of comprehensive geriatric assessments (CGAs), an evaluation can be made of the different palliative care needs of nursing home residents. This review aims to identify all CGAs that can be used to assess palliative care needs in long-term care settings and that have been validated for nursing home residents receiving palliative care. The CGAs are evaluated in terms of psychometric properties and content comprehensiveness. A systematic literature search in electronic databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrane, CINAHL, and PsycInfo was conducted for the years 1990 to 2012. Nursing homes. Nursing home residents with palliative care needs. Psychometric data on validity and reliability were extracted from the articles. The content comprehensiveness of the identified CGAs was analyzed, using the 13 domains for a palliative approach in residential aged care of the Australian Government Department of Health and Aging. A total of 1368 articles were identified. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria, describing 5 different CGAs that have been validated for nursing home residents with palliative care needs. All CGAs demonstrate moderate to high psychometric properties. The interRAI Palliative Care instrument (interRAI PC) covers all domains for a palliative approach in residential aged care of the Australian Government Department of Health and Aging. The McMaster Quality of Life Scale covers nine domains. All other CGAs cover seven domains or fewer. The interRAI PC and the McMaster Quality of Life Scale are considered to be the most comprehensive CGAs to evaluate the needs and preferences of nursing home residents receiving palliative care. Future research should aim to examine the effectiveness of the identified CGAs and to further validate the CGAs for nursing home residents with palliative care needs. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published

  15. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Survey on demand of the aged people for college volunteers in home nursing care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objects: To study the demand of the aged community residents for college volunteers in home nursing care service and its influence factors. Methods: Questionnaires on the aged residents’ expectation and requirements for college volunteers in home nursing care was prepared on basis of studies of reference books, study materials and pre-investigation, and then the questionnaires was completed by means of convenient sampling of 200 aged residents. Results The demand and expectation of the elderly for college volunteers in health care and spiritual comfort was strong. The old people who have more children, living alone and often feel lonely are more likely to need college volunteers. Conclusions: Volunteers should be arranged reasonably according to the needs of the aged people, and priority should be given to those who have more children, living alone and often feel lonely.

  17. Palliative care needs of chronically ill nursing home residents in Germany: focusing on living, not dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohbuecker, Barbara; Eisenmann, Yvonne; Galushko, Maren; Montag, Thomas; Voltz, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    To explore the palliative care needs of nursing home residents in Germany who had not yet entered the dying phase. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of nine residents suffering from chronic disease or frailty. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed using a grounded theory approach. The residents described multidimensional needs, which were categorized as 'being recognized as a person', 'having a choice and being in control', 'being connected to family and the world outside', 'being spiritually connected', and 'physical comfort'. They emphasized their desire to control everyday matters. Physical impairment was a problem, especially when independence was threatened, e.g. by immobility or a reliance on pain killers. The desire for self-determination is key when designing and evaluating primary and palliative care programmes for nursing homes. Early integration of palliative care can improve the quality of life of chronically ill residents.

  18. Development and validation of scales for attitudes, self-reported practices, difficulties and knowledge among home care nurses providing palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Megumi; Nishimura, Misako; Ishii, Yoko; Kuramochi, Masayo; Kakuta, Naoe; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2016-06-01

    Although educational programs for nurses are required to ensure high-quality home care, there is currently no scale to appropriately evaluate such programs for home care nurses providing palliative care. We developed and validated four scales to evaluate home care nurses' attitude, self-reported practices, difficulties, and knowledge regarding home palliative cancer care, and identified factors associated with home care nurses' attitude, self-reported practices, and difficulties. The scale items were generated based on literature review and a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted. Experienced home care nurses from visiting nurse stations who enrolled in a home palliative care educational program were recruited for this survey. Of the 125 questionnaires delivered to home care nurses, 122 were returned (response rate, 98%). After factor analysis, the scale for attitude comprised four domains with 12 items, the scale for self-reported practices comprised six domains with 26 items, and the scale for difficulties comprised five domains with 18 items. Cronbach's alphas for these scales were 0.61-0.70. After using the Item Response Theory model, the scale for knowledge was found to comprise 26 items. The multiple logistic regression model showed that experience in caring for terminal patients at home or in hospitals were associated with having more positive attitude, higher self-reported practices and lower difficulties. We developed valid and reliable scales to evaluate home care nurses' attitude, self-reported practices, difficulties, and knowledge regarding home palliative cancer care. These scales potentially useful for evaluating a home palliative cancer care education program for nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Objective and subjective measures of the quality of managed care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, J F; Ouslander, J G; Buchanan, J; Zellman, G; Farley, D; Hirsch, S H; Reuben, D B

    1999-04-01

    The number of nursing home (NH) residents enrolled in managed care plans (HMO) will increase, and there is concern that the quality of their medical care may be compromised by cost-containment pressures. In this study, we evaluated the medical care of residents enrolled in 3 health maintenance organizations (HMO) that developed specific long-term care programs. To compare the medical care received by NH residents enrolled in HMO and Fee-for-Service (FFS) plans with both objective process of care and consumer perception (subjective) measures. To describe the relationship between the objective and subjective measures. Number of primary care visits per month; process of medical care for 2 geriatric tracer conditions (falls, fevers); family and residents' perceptions of the adequacy of sickness episode management; and the frequency of primary provider visits. Quasi-experimental. HMO residents received more timely and appropriate responses to falls and fevers than did FFS residents. HMO residents also received more frequent routine visits by a primary care provider team consisting of a physician and nurse practitioner. Consumer perceptions of quality did not differ between the HMO and FFS groups. Families within both groups were significantly more positive than were residents about the frequency of visits by both physicians and nurse practitioners. Within the HMO group, both families and residents were more positive about the frequency of nurse practitioner visits than were physician visits even when the frequency of visits by the 2 providers were similar. Although the medical care received by HMO residents was better on most objective process measures than that received by FFS residents, consumer perceptions of care did not detect those differences. NH residents and families have different perceptions about the adequacy of visits by physicians and nurse practitioners, and both families and residents appear to have different expectations concerning how often they want

  20. Weathering the storm: challenges to nurses providing care to nursing home residents during hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Kathryn; Brown, Lisa M; Christensen, Janelle J; Thomas, Kali S

    2009-11-01

    This article documents the experience of 291 Florida nursing homes during the 2004 hurricane season. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, the authors described and compared the challenges nurses encountered when evacuating residents with their experiences assisting residents of facilities that sheltered in place. The primary concerns for evacuating facilities were accessing appropriate evacuation sites for residents and having ambulance transportation contracts honored. The main issue for facilities that sheltered in place was the length of time it took for power to be restored. Barriers to maintaining resident health during disasters for those who evacuated or sheltered in place are identified.

  1. End-of-life care bonus promoting end-of-life care in nursing homes: An 11-year retrospective longitudinal prefecture-wide study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Sho; Sugaya, Nagisa; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Mizushima, Shunsaku

    2017-03-22

    The end-of-life (EOL) care bonus introduced by the Japanese government works as a financial incentive and framework of quality preservation, including advance care planning, for EOL care among nursing home residents. This study aims to clarify the effects of the EOL care bonus in promoting EOL care in nursing homes. A longitudinal observational study using a questionnaire was conducted. We invited 378 nursing homes in Kanagawa prefecture in Japan, a region with a rapidly aging population, to participate in the study. The outcome was the number of residents dying in nursing homes from 2004 to 2014. In a linear mixed model, fixed-effect factors included year established, unit care, regional elderly population rate and hospital beds, adjacent affiliated hospital, full-time physician on site, physician's support during off-time, basic EOL care policy, usage of the EOL care bonus, EOL care conference, and staff experience of EOL care. A total of 237 nursing home facilities responded (62.7%). The linear mixed model showed that the availability of the EOL care bonus (coefficient 3.1, 95 % CI 0.67-5.51, p = 0.012) and years of usage of the EOL care bonus (p nursing homes. Our analysis revealed that the EOL care bonus has the potential to increase the number of residents receiving EOL care in nursing homes over several years. EOL care conferences, physician support for emergency care during off-time, and the presence of an adjacent affiliated hospital may also increase the number of residents receiving EOL care in nursing homes. These results suggest that a government financial incentive may contribute to effective EOL care among nursing home residents in other developed countries with rapidly aging populations.

  2. Nursing Home Staff Palliative Care Knowledge and Practices: Results of a Large Survey of Frontline Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Cagle, John G; Lane, Kathleen A; Callahan, Christopher M; Miller, Susan C

    2015-11-01

    Deficits in quality end-of-life care for nursing home (NH) residents are well known. Palliative care is promoted as an approach to improve quality. The Palliative Care Survey (PCS) is designed to measure NH staff palliative care knowledge and practice. To comparing palliative care knowledge and practices across NH staff roles using the PCS, and to examine relationships between facility characteristics and PCS scores. The PCS was administered to frontline NH staff-certified nursing assistants (CNAs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), registered nurses (RNs), and social workers (SWs)-in 51 facilities in 2012. Descriptive statistics were calculated by job role. Linear mixed effects models were used to identify facility and individual factors associated with palliative care practice and knowledge. The analytic sample included 1200 surveys. CNAs had significantly lower practice and knowledge scores compared to LPNs, RNs, and SWs (P palliative care. Given observed differences in palliative care practice and knowledge scores by staff training, it appears the PCS is a useful tool to assess NH staff. Low end-of-life knowledge scores represent an important target for quality improvement. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. End-of-life care in two Norwegian nursing homes: family perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarbø, Elsa

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this article is to report a study exploring experiences of relatives who have been present immediately prior to and after the death (in the last 72 hours) of a next-of-kin in a nursing home. The purpose of the study was to acquire research-based knowledge to improve practice. Globally, a growing number of older people, often with increased morbidity and complexity of conditions, require specialised nursing care, particularly at the end of life. Several international studies describe end-of-life care in nursing homes as insufficient, mainly owing to shortage of qualified staff and other essential resources. There are few studies in this field in Norway; none of them focus on the final days and hours of a patient's life from the perspective of their relatives. A mixed methods design was used. Data were collected through structured interviews with 50 relatives during Spring 2006 and analysed by SPSS version 14 and theme-based analysis. With a few exceptions, the quality of nursing care was considered professional and good. Care was described as supportive, individualised and based on patients' needs - in a safe atmosphere and supported by good relations between patients and nursing staff. Information and communication between staff and relatives, however, were described as unsystematic and casual. That some patients died alone became a source of distress for their relatives. Information and communication between staff and relatives need to be improved. There is need for change to avoid the situation where patients die in solitude. End-of-life care is performed at a time when patients and their relatives are at their most vulnerable. Nurses and other health workers need information, as this study suggests, to provide high-quality care to ease this situation. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Perception of quality of care among residents of public nursing-homes in Spain: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, Beatriz; Martínez-Andrés, María; Cervera-Monteagudo, Beatriz; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2013-06-28

    The quality of care in nursing homes is weakly defined, and has traditionally focused on quantify nursing homes outputs and on comparison of nursing homes' resources. Rarely the point of view of clients has been taken into account. The aim of this study was to ascertain what means "quality of care" for residents of nursing homes. Grounded theory was used to design and analyze a qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with a theoretical sampling including 20 persons aged over 65 years with no cognitive impairment and eight proxy informants of residents with cognitive impairment, institutionalized at a public nursing home in Spain. Our analysis revealed that participants perceived the quality of care in two ways, as aspects related to the persons providing care and as institutional aspects of the care's process. All participants agreed that aspects related to the persons providing care was a pillar of quality, something that, in turn, embodied a series of emotional and technical professional competences. Regarding the institutional aspects of the care's process, participants laid emphasis on round-the-clock access to health care services and on professional's job stability. This paper includes perspectives of the nursing homes residents, which are largely absent. Incorporating residents' standpoints as a complement to traditional institutional criteria would furnish health providers and funding agencies with key information when it came to designing action plans and interventions aimed at achieving excellence in health care.

  5. Train the trainer in dementia care. A program to foster communication skills in nursing home staff caring for dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmann, J; Haberstroh, J; Pantel, J

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of communication skills in nursing home staff is key to provide better care for dementia patients and decrease occupational mental stress. An innovative train-the-trainer program to improve and maintain professional caregivers' social competencies in nursing home dementia care is described. Over a period of 6 months, a group of 6 senior staff members were qualified as program trainers (multiplicators) for the TANDEM training program, which qualified them to design, deliver, and evaluate training sessions that foster specific social competencies in dementia care. In a subsequent intervention study with 116 geriatric caregivers in 14 nursing homes, training was provided either by multiplicators (intervention group) or directly by project coworkers (control group). Participants in both groups improved their dementia-specific communication skills. In a follow-up survey, the intervention group also reported lasting reductions in mental stressors at work (p nursing homes to be multiplicators for the TANDEM train-the-trainer program for dementia-specific communication skills has a beneficial influence on social competencies, mental stressors at work, and occupational mental stress of staff who care for dementia patients and may contribute to a sustainable implementation of dementia-specific social competencies.

  6. Care dependency : testing the German version of the care dependency scale in nursing homes and on geriatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohrmann, C; Dijkstra, Ate; Dassen, T

    The purpose of this study was the psychometric evaluation of the German version of the dependency scale in nursing homes and on geriatric wards. The 15-item scale was originally developed in the Netherlands for assessing the care dependency of demented and mentally handicapped patients. Data of 81

  7. [The importance of longitudinality, comprehensiveness, coordination and continuity of nursing home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Nevado, Dolores; Palomo-Cobos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Home care is essential for dependent persons, in order to support the high levels of morbidity, for the elderly as well as their caregivers, as it enables patients to remain in their familiar environment as long as possible, fulfilling the wish expressed by most of the population. Home care is the activity that best represents the essential attributes (longitudinality, comprehensiveness, continuity, coordination) of the primary, and that suffers most when these attributes are not included in the activities undertaken by primary care teams, or due to cuts in health-care. Home care requires highly skilled, versatile and committed nursing staff, with whom the population identifies as a source of care, and where they are assessed for their relevance and effectiveness. Nurses with wide clinical care skills, with a balanced content of treatment and prevention, and the freedom to develop their work, are needed in order to continuously monitor the health problems of their acute and chronic patients, in the family and community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. IAGG/IAGG GARN International Survey of End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L; Swagerty, Daniel; Barbagallo, Mario; Vellas, Bruno; Cha, Heung Bong; Holmerova, Iva; Dong, Birong; Koopmans, Raymond; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis Miguel; Moreno, Juan Cuadros; Hajjar, Ramzi; Woo, Jean; Arai, Hidenori; Okochi, Jiro; Visvanathan, Renuka; Abdul-Rahman, Samia A; Goel, Ashish; Moser, Andrea; Rolland, Yves; Abbatecola, Angela M; Russo, Marcello; Morley, John E

    2017-06-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey on end-of-life (EOL) care in nursing homes of 18 long-term care experts across 15 countries. The experts were chosen as a convenience-based sample of known experts in each country. The survey was administered in 2016 and included both open-ended responses for defining hospice care, palliative care, and "end of life," and a series of questions related to the following areas-attitudes toward EOL care, current practice and EOL interventions, structure of care, and routine barriers. Overall experts strongly agreed that hospice and palliative care should be available in long-term care facilities and that both are defined by holistic, interdisciplinary approaches using measures of comfort across domains. However, it appears the experts felt that in most countries the reality fell short of what they believed would be ideal care. As a result, experts call for increased training, communication, and access to specialized EOL services within the nursing home. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Living with and Caring for Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many of the patients with Alzheimer disease are taken care of in nursing homes. However the literature on the experiences of Iranian formal caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer disease is scarce. This qualitative study explored the caring experiences of formal caregivers in nursing homes that can improve the quality of care and patient’s quality of life. Methods: This qualitative study used the principles of descriptive content analysis to analyze these data. Our participants included 11 female and 3 male caregivers aged 25 to 38 years who were selected for interviewing based on a purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed with a content analysis method. Results: Nearly 900 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 6 main themes including "managing difficult behaviors", "dependence on familial care", "continuum of different feelings", "care for a child", "living with the patients" and "not understanding the patients", which was further analyzed in the two subcategories "caring without enough information" and " a dead man moving". Conclusion: The care provided by our informants was mainly influenced by attitudes, culture and religious beliefs of caregivers about family attachment and ample driven reward of helping and caring frail or old people in Islam. These cultural and religious beliefs could facilitate provision of care and confrontation with patients’ child-like behaviors. It is suggested that employment of trained staff and plans for their continued education can improve the quality of care and the quality of the patient's life.

  10. Pain and hospice care in nursing home residents with dementia and terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Todd B; Carter, Michael A; Feldt, Karen S; Dietrich, Mary S; Cowan, Ronald L

    2013-10-01

    One condition associated with severe end-of-life pain that can lead to a poor quality of death is cancer. Cancer pain in people with dementia is of particular concern because of communication problems that occur with worsening disease. The aim of the current pilot study was to examine the association between hospice enrolment, dementia severity and pain among nursing home residents who died from advanced cancer. Between-groups cross-sectional chart audits of 55 nursing home residents with dementia who died from cancer were carried out. A total of 45% of residents were in hospice at the end-of-life. Residents in hospice were more likely to receive an opioid (80% vs 43%, P = 0.005); but less likely to show severe cognitive impairment (20% vs 50%, P = 0.050). Enrolment in hospice was associated with an increased likelihood of receiving an opioid after controlling for level of cognitive impairment (OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.1-14.0, P = 0.037). Lower levels of cognitive functioning were associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving an opioid after controlling for enrolment in hospice (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1-0.8, P = 0.030). Notably, 40% of nursing home residents with dementia who died from cancer did not receive any opioid during this time. Preliminary results suggest that hospice enrolment might be influenced by the facility or region of this particular country. Hospice enrolment predicts more opioid pain treatment in residents with dementia and terminal cancer; however, no resident with very severe dementia and terminal cancer was placed in hospice care. Severely cognitively impaired nursing home residents requiring opioids are at great risk of suffering from untreated advanced cancer pain. New methods are urgently required to improve end-of-life palliative care for nursing home residents with terminal cancer and severe dementia. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  12. Person-Directed Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Resident, Family, and Staff Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Kezia; Lepore, Michael; Anderson, Ruth A; McConnell, Eleanor S; Song, Yuting; Kang, Bada; Porter, Kristie; Thach, Trini; Corazzini, Kirsten N

    2017-09-01

    Empowering individuals to direct their own care is central to person-centered care and health care policy. However, there is limited knowledge of how "person-directed care planning" (PDCP) can be achieved in particular settings. This study identifies key structures and processes for operationalizing and implementing PDCP in nursing homes. Using participatory inquiry, we convened "stakeholder engagement sessions" with residents, families, nursing staff, and managers/administrators in two North Carolina nursing homes ( N = 24 sessions; N = 67 unique participants). Stakeholders discussed current care-planning processes and provided feedback on an emergent conceptual framework of PDCP. Three themes emerged through directed-content analysis: strategies included providing formal and informal opportunities to engage in care planning and ensuring effective follow-through; different roles were required among leadership, staff, residents, and families to accomplish PDCP; and limits on achieving PDCP included competing priorities and perceived regulatory and resource constraints. Results are discussed in terms of the specific competencies required for accomplishing PDCP.

  13. Understanding bereaved family members' dissatisfaction with end-of-life care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Genevieve N; McClement, Susan E; Menec, Verena H; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2012-10-01

    With increasing numbers of older adults identifying a nursing home (NH) as their final place of care, it is important to assess the quality of dying in this setting and understand factors that impact family members' dissatisfaction with end-of-life care. A retrospective bereaved family member survey (N = 208) was conducted in 21 NHs located in urban areas of central Canada. Bereaved family members who were dissatisfied with care identified significantly more concerns in all domains assessed and were more likely to have problems with: (a) receiving confusing information from nursing staff about the resident's care, including medical treatments; (b) receiving inadequate information from nursing staff; and (c) feeling that end-of-life care was different than they had expected. Since the quality of communication between nurses, residents, and family members is the main factor that determines families' dissatisfaction with care, strategies and interventions aimed at reducing unmet information needs will be vital to improving end-of-life care in NHs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Spiritual end-of-life care in Dutch nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsberts, Marie-José H E; van der Steen, Jenny T; Muller, Martien T; Hertogh, Cees M P M; Deliens, Luc

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore if and how spiritual needs are assessed and if spiritual care is provided to Dutch nursing home residents, including residents suffering from dementia, and if and how caregivers communicate and collaborate regarding the residents' spiritual needs. Two researchers conducted an ethnographic participatory study in a Dutch nursing home between April 2010 and June 2011, on a psychogeriatric unit (mostly dementia) and a somatic unit for residents suffering from physical disabilities. Inductive thematic analysis was used to identify patterns and trends and to interpret the data. The physicians did not actively address spiritual issues, nor was it part of the official job of care staff. There was no communication between the physicians and the spiritual counselor. When a resident was about to die, the nurses started an informal care process aimed at (spiritual) well-being, including cuddling, rituals, and music. This was not mentioned in the care plan or the medical chart. The nurses even supported the residents outside their professional role in their spare time. Furthermore, we identified different occupational subcultures (eg, nurses and physicians), in which behavior of residents was given different meaning, depending on the frame of reference within the subculture. Spiritual issues were addressed only informally and were not part of the formal care process, either for residents suffering from dementia or for those with physical disabilities. Our results raise questions about how the lack of communication about spiritual end-of-life care between disciplines, and the informal and formal care processes affect spiritual well-being. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Natural History of Nursing Home Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Ann; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Former nursing home residents (N=197) were followed for 2 years after discharge. Four subgroups of patients were identified on the basis of different patterns of survival and use of health care resources: those who returned home, died in nursing homes, transferred to hospitals, or transferred to other nursing homes. (NRB)

  16. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Moral Competence Scale for Home Care Nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Kiyomi; Ono, Wakanako; Kobayashi, Maasa; Omori, Junko; Todome, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Moral Competence Scale for Home Care Nurses (MCSHCN). A self-administered questionnaire that included the preliminary MCSHCN (90 items) was distributed to home care nurses (HCNs) in Japan. Usable data (from 1,961 questionnaires) were analyzed. Item and exploratory factor analysis for the MCSHCN revealed 45 items that loaded on 5 factors. This 5-factor model showed reasonable fit to the data by confirmatory factor analysis (root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = 0.070). Thus, the model closely corresponded to the theoretical components of moral competence. Cronbach's alpha ranged from .78 to .93. The construct validity and internal consistency reliability were supported. Further research is needed to refine this scale to increase the generalizability.

  17. Involved accounting and control in health care : Different perceptions of management accounting and control systems in the Dutch branch of nursing homes, homes for the elderly and homecare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wil van Erp

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore why and how Management Accounting and Control Systems (MACS) enact and are enacted upon in the Dutch branch of nursing homes, homes for the elderly and home care. In search for answers, this study chooses an actor-network theory (ANT) perspective combined with

  18. Tailored mental health care after nursing home admission: improving transfers of people with dementia with behavioral problems. An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, L.D.; van der Wiel, A.; Meiland, F.J.M.; van Hout, H.P.J.; Stek, M.L.; Dröes, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In the Netherlands, many community-dwelling people with dementia and behavioral disturbances and their family caregivers receive mental health care from a community psychiatric nurse (CPN). To promote continuity of care for these persons after moving to a nursing home, a transfer

  19. Advance directives in Japanese nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezako, Yayoi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Kajii, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Advance directives are poorly understood in Japanese nursing homes. In April 2006, additional funding for end-of-life care became available as the first support for terminal care at Japanese nursing homes. The objectives of this study were to investigate the adoption of advance directives by Japanese nursing homes, the effect of additional funding for end-of-life care in nursing homes from long-term care insurance on the use of advance directives, and the types of directives used. A nationwide questionnaire survey of nursing homes was performed in Japan. The participants were 913 nursing homes. We investigated the prevalence of advance directives, details of the directives, and demographic data of the responders. Advance directives were used in 58.4% of nursing homes. The timing of introduction of the directives and the results of multivariate analysis at the facility level suggested a relation between the availability of additional funding for end-of-life care and the adoption of advance directives. Most nursing homes used instructional directives, especially directives providing an explanation and informed consent for end-of-life care in the nursing home. More than half of Japanese nursing homes have introduced advance directives, and additional funding for end-of-life care is related to their introduction. Most nursing homes have adopted instructional directives, especially those providing an explanation and informed consent regarding end-of-life care at the nursing home. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early palliative home care: Evaluation of an interprofessional educational intervention for district nurses and general practitioners about nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Erika; Ödlund Olin, Ann; Orrevall, Ylva; Strang, Peter; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Törnkvist, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork is important in early palliative home care, and interprofessional education is required to achieve teamwork. It is thus crucial to ensure that interprofessional education works well for the members of all participating professions because levels of knowledge and educational needs may vary. To evaluate, by profession, the effectiveness of an interprofessional educational intervention for district nurses and general practitioners on three areas of nutritional care for patients in a palliative phase. A quasi-experimental study that used a computer-based, study-specific questionnaire to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The continuing education in primary health care (ConPrim ® ) model was used to create the intervention. ConPrim includes a web-based program, a practical exercise and a case seminar, all with interprofessional training. Primary health care centers in Stockholm County, Sweden. Intervention group (n = 87; 48 district nurses, 39 general practitioners); control group (n = 53; 36 district nurses, 17 general practitioners). The total intervention effect was significant in all three areas, p = 0.000-0.004. The intervention effects were similar and significant for both professions in areas 1 and 2. In area 3, the intervention effects were significant for general practitioners but not for district nurses. The intervention seems promising, as it may create better prerequisites for teamwork and caring for patients living at home. However, it needs to be optimized to better increase district nurses' level of knowledge (area 3).

  1. The meaning of consolation as experienced by nurses in a home-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxberg, Asa; Eriksson, Katie; Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Fridlund, Bengt

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate nurses' experiences of consolation and how these experiences relate to suffering and care. Consolation is commonly associated with the relief of suffering. The question of consolation in terms of its definition and relevance for care has, however, been a matter of discussion among nurse researchers. The question raised concerns about the nature of consolation, its place and its role in relation to care and the caring sciences. An explorative qualitative interview study with 12 participants, six registered and six enrolled nurses, was carried out in a home-care context. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was used for the text analysis. Results. Two main aspects of consolation appeared: 'the present consolation', which is flexible, sustaining and opening and 'the absent consolation', which conceals the suffering and is incapable of consoling. The result was interpreted from a philosophical-ethical perspective, based on the works of Levinas and Lögstrup. Consolation appears as a complex phenomenon, both in terms of its existence and its absence consolation, constituting a caring and non-caring consolation. A caring consolation entails meeting the other as different and being present in a way that gives the other space to be the one he or she really is. It requires acceptance, accepting the sufferer and his/her way of suffering as unique. Relevance to clinical practice. The clinical nurse is involved in complex care situations, which entails both reflecting upon and using intuition when consoling. A caring consolation is a contradictory phenomenon that requires a nurse to be capable of both reflecting upon and acting intuitively on the unique suffering of the other.

  2. Lower back pain in nurses working in home care: linked to work-family conflict, emotional dissonance, and appreciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Häfliger, Evelyne; Celik, Zehra; Grebner, Simone

    2017-12-18

    In industrial countries home care services for elderly people living in the community are growing rapidly. Home care nursing is intensive and the nurses often suffer from musculoskeletal pain. Time pressure and job control are job-related factors linked to the risk of experiencing lower back pain (LBP) and LBP-related work impairment. This survey investigated whether work-family conflict (WFC), emotional dissonance and being appreciated at work have incremental predictive value. Responses were obtained from 125 home care nurses (63% response rate). Multiple linear regression showed that emotional dissonance and being appreciated at work predicted LBP intensity and LBP-related disability independently of time pressure and job control. WFC was not a predictor of LBP-related disability in multiple regression analyses despite a zero-order correlation with it. Redesigning the working pattern of home care nurses to reduce the emotional demands and improve appreciation of their work might reduce the incidence of LBP in this group.

  3. Do not confuse multidisciplinary task management in nursing homes with interprofessional care!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakitzidis, Giannoula; Anthierens, Sibyl; Timmermans, Olaf; Truijen, Steven; Meulemans, Herman; Van Royen, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Problem statement Little is known about how interprofessional healthcare providers in nursing homes work together. We know that interprofessional teamwork evolves from trial and error learning and so interprofessional collaboration has to be actively taught. This study aims to gain insights in the perception of professionals towards interprofessional collaboration in nursing homes and the factors that have an impact on interprofessional collaboration. Approach A qualitative descriptive methodology using focus group interviews and additional semi-structured interviews was performed. In total three focus group sessions with healthcare providers from different disciplines were held and additionally nine semi-structured interviews were executed. A thematic analysis was performed. The transcripts were read to immerse in the data and initial ideas were noted. Both open coding (identification of primary themes) and axial coding (analysis of relationships among themes) were conducted and re-focussed into potential themes. Findings Four main themes emerge from the analysis: context, collaboration, care and experience. From the findings it seems that healthcare teams in nursing homes work as 'separated groups'. A lot of collaboration is perceived, but no common vision or responsibility sharing is found. The role description of the different disciplines does not always seem clear or is not always explicit. In usual care the perceived interactions between professionals are called collaboration. Obviously physicians and all healthcare professionals do not work interprofessionally according to definitions from the literature. This study provided evidence of the awareness that interprofessional collaboration in usual care is situational and fragmentary organised.

  4. Dental status in nursing home residents with domiciliary dental care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, P; Renvert, S; Sjogren, P; Zimmerman, M

    2017-12-01

    To describe the dental health status of elderly people in nursing homes receiving domiciliary dental care. Case note review. Nursing homes in 8 Swedish counties. Care dependent elderly people (≥65 years). Clinical data, including the number of remaining natural teeth, missing and decayed teeth (manifest dental caries) and root remnants, recorded by dentists according to standard practices. Medical and dental risk assessments were performed. Data were available for 20,664 patients. Most were women (69.1%), with a mean age of 87.1 years (SD 7.42, range 65-109). The mean age for men was 83.5 years (SD 8.12, range 65-105). Two or more medical conditions were present in most of the population. A total of 16,210 individuals had existing teeth of whom 10,974 (67.7%) had manifest caries. The mean number of teeth with caries was 5.0 (SD 5.93) corresponding to 22.8% of existing teeth. One in four individuals were considered to have a very high risk in at least one professional dental risk assessment category. Care dependent elderly in nursing homes have very poor oral health. There is a need to focus on the oral health-related quality of life for this group of frail elderly during their final period of life. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  5. Depression in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, John

    2010-11-01

    Although studies have shown the prevalence of depression in nursing homes to be high, under-recognition of depression in these facilities is widespread. Use of screening tests to enhance detection of depressive symptoms has been recommended. This paper aims to provoke discussion about optimal management of depression in nursing homes. The utility of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) is considered. CSDD data relating to residents assessed in 2008-2009 were collected from three Sydney nursing homes. CSDD scores were available from 162 residents, though raters stated they were unable to score participants on at least one item in 47 cases. Scores of 13 or more were recorded for 23% of residents in these facilities, but in most of these cases little was documented in case files to show that the results had been discussed by staff, or that they led to interventions, or that follow-up testing was arranged. Results of CSDD testing should prompt care staff (including doctors) to consider causation of depression in cases where residents are identified as possibly depressed. In particular, there needs to be discussion of how to help residents to cope with disability, losses, and feelings of powerlessness. Research is needed, examining factors that might predict response to antidepressants, and what else helps. Accreditation of nursing homes could be made to depend partly on evidence that staff regularly search for, and (if found) ensure appropriate responses to, depression.

  6. Usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument according to care professionals in nursing homes: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Nursing homes are important locations for palliative care. High quality palliative care requires an evaluation of the different care needs of the nursing home residents. The interRAI Palliative Care instrument is a comprehensive assessment that evaluates the needs and preferences of adults receiving palliative care. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument. A qualitative study was conducted, based on the abductive reasoning approach. Fifteen nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Calls for participation were sent out by four umbrella organizations of Flemish nursing homes (Belgium) and at a national conference for nursing home staff. Nineteen care professionals (nurses, certified nursing assistants, psychologists, physiotherapists, quality coordinators and directors) of 15 nursing homes voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. During one year, care professionals evaluated the needs and preferences of all nursing home residents receiving palliative care by means of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument. Data on the usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument were derived from notes, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with participating care professionals and were thematically analyzed and synthesized. Data were gathered between December 2013 and March 2015. In general, the interRAI Palliative Care (interRAI PC instrument) is a useful instrument according to care professionals in nursing homes. However, care professionals made a series of recommendations in order to optimize the usefulness of the instrument. The interRAI PC instrument is not always feasible to complete because of organizational reasons. Furthermore, the face validity of the instrument could be improved since certain items are incomplete, lacking, redundant or too complex. Findings highlight the importance of adapting the content of the interRAI Palliative Care

  7. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Galindo-Garre; Ladislav Volicer; Steen, Jenny T van der

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. Methods: The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others was explored using four assessments from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) within a period of 15 months on 1,101 residents with dementia in Dutch nursing homes. Presence of depressive symptoms was asce...

  8. Experiences in home care of cancer patients. A new approach in cancer nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophof, J; Leucht, R; Frohmüller, S; Dörsam, J; Ruoff, G; Schlag, P

    1989-01-01

    As a result of mutilating operative procedures, aggressive cytotoxic chemotherapy and terminal stage of the disease, tumor patients face frequent visits to the tumor center. They are often hospitalized and thereby excluded from family and home. To enable cancer therapy and supportive care on an ambulatory basis, a team consisting of two physicians, two nurses and one psychologist was settled in our department in November 1986. The purpose of this team was to transfer several oncological treatment modalities from the hospital to the homes of the patients. Apart from organizing the patients' discharge from the hospital and coordinating treatment, the main task of the team has been to follow the patient during the course of the disease and give psycological support. In our experience the possibility of home care has clearly improved the patients' quality of life.

  9. Caregivers’ attitudes, knowledge and practices of oral care at nursing homes in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Within the elderly population, residents in nursing homes, there is a greather risk of caries, periodontal disease and teeth loss. Assistance of caregivers in maintaininig good oral hygiene besides improving oral health can improve of residents general health and the qulity of their lives. The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of caregivers and knowledge about oral health, as well as the practice regarding oral care they apply at nursing homes in Serbia. Methods. The survey was conducted at the Gerontology Center Belgrade, consisting of four nursing homes located in the urban area. The study included 58 caregivers. They were contacted on working days, in all work shifts, during January, February and March of 2013. They were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire consisting of 26 closed-type questions. Results. The caregivers mostly considered that it was very important to take care of oral health of the residents, but 69% responded that the level of their oral health was low or very low. As the main barriers to oral hygiene maintenance, the caregivers indicated lack of time. The caregivers had more knowledge about periodontal disease than about the main cause of caries and its prevention. Formal medical education had the influence on the knowledge about oral diseases. Oral hygiene procedures carried out by the mayority of caregivers were denture cleaning and tooth brushing. Conclusion. The caregivers were aware of the limitations in everyday oral care of nursing homes residents in Serbia, although solving these problems requires the involvement of the entire public health service.

  10. 'I feel like a salesperson': the effect of multiple-source care funding on the experiences and views of nursing home nurses in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Juliana; Cook, Glenda; Duschinsky, Robbie

    2015-06-01

    The difficulties faced in the recruitment and retention of nursing staff in nursing homes for older people are an international challenge. It is therefore essential that the causes of nurses' reluctance to work in these settings are determined. This paper considers the influence that multiple-source care funding issues have on nursing home nurses' experiences and views regarding the practice and appeal of the role. The methodology for this study was hermeneutic phenomenology. Thirteen nurses from seven nursing homes in the North East of England were interviewed in a sequence of up to five interviews and data were analysed using a literary analysis method. Findings indicate that participants are uncomfortable with the business aspects that funding issues bring to their role. The primary difficulties faced are: tensions between care issues and funding issues; challenges associated with 'selling beds'; and coping with self-funding residents' changing expectations of care. The findings of the study suggest that multiple-source care funding systems that operate in nursing homes for older people pose challenges to nursing home nurses. Some of these challenges may impact on their recruitment and retention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Does using the interRAI Palliative Care instrument reduce the needs and symptoms of nursing home residents receiving palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; De Almeida Mello, Johanna; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether using the interRAI Palliative Care instrument (the interRAI PC) in nursing homes is associated with reduced needs and symptoms in residents nearing the end of their lives. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest study using the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS) was conducted to compare the needs and symptoms of residents nearing the end of their lives in the control and intervention nursing homes. Care professionals at the intervention nursing homes filled out the interRAI PC over the course of a year for all residents aged 65 years and older who were nearing the end of their lives. This intervention was not implemented in the control nursing homes. At baseline, POS scores in the intervention nursing homes were lower (more favorable) than in the control nursing homes on the items "pain", "other symptoms", "family anxiety", and the total POS score. Posttest POS scores for "wasted time" were higher (less favorable) than pretest scores in the intervention nursing homes. In the intervention nursing homes where care professionals did not have prior experience with the interRAI Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF) assessment instrument (n = 8/15), total POS scores were lower (more favorable) at posttest. One year after introducing the interRAI PC, no reduction in residents' needs and symptoms were detected in the intervention nursing homes. However, reductions in needs and symptoms were found in the subgroup of intervention nursing homes without prior experience with the interRAI LTCF instrument. This may suggest that the use of an interRAI instrument other than the interRAI PC specifically can improve care. Future research should aim at replicating this research with a long-term design in order to evaluate the effect of integrating the use of the interRAI PC in the day-to-day practices at nursing homes.

  12. A three perspective study of the sense of home of nursing home residents: the views of residents, care professionals and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, J; Verbeek, H; Janssen, B M; Eijkelenboom, A; Molony, S L; Felix, E; Nieboer, K A; Zwerts-Verhelst, E L M; Sijstermans, J J W M; Wouters, E J M

    2016-10-03

    The sense of home of nursing home residents is a multifactorial phenomenon which is important for the quality of living. This purpose of this study is to investigate the factors influencing the sense of home of older adults residing in the nursing home from the perspective of residents, relatives and care professionals. A total of 78 participants (n = 24 residents, n = 18 relatives and n = 26 care professionals) from 4 nursing homes in the Netherlands engaged in a qualitative study, in which photography was as a supportive tool for subsequent interviews and focus groups. The data were analyzed based on open ended coding, axial coding and selective coding. The sense of home of nursing home residents is influenced by a number of jointly identified factors, including the building and interior design; eating and drinking; autonomy and control; involvement of relatives; engagement with others and activities; quality of care are shared themes. Residents and relatives stressed the importance of having a connection with nature and the outdoors, as well as coping strategies. Relatives and care professionals emphasized the role the organization of facilitation of care played, as well as making residents feel like they still matter. The sense of home of nursing home residents is influenced by a multitude of factors related to the psychology of the residents, and the social and built environmental contexts. A holistic understanding of which factors influence the sense of home of residents can lead to strategies to optimize this sense of home. This study also indicated that the nursing home has a dual nature as a place of residence and a place where people are supported through numerous care strategies.

  13. Alzheimer's Disease And Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaugler, Joseph E; Yu, Fang; Davila, Heather W; Shippee, Tetyana

    2014-01-01

    Close to two-thirds of all US nursing home residents have some type of cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer's disease, and the quality of care and quality of life of these people has long been called into question...

  14. Ambiguities: residents' experience of 'nursing home as my home'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid; Vinsnes, Anne G; Harkless, Gene E; Paulsen, Bård; Seim, Arnfinn

    2013-09-01

    Residential care in nursing homes continues to be necessary for those individuals who are no longer able to live at home. Uncovering what nursing home residents' view as quality of care in nursing homes will help further understanding of how best to provide high quality, person-centred care. To describe residents' experiences of living in a nursing home related to quality of care. The study utilises a descriptive exploratory design. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 15 residents who were not cognitively impaired, aged 65 and over and living in one of four nursing homes. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by categorising of meaning. Residents perceived the nursing home as their home, but at the same time not 'a home'. This essential ambiguity created the tension from which the categories of perceptions of quality emerged. Four main categories of quality of care experience were identified: 'Being at home in a nursing home', 'Paying the price for 24-hour care', 'Personal habits and institutional routines', and 'Meaningful activities for a meaningful day'. Ambiguities concerning the nursing home as a home and place to live, a social environment in which the residents experience most of their social life and the institution where professional health service is provided were uncovered. High-quality care was when ambiguities were managed well and a home could be created within the institution. Implication for practice. Achieving quality care in nursing homes requires reconciling the ambiguities of the nursing home as a home. This implies helping residents to create a private home distinct from the professional home, allowing residents' personal habits to guide institutional routines and supporting meaningful activities. Using these resident developed quality indicators is an important step in improving nursing home services. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Occupational hazards for home care nurses across the rural-to-urban gradient in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Matthew; Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin; Puts, Martine; Tourangeau, Ann E

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe occupational hazards for nurses working in home care (HC) and explore how they differ across the rural-to-urban gradient. Responses (n = 823) from a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2012 of HC nurses registered to practise nursing in the Province of Ontario, Canada were used. Using chi-square analysis and posthoc pairwise tests with a Bonferroni correction, 14 occupational hazards were individually tested for differences between four geographical settings (rural, town, suburban or urban areas). Our study reports that in addition to common occupational hazards that all HC nurses experience, the frequency of experiencing some hazards varies based on geographic setting. These specific hazards include exposure to: aggressive pets, environmental tobacco smoke, oxygen equipment, unsafe neighbourhoods and pests. Findings from this study suggest that a relationship exists between where a patient's home is located and the types of occupational hazards that may be experienced by HC staff. This research is useful for HC organisations in developing staff training programmes to recognise and manage occupational hazards that workers are likely to encounter. Home healthcare and policy leaders may use these findings to develop and implement educational and other strategies to reduce risk and manage exposures across the rural-to-urban gradient. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. End of life care in nursing homes in Spain: Exploratory analysis and evidences of validity of a new scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, María Remedios; Gutiérrez-Romero, Jose Antonio; Fernández-Alcántara, Manuel; Hueso-Montoro, César; Goodman, Claire; Montoya-Juárez, Rafael

    2017-10-01

    Quality end-of-life care is a central issue in nursing homes, requiring the assessment of individual and family needs by health professionals. Although previous instruments have been developed, they usually rely on family reports and have been adapted from other clinical contexts (hospital or primary care). It is important to consider how health care professionals working in nursing homes perceive what is necessary to achieve quality end-of-life care. In this study, the objective was to develop an instrument to assess quality of end-of-life care in the context of Spanish care homes. A 24 item scale Nursing Home End of Life Care Scale (NHEOLC) was developed through a systematic evaluation of existing tools combined with an iterative process of consultation with group experts in end of life care in long term care settings. A total of 307 health care professionals agreed to participate in the study and completed the scale. The scale was grouped in six dimensions: physical, psychological aspects and spiritual aspects of care, family care, bereavement, and patient/family preferences management. The results suggest an adequate factorial structure of the scale and good internal consistency for the total score and the subscales. In addition, the results showed significant differences depending on the size of the nursing home, the category of health professionals, and their own perceptions of his work regarding end-of-life care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of wound, ostomy and continence-certified nurses on individual patient outcomes in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Westra, Bonnie L; Savik, Kay; Hou, Yuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether there was a significant improvement and stabilization (not worse at discharge) in pressure ulcers, lower extremity venous ulcers, surgical wounds, urinary incontinence, bowel incontinence, and urinary tract infections in home health care (HHC) patients cared for by a certified WOC nurse. There were 449,170 episodes of care from a national convenience sample of 785 HHC agencies with 447,309 nonmaternity, adult patients between October 1, 2008, and December 31, 2009. Descriptive and comparative. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set documented by HHC clinicians were analyzed using mixed-effects logistic regression, propensity score analysis, and appropriate parametric and nonparametric tests. An Internet survey identified whether WOC nurses provided care to patients in an HHC agency. Home health care agencies identified records of patients receiving WOC nurse visits/consults. An HHC patient assigned to a WOC nurse had surgical wounds, pressure ulcers, and incontinence problems that were significantly worse than HHC patients not assigned to a WOC nurse. Patients cared for by a WOC nurse showed significant improvement and stabilization of the number of pressure ulcers and surgical wounds and the frequency of urinary and bowel incontinence, despite having problems that were more severe than other patients. Home health care patients not cared for by WOC nurses, with less-severe wound and incontinence problems, also got better. WOC nurses are effective in achieving positive health outcomes for pressure ulcers, surgical wounds, and incontinence in HHC patients with severe health problems.

  18. Hospice and palliative care in nursing homes: challenges and opportunities for enhanced access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C

    2014-04-01

    The use of hospice care in nursing homes (NHs) has grown exponentially, but an increasing concern is the lack of access to resident and family-centered palliative care when residents do not elect hospice, and in time periods prior to election. This concern is amplified by the high magnitude of palliative care needs present for NH residents (and their families) when the NH will be their final residence; and, it is amplified because of short hospice stays, half of which are 22 days or less. This manuscript describes the use of the Medicare hospice care in NHs and discusses the policy, staff and physician barriers to timely hospice referral. It also describes the challenges NHs face in expanding residents' access to palliative care. Opportunities and approaches for increasing palliative care expertise and practice in NHs are presented.

  19. Family physicians' experiences when collaborating with district nurses in home care-based medical treatment. A grounded theory study

    OpenAIRE

    Modin, Sonja; T?rnkvist, Lena; Furhoff, Anna-Karin; Hylander, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This article concerns Swedish family physicians' (FPs) experiences collaborating with district nurses (DNs) when the DNs provide medical treatment for home care patients. The aim was to develop a model to illuminate this process from the FPs' perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 FPs concerning one of their patients with home care by a DN. The interview focused on one patient's treatment and care by different care providers and the collabor...

  20. The effect of policy on end-of-life care practice within nursing care homes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Julie; Froggatt, Katherine; Bennett, Michael I

    2013-03-01

    The number of older people in the UK is increasing. A significant proportion of end of life care for this population is currently provided and will increasingly be provided within nursing care homes. To identify the impact of implementing end of life care policy with regard to the use of the Gold Standards Framework in Care Homes programme, the Liverpool Care Pathway (or an Integrated Care Pathway) and educational/training interventions to support the provision of end of life care within nursing care homes within the UK. Systematic literature review of published literature and reports. An electronic search was undertaken of five databases-Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane library and websites of government and palliative care organisations for papers and reports published between 2000 to June 2010. The reference lists of studies that were retrieved for the detailed evaluation were hand-searched for any additional relevant citations.. Only studies that included comparative outcome data were eligible for inclusion. Eight papers/reports, incorporating information from three studies were identified. Two studies reported on the implementation of the Gold Standards Framework in Care Homes programme and one the implementation of an Integrated Care Pathway for the last days of life. Improvements occurred in resident outcomes and in relation to staff recognising, managing and meeting residents needs for end of life care. The studies provided limited evidence on improved outcomes following the implementation of these interventions. Further research is needed, both within the UK and internationally, that measures the process and impact of implementing these initiatives.

  1. Provision and use of safety-engineered medical devices among home care and hospice nurses in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss, Jack K

    2010-10-01

    Nurses who provide care in the home are at risk of blood exposure from needlesticks. Using safety-engineered medical devices reduces the risk of needlestick. The objectives of this study were to assess provision of safety devices by home care and hospice agencies as well as the use of these devices by home care and hospice nurses in North Carolina, and to examine the association between provision and use. A mail survey was conducted among North Carolina home care and hospice nurses in 2006. The adjusted response rate was 69% (n = 833). The percentage of nurses who were always provided with safety devices ranged from 51% (blood tube holders) to 83% (winged steel needles). Ninety-five percent of nurses who were always provided with safety devices, but only 15%-50% of nurses who were not always provided with safety devices, used a safety device the last time they used that general type of device. Among nurses who did not use a safety device on that occasion, 60%-80% did not use it because it was not provided by the agency. This study suggests that limited access is the primary reason for home care/hospice nurses' failure to use safety devices. The policy goal of providing safety devices to health care workers in all situations in which such devices could reduce their risk of needlestick is not being achieved for home care nurses in North Carolina. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes: From Care Processes to Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Segelman, Micah; Mukamel, Dana B

    2016-12-01

    Nursing homes (NHs) are an important setting for the provision of palliative and end-of-life (EOL) care. Excessive reliance on hospitalizations at EOL and infrequent enrollment in hospice are key quality concerns in this setting. We examined the association between communication-among NH providers and between providers and residents/family members-and two EOL quality measures (QMs): in-hospital deaths and hospice use. We developed two measures of communication by using a survey tool implemented in a random sample of U.S. NHs in 2011-12. Using secondary data (Minimum Data Set, Medicare, and hospice claims), we developed two risk-adjusted quality metrics for in-hospital death and hospice use. In the 1201 NHs, which completed the survey, we identified 54,526 residents, age 65+, who died in 2011. Psychometric assessment of the two communication measures included principal factor and internal consistency reliability analyses. Random-effect logistic and weighted least-square regression models were estimated to develop facility-level risk-adjusted QMs, and to assess the effect of communication measures on the quality metrics. Better communication with residents/family members was statistically significantly (p = 0.015) associated with fewer in-hospital deaths. However, better communication among providers was significantly (p = 0.006) associated with lower use of hospice. Investing in NHs to improve communication between providers and residents/family may lead to fewer in-hospital deaths. Improved communication between providers appears to reduce, rather than increase, NH-to-hospice referrals. The actual impact of improved provider communication on residents' EOL care quality needs to be better understood.

  3. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the following... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of community nursing...

  4. To what extent do structural quality indicators of (nutritional) care influence malnutrition prevalence in nursing homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nie-Visser, Noémi C; Meijers, Judith M; Schols, Jos M; Lohrmann, Christa; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Halfens, Ruud J

    2015-12-01

    Many residents in European healthcare institutions are malnourished, with reported malnutrition prevalence rates of up to 60%. Due to the negative effects of malnutrition it is important to optimize the quality of nutritional care. If structural quality indicators of nutritional care might improve resident care and outcome is not yet known. The aim of this study is to explore whether structural quality indicators for nutritional care influence malnutrition prevalence in Dutch, German and Austrian nursing homes. This study follows a cross-sectional, multi-center design. Data were collected by using a standardised questionnaire at resident, ward and institution level. Data from 214 nursing homes (NL = 133, G = 61, A = 20) were analysed. The prevalence of malnutrition varied significantly between the three countries (NL = 18.2% G = 20.1% A = 22.5%). Two structural quality indicators at ward level namely (1) the policy that the care file should include the nutritional intake for each patient and (2) having a weight measurement policy at ward level are predictive for malnutrition prevalence. Furthermore also the variable country was of influence. A policy of registering nutritional intake in the file of the patient and a policy to assess the patient's weight regularly have a positive influence on malnutrition prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Home-care nursing staff in self-directed teams are more satisfied with their job and feel they have more autonomy over patient care: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; Groenewegen, Peter P; Francke, Anneke L

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction. Self-directed teams are being introduced in home care in several countries. It is unknown whether working in a self-directed team is related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. It is important to gain insight into this association since self-directed teams may help in retaining nursing staff. A cross-sectional study based on two questionnaire surveys in 2014 and 2015. The study involved 191 certified nursing assistants and registered nurses employed in Dutch home-care organizations (mean age of 50). These were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide panel of nursing staff working in various healthcare settings. Self-direction is positively related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. This relationship is partly mediated by autonomy over patient care. For certified nursing assistants and registered nurses with a bachelor's degree, a greater sense of autonomy over patient care in self-directed teams is positively related to job satisfaction. No significant association was found between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction for registered nurses with an associate degree. This study suggests that home-care organizations should consider the use of self-directed teams as this increases nursing staff's job satisfaction and may therefore help to retain nursing staff in home care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identifying work ability promoting factors for home care aides and assistant nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Agneta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In workplace health promotion, all potential resources needs to be taken into consideration, not only factors relating to the absence of injury and the physical health of the workers, but also psychological aspects. A dynamic balance between the resources of the individual employees and the demands of work is an important prerequisite. In the home care services, there is a noticeable trend towards increased psychosocial strain on employees at work. There are a high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and a low prevalence of sustainable work ability. The aim of this research was to identify factors promoting work ability and self-efficacy in care aides and assistant nurses within home care services. Methods This study is based on cross-sectional data collected in a municipality in northern Sweden. Care aides (n = 58 and assistant nurses (n = 79 replied to a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 46%. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of several independent variables on self-efficacy (model 1 and work ability (model 2 for care aides and assistant nurses separately. Results Perceptions of personal safety, self-efficacy and musculoskeletal wellbeing contributed to work ability for assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.36, p 2adj of 0.29, p = 0.001. Self-efficacy was associated with the safety climate and the physical demands of the job in both professions (R2adj of 0.24, p = 0.003 for care aides, and also by sex and age for the assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.31, p Conclusions The intermediate factors contributed differently to work ability in the two professions. Self-efficacy, personal safety and musculoskeletal wellbeing were important for the assistant nurses, while the work ability of the care aides was associated with the safety climate, but also with the non-changeable factors age and seniority. All these factors are important to acknowledge in

  7. Provider category and quality of care in the Norwegian nursing home industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri Drange Hole

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines empirically if there is a link between quality of care in the Norwegian nursing home industry and exposure of the industry to competition. Exposing public care to competition implies that the responsibility for providing care services is shared between public authorities and private actors. In Norway, exposure to competition means tender competition. Suppliers bid for a contract issued by the Norwegian authorities for a limited number of years. Quality of care in an institution is the major competitive factor. The provider categories of elderly care are: 1 care provided by institutions run by municipalities, 2 care provided by institutions run by private companies, which have won a tender competition, 3 care provided by institutions run by private companies owned by private families, voluntary religious or idealistic organizations. Nurse-to-patient ratio is used as a proxy for quality of care. The regression analysis indicates a relationship between quality of care and exposure to competition. The quality of care in provider category 2 is significantly lower than in provider category 1, but there are more variations in the quality of care in provider category 1 than in provider category 2. We find the lowest quality of care in provider category 1. There is also a relationship between the quality of care in an institution and the educational level of the staff, the location, the workforce, and the size of an institution. Finally, there is a relationship between the quality of care in an institution and the real and the required capacity, and the financial status in a region.

  8. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: A Qualitative Interview Study Among Family and Professional Caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest-Poortvliet, M.C.; van der Steen, J.T.; Gutschow, G.; Deliens, L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the process of advance care planning (ACP) and to explore factors related to the timing and content of ACP in nursing home patients with dementia, as perceived by family, physicians, and nurses. Design: A qualitative descriptive study. Methods: A

  9. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: A Qualitative Interview Study Among Family and Professional Caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest-Poortvliet, M.C. van; Steen, J.T. van der; Gutschow, G.; Deliens, L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Vet, H.C. de; Hertogh, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the process of advance care planning (ACP) and to explore factors related to the timing and content of ACP in nursing home patients with dementia, as perceived by family, physicians, and nurses. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study. METHODS: A

  10. Enhancing Care for Older People Living in Nursing Homes in Rural Australia Using Action Learning as a Catalyst for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Wendy; Meyer, Julienne; Cash, Penny; Clinnick, Lisa; Martin, Louise

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of action learning workshops in three nursing homes in rural Victoria, Australia has been critical in the re-visioning of how care can be enhanced for residents. The workshops were designed with the intent of improving quality of care for residents by providing health care staff with opportunities to learn together and effect…

  11. Regional variation in post-stroke multidisciplinary rehabilitation care among veteran residents in community nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Huanguang Jia,1 Qinglin Pei,1 Charles T Sullivan,1 Diane C Cowper Ripley,1 Samuel S Wu,1 W Bruce Vogel,1 Xinping Wang,1 Douglas E Bidelspach,2 Jennifer L Hale-Gallardo,1 Barbara E Bates3 1Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC, 3Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Center, Saginaw, MI, USA Introduction: Effective post-acute multidisciplinary rehabilitation therapy improves stroke survivors’ functional recovery and daily living activities. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA places veterans needing post-acute institutional care in private community nursing homes (CNHs. These placements are made under the same rules and regulations across the VA health care system and through individual per diem contracts between local VA facilities and CNHs. However, there is limited information about utilization of these veterans’ health services as well as the geographic variation of the service utilization. Aim: The aims of this study were to determine rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans with stroke in VA-contracted CNHs and to assess risk-adjusted regional variations in the utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care. Methods: This retrospective study included all veterans diagnosed with stroke residing in VA-contracted CNHs between 2006 and 2009. Minimum Dataset (a health status assessment tool for CNH residents for the study CNHs was linked with veterans’ inpatient and outpatient data within the VA health care system. CNHs were grouped into five VA-defined geographic regions: the North Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, Continental, and Pacific regions. A two-part model was applied estimating risk-adjusted utilization probability and average weekly utilization days. Two dependent variables were rehabilitation

  12. Change in Care Dependency and Nursing Care Problems in Nursing Home Residents with and without Dementia: A 2-Year Panel Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Schüssler

    Full Text Available Over time, chronic conditions like dementia can lead to care dependency and nursing care problems, often necessitating nursing home admission. This panel study (2012-2014 aims to explore changes in care dependency and nursing care problems (incontinence, malnutrition, decubitus, falls and restraints in residents with and without dementia over time. In total, nine Austrian nursing homes participated, including 258 residents (178 with, 80 without dementia who completed all five measurements. Data were collected with the International Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems questionnaire, the Care Dependency Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination-2. Repeated measures ANOVA and crosstabs were used to analyse changes. The results showed that care dependency in dementia residents increased significantly for all 15 items of the Care Dependency Scale, with the highest increase being residents' day-/night pattern, contact with others, sense of rules/values and communication. In contrast, care dependency in residents without dementia increased for four of the 15 items, with the highest increase being for continence, followed by getting (undressed. With respect to the assessed nursing care problems, residents with dementia and those without only differed significantly in terms of an increase in urinary- (12.3% vs. 14.2%, fecal- (17.4% vs. 10%, and double incontinence (16.7% vs. 11.9%. The results indicated that residents with dementia experienced increased care dependency in different areas than residents without dementia. Furthermore, residents with dementia experienced a lower increase in urinary incontinence but a higher increase in fecal- and double incontinence. These results help professionals to identify areas for improvement in dementia care.

  13. Happy in a nursing home?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cretien van Campen; Debbie Verbeek-Oudijk

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Gelukkig in een verpleeghuis? Life in Dutch residential nursing and care homes is changing. The number of frail older persons in the Netherlands is increasing. Older people are increasingly living independently for longer, and only the most frail older persons move to a nursing or

  14. Monitoring Technology Meets Care Work: Challenges of monitoring wet-beds in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bygholm, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring technology, especially sensor-based technology, is increasingly taken into use in care work. Despite the simplicity of these technologies - aimed to automate what appear as mundane monitoring tasks - recent research has identified major challenges primarily related to the technology's ability to meet the complexity of care work. Understanding intersectional challenges between these care technologies and care work is fundamental to improve design and use of health informatics. In this paper we present an analysis of interaction challenges between a wet-sensor at the task of monitoring wet beds at a nursing home. The analysis identifies the multifaceted nature of monitoring work and the intricacy of integrating sensor technology into the complex knowledge system of monitoring work.

  15. What is Family-Centered Care for Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Givens, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand family members’ perspectives on person- and family-centered end-of-life care provided to nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a qualitative follow-up interview with 16 respondents who had participated in an earlier prospective study, Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advance Dementia at End of Life (CASCADE). Family members of NH residents (N = 16) with advanced dementia participated in semistructured qualitative interviews that inquired about overall NH experience, communication, surrogate decision making, emotional reaction, and recommendations for improvement. Analysis identified 5 areas considered important by family members: (1) providing basic care; (2) ensuring safety and security; (3) creating a sense of belonging and attachment; (4) fostering self-esteem and self-efficacy; and (5) coming to terms with the experience. These themes can provide a framework for creating and testing strategies to meet the goal of person- and family-centered care. PMID:24085250

  16. Prevalence of Different Combinations of Antiepileptic Drugs and CNS Drugs in Elderly Home Care Service and Nursing Home Patients in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell H. Halvorsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are used to treat different conditions in elderly patients and are among the drug classes most susceptible to be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDI. The aim of the study was to describe and compare use of AEDs between home care service and nursing home patients, as these patients are not included in nationwide databases of drug utilization. In the combined population, we investigate DDI of AEDs with other central nervous system- (CNS- active drugs and DDIs involving AEDs in general. Materials and Methods. Point-prevalence study of Norwegian patients in home care services and nursing homes in 2009. At the patient level, we screened for different DDIs involving AEDs. Results. In total, 882 patients (7.8% of 11,254 patients used AEDs and number of users did not differ between home care services and nursing homes (8.2% versus 7.7%. In the combined population, we identified 436 potential DDIs in 45% of the patients. Conclusions. In a large population of elderly, home care service and nursing home patients do not differ with respect to exposure of AEDs but use more AEDs as compared to the general population of similar age. The risk of DDIs with AEDs and other CNS-active drugs should be taken into consideration and individual clinical evaluations are assessed in this population.

  17. SmartNursing - a mobile application to improve communication in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Bashir, Khurram; Maknickaite, Asta

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents SmartNursing system and discusses how increasing capabilities of smartphone could benefit employees in working environment. A SmartNursing system is developed for home nurses working environment to fulfil their needs. The solution helps to improve communication among nurses, p......, provide customized information and increase work efficiency. Developed system consists of mobile application, web based server and database. This article discusses the solution SmartNursing from design to implementation....

  18. Interprofessional collaboration and communication in nursing homes: a qualitative exploration of problems in medical care for nursing home residents – study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christiane A; Tetzlaff, Britta; Theile, Gudrun; Fleischmann, Nina; Cavazzini, Christoph; Geister, Christina; Scherer, Martin; Weyerer, Siegfried; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the current state of collaboration and communication between nurses and general practitioners in nursing homes, as well as needs and expectations of nursing home residents and their families. Finally, we aim to develop a new model of collaboration and communication. Rising numbers of residents in nursing homes present a challenge for general practice and nursing in most Western countries. In Germany, general practitioners visit their patients in nursing homes, where nurses work in shifts. This leads to a big variety of contacts with regard to persons involved and ways of communication. Qualitative multicentre study. Study part 1 explores needs and problems in interprofessional collaboration in interviews with nursing home residents and their relatives, general practitioners and nurses. Simultaneously, general practitioners' visits in nursing homes are observed directly. In study part 2, general practitioners and nurses will discuss findings from study part 1 in focus groups, aiming to develop strategies for the improvement of shortcomings in a participatory way. Based on the results, experts will contribute to the emerging model of collaboration and communication in a multi-professional workshop. Finally, this model will be tested in a small feasibility study. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research approved funding in March 2011. The study is expected to uncover deficits and opportunities in interprofessional collaboration in nursing homes. It provides deeper understanding of the concepts of all involved person groups and adds important clues for the interaction between professionals and older people in this setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Regular visitors are not good substitutes for assessment of elderly patient satisfaction with nursing home care and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquet, Isabelle; Dehé, Sophie; Gaudebout, Pierre; Falissard, Bruno

    2003-11-01

    Due to physical and psychological impairments, elderly patients residing in homes are often unable to participate in studies on satisfaction with care services. While their regular visitors provide interesting information, patient-visitor response concordance requires study. Our objective was to measure patient-visitor agreement on quality of care and accommodation. A survey was conducted on elderly people in 13 nursing homes and their visitors. The 125 patient-visitor pairs completed the same Nursing Home Satisfaction Questionnaire (NHSQ) independently, for which reliability and internal validity have previously been explored. Satisfaction scores for room comfort, meal provision, information, and medical/nursing care were calculated. To estimate patient-visitor concordance, intraclass coefficients, a bias index, and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated. Patient satisfaction scores ranged from 57.8 (information) to 78.6 (room comfort), and visitor satisfaction from 67.9 (meal provision) to 85.9 (medical/nursing care). Mean visitor scores were higher for all scales, with a small-to-moderate index bias statistically significant for medical/nursing care (p Visitors were not able to provide information on elderly patients' satisfaction with nursing home. Their assessments were milder than patient assessments. The NHSQ is reliable for use in either population, but patient and visitor assessments should not be merged in satisfaction studies.

  20. Physical, mental and cognitive disabilities in relation to utilization of dental care services by nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Fidaa M; Bani-Issa, Wegdan

    2017-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate factors affecting dental care utilization among nursing home residents in Jordan. A total of 221 subjects with a mean age of 62.4 years (121 males and 100 females) taken from among nursing home residents across Jordan were recruited and composed a convenience sample for this study. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Tinetti Assessment Battery for gait and balance (TAB), Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand test (DASH) were administered and oral health status was assessed for all subjects and examined as expected correlates of dental care utilization among nursing home residents. The response rate was about 88%. One-third of residents suffered from total edentulism and most of the remaining dentate residents exhibited periodontal disease (90%). Of the dentate sample, 90% of residents had bleeding upon probing, 85% were diagnosed with tooth mobility, 88% had presence of dental calculus, and 30% were diagnosed with root caries. Of the denture wearers, 59.1 % reported having soreness with their dentures and 32% of denture wearers reported having poor quality dentures. MMSE score, suffering from tooth sensitivity and having diabetes mellitus were identified to be indicators for utilization of dental care services among the study population. Regular oral care, assessments, and rehabilitation services are considered to be limited for nursing home residents in Jordan. Based upon these findings, future interventions should address oral health among nursing home residents in Jordan. © 2017 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Advance directive and end-of-life care preferences among Chinese nursing home residents in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Luk, James K H; Hui, Elsie; Chiu, Patrick K C; Chan, Cherry S Y; Kwan, Fiona; Kwok, Timothy; Lee, Diana; Woo, Jean

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of the present study were to describe the knowledge and preferences of Hong Kong Chinese older adults regarding advance directives and end-of-life care decisions, and to investigate the predictors of preferences for advance directive and community end-of-life care in nursing homes. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 140 nursing homes in Hong Kong. A total of 1600 cognitively normal Chinese older adults were recruited. Information on demographics, social, medical diseases, preferences of end-of-life care decisions, and advance directives were collected by face-to-face questionnaire interviews. The mean age of the participants was 82.4 years; 94.2% of them would prefer to be informed of the diagnosis if they had terminal diseases and 88.0% preferred to have their advance directives regarding medical treatment in the future. Approximately 35% would prefer to die in their nursing homes. The significant independent predictors for the preference of advance directive included asking for relatives' advice, wishing to be informed of their terminal illness diagnoses, absence of stroke, and having no problems in self-care in European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. For the preference for community end-of-life care and dying in nursing homes, the independent predictors included older age, not having siblings in Hong Kong, Catholic religion, nonbeliever of traditional Chinese religion, not receiving any old age allowance, lower Geriatric Depression Scale score, and being residents of government-subsidized nursing homes. Most of our cognitively normal Chinese nursing home older adults prefer having an advance directive, and one-third of them would prefer to die in nursing homes. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Quality-Based Payment Strategy for Nursing Home Care in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L.; Arling, Greg; Mueller, Christine; Held, Robert; Cooke, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pay-for-performance system developed for Minnesota nursing homes. In effect, nursing homes can retain a greater proportion of the difference between their costs and the average costs on the basis of their quality scores. The quality score is a derived and weighted composite measure currently composed of five elements:…

  3. Alternative paths to long-term care: nursing home, geriatric day hospital, senior center, and domiciliary care options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S; Morris, J N; Ruchlin, H S

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines certain quality of life outcomes, as well as comparative costs of care, for selected types of persons entering three very distinct types of alternative service programs that address the long-term care needs of vulnerable elderly persons: nursing homes (NH), geriatric day hospitals (GDH), and senior center (SC) programs. For selected outcomes, based on secondary analysis of the data gathered in another study, it was possible to add to the comparison samples of similar types of persons entering small foster-type domiciliary care homes (DC). From pools of persons entering these programs, six separate sets of comparison samples who were similar at baseline were constructed (GDH-SC, NH-SC, NH-GDH, NH-DC, SC-DC, GDH-DC). Only analyses pertaining to institutionalization and costs were conducted for the last three sets of comparison groups. Except for the issue of institutionalization, quality of life impact analysis showed only a few more post-test differences than would be expected by chance (although the few post-test differences that were observed in each case favored less restrictive settings). This more general similarity of outcome is indeed provocative, suggesting that in many ways the applicants adapted similarly to these quite distinct programs. Cost analyses found that nursing home and geriatric day hospital care, the two most restrictive settings, were also the two most expensive interventions. PMID:3940452

  4. Home care nurses' experiences with and perceptions of elder self-neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Yvonne O'Connell

    2015-01-01

    Self-neglect is a poorly understood phenomenon evident to home healthcare nurses who describe older adults who self-neglect as disheveled, unkempt individuals living in cluttered, filthy homes. In spite of the concerns nurses report about these individuals and their situations, individuals who self-neglect give no indication there is any reason for concern for their welfare, and in fact some refuse intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine how home healthcare nurses perceive elder self-neglect, their experiences with this phenomenon, and to explore the steps nurses take when self-neglect is suspected.

  5. End-of-life quality-of-care measures for nursing homes: place of death and hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B; Caprio, Thomas; Ahn, Richard; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Norton, Sally; Quill, Timothy; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2012-04-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) publishes a web-based quality report card for nursing homes. The quality measures (QMs) do not assess quality of end-of-life (EOL) care, which affects a large proportion of residents. This study developed prototype EOL QMs that can be calculated from data sources available for all nursing homes nationally. The study included approximately 1.5 million decedents residing in 16,000 nursing homes during 2003-2007, nationally. Minimum Data Set (MDS) data were linked to Medicare enrollment files, hospital claims, and hospice claims. Random effect logistic models were estimated to develop risk-adjustment models predicting two outcome measures (place of death [POD] and hospice enrollment), which were then used to construct two EOL QMs. The distributional properties of the QMs were investigated. The QMs exhibited moderate stability over time. They were more stable in identifying quality outliers among the larger nursing homes and in identifying poor-quality outliers than high-quality outliers. This study offers two QMs specialized to EOL care in nursing homes that can be calculated from data that are readily available and could be incorporated in the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) report card. Further work to validate the QMs is required.

  6. Community nurses' experiences of ethical problems in end-of-life care in the patient's own home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Margareta; Karlsson, Christina; Barbosa da Silva, António; Berggren, Ingela; Söderlund, Maud

    2013-12-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of community nurses' experiences of ethical problems in end-of-life care in the patient's own home. Ten female nurses from five different communities with experience of end-of-life care were interviewed. A hermeneutic approach inspired by Gadamer was used to analyse the qualitative data from the interviews. In the first step of interpretation, two themes emerged: Uncomfortable feelings and Lack of cooperation and in the second step, one theme Lack of security emerged. Finally, the overall interpretation revealed the theme Feelings of loss of control in end-of-life care in the patient's own home. The nurses exhibited commitment and a desire to do good when caring for patients in the end-of-life phase, even if they sometimes experienced feelings of lack of control. This implies that, when confronted with care-related issues, they have the power to both act and react. This study aimed to increase understanding of ethical problems that arise in end-of-life care in the patient's own home and revealed the need to take the patients', relatives' and nurses' perspectives on health and suffering into consideration to ensure good end-of-life home care. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Developing palliative care practice guidelines and standards for nursing home-based palliative care teams: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Ladwig, Susan; Caprio, Tom; Norton, Sally; Quill, Timothy; Olsan, Tobie; Cai, Xueya; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-01-01

    Lack of nursing home (NH)-specific palliative care practice guidelines has been identified as a barrier to improving palliative and end-of-life (EOL) quality of care. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess which of the guidelines developed by the National Consensus Project, and the corresponding preferred care practices endorsed by the National Quality Forum, are important and feasible to implement in NHs; and (2) identify the operational standards for palliative care teams in NHs. Two-round mail Delphi study. Based on the existing literature, a set of 7 domains with associated 22 palliative practice guidelines was drafted. We invited 48 NH leaders, including clinicians, to review the importance (10-point Likert scale) and the feasibility (5-point Likert scale) of these guidelines. Participants were also asked about palliative care team composition rounding frequency. The response rate to both rounds was 85%. With regard to importance, the mean rating for all guidelines was 8 or higher (ie, highly important), but there was variability in agreement with regard to 5 of the guidelines. The same 5 guidelines were also considered more difficult to implement (eg, costly, unrealistic). Overall, 17 palliative care guidelines were identified for use by NH palliative care teams. Five disciplines (social work, certified nurse assistant, nurse, physician, and nurse practitioner or physician assistant) were identified as comprising a core team and 3 were proposed as extended or ad hoc members. The palliative care guidelines and team standards identified in this study may be helpful in providing practical direction to NH administrators and staff looking to improve palliative care practice for their residents. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ageing, nursing and care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isolde Woittiez; Evelien Eggink; Jedid-Jah Jonker; Klarita Sadiraj

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Vergrijzing, verpleging en verzorging. All the expectations are that the ageing of the Dutch population will continue over the coming years. This has consequences for the demand, use and costs of care. This applies in particular for home care and for nursing and care homes,

  9. Talking about end-of-life care: Perspectives of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towsley, Gail L; Hirschman, Karen B

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe how residents express preferences for end-of-life (EOL) care. For this qualitative study, we conducted semi-structured interviews and completed conventional content analysis to describe how residents' expressed their preferences for care at the end of life. Sixteen residents from four nursing homes (NH) in southeastern Pennsylvania participated in this study. Residents were on average 88 years old, primarily non White, and widowed. Three key domains emerged from the analyses: Preferences for Today, Anticipating the End of My Life, and Preferences for Final Days. Residents linked their everyday living and EOL preferences by using 'if and then' logic to convey anticipation and readiness related to EOL. These findings suggest new strategies to start discussions of EOL care preferences with NH residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness of nursing interventions in heart failure patients in home care using NANDA-I, NIC, and NOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Karina; Mussi, Claudia Motta; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; de Fátima Lucena, Amália; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of nursing interventions (NIC) using nursing outcomes (NOC) and based on NANDA-I nursing diagnoses in patients with heart failure in home care. In this longitudinal study, 23 patients with heart failure were followed for 6 months, in four home visits. During the visits, nursing diagnoses were established, outcomes assessed, and interventions implemented. Of the 11 NIC interventions implemented, eight proved effective, that is, showed significant improvement between the first and the fourth visit, according to scores obtained for six outcomes: knowledge: treatment regimen, knowledge: medication, compliance behavior, symptom control, activity tolerance, and energy conservation. NIC interventions health education, self-modification assistance, behavior modification, teaching: prescribed medication, teaching: disease process, nutritional counseling, telephone consultation, and energy conservation showed effective outcomes based on NOC scores, suggesting that the NANDA-I, NIC, and NOC linkage is useful in patients with heart failure in home care. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nursing Home Physicians' Assessments of Barriers and Strategies for End-of-Life Care in Norway and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fosse, Anette; Zuidema, Sytse; Boersma, Froukje; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Working conditions in nursing homes (NHs) may hamper teamwork in providing quality end-of-life (EOL) care, especially the participation of NH physicians. Dutch NH physicians are specialists or trainees in elderly care medicine with NHs as the main workplace, whereas in Norway, family

  12. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galindo Garre, F.; Volicer, L.; van der Steen, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. Methods: The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards

  13. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galindo-Garre, F.; Volicer, L.; Steen, J.T. van der

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. METHODS: The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards

  14. Effect of oral healthcare education on knowledge, attitude and skills of care home nurses: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugt-Lustig, K.H. de; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Putten, G.J. van der; Visschere, L.M. De; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the literature on the effect of providing oral healthcare education to care home nurses on their oral healthcare knowledge and attitude and their oral hygiene care skills. METHODS: A literature search was obtained for relevant articles on oral healthcare

  15. Quality of Dying in Nursing Home Residents Dying with Dementia: Does Advanced Care Planning Matter? A Nationwide Postmortem Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandervoort, A.; Houttekier, D.; Stichele, R.V.; van der Steen, J.T.; Block, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advance care planning is considered a central component of good quality palliative care and especially relevant for people who lose the capacity to make decisions at the end of life, which is the case for many nursing home residents with dementia. We set out to investigate to what extent

  16. [The anxiety and influence factors of care managers who provide a home palliative care for terminal cancer patients--a comparison between nursing staffs and others].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Naoko; Hirose, Kyoko; Shobatake, Tadataka; Yano, Hidemi; Okazaki, Noriko

    2010-12-01

    In home palliative care, care managers play an important part. But we suspect that care managers, who don't have a medical license, may feel an anxiety. So, we investigated if these care managers felt an anxiety, and would like to report a role of nursing staffs in home palliative care. We surveyed care managers who were working in the western part of Hiroshima. The number of care managers was 199. And 129 of them(86.9%)filled out the questionnaire. We used c 2 -test and analyzed the difference of an anxiety between nursing staffs and the others. The care managers felt an anxiety about the patient's condition and the therapy rather than nursing staffs. Nursing staffs play an important role by doing a therapeutic management for terminal cancer patients, an explanation for the family of patients, and a cooperation with other staffs.

  17. Professional caregivers' experiences with the Liverpool Care Pathway in dementia: An ethnographic study in a Dutch nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos Dekker, Natashe; Gysels, Marjolein; van der Steen, Jenny T

    2017-07-11

    There are few studies on how professional caregivers apply the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) in nursing home care for people with dementia. Further, despite critiques in the United Kingdom, the LCP continues to be used in the Netherlands, while, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted since its implementation. The purpose of the present study was to analyze professional caregivers' experiences with the LCP in this context. This article draws on an ethnographic study. Data collection was based on 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork in 2015 in 11 psychogeriatric units of a nursing home in a rural area of the Netherlands. Data collection included participant observation and 25 semistructured audiotaped interviews with specialist elderly care physicians, nursing staff, and a nurse practitioner. We found that professional caregivers appreciate the LCP as a communication tool and as a reminder of care goals. However, the document was deemed too complicated and to cause duplication of work. It was also reported that the LCP did not cover the complexity of care needs that emerge in practice. Actual care needs were prioritized over the LCP, which calls its contribution into question. Overall, the LCP does not match the context of dementia care in the nursing home. While it could be argued that the LCP does not intend to replace good care, its benefits as a reminder and a communication tool need continued consideration in relation to the amount of work it requires as a bureaucratic obligation.

  18. Interactional communication challenges in end-of-life care: dialectical tensions and management strategies experienced by home hospice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Cristina M; White, Zachary M

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the dialectical tensions experienced by home hospice nurses in interactions with patients, families, and health care providers. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 home hospice nurses from a mid-size for-profit hospice organization serving approximately 230 patients on an annual basis. Interviews revealed hospice nurses experience both interpersonal and organizational dialectics during hospice interactions: authoritative-nonauthoritative, revelation-concealment, independence-collaboration, and quality of care-business of care. Dialectics often resulted as a by-product of (a) responding to expectations and care choices of patients and families particular to the emotionally charged home context, (b) obtaining authorization from health care providers who are not members of the interdisciplinary team, and (c) pressures associated with providing quality patient care while fulfilling organizational role requirements. The praxis strategies used to negotiate tensions included segmentation, balance, recalibration, and spiraling inversion. Specifically, nurses employed strategies such as ascertaining family/patient acceptance, using persuasive tactics when communicating with external health care providers, relying on effective time management, and working off the clock to provide more in-person care. Although functional for patients and hospice organizations, nurses who continually rely on these strategies may experience job stress when their interpersonal commitments repeatedly conflict with organizational role demands.

  19. Discussing advance care planning: insights from older people living in nursing homes and from family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, Francesca; Mignani, Veronica; Mariani, Elena; Ottoboni, Giovanni; Melon, Marie Christine; Chattat, Rabih

    2017-10-09

    Evidence concerning when and in which manner older people living in nursing homes (NHs) would prefer to discuss advance care planning (ACP) is still scarce. This study explored the attitudes of NH residents and family members toward ACP and their opinions as to the right time to broach the subject, the manner in which it should be approached, and the content of ACP. This was a qualitative study using face-to-face interviews with 30 residents (age range 66-94), and 10 family members from 4 Italian NHs. The interviews were analyzed using content analysis. Three main themes were identified: (1) life in the NH, including thoughts about life in a nursing home, residents' concerns, wishes and fears, and communication barriers; (2) future plans and attitudes toward ACP, including attitudes toward planning for the future and plans already made, and attitudes toward and barriers against ACP; (3) contents and manner of ACP, including contents of ACP discussions, the right moment to introduce ACP, with whom it is better to discuss ACP, and attitudes toward advance directives. ACP was a welcome intervention for the majority of participants, but an individualized assessment of the person's readiness to be involved in ACP is needed. For people with dementia, it is essential to identify the right time to introduce ACP before NH admission. Participants in our study suggested that ACP should include palliative care and practical issues, and that in the NH setting all staff and family members may have a valuable role in ACP.

  20. Evidence on the validity and reliability of the German, French and Italian nursing home version of the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Franziska; Schubert, Maria; Hamers, Jan P H; Simon, Michael; Schwendimann, René; Engberg, Sandra; Ausserhofer, Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    To develop and test psychometrically the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes instrument, providing initial evidence on the validity and reliability of the German, French and Italian-language versions. In the hospital setting, implicit rationing of nursing care is defined as the withholding of nursing activities due to lack of resources, such as staffing or time. No instrument existed to measure this concept in nursing homes. Cross-sectional study. We developed the instrument in three phases: (1) adaption and translation; (2) content validity testing; and (3) initial validity and reliability testing. For phase 3, we analysed survey data from 4748 care workers collected between May 2012-April 2013 from a randomly selected sample of 162 nursing homes in the German-, French- and Italian-speaking regions of Switzerland to provide evidence from response processes (e.g. missing), internal structure (exploratory factor analysis), inter-item inconsistencies (e.g. Cronbach's alpha) and interscorer differences (e.g. within-group agreement). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure with good fit statistics. Rationing of nursing care was structured in four domains: (1) activities of daily living; (2) caring, rehabilitation and monitoring; (3) documentation; and (4) social care. Items of the social care subscale showed lower content validity and more missing values than items of other subscales. First evidence indicates that the new instrument can be recommended for research and practice to measure implicit rationing of nursing care in nursing homes. Further refinements of single items are needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A new model for end-of-life care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Elsie; Ma, Hon Ming; Tang, Wing Han; Lai, Wai Sze; Au, Ka Ming; Leung, Mei Tak; Ng, Joey S W; Ng, Winnie W L; Lee, Jenny S W; Li, Philip K T; Woo, Jean

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to promote quality end-of-life (EOL) care for nursing home residents, through the establishment of advance care plan (ACP) and introduction of a new care pathway. This pathway bypassed the emergency room (ER) and acute medical wards by facilitating direct clinical admission to an extended-care facility. An audit on a new clinical initiative that entailed the Community Geriatrics Outreach Service, ER, acute medical wards, and an extended-care facility during winter months in Hong Kong. The participants were older nursing home residents enrolled in an EOL program. We monitored the ratio of clinical to emergency admissions, ACP compliance rate, average length of stay (ALOS) in both acute hospital and an extended-care facility, and mortality rates. A total of 76 patients were hospitalized from January to March 2013. Of them, 30 (39%) were directly admitted to the extended-care facility, either through the liaison of Community Geriatrics Outreach Service (group A, 19/76, 25%) or transferred from the ER (group B, 11/76, 14%). The remaining 46 patients (group C, 61%) were admitted via the ER to acute medical wards following the usual pathway, followed by transfer to an extended-care facility if indicated. The ACP compliance rate was nearly 100%. In the extended-care unit, groups A and C had similar ALOS of 11.8 and 11.1 days, respectively, whereas group B had a shorter stay of 7.6 days. The ALOS of group C in acute medical wards was 3.5 days. The in-hospital mortality rates were comparable in groups A and C of 26% and 28%, respectively, whereas group B had a lower mortality rate of 18%. Nearly 40% of EOL patients could be managed entirely in an extended-care setting without compromising the quality of care and survival. A greater number of patients may benefit from the EOL program by improving the collaboration between community outreach services and ER; and extending hours for direct clinical admission to an extended-care facility. Copyright © 2014

  2. [Home visiting nursing care for a terminal stage cancer patient with bed sore--coordination through exchanging of advice request memo as a useful tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Sachiko; Yamada, Mai; Tayoshi, Mayumi; Kitamikado, Hatsue; Nakajima, Kazuyo; Konno, Hitomi; Akaeda, Kazuko; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Oka, Yoichi

    2010-12-01

    Visiting nursing care service was provided to a 40s female patient, who had a terminal cancer with bed sore around the sacred bones. We started the nursing service when the patient was still cared at hospital. The nursing service we provided was coordinated by the certified nurse specialized in skin and excrement care and home visiting nurse. A smooth home care transition was resulted because of the coordination provided by the two nurses. We started coaching the family while the patient was still at the hospital with a home care instruction manual until the patient was discharged. All in all, the patient and her family were at ease with two nurses' coordinated efforts. Since the patient was cared at home, her bed sore problem got worse due to an absence of caregiver. In order to solve the bed sore problem, the visiting nurse took pictures of peeled adhesive patch and the bed sore around the sacred bones to show and consult with the certified nurse. With the advice from the certified nurse, the home visiting nurse was able to care the bed sore problem manageable in size. From this experience, we learned that a proper communication channel, in this case an advice request memo exchange, between the certified nurse and visiting nurse was a useful tool for both sides in order to properly assess the patient's medical care needs.

  3. Nurses' Learning Experiences with the Kinaesthetics Care Concept Training in a Nursing Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fringer, André; Huth, Martina; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    In geriatric care, movement support skills of nurses are often limited, resulting in unnecessary functional decline of older adult residents and physical strain of nurses. Kinaesthetics training aims to improve movement competences of nurses and residents. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe nursing teams' experience with…

  4. The comparison of quality of life among people with mild dementia in nursing home and home care--a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmat, Azlina W; Hawthorne, Graeme; Al-Mashoor, Syed H

    2015-01-01

    Living arrangements play an important role in determining the quality of life (QoL) of people with dementia. Although informal care (home-based) is favored, the transition to formal (institutional) care often becomes necessary, especially in the later stages of dementia. Nevertheless, there is currently no definitive evidence showing that informal or formal care provides a higher QoL for those with dementia. To compare the QoL of people with dementia in the nursing home and home care, and identify factors that differentiate their QoL. This was a cross-sectional survey. A total of 49 people with dementia ≥60 years old were recruited from government nursing homes and hospitals (home care). Consenting participants were assessed on cognitive severity, QoL, activities of daily living (ADLs), depression, and social isolation/connectedness by the Short Mini Mental State Examination (SMMSE), the WHO-8 (the EUROHIS-QOL), Short Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL-8), Barthel Index (BI), Cornell Scale for Depression (CSDD), and Friendship Scale (FS). There were significant differences in QoL, HRQoLs, ADLs, and social connectedness among people with dementia in home care (n = 19) and those in nursing homes (n = 30) (p home experienced higher QoL, ADLs, and social connectedness compared with those living in institutional care. Support should be provided enabling home care and empowering caregivers to provide better care for people with dementia. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Grief after patient death: direct care staff in nursing homes and homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Burack, Orah R; Jopp, Daniela S; Mock, Steven E

    2015-02-01

    Patient death is common in long-term care (LTC). Yet, little attention has been paid to how direct care staff members, who provide the bulk of daily LTC, experience patient death and to what extent they are prepared for this experience. To 1) determine how grief symptoms typically reported by bereaved family caregivers are experienced among direct care staff, 2) explore how prepared the staff members were for the death of their patients, and 3) identify characteristics associated with their grief. This was a cross-sectional study of direct care staff experiencing recent patient death. Participants were 140 certified nursing assistants and 80 homecare workers. Standardized assessments and structured questions addressed staff (e.g., preparedness for death), institutional (e.g., support availability), and patient/relational factors (e.g., relationship quality). Data analyses included bivariate group comparisons and hierarchical regression. Grief reactions of staff reflected many of the core grief symptoms reported by bereaved family caregivers in a large-scale caregiving study. Feelings of being "not at all prepared" for the death and struggling with "acceptance of death" were prevalent among the staff. Grief was more intense when staff-patient relationships were closer, care was provided for longer, and staff felt emotionally unprepared for the death. Grief symptoms like those experienced by family caregivers are common among direct care workers after patient death. Increasing preparedness for this experience via better training and support is likely to improve the occupational experience of direct care workers and ultimately allow them to provide better palliative care in nursing homes and homecare. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Informed Family Member Involvement to Improve the Quality of Dementia Care in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A; Bonner, Alice; Compher, Christina; Paice, Kelli; Field, Terry; Mazor, Kathleen; Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Lapane, Kate L; Gurwitz, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    To describe the extent to which nursing homes engaged families in antipsychotic initiation decisions in the year before surveyor guidance revisions were implemented. Mixed-methods study based on semistructured interviews. U.S. nursing homes (N = 20) from five CMS regions (III, IV, VI, VIII, IX). Family members of nursing home residents (N = 41). Family member responses to closed- and open-ended questions regarding involvement in resident care and antipsychotic initiation. Two researchers used a content analytical approach to code open responses to themes of family involvement in behavior management, decision-making, knowledge of risks and benefits, and informed consent. Fifty-four percent of family members felt highly involved in decisions about behavior management. Forty-two percent recalled being asked how to manage resident behavior without medication, and 17% recalled receipt of information about antipsychotic risks and benefits. Sixty-six percent felt highly involved in the process of initiating antipsychotic medication; 24% reported being asked for input into the antipsychotic initiation decision and knowing before the antipsychotic was started. Under existing federal regulations but before guidance revisions were implemented in 2013, more than 40% of families reported being involved in nonpharmacological behavior management of family members, but fewer than one in four reported being involved throughout the entire antipsychotic prescribing process. Interventions that standardize family engagement and promote adherence to existing federal regulations are needed. This discussion builds on these findings to weigh the policy options of greater enforcement of existing regulations versus enactment of new legislation to address this challenging issue. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Blended e-learning and end of life care in nursing homes: a small-scale mixed-methods case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrington, Conor Jt

    2014-01-01

    .... staff with relatively infrequent contact with end of life care) has been delivered across several English counties with the aim of improving end of life care in nursing and residential care homes...

  8. Action research in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Anette

    2016-01-01

    quality in a joint effort between care workers, residents at the nursing home, and researchers. It concludes that the project led to empowerment of the residents and staff and played an important role in the development of democratic knowledge building about better quality and ethics in elder care...

  9. Action research in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    2016-01-01

    quality in a joint effort between care workers, residents at the nursing home, and researchers. It concludes that the project led to empowerment of the residents and staff and played an important role in the development of democratic knowledge building about better quality and ethics in elder care....

  10. Family perceptions of quality of hospice care in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Deborah; Teno, Joan M; Clark, Melissa; Shield, Renée; Williams, Cindy; Casarett, David; Spence, Carol

    2014-12-01

    Nursing homes (NHs) are increasingly the site of hospice care. High quality of care is dependent on successful NH-hospice collaboration. To examine bereaved family members' perceptions of NH-hospice collaborations in terms of what they believe went well or could have been improved. Focus groups were conducted with bereaved family members from five diverse geographic regions, and included participants from inner city and rural settings, with oversampling of African Americans. A total of 28 participants (14.8% African American, mean age 61.4 years) identified three major aspects of collaboration as important to care delivery. First, most (67.9%) voiced concerns with knowing who (NH or hospice) is responsible for which aspects of patient care. Second, nearly half (42.9%) stated concern about information coordination between the NH and hospice. Finally, 67.9% of the participants mentioned the need for hospice to advocate for high-quality care rather than their having to directly do so on behalf of their family members. The important concerns raised by bereaved family members about NH-hospice collaboration have been incorporated into the revised Family Evaluation of Hospice Care, a post-death survey used to evaluate quality of hospice care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Impact of health care worker policy awareness on hand hygiene and urinary catheter care in nursing homes: results of a self-reported survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Ana; Chen, Shu; Galecki, Andrzej; McNamara, Sara; Lansing, Bonnie; Mody, Lona

    2013-06-01

    Utilizing a self-administered questionnaire in 440 health care workers (81% response rate), we evaluated the impact of health care workers policy awareness on hand hygiene and urinary catheter care in nursing homes. We show that health care workers aware of their nursing home policies are more likely to report wearing gloves and practicing hand hygiene as per evidence-based recommendations during urinary catheter care compared with those who are unaware of their facility policies. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of care in one Italian nursing home measured by ACOVE process indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pileggi

    Full Text Available To adapt the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders Quality Indicators (ACOVE QIs for use in Italy, to assess the adherence to these indicators as reported in the medical records of residents in a nursing home (NH, to compare this adherence for general medical and geriatric conditions, and eventually, to identify the relationships between patients' characteristics and reported processes of care.Two physicians collected the data by reviewing medical records of all NH residents in the previous 5 years, for a period of one year. Patients aged <65 years were excluded. A total of 245 patients were reviewed during the study period. The ACOVE QIs set, developed for NH processes of care, was used to assess the quality of care. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify and to assess the role of patients' characteristics on quality of processes of care by several domains of care in general medical and geriatric conditions.With the exception of diabetes management, quality of processes of care for general medical conditions approached adequate adherence. Care falls substantially short of acceptable levels for geriatric conditions (pressure ulcers, falls, dementia. On the contrary, the recommended interventions for urinary incontinence were commonly performed. Adherence to indicators varied for the different domains of care and was proven worse for the screening and prevention indicators both for geriatric and general medical conditions. Statistical analysis showed disparities in provision of appropriate processes of care associated with gender, age, co-morbidities, level of function and mobility, length of stay and modality of discharge by NHs.Adherence to recommended processes of care delivered in NH is inadequate. Substantial work lies ahead for the improvement of care. Efforts should focus particularly on management of geriatric conditions and on preventive healthcare.

  13. They know!?Do they? A qualitative study of residents and relatives views on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Bollig, Georg; Gjengedal, Eva; Rosland, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residents living in long-term care facilities are a vulnerable population. For many residents, a nursing home is their place of death. Palliative care and end-of-life decisions are important components of their care provision. Aim: To study the views of cognitively able residents and relatives on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes. Design: A qualitative study with in-depth interviews with nursing home residents and focus group inter...

  14. Transforming nursing home-based day care for people with dementia into socially integrated community day care: Process analysis of the transition of six day care centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A.M.; Meiland, F.J.M.; van Mierlo, L.D.; Dröes, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The community-based Meeting Centres Support Programme for people with dementia and their carers has been proven more effective in influencing behaviour and mood problems of people with dementia and improving sense of competence of carers compared to nursing home-based day care centres

  15. Palliative Care Consultations in Nursing Homes and End-of-Life Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Dahal, Roshani; Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Martin, Edward; Bull, Janet; Hanson, Laura C

    2016-12-01

    Although specialty palliative care in hospital and outpatient settings is associated with lower acute care use, its impact in U.S. nursing homes (NHs) is unknown. To understand how NH use of palliative care consults is associated with end-of-life hospitalizations. Seven consult providers in four states and 24 counties shared data on the number of consult visits and residents served (per NH) in study years 2000-2010. All NHs in the 24 counties were studied (n = 286). An NH-level longitudinal file included consult data, aggregated Medicare resident assessment and claims data, and NH characteristics. Consult introduction was "yes" when 1% of residents received consults. Volume was the number of consult visits per 100 residents, annually. Panel multivariate regression with NH fixed effects examined whether rates of hospital deaths and hospitalizations in the last 30 days of life differentially changed for NHs introducing consults, or increasing consult volume. One hundred seventy (59%) of the 286 NHs introduced consults by 2010. NHs with consults, compared to others, had residents with higher acuity and functional impairment, and lower nurse but higher nursing assistant staffing. Controlling for covariate differences and compared to NHs without consults, NHs introducing consults had a 1% (95% CI -0.021, 0.002) greater reduction in hospital death rates and a 1.6% (95% CI -0.031, -0.002) greater reduction in hospitalizations in the last 30 days of life. No statistically significant associations between volume and study outcomes were observed. The introduction of specialty palliative care consults in NHs is associated with overall reductions in end-of-life hospitalizations. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Mapping of risks related to medication care in nursing homes: An overview in Alsace - France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K; Beck, M; Rybarczyk-Vigouret, M C; Michel, B

    2015-06-01

    Medication care of patients in nursing homes involves a complex circuit whose related risks need to be identified. The aim of this study was first to map risks related to medication care in a representative panel of nursing homes under contract with community pharmacies in Alsace, then to propose improvement action plans to remedy the weaknesses identified. This study was conducted on a representative sample of 23 nursing homes in Alsace in 2014. A self-assessment questionnaire (Interdiag EHPAD), divided into 7 fields and made up of 198 questions, was completed by each of the 23 nursing homes during multidisciplinary meetings that were organized by the OMEDIT (observatoire du médicament, des dispositifs médicaux et de l'innovation thérapeutique of Alsace). The percentages of controlled risks were calculated for each of the 7 fields of the medication circuit, both at nursing home and regional levels. Similarly, the percentages of non-controlled risks were calculated for each of the 198 items. Considering the 7 fields, regional percentages of controlled risks varied from 63% to 85%. The field relative to drug supply was the best controlled, while that relative to prevention was the least controlled. Considering the 198 items, 30 important vulnerability points were identified, among which stand out: failure to report and to analyze adverse drug events, lack of involvement of general practitioner in nursing homes through collaborative approaches and transcription by nurse staff of oral or handwritten prescriptions in medical software. The analysis of those items led to the proposal of 13 improvement actions. The study pointed out mainly difficulties linked to the absence of suitable risk management policies and the lack of adjustment between nursing home staffs and general practitioners. In contrast, it revealed that the collaboration between nursing homes and community pharmacies was successful overall. Finally, we hope that this multi-center study, that led to

  17. Patient safety in domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, P; Bäckman, N; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M

    2015-12-01

    To analyse patient safety in domiciliary dental care, with data from a quality registry. Retrospective analysis. Domiciliary dental care, private caregiver, Sweden, 2012-2014. All reported events in the quality registry at a provider of domiciliary dental care, (2012-05-01 to 2014-06-30) were categorized into 14 domains, and for severity as 'minor', 'moderate', or 'serious' events. The reported events were also independently assessed by an experienced reviewer for national requirements of reporting patient safety related events. The quality registry covered 724 (0.03%) reported events during 218,586 consecutive treatment sessions in domiciliary dental care, including 628,070 registered dental procedures. Fifty (6.9%) of the reported events were patient safety related, of which 11 (1.5%) events were reportedly of minor severity, 20 (2.8%) as moderate, and 19 (2.6%) as serious. For all degrees of severity, the most frequently reported events were related to problems with patient identity control (3.3%). None of the events required reporting to national authorities. Domiciliary dental care has a low frequency of patient safety related events (0.03% of all treatments). Identity controls need to be emphasised in nursing homes or where individuals are dependent on the care of others.

  18. An evaluation of the implementation of a programme to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, F; Clifford, C; Hewison, A; Thomas, K

    2009-09-01

    The Gold Standards Framework in Care Homes programme aims to improve the quality of end-of-life care for residents. The impact of introducing phase 2 of the programme to homes in England was evaluated. A pre-post survey design was adopted, focusing on indicators identified as markers of good end-of-life care. The 95 homes in phase 2 of the programme were invited to participate in the evaluation. Homes completed a baseline survey of care provision and an audit of the five most recent resident deaths. The survey and audit were repeated post programme completion. Forty-nine homes returned completed pre- and post-surveys, 44 returned pre- and post-data on deaths. Although some staff found completion of the programme challenging, homes that returned pre- and post-data demonstrated improvements in aspects of end-of-life care. There were statistically significant increases in the proportion of residents who died in the care homes and those who had an advanced care plan. Crisis admissions to hospital were significantly reduced. This evaluation indicates that appropriately funded structured programmes have the potential to assist nursing homes improve the provision of end-of-life care to older adults, in line with government health policy.

  19. Rurality and Nursing Home Quality: Evidence from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Meng, Hongdao; Miller, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To evaluate the impact of rural geographic location on nursing home quality of care in the United States. Design and Methods: The study used cross-sectional observational design. We obtained resident- and facility-level data from 12,507 residents in 1,174 nursing homes from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. We used…

  20. Japan's policy of promoting end-of-life care in nursing homes: impact on facility and resident characteristics associated with the site of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of the policy to encourage nursing homes to provide end-of-life care by comparing facility and resident variables associated with dying within the nursing home and not in hospitals, and by comparing life sustaining treatment (LST) respectively provided. Questionnaires mailed to an 11% random sample of 653 nursing homes in 2009. Facility characteristics from 371 nursing homes (57%) and resident characteristics of the 1158 who had been discharged due to death were obtained from 241 facilities (37%). Facility characteristics related to dying in nursing homes were their policy of providing end-of-life care and physicians being based in home care supporting clinics. Resident characteristics related were not having pneumonia as the cause of death, the family's preference of the nursing home as the site of death and agreement within the family. Preferences on the use of LST were adhered more in residents who had died in nursing homes. Although the percentage of residents dying within the facility has increased, the nursing home as a site of death still composes only 3.2% of the total. To increase the latter, nursing homes should refocus their function to providing end-of-life care to those not preferring aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. What the Desirable Collaboration between Care Workers in Nursing Homes and Phamacists Should Be: An Approach for Security and Safe Medication for Residents in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Hideyuki; Shiraishi, Akira; Miki, Akiko; Satoh, Hiroki; Konishi, Yukari; Asai, Kohei; Funahashi, Kenichi; Usui, Yoshinobu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2017-01-01

    In our previous research, there was no collaboration between care workers and pharmacists, for the most part. As a result, it was discovered that in some cases, problems concerning medication of nursing home residents had not been resolved. To solve this issue, we brought together care workers and pharmacists for a workshop we conducted. We assigned 12 care workers with at least two years of experience and 12 pharmacists to four mixed groups and guided them in the management of in-home long-term medical care and conducted small group discussions (SGD) using the KJ method. In the pre-survey before the workshop, all 12 care workers replied "yes" to having experienced "concerns over medication" and nine (75%) replied "no" to having experienced "discussions (consultations) with pharmacists regarding the medication of residents". As a result of the SGD, "information sharing among professionals" was revealed as a problem common to all groups. Furthermore, common countermeasures for this issue included communication notes and holding collaborative meetings. In the post-survey after the workshop, 67% of the participants replied that their thoughts concerning countermeasures were "coherent", and everyone replied that their "awareness was increased". In a follow-up survey after the workshop, 82% of the participants replied that they were using some form of what they had learned and discovered in the workshop in their actual work.

  2. Improving Nursing Home Care through Feedback On PerfoRMance Data (INFORM): Protocol for a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Norton, Peter G; Ginsburg, Liane R; Anderson, Ruth A; Cummings, Greta G; Lanham, Holly J; Squires, Janet E; Taylor, Deanne; Wagg, Adrian S; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2017-01-10

    Audit and feedback is effective in improving the quality of care. However, methods and results of international studies are heterogeneous, and studies have been criticized for a lack of systematic use of theory. In TREC (Translating Research in Elder Care), a longitudinal health services research program, we collect comprehensive data from care providers and residents in Canadian nursing homes to improve quality of care and life of residents, and quality of worklife of caregivers. The study aims are to a) systematically feed back TREC research data to nursing home care units, and b) compare the effectiveness of three different theory-based feedback strategies in improving performance within care units. INFORM (Improving Nursing Home Care through Feedback On PerfoRMance Data) is a 3.5-year pragmatic, three-arm, parallel, cluster-randomized trial. We will randomize 67 Western Canadian nursing homes with 203 care units to the three study arms, a standard feedback strategy and two assisted and goal-directed feedback strategies. Interventions will target care unit managerial teams. They are based on theory and evidence related to audit and feedback, goal setting, complex adaptive systems, and empirical work on feeding back research results. The primary outcome is the increased number of formal interactions (e.g., resident rounds or family conferences) involving care aides - non-registered caregivers providing up to 80% of direct care. Secondary outcomes are a) other modifiable features of care unit context (improved feedback, social capital, slack time) b) care aides' quality of worklife (improved psychological empowerment, job satisfaction), c) more use of best practices, and d) resident outcomes based on the Resident Assessment Instrument - Minimum Data Set 2.0. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately after the 12-month intervention period, and 18 months post intervention. INFORM is the first study to systematically assess the effectiveness of different

  3. The burden of caring for people with dementia at the end of life in nursing homes: a postdeath study among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Gwenda; Van den Block, Lieve; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2014-06-01

    To investigate how often nursing staff perceive caring for nursing home residents with dementia at the end of life as an emotional and/or physical burden, and to identify associated factors. Postdeath study conducted in 2010 in Flanders, Belgium. Nursing homes were selected through random clustersampling. All residents who died with dementia in a three-month period were identified, and a structured questionnaire was completed by the nurse mostly involved. Nursing staff were asked to indicate how they perceived burden of caregiving for this resident on 10-point scale. Sixty-nine out of 120 nursing homes (response rate 58%) participated in the study. In 37% and 32% of cases, respectively, the nursing staff reported that they perceived themselves as experiencing a high emotional and physical burden. In cases where the resident had capacity for medical decision making during the last week of life and where the nurse had spoken with a relative about wishes for medical end-of-life treatments, they were more likely to report an emotional burden. A physical burden was more likely to be reported where the resident had decubitus ulcers or had developed pneumonia. In one-third of cases, nursing staff experienced a high emotional and/or physical burden. While experiencing a physical burden seems to be related to the poorer clinical status of the resident, an emotional burden was more likely to be related to greater and closer contact with the resident or a relative and to the nurse being involved in the process of care and decision making in the last phase of life. This study highlights the need to support nursing home staff in providing compassionate end-of-life care for people with dementia and suggests that both the physical and emotional burdens in staff should be monitored regularly to achieve optimal working. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. From Hospital to Nursing Home: The Long-Term Care Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L. Matthias, Ruth

    1984-01-01

    Applied a logistic model to predict elderly patients' risk for discharge to nursing homes following hospitalization. Age was the only consistently strong predictor in the individualized models developed for each of four areas. (Author/JAC)

  5. Palliative care needs and symptoms of nursing home residents with and without dementia: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; Cohen, Joachim; Spruytte, Nele; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2017-10-01

    The aims of the present study were: (i) to describe palliative care needs and symptoms of older adults anticipated to be in the last year of their life in Flemish nursing homes (Belgium); and (ii) to evaluate whether these needs differ between residents with and without dementia. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2014. Nurses and nursing assistants in 15 Flemish nursing homes (Belgium) completed the Palliative care Outcome Scale for 109 residents with palliative care needs. Pain, as well as other physical symptoms, was present in more than half of the nursing home residents according to caregivers. The most prominent needs occurred on psychosocial and spiritual domains, such as patient anxiety, support, finding life worth living and self-worth. Caregivers reported that residents with dementia experienced fewer physical symptoms apart from pain than did residents without dementia (coeffficient -0.73, 95% CI -1.18-0.84; P = 0.001. Furthermore, residents with dementia received higher scores on the items "support" (coefficient 0.75; 95% CI 0.15-1.34, P = 0.015), "life worthwhile" (coeffficient 0.58; 95% CI 0.090-1.07, P = 0.020) and "self-worth" (coefficient 0.58, 95% CI 0.13-1.03, P = 0.012). According to caregivers, residents with dementia experienced fewer other physical symptoms (e.g. nausea) than residents without dementia. This, however, might be a result of an underdetection of other symptoms in nursing home residents with dementia. Furthermore, most challenges in nursing homes lie within the spiritual and psychosocial domains of palliative care, particularly in people with dementia. These aspects should be integrated in the professional education of caregivers. Assessment tools might be of help to improve the identification of needs and symptoms. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1501-1507. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Kreinfeldt Skovgaard Møller, Tina; Boll Hansen, Eigil; Keiding, Hans

    2014-08-28

    Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss or poor nutrition. Hence a structured and multidisciplinary approach, focusing on the nutritional risk factors and involving e.g. dieticians, occupational therapists, and physiotherapist, may be necessary to achieve benefits. Up till now a few studies have been done evaluating the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support among undernourished older adults and none of these have used such a multidisciplinary approach. An 11 week cluster randomized trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus will be on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified by screening, by involving physiotherapist, registered dietician, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system.The primary outcome parameter will be change in quality of life (by means of Euroquol-5D-3L). Secondary outcomes will be: physical performance (chair stand), nutritional status (weight, Body Mass Index and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (for participants from home-care), use of social services and mortality.An economic evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary

  7. Improving person-centred care in nursing homes through dementia-care mapping: design of a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, G. van de; Draskovic, I.; Adang, E.M.M.; Donders, R.; Post, A.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness and efficiency of nursing-home dementia care are suboptimal: there are high rates of neuropsychiatric symptoms among the residents and work-related stress among the staff. Dementia-care mapping is a person-centred care method that may alleviate both the resident and the

  8. Improving person-centred care in nursing homes through dementia-care mapping : design of a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M M; Donders, Rogier A R T; Post, Aukje; Zuidema, Sytse U; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness and efficiency of nursing-home dementia care are suboptimal: there are high rates of neuropsychiatric symptoms among the residents and work-related stress among the staff. Dementia-care mapping is a person-centred care method that may alleviate both the resident and the

  9. Do nursing homes for older people have the support they need to provide end-of-life care? A mixed methods enquiry in England

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Jane E; Kumar, Arun; Froggatt, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Nursing homes are a common site of death, but older residents receive variable quality of end-of-life care. We used a mixed methods design to identify external influences on the quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes. Two qualitative case studies were conducted and a postal survey of 180 nursing homes surrounding the case study sites. In the case studies, qualitative interviews were held with seven members of nursing home staff and 10 external staff. Problems in accessing support for en...

  10. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-09-01

    The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. The best evidence for minimizing resistance-to-care during assisted personal care for older adults with dementia in nursing homes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Rie; Kang, Hee Sun; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of interventions in minimizing resistance-to-care behaviors during assisted personal care for nursing home residents with dementia. • What interventions are effective for reducing the frequency and intensity of resistance-to-care behaviors during assisted personal care activities (i.e. mealtime assistance, toileting, mouth care, morning care and shower/bathing) for nursing home residents with dementia?• What interventions are effective for reducing the frequency and intensity of resistance-to-care behaviors for overall daily personal care activities for nursing home residents with dementia? In many countries the proportion of older adults with dementia is steadily increasing. Many older adults with dementia live in nursing homes and most of them require assistance with personal care due to having dementia-related symptoms. Nursing staff and formal caregivers frequently experience resistance or rejection from such residents when they are providing care. Such behavior can be a large obstacle, particularly when caregivers attempt to provide assistance in daily personal care including oral care, bathing, feeding, dressing and toileting.The definition of "resistance-to-care" means physically and/or psychologically resistive behavior, for example "pulling away from staff, tightening limbs, stiffening the body, deliberately ceasing or refusing to weight bear during care, waving arms and legs and verbally objecting to care using words and/or sounds" (p.7). Several other definitions can be found in the literature concerning the resistance-to-care behaviors exhibited by nursing home residents with dementia. No distinct difference seems to exist for what terms mean and they are often used interchangeably in the studies on nursing. For instance, Mahoney et al. have defined the term "resistive to care" to mean "the repertoire of behaviors with which persons with dementia withstand or oppose the efforts of a caregiver" (p.28). Other commonly

  12. Hospice utilization in nursing homes: association with facility end-of-life care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B; Caprio, Thomas V; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2013-10-01

    Hospice care provided to nursing home (NH) residents has been shown to improve the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care. However, hospice utilization in NHs is typically low. This study examined the relationship between facility self-reported EOL practices and residents' hospice use and length of stay. The study was based on a retrospective cohort of NH residents. Medicare hospice claims, Minimum Data Set, Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system and the Area Resource File were linked with a survey of directors of nursing (DON) regarding institutional EOL practice patterns (EOLC Survey). In total, 4,540 long-term-care residents who died in 2007 in 290 facilities which participated in the EOLC Survey were included in this study. We measured NHs' tendency to offer hospice to residents and to initiate aggressive treatments (hospital transfers and feeding tubes) for EOL residents based on DON's responses to survey items. Residents' hospice utilization was determined using Medicare hospice claims. The prevalence of hospice use was 18%. The average length of stay was 93 days. After controlling for individual risk factors, facilities' self-reported practice measures associated with residents' likelihood of using hospice were tendency to offer hospice (p = .048) and tendency to hospitalize (p = .002). Residents in NHs reporting higher tendency to hospitalize tended to enroll in hospice closer to death. Residents' hospice utilization is not only associated with individual and facility characteristics but also with NHs' self-reported EOL care practices. Potential interventions to effect greater use of hospice may need to focus on facility-level care processes and practices.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary wound care in nursing homes: a pseudo-randomized pragmatic cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Trang; Harris, Anthony; Duncan, Gregg; Sussman, Geoff

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary wound care team in the nursing home setting from a health system perspective. Pseudo-randomized pragmatic cluster trial with 20-week follow-up involving 342 uncomplicated leg and pressure ulcers in 176 residents located in 44 high-care nursing homes in Melbourne, Australia in 1999-2000. Twenty-one nursing homes (180 wounds in 94 residents) were assigned to the intervention arm and 23 to the control arm (162 wounds in 82 residents). Residents in the intervention arm received standardized treatment from a wound care team comprising of trained community pharmacists and nurses. Residents in the control arm received usual care. More wounds healed during the trial in the intervention arm than in the control arm (61.7% versus 52.5%, P = 0.07). A Cox regression with shared frailty predicted that the chances of healing increased 73% for intervention wounds [95% confidence interval (CI) 20-150%, P = 0.003]. The mean treatment cost was $A616.4 for intervention and $A977.9 for control patients (P = 0.006). Most cost reduction was obtained from decreases in nursing time and waste disposal. The mean cost saving per wound, adjusted for baseline wound severity and random censoring, was $A277.9 (95% CI $A21.6-$A534.1). Standardized treatment provided by a multidisciplinary wound care team saved costs and improved chronic wound healing in nursing homes. The main source of saving was in the cost of nursing time in applying traditional dressings and in the cost of their disposal.

  14. Care staff training based on person-centered care and dementia care mapping, and its effects on the quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mami; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of care staff training based on person-centered care (PCC) and dementia care mapping (DCM) on the quality of life (QOL) of residents with dementia in a nursing home. An intervention of staff training based on PCC and DCM was conducted with 40 care staff members at a geriatric nursing home. The effects of the staff training on the QOL of residents with dementia were evaluated by the DCM measurements of 40 residents with dementia three times at about one-month intervals (first, baseline; second, pre-intervention; third, post-intervention). The well-being and ill-being values (WIB values) of the residents with dementia measured by DCM were not different between the first and second rounds before the staff training (p = 0.211). Meanwhile, the WIB values increased from the first and second rounds to the third post-intervention round (p = 0.035 and p dementia.

  15. The Residential History File: Studying Nursing Home Residents' Long-Term Care Histories*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Hiris, Jeffrey; Berg, Katherine; Miller, Susan C; Mor, Vince

    2011-01-01

    Objective To construct a data tool, the Residential History File (RHF), that summarizes information from Medicare claims and nursing home (NH) Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments to track people through health care locations, including non-Medicare-paid NH stays. Data Sources Online Survey of Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data for 202 free-standing NHs, Medicare Denominator, claims (parts A and B), and MDS assessments for 60,984 people who were present in one of these NHs in 2006. Methods The algorithm creating the RHF is outlined and the RHF for the study data are used to describe place of death. The identification of residents in NHs is compared with the reports in OSCAR and part B claims. Principal Findings The RHF correctly identified 84.8 percent of part B claims with place-of-service in NH, and it identified 18.3 less residents on average than reported in the OSCAR on the day of the survey. The RHF indicated that 17.5 percent non-Medicare NH decedents were transferred to the hospital to die versus 45.6 percent skilled nursing facility decedents. Conclusions The population-based design of the RHF makes it possible to conduct policy-relevant research to examine the variation in the rate and type of health care transitions across the United States. PMID:21029090

  16. The residential history file: studying nursing home residents' long-term care histories(*).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Hiris, Jeffrey; Berg, Katherine; Miller, Susan C; Mor, Vince

    2011-02-01

    To construct a data tool, the Residential History File (RHF), that summarizes information from Medicare claims and nursing home (NH) Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments to track people through health care locations, including non-Medicare-paid NH stays. Online Survey of Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data for 202 free-standing NHs, Medicare Denominator, claims (parts A and B), and MDS assessments for 60,984 people who were present in one of these NHs in 2006. The algorithm creating the RHF is outlined and the RHF for the study data are used to describe place of death. The identification of residents in NHs is compared with the reports in OSCAR and part B claims. The RHF correctly identified 84.8 percent of part B claims with place-of-service in NH, and it identified 18.3 less residents on average than reported in the OSCAR on the day of the survey. The RHF indicated that 17.5 percent non-Medicare NH decedents were transferred to the hospital to die versus 45.6 percent skilled nursing facility decedents. The population-based design of the RHF makes it possible to conduct policy-relevant research to examine the variation in the rate and type of health care transitions across the United States. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Impact of Symptoms and Care Practices on Nursing Home Residents at the End of Life: A Rating by Front-line Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Chamberlain, Stephanie A; Knopp-Sihota, Jennifer A; Poss, Jeffrey W; Thompson, Genevieve N; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2016-02-01

    Burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices are common at the end of life for nursing home residents. Appropriately managing symptoms and limiting aggressive care practices is key to high-quality end-of-life care. Little research is available, however, on the opinions of nursing home care providers about the impact of symptoms and practices for both residents and care facilities. Our objectives were to (1) identify common burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate practices at the end of life for nursing home residents, (2) develop and assess the feasibility of a procedure to have various groups of nursing home care providers rate impact of symptoms and practices, and (3) generate recommendations for action and further research, with key policy and decision makers. Proof-of-concept study. Partnered research by researchers, health professionals, and decision makers to identify and explore the impact of burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices for nursing home residents at the end of life. Thirty-six nursing homes from Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. A total of 6007 residents (prevalence rating); 4 medical directors, 5 directors of care, 4 nurse practitioners, 4 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 5 care aides (impact rating); and 13 key policy or decision makers from Alberta, British Columbia, and Manitoba (expert panel). Based on a literature search and data in the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) 2.0, we generated lists of burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices for nursing home residents at the end of life. We rated prevalence of those symptoms and practices in the last quarter before death as high, medium, or low. Care providers rated the burden of symptoms and inappropriateness of practices as high, medium, or low. Directors of care rated the unnecessary cost of those symptoms and practices to a nursing home as high, medium, or low. We ranked

  18. Entrepreneurial program of research and service to improve nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Mehr, David R; Hicks, Lanis; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Petroski, Gregory F; Madsen, Richard W; Porter, Rose; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary

    2006-12-01

    This is a methodological article intended to demonstrate the integration of multiple goals, multiple projects with diverse foci, and multiple funding sources to develop an entrepreneurial program of research and service to directly affect and improve the quality of care of older adults, particularly nursing home residents. Examples that illustrate how clinical ideas build on one another and how the research ideas and results build on one another are provided. Results from one study are applied to the next and are also applied to the development of service delivery initiatives to test results in the real world. Descriptions of the Quality Improvement Program for Missouri and the Aging in Place Project are detailed to illustrate real-world application of research to practice.

  19. Nursing Home Data Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The compendium contains figures and tables presenting data on all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the United States as well as the residents in...

  20. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  1. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  2. Transforming nursing home-based day care for people with dementia into socially integrated community day care: process analysis of the transition of six day care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haeften-van Dijk, A M; Meiland, F J M; van Mierlo, L D; Dröes, R M

    2015-08-01

    The community-based Meeting Centres Support Programme for people with dementia and their carers has been proven more effective in influencing behaviour and mood problems of people with dementia and improving sense of competence of carers compared to nursing home-based day care centres for people with dementia. Six Dutch nursing home-based day care centres were transformed into Community-based day care centres with carer support, according to this Meeting Centres model. To determine which factors facilitate or impede the transition to Community-based day care. A process evaluation was conducted with a qualitative study design. Six nursing home-based day care centres transformed into Community-based day care centres for people with dementia and their carers. Stakeholders (n=40) that were involved during the transition. Factors that facilitated or impeded the transition were traced by means of (audiotaped and transcribed) interviews with stakeholders and document analysis. All data were coded by two independent researchers and analyzed using thematic analysis based on the Theoretical framework of adaptive implementation. Six nursing home-based day care centres successfully made the transition to Community-based day care with carer support. Success factors for the start of the project were: the innovation being in line with the current trend towards more outpatient care and having motivated pioneers responsible for the execution of the transition. Barriers were difficulties reaching/recruiting the target group (people with dementia and carers), inflexible staff and little or no experience with collaboration with community-based care and welfare organizations. Facilitating factors during the implementation phase were: finding a suitable location in the community, positive changes in staff attitude and adoption of the new vision, and good cooperation with care and welfare organizations. Barriers were insufficient involvement of, and support from the managers of the

  3. Antipsychotic drug prescription rates among Dutch nursing homes: the influence of patient characteristics and the dementia special care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, M.J.A.M. van; Wetzels, R.B.; Bor, H.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the differences in antipsychotic drug prescription rates in residents with dementia in dementia special care units (SCUs) of Dutch nursing homes, considering the differences in patient characteristics. METHOD: As part of the Waalbed-II study, the data on antipsychotic drug use

  4. Antipsychotic drug prescription rates among Dutch nursing homes : the influence of patient characteristics and the dementia special care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, M. J. G.; Wetzels, R. B.; Bor, H.; Zuidema, S. U.; Koopmans, R. T. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the differences in antipsychotic drug prescription rates in residents with dementia in dementia special care units (SCUs) of Dutch nursing homes, considering the differences in patient characteristics. Method: As part of the Waalbed-II study, the data on antipsychotic drug use

  5. Referral and Timing of Referral to Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: The Significant Role of Staff Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Lisa C.; Miller, Susan C.; Martin, Edward W.; Nanda, Aman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Given concerns about end-of-life care for many nursing home (NH) residents, this study sought to understand factors influencing hospice referral or nonreferral as well as timing of referral. Design and Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with personnel from seven participating NHs and two hospices. We interviewed NH directors…

  6. A review of self-rated generic quality of life instruments used among older patients receiving home care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegaard, Marit; Utne, Inger; Halvorsrud, Liv; Valeberg, Berit Taraldsen; Torbjørnsen, Astrid; Bjørnnes, Ann Kristin; Bjørge, Heidi; Grov, Ellen Karine; Løyland, Borghild

    2017-03-28

    In the last two decades, quality of life and health-related quality of life have become commonly used outcome measures in the large number of studies evaluating healthcare and home care nursing. The objective of this systematic search and review was to evaluate studies that include self-rated generic quality of life instrument used among elderly patients receiving home care nursing. Searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, PsycINFO and Cinahl for articles published between January 2005 and June 2016, with 17 studies in eight countries meeting the inclusion criteria and assessed for quality. Overall, the review shows great variations in the included studies regarding characteristics of the participants and place of origin, the generic quality of life instruments applied and their dimensions. In this review, we raise the question of whether the generic questionnaires used to measure quality of life do in fact measure what is essential for quality of life in elderly users of home care nursing. The psychological and physical dimensions of quality of life were assessed in almost all included studies, while older-specific dimensions like autonomy, control and sensation were less frequently assessed. There is reason to believe that generic quality of life instruments frequently do not capture the dimensions that are most important for elderly people with health problems in need of home care nursing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The last days of life of nursing home patients with and without dementia assessed with the palliative care outcome scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, H.E.; Deliens, L.H.J.; Steen, van der J.T.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.; Wal, van der G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS) for terminally ill nursing home (NH) patients in the Netherlands. METHODS: A prospective observational study of patients with a life-expectancy of six weeks or less in 16 Dutch NHs. NH staff rated the patient characteristics

  8. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Wetzels; MD E.J.M. Wouters; J. van Hoof; A.M.C. Dooremalen; H.T.G. Weffers

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in

  9. Care of Older People in Nursing Homes: An Intensive Programme as an Educational Activity within Erasmus-Socrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzabassaki, Stella; Alabaster, Erica S.; And, Kati; Larsson, Ulla; de Vree, Willem

    2003-01-01

    An intensive 3-year program provided cross-national training in holistic care for European nursing home staff. Data from 38 teachers and 57 students indicated that the goals of transcultural awareness, skill development, and increased knowledge were achieved. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  10. Organization and financing of home nursing in the European Union.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkstra, A.; Hutten, J.B.F.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the organization and financing of home nursing in the 15 member states in the European Union. Home nursing was defined as the nursing care provided at the patients' home by professional home nursing organizations. Data were gathered by means of

  11. The role of leadership in the implementation of person-centred care using Dementia Care Mapping: a study in three nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokstad, Anne Marie Mork; Vatne, Solfrid; Engedal, Knut; Selbæk, Geir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of leadership in the implementation of person-centred care (PCC) in nursing homes using Dementia Care Mapping (DCM). Leadership is important for the implementation of nursing practice. However, the empirical knowledge of positive leadership in processes enhancing person-centred culture of care in nursing homes is limited. The study has a qualitative descriptive design. The DCM method was used in three nursing homes. Eighteen staff members and seven leaders participated in focus-group interviews centring on the role of leadership in facilitating the development process. The different roles of leadership in the three nursing homes, characterized as 'highly professional', 'market orientated' or 'traditional', seemed to influence to what extent the DCM process led to successful implementation of PCC. This study provided useful information about the influence of leadership in the implementation of person-centred care in nursing homes. Leaders should be active role models, expound a clear vision and include and empower all staff in the professional development process. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Palliative Care Consultations in Nursing Homes and Reductions in Acute Care Use and Potentially Burdensome End-of-Life Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Martin, Edward; Bull, Janet; Hanson, Laura C

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate how receipt and timing of nursing home (NH) palliative care consultations (primarily by nurse practitioners with palliative care expertise) are associated with end-of-life care transitions and acute care use DESIGN: Propensity score-matched retrospective cohort study. Forty-six NHs in two states. Nursing home residents who died from 2006 to 2010 stratified according to days between initial consultation and death (≤7, 8-30, 31-60, 61-180). Propensity score matching identified three controls (n = 1,174) according to strata for each consultation recipient (n = 477). Outcomes were hospitalizations in the last 7, 30, and 60 days of life; emergency department (ED) visits in the last 30 and 60 days; and any potentially burdensome care transition, defined as hospitalization or hospice admission within 3 days of death or two or more hospitalizations or ED visits within 30 days. Weighted multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate outcomes. Residents with consultations had lower rates of hospitalization than controls, with rates lowest when initial consultations were furthest from death. For instance, in residents with initial consultations 8 to 30 days before death, the adjusted hospitalization rate in the last 7 days of life was 11.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 9.8-12.4%), vs 22.0% (95% CI = 20.6-23.4%) in controls, although in those with initial consultations 61 to 180 days before death, rates were 6.9% (95% CI = 5.5-8.4%), vs 22.9% (95% CI = 20.5-25.4%). Potentially burdensome transition rates were lower when consultations were 61 to 180 days before death (16.2%, 95% CI = 13.7-18.6%), vs 28.2% (95% CI = 25.8-30.6%) for controls. Palliative care consultations improve end-of-life NH care by reducing acute care use and potentially burdensome care transitions. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. 'It's the little things that count'. Families' experience of roles, relationships and quality of care in rural nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Assumpta Ann; McKenna, Hugh

    2015-03-01

    Entry to long-term care is an emotional time for older people and their families. Poor communication and uncertainty about roles and responsibilities in the post-placement period can cause distress for families and staff, further exacerbating an already difficult situation. However, there are limited studies that specifically address roles and relationships between families and care home staff in the post-placement period. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of families following the nursing home placement of an older relative. A qualitative approach using grounded theory methodology was used to conduct the study. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 29 relatives of nursing home residents in a region of the UK. Consistent with grounded theory methodology, data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously. Data analysis revealed five distinct categories that captured the experience of families in the post-placement period. These were: communication with staff, involvement in relative's care, the importance of 'the little things', quality of care and areas for improvement. Developing caring partnership is crucial if the resources of care home staff and families are to be maximised for the benefit of all concerned. A number of programmes and initiatives already exist to enhance the quality of life of older people in care homes and their families. Serious consideration should be given to more widespread uptake of these initiatives. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Work environment characteristics associated with quality of care in Dutch nursing homes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Ramona; Rossum, Erik van; Verbeek, Hilde; Halfens, Ruud J G; Tan, Frans E S; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2017-01-01

    A lack of relationship between direct care staffing levels and quality of care, as found in prior studies, underscores the importance of considering the quality of the work environment instead of only considering staff ratios. Only a few studies, however, have combined direct care staffing with work environment characteristics when assessing the relationship with quality of care in nursing homes. To examine the relationship between direct care staffing levels, work environment characteristics and perceived quality of care in Dutch nursing homes. Cross-sectional, observational study in cooperation with the Dutch Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems. Twenty-four somatic and 31 psychogeriatric wards from 21 nursing homes in the Netherlands. Forty-one ward managers and 274 staff members (registered nurses or certified nurse assistants) from the 55 participating wards. Ward rosters were discussed with managers to obtain an insight into direct care staffing levels (i.e, total direct care staff hours per resident per day). Participating staff members completed a questionnaire on work environment characteristics (i.e., ward culture, team climate, communication and coordination, role model availability, and multidisciplinary collaboration) and they rated the quality of care in their ward. Data were analyzed using multilevel linear regression analyses (random intercept). Separate analyses were conducted for somatic and psychogeriatric wards. In general, staff members were satisfied with the quality of care in their wards. Staff members from psychogeriatric wards scored higher on the statement 'In the event that a family member had to be admitted to a nursing home now, I would recommend this ward'. A better team climate was related to better perceived quality of care in both ward types (p≤0.020). In somatic wards, there was a positive association between multidisciplinary collaboration and agreement by staff of ward recommendation for a family member (p=0.028). In

  15. Nursing home organizational change: the "Culture Change" movement as viewed by long-term care specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Miller, Edward Alan; Jung, Hye-Young; Sterns, Samantha; Clark, Melissa; Mor, Vincent

    2010-08-01

    A decade-long grassroots movement aims to deinstitutionalize nursing home (NH) environments and individualize care. Coined "NH Culture Change" the movement is often described by its resident-centered/directed care focus. While empirical data of "culture change's" costs and benefits are limited, it is broadly viewed as beneficial and widely promoted. Still, debate abounds regarding barriers to its adoption. We used data from a Web-based survey of 1,147 long-term care specialists (including NH and other providers, consumers/advocates, state and federal government officials, university/academic, researchers/consultants, and others) to better understand factors associated with perceived barriers. Long-term care specialists view the number-one barrier to adoption differently depending on their employment, familiarity with culture change, and their underlying policy views. To promote adoption, research and broad-based educational efforts are needed to influence views and perceptions. Fundamental changes in the regulatory process together with targeted regulatory changes and payment incentives may also be needed.

  16. Comparative characteristics of the home care nursing services used by community-dwelling older people from urban and rural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Ewa; Kostka, Tomasz

    2013-06-01

    To compare home care nursing services use by community-dwelling older people from urban and rural environments in Poland. In the current literature, there is a lack of data based on multidimensional geriatric assessment concerning the provision of care delivered by nurses for older people from urban and rural environments. Cross-sectional random survey. Between 2006-2010, a random sample of 935 older people (over 65 years of age) from an urban environment and 812 from a neighbouring rural environment were interviewed in a cross-sectional survey. The rural dwellers (82·8%) nominated their family members as care providers more often than the city inhabitants (51·2%). Home nursing care was provided to 4·1% of people in the city and 6·5% in the county. Poststroke condition, poor nutritional status, and low physical activity level, as well as low scores for activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and Mini-Mental State Examination values, were all determinants of nursing care, both in urban and rural areas. In the urban environment, additional predictors of nursing care use were age, presence of ischaemic heart disease, diabetes and respiratory disorders, number of medications taken, and a high depression score. Poor functional status is the most important determinant of nursing care use in both environments. In the urban environment, a considerable proportion of community-dwelling elders live alone. In the rural environment, older people usually have someone available for potential care services. The main problem seems to be seeking nursing care only in advanced deterioration of functional status. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Decision-making in caring for people with dementia at the end of life in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppitz, Andrea; Bosshard, Georg; Kipfer, Stephanie; Imhof, Lorenz

    2016-02-01

    Alleviating symptoms, fulfilling psychosocial needs, and the inclusion of family are among the criteria that determine care quality in palliative treatment. The care quality is especially inadequate for people with dementia (PwD) at the end of life. To improve this, it is necessary to understand the process of nurses' clinical decision-making in symptom management in the terminal phase of PwD. The aim of the study was to examine the decision-making process of symptom management for PwD in nursing homes in their terminal phase of life. A qualitative design was chosen with a constructivist approach. Individual interviews were conducted with nurses (n=32) in four Swiss nursing homes. 'Recount and reflect' plays a vital role in the care of PwD in terminal phase, enabling symptom recognition and facilitating symptom management. A process of thinking during the course of action enables nursing staff members to understand what, when, and how symptom changes have taken place. Highly-trained nurses need to support health care assistants through counselling, coaching, and leadership to help reduce the symptom burden experienced by PwD. Relatives are necessary to maintain an exchange of ideas regarding the appropriate treatment to reduce symptom burden.

  18. Fair nursing care when resources are limited: the role of patients and family members in Norwegian home-based services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Siri; Førde, Reidun; Nortvedt, Per

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate nurses' priority decisions and the provision of home-based nursing care services. Interviews were conducted with 17 nurses in various positions in this service. The data were interpreted and analyzed according to interpretive hermeneutic methodology. The authors particularly address the nurses' descriptions of the role of the patient and his or her family members for the provision of home-based care. Cooperative patients and family members represent an important resource for care and can make it possible for nurses to provide services for all the patients on an egalitarian basis and to prioritize those who live alone. However, demanding and resourceful patients and family members may "rule" the service at the expense of other patients who also have legitimate care needs--a practice that the nurses describe as unfair. In this article, the authors discuss how a fair and impartial distribution of common benefits can be achieved without some parties being unjustly treated.

  19. Recording care time in nursing homes: development and validation of the "RUD-FOCA" (Resource Utilization in Dementia-Formal Care).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttenberger, Katharina; Graessel, Elmar

    2010-12-01

    Currently there is no standardized procedure for recording direct care time of dementia patients in a nursing home. Recording the direct care time, however, provides an important component of both cost estimates for time-dependent reimbursement of nursing activities and for recording the degree of dependency as an outcome measure for the efficiency of new treatment methods for dementia patients. The purpose of this study is thus to develop and validate the "RUD-FOCA" (Resource Utilization in Dementia - Formal Care), based on the RUD lite, as a standardized tool to measure the direct care time actually required in the nursing home. Based on four hypotheses, construct validity was tested within a randomized controlled trial in a sample of 148 residents in six German nursing homes. The RUD-FOCA records the care time in three areas: activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and supervision. For validation, the residents' capabilities were examined using the Barthel Index, the Nurses' Observation Scale on Geriatric Patients (NOSGER), the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS), the Erlangen Test on Activities of Daily Living (E-ADL) and the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE). The hypotheses assume relationships between the time required for care in the three areas and the limitations involved in these areas. The retest reliability was also determined. ADL care accounts for two-thirds of total care time in the homes. The hypotheses which refer to total time, ADL and supervision are supported by differentiated correlation profiles. The IADL hypothesis is not supported owing to even, low correlations. The retest reliability was r = 0.76 for the entire care time. Overall time and the times for ADL care and supervision can be considered valid estimates. The validity is lowest for recording IADL times. Thus, the RUD-FOCA is suitable as an instrument to determine the direct care time in the nursing home. Recording IADL times should be

  20. Marketization in Long-Term Care: A Cross-Country Comparison of Large For-Profit Nursing Home Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Jacobsen, Frode F; Panos, Justin; Pollock, Allyson; Sutaria, Shailen; Szebehely, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents cross-country comparisons of trends in for-profit nursing home chains in Canada, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Using public and private industry reports, the study describes ownership, corporate strategies, costs, and quality of the 5 largest for-profit chains in each country. The findings show that large for-profit nursing home chains are increasingly owned by private equity investors, have had many ownership changes over time, and have complex organizational structures. Large for-profit nursing home chains increasingly dominate the market and their strategies include the separation of property from operations, diversification, the expansion to many locations, and the use of tax havens. Generally, the chains have large revenues with high profit margins with some documented quality problems. The lack of adequate public information about the ownership, costs, and quality of services provided by nursing home chains is problematic in all the countries. The marketization of nursing home care poses new challenges to governments in collecting and reporting information to control costs as well as to ensure quality and public accountability. PMID:28634428

  1. Marketization in Long-Term Care: A Cross-Country Comparison of Large For-Profit Nursing Home Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Harrington

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents cross-country comparisons of trends in for-profit nursing home chains in Canada, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Using public and private industry reports, the study describes ownership, corporate strategies, costs, and quality of the 5 largest for-profit chains in each country. The findings show that large for-profit nursing home chains are increasingly owned by private equity investors, have had many ownership changes over time, and have complex organizational structures. Large for-profit nursing home chains increasingly dominate the market and their strategies include the separation of property from operations, diversification, the expansion to many locations, and the use of tax havens. Generally, the chains have large revenues with high profit margins with some documented quality problems. The lack of adequate public information about the ownership, costs, and quality of services provided by nursing home chains is problematic in all the countries. The marketization of nursing home care poses new challenges to governments in collecting and reporting information to control costs as well as to ensure quality and public accountability.

  2. Marketization in Long-Term Care: A Cross-Country Comparison of Large For-Profit Nursing Home Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Jacobsen, Frode F; Panos, Justin; Pollock, Allyson; Sutaria, Shailen; Szebehely, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents cross-country comparisons of trends in for-profit nursing home chains in Canada, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States. Using public and private industry reports, the study describes ownership, corporate strategies, costs, and quality of the 5 largest for-profit chains in each country. The findings show that large for-profit nursing home chains are increasingly owned by private equity investors, have had many ownership changes over time, and have complex organizational structures. Large for-profit nursing home chains increasingly dominate the market and their strategies include the separation of property from operations, diversification, the expansion to many locations, and the use of tax havens. Generally, the chains have large revenues with high profit margins with some documented quality problems. The lack of adequate public information about the ownership, costs, and quality of services provided by nursing home chains is problematic in all the countries. The marketization of nursing home care poses new challenges to governments in collecting and reporting information to control costs as well as to ensure quality and public accountability.

  3. Act In case of Depression: the evaluation of a care program to improve the detection and treatment of depression in nursing homes. Study Protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerritsen, D.L; Smalbrugge, M; Teerenstra, S; Leontjevas, R; Adang, E.M.M; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J; Derksen, E; Koopmans, R.T.C.M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is evaluating the (cost-) effectiveness of a multidisciplinary, evidence based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents of somatic and dementia special care units...

  4. Improving the Quality of Nursing Documentation in Home Health Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obioma, Chidiadi

    2017-01-01

    Poor nursing documentation of patient care was identified in daily nurse visit notes in a health care setting. This problem affects effective communication of patient status with other clinicians, thereby jeopardizing clinical decision-making. The purpose of this evidence-based project was to determine the impact of a retraining program on the…

  5. Bereaved family members' perspectives on suffering among older rural cancer patients in palliative home nursing care: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devik, S A; Hellzen, O; Enmarker, I

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about experiences with receiving home nursing care when old, living in a rural area, and suffering from end-stage cancer. The aim of this study was thus to investigate bereaved family members' perceptions of suffering by their older relatives when receiving palliative home nursing care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 family members, in Norway during autumn 2015, and directed content analysis guided by Katie Eriksson's theoretical framework on human suffering was performed upon the data. The two main categories identified reflected expressions of both suffering and well-being. Expressions of suffering were related to illness, to care and to life and supported the theory. Expressions of well-being were related to other people (e.g. familiar people and nurses), to home and to activity. The results indicate a need to review and possibly expand the perspective of what should motivate care. Nursing and palliative care that become purely disease and symptom-focused may end up with giving up and divert the attention to social and cultural factors that may contribute to well-being when cure is not the goal. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-12-01

    The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is important to retain existing nursing staff in the healthcare sector to ensure a stable home-care workforce for the future. However, to date there has been little research about the job factors in home care that affect whether staff are considering leaving the healthcare sector. The main purpose of the study was to examine how home-care nursing staff's self-perceived autonomy relates to whether they have considered leaving the healthcare sector and to assess the possible mediating effect of work engagement. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study involved 262 registered nurses and certified nursing assistants employed in Dutch home-care organisations (mean age of 51; 97% female). The respondents were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide group of nursing staff members in various healthcare settings (67% response rate). The questionnaire included validated scales concerni