WorldWideScience

Sample records for home care assistance

  1. Common Ambient Assisted Living Home Platform for Seamless Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Stenner, Rene; Memon, Mukhtiar

    The CareStore project is investigating the feasibility of creating an open and flexible infrastructure for facilitating seamless deployment of assisted living devices and applications on heterogeneous platforms. The Common Ambient Assisted Living Home Platform (CAALHP) is intended to be the main...... user interface for patients and healthcare staff in the CareStore eco system. The aim of this abstract is to demonstrate the currently implemented features and outline relevant perspectives and future work in the CareStore project....

  2. Home care as change of the technical-assistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kênia Lara; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; Feuerwerker, Laura Camargo Macruz; Merhy, Emerson Elias

    2010-02-01

    To analyze home care practices of outpatient and hospital services and their constitution as a substitute healthcare network. A qualitative study was carried out using tracer methodology to analyze four outpatient home care services from the Municipal Health Department and one service from a philanthropic hospital in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. The following procedures were carried out: interviews with the home care services' managers and teams, analysis of documents and follow-up of cases, holding interviews with patients and caregivers. The analysis was guided by the analytical categories home care integration into the healthcare network and technical-assistance model. Home care implementation was preceded by a political-institutional decision, both with a rationalizing orientation, intending to promote cost reduction, and also with the aim of carrying out the technical-assistance rearrangement of the healthcare networks. These two types of orientation were found to be in conflict, which implies difficulties for conciliating interests of the different players involved in the network, and also the creation of shared management spaces. It was possible to identify technological innovation and families' autonomy in the implementation of the healthcare projects. The teams proved to be cohesive, constructing, in the daily routine, new forms of integrating different perspectives so as to transform the healthcare practices. Challenges were observed in the proposal of integrating the different substitutive healthcare services, as the home care services' capacity to change the technical-assistance model is limited. Home care has potential for constituting a substitutive network by producing new care modalities that cross the projects of users, family members, social network, and home care professionals. Home care as a substitute healthcare modality requires political, conceptual and operational sustainability, as well as

  3. [Coordinating home assistance and nursing care for global patient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Enabling patients to remain in their home is only possible when the different services, both from within and outside the hospital are able to communicate and when the recommended actions are properly coordinated. Entrusting the coordination of the care to the Spasad (polyvalent service for home assistance and nursing care) enables the expectations of the patients and family carers to be analysed. This allows the team to put in place the appropriate actions both in terms of assistance and nursing care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and respiratory ), social workers, personal care aides, home medical equipment suppliers, and most importantly, informal caregivers (e.g., ... also available to help with home assessment. Assistive Technology to improve home safety can also be an ...

  5. Assisting Frail Seniors With Toileting in a Home Bathroom: Approaches Used by Home Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Emily C; Boscart, Veronique M; Weiss, Brett M; Dutta, Tilak; Callaghan, Jack P; Fernie, Geoff R

    2017-04-01

    Home care providers experience high occupational injury rates. Improving safety is becoming increasingly urgent as this sector expands to support the aging population. Caregivers identify assisting with toileting as a particularly frequent and difficult activity. This mixed-methods observational study identified and analyzed the toileting subactivities that place care providers at the greatest risk of musculoskeletal injury. Eight personal support workers (home care aides) assisted a frail older adult (actor) in a simulated home bathroom. Overall technique and body postures were analyzed. Exposure to musculoskeletal injury risk factors (low back loads and time in extreme trunk postures) was greatest when removing/replacing clothing and providing posterior perineal care; high loads were also possible during transfers. Exposures can be reduced by lowering the pants only to knee level or squatting to raise them. A bidet seat or attachment can perform perineal cleaning, which accounted for 32% of time in severe trunk flexion.

  6. Personal care assistants' experiences of caring for people on home mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson-Skogsberg, Åsa; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe personal care assistants' (PCA) experiences of working with a ventilator-assisted person at home. Data were collected from fifteen audiotaped semistructured interviews with PCAs supporting a child or adult using home mechanical ventilation (HMV). Thirteen women and two men participated; their working experience with HMV users ranged from one to 17 years (median 6 years). Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis in an inductive and interpretive manner. Five categories emerged from the data: Being part of a complex work situation; Taking on a multidimensional responsibility; Caring carried out in someone's home; Creating boundaries in an environment with indistinct limits; and Being close to another's body and soul. The participants felt very close to the person they worked with, both physically and emotionally. They had a great responsibility and therefore a commensurate need for support, guidance and a well-functioning organisation around the HMV user. There is international consensus that advanced home care will continue to expand and personal care assistance is key in this development. We suggest that one way to move forward for PCAs working with HMV users is to create multiprofessional teams led by a key-person who coordinates the individual needs. More research is needed within this area from a broad perspective including the HMV-assisted persons, relatives, personal care assistants and management organisations. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-05-23

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers' 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients' homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants' strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues' and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future.

  9. Patient Care Assisting. A Curriculum for Career Entry in the Nursing Homes of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sharon; Bailey, Nancy

    This curriculum guide contains 16 units aimed at training entry-level workers as patient care assistants in nursing homes. The units cover the following topics: the role of patient care assistants; psychosocial needs of geriatric patients; work ethics; legal issues; communication skills; infection control; safety issues; patient hygiene; patient…

  10. Measuring end-of-life care and outcomes in residential care/assisted living and nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, S.; Cohen, L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Reed, D.; Soest-Poortvliet, M.C. van; Hanson, L.C.; Sloane, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been

  11. Measuring End-of-Life Care and Outcomes in Residential Care/Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, S.; Cohen, L.; van der Steen, J.T.; Reed, D.; van Soest-Poortvliet, M.C.; Hanson, L.C.; Sloane, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Context The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been

  12. [Support at the end of life in care homes by nursing assistants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croyère, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    In nursing homes, the nursing assistant supports patients at the end of life, notably as they move into palliative care. This involves team work to relieve pain, limit treatments considered disproportionate and improve comfort. Relations with the residents and their families are particularly important in this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection...

  14. Tele-care robot for assisting independent senior citizens who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    In the last twenty years most developed countries face dramatic demographic changes, and predominantly the rapid aging of their population. As the share of elderly people is climbing while the number of care providers is declining, the aging problem is becoming an increasingly important social and economic challenge. The supply of care at home, utilizing affordable tele-care systems and smart home technologies, is one of the promising strategies to cope with challenges posed by these demographic changes. The goal of this paper is to present a tele-care robot (TCR) aimed to assist Senior citizens who live independently at their home, that need assistance in daily life activities. The idea of the proposed system is that a caregiver, operating from a central location, will be able to service between 10 to 20 patients living at their home, by using the tele-care robot. The robot will possess motion control capabilities to move inside the house of each patient and alert in case that emergency events occur. The robot will allow the care provider to communicate remotely with the patient using audio and video equipment installed on the robot. By using the robot, the caregiver will be able to examine several times during the day the well-being of the patient, his medication consumption, and his overall functionality.

  15. Hospice Care in Assisted Living Facilities Versus at Home: Results of a Multisite Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Meredith; Harris, Pamela S; Teno, Joan; Corcoran, Amy M; Douglas, Cindy; Nelson, Jackie; Way, Deborah; Harrold, Joan E; Casarett, David J

    2015-06-01

    To compare residents of assisted living facilities receiving hospice with people receiving hospice care at home. Electronic health record-based retrospective cohort study. Nonprofit hospices in the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness network. Individuals admitted to hospice between January 1, 2008, and May 15, 2012 (N = 85,581; 7,451 (8.7%) assisted living facility, 78,130 (91.3%) home). Hospice length of stay, use of opioids for pain, and site of death. The assisted living population was more likely than the home hospice population to have a diagnosis of dementia (23.5% vs 4.7%; odds ratio (OR) = 13.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 12.3-14.4; P < .001) and enroll in hospice closer to death (median length of stay 24 vs 29 days). Assisted living residents were less likely to receive opioids for pain (18.1% vs 39.7%; OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.29-0.39, P < .001) and less likely to die in an inpatient hospice unit (9.3% vs 16.1%; OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.49-0.58, P < .001) or a hospital (1.3% vs 7.6%; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.13-0.19, P < .001). Three are several differences between residents of assisted living receiving hospice care and individuals living at home receiving hospice care. A better understanding of these differences could allow hospices to develop guidelines for better coordination of end-of-life care for the assisted living population. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Identifying work ability promoting factors for home care aides and assistant nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Agneta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In workplace health promotion, all potential resources needs to be taken into consideration, not only factors relating to the absence of injury and the physical health of the workers, but also psychological aspects. A dynamic balance between the resources of the individual employees and the demands of work is an important prerequisite. In the home care services, there is a noticeable trend towards increased psychosocial strain on employees at work. There are a high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and a low prevalence of sustainable work ability. The aim of this research was to identify factors promoting work ability and self-efficacy in care aides and assistant nurses within home care services. Methods This study is based on cross-sectional data collected in a municipality in northern Sweden. Care aides (n = 58 and assistant nurses (n = 79 replied to a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 46%. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of several independent variables on self-efficacy (model 1 and work ability (model 2 for care aides and assistant nurses separately. Results Perceptions of personal safety, self-efficacy and musculoskeletal wellbeing contributed to work ability for assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.36, p 2adj of 0.29, p = 0.001. Self-efficacy was associated with the safety climate and the physical demands of the job in both professions (R2adj of 0.24, p = 0.003 for care aides, and also by sex and age for the assistant nurses (R2adj of 0.31, p Conclusions The intermediate factors contributed differently to work ability in the two professions. Self-efficacy, personal safety and musculoskeletal wellbeing were important for the assistant nurses, while the work ability of the care aides was associated with the safety climate, but also with the non-changeable factors age and seniority. All these factors are important to acknowledge in

  17. Home care assistants? perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Grundberg, ?ke; Hansson, Anna; Religa, Dorota; Hiller?s, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Åke Grundberg,1,2 Anna Hansson,2 Dorota Religa,1 Pernilla Hillerås1,2 1Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, 2Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden Introduction: Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs). Mental health promotion by...

  18. Measuring end-of-life care and outcomes in residential care/assisted living and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Cohen, Lauren; van der Steen, Jenny T; Reed, David; van Soest-Poortvliet, Mirjam C; Hanson, Laura C; Sloane, Philip D

    2015-04-01

    The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been growing, the comparative suitability of various measures to guide this work is unknown. To determine the optimal measures to assess end-of-life care and outcomes in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. A total of 264 family members of decedents from 118 settings were interviewed and provided data on 11 instruments that have been used in, but not necessarily developed for, long-term care populations; Overall, 20 scales and subscales/indices were evaluated. Measures were compared on their psychometric properties and the extent to which they discriminated among important resident, family, and setting characteristics. Prioritizing measures that distinguish the assessment of care from the assessment of dying, and secondarily that exhibit an acceptable factor structure, this study recommends two measures of care-the Family Perceptions of Physician-Family Caregiver Communication and the End of Life in Dementia (EOLD)-Satisfaction With Care-and two measures of outcomes-the EOLD-Symptom Management and the EOLD-Comfort Assessment in Dying. An additional measure to assess outcomes is the Mini-Suffering State Examination (MSSE). The care measures and the MSSE are especially valuable as they discriminate between decedents who were and were not transferred immediately before death, an important outcome, and whether the family expected the death, a useful target for intervention. Despite these recommendations, measurement selection should be informed not only on the basis of psychometric properties but also by specific clinical and research needs. The data in this manuscript will help researchers, clinicians, and administrators understand the implications of choosing various

  19. Ergonomic evaluation of slide boards used by home care aides to assist client transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuan; Buchholz, Bryan; Quinn, Margaret; Punnett, Laura; Galligan, Catherine; Gore, Rebecca

    2017-12-21

    Home care aides risk musculoskeletal injury because they lift and move clients; the body weight of most adults exceeds the NIOSH recommended limit for lifting (Waters 2007). Methods to reduce manual patient lifting in institutional settings are often technically or economically infeasible in home care. Our goal was to identify suitable, safe, low-technology transfer devices for home care use. Sixteen experienced home care aides performed client transfers from wheelchair to bed (upward) and bed to wheelchair (downward) in a simulated home care environment (laboratory), using four different slide boards and by hand without a device. Aides' hand forces were measured during client transfers; aides also evaluated usability of each board. Hand forces exerted while using slide boards were mostly lower than in manual transfer, and forces were lower in downward versus upward transfers. Aides judged a board with a sliding mechanism easier to use than boards without a sliding mechanism. Practitioner Summary This paper provides quantitative biomechanical measurements showing that slide boards reduced the hand forces needed by home care aides to transfer clients from bed to wheel chair and vice versa, compared to manual lifting. Using a semi-quantitative usability survey, aides identified boards with a sliding mechanism easiest to use.

  20. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... are chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help ...

  1. [Animal assisted therapy in a long-term care nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudzyk, Agnés; Bourque, Monique; Guilbert, Héléne; Seguin, Anne Dahaba; Savoye, Marie-Jo

    2011-01-01

    Animal assisted therapy sessions have been set up at the Bellevaux nursing home in Besançon. The project has required a number of specific procedures and training courses to be put in place as well as the involvement of different departments. The sessions give real pleasure to the residents and produce interesting results.

  2. Hospice assist at home : does the integration of hospice care in primary healthcare support patients to die in their preferred location - A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Everlien; Zweers, Daniëlle; Valkenburg, Anna Ch; Uyttewaal, Allegonda; Teunissen, Saskia Ccm

    BACKGROUND: A majority of patients prefer to die at home. Specialist palliative care aims to improve quality of life. Hospice assist at home is a Dutch model of general/specialised palliative care within primary care, collaboratively built by general practitioners and a hospice. AIM: The aims of

  3. [Withdrawal of assisted ventilation in the home: making decisions in paediatric palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salido, A; Monleón-Luque, M; Barceló-Escario, M; Del Rincón-Fernández, C; Catá-Del Palacio, E; Martino-Alba, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    End-of-life care is of growing interest in Paediatrics. The number of children with diseases being treated using high-technology as palliative treatment has also increased. The creation of multidisciplinary care teams with 24/7 hours home care may prevent prolonged hospital stays in these patients. To adapt the treatment in order to avoid new hospital admissions and to obtain a better quality of life is a desirable objective. The taking of decisions and subsequent withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in the home is presented, along with the underlying disease and the acute event that led to the worsening of the patient. The decision-making and clinical management until the death of the patient is then discussed and reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; van Tilburg, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. Design: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. Setting: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  5. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  6. Dementia - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Dementia - home care URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007428.htm Dementia - home care To use the ...

  7. The best evidence for minimizing resistance-to-care during assisted personal care for older adults with dementia in nursing homes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Rie; Kang, Hee Sun; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of interventions in minimizing resistance-to-care behaviors during assisted personal care for nursing home residents with dementia. • What interventions are effective for reducing the frequency and intensity of resistance-to-care behaviors during assisted personal care activities (i.e. mealtime assistance, toileting, mouth care, morning care and shower/bathing) for nursing home residents with dementia?• What interventions are effective for reducing the frequency and intensity of resistance-to-care behaviors for overall daily personal care activities for nursing home residents with dementia? In many countries the proportion of older adults with dementia is steadily increasing. Many older adults with dementia live in nursing homes and most of them require assistance with personal care due to having dementia-related symptoms. Nursing staff and formal caregivers frequently experience resistance or rejection from such residents when they are providing care. Such behavior can be a large obstacle, particularly when caregivers attempt to provide assistance in daily personal care including oral care, bathing, feeding, dressing and toileting.The definition of "resistance-to-care" means physically and/or psychologically resistive behavior, for example "pulling away from staff, tightening limbs, stiffening the body, deliberately ceasing or refusing to weight bear during care, waving arms and legs and verbally objecting to care using words and/or sounds" (p.7). Several other definitions can be found in the literature concerning the resistance-to-care behaviors exhibited by nursing home residents with dementia. No distinct difference seems to exist for what terms mean and they are often used interchangeably in the studies on nursing. For instance, Mahoney et al. have defined the term "resistive to care" to mean "the repertoire of behaviors with which persons with dementia withstand or oppose the efforts of a caregiver" (p.28). Other commonly

  8. ERMHAN: A Context-Aware Service Platform to Support Continuous Care Networks for Home-Based Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Paganelli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous care models for chronic diseases pose several technology-oriented challenges for home-based continuous care, where assistance services rely on a close collaboration among different stakeholders such as health operators, patient relatives, and social community members. Here we describe Emilia Romagna Mobile Health Assistance Network (ERMHAN a multichannel context-aware service platform designed to support care networks in cooperating and sharing information with the goal of improving patient quality of life. In order to meet extensibility and flexibility requirements, this platform has been developed through ontology-based context-aware computing and a service oriented approach. We also provide some preliminary results of performance analysis and user survey activity.

  9. ERMHAN: A Context-Aware Service Platform to Support Continuous Care Networks for Home-Based Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Federica; Spinicci, Emilio; Giuli, Dino

    2008-01-01

    Continuous care models for chronic diseases pose several technology-oriented challenges for home-based continuous care, where assistance services rely on a close collaboration among different stakeholders such as health operators, patient relatives, and social community members. Here we describe Emilia Romagna Mobile Health Assistance Network (ERMHAN) a multichannel context-aware service platform designed to support care networks in cooperating and sharing information with the goal of improving patient quality of life. In order to meet extensibility and flexibility requirements, this platform has been developed through ontology-based context-aware computing and a service oriented approach. We also provide some preliminary results of performance analysis and user survey activity. PMID:18695739

  10. Being the parent of a ventilator-assisted child: perceptions of the family-health care provider relationship when care is offered in the family home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Berit; Lindblad, Britt-Marie

    2013-11-01

    The number of medically fragile children cared for at home is increasing; however, there are few studies about the professional support these families receive in their homes. The aim of the study was to understand the meanings that parents had about the support they received from health care professionals who offered care for their ventilator-assisted child in the family home. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used. Data included the narratives of five mother-father couples living in Sweden who were receiving professional support for their ventilator-assisted child. The findings indicate that receiving professional support meant being at risk of and/or exposed to the exercise of control over family privacy. The professional support system in the families' homes worked more by chance than by competent and sensible planning. In good cases, caring encounters were characterized by a mutual relationship where various occupational groups were embraced as a part of family life. The findings are discussed in light of compassionate care, exercise of power, and the importance of holistic educational programs.

  11. Hospice assist at home: does the integration of hospice care in primary healthcare support patients to die in their preferred location - A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Everlien; Zweers, Daniëlle; Valkenburg, Anna Ch; Uyttewaal, Allegonda; Teunissen, Saskia Ccm

    2016-06-01

    A majority of patients prefer to die at home. Specialist palliative care aims to improve quality of life. Hospice assist at home is a Dutch model of general/specialised palliative care within primary care, collaboratively built by general practitioners and a hospice. The aims of this study are to explore whether hospice assist at home service enables patients at hometo express end-of-life preferences and die in their preferred location. In addition, this study provides insight into symptomburden, stability and early referral. A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation study was performed (December 2014-March 2015), using hospice assist at home patient records and documentation. Primary outcome includes congruence between preferred and actual place of death. Secondary outcomes include symptom burden, (in)stability and early identification. Between June 2012 and December 2014, 130 hospice assist at home patients, living at home with a life expectancy home, a collaboration between general practitioners, district nurses, trained volunteers and a hospice team, facilitates (1) general practitioner-initiated consultation by Nurse Consultant Hospice, (2) fortnightly interdisciplinary consultations and (3) 24/7 hospice backup for patients, caregivers and professionals. A total of 130 patients (62 (48%) men; mean age, 72 years) were enrolled, of whom 107/130 (82%) died and 5 dropped out. Preferred place of death was known for 101/107 (94%) patients of whom 91% patients died at their preferred place of death. Hospice assist at home service supports patients to die in their preferred place of death. Shared responsibility of proactive care in primary care collaboration enabled patients to express preferences. Hospice care should focus on local teamwork, to contribute to shared responsibilities in providing optimal palliative care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Home care assistants' perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundberg, Åke; Hansson, Anna; Religa, Dorota; Hillerås, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs). Mental health promotion by HCAs needs to be studied further because they may be among the first to observe changes in clients' mental health status. To describe HCAs' perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among homebound seniors with multimorbidity. We applied a descriptive qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews. Content analyses were performed on five focus group interviews conducted in 2014 with 26 HCAs. Most HCAs stated that they were experienced in caring for clients with mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and high alcohol consumption. The HCAs mentioned as causes, or risk factors, multiple chronic conditions, feelings of loneliness, and social isolation. The findings reveal that continuity of care and seniors' own thoughts and perceptions were essential to detecting mental health problems. Observation, collaboration, and social support emerged as important means of detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health. The HCAs had knowledge of risk factors, but they seemed insecure about which health professionals had the primary responsibility for mental health. They also seemed to have detected early signs of mental health problems, even though good personal knowledge of the client and continuity in home visits were crucial to do so. When it came to mental health promotion, the suggestions related to the aim of ending social isolation, decreasing feelings of loneliness, and increasing physical activity. The results indicate that the HCAs seemed dependent on supervision by district nurses and on care managers' decisions to support the needed care, to schedule assignments related to the detection of mental health problems, and to promote mental health.

  13. Patient satisfaction with home-birth care in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the necessary elements in an obstetric system of home confinements is well-organized postnatal home care. In The Netherlands home care assistants assist midwives during home delivery, they care for the new mother as well as the newborn baby, instruct the family on infant health care and carry

  14. On-the-job training makes the difference: healthcare assistants' perceived competence and responsibility in the care of patients with home mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedberg, Lena; Michélsen, Hans; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Hylander, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    To describe and analyse perceived competence and perceived responsibility among healthcare assistants (HC assistants), caring for patients with home mechanical ventilation (HMV) and other advanced caring needs, adjusted for socio-demographic and workplace background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted including 128 HC assistants employed in Stockholm County, Sweden. The HC assistants responded to a study-specific questionnaire on perceived competence and perceived responsibility, provided socio-demographic and workplace background data, as well as information on the patient characteristics for the understanding of their work situations. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed. Eighty per cent of the HC assistants rated their perceived competence as high, and fifty-nine per cent rated their perceived responsibility as high. Fifty-five per cent lacked formal healthcare training, and only one in five of the HC assistants had a formal training equivalent with a licensed practical nurse (LPN) examination. Males lacked formal training to a greater extent than females and rated their competence accordingly. On-the-job training was significantly associated with high ratings on both perceived competence and perceived responsibility, and clinical supervision was associated with high rating on perceived responsibility. HC assistants with limited formal training self-reported their competence as high, and on-the-job training was found to be important. Also, clinical supervision was found important for their perception of high responsibility. In Sweden, HC assistants have a 24-hour responsibility for the care and safety of their patient with HMV and other advanced caring needs. The study results point out important issues for further research regarding formal training requirements as well as the needs for standardised workplace training and supervision of HC assistants. The consequences of transfer of responsibility by delegation from

  15. Assisted Living Facilities - CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN: Residential Care Facilities, Nursing Homes, and Hospices in Indiana in 2007 (Indiana State Department of Health, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 86 residential care facilities, 525 long-term care facilities (nursing homes), and 81...

  16. Home health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Home Care Services Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  17. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  18. [Assessment of our home care and home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Suzushino, Seiko; Tamotsu, Kiyokazu

    2014-12-01

    We conducted home care and home palliative care from the department of home care. We provided home care services to 190 patients(105 men, 85 women)in October 2013. Their average age was 78.7(range: 32-102)years old, and home care had been underway from 1 day to 8 years, 10 months. Among all participants, 168(88.4%)suffered from malignant diseases, 168 patients had died, and over half of deceased patients(88 out of 168)had died at home. We used opioids for control of cancer pain, carried out home parenteral nutrition(HPN), home enteral nutrition(HEN), percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy( PEG), and removed pleural effusion and ascites during home care. In order to facilitate the practice of palliative care by the palliative care team, which consists of various medical staff in the hospital, we are giving high priority to education and enlightenment in the hospital. To provide enlightenment, education, and cooperation between regional home care and home palliative care, we are also conducting educational lectures in the regional party of the Iwaki city medical associate, and providing combined educational-medical training for home care and home palliative care by various medical staff.

  19. FastStats: Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... Centers Hospice Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare ...

  20. Upon a Home Assistant Solution Based on Raspberry Pi Platform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandru Florentin Iftimie; Claudiu Vințe

    2017-01-01

    ... to take care and execute the respective commands in a safe and secure manner. This paper presents our current research results upon a personal home assistant solution designed and built around Raspberry Pi V3 platform...

  1. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leadership positions are very important to maintaining quality care in the nursing home. Here are some things to look for ... symptoms, and health problems. May 2013 Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in ...

  2. FastStats: Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Nursing Home Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ...

  3. The Caring Home Program: In-Home Interventions for Alzheimer's Disease Patients and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynoos, Jon; Ohta, Russell J.

    The home is clearly the major setting in which care is provided to individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The Caring Home Program was a multi-disciplinary program designed to complement existing efforts to assist caregivers (N=12) with the in-home care of Alzheimer's disease patients. The program components consisted of an assessment of…

  4. Seniors' use of and unmet needs for home care, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Melanie; Rotermann, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this article provides current information about home care use and unmet home care needs of community-dwelling seniors aged 65 or older. Home care is assistance received at home for a health-related reason in the 12 months before the interview. It includes formal care provided by paid workers or volunteer organizations and informal care provided by family, friends and/or neighbours. In 2009, 25% of seniors received home care services. The percentage receiving home care increased with age and ill health. As well, seniors who lived alone were more likely to have received home care than were those who lived with others. Housework and transportation were the most common types of care reported. Family, friends and neighbours provided the majority of care across all care types. Nearly 180,000 seniors (4%) reported having unmet needs for professional home care.

  5. Procedures to Assist Health Care Providers to Determine When Home Assessments for Potential Mold Exposure Are Warranted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Ginger L; Horner, W Elliott; Kennedy, Kevin; Grimes, Carl; Barnes, Charles S; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Miller, J David

    2016-01-01

    Drawing evidence from epidemiology and exposure assessment studies and recommendations from expert practice, we describe a process to guide health care providers helping their patients who present with symptoms that might be associated with living in damp housing. We present the procedures in the form of a guided 2-part interview. The first part has 5 questions that triage the patient toward a more detailed questionnaire that reflects features of housing conditions known to be reliably associated with exposures to mold and dampness contaminants. We chose the questions based on the conditions associated with moisture problems in homes across the United States and Canada. The goal is to facilitate the clinician's effort to help patients reduce exposure to environmental triggers that elicit symptoms to better manage their disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Financing home care in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Gulácsi, L.; Boerma, W.; Hutchinson, A.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Naiditch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Financial incentives are widely used to get better value for money. Incentives can be applied to authorities responsible for home care, or to agencies that provide services or to clients who receive care. Details of the financing system of home care services very much determine the

  7. Social Workers in Home Care: The Israeli Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    In Israel, the government partially supports personal home care services (grooming, feeding, assistance with transfers) as a means to maintain frail individuals in their home environment for as long as possible. Social workers capture a prominent position in these arrangements as initiators and supervisors of personal home care services. This…

  8. Taking care of your back at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back strain treatment; Back pain - home care; Low back pain - home care; Lumbar pain - home care; LBP - home care; Sciatic - home care ... R, Loeser JD, Owens DK, et al. Interventional therapies, surgery, ... pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the ...

  9. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    , parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a "bell cord" to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication...... with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when......BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...

  10. Laxative use in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Heather; Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L; Norton, Christine; Fader, Mandy; Wells, Mandy; Morris, Jackie; Williams, Peter

    2010-06-01

    This paper is a report of an investigation into the factors associated with laxative-taking by older people in care homes. Constipation is a common source of discomfort, pain and morbidity for care home residents, and laxative-taking is prevalent. Differences in the extent to which older people suffer from constipation may result from care routines rather than demographic or clinical factors. Primary data were gathered from care records as part of a larger study in seven care homes (without on-site nursing) in London, England in 2003-2004. Backward stepwise logistic regression modelling was used to investigate factors (age, sex, level of dependency [Barthel]), number of comorbidities, number of medications, constipating medications, length of stay in care home, diagnosis of dementia/Alzheimer disease) associated with regular laxative-taking. Of 168 residents, 99 (58.9%) were routinely given laxatives. Taking more medicines (moving up one category: 0, 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, > or = 7) increased the likelihood of taking laxatives more than threefold, after controlling for all other factors. Women were 2.9 times more likely to take laxatives than men. Having dementia/Alzheimer disease increased the likelihood of taking laxatives by 2.6 times. Laxative-taking was statistically significantly lower in two of the care homes. Laxative use amongst older people in care homes varies and may not be based on rational criteria. Nurses working in care homes and with care staff can help to implement appropriate bowel care for older people.

  11. Home Health Care Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all Home Health Agencies that have been registered with Medicare. The list includes addresses, phone numbers, and quality measure ratings for each agency.

  12. Animal-Assisted Interventions in Dutch Nursing Homes: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, Lonneke; Enders-Slegers, Marie-Jose; Verheggen, Theo; Schols, Jos

    2016-07-01

    sophisticated robot seal Paro was used in 7 nursing homes. A large percentage (80%) of nursing homes that worked with animals did not have AAI-specific health protocols or animal welfare and safety protocols underlying the animal activities or specific selection criteria for the selection of suitable animals. Most of the participating Dutch nursing homes offer AAI in recreational programs (animal-assisted activities) for psychogeriatric clients (using visiting animals, especially dogs). Most nursing homes do not have specific AAI protocols for animal welfare, hygiene, and safety during animal activities, nor do they employ specific selection criteria for participating animals and their handlers. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patients in 24-hour home care striving for control and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Swedberg, Lena; Hammar Chiriac, Eva; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This article concerns Swedish patients receiving 24-hour home care from health care assistants (HC assistants) employed by the municipality. Home care is a complex interactive process involving the patient, family, HC assistants as well as professional care providers. Previous studies exploring patient perspectives on home care have been based mainly on patient interviews. In contrast, the present study took a broad perspective on patients’ experiences and thoughts by comb...

  14. Home-based chronic care. An expanded integrative model for home health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Harrison, Gregory; Fagan, Martha; Norman, Barbara; Suter, W Newton

    2008-04-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) developed by is an influential and accepted guide for the care of patients with chronic disease. Wagner acknowledges a current healthcare focus on acute care needs that often circumvents chronic care coordination. He identifies the need for a "division of labor" to assist the primary care physician with this neglected function. This article posits that the role of chronic care coordination assistance and disease management fits within the purview of home healthcare and should be central to home health chronic care delivery. An expanded Home-Based Chronic Care Model (HBCCM) is described that builds on Wagner's model and integrates salient theories from fields beyond medicine. The expanded model maximizes the potential for disease self-management success and is intended to provide a foundation for home health's integral role in chronic disease management.

  15. Public authority over home care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.A.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kroneman, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ageing society, decreasing resources and financial constraints are putting governments under pressure. Across Europe, division of responsibilities for long-term care are being reconsidered. Under these pressures, the role of governments in home care could be changing. This paper will

  16. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    SpeakUP TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Home Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged ... family members, caregivers, doctors and health care professionals. Home care organizations all across the country are working to ...

  17. Changes in malnutrition and quality of nutritional care among aged residents in all nursing homes and assisted living facilities in Helsinki 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Riitta K T; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Savikko, Niina N; Soini, Helena; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2017-09-01

    While nutritional problems have been recognized as common in institutional settings for several decades, less is known about how nutritional care and nutrition has changed in these settings over time. To describe and compare the nutritional problems and nutritional care of residents in all nursing homes (NH) in 2003 and 2011 and residents in all assisted living facilities (ALF) in 2007 and 2011, in Helsinki, Finland. We combined four cross-sectional datasets of (1) residents from all NHs in 2003 (N=1987), (2) residents from all ALFs in 2007 (N=1377), (3) residents from all NHs in 2011 (N=1576) and (4) residents from all ALFs in 2011 (N=1585). All participants at each time point were assessed using identical methods, including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The mean age of both samples from 2011 was higher and a larger proportion suffered from dementia, compared to earlier collected samples. A larger proportion of the residents in 2011 were assessed either malnourished or at-risk for malnutrition, according to the MNA, than in 2003 (NH: 93.5% vs. 88.9%, p<0.001) and in 2007 (ALF: 82.1% vs. 78.1%, p=0.007). The use of nutritional, vitamin D and calcium supplements, and snacks between meals was significantly more common in the 2011 residents, compared to the respective earlier samples. In 2011, institutionalized residents were more disabled and more prone to malnourishment than in 2003 or 2007. Institutions do seem to be more aware of good nutritional care for vulnerable older people, although there is still room for improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Communicative challenges in the home care of older persons - a qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundler, A.J.; Eide, H.; Dulmen, S. van; Holmstrom, I.K.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore communicative challenges in encounters between nurse assistants and older persons during home care visits. BACKGROUND: The older population is increasing worldwide. Currently, there is a shift in care for older people from institutional care to home care. Providing home care in a

  19. 45 CFR 233.53 - Support and maintenance assistance (including home energy assistance) in AFDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Support and maintenance assistance (including home... § 233.53 Support and maintenance assistance (including home energy assistance) in AFDC. (a) General. At State option, certain support and maintenance assistance (including home energy assistance) may be...

  20. Home Care Reform in the Netherlands. Impacts on Unpaid Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction In the Netherlands, about half a million people make use of home care, that is, formally arranged, and publicly financed home care services. Until 1 January 2007, Dutch home care provisioning used to be supplied by relatively small, profit and non-profit home care

  1. Handbook of Smart Homes, Health Care and Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; George Demiris; Eveline Wouters

    2017-01-01

    Smart homes, home automation and ambient-assisted living are terms used to describe technological systems that enrich our living environment and provide means to support care, facilitate well-being and improve comfort. This handbook provides an overview of the domain from the perspective of health

  2. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  3. Nurses' experiences of using a smart mobile device application to assist home care for patients with chronic disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuei-Feng; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To examine nurses' experiences regarding the benefits and obstacles of using a smart mobile device application in home care. The popularity of mobile phones and Internet technology has established an opportunity for interaction between patients and health care professionals. Line is an application allowing instant communication that is available for free globally. However, the literature relating to use of Line in this area is limited. A qualitative study involving individual in-depth interviews. Participants included community nurses (N = 17) from six home care facilities in southern Taiwan who had used Line for home care of chronically ill patients for at least six months. The study was conducted using semi-structured in-depth interviews, which were recorded and converted into transcripts for content analysis. Seven themes emerged from data analysis: reduction in medical care consumption and costs, reduction in workload and stress, facilitating improvement in the quality of care, promotion of the nurse-patient relationship, perceived risk, lack of organisational incentives and operating procedures and disturbance to personal life. Nurses considered Line valuable for use in home care. While this application has diverse functions, its video transfer function could in particular help nursing staff make prompt decisions about patients' problems and promote nurse-patient relationships. However, there might be hidden risks including legal consequences, safety risks to patients, possible violations of professionalism and increased risk of nurse burnout. Increasing nursing staff awareness of using mobile messaging software applications is necessary. This study provides relevant information about the benefits, disadvantages, risks and limitations of nurses' use of Line. The study also provides suggestions for software programmers and future organisational strategy and development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Australian home care work: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesy, Debra; Jakimowicz, Samantha; Saunders, Carla; Lewis, Joanne

    2018-02-09

    The home care sector comprises one of Australia's fastest growing workforces, yet few papers capture the overall landscape of Australian home care. This integrative review investigates home care work with the aim of better understanding care recipients and their needs, funding and regulation, care worker skills, tasks, demographics, employment conditions and training needs. Over 2,700 pieces of literature were analysed to inform this review. Results suggest sector fragmentation and a home care workforce who, although well placed to improve outcomes for care recipients, are in need of better training and employment support. Suggestions for future research regarding Australian home care include studies that combine both aged and disability aspects of care, more research around care recipients, priority needs and strategies for addressing them, and how best to prepare home care workers for their roles.

  5. Integrating Advanced Practice Nurses in Home Care. Recommendations for a Teaching Home Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Mezey, Mathy

    1998-01-01

    A telephone survey of home care agencies and providers revealed a need for the following: evidence of the effectiveness of nurse practitioners in home care, regulatory and financial support for nurse practitioner home care, and development of home care agencies as clinical sites for training. (SK)

  6. Big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimarlund, V; Wass, S

    2014-08-15

    To discuss how current research in the area of smart homes and ambient assisted living will be influenced by the use of big data. A scoping review of literature published in scientific journals and conference proceedings was performed, focusing on smart homes, ambient assisted living and big data over the years 2011-2014. The health and social care market has lagged behind other markets when it comes to the introduction of innovative IT solutions and the market faces a number of challenges as the use of big data will increase. First, there is a need for a sustainable and trustful information chain where the needed information can be transferred from all producers to all consumers in a structured way. Second, there is a need for big data strategies and policies to manage the new situation where information is handled and transferred independently of the place of the expertise. Finally, there is a possibility to develop new and innovative business models for a market that supports cloud computing, social media, crowdsourcing etc. The interdisciplinary area of big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living is no longer only of interest for IT developers, it is also of interest for decision makers as customers make more informed choices among today's services. In the future it will be of importance to make information usable for managers and improve decision making, tailor smart home services based on big data, develop new business models, increase competition and identify policies to ensure privacy, security and liability.

  7. Home care services for sick children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castor, Charlotte; Hallström, Inger; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore healthcare professionals' conceptions of caring for sick children in home care services. BACKGROUND: Families often prefer home care to hospital care, and the number of home care services for children is increasing. Caring for children at home has been recognised...... using a phenomenographic analysis. RESULTS: Three description categories emerged: "A challenging opportunity", "A child perspective", and "Re-organise in accordance with new prerequisites." Providing home care services for children was conceived to evoke both professional and personal challenges......-functioning team work were important organisational aspects. CONCLUSION: Providing home care for children was a challenging but rewarding task for healthcare professionals used to care for adults. To provide care with a child perspective was experienced as important even though there were conflicting conceptions...

  8. Bellco Formula Domus Home Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewin, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    There are certain characteristics in a dialysis machine that would be desirable for use in home and limited care environments. These features relate to safety, ease of use, consideration of physical space, and reliability. The Bellco Formula Domus Home Care System was designed to meet all these requirements. Bellco's philosophy of patient treatment centers on global biocompatibility. This is evident in the design of the Formula Domus Home Care System. It has the smallest hydraulic fluid pathway of any dialysis machine on the market. Formula is capable of preparing ultrapure dialysate. The ultrafiltration measurement mechanism, the patented Coriolis flow meter, measures the mass of the dialysate, not the volume. For this reason it is the only dialysis machine that detects actual backfiltration, not just the theoretical possibility of it based on transmembrane pressure. The Coriolis flow meter also ensures that dialysate flow is a true single pass. The operator interface is a single window operating control. It is possible to select up to 14 different languages. There is an online help key to assist patients with troubleshooting. Programmable start-up and shutdown times save time for the patient. Formula is the only dialysis machine to offer a backup battery feature. Formula is capable of communicating with any software available. The focus on global biocompatibility ensures the best quality dialysis treatments for a population of patients who will likely remain on dialysis for a longer period of time than conventional dialysis patients.

  9. Dyspnea Management in Palliative Home Care: A Case Series in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rojanasak Thongkhamcharoen; Katrina Breaden; Meera Agar; Ednin Hamzah

    2012-01-01

    Managing dyspnea at home is a challenging task. Although a competent palliative home care team can assist a patient to live at home with better pain control, dyspnea is usually not as well managed. In the Asian context, there are few research studies in dyspnea management in palliative home care. This paper aims to illustrate the cultural context that has an impact on dyspnea management at home and the assessment and management of dyspnea in a community palliative care setting in Malaysia. Th...

  10. Population Health and Tailored Medical Care in the Home: the Roles of Home-Based Primary Care and Home-Based Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Christine S; Leff, Bruce

    2017-10-12

    With the growth of value-based care, payers and health systems have begun to appreciate the need to provide enhanced services to homebound adults. Recent studies have shown that home-based medical services for this high-cost, high-need population reduce costs and improve outcomes. Home-based medical care services have two flavors that are related to historical context and specialty background-home-based primary care (HBPC) and home-based palliative care (HBPalC). Although the type of services provided by HBPC and HBPalC (together termed "home-based medical care") overlap, HBPC tends to encompass longitudinal and preventive care, while HBPalC often provides services for shorter durations focused more on distress management and goals of care clarification. Given workforce constraints and growing demand, both HBPC and HBPalC will benefit from working together within a population health framework-where HBPC provides care to all patients who have trouble accessing traditional office practices and where HBPalC offers adjunctive care to patients with high symptom burden and those who need assistance with goals clarification. Policy changes that support provision of medical care in the home, population health strategies that tailor home-based medical care to the specific needs of the patients and their caregivers, and educational initiatives to assure basic palliative care competence for all home-based medical providers will improve access and reduce illness burden to this important and underrecognized population. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors predicting a home death among home palliative care recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ming-Chung; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Chen, Chu-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ping; Lien, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Jia-Yi; Woung, Lin-Chung; Chan, Shang-Yih

    2017-10-01

    Awareness of factors affecting the place of death could improve communication between healthcare providers and patients and their families regarding patient preferences and the feasibility of dying in the preferred place.This study aimed to evaluate factors predicting home death among home palliative care recipients.This is a population-based study using a national representative sample retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Subjects receiving home palliative care, from 2010 to 2012, were analyzed to evaluate the association between a home death and various characteristics related to illness, individual, and health care utilization. A multiple-logistic regression model was used to assess the independent effect of various characteristics on the likelihood of a home death.The overall rate of a home death for home palliative care recipients was 43.6%. Age; gender; urbanization of the area where the patients lived; illness; the total number of home visits by all health care professionals; the number of home visits by nurses; utilization of nasogastric tube, endotracheal tube, or indwelling urinary catheter; the number of emergency department visits; and admission to intensive care unit in previous 1 year were not significantly associated with the risk of a home death. Physician home visits increased the likelihood of a home death. Compared with subjects without physician home visits (31.4%) those with 1 physician home visit (53.0%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.93-5.42) and those with ≥2 physician home visits (43.9%, AOR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.06-4.70) had higher likelihood of a home death. Compared with subjects with hospitalization 0 to 6 times in previous 1 year, those with hospitalization ≥7 times in previous 1 year (AOR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.34-0.95) had lower likelihood of a home death.Among home palliative care recipients, physician home visits increased the likelihood of a home death. Hospitalizations ≥7

  12. Assistência domiciliar em saúde: subsídios para um projeto de atenção básica brasileira Home health care: subsidies for a primary care project in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Cristina Morais Santa Bárbara Rehem

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo aborda o tema da Assistência Domiciliar (AD, identificando-a com uma modalidade de atenção que vem sendo adotada no âmbito dos sistemas de saúde, aliando motivações racionalizadoras e humanitárias. Por meio de uma breve contextualização histórico-conceitual, reconhece-se o predomínio desta abordagem no contexto hospitalar, problematizando, entretanto, a necessidade de seu fortalecimento no contexto da atenção básica. Neste sentido, desenvolve-se uma análise comparada entre uma proposta de assistência domiciliar no âmbito da Atenção Básica no Brasil, formulada pelo Ministério da Saúde, com o modelo adotado pelo Canadá. A despeito das diferenças socioeconômicas e sanitárias entre os dois países, a análise empreendida forneceu elementos que podem subsidiar a proposta brasileira, seja nos aspectos normativos e operacionais, seja no tocante à sua viabilidade político-institucional.This paper addresses the topic of Home Health Care (HHC, a mode of assistance that adds rational and humanitarian motivations, and currently adapted by the health systems. By means of a brief historic-conceptual contextualization, the predominance of this approach is recognized in the hospital context, giving rise, however, to the problem of the need to strengthen it in the context of basic health attention. For that matter, a comparative analysis between the proposition of home health care in the scope of basic attention in Brazil, as proposed by the Ministry of Health, and the model adopted in Canada is discussed. Despite socio-economic and sanitation differences between the two countries, the analysis has provided elements that can support the Brazilian proposition, be it in regard to normative and operational aspects or in regard to its political-institutional feasibility.

  13. Sistema de classificação de pacientes em assistência domiciliária Sistema de classificación de pacientes en atención domiciliaria Patients classification system in home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Watanabe Dal Ben

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar os Sistemas de Classificação de Pacientes (SCP existentes nessa área. MÉTODOS: revisão bibliográfica. RESULTADOS: Os instrumentos encontrados foram: de Garrard et al, Home Health Care Classification System4.4 Método Home Health Care Classification System (HHCC, segundo Saba (1991, Escala Katz, as tabelas utilizadas pela Associação Brasileira de Empresas de Medicina de Internação Domiciliar e pelo Núcleo Nacional das Empresas de Assistência Domiciliar, o TISS-Intermediário adaptado por Dal Ben e o catálogo de prestação de serviços da "Fondation des Services d'aide et de Soins à Domicile". Desses instrumentos os dois últimos mensuram a carga de trabalho e os demais apresentam indicadores para obter recursos humanos e financeiros. CONSIDERAÇÕES FINAIS: Quanto ao tempo despendido na assistência ao paciente considera-se como dependência total 24 horas; dependência parcial 12 horas; dependência moderada 6 horas de assistência / dia / paciente.OBJETIVO: el objetivo de este articulo es presentar los sistemas de clasificación de pacientes existentes en esta area. METODOS: revisión bibliográfica. RESULTADOS: Los instrumentos encuentrados fueron: de Garrard et al, Home Health Care Classification System, Escala Katz, las tablas utilizadas por la Asociación Brasileña de Empresas de Medicina de Atencion Domiciliaria y por el Nucleo Nacional de Empresas de Atención Domiciliaria, el TISS-Intermediário adaptado por Dal Ben y el catálogo de la prestación de servicios de la "Fundación de servicios de ayuda y atención domiciliária". De eses instrumentos los dos ultimos miden la carga del trabajo y los demás presentan indicadores para obtener los recursos humanos y financieros. CONSIDERACIONES FINALES: Cuanto al tiempo gasto en la atención del paciente se considera de 24 horas para los que tienen dependencia total, de 12 horas para los que tienen dependencia parcial y de 6

  14. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    The use of digital technology is increasing in home care services in Denmark. In the municipality of Copenhagen digital screens visits are being used as an alternative version of the traditional (physical) home visit to a selected population to increase quality and efficiency in the home care...

  15. Teaching home care to family medicine residents.

    OpenAIRE

    Boillat, M.; Boulet, S.; Poulin de Courval, L.

    1996-01-01

    A growing elderly population suffering from chronic and debilitating diseases, the rising cost of institutional care, and increasing demand from patients for home visits indicate that home care will become a more important part of family physicians' practice in the future. We describe a model for teaching family medicine residents how to provide home services.

  16. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Clement PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assisted living facilities (ALFs have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs, NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  17. Wound care dressings and choices for care of wounds in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Carrie L

    2013-05-01

    Statistics from various resources report that many patients in home healthcare settings have wounds. These vary from surgical, pressure, neuropathic, trauma, stasis, and venous wounds. These require the assessment, knowledge, and expertise of a clinician to assist them with wound care management. The purpose of this article is to identify and categorize types of wound care products appropriate for the various types of wounds that clinicians care for and manage in the home.

  18. The Future of Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Steven; Madigan, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Rosati, Robert J.; McCann, Barbara A.; Hornbake, Rodney; MacMillan, Richard; Jones, Kate; Bowles, Kathryn; Dowding, Dawn; Lee, Teresa; Moorhead, Tracey; Rodriguez, Sally; Breese, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Future of Home Health project sought to support transformation of home health and home-based care to meet the needs of patients in the evolving U.S. health care system. Interviews with key thought leaders and stakeholders resulted in key themes about the future of home health care. By synthesizing this qualitative research, a literature review, case studies, and the themes from a 2014 Institute of Medicine and National Research Council workshop on “The Future of Home Health Care,” the authors articulate a vision for home-based care and recommend a bold framework for the Medicare-certified home health agency of the future. The authors also identify challenges and recommendations for achievement of this framework. PMID:27746670

  19. Complexity of occupational exposures for home health-care workers: nurses vs. home health aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittle, Beverly; Agbonifo, Noma; Suarez, Rassull; Davis, Kermit G; Ballard, Tangela

    2016-11-01

    To identify occupational exposures for home health-care nurses and aides. Home health-care workers' occupational injury rates in the USA are higher than the national average, yet research on causative exposures and hazards is limited. Participants were interviewed about annual frequency of occupational exposures and hazards. Exposure and hazard means were compared between home health-care nurses and aides using a Wilcoxon two-sample test. A majority of the sample was over 40 years old and obese, potentially increasing injury risks. Home health-care nurses performed more clinical tasks, increasing exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Home health-care aides performed more physical tasks with risk for occupational musculoskeletal injuries. They also dispensed oral medications and anti-cancer medications, and were exposed to drug residue at a frequency comparable to home health-care nurses. Both groups were exposed to occupational second-hand smoke. Establishing employee safety-related policies, promoting healthy lifestyle among staff, and making engineered tools readily available to staff can assist in decreasing exposures and hazards. Implications for nursing management include implementation of health-promotion programmes, strategies to reduce exposure to second-hand smoke, ensuring access to and education on assistive and safety devices, and education for all staff on protection against drug residue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Care homes crisis must be addressed urgently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine

    2014-11-04

    The annual report on the state of health and social care in England from the Care Quality Commission makes for worrying reading. As well as safety concerns in 80 per cent of the hospitals that it inspected, the watchdog warns of a shortage of nurses in care homes - one in three vacancies is unfilled in some places and one in five care homes inspected had too few staff on duty to ensure patient safety and good quality care.

  1. Caring at home until death: enabled determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carole A; Bottorff, Joan L; McFee, Erin; Bissell, Laura J; Fyles, Gillian

    2017-04-01

    The importance of family caregivers in providing palliative care at home and in supporting a home death is well supported. Gaining a better understanding of what enables palliative family caregivers to continue caring at home for their family members until death is critical to providing direction for more effective support. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of bereaved family caregivers whose terminally ill family members with advanced cancer were successful in achieving a desired home death. A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach was used. Data were collected using semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews conducted in-person or via telephone in addition to field notes and reflective journaling. The study took place in British Columbia, Canada, and included 29 bereaved adult family caregivers who had provided care for a family member with advanced cancer and experienced a home death. Four themes captured the experience of caring at home until death: context of providing care, supportive antecedents to providing care, determination to provide care at home, and enabled determination. Factors that enabled determination to achieve a home death included initiation of formal palliative care, asking for and receiving help, augmented care, relief or respite, and making the healthcare system work for the ill person. Clarifying caregiving goals and supporting the factors that enable caregiver determination appear to be critical in enhancing the likelihood of a desired home death.

  2. Nurse Assistant Communication Strategies About Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L

    2015-07-01

    There is growing recognition of benefits of sophisticated information technology (IT) in nursing homes (NHs). In this research, we explore strategies nursing assistants (NAs) use to communicate pressure ulcer prevention practices in NHs with variable IT sophistication measures. Primary qualitative data were collected during focus groups with NAs in 16 NHs located across Missouri. NAs (n = 213) participated in 31 focus groups. Three major themes referencing communication strategies for pressure ulcer prevention were identified, including Passing on Information, Keeping Track of Needs and Information Access. NAs use a variety of strategies to prioritize care, and strategies are different based on IT sophistication level. NA work is an important part of patient care. However, little information about their work is included in communication, leaving patient records incomplete. NAs' communication is becoming increasingly important in the care of the millions of chronically ill elders in NHs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Upon a Home Assistant Solution Based on Raspberry Pi Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Florentin IFTIMIE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our ongoing research on Internet of Things (IoT has been focused on a project aiming to creating a proof of concept for a distributed system capable of controlling common devices found in a house such as TVs, air conditioning units, and other electrical devices. In order to automate these devices, the system integrates various sensors and actuators and, depending of user’s needs and creativity in conceiving and implementing new commands, the system is able to take care and execute the respective commands in a safe and secure manner. This paper presents our current research results upon a personal home assistant solution designed and built around Raspberry Pi V3 platform. The distributed, client-server approach enables users to control home electric and electronic devices from an Android based mobile application.

  4. Big Data, Smart Homes and Ambient Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To discuss how current research in the area of smart homes and ambient assisted living will be influenced by the use of big data. Methods A scoping review of literature published in scientific journals and conference proceedings was performed, focusing on smart homes, ambient assisted living and big data over the years 2011-2014. Results The health and social care market has lagged behind other markets when it comes to the introduction of innovative IT solutions and the market faces a number of challenges as the use of big data will increase. First, there is a need for a sustainable and trustful information chain where the needed information can be transferred from all producers to all consumers in a structured way. Second, there is a need for big data strategies and policies to manage the new situation where information is handled and transferred independently of the place of the expertise. Finally, there is a possibility to develop new and innovative business models for a market that supports cloud computing, social media, crowdsourcing etc. Conclusions The interdisciplinary area of big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living is no longer only of interest for IT developers, it is also of interest for decision makers as customers make more informed choices among today’s services. In the future it will be of importance to make information usable for managers and improve decision making, tailor smart home services based on big data, develop new business models, increase competition and identify policies to ensure privacy, security and liability. PMID:25123734

  5. Technology-dependent Children and Home Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Akçay Didişen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, with the rapid development in the field of healthcare technology which is reflected in medicine and patient care, the number of children who are dependent on technological tools and in need of special care, and sustain life in the home environment is rapidly increasing. These children require a multidisciplinary, multifunctional care at home. In the provision of care, healthcare workers, such as physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and psychologists, work in coordination. The aim of this review was to draw attention to the care of the technology-dependent children at home. In order to achieve the goals of the care given to the technology-dependent child, inclusion of the family in the provision of care is of importance. In order to improve the care given to these children at home, home care services must be well planned and their families should be trained on the issue because delaying the discharge of these children may increase their risk of developing a hospital-acquired infection and can extend the length of their stay in the hospital. This not only increases hospital costs but also leads to the occupation of a bed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Therefore, home healthcare is an alternative for technology-dependent children with chronic diseases and for their families. Therefore, more efforts should be made to plan and evaluate home care services, to set up support and training systems, and to make legal arrangements.

  6. Who are good home-based care volunteers? | Marincowitz | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of volunteers who remained active in the home-based care project located in Tzaneen (Limpopo Province) and thereby assist the project leaders to improve the recruitment and quality of the service in the future. Methodology: Structured questionnaires were ...

  7. Home Care Services: Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care services range from skilled care provided by nurses or physical or occupational therapists to household support, ... Does the home health aide have a positive attitude? Are you and your loved one comfortable with ...

  8. Characteristics and Recruitment Paths of Certified Nursing Assistants in Rural and Urban Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Janice C.; Baek, Jong-Deuk; Laditka, Sarah B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Most nursing home care is provided by certified nursing assistants (CNAs), but little is known about rural CNAs. Purpose: To develop a representative geographic profile of the CNA workforce, focusing on paths leading to present job. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a…

  9. Utilization of palliative care principles in nursing home care: Educational interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Larsson, Lise-Lotte Franklin; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Österlind, Jane

    2015-12-01

    This study is part of the overarching PVIS (Palliative Care in Nursing Homes) project aimed at building competence in palliative care for nursing home staff. Our objective was to describe nursing home staff's attitudes to competence-building programs in palliative care. Three different programs were developed by specialist staff from three local palliative care teams. In all, 852 staff at 37 nursing homes in the greater Stockholm area participated. Staff from 7 nursing homes participated in 11 focus-group discussions. Variation in size between the seven nursing homes initiated purposeful selection of staff to take part in the discussions, and descriptive content analysis was used. The results suggest that staff reported positive experiences as they gained new knowledge and insight into palliative care. The experiences seemed to be similar independent of the educational program design. Our results also show that staff experienced difficulties in talking about death. Enrolled nurses and care assistants felt that they carried out advanced care without the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge. Further, the results also suggest that lack of support from ward managers and insufficient collaboration and of a common language between different professions caused tension in situations involved in caring for dying people. Nursing home staff experienced competence-building programs in palliative care as useful. Even so, further competence is needed, as is long-term implementation strategies and development of broader communication skills among all professions working in nursing homes.

  10. Long-term home care scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Jensen, Thomas Sejr

    In several countries, home care is provided for certain citizens living at home. The long-term home care scheduling problem is to generate work plans spanning several days such that a high quality of service is maintained and the overall cost is kept as low as possible. A solution to the problem...... provides detailed information on visits and visit times for each employee on each of the covered days. We propose a branch-and-price algorithm for the long-term home care scheduling problem. The pricing problem generates one-day plans for an employee, and the master problem merges the plans with respect...

  11. American Academy of Home Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... articles Community Paramedicine Is at the Forefront of Home Care Medicine By Linda DeCherrie, MD Learn how community ... You can still learn from the leaders in home-based primary care. All of the stand-out sessions will be ...

  12. Nurse Physiotherapy in Medical Home Care

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlářová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis is centred on theme medical home care, importace of nurse physiotherapy and significance nurse physiotherapy by patiens in medical home care. It look on wide of use at illnies cerebral apoplexy, the theses of nurse physiotherapy and some suggestions and tips how the nurse physiotherapy instruments use for patients by cerebral apoplexy. Substance of the bachelor's thesis make research of use nurse physioterapy by medical workers and of knowledge how utilize in medical home ca...

  13. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Barbara-Beate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices

  14. Toward Healthy and Successful Aging: Intelligent Home Care Environments for the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Hsin-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Due to increases in chronic diseases, hospital costs, and aging populations, home care has become a growing worldwide trend in elder care. This research proposes Intelligent Home Care Environment (IHCE) as a solution that can assist the elderly with physical and cognitive functioning, while reducing costs and avoiding the social and cultural problems associated with current solutions. In order to research the interrelationship between the elderly and their physical environments in home care, ...

  15. Communicative challenges in the home care of older persons: a qualitative exploration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundler, A.J.; Eide, H.; Dulmen, S. van; Holmström, I.K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore communicative challenges in encounters between nurse assistants and older persons during home care visits. Background The older population is increasing worldwide. Currently, there is a shift in care for older people from institutional care to home

  16. Hospital at home: home-based end of life care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Wee, Bee; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Background The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and patients with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end of life care at home. Objectives To determine if providing home-based end of life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients’ symptoms, quality of life, health service costs and care givers compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) to October 2009, Ovid MED-LINE(R) 1950 to March 2011, EMBASE 1980 to October 2009, CINAHL 1982 to October 2009 and EconLit to October 2009. We checked the reference lists of articles identified for potentially relevant articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end of life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible we presented the data in narrative summary tables. Main results We included four trials in this review. Those receiving home-based end of life care were statistically significantly more likely to die at home compared with those receiving usual care (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi 2 = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I2 = 0% (three trials; N=652)). We detected no statistically significant differences for functional status (measured by the Barthel Index), psychological well-being or cognitive status, between patients receiving home-based end of life care compared with those receiving standard care (which

  17. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care. PMID:21881429

  18. Nurse Delegation in Home Care: Research Guiding Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; Farnham, Jennifer; Reinhard, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    The current study evaluated nurse delegation in home care, a pilot program introduced in 2007 in New Jersey to promote home care options for consumers needing assistance with medical/nursing tasks. Findings on readiness for the program, barriers and facilitating factors, experience with the program, and recommendations are summarized and presented. Methods included surveys and interviews with participants in nurse delegation, observations of planning and implementation meetings, and review meeting minutes. Major findings were no negative outcomes for consumers, improvements in quality of life and quality of care for consumers, high readiness and increasing satisfaction with experience in delegation, perception of nurse delegation in home care as a valued option, and the challenges of ensuring adequate staffing. Subsequent changes in regulation in New Jersey are underway, translating this research into policy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 7-15.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Financing of Pediatric Home Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpser, Edwin; Hudak, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric home health care is an effective and holistic venue of treatment of children with medical complexity or developmental disabilities who otherwise may experience frequent and/or prolonged hospitalizations or who may enter chronic institutional care. Demand for pediatric home health care is increasing while the provider base is eroding, primarily because of inadequate payment or restrictions on benefits. As a result, home care responsibilities assumed by family caregivers have increased and imposed financial, physical, and psychological burdens on the family. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act set forth 10 mandated essential health benefits. Home care should be considered as an integral component of the habilitative and rehabilitative services and devices benefit, even though it is not explicitly recognized as a specific category of service. Pediatric-specific home health care services should be defined clearly as components of pediatric services, the 10th essential benefit, and recognized by all payers. Payments for home health care services should be sufficient to maintain an adequate provider work force with the pediatric-specific expertise and skills to care for children with medical complexity or developmental disability. Furthermore, coordination of care among various providers and the necessary direct patient care from which these care coordination plans are developed should be required and enabled by adequate payment. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for high-quality care by calling for development of pediatric-specific home health regulations and the licensure and certification of pediatric home health providers. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Health Care, capabilities and AI assistive technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Scenarios involving the introduction of artificially intelligent (AI) assistive technologies in health care practices raise several ethical issues. In this paper, I discuss four objections to introducing AI assistive technologies in health care practices as replacements of human care. I analyse them as demands for felt care, good care, private care, and real care. I argue that although these objections cannot stand as good reasons for a general and a priori rejection of AI assistive technolog...

  1. HOME LONG-TERM CARE IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kułagowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The considerable proportion of the elderly, the chronically ill and the disabled in community is an economic and organizational challenge for the state social policy. It requires a large, steadily increasing financing from the public funds and creating an optional care model to fulfill the needs of citizens and guarantee high quality services. Development of the long-term care is one of the problems to be solved. This paper presents: – a long-term care forms, organization and tasks; – a role of long-term care but particularly home longterm care to protect health in Poland; – problems related with home long-term care functioning.

  2. [Evaluation of family function in home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamori, Tadashi; Sato, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomohiro; Yamagishi, Tadashi; Hattori, Yukari; Ishii, Nobuo; Saka, Shohei; Koyanagi, Junko; Murase, Jutaro; Nitoh, Noriko; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuo, Kyoko; Moriya, Akemi; Ikemizu, Ayumi; Arino, Kaoru; Mori, Mitsuko; Sato, Kyoko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of a caring family are needed to improve home care. We propose a three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of family functioning. The first dimension is food, clothing, and shelter; the second dimension is patient, medical, and caring conditions; and the third dimension is the caring family condition. We used the home care score and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale at Kwansei Gakuin(FACESKG)IV for the quantitative evaluation of family functioning. Narrative medicine and ethnography are valuable for the qualitative evaluation of a caring family.

  3. Associations Between Home Death and the Use and Type of Care at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Rebecca; Asada, Yukiko; Burge, Frederick; Lawson, Beverley

    2018-01-01

    Despite wishes for and benefits of home deaths, a discrepancy between preferred and actual location of death persists. Provision of home care may be an effective policy response to support home deaths. Using the population-based mortality follow-back study conducted in Nova Scotia, we investigated the associations between home death and formal care at home and between home death and the type of formal care at home. We found (1) the use of formal care at home at the end of life was associated with home death and (2) the use of formal home support services at home was associated with home death among those whose symptoms were well managed.

  4. Oral Health Care in Home Care Service – Personnels’ Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lundqvist, Pontus; Mathson, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Elderly nowadays stay longer in their own home. This raises the standards on home care service to contribute to the maintenance of elderly’s general and oral health. Our objective is therefore to explore attitudes about how home care workers view oral health care and the importance of good oral health for elderly clients. 8 subjects (22 to 61 years of age) were selected for the study working in home care service, which all gave their informed consent. Semi-structured interviews were performed...

  5. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care + Share widget - Select to show What’s home health care? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  6. Aggression and violence against home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, André; Höge, Thomas

    2004-07-01

    This article describes the development of the Violence and Aggression in Health Care Questionnaire (VAQ) and the application of the measure in the field of home care. In a 1st sample of 361 German home care workers, the scales of the VAQ reached internal consistencies from .72 to .93. A confirmatory factor analysis gave evidence to the hypothesized factor structure. Significant correlation with indicators of psychophysical strain and health resulted in a 2nd sample of 180 home care workers. In multiple regression analysis based on a 3rd sample of 180 home care workers, verbal aggression by patients was a significant predictor of negative psychological outcomes. The relationship is completely mediated by negative emotional reactions after aggressive incidents.

  7. [Home care to the elderly who had stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; Lopes, Regina Lúcia Mendonça

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to Identify the knowledge production about the stroke in elderly under home care. Bibliographic research whose data were collected though the abstracts from 1997 to 2007, contained in LILACS and SciELO databases. The following key words were used: home assistance, aged people and cerebrovascular accident. Fifty-two references were found in the LILACS database, nine in the SciELO Brazil, and three in the SciELO Cuba. Most of the researches were carried out in 2000. Regarding the method, qualitative method predominance were observed, and central theme is related to the care giver, as well as to the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of the disease. It was observed that this knowledge is still established in Brazil, and the themes related to the person submitted to home care and violence to the aged are still little explored.

  8. Integrating home care services in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Katalin, E.; Boerma, W.; Hutchinson, A.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Naiditch, M.; Lamura, G.; Chlabicz, S.; Gulácsi, L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Bolibar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A key feature of home care is its divided nature. Conditions for coordination are poor. A variety of professionals provides a coherent mix of services. The social care system is in general local, less professionalised and usually more poorly financed than the health care system. These

  9. Teaching Home-Based Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Ornstein, Katherine A; Wajnberg, Ania; Kopke, M Victoria; DeCherrie, Linda V

    Despite the growing homebound population and the development of innovative models of care that work to bring care to people in their homes, home visits are not a routine part of education for many healthcare providers. This manuscript describes the experience of Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors teaching home-based primary care to learners of various disciplines and reports the results of a survey performed to assess trainee experience. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors is the largest academic home-based primary care program in the country and trainees of various disciplines have nearly 1,700 contact days annually of directly supervised clinical teaching. In order to improve trainee education and meet our practice needs, trainees: 1) independently conduct urgent visits, 2) carry longitudinal panels of homebound patients, and 3) perform subspecialist consultations. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors has exposed thousands of trainees to home-based primary care in the past 20 years and trainees report positive reviews of their experiences. As the need to train future providers in home-based primary care grows, we will be challenged to provide trainees with adequate exposure to multidisciplinary teams and to teach about the importance of continuity of care.

  10. Hospital information technology in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    The utilization of hospital information technology (HIT) as a tool for home care is a recent trend in health science. Subjects gaining benefits from this new endeavor include middle-aged individuals with serious chronic illness living at home. Published data on the utilization of health care information technology especially for home care in chronic illness patients have increased enormously in recent past. The common chronic illnesses reported in these studies were primarily on heart and lung diseases. Furthermore, health professionals have confirmed in these studies that HIT was beneficial in gaining better access to information regarding their patients and they were also able to save that information easily for future use. On the other hand, some health professional also observed that the use of HIT in home care is not suitable for everyone and that individuals cannot be replaced by HIT. On the whole it is clear that the use of HIT could complement communication in home care. The present review aims to shed light on these latest aspects of the health care information technology in home care.

  11. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  12. Chronic kidney disease and support provided by home care services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydede, Sema K; Komenda, Paul; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Levin, Adeera

    2014-07-18

    Chronic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), are growing in incidence and prevalence, in part due to an aging population. Support provided through home care services may be useful in attaining a more efficient and higher quality care for CKD patients. A systematic review was performed to identify studies examining home care interventions among adult CKD patients incorporating all outcomes. Studies examining home care services as an alternative to acute, post-acute or hospice care and those for long-term maintenance in patients' homes were included. Studies with only a home training intervention and those without an applied research component were excluded. Seventeen studies (10 cohort, 4 non-comparative, 2 cross-sectional, 1 randomized) examined the support provided by home care services in 15,058 CKD patients. Fourteen studies included peritoneal dialysis (PD), two incorporated hemodialysis (HD) and one included both PD and HD patients in their treatment groups. Sixteen studies focused on the dialysis phase of care in their study samples and one study included information from both the dialysis and pre-dialysis phases of care. Study settings included nine single hospital/dialysis centers and three regional/metropolitan areas and five were at the national level. Studies primarily focused on nurse assisted home care patients and mostly examined PD related clinical outcomes. In PD studies with comparators, peritonitis risks and technique survival rates were similar across home care assisted patients and comparators. The risk of mortality, however, was higher for home care assisted PD patients. While most studies adjusted for age and comorbidities, information about multidimensional prognostic indices that take into account physical, psychological, cognitive, functional and social factors among CKD patients was not easily available. Most studies focused on nurse assisted home care patients on dialysis. The majority were single site studies incorporating

  13. Palliative Home Care: A Designer's Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhatnagar, Tigmanshu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development...

  14. Staph infections -- self-care at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000686.htm Staph infections - self-care at home To use the ... used to treat other staph germs. How Does Staph Spread? Many healthy people normally have staph on ...

  15. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Network solutions for home health care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Almut; Lind, Leili

    2003-01-01

    The growing number of the elderly in industrialised countries is increasing the pressure on respective health care systems. This is one reason for recent trends in the development and expansion of home health care organisations. With Internet access available to everyone and the advent of wireless technologies, advanced telehomecare is a possibility for a large proportion of the population. In the near future, one of the authors plans to implement a home health care infrastructure for patients with congestive heart failure and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The system is meant to support regular and ad-hoc measurements of medical parameters in patient homes and transmission of measurement data to the home health care provider. In this paper we look at network technologies that connect sensors and input devices in the patient home to a home health care provider. We consider wireless and Internet technologies from functional and security-related perspectives and arrive at a recommendation for our system. Security and usability aspects of the proposed network infrastructures are explored with special focus on their impact on the patient home.

  17. Characteristics of communication with older people in home care: A qualitative analysis of audio recordings of home care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Dorte V; Sundler, Annelie J; Eide, Hilde; Hafskjold, Linda; Ruud, Iren; Holmström, Inger K

    2017-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of communication practice in home care visits between older people (over 65 years old) and nurse assistants and to discuss the findings from a person-centered perspective. The older population is increasing worldwide, along with the need for healthcare services in the person's home. To achieve a high-quality care, person-centered communication is crucial. A descriptive design with a qualitative inductive approach was used. Fifteen audio recordings of naturally occurring conversations between 12 nurse assistants and 13 older people in Norway were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Four categories were revealed through analysis: (i) supporting older people's connection to everyday life; (ii) supporting older people's involvement in their own care; (iii) attention to older people's bodily and existential needs; and (iv) the impact of continuity and predictability on older people's well-being. The communication between the older people and the nurse assistants during home care visits was mainly task-oriented, but also related to the person. The older people were involved in the tasks to be carried out and humour was part of the communication. Greater attention was paid to bodily than existential needs. The communication was connected with the older people's everyday life in several ways. Time frames and interruptions concern the older people; hearing and speech impairments were a challenge to communication. To enhance person-centred communication, further studies are needed, especially intervention studies for healthcare professionals and students. Being responsive to older people's subjective experiences is important in meeting their needs in home care. Communication that addresses the need for trust and predictability is important for older people. Responding to existential needs require more attention. The home care setting has an impact on communication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prediction of Advisability of Returning Home Using the Home Care Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Nami; Yamashita, Akira; Mori, Nobuhiko; Oku, Kosuke; Ikeda, Masashi; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess whether the home care score (HCS), which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan in 1992, is useful for the prediction of advisability of home care. Methods. Subjects living at home and in assisted-living facilities were analyzed. Binominal logistic regression analyses, using age, sex, the functional independence measure score, and the HCS, along with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, were conducted. Findings/Conclusions. Only HCS was selected for the regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.83), and positive predictive value (0.84) for HCS were higher than those for the functional independence measure, indicating that the HCS is a powerful predictor for advisability of home care. Clinical Relevance. Comprehensive measurements of the condition of provided care and the activities of daily living of the subjects, which are included in the HCS, are required for the prediction of advisability of home care. PMID:26491568

  19. Prediction of Advisability of Returning Home Using the Home Care Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Matsugi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess whether the home care score (HCS, which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan in 1992, is useful for the prediction of advisability of home care. Methods. Subjects living at home and in assisted-living facilities were analyzed. Binominal logistic regression analyses, using age, sex, the functional independence measure score, and the HCS, along with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, were conducted. Findings/Conclusions. Only HCS was selected for the regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (0.9, sensitivity (0.82, specificity (0.83, and positive predictive value (0.84 for HCS were higher than those for the functional independence measure, indicating that the HCS is a powerful predictor for advisability of home care. Clinical Relevance. Comprehensive measurements of the condition of provided care and the activities of daily living of the subjects, which are included in the HCS, are required for the prediction of advisability of home care.

  20. Paramedic-Initiated Home Care Referrals and Use of Home Care and Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amol A; Klich, John; Thurston, Adam; Scantlebury, Jordan; Kiss, Alex; Seddon, Gayle; Sinha, Samir K

    2017-11-15

    We examined the association between paramedic-initiated home care referrals and utilization of home care, 9-1-1, and Emergency Department (ED) services. This was a retrospective cohort study of individuals who received a paramedic-initiated home care referral after a 9-1-1 call between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Home care, 9-1-1, and ED utilization were compared in the 6 months before and after home care referral. Nonparametric longitudinal regression was performed to assess changes in hours of home care service use and zero-inflated Poisson regression was performed to assess changes in the number of 9-1-1 calls and ambulance transports to ED. During the 24-month study period, 2,382 individuals received a paramedic-initiated home care referral. After excluding individuals who died, were hospitalized, or were admitted to a nursing home, the final study cohort was 1,851. The proportion of the study population receiving home care services increased from 18.2% to 42.5% after referral, representing 450 additional people receiving services. In longitudinal regression analysis, there was an increase of 17.4 hours in total services per person in the six months after referral (95% CI: 1.7-33.1, p = 0.03). The mean number of 9-1-1 calls per person was 1.44 (SD 9.58) before home care referral and 1.20 (SD 7.04) after home care referral in the overall study cohort. This represented a 10% reduction in 9-1-1 calls (95% CI: 7-13%, p home care referral and 0.79 (SD 6.27) after home care referral, representing a 7% reduction (95% CI: 3-11%, p home care records were included in the analysis, the reductions in 9-1-1 calls and ambulance transports to ED were attenuated but remained statistically significant. Paramedic-initiated home care referrals in Toronto were associated with improved access to and use of home care services and may have been associated with reduced 9-1-1 calls and ambulance transports to ED.

  1. Home sweet home? Community care for older people in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emily J; Caplan, Gideon A

    2008-02-01

    Community care provision for older Australians is growing in places and options, based on older people's preference to stay in their own homes, coupled with its cost efficiency compared to long-term residential care. Australia's aging population, cultural diversity, and dispersed population in rural and remote areas presents significant challenges in meeting these care needs. The objective of this review is to provide a critical overview of community care services in Australia, from its origin in the 1940s through to the current array of programs that deliver care. Barriers to access for these programs, growth in funding and expenditure, evidence of client satisfaction and the problems of workforce provision are presented. It is not clear how the growing future demands for care programs, resulting from greater client expectation, increasingly complex care needs and a diminishing workforce of paid and unpaid carers, will be met. However, the economic burden is anticipated to be manageable. Despite seemingly well-structured programs, the current multiplicity and rigidity of services means care provided is sometimes unsatisfactory at the point of delivery. It remains to be seen therefore if services can be expanded, modified and developed to address current deficiencies and meet future demands. The reality of timely and equitable care for all older Australians living in the community is elusive at present. The ongoing rationing of residential care beds coupled with people's desires to stay in their own homes means community care is here to stay. The future inevitably presents huge challenges to those planning, implementing and providing care in this setting.

  2. Home Accidents and Assistance in Daily Activities of Older Women in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkal, Sibel; Sahin, Hande

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the relation between incidents of at-home accidents and the assistance in daily activities of women age of 65+ living in the area of Dikmen Akpinar Health Care Unit in Ankara-Turkey. Of the women, 49.2% had experienced a home accident in the last 12 months. More than half of these accidents were caused by falling. Women over…

  3. Assisted Living Facilities - MDC_NursingHome

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Label (point) feature class of Miami-Dade County Nursing Homes Facilities. As of May 2004 the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will provide updates for Nursing...

  4. Palliative care in home care: perceptions of occupational therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séfora Gomez Portela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at understanding and reflecting on the perceptions of occupational therapists regarding the implementation of palliative care in home care. This is an exploratory, qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews, conducted in the second semester of 2012 with eight occupational therapists with experience in palliative care in the city of São Paulo. Content analysis identified four themes: characterization and professional trajectory in the field, understanding the concepts of palliative care, home care and palliative care, and occupational therapy and palliative care in home care. The results suggest that the role of the occupational therapist in this field has taken place at different levels of health care, being addressed to people with varying needs. The use of the concept of palliative care by the interviewees exceeds the notion of end of life, following the changes in the epidemiological transition. They understand that professional services follow the trend of national palliative care services with focus on specialized levels, but manifest the importance of its implementation in primary and home care. Among the barriers to practice, they identified the complexity of “being at home “, peculiarities of palliative care with high cost demands, lack of infrastructure and implementation of the current policy. Professional training and scientific roduction in the area were viewed as inadequate, although they identified a call for change. The interviewees recognized palliative care in home care as a strong professional field, but one still requiring study and discussions regarding its limits and conditions of implementation, especially in the Unified Health System.

  5. Dutch nursing home policies and guidelines on physician-assisted death and decisions to forego treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkate, I; van der Wal, G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe: (a) the prevalence and content of policies on euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) in three different types of nursing homes; (b) specific content items of written guidelines for EAS; and (c) the prevalence of guidelines on withholding or withdrawing treatment from severely demented patients and patients in a persistent vegetative state in the nursing homes. Descriptive, cross-sectional. We have used a postal survey among directors of patient care of all (n = 304) Dutch somatic nursing homes (meant for physically handicapped patients), psychogeriatric nursing homes (meant for patients suffering from dementia) and combined nursing homes. Data were collected from October 1994 through January 1995. Results indicate that psychogeriatric nursing homes less often had a written EAS policy than somatic and combined nursing homes (62, 68 and 80% respectively). The most frequently reported aspects in the EAS guidelines, by the nursing homes with guidelines based on a policy that EAS was accepted under certain conditions; were consultation of another physician (97%), referral to another physician if the attending physician had in-principle objections (82%), and the involvement of the nurse in the decision-making procedure (82%). Of the nursing homes, 9% reported having specific written procedures concerning withholding or withdrawing treatment from severely demented patients. Guidelines in the nursing homes on euthanasia and assisted suicide might be improved. Especially with regard to withholding or withdrawing treatment from incompetent patients, more guidelines should be developed.

  6. Atenção domiciliar como mudança do modelo tecnoassistencial Atención domiciliar como cambio del modelo tecnoasistencial Home care as change of the technical-assistance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia Lara Silva

    2010-02-01

    . CONCLUSIONES: La atención domiciliar posee potencial para constitución de una red sustitutiva al producir nuevos modos de cuidar que atraviesan los proyectos de los usuarios, de los familiares, de la red social y de los trabajadores de la atención domiciliar. La atención domiciliar como modalidad sustitutiva de atención a la salud requiere sustentabilidad política, conceptual y operacional, así como reconocimiento de los nuevos arreglos y articulación de las propuestas en curso.OBJECTIVE: To analyze home care practices of outpatient and hospital services and their constitution as a substitute healthcare network. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES: A qualitative study was carried out using tracer methodology to analyze four outpatient home care services from the Municipal Health Department and one service from a philanthropic hospital in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. The following procedures were carried out: interviews with the home care services' managers and teams, analysis of documents and follow-up of cases, holding interviews with patients and caregivers. The analysis was guided by the analytical categories home care integration into the healthcare network and technical-assistance model. RESULTS: Home care implementation was preceded by a political-institutional decision, both with a rationalizing orientation, intending to promote cost reduction, and also with the aim of carrying out the technical-assistance rearrangement of the healthcare networks. These two types of orientation were found to be in conflict, which implies difficulties for conciliating interests of the different players involved in the network, and also the creation of shared management spaces. It was possible to identify technological innovation and families' autonomy in the implementation of the healthcare projects. The teams proved to be cohesive, constructing, in the daily routine, new forms of integrating different perspectives so as to transform the

  7. Health Care, capabilities and AI assistive technologies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Scenarios involving the introduction of artificially intelligent (AI) assistive technologies in health care practices raise several ethical issues. In this paper, I discuss four objections to introducing AI assistive technologies in health care practices as replacements of human care. I analyse them

  8. 'I try to make a net around each patient': home care nursing as relational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2017-05-24

    As a result of restructuring, home care is increasingly defined in a narrow, task-based way, undermining the holistic nature of practice. Recent practice theories can aid us in articulating the nature of this important, yet often invisible practice. My aim in this article was to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the nature of home care nursing practice. The approach was ethnographic, involving extensive fieldwork and formal interviews with members of five home care nursing teams and 15 older persons receiving care at home in a metropolitan area of Iceland. The study was approved by the National Bioethics Committee. As a net of services, home care was enacted through relational, but often invisible care practices, relating different actors - patient, family and health-care and social-care workers - in doing the work needed for the older persons to live comfortably at home. The work was collective in that it was shared by different actors and motivated by a common understanding that had developed and was preserved in conversations in the teams. Although the findings are limited in that they only reflect home care as practiced in one neighbourhood, they can be seen as providing important insights into what is needed for home care services to work. Home care practice can be understood as relational, aimed at creating a net of needed assistance. This work is a collective accomplishment of the teams and shaped by ideals and values shared among team members. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ2 tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( pclusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  10. Home Care Providers to the Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen M; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA......). METHODS: We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched...... providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. RESULTS: Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases...

  11. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    services. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate how the intercultural communication is used during digital home visits in a Copenhagen community when caring for older patients with a minority ethnic background. Methods: document analysis teaching material including two video cases combined...... home visits due to expected communication difficulties. Included patients with a minority ethnic background are younger, relative independent from the start point and drop out before completed care plan. In addition, the screen visit seems to appeal to some patients with a minority ethnic background....... Surprisingly, we found that screen visits might help some patients with major language communication difficult ies to care for their health in better ways than they were able to when helped though a traditional home visit. It is our hope that this study will contribute with new knowledge to promote cultural...

  12. Communicative challenges in the home care of older persons - a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundler, Annelie J; Eide, Hilde; van Dulmen, Sandra; Holmström, Inger K

    2016-10-01

    To explore communicative challenges in encounters between nurse assistants and older persons during home care visits. The older population is increasing worldwide. Currently, there is a shift in care for older people from institutional care to home care. Providing home care in a person's home involves several challenges, including the complexity of communication. A descriptive observational design with a qualitative approach was used. The data consisted of audio recordings of real-life encounters during home care visits between nurse assistants and older persons, collected in 2014. A hermeneutic phenomenological analysis was conducted. Communicative challenges were identified: (a) in situations where the older persons had a different view than the nurse assistants on the care task and its content; and (b) when unexpected actions or turns occurred in the communication. Challenges included older person's existential issues, fragility and worries and concerns, which often appeared to be only vaguely expressed and difficult to verbally detect and tackle. This engendered a risk of misinterpretation or ignorance of these challenges. The findings point to the importance of communication as the key to facilitate person-centred home care. Communication training should focus more on addressing needs and existential issues in older persons. Person-centred home care for older persons needs to be addressed at both an individual and an organizational level. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Psychology of nursing personnel in home care nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergler, R

    1995-04-01

    In a random survey questions were put to 100 employees of home care centers (51 qualified nursing staff, 28 assistants and/or trainees, 21 young people doing community service as an alternative to military service). (1) The job motivation is primarily of a private nature: social commitment, achievement motivation, being responsible for solving diverse human problems are at the centre of job orientation. (2) Huge disappointments (neglect of patients, stress, arrangement of working hours, bureaucracy, lack of self-responsibility) are in 62% of the cases the reasons for changing from a clinic to the home care centre. (3) The psychological results of home care nursing are only positive in 62% of the cases; 26% have thought of giving notice, 37% would not choose their job again. (4) The training qualification for home care nursing is only adequate for 60% of those questioned; deficiencies are experienced with regard to consulting competence, gerontopsychiatry, specific knowledge about illnesses, legal questions. Essential further training is neglected. Also initial instruction in the home care service is to a great extent unsatisfactory. (5) For economic reasons it is frequently necessary to limit daily care to basic nursing; the patients' communicative needs have to ignored. One's occupational self-importance dwindles away; the job increasingly becomes an everyday stress factor. (6) The high risk of infection in the case of home-care patients is considered to be above-average (bedsores, infection risks with regard to changing bandages/catheters, anuspraeter aids, incontinence, fungal diseases, food risks: not keeping to diets, food not suitable for the elderly, lack of appropriate storage for leftovers. (7) Nursing staff, as well as patients, regard soap, cleansing lotion, shampoo, tooth brushes and toothpaste as the main items for personal hygiene, for the prevention and treatment of bedsores. Beyond that, compared with nursing staff, patients have a greater need for

  14. Possibilities and problems in the development of home care technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekum, T. van; Banta, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Limited resources for health care and increasing health care costs have led to proposals to expand home care services. Presently, home care technology is rather primitive. Its development and use have been largely unplanned. Nonetheless, home care technology is growing in response to obvious needs,

  15. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. Methods The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and...

  16. [Satisfaction with work in the home care sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, Anja; Bellin, Judith; Gräske, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Due to the demographic change and the growing number of care-dependent people, the number of professional caregivers is increasing. To slow down the cost explosion in the health care sector, the German government brings forward the home care principle. However, the recruitment of new nursing staff is challenging already, and will become harder in the future. A higher satisfaction with work indicates staying in the job and in the nursing sector. Valid data, concerning the satisfaction of work of nursing staff in the home care sector is lacking, yet. The present study aims to reduce this research gap. A written, standardized cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011. In this study socio-demographic characteristics as well as characteristics of the working circumstances were collected. In addition, the satisfaction with work (SAZ) and the satisfaction with life (SWLS) were evaluated. In total, 102 staff members of community health care providers were included in the study (37.5 years; 85 percent female). Registered nurses (n = 62) are significant older than nursing assistants (n = 40). No differences between satisfaction with work and satisfaction with life, professions, gender, marital status, and working condition could be found. Satisfaction with work interacts not significantly with age. However, it depends significantly on working in three shifts (morning, afternoon, night). Staff members working in all three shifts show a significant higher satisfaction with work. The present study adds knowledge in terms of satisfaction with work in the German home care sector.

  17. Leadership philosophy of care home managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, Daniel; James, Ian Andrew

    Care home managers have a significant influence on staff morale and care delivery. Training methods underpinned by transformational leadership theory (TLT) have been used successfully to develop leaders in healthcare services. The aim of this preliminary study was to establish which aspects of TLT were apparent in care home managers' philosophies of leadership. A qualitative research design was used and 25 care home managers in the north-east of England took part. Participants were asked to provide their philosophies of leadership by completing a questionnaire; a thematic analysis of the responses was then conducted. Development of philosophy, enablement and interpersonal impact emerged as key themes. The findings suggested that elements of TLT were apparent in the participants' philosophies of leadership. However, the importance of gaining the support of senior management when attempting to apply a philosophy of eadership in practice was lacking. Aspects of TLT, such as supporting frontline employees to engage in education and establishing trust, were embedded in care home managers' philosophies. To develop leadership skills, managers may benefit from training programmes that involve both structured teaching and guided learning through experience.

  18. Medicaid Home Care for Tribal Health Services: A Tool Kit for Developing New Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Steven P.; Satter, Delight E.; Zubiate, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Planning and financing long-term care services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) elders is a challenge. Institutional care (i.e. nursing homes) is not desired by most elders and has high costs for both the elders and tribal governments. In contrast, less expensive home care can provide enough assistance to keep most disabled elders in their own or their relatives’ homes, where they prefer to be. State Medicaid programs are one source of funding for home and community based long-ter...

  19. A qualitative study of in-home robotic telepresence for home care of community-living elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Corriveau, Hélène; Michaud, François

    2007-01-01

    categorized under three themes: potential applications, usability issues and user requirements. Teleoperated mobile robotic systems in the home were thought to be useful in assisting multidisciplinary patient care through improved communication between patients and healthcare professionals, and offering......We examined the requirements for robots in home telecare using two focus groups. The first comprised six healthcare professionals involved in geriatric care and the second comprised six elderly people with disabilities living in the community. The concept of an in-home telepresence robot...

  20. Automatically Adapting Home Lighting to Assist Visually Impaired Children

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Euan; Wilson, Graham; Brewster, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    For visually impaired children, activities like finding everyday items, locating favourite toys and moving around the home can be challenging. Assisting them during these activities is important because it promotes independence and encourages them to use and develop their remaining visual function. We describe our work towards a system that adapts the lighting conditions at home to help visually impaired children with everyday tasks. We discuss scenarios that show how they may benefit from ad...

  1. Fixing the broken image of care homes, could a 'care home innovation centre' be the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, Jo; Harrison, Jennifer Kirsty; Watson, Julie; Randall, Marion; Murray, Scott

    2017-03-01

    The UK has many excellent care homes that provide high-quality care for their residents; however, across the care home sector, there is a significant need for improvement. Even though the majority of care homes receive a rating of 'good' from regulators, still significant numbers are identified as requiring 'improvement' or are 'inadequate'. Such findings resonate with the public perceptions of long-term care as a negative choice, to be avoided wherever possible-as well as impacting on the career choices of health and social care students. Projections of current demographics highlight that, within 10 years, the part of our population that will be growing the fastest will be those people older than 80 years old with the suggestion that spending on long-term care provision needs to rise from 0.6% of our Gross Domestic Product in 2002 to 0.96% by 2031. Teaching/research-based care homes have been developed in the USA, Canada, Norway, the Netherlands and Australia in response to scandals about care, and the shortage of trained geriatric healthcare staff. There is increasing evidence that such facilities help to reduce inappropriate hospital admissions, increase staff competency and bring increased enthusiasm about working in care homes and improve the quality of care. Is this something that the UK should think of developing? This commentary details the core goals of a Care Home Innovation Centre for training and research as a radical vision to change the culture and image of care homes, and help address this huge public health issue we face. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ethical issues in palliative care for nursing homes: Development and testing of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preshaw, Deborah Hl; McLaughlin, Dorry; Brazil, Kevin

    2017-10-20

    To develop and psychometrically assess a survey instrument identifying ethical issues during palliative care provision in nursing homes. Registered nurses and healthcare assistants have reported ethical issues in everyday palliative care provision. Identifying these issues provides evidence to inform practice development to support healthcare workers. Cross-sectional survey of Registered nurses and healthcare assistants in nursing homes in one region of the UK. A survey instrument, "Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes", was developed through the findings of qualitative interviews with Registered nurses and healthcare assistants in nursing homes and a literature review. It was reviewed by an expert panel and piloted prior to implementation in a survey in 2015 with a convenience sample of 596 Registered nurses and healthcare assistants. Descriptive and exploratory factor analyses were used to assess the underlying structure of the Frequency and Distress Scales within the instrument. Analysis of 201 responses (response rate = 33.7%) revealed four factors for the Frequency Scale and five factors for the Distress Scale that comprise the Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes. Factors common to both scales included "Processes of care," "Resident autonomy" and "Burdensome treatment." Additionally, the Frequency Scale included "Competency," and the Distress Scale included "Quality of care" and "Communication." The Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes instrument has added to the palliative care knowledge base by considering the ethical issues experienced specifically by Registered nurses and healthcare assistants within the nursing home. This research offers preliminary evidence of the psychometric properties of the Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes survey instrument. The two largest factors highlight the need to address the organisational aspects of caring and provide training in negotiating conflicting

  3. Caring for home-based care workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    independence and achieve the best possible quality of life through physical, psychosocial, spiritual and ... compensated for their participation with lunch and a pen. QUANTITATIVE COMPONENT. A survey was ... Participating care workers were divided into small groups and asked four questions relating to VCT and.

  4. Client Involvement in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone

    2013-01-01

    from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a homecare setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural...

  5. Human resources in home care in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Lamura, G.; Boerma, W.; Hutchinson, A.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Naiditch, M.; Chlabicz, S.; Ersek, K.; Gulácsi, L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Bolibar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing old-age dependency ratio implies future reduction of human resources available to provide services. Little information is available about the level of qualification, contractual aspects, payment and working conditions of home care workers and the existence of staff

  6. "We Only Own the Hours": Discontinuity of Care in the British Columbia Home Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Zena; McLaren, Arlene Tigar; Cohen, Marcy; Ostry, Aleck

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the concept of continuity of care to examine the implications of health-system restructuring for workers and staff in the BC home support system. Home support primarily serves frail seniors living in poverty and has the potential to provide assistance with tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as offer social…

  7. Palliative Care Development in European Care Homes and Nursing Homes: Application of a Typology of Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Katherine; Payne, Sheila; Morbey, Hazel; Edwards, Michaela; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Gambassi, Giovanni; Pasman, H Roeline; Szczerbińska, Katarzyna; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-06-01

    The provision of institutional long-term care for older people varies across Europe reflecting different models of health care delivery. Care for dying residents requires integration of palliative care into current care work, but little is known internationally of the different ways in which palliative care is being implemented in the care home setting. To identify and classify, using a new typology, the variety of different strategic, operational, and organizational activities related to palliative care implementation in care homes across Europe. We undertook a mapping exercise in 29 European countries, using 2 methods of data collection: (1) a survey of country informants, and (2) a review of data from publically available secondary data sources and published research. Through a descriptive and thematic analysis of the survey data, we identified factors that contribute to the development and implementation of palliative care into care homes at different structural levels. From these data, a typology of palliative care implementation for the care home sector was developed and applied to the countries surveyed. We identified 3 levels of palliative care implementation in care homes: macro (national/regional policy, legislation, financial and regulatory drivers), meso (implementation activities, such as education, tools/frameworks, service models, and research), and micro (palliative care service delivery). This typology was applied to data collected from 29 European countries and demonstrates the diversity of palliative care implementation activity across Europe with respect to the scope, type of development, and means of provision. We found that macro and meso factors at 2 levels shape palliative care implementation and provision in care homes at the micro organizational level. Implementation at the meso and micro levels is supported by macro-level engagement, but can happen with limited macro strategic drivers. Ensuring the delivery of consistent and high

  8. A training program to enhance recognition of depression in nursing homes, assisted living, and other long-term care settings: Description and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Robert C; Nathanson, Mark; Silver, Stephanie; Ramirez, Mildred; Toner, John A; Teresi, Jeanne A

    2017-01-01

    Low levels of symptom recognition by staff have been "gateway" barriers to the management of depression in long-term care. The study aims were to refine a depression training program for front-line staff in long-term care and provide evaluative knowledge outcome data. Three primary training modules provide an overview of depression symptoms; a review of causes and situational and environmental contributing factors; and communication strategies, medications, and clinical treatment strategies. McNemar's chi-square tests and paired t-tests were used to examine change in knowledge. Data were analyzed for up to 143 staff members, the majority from nursing. Significant changes (p depressive disorder.

  9. The Fresenius Medical Care home hemodialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaeper, Christian; Diaz-Buxo, Jose A

    2004-01-01

    The Fresenius Medical Care home dialysis system consists of a newly designed machine, a central monitoring system, a state-of-the-art reverse osmosis module, ultrapure water, and all the services associated with a successful implementation. The 2008K@home hemodialysis machine has the flexibility to accommodate the changing needs of the home hemodialysis patient and is well suited to deliver short daily or prolonged nocturnal dialysis using a broad range of dialysate flows and concentrates. The intuitive design, large graphic illustrations, and step-by-step tutorial make this equipment very user friendly. Patient safety is assured by the use of hydraulic systems with a long history of reliability, smart alarm algorithms, and advanced electronic monitoring. To further patient comfort with their safety at home, the 2008K@home is enabled to communicate with the newly designed iCare remote monitoring system. The Aquaboss Smart reverse osmosis (RO) system is compact, quiet, highly efficient, and offers an improved hygienic design. The RO module reduces water consumption by monitoring the water flow of the dialysis system and adjusting water production accordingly. The Diasafe Plus filter provides ultrapure water, known for its long-term benefits. This comprehensive approach includes planning, installation, technical and clinical support, and customer service.

  10. Quality Reforms in Danish Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Despite relatively generous coverage of the over-65 population, Danish home help services receive regular criticism in the media and public opinion polls. Perhaps as a consequence, reforms of Danish home care policy for senior citizens have placed strong emphasis on quality since the 1990s....... This reform strategy represents a shift from the welfare state modernisation program of the 1980s, which built mainly on economic strategies of cost-efficiency and New Public Management (NPM) princi-ples, including contract management and performance management. Recent reforms have instead attempted...... to increase the overall quality of care by increasing the transparency at the political, administrative and user levels. However, reforms have revolved around conflicting principles of standardisation and the individualisation of care provision and primarily succeeded in increasing the political and ad...

  11. Voicing Ageism in Nursing Home Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Shaw, Clarissa; Lee, Alexandria; Kim, Sohyun; Dinneen, Emma; Turk, Margaret; Jao, Ying-Ling; Liu, Wen

    2017-09-01

    Elderspeak (i.e., infantilizing communication) is a common form of ageism that has been linked to resistiveness to care in nursing home residents with dementia. Nursing home staff use elderspeak by modifying speech with older residents based on negative stereotypes, which results in patronizing communication that provides a message of incompetence. The purpose of the current secondary analysis was to describe communication practices used by nursing home staff that reflect ageism. Transcripts of 80 video recordings of staff-resident communication collected during nursing home care activities were re-analyzed to identify specific elderspeak patterns, including diminutives, collective pronouns, tag questions, and reflectives. Elderspeak was used in 84% of transcripts, and specifically during bathing, dressing, oral care, and other activities. Collective pronoun substitution occurred most frequently-in 69% of recorded conversations. Subgroup analysis of the inappropriate terms of endearment found that "honey"/"hon" and "sweetheart"/"sweetie" were most commonly used. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(9), 16-20.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. The provision of emotional labour by health care assistants caring for dying cancer patients in the community: a qualitative study into the experiences of health care assistants and bereaved family carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Melanie; Nanton, Veronica; Roberts, Julie; Ingleton, Christine; Noble, Bill; Pitt, Elizabeth; Seers, Kate; Munday, Dan

    2015-01-01

    While previous research has suggested that health care assistants supporting palliative care work in the community regard the provision of emotional labour as a key aspect of their role, little research has explored the experiences of family carers who are the recipients of such support. To explore the emotional labour undertaken by health care assistants working in community palliative care from the perspectives of both health care assistants and bereaved family carers. We conducted a qualitative interview study in 2011-2012 with bereaved family carers of cancer patients who had received the services of health care assistants in the community, and health care assistants who provided community palliative care services. Transcripts were coded and analysed for emergent themes using a constant comparative technique. Three different research sites in the United Kingdom, all providing community palliative care. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 bereaved family carers and eight health care assistants. Health care assistants view one of their key roles as providing emotional support to patients and their family carers, and family carers recognise and value this emotional support. Emotional support by health care assistants was demonstrated in three main ways: the relationships which health care assistants developed and maintained on the professional-personal boundary; the ability of health care assistants to negotiate clinical/domestic boundaries in the home; the ways in which health care assistants and family carers worked together to enable the patient to die at home. Through their emotional labour, health care assistants perform an important role in community palliative care which is greatly valued by family carers. While recent reports have highlighted potential dangers in the ambiguity of their role, any attempts to clarify the 'boundaries' of the health care assistant role should acknowledge the advantages health care assistants can bring in bridging

  13. Implementing a quality improvement programme in palliative care in care homes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higginson Irene J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of older people reach the end of life in care homes. The aim of this study is to explore the perceived benefits of, and barriers to, implementation of the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes (GSFCH, a quality improvement programme in palliative care. Methods Nine care homes involved in the GSFCH took part. We conducted semi-structured interviews with nine care home managers, eight nurses, nine care assistants, eleven residents and seven of their family members. We used the Framework approach to qualitative analysis. The analysis was deductive based on the key tasks of the GSFCH, the 7Cs: communication, coordination, control of symptoms, continuity, continued learning, carer support, and care of the dying. This enabled us to consider benefits of, and barriers to, individual components of the programme, as well as of the programme as a whole. Results Perceived benefits of the GSFCH included: improved symptom control and team communication; finding helpful external support and expertise; increasing staff confidence; fostering residents' choice; and boosting the reputation of the home. Perceived barriers included: increased paperwork; lack of knowledge and understanding of end of life care; costs; and gaining the cooperation of GPs. Many of the tools and tasks in the GSFCH focus on improving communication. Participants described effective communication within the homes, and with external providers such as general practitioners and specialists in palliative care. However, many had experienced problems with general practitioners. Although staff described the benefits of supportive care registers, coding predicted stage of illness and advance care planning, which included improved communication, some felt the need for more experience of using these, and there were concerns about discussing death. Conclusions Most of the barriers described by participants are relevant to other interventions to improve end of

  14. Using data from ambient assisted living and smart homes in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, P; Schöpe, L

    2014-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". To increase efficiency in the health care of the future, data from innovative technology like it is used for ambient assisted living (AAL) or smart homes should be available for individual health decisions. Integrating and aggregating data from different medical devices and health records enables a comprehensive view on health data. The objective of this paper is to present examples of the state of the art in research on information management that leads to a sustainable use and long-term storage of health data provided by innovative assistive technologies in daily living. Current research deals with the perceived usefulness of sensor data, the participatory design of visual displays for presenting monitoring data, and communication architectures for integrating sensor data from home health care environments with health care providers either via a regional health record bank or via a telemedical center. Integrating data from AAL systems and smart homes with data from electronic patient or health records is still in an early stage. Several projects are in an advanced conceptual phase, some of them exploring feasibility with the help of prototypes. General comprehensive solutions are hardly available and should become a major issue of medical informatics research in the near future.

  15. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  16. Using integrated bio-physiotherapy informatics in home health-care settings: A qualitative analysis of a point-of-care decision support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canally, Culum; Doherty, Sean; Doran, Diane M; Goubran, Rafik A

    2015-06-01

    The growing need to gain efficiencies within a home care setting has prompted home care practitioners to focus on health informatics to address the needs of an aging clientele. The remote and heterogeneous nature of the home care environment necessitates the use of non-intrusive client monitoring and a portable, point-of-care graphical user interface. Using a grounded theory approach, this article examines the simulated use of a graphical user interface by practitioners in a home care setting to explore the salient features of monitoring the activity of home care clients. The results demonstrate the need for simple, interactive displays that can provide large amounts of geographical and temporal data relating to patient activity. Additional emerging themes from interviews indicate that home care professionals would use a graphical user interface of this type for patient education and goal setting as well as to assist in the decision-making process of home care practitioners. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. The moral geography of home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaschenko, J

    1994-12-01

    One result of the historical division of labor between nurses and physicians is that nurses became the eyes and ears of the physician, extending their perceptual capabilities across space and time. This "gaze of medicine" has evolved with the rise of technology, hospitals, and the medical profession to a sort of scientific totalitarianism. Protecting and enhancing patient agency, which is part of the moral work of nursing practice, can be difficult under such circumstances. Yet the geography of sickness is changing as patients move from the hospital back to the home. Because home is thought of as private, as the patient's domain, nurses may think that supporting patient agency will be easier with this transformation of health care. But that assumption may not be warranted since the gaze of medicine will follow patients and change the landscape of the home. The challenge for nursing will be to sharpen the "gaze of nursing," which is an antidote to the strictly biomedical understanding of disease.

  18. [Alcohol in care homes for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menecier-Ossia, Laure; Kholler, Maureen; Moscato, Alba; Menecier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The majority of those living in care homes for the elderly are very old, with multiple pathologies and taking multiple forms of medication. They are therefore more fragile and vulnerable in the face of alcohol, both with occasional consumption or with addictive behaviour. Far from anecdotal, these situations arise almost on a daily basis for the frontline caregivers. They are sometimes difficult to detect by other professionals who do not have such prolonged contact with the residents. Addressing the risk as well as the misuse of alcohol in a nursing home is a matter for the whole institute and must involve all the players, professionals, families and residents, in a cross-disciplinary and coherent approach. Addiction treatment, in the particular case of nursing home residents, as for the general population, considers all methods of consumption and actions, from prevention to the reduction of risks or harmful effects, to curative treatment, including alcohol withdrawal.

  19. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Allocation of home care services by municipalities in Norway: a document analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Solrun G; Mathisen, Terje A; Sæterstrand, Torill M; Brinchmann, Berit S

    2017-09-22

    In Norway, elder care is primarily a municipal responsibility. Municipal health services strive to offer the 'lowest level of effective care,' and home healthcare services are defined as the lowest level of care in Norway. Municipalities determine the type(s) of service and the amount of care applicants require. The services granted are outlined in an individual decision letter, which serves as a contract between the municipality and the home healthcare recipient. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the scope and duration of home healthcare services allocated by municipalities and to determine where home care recipients live in relation to home healthcare service offices. A document analysis was performed on data derived from 833 letters to individuals allocated home care services in two municipalities in Northern Norway (Municipality A = 500 recipients, Municipality B = 333 recipients). In Municipality A, 74% of service hours were allotted to home health nursing, 12% to practical assistance, and 14% to support contact; in Municipality B, the distribution was 73%, 19%, and 8%, respectively. Both municipalities allocated home health services with no service end date (41% and 85% of the total services, respectively). Among recipients of "expired" services, 25% in Municipality A and 7% in Municipality B continued to receive assistance. Our findings reveal that the municipalities adhered to the goal for home care recipients to remain at home as long as possible before moving into a nursing home. The findings also indicate that the system for allocating home healthcare services may not be fair, as the municipalities lacked procedures for revising individual decisions. Our findings indicate that local authorities should closely examine how they design individual decisions and increase their awareness of how long a service should be provided.

  1. Risk Factors of Entry in Out-of-Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Mette; Ejrnæs, Niels Morten; Frederiksen, Signe

    2011-01-01

    , the mother and the father. We discovered that especially children who had a mother on disability pension, children who came from broken homes but also children whose mothers were unemployed or receiving social assistance and children whose mothers had a conviction had a high risk of being placed in care....... The mother’s characteristics are more important risk factors than the corresponding risk factors of the father. The results, the applied method and the epidemiological inspired analysis make an opportunity to discuss the central concepts and methods of calculation of statistical association, risk, prediction...... and causal inference in applied sociology and social work....

  2. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  3. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, J.L.P. van; Selm, M. van; Leeuwen, E. van; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  4. End-of-life care in nursing and care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, John; Johnson, Malcolm

    More than 70,000 people die each year in nursing and residential care homes, yet comparatively little attention has been paid to end-of-life care practice and its challenges in this setting. We conducted interviews and group discussions in 12 homes, involving 73 residents, 97 members of staff and 16 relatives. These revealed that personalised care, dignity and respect, making time, talking about death, relatives' roles, and staff support were priorities for all concerned. Training is vital in helping staff to engage sensitively, respectfully and creatively with dying residents. Staffing levels must be sufficient so staff can sit with residents and care in a way that is attuned to their personality, life history and wishes. relatives help to ensure a "civilised death".

  5. Nutrition and dementia care: developing an evidence-based model for nutritional care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane L; Holmes, Joanne; Brooks, Cindy

    2017-02-14

    There is a growing volume of research to offer improvements in nutritional care for people with dementia living in nursing homes. Whilst a number of interventions have been identified to support food and drink intake, there has been no systematic research to understand the factors for improving nutritional care from the perspectives of all those delivering care in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to develop a research informed model for understanding the complex nutritional problems associated with eating and drinking for people with dementia. We conducted nine focus groups and five semi-structured interviews with those involved or who have a level of responsibility for providing food and drink and nutritional care in nursing homes (nurses, care workers, catering assistants, dietitians, speech and language therapists) and family carers. The resulting conceptual model was developed by eliciting care-related processes, thus supporting credibility from the perspective of the end-users. The seven identified domain areas were person-centred nutritional care (the overarching theme); availability of food and drink; tools, resources and environment; relationship to others when eating and drinking; participation in activities; consistency of care and provision of information. This collaboratively developed, person-centred model can support the design of new education and training tools and be readily translated into existing programmes. Further research is needed to evaluate whether these evidence-informed approaches have been implemented successfully and adopted into practice and policy contexts and can demonstrate effectiveness for people living with dementia.

  6. Cultural competence: assessment and education resources for home care and hospice clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Home healthcare and hospice clinicians face many challenges in the complex healthcare system caring for patients and their families in the home environment. One of those challenges is providing culturally competent care for an increasingly diverse population. This article will highlight free, easily accessible, online resources to assist clinicians and organizations to assess organizational and individual cultural competence and provide many resources for cultural competency education programs.

  7. Cultural competence: assessment and education resources for home care and hospice clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    Home healthcare and hospice clinicians face many challenges in the complex healthcare system caring for patients and their families in the home environment. One of those challenges is providing culturally competent care for an increasingly diverse population. This article will highlight free, easily accessible, online resources to assist clinicians and organizations to assess organizational and individual cultural competence and provide many resources for cultural competency education programs.

  8. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  9. The Role of ICT in Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Sofie; Vimarlund, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    With an ageing population and limited resources, ICT is often mentioned as a solution to support elderly people in maintaining an independent and healthy lifestyle. In this paper, we describe how ICT can support access to information and rationalization of work processes in a home care context. We do this by modelling the workflow and identifying the possible impact of ICT. The results show a complex process and indicate that the available resources are not used in the best possible way. The introduction of ICT could increase patient safety by reducing the risk of misplacing information about the care recipients and at the same time provide real time information about the care recipients' needs and health at the point of care. However, to rationalize the work processes there is a need to combine ICT with a changed procedure for handling keys.

  10. End-of-life care in U.S. nursing homes: nursing homes with special programs and trained staff for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Han, Beth

    2008-07-01

    The degree to which nursing homes have internal programs for hospice and palliative care is unknown. We used self-reported data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) to estimate the prevalence of special programs and (specially) trained staff (SPTS) for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care in U.S. nursing homes. Factors associated with the presence of SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care were identified. We merged 2004 NNHS data for 1174 nursing homes to county-level data from the 2004 Area Resource File and to Nursing Home 2004 Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data. chi(2) tests and logistic regression models were applied. Twenty-seven percent of U.S. nursing homes reported (internal) SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care. After controlling for covariates, we found nonprofit status, being in the southern region of the United States, having an administrator certified by the American College of Health Care Administrators, contracting with an outside hospice provider, and having other specialty programs to be associated with a greater likelihood of nursing homes having SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care. The largest effects were observed for nursing homes with programs for behavioral problems (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.40, 5.37) and for pain management (AOR 5.92; 95% CI 4.09, 8.57). The presence of internal SPTS for hospice or palliative/end-of-life care is prevalent in U.S. nursing homes, and may be preceded by hospice contracting and/or the implementation of specialty programs that assist nursing homes in developing the expertise needed to establish their own palliative care programs.

  11. Smart home technologies for health and social care support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Kelly, Greg; Kernohan, W George; McCreight, Bernadette; Nugent, Christopher

    2008-10-08

    The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. To explore the effectiveness of smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home, and to consider the impact on the individual's health status and on the financial resources of health care. We searched the following databases for primary studies: (a) the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Register, (b) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, issue 1, 2007), and (c) bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2007). We also searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched the electronic databases using a strategy developed by the EPOC Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series analyses (ITS). Participants included adults over the age of 18, living in their home in a community setting. Participants with a physical disability, dementia or a learning disability were included. The included interventions were social alarms, electronic assistive devices, telecare social alert platforms, environmental control systems, automated home environments and 'ubiquitous homes'. Outcome measures included any objective measure that records an impact on a participant's quality of life, healthcare professional workload, economic outcomes, costs to healthcare provider or costs to participant. We included measures of service satisfaction

  12. Factors related to the provision of home-based end-of-life care among home-care nursing, home help, and care management agencies in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Kurinobu, Takeshi; Ko, Ayako; Okamoto, Yuko; Matsuura, Shino; Feng, Mei; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    ...) care and consider strategies to deal with this process. This study aims to clarify institution-related factors associated with the provision of home-based EOL care cases, and to compare them among three different types of home-care agencies...

  13. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagerström Cecilia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more

  14. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Nadine; Boerma, Wienke Gw; Kringos, Dionne S; Bouman, Ans; Francke, Anneke L; Fagerström, Cecilia; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Cosetta; Devillé, Walter

    2011-08-30

    Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the state of home care in Europe requires the

  15. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the

  16. Predictors of Home Care Expenditures and Death at Home for Cancer Patients in an Integrated Comprehensive Palliative Home Care Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Doris M.; Abernathy, Tom; Cockerill, Rhonda; Brazil, Kevin; Wagner, Frank; Librach, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Empirical understanding of predictors for home care service use and death at home is important for healthcare planning. Few studies have examined these predictors in the context of the publicly funded Canadian home care system. This study examined predictors for home care use and home death in the context of a “gold standard” comprehensive palliative home care program pilot in Ontario where patients had equal access to home care services. Methods: Secondary clinical and administrative data sources were linked using a unique identifier to examine multivariate factors (predisposing, enabling, need) on total home care expenditures and home death for a cohort of cancer patients enrolled in the HPCNet pilot. Results: Subjects with gastrointestinal symptoms (OR: 1.64; p=0.03) and those with higher income had increased odds of dying at home (OR: 1.14; phome care expenditures. Conclusions: Predictors of home death found in earlier studies appeared less important in this comprehensive palliative home care pilot. An income effect for home death observed in this study requires examination in future controlled studies. Relevance: Access to palliative home care that is adequately resourced and organized to address the multiple domains of issues that patients/families experience at the end of life has the potential to enable home death and shift care appropriately from limited acute care resources. PMID:22294993

  17. The interdisciplinary approach to the implementation of a diabetes home care disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Mary Ann; Lapides, Shawn; Hayden, Corrine; Santangelo, Roxanne

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes is a national epidemic and a leading cause of hospitalizations in the United States. Home care agencies need to be able to provide effective Diabetes Disease Management to help prevent avoidable hospitalizations and assist patients to live a good quality of life. This article describes one organization's journey toward providing patients with better diabetes care resulting in an improved quality of life.

  18. Psychosocial changes following transition to an aged care home: qualitative findings from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Pakpour, Vahid; Chenoweth, Lynnette Lorraine; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2017-06-01

    The study explored the psychosocial effects of transitioning from home to an aged care home for older Iranian people. Moving from one's own home to a communal aged care home is challenging for older people and may give rise to numerous psychosocial responses. The extent and intensity of such changes have rarely been explored in Middle Eastern countries. Data were collected through purposive sampling by in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 participants (17 people living in aged care homes and three formal caregivers). All the interviews were recorded and typed, and conventional qualitative content analysis was used, eliciting common themes. There were four common themes: communication isolation, resource change, monotone institutional life and negative emotional response. Participants lost their previous support systems when transitioning to an aged care home and were not able to establish new ones. Routine care was provided by formal caregivers with little attention to individual needs, and minimal support was given to help maintain the older person's independence. These losses gave rise to negative emotions in some of the participants, depending on their previous lifestyle and accommodation arrangements. The extent and intensity of psychosocial changes occurring in most of the participants following their transition to an aged care home indicates the need for a review of Iranian aged care services. To assist older Iranian people adapt more readily when making the transition to aged care home and to meet their unique psychosocial needs, a family-centred approach to service delivery is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 'High-tech' home care: overview of professional care in patients on home parenteral nutrition and implications for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Achterberg, Theo; Jansen, Jan; Wanten, Geert; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the quality, quantity and content of care given to home parenteral nutrition-dependent patients by various professionals in the Netherlands and to detect potential shortcomings. Home parenteral nutrition is a lifesaving treatment for patients who cannot eat or cannot eat sufficiently. Very little is known about follow-up care after hospital stay. Yet this is an important aspect of care as patients must cope with high-tech skills at home. Also, complications and psychosocial complaints can occur. Survey. A patient questionnaire was used to assess contacts with professionals and possible shortcomings in care. Nursing files from home parenteral nutrition nurses were reviewed for information from all contact moments. Home parenteral nutrition nurses and home care teams were interviewed to assess nursing care and to detect bottlenecks. The nutrition support team was primarily responsible for the home parenteral nutrition care. Physical complaints like abdominal pain or nausea and venous access problems like fever were discussed most often. Patients were satisfied about the nutrition support team, but both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial problems. Furthermore, the included patients visited their General Practitioner 11 times per year on average (range 1-104). Patients experienced a bottleneck with respect to the general practitioner's knowledge of home parenteral nutrition-related matters. Home parenteral nutrition patients visit the nutrition support team and their general practitioner most frequently and much attention is paid to medical and physical problems. Psychosocial problems, however, were only discussed in a minority of patients, and this was experienced as a shortcoming. Relevance to clinical practice.  Both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial

  20. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  1. Quality of needs assessment for care and assistive devices from a client's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nispen, R.M.A. van; Sixma, H.J.; Kerkstra, A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Like in many other European countries, health care policy makers in The Netherlands are looking for new ways to organize different health care services. To facilitate a more objective, independent and integral assessment for individuals in need of (nursing) home care or assistive

  2. From home to 'home': Mapping the caregiver journey in the transition from home care into residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainstock, Taylor; Cloutier, Denise; Penning, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    Family caregivers play a pivotal role in supporting the functional independence and quality of life of older relatives, often taking on a wide variety of care-related activities over the course of their caregiving journey. These activities help family members to remain in the community and age-in-place for as long as possible. However, when needs exceed family capacities to provide care, the older family member may need to transition from one care environment to another (e.g., home care to nursing home care), or one level of care to another (from less intense to more intensive services). Drawing upon qualitative interview data collected in a populous health region in British Columbia, Canada, this study explores the roles and responsibilities of family caregivers for family members making the care transition from home care to residential care. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts resulted in the development of a conceptual framework to characterize the "Caregiver Journey" as a process that could be divided into at least three phases: 1) Precursors to transition - recognizing frailty in family members and caregivers prior to transition; 2) Preparing to transition into residential nursing home care (RC) and 3) Post-transition: Finding a new balance - where caregivers adjust and adapt to new caregiving responsibilities. Our analyses revealed that the second phase is the most complex involving a consideration of the various activities, and roles that family caregivers take on to prepare for the care transition including: information gathering, advocacy and system navigation. We conclude that there is a need for family caregivers to be better supported during care transitions; notably through ongoing and enhanced investments in strategies to support caregiver communication and education. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  4. Is informal care a substitution for home care among migrants in the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, G.T.; Foets, M.; Devillé, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Among migrants the level of home care use seems to be lower than among the native population. As migrants may prefer informal care for several reasons, they possibly use these sources of care instead of home care. We therefore, examined the use of home care in relation to household

  5. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Quinn, Terry J; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C; Stott, David J

    2017-04-03

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce costs and improve the quality of care compared. To assess the effects of long-term home or foster home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and two trials registers to November 2015. We included randomised and non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies complying with the EPOC study design criteria and comparing the effects of long-term home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. We reported the results narratively, as the substantial heterogeneity across studies meant that meta-analysis was not appropriate. We included 10 studies involving 16,377 participants, all of which were conducted in high income countries. Included studies compared community-based care with institutional care (care homes). The sample size ranged from 98 to 11,803 (median N = 204). There was substantial heterogeneity in the healthcare context, interventions studied, and outcomes assessed. One study was a randomised trial (N = 112); other included studies used designs that had potential for bias, particularly due lack of randomisation, baseline imbalances, and non-blinded outcome assessment. Most studies did not select (or exclude) participants for any specific disease state, with the exception of one study that only included patients if they had a stroke. All studies had methodological limitations, so readers should interpret results with caution.It is uncertain

  6. Organization and financing of home care in Europe: an overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkstra, A.; Hutten, J.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the organization and financing of home nursing in the 15 member states in the European Union. Home nursing was defined as the nursing care provided at the patients' home by professional home nursing organizations. Data were gathered by means of

  7. Assistência domiciliaria ao idoso: perfil do cuidador formal - parte I Asistencia domiciliar al anciano: perfil del cuidador formal - parte I The home care of elderly: caregiver profile - part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozue Kawasaki

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available O idoso fragilizado, mantido em seu domicílio, requer cuidados específicos, os quais são realizados muitas vezes por pessoas contratadas, pelas famílias, sem necessariamente terem formação específica e são comumente denominadas cuidadores formais. Frente o aumento da oferta de trabalho destas pessoas e a escassez de literatura sobre seu perfil, desenvolvemos um estudo com 41 anunciantes que ofereceram seus serviços em dois jornais de maior circulação no município de Campinas, São Paulo, com os seguintes objetivos: 1. caracterizar estes cuidadores e 2. verificar as atividades propostas para a assistência ao idoso. No presente trabalho são apresentados os dados referentes as características dos cuidadores quanto: ao sexo, a idade, a formação e experiência anterior, disponibilidade de horário e remuneração exigida.El anciano debilitado, mantenido en su habitación, carece de cuidados específicos, los cuales han sido realizados muchas veces por personas contratadas, denominadas cuidadores formales. Frente al aumento de oferta e trabajo de estas personas y a la escasez de literatura sobre el perfil, desarrollamos un estudio con 41 anunciantes que ofrecieron sus servicios dos periódicos de grande circulación en el municipio de Campinas, San Pablo, con los siguientes objetivos: 1. caracterizar estos cuidadores y 2. verificar las actividades propuestas para la asistencia al anciano. El presente trabajo presenta los datos referentes a las características de los cuidadores con respecto a: sexo, edade, formación y experiencia previa, disponibilidad de horario y remuneración exigida.The frail elderly, maintained in its home, request specific cares, wich are accomplished many times by people contracted, denominated formal caregivers. With the increase of offer of these people's work and the shortage on its profile, we developed a study with 41 advertisers that offered its services in two newspapers of larger circulation in the

  8. Assistência domiciliaria ao idoso: perfil do cuidador formal - parte II Asistencia domiciliar al anciano: perfil del cuidador formal - parte II The home care of elderly: caregiver profile - part two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozue Kawasaki

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O idoso fragilizado, mantido em seu domicílio, requer cuidados específicos, os quais são realizados muitas vezes por pessoas contratadas pela família para tal, denominadas cuidadores formais. Frente o aumento da oferta de trabalho destas pessoas e a escassez de literatura nacional sobre seu perfiL, desenvolvemos um estudo com 41 pessoas que ofereceram seus serviços através de anúncios em dois jornais de maior circulação no município de Campinas, São Paulo. Tal estudo teve por objetivos: 1. caracterizar estes cuidadores (este objetivo foi contemplado com um artigo publicado anteriormente e 2. verificar as atividades propostas para a assistência ao idoso. No presente trabalho serão apresentados os dados referentes ao segundo objetivo.El anciano debilitado, mantenido en su habitación, carece de cuidados específicos, los cuales han sido realizados muchas veces por personas contratadas, denominadas cuidadores formales. Frente al aumento de oferta de trabajo de estas personas y a la escasez de literatura sobre el perfil, desarrollamos un estudio con 41 anunciantes que ofrecieron sus servicios dos periódicos de grande circulación en el municipio de Campinas, San Pablo, con los siguientes objetivos: 1. caracterizar estos cuidadores y 2. verificar las actividades propuestas para la asistencial al anciano. El presente trabajo presenta los datos referentes a lo secundo objetivo.The frail elderly, maintained in its home, request specific cares, which are accomplished many times by people contracted, denominated formal caregivers. With the increase of the offer of these people's work and the shortage literature on its profile, we developed a study with 41 advertisers that offered their services in two newspapers of larger circulation in the city of Campinas, São Paulo, with the following objectives: 1. to characterize these caregivers and 2. to verify the activities proposals for care to the elderly. In the present work the referring data

  9. Questioning Care in Mental Health: Professionalization of Home Health Care Based on In Home Therapeutic Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gouveia Passos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present how to operate home health care practices. It describes  the influence of the experience given by the Italian psychiatric reform in democratic societies, with emphasis on the intervening dimensions and replacement services. The study indicates the guidelines and strategies established for the promotion of health care in individuals under psychological distress in the deinstitutionalization process. It also addresses the professionalization and the performance of caretakers in home services. Based on a review of the literature, this paper poses some questions to guide the ways outlined for the construction and establishment of professional practices by mental health caregivers.

  10. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, Nadine; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; Kringos, Dionne S.; Bouman, Ans; Francke, Anneke L.; Fagerström, Cecilia; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Cosetta; Devillé, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the

  11. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Bouman, A.; Francke, A.L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Melchiorre, M.G.; Greco, C.; Devillé, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe

  12. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Bouman, A.; Francke, A.L.; Fagerström, C.; Melchiorre, M.G.; Greco, C.; Devillé, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in

  13. At-home oral care for adults with developmental disabilities: a survey of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihan, Paula M; Morgan, John P; Park, Angel; Yantsides, Konstantina E; Nobles, Carrie J; Finkelman, Matthew D; Stark, Paul C; Must, Aviva

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about effective at-home oral care methods for people with developmental disabilities (DDs) who are unable to perform personal preventive practices themselves and rely on caregivers for assistance. A convenience sample of 808 caregivers (84.5 percent paid, 15.5 percent family members) who accompanied adults with DDs (20 years or older) to appointments at a specialized statewide dental care system completed computer-assisted personal interview surveys. The authors used these data to investigate caregivers' at-home oral care experiences and to explore differences between caregivers who were paid and those who were family members. Caregivers reported that a high proportion (85 percent) of dentate adults with DDs received assistance with tooth cleaning. They also reported a high prevalence of dental problems, and low adherence to brushing (79 percent) and flossing (22 percent) recommendations. More caregivers reported that they felt confident assisting with brushing than with flossing (85 percent versus 54 percent). Family members and paid caregivers differed with respect to confidence and training. At-home oral care, particularly flossing, presents substantial challenges for adults with DDs. Solutions must be tailored to address the different experiences and distinct needs of the family members and paid caregivers who assist these adults. Caregivers play an important role in providing at-home oral care, and they must be included in efforts to improve oral health outcomes for people with DDs.

  14. Handbook of smart homes, health care and well-being

    CERN Document Server

    Demiris, George; Wouters, Eveline

    2017-01-01

    Smart homes, home automation and ambient-assisted living are terms used to describe technological systems that enrich our living environment and provide means to support care, facilitate well-being and improve comfort. This handbook provides an overview of the domain from the perspective of health care and technology.  In Part 1, we set out to describe the demographic changes in society, including ageing, and diseases and impairments which lead to the needs for technological solutions. In Part 2, we describe the technological solutions, ranging from sensor-based networks, components, to communication protocols that are used in the design of smart homes. We also deal will biomedical features which can be measured, and services that can be delivered to end-users as well as the use of social robots.  In Part 3, we present best practices in the field. These best practices mainly focus on existing projects in Europe, the USA and Asia, in which people receive help through dedicated technological solutions being p...

  15. Quality of care in European home care programs using the second generation interRAI Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foebel, A.D.; van Hout, H.P.J.; van der Roest, H.G.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Jonsson, P.V.; Hirdes, J.P.; Bernabei, R.; Onder, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the quality of care provided to older individuals is a key step to ensure that needs are being met and to target interventions to improve care. To this aim, interRAI's second-generation home care quality indicators (HCQIs) were developed in 2013. This study assesses the

  16. Nutrition in care homes and home care: How to implement adequate strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvanitakis, M.; Beck, Anne Marie; Coppens, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background & aims: Undernutrition in home care and care home settings is an unrecognized problem with significant consequences. The present work was edited after a forum concerning nutrition in these settings was held in Brussels in order to tackle the problem. Methods: Various aspects of the que......Background & aims: Undernutrition in home care and care home settings is an unrecognized problem with significant consequences. The present work was edited after a forum concerning nutrition in these settings was held in Brussels in order to tackle the problem. Methods: Various aspects...... are various: medical, social, environmental, organizational and financial. Lack of alertness of individuals, their relatives and health-care professionals play an important role. Undernutrition enhances the risk of infection, hospitalization, mortality and alter the quality of life. Moreover, undernutrition...... related-disease is an economic burden in most countries. Nutritional assessment should be part of routine global management. Nutritional support combined with physical training and an improved ambiance during meats is mandatory. Awareness, information and collaboration with all the stakeholders should...

  17. Relaying experiences for care home design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses organizational planning and decision making as situated material-semiotic practices in which various local and non-local meaningful elements (e.g. texts and photos) are invocated and resemiotized. The discussion is based on an analysis of a seminar meeting where different...... stakeholders (researchers, family members, etc.) could put forward their ideas and wishes about the facilities of a soon-to-be-built care home for people with brain injury. In other words, the seminar was part of a wider diagnostic endeavor that was to be started in a specially designed building. The future...

  18. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period.

  19. Family Satisfaction With Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Tetyana P; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Gaugler, Joseph E; Held, Robert; Kane, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the factor structure of a new family satisfaction with nursing home care instrument and determines the relationship of resident quality of life (QOL) and facility characteristics with family satisfaction. Data sources include (1) family satisfaction interviews ( n = 16,790 family members), (2) multidimensional survey of resident QOL ( n = 13,433 residents), and (3) facility characteristics ( n = 376 facilities). We used factor analysis to identify domains of family satisfaction and multivariate analyses to identify the role of facility-level characteristics and resident QOL on facility-mean values of family satisfaction. Four distinct domains were identified for family satisfaction: "care," "staff," "environment," and "food." Chain affiliation, higher resident acuity, more deficiencies, and large size were all associated with less family satisfaction, and resident QOL was a significant (albeit weak) predictor of family satisfaction. Results suggest that family member satisfaction is distinct from resident QOL but is associated with resident QOL and facility characteristics.

  20. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care... solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities... services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day health care to...

  1. Testing of the voice communication in smart home care

    OpenAIRE

    Vaňuš, Jan; Smolon, Marek; Martinek, Radek; Koziorek, Jiří; Žídek, Jan; Bilík, Petr

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed to describe the method of testing the implementation of voice control over operating and technical functions of Smart Home Come. Custom control over operating and technical functions was implemented into a model of Smart Home that was equipped with KNX technology. A sociological survey focused on the needs of seniors has been carried out to justify the implementation of voice control into Smart Home Care. In the real environment of Smart Home Care, there are usually unwa...

  2. Aspects of family-managed care at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik

    More and more care, for example of older adults, is performed at home. Municipality home-care workers and novel technologies support this translocation of care. At home, an important care provider is also the immediate family. A recent trend is to formalize this volunteer-, and family-based care....... However, this formalization requires new support systems for collaboration and communication. Also, when informal care turns formal there is a risk that a caring family-member might have to give up professional goals such as a career, or suffer economically as one may not be able to work fulltime while...

  3. Organizational home care models across Europe: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eenoo, Liza; van der Roest, Henriëtte; Onder, Graziano; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Jonsson, Palmi V; Draisma, Stasja; van Hout, Hein; Declercq, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Decision makers are searching for models to redesign home care and to organize health care in a more sustainable way. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize home care models within and across European countries by means of structural characteristics and care processes at the policy and the organization level. At the policy level, variables that reflected variation in health care policy were included based on a literature review on the home care policy for older persons in six European countries: Belgium, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, and the Netherlands. At the organizational level, data on the structural characteristics and the care processes were collected from 36 home care organizations by means of a survey. Data were collected between 2013 and 2015 during the IBenC project. An observational, cross sectional, quantitative design was used. The analyses consisted of a principal component analysis followed by a hierarchical cluster analysis. Fifteen variables at the organizational level, spread across three components, explained 75.4% of the total variance. The three components made it possible to distribute home care organizations into six care models that differ on the level of patient-centered care delivery, the availability of specialized care professionals, and the level of monitoring care performance. Policy level variables did not contribute to distinguishing between home care models. Six home care models were identified and characterized. These models can be used to describe best practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Death in the nursing home: an examination of grief and well-being in nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Keith A; Ewen, Heidi H

    2011-04-01

    The grief that nurses experience when patients and residents die can be complex and has been linked to both problematic (e.g., depression) and beneficial (e.g., gains in coping) outcomes. In this study, 380 nursing assistants working in the nursing home setting were surveyed to gain an understanding of the relationship between grief and well-being. Findings indicated that participants experienced both distress and growth in their grief. Those who experienced greater distress from grief reported significantly higher levels of burnout and lower levels of psychological and physical well-being. Conversely, participants who experienced greater growth from their grief reported significantly lower levels of burnout, higher levels of psychological and physical well-being, and higher levels of job satisfaction. These findings suggest that grief may be an important determinant of well-being in nursing assistants, which, in turn, may impact quality of care in the nursing home. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Ethics and safety in home care: perspectives on home support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Janet; Curry, Cherie Geering; Stevenson, Lynn; Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella

    2014-03-01

    Home support workers (HSWs) encounter unique safety issues in their provision of home care. These issues raise ethical concerns, affecting the care workers provide to seniors and other recipients. This paper is derived from a subproject of a larger Canada-wide study, Safety at Home: A Pan-Canadian Home Care Safety Study, released in June 2013 by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Semi-structured, face-to-face, audiotaped interviews were conducted with providers, clients and informal caregivers in British Columbia, Manitoba and New Brunswick to better understand their perceptions of patient safety in home care. Using the BC data only, we then compared our findings to findings of other BC studies focusing on safety in home care that were conducted over the past decade. Through our interviews and comparative analyses it became clear that HSWs experienced significant inequities in providing home care. Utilizing a model depicting concerns of and for HSWs developed by Craven and colleagues (2012), we were able to illustrate the physical, spatial, interpersonal and temporal concerns set in the context of system design that emphasized the ethical dilemmas of HSWs in home care. Our data suggested the necessity of adding a fifth domain, organizational (system design). In this paper, we issue a call for stronger advocacy for home care and improved collaboration and resource equity between institutional care and community care.

  6. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and...

  7. Attitudes of palliative home care physicians towards palliative sedation at home in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home. One hundred and fifty participants responded. A large heterogeneity of home care organizations that generate some problems was found. Indications, intention and monitoring of PS seem to be appropriate, although some cultural and logistic conditions were limiting the use of PS. Specialized home care physicians are almost involved to start PS at home. Midazolam was seldom available at home and opioids were more frequently used. These data should prompt health care agencies to make a minimal set of drugs easily available for home care. Further research is necessary to compare attitudes in countries with different sociocultural profiles.

  8. Challenges and Opportunities for Collaborative Technologies for Home Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Grönvall, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This article offers an exploration of home care work and the design of computational devices in support of such work. We present findings from a field study and four participatory design workshops. Themes emerging from the findings suggest that home care work may be highly cooperative in nature....... The themes emerging are used to elicit a number of design implications and to promote some illustrative design concepts for new devices in support of cooperative home care work....

  9. Challenges of improving oral health for adults in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Victoria

    2017-08-31

    In 2016 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a guideline on oral health for adults in care homes in England. The author was a co-opted member of the NICE oral health for adults in care homes public health advisory committee. This article reviews the NICE guideline as it applies to care homes, and relates it to the results of a survey of oral care practice undertaken in a large care home organisation and the available research literature from the past 20 years. The literature and survey results suggest that, if translated into practice, the NICE guideline could do much to improve oral health for adults in care homes. The survey highlighted that 85% of residents required support from carers to undertake mouth care. It also found that care homes experienced significant difficulties in accessing dental services for residents. The author concludes that providers need to equip staff with the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake mouth care and to give this area of personal care greater priority. Finally, the author suggests that the Care Quality Commission could ensure that the NICE guideline is translated into practice in care homes.

  10. How home hospice care facilitates patient and family engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Ellis C

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how patient and family engagement manifests in home hospice care. This qualitative study included interviews and observation of home hospice care with 18 patients, 11 caregivers, and 26 hospice workers in the United States. Structural factors (e.g., home setting, ample time, personal relationships), hospice worker strategies (e.g., patient education and presenting choices), and family member support facilitated engagement. Barriers to engagement included difficult relationships and unavailable or unwilling family members. Home hospice care demonstrates potential strategies for continuous, informed, and holistic engagement. These engagement strategies may translate to other arenas of health care.

  11. Variations in quality of home care between sites across Europe, as measured by Home Care Quality Indicators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.T.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Wagner, C.; Carpenter, I.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Henrard, J.C.; Jonsson, P.V.; Sorbye, l.; Ljunggren, G.; Schroll, M.; Gambassi, G.; Bernabei, R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in the proportion of elderly people and a consequent increase in the demand for care have caused healthcare systems to become overloaded. This paper describes the use of Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs), derived from the Minimum Data Set for Home Care, for

  12. Variations in quality of Home Care between sites across Europe, as measured by Home Care Quality Indicators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.T.; Frijters, D.H.; Wagner, C.; Carpenter, G.I.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Henrard, J.C.; Jonsson, P.V.; Sorbye, L.; Ljunggren, G.; Schroll, M.; Gambassi, G.; Bernabei, R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in the proportion of elderly people and a consequent increase in the demand for care have caused healthcare systems to become overloaded. This paper describes the use of Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs), derived from the Minimum Data Set for Home Care, for

  13. German nursing home professionals' knowledge and specific self-efficacy related to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, David; Markett, Sebastian; Müller, Monika; Müller, Sigrun; Grützner, Felix; Rolke, Roman; Kern, Martina; Schmidt-Wolf, Gabriele; Radbruch, Lukas

    2013-07-01

    In Germany, more and more terminally ill patients spend their last days of life in nursing homes, and this presents a challenge for these institutions. Even though palliative care is a growing domain in health care, no quantitative in-depth evaluations of the status quo in nursing homes has been conducted so far in Germany, partly because of lacking measuring tools. This study used a new questionnaire to assess German health care professionals' theoretical knowledge of palliative care and their perceived self-efficacy. Both variables have been proven to be indicators for the quality of the implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. We used the Bonn Palliative Care Knowledge Test (Bonner Palliativwissenstest, BPW) questionnaire to measure knowledge of palliative care in the domains of medicine, care, and psychosocial care and to measure self-efficacy relating to palliative care. Care workers (N=130) in five nursing homes in the region of Aachen in western Germany answered the questionnaires. The results show low knowledge (on average 52.8% correct answers) and self-efficacy relating to palliative care, although work with dying people is their daily challenge. While general knowledge correlated with work experience, a negative correlation of specific self-efficacy with age and working experience was observed. Lower self-efficacy of care workers experienced in palliative care probably implies that the difficulty of palliative care skills is underestimated by inexperienced care workers. Palliative care training is urgently needed to improve knowledge and self-efficacy. Guidance to assist care professionals involved in palliative care in nursing homes needs to be developed and provided.

  14. Sensor Network Infrastructure for a Home Care Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Palumbo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the sensor network infrastructure for a home care system that allows long-term monitoring of physiological data and everyday activities. The aim of the proposed system is to allow the elderly to live longer in their home without compromising safety and ensuring the detection of health problems. The system offers the possibility of a virtual visit via a teleoperated robot. During the visit, physiological data and activities occurring during a period of time can be discussed. These data are collected from physiological sensors (e.g., temperature, blood pressure, glucose and environmental sensors (e.g., motion, bed/chair occupancy, electrical usage. The system can also give alarms if sudden problems occur, like a fall, and warnings based on more long-term trends, such as the deterioration of health being detected. It has been implemented and tested in a test environment and has been deployed in six real homes for a year-long evaluation. The key contribution of the paper is the presentation of an implemented system for ambient assisted living (AAL tested in a real environment, combining the acquisition of sensor data, a flexible and adaptable middleware compliant with the OSGistandard and a context recognition application. The system has been developed in a European project called GiraffPlus.

  15. Exploring new operational research opportunities within the Home Care context: the chemotherapy at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahed, Salma; Marcon, Eric; Sahin, Evren; Feillet, Dominique; Dallery, Yves

    2009-06-01

    Home Care (HC) services provide complex and coordinated medical and paramedical care to patients at their homes. As health care services move into the home setting, the need for developing innovative approaches that improve the efficiency of home care organizations increases. We first conduct a literature review of investigations dealing with operation planning within the area of home care management. We then address a particular issue dealing with the planning of operations related to chemotherapy at home as it is an emergent problem in the French context. Our interest is focused on issues specific to the anti-cancer drug supply chain. We identify various models that can be developed and analyze one of them.

  16. Pervasive Home Care - Technological support for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo

    2006-01-01

    approach that I outline in this dissertation. Furthermore I describe the results of the project contributing to three related scientific fields: home care technologies, telemedicine and computer supported cooperative work (CSCW). The main conclusion towards home care technologies is that the many visionary...... the need arises for moving treatment and care involving specialised knowledge from the hospital to the home. In this dissertation I use the term Home Care" for the multidisciplinary investigation of how this movement can be supported with technology enabling the expert to carry on a treatment in the home...... of the patient in collaboration with patient and home care clinicians. My main research method has been qualitative analysis of the empirical results generated during an experimental project using Participatory Design (PD) to investigate potential futures in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers...

  17. Nurse Preparation and Organizational Support for Supervision of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Nursing Homes: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Elena O.; Young, Heather M.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Shannon, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing supervision of the routine daily care (e.g., grooming, feeding, and toileting) that is delegated to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) is critical to nursing home service delivery. The conditions under which the supervisory role is organized and operationalized at the work-unit level, taking into account workloads, registered…

  18. Medical Foster Homes: Can the Adult Foster Care Model Substitute for Nursing Home Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    To compare characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of care of veterans in the rapidly expanding Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical foster home (MFH) with those of three other VHA long-term care (LTC) programs. Descriptive, unmatched study. VHA MFHs, home-based primary care (HBPC), community living centers (CLCs), and community nursing homes (CNHs). Veterans newly enrolled in one of the four LTC settings in calendar years 2010 or 2011. Using VA and Medicare data from fiscal years 2010 and 2011, demographic characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of 388 veterans in MFHs were compared with 26,037 of those in HBPC, 5,355 in CLCs, and 5,517 in CNHs in the year before and the year after enrollment. Veterans enrolled in the MFH program were more likely to be unmarried than those in other LTC programs and had higher levels of comorbidity and frailty than veterans receiving HBPC but had similar levels of comorbidity, frailty, and healthcare use as those in CLCs and CNHs. MFH veterans incurred lower costs than those in CNHs and CLCs. MFHs served a distinct subset of veterans with levels of comorbidity and frailty similar to those of veterans cared for in CLCs and CNHs at costs that were comparable to or lower than those of the VHA. Propensity-matched comparisons will be necessary to confirm these findings. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Inclusive design for a care home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Nordic Conference on Activity Theory and the Forth Finnish Conference on Cultural and Activity Research (FISCAR10) Proceedings ISBN 987-952-60-0021-3 p. 160 INCLUSIVE DESIGN FOR A CARE HOME Pirkko Raudaskoski The paper discusses the methodological challenges of both theorizing and implementing...... communication skills with language or by other means. Instead, others will have to mediate their experiences. These accounts are necessarily (value-laden) transformations that can be problematic also due to the sudden identity change for the occupant from a ‘normal’ person to a ‘disabled’ person and the wish...... for the people around to restore the ‘old version’ of the person. Is there space for disability advocacy in this environment? Büscher, M., O’Neille, J., Rooksby, J. 2009. Designing for diagnosing. CSCW 18. Keinonen, T. 2007. Immediate, product and remote design. IASDR07....

  20. Practices of Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home Health Clinician Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Sheeran, Thomas F; Bruce, Martha L

    2015-12-01

    The study assessed gaps between published best practices and real-world practices of treating depression in home health care (HHC) and barriers to closing gaps. The qualitative study used semistructured interviews with nurses and administrators (N=20) from five HHC agencies in five states. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed by a multidisciplinary team using grounded theory method to identify themes. Routine HHC nursing overlapped with all functional areas of depression care. However, gaps were noted between best and real-world practices. Gaps were associated with perceived scope of practice by HHC nurses, knowledge gaps and low self-efficacy in depression treatment, stigma attached to depression, poor quality of antidepressant management in primary care, and poor communication between HHC and primary care clinicians. Strategies to close gaps between typical and best practices include enhancing HHC clinicians' knowledge and self-efficacy with depression treatment and improving the quality of antidepressant management and communication with primary care.

  1. Shared Caregiving: Comparisons between Home and Child-Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Lieselotte; Rickert, Heike; Lamb, Michael E.

    2000-01-01

    Described experiences of 84 German toddlers enrolled or not enrolled in child care. Found total amount of care per weekday did not differ by child-care status; child-care toddlers received lower care levels from center providers; their mothers engaged in more social interactions during nonworking hours than did mothers of home-only toddlers; and…

  2. Practical care work and existential issues in palliative care: experiences of nursing assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsberg, Elizabeth; Carlsson, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Despite increasing international interest in palliative care, little focus has been given to the role of nursing assistants, nor to research on existential issues. To investigate nursing assistants' experiences of existential issues in palliative care. An explorative study using focus group discussions as data. Seven nursing assistants working in a palliative care unit and a nursing home participated on three occasions. Data were analysed using a content analysis approach. Two overlapping domains were extracted: practical care, interpreted in themes as meeting others, the patient's body and organisational boundaries; and existential issues, interpreted as the difficult part, the valuable part and death and dying. Communication seemed to be a theme central to both domains. The results indicate that nursing assistants may give existential support in addition to practical aspects of care. The intimate interactions inherent in practical aspects of personal care create opportunities for meaningful conversations. Such conversations may constitute existential support for patients and a meaningful task for staff. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Explaining regional variation in home care use by demand and supply variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Leendert Olivier; Schotanus, Fredo; van der Klundert, Joris; Telgen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands, home care services like district nursing and personal assistance are provided by private service provider organizations and covered by private health insurance companies which bear legal responsibility for purchasing these services. To improve value for money, their procurement

  4. 45 CFR 1356.30 - Safety requirements for foster care and adoptive home providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... against a child or children (including child pornography); or, (4) A crime involving violence, including... ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND... made on behalf of a child placed in a foster home operated under the auspices of a child placing agency...

  5. The care home activity project: does introducing an occupational therapy programme reduce depression in care homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, C G; Schneider, J; Cordingley, L; Molineux, M; Duggan, S; Hart, C; Stoker, B; Williamson, R; Lovegrove, R; Cruickshank, A

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that depression severity in care homes for older people would be reduced by an occupational therapy programme. This was a feasibility study for a cluster randomised controlled trial and involved four intervention and four control homes in northern England. In each intervention home a registered occupational therapist worked full-time for one year delivering an individualised programme to participants. Pre- and post-intervention data for the Geriatric Mental State-Depression Scale (primary outcome measure) were obtained for 143 participants. Secondary outcomes included dependency and quality of life. No significant intervention effects were found in any of the quantitative outcome measures, though qualitative interviews showed the intervention was valued by many participants, staff and relatives. Therapist ratings and qualitative interviews suggested that the intervention was beneficial to some participants but no distinctive characteristics were found that might enable prediction of likely benefit on initial assessment. This exploratory study provides no evidence that this intervention produced benefits in terms of depression, dependency or quality of life. Lack of prior power calculations means these are not definitive findings; but numbers were sufficient to perform the required analyses and data did not suggest effects that would have reached statistical significance with a larger sample. This study highlights issues for consideration in providing such services in care homes.

  6. Home care nursing orientation model. Justification and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, C J; Milone-Nuzzo, P

    1992-01-01

    An orientation program for new nurses in a home care agency can be an effective tool that increases job satisfaction, alleviates a potentially high employee attrition rate, boosts morale, and thereby improves overall quality of patient care.

  7. Information persistence services designed to support home care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocha, Nelson Pacheco; Queirós, Alexandra; Augusto, Filipe; Rodríguez, Yosvany Llerena; Cardoso, Carlos; Grade, José Miguel; Quintas, João

    2015-01-01

    Due to the challenges faced by health and social care systems, in particular those related to actual demographic trends, home care emerges as a potentially cost-effective solution to answer the needs...

  8. Integration home care in the care chain: results from the EURHOMAP study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Demand for home care is expected to rise sharply across Europe as a result of trends of reduced institutional care and the ageing of populations. The increased volume and complexity in home care will challenge the coordination of services delivered in the home situation and the

  9. Home care in Austria: the interplay of family orientation, cash-for-care and migrant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österle, August; Bauer, Gudrun

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses the development of the home care sector in Austria. It analyses what impacts the interplay of the traditional family orientation to care, a universal cash-for-care scheme (reaching about 5% of the population) and a growing migrant care sector have on formal home care in Austria. The article is based on an analysis of research papers, policy documents and statistical data covering the period from the introduction of the cash-for-care scheme in 1993 up to 2011. Some authors have argued that generous cash benefits with no direct link to service use - as in the case of Austria - limit the development of home care, particularly in countries with a traditionally strong family orientation towards long-term care. Additionally, a tradition of family care and an emphasis on cash benefits may be conducive to the employment of migrant carers in private households, as a potential substitute for both family care and formal care. Despite this context, Austria has seen a substantial increase in formal home care over the past two decades. This has been driven by clients using their increased purchasing power and by policy priorities emphasising the extension of home care. Migrant care work was regularised in 2007, and the analysis suggests that while migrant care has usually worked as a substitute for other care arrangements, migrant care can also become a more integral element of care schemes. The article concludes that family orientation, unconditional cash benefits and the use of migrant carers do not necessarily preclude the development of a strong social service sector. However, there is a risk that budgetary limitations will primarily affect social service development. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of Home Health Care Devices: Remote Usability Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortum, Philip; Peres, S Camille

    2015-06-05

    An increasing amount of health care is now performed in a home setting, away from the hospital. While there is growing anecdotal evidence about the difficulty patients and caregivers have using increasingly complex health care devices in the home, there has been little systematic scientific study to quantify the global nature of home health care device usability in the field. Research has tended to focus on a handful of devices, making it difficult to gain a broad view of the usability of home-care devices in general. The objective of this paper is to describe a remote usability assessment method using the System Usability Scale (SUS), and to report on the usability of a broad range of health care devices using this metric. A total of 271 participants selected and rated up to 10 home health care devices of their choice using the SUS, which scores usability from 0 (unusable) to 100 (highly usable). Participants rated a total of 455 devices in their own home without an experimenter present. Usability scores ranged from 98 (oxygen masks) to 59 (home hormone test kits). An analysis conducted on devices that had at least 10 ratings showed that the effect of device on SUS scores was significant (Pusability of these devices was on the low end when compared with other commonly used items in the home, such as microwave ovens and telephones. A large database of usability scores for home health care devices collected using this remote methodology would be beneficial for physicians, patients, and their caregivers.

  11. Exploring Relationships Among Occupational Safety, Job Turnover, and Age Among Home Care Aides in Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sandra S

    2017-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages, the number of people needing personal assistance in the home care setting is increasing dramatically. Personal care aides and home health workers are currently adding more jobs to the economy than any other single occupation. Home health workers face physically and emotionally challenging, and at times unsafe, work conditions, with turnover rates ranging from 44 percent to 65 percent annually. As part of a mixed-method, longitudinal study in Maine examining turnover, interviews with 252 home care aides were analyzed thematically. Responses to interview questions regarding the job's impact on health and safety, the adequacy of training, and the level of agency responsiveness were examined. Emergent themes, indicating some contradictory perspectives on workplace safety, quality of training, and agency support, were compared across three variables: job termination, occupational injury, and age. Implications for increasing occupational safety and job retention are discussed.

  12. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  13. [Private practice nurse and palliative care in the home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daydé, Marie-Claude

    2017-11-01

    The development of palliative care in the home, requested by patients and recommended in the 2015-2018 national plan, requires the home to be considered as a specific place of care. Private practice nurses have an important role to play with the patient and their relatives, in the assessment of needs, coordination, relational care as well as in providing the care required for maintaining and continuing life, an increasingly technical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of integrated interventions combining psychiatric care and nursing home care for nursing home residents: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Janine; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Verhey, Frans R J; Schols, Jos M G A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing home residents needing both psychiatric care and nursing home care for either somatic illness or dementia combined with psychiatric disorders or severe behavioural problems are referred to as Double Care Demanding patients, or DCD patients. Integrated models of care seem to be necessary in order to improve the well-being of these residents. Two research questions were addressed. First, which integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are described in the research literature? And second, which outcomes of integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are reported in the literature? A critical review of studies was done that involved integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care on psychiatric disorders and severe behavioural problems in nursing home patients. A systematic literature search was performed in a number of international databases. Eight intervention trials, including four RCTs (2b level of evidence), were identified as relevant studies for the purpose of this review. Seven studies, three of which were RCTs, showed beneficial effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach combining medical, psychiatric and nursing interventions on severe behavioural problems in DCD nursing home patients. Important elements of a successful treatment strategy for DCD nursing home patients include a thorough assessment of psychiatric, medical and environmental causes as well as programmes for teaching behavioural management skills to nurses. DCD nursing home patients were found to benefit from short-term mental hospital admission.This review underlines the need for more rigorously designed studies to assess the effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach towards DCD nursing home residents. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The home care teaching and learning process in undergraduate health care degree courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ana Paula; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Maftum, Mariluci Alves; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Mello, Ana Lúcia Schaefer Ferreira de

    2017-07-01

    Home care, one of the services provided by the health system, requires health practitioners who are capable of understanding its specificities. This study aimed to build a substantive theory that describes experiences of home care teaching and learning during undergraduate degree courses in nursing, pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, dentistry and occupational therapy. A qualitative analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach based on the results of 63 semistructured interviews conducted with final year students, professors who taught subjects related to home care, and recent graduates working with home care, all participants in the above courses. The data was analyzed in three stages - open coding, axial coding and selective coding - resulting in the phenomenon Experiences of home care teaching and learning during the undergraduate health care degree courses. Its causes were described in the category Articulating knowledge of home care, strategies in the category Experiencing the unique nature of home care, intervening conditions in the category Understanding the multidimensional characteristics of home care, consequences in the category Changing thinking about home care training, and context in the category Understanding home care in the health system. Home care contributes towards the decentralization of hospital care.

  16. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  17. The prevalence, incidence and risk factors for delirium in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, M.; Joling, K.J.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Nijpels, G.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate and compare the prevalence and incidence of delirium and its risk factors in residents of Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes. Methods Data were extracted from the Long-Term Care Facility (inter RAI-LTCF) version of the Resident Assessment Instrument, which was

  18. Assessment of Anxiety in Older Home Care Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Tolin, David F.; Meunier, Suzanne A.; Gilliam, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined the psychometric properties of a variety of anxiety measures administered to older adults receiving home care services. Design and Methods: Data were collected from 66 adults aged 65 years and older who were receiving home care services. Participants completed self-report and clinician-rated measures of anxiety and…

  19. Factors influencing home care nurse intention to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Patterson, Erin; Rowe, Alissa; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; MacDonald, Geraldine; Cranley, Lisa; Squires, Mae

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors affecting Canadian home care nurse intention to remain employed (ITR). In developed nations, healthcare continues to shift into community settings. Although considerable research exists on examining nurse ITR in hospitals, similar research related to nurses employed in home care is limited. In the face of a global nursing shortage, it is important to understand the factors influencing nurse ITR across healthcare sectors. A qualitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Focus groups were conducted with home care nurses. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Six categories of influencing factors were identified by home care nurses as affecting ITR: job characteristics; work structures; relationships/communication; work environment; nurse responses to work; and employment conditions. Findings suggest the following factors influence home care nurse ITR: having autonomy; flexible scheduling; reasonable and varied workloads; supportive work relationships; and receiving adequate pay and benefits. Home care nurses did not identify job satisfaction as a single concept influencing ITR. Home care nursing management should support nurse autonomy, allow flexible scheduling, promote reasonable workloads and create opportunities for team building that strengthen supportive relationships among home care nurses and other health team members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Technological advances and hospital-at-home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, Vittoria; Aimonino Ricauda, Nicoletta; Rocco, Maurizio; Bertone, Paola; Fanton, Giordano; Isaia, Giancarlo

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the miniaturization and portability of diagnostic technologies, information technologies, remote monitoring, and long-distance care have increased the viability of home-based care, even for patients with serious conditions. Telemedicine and teleradiology projects are active at the Hospital at Home Service of Torino.

  1. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  2. Nonemergency Acute Care: When It's Not the Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Gregory P; Kressly, Susan J; Perrin, James M; Richerson, Julia E; Sankrithi, Usha M

    2017-05-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) affirms that the optimal location for children to receive care for acute, nonemergency health concerns is the medical home. The medical home is characterized by the AAP as a care model that "must be accessible, family centered, continuous, comprehensive, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective." However, some children and families use acute care services outside the medical home because there is a perceived or real benefit related to accessibility, convenience, or cost of care. Examples of such acute care entities include urgent care facilities, retail-based clinics, and commercial telemedicine services. Children deserve high-quality, appropriate, and safe acute care services wherever they access the health care system, with timely and complete communication with the medical home, to ensure coordinated and continuous care. Treatment of children under established, new, and evolving practice arrangements in acute care entities should adhere to the core principles of continuity of care and communication, best practices within a defined scope of services, pediatric-trained staff, safe transitions of care, and continuous improvement. In support of the medical home, the AAP urges stakeholders, including payers, to avoid any incentives (eg, reduced copays) that encourage visits to external entities for acute issues as a preference over the medical home. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. The innovative use of Six Sigma in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberfeld, Adrienne; Bennis, Sandra; Ritzius, Jeannie; Yhlen, David

    2007-01-01

    The Prospective Payment System had significant impact on home healthcare agencies throughout the nation. Virtua Home Care, located in Southern New Jersey, realized the need for process improvement in order to remain viable. Six Sigma was introduced to the agency and the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control processes were initiated to achieve sustainable results, and within 9 months, Virtua Home Care improved regulatory compliance, experienced a deficiency-free survey, and recognized a 1.2 million dollars financial gain.

  4. Quality of care in European home care programs using the second generation interRAI Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foebel, Andrea D; van Hout, Hein P; van der Roest, Henriëtte G; Topinkova, Eva; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Frijters, Dinnus; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Jónsson, Pálmi V; Hirdes, John P; Bernabei, Roberto; Onder, Graziano

    2015-11-14

    Evaluating the quality of care provided to older individuals is a key step to ensure that needs are being met and to target interventions to improve care. To this aim, interRAI's second-generation home care quality indicators (HCQIs) were developed in 2013. This study assesses the quality of home care services in six European countries using these HCQIs as well as the two derived summary scales. Data for this study were derived from the Aged in Home Care (AdHOC) study - a cohort study that examined different models of community care in European countries. The current study selected a sub-sample of the AdHOC cohort from six countries whose follow-up data were complete (Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands). Data were collected from the interRAI Home Care instrument (RAI-HC) between 2000 and 2002. The 23 HCQIs of interest were determined according to previously established methodology, including risk adjustment. Two summary measures, the Clinical Balance Scale and Independence Quality Scale were also determined using established methodology. A total of 1,354 individuals from the AdHOC study were included in these analyses. Of the 23 HCQIs that were measured, the highest proportion of individuals experienced declines in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) (48.4 %). Of the clinical quality indicators, mood decline was the most prevalent (30.0 %), while no flu vaccination and being alone and distressed were the most prevalent procedural and social quality indicators, respectively (33.4 and 12.8 %). Scores on the two summary scales varied by country, but were concentrated around the median mark. The interRAI HCQIs can be used to determine the quality of home care services in Europe and identify areas for improvement. Our results suggest functional declines may prove the most beneficial targets for interventions.

  5. Cost Analysis of Physician Assistant Home Visit Program to Reduce Readmissions After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabagiez, John P; Shariff, Masood A; Molloy, William J; Demissie, Seleshi; McGinn, Joseph T

    2016-09-01

    A physician assistant home care (PAHC) program providing house calls was initiated to reduce hospital readmissions after adult cardiac surgery. The purpose of our study was to compare 30-day PAHC and pre-PAHC readmission rate, length of stay, and cost. Patients who underwent adult cardiac surgery in the 48 months from September 2008 through August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using pre-PAHC patients as the control group. Readmission rate, length of stay, and health care cost, as measured by hospital billing, were compared between groups matched with propensity score. Of the 1,185 patients who were discharged directly home, 155 (13%) were readmitted. Total readmissions for the control group (n = 648) was 101 patients (16%) compared with the PAHC group (n = 537) total readmissions of 54 (10%), a 38% reduction in the rate of readmission (p = 0.0049). Propensity score matched groups showed a rate reduction of 41% with 17% (62 of 363) for the control compared with 10% (37 of 363) for the PAHC group (p = 0.0061). The average hospital bill per readmission was $39,100 for the control group and $56,600 for the PAHC group (p = 0.0547). The cost of providing home visits was $25,300 for 363 propensity score matched patients. The PAHC program reduced the 30-day readmission rate by 41% for propensity score matched patients. Analysis demonstrated a savings of $977,500 at a cost of $25,300 over 2 years, or $39 in health care saved, in terms of hospital billing, for every $1 spent. Therefore, a home visit by a cardiac surgical physician assistant is a cost-effective strategy to reduce readmissions after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart failure in children - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children; Cor pulmonale - home monitoring for children; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure home monitoring for children ... PF, Lougheed J, Dancea A, et al. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: ...

  7. Structural impact on gendered expectations and exemptions for family caregivers in hospice palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Nisha; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol; Stajduhar, Kelli

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of gender differences in the amount and type of care provided by family caregivers in hospice palliative home care suggests potential inequities in health and health care experiences. As part of a larger critical ethnographic study examining gender relations among clients with cancer, their family caregivers and primary nurses, this article describes gendered expectations and exemptions for family caregivers within the sociopolitical context of end-of-life at home. Data were collected from in-depth interviews (n = 25), observations of agency home care visits (n = 9) and analyses of policy and home care agency documents (n = 12). Employing a critical feminist lens, a gender-based analysis revealed that structural discourses emphasizing an artificial divide between public and private spheres constructed end-of-life at home as private and apolitical. Associated with care of home and family, women were most impacted by these public/private discourses underpinning neoliberal values of cost-efficiency. Findings suggest that a critical perspective is needed to assist policy makers and healthcare providers to view how caregiver experiences are shaped by structures that control the availability of resources. Thus, instead of focusing on caregivers' deficits, interventions should be directed at the social, political and economic conditions that shape gendered experiences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Association of comorbidities with home care service utilization of patients with heart failure while receiving telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Bigelow, Carol; Roche, Joan P; Marquard, Jenna L; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2013-01-01

    Comorbidities adversely impact heart failure (HF) outcomes. Telehealth can assist healthcare providers, especially nurses, in guiding their patients to follow the HF regimen. However, factors, including comorbidity patterns, that act in combination with telehealth to reduce home care nursing utilization are still unclear. The purpose of this article was to examine the association of the comorbidity characteristics of HF patients with nursing utilization along with withdrawal from telehealth service during an episode of tele-home care. A descriptive, correlational study design using retrospective chart review was used. The sample comprised Medicare patients admitted to a New England home care agency who had HF as a diagnosis and had used telehealth from 2008 to 2010. The electronic documentation at the home care agency served as the data source, which included Outcome and Assessment Information Set data of patients with HF. Logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze data. The sample consisted of 403 participants, of whom 70% were older than 75 years, 55% were female, and 94% were white. Comorbidities averaged 5.19 (SD, 1.92), ranging from 1 to 11, and nearly 40% of the participants had 5 or more comorbidities. The mean (SD) nursing contacts in the sample was 9.9 (4.7), ranging from 1 to 26, and 52 (12.7%) patients withdrew from telehealth service. For patients with HF on telehealth, comorbidity characteristics of anemia, anxiety, musculoskeletal, and depression were significantly associated with nursing utilization patterns, and renal failure, cancer, and depression comorbidities were significantly associated with withdrawal from telehealth service. Knowledge of the association of comorbidity characteristics with the home care service utilization patterns of patients with HF on telehealth can assist the home health nurse to develop a tailored care plan that attains optimal patient outcomes. Knowledge of such associations would also focus home

  9. The Medical Home and Care Coordination in Disaster Recovery: Hypothesis for Interventions and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Robert K; Abramson, David M; Redlener, Irwin; Gracy, Delaney

    2015-08-01

    In postdisaster settings, health care providers encounter secondary surges of unmet primary care and mental health needs that evolve throughout disaster recovery phases. Whatever a community's predisaster adequacy of health care, postdisaster gaps are similar to those of any underserved region. We hypothesize that existing practice and evidence supporting medical homes and care coordination in primary care for the underserved provide a favorable model for improving health in disrupted communities. Elements of medical home services can be offered by local or temporary providers from outside the region, working out of mobile clinics early in disaster recovery. As repairs and reconstruction proceed, local services are restored over weeks or years. Throughout recovery, major tasks include identifying high-risk patients relative to the disaster and underlying health conditions, assisting displaced families as they transition through housing locations, and tracking their evolving access to health care and community services as they are restored. Postdisaster sources of financial assistance for the disaster-exposed population are often temporary and evolving, requiring up-to-date information to cover costs of care until stable services and insurance coverage are restored. Evidence to support disaster recovery health care improvement will require research funding and metrics on structures, processes, and outcomes of the disaster recovery medical home and care coordination, based on adaptation of standard validated methods to crisis environments.

  10. Weatherizing the Homes of Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Clients: A Programmatic Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.

    2002-09-16

    The purpose of this project was to assess the relationships between two federal programs that support low income households, the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). The specific question addressed by this research is: what impact does weatherizing homes of LIHEAP recipients have on the level of need for LIHEAP assistance? The a priori expectation is that the level of need will decrease. If this is the case, then it can be argued that a non-energy benefit of WAP is the reduction in the level of need for LIHEAP assistance for households receiving weatherization assistance. The study area for this project was Boston, Massachusetts, which is representative of large northern urban areas. Additionally, Boston was chosen because one of its social service agencies, Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD), administers both WAP and LIHEAP programs. ABCD has a substantial client base of low-income households and was willing to cooperate in this study. In the State of Massachusetts, an income test is used to determine whether low-income households qualify for standard LIHEAP benefits. Benefits provided to eligible households are determined by a schedule that gauges benefit levels based on household income and number of members in the household. Additionally, households that consume large amounts of primary heating fuel can also qualify an additional high energy subsidy. It was expected that weatherization's biggest influence on the LIHEAP program would be in reducing the number of households qualifying for high energy subsidies. Data were collected for three groups of households that received both weatherization and LIHEAP assistance and for one control group that only received LIHEAP assistance. Table ES-1 indicates the sample sizes, weatherization dates, and winter time periods when changes in energy consumption and receipt of LIHEAP benefits could be expected to be observed. The reason why there is

  11. A home assistance model for dementia: outcome in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease after three months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Carbone

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of dementias, which are currently incurable pathologies, requires an approach to care that involves both the patients and their families. The effect of alternative interventions, besides the pharmacological approach, therefore warrants evaluation. In this paper, we describe one such intervention, which was provided by our home care team for Alzheimer's Disease. Patients were granted a three-month period of home care assistance, which included physical and cognitive rehabilitation as well as interventions on the home environment and the family, such as psychological support for the main caregivers. The assistance was provided in thrice-weekly sessions, each lasting six hours. Twenty-two patients (age 78.4±6.5 yrs, all of whom had received a diagnosis of probable AD, were enrolled. There was a statistically significant improvement in the NPI score (p = 0.004, Barthel index (p = 0.01, Tinetti's scale (p = 0.013 and CBI score (p = 0.016 at the end of the 3-month treatment period. The patients' caregivers also reported a significant improvement in the physical and social burden at the CBI at the end of the period of home care assistance (p = 0.026 and p = 0.006. In a further evaluation performed 3 months after the end of the treatment period, the beneficial effect previously observed in both patients and caregivers was no longer present.

  12. A measure of palliative care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Bott, Marjorie; Boyle, Diane; Gajewski, Byron; Tilden, Virginia P

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to improve care for nursing home residents stand to be enhanced by measures to assess the degree to which staff provide palliative care. As the incidence of death in nursing homes increases with the aging population, the gap in measurement must be addressed. To that end, we report the development and psychometric testing of a nursing home palliative care survey. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Palliative Care Survey (PCS) for use in nursing homes. Psychometric evaluation of the instrument was completed in two phases. Phase 1 focused on individual item analyses and subsequent revision or deletion of items, and Phase 2 evaluated evidence for reliability and validity. Phase 1 included 26 nursing homes and staff (n=717), and Phase 2 included 85 nursing homes and staff (n=2779). Data were analyzed using item-total correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analysis, and analysis of variance. Support was obtained for a 51-item PCS made up of two constructs, Palliative Care Practice and Palliative Care Knowledge. The PCS measures the extent to which the nursing home staff engage in palliative care practices and have knowledge consistent with good end-of-life care. Both practice and knowledge are an essential foundation to providing good end-of-life care to nursing home residents. Efforts to improve care for the dying in nursing homes have been slowed by an absence of measurement tools that capture care processes, a gap that the PCS reported here helps fill. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Choice of Expiration for Cancer Patients under Home Medical Care - Palliative Care Unit or Home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Takashi; Okagaki, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Okino, Akie

    2015-12-01

    Kohka Public Hospital(KPH)was rebuilt at a new place in April 2013. The Palliative Care Unit(PCU)was newly constructed during renovation. We examined the will and outcome of cancer patients, especially on expiration. A 123 patients died in 2014: 27 died at the PCU, and the remaining 7 at home. Of 27 patients, 20 were willing to die at the PCU, and one patient visited the hospital after judgment by the Visiting Nurse Center. Other 6 patients were admitted finally after their families experienced fatigue. Six of seven patients who died at home, showed a strong will to stay at home. We think that patients' will drives the clinical course, especially in their end-stage. In this context, the majority of the patients decided their terminal place based on their will. On the contrary, there were several cases whose requests were not fulfilled. To overcome the problem, we should discuss cancer patients' will to make a choice regarding death at the end-stage of their lives and the place of expiration in advance. We including the staff of social care and regional medical resources, should co-operate and share information on these patients to solve the problems.

  14. Quality assessment of palliative home care in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaccabarozzi, Gianlorenzo; Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio; Limonta, Fabrizio; Floriani, Maddalena; Pellegrini, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The complexity of end-of-life care, represented by a large number of units caring for dying patients, of different types of organizations motivates the importance of measure the quality of provided care. Despite the law 38/2010 promulgated to remove the barriers and provide affordable access to palliative care, measurement, and monitoring of processes of home care providers in Italy has not been attempted. Using data drawn by an institutional voluntary observatory established in Italy in 2013, collecting home palliative care units caring for people between January and December 2013, we assess the degree to which Italian home palliative care teams endorse a set of standards required by the 38/2010 law and best practices as emerged from the literature. The evaluation strategy is based on Rasch analysis, allowing to objectively measuring both performances of facilities and quality indicators' difficulty on the same metric, using 14 quality indicators identified by the observatory's steering committee. Globally, 195 home care teams were registered in the observatory reporting globally 40 955 cured patients in 2013 representing 66% of the population of home palliative care units active in Italy in 2013. Rasch analysis identifies 5 indicators ("interview" with caregivers, continuous training provided to medical and nursing staff, provision of specialized multidisciplinary interventions, psychological support to the patient and family, and drug supply at home) easy to endorse by health care providers and 3 problematic indicators (presence of a formally established Local Network of Palliative care in the area of reference, provision of the care for most problematic patient requiring high intensity of the care, and the percentage of cancer patient dying at Home). The lack of Local Network of Palliative care, required by law 38/2010, is, at the present, the main barrier to its application. However, the adopted methodology suggests that a clear roadmap for health facilities

  15. Essential newborn care after home delivery in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Målqvist, Mats; Pun, Asha; Kc, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    Postnatal care of the newborn is essential in order to reduce neonatal mortality. Nepal has made great efforts to improve maternal and child health by focusing on accessibility and outreach over the past decades. This study aims to examine trends, over the past decade, in levels and equity of facility delivery rates and the provision of newborn care after home delivery in Nepal. Household-level data from the Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) 2006 and 2011 and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS5) from 2014 performed in Nepal was sourced for the study. Coverage rates of facility delivery and newborn care after home delivery were calculated and logistic regression models were used to ascertain inequity. Home delivery rate dropped from 79.2% in 2006 to 46.5% in 2014, a development showing an inequitable distribution, with a larger share of better-off families shifting to facility delivery. For those who still delivered at home there was an increased rate of early initiation of breastfeeding and adequate temperature control, but only 2.2% of women delivering at home received a home visit by a health professional in the first week of delivery. No inequity in receiving newborn care after home delivery could be detected. There have been significant improvements in facility delivery rates over the last 10 years in Nepal and postnatal care at home has improved. There is, however, an alarmingly low level of home visits during an infant's first week.

  16. Realising dignity in care home practice: an action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ann; Curtis, Katherine; Dunn, Michael; Baillie, Lesley

    2017-06-01

    More than 400,000 older people reside in over 18,000 care homes in England. A recent social care survey found up to 50% of older people in care homes felt their dignity was undermined. Upholding the dignity of older people in care homes has implications for residents' experiences and the role of Registered Nurses. The study aimed to explore how best to translate the concept of dignity into care home practice, and how to support this translation process by enabling Registered Nurses to provide ethical leadership within the care home setting. Action research with groups of staff (Registered Nurses and non-registered caregivers) and groups of residents and relatives in four care homes in the south of England to contribute to the development of the dignity toolkit. Action research groups were facilitated by 4 researchers (2 in each care home) to discuss dignity principles and experiences within care homes. These groups reviewed and developed a dignity toolkit over six cycles of activity (once a month for 6 months). The Registered Nurses were individually interviewed before and after the activity. Hard copy and online versions of a dignity toolkit, with tailored versions for participating care homes, were developed. Registered Nurses and caregivers identified positive impact of making time for discussion about dignity-related issues. Registered Nurses identified ongoing opportunities for using their toolkit to support all staff. Nurses and caregivers expressed feelings of empowerment by the process of action research. The collaborative development of a dignity toolkit within each care home has the potential to enable ethical leadership by Registered Nurses that would support and sustain dignity in care homes. Action research methods empower staff to maintain dignity for older people within the care home setting through the development of practically useful toolkits to support everyday care practice. Providing opportunities for caregivers to be involved in such

  17. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced...... by 91 %, mainly due to improvement in symptom management, 'security', and accessibility of specialists in palliative care. After one month, 57% of the participants reported to have learnt aspects of palliative care, primarily symptom control, and 89% of them found cooperation satisfactory...

  18. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved.

  19. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  20. [The Home Care Doctor Today is "STRIKE" - Considering Care of Terminal Stage Patients with Cancer through a Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Miyoko; Yamaoka, Keita; Fujimaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsuko; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2015-12-01

    Although many patients wish to remain in their familiar home environment while undergoing cancer treatment, many obstacles prevent a patient from receiving cancer care at home. With early-stage cancer, the patients may better accept the diagnosis and have a greater will to fight the illness. However as time proceeds, progression or recurrence of cancer may occur, and eventually, proactive treatments will not be available. This progression results in great physical and mental strain on the patients and their family. At all stages of such progression, opportunities exist for a care provider to assist with overcoming potential obstacles by openly communicating with the patients, talking through the patients' experiences, and understanding their feelings. However, on diagnosis, cancer patients must often face the reality that they have very little time left to live. When transiting medical care from their long-trusted hospital to a home care base, a new physician must be selected and other decisions related to their care must be quickly made. Transferring responsibility to a good home care provider can greatly influence a patient's emotional state. This paper reports one such case in which the patients died in their homes with the best comfort and possible outcome.

  1. A Study of the Association Between Multidisciplinary Home Care and Home Death Among Thai Palliative Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaviroj, Kittiphon; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2017-06-01

    Many terminally ill patients would prefer to stay and die in their own homes, but unfortunately, some may not be able to do so. Although there are many factors associated with successful home deaths, receiving palliative home visits from the multidisciplinary care teams is one of the key factors that enable patients to die at home. Our study was aimed to find whether there was any association between our palliative home care program and home death. A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Family Medicine at Ramathibodi Hospital between January 2012 and May 2014. All of the patients who were referred to multidisciplinary palliative care teams were included. The data set comprised of patient's profile, disease status, functional status, patient's symptoms, preferred place of death, frequency of home visits, types of team interventions, and patient's actual place of death. Multiple logistic regression was applied in order to determine the association between the variables and the probability of dying at home. A total of 142 patients were included into the study. At the end of the study, 50 (35.2%) patients died at home and 92 (64.8%) patients died in the hospital. The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a strong association between multidisciplinary home care and home death (odds ratio 6.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.48-17.38). Palliative home care was a significant factor enabling patients who want to die at home. We encourage health policy makers to promote the development of community-based palliative care programs in Thailand.

  2. Study on the factors determining home death of patients during home care: a historical cohort study at a home care support clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Seiji; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Associations between markedly low activities of daily living (ADL) at the start of home visit care and patient home death were analyzed using data from a home care support clinic in Japan that has a low rate of home deaths. The study was a historical cohort study. It involved patients who began to receive home visit care from a home visit care support clinic between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2011. Using home death as a dependent variable and presence/absence of markedly low ADL and other parameters (cancer, the patient's desire for home death, etc.) as independent variables, the adjusted hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Markedly low ADL were associated with home death even after adjustment for factors that influence home death (adjusted hazard ratio 4.40; 95% CI 2.37-8.16). Cancer and the patient's desire for home death were statistically significant factors involved in home death. In a subgroup analysis according to the presence/absence of cancer, the association between markedly low ADL and home death was stronger in the cancer-free group (adjusted hazard ratio 10.78; 95% CI 2.89-40.26) than in the cancer group (adjusted hazard ratio 5.58; 95% CI2.39-13.05). Patients' desire for home death could be fulfilled if home care support clinics provide home visit services to not only terminal-stage cancer patients, but also bedridden cancer-free patients. We must establish systems for older adults to remain at home during the terminal period of their lives. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Innovative Urgent Care for the Palliative Patient at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Carmel L; Pooler, Charlotte; Arsenault, Julia E; Berean, Colleen; Sharman, Robert; Cameron, Cheryl L; de Kock, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    Palliative and end-of-life patients in their homes are at risk of developing symptom crises requiring urgent care. The usual care for these patients involves transport to an Emergency Department (ED) despite the preference of most palliative patients to stay home. The objective of this initiative was to develop an innovative strategy to provide collaborative care in the home to alleviate symptoms and avoid transport. A partnership was created among Emergency Medical Services and Community Care staff, physicians, and leaders to enable patients to stay at home with existing resources during symptom crisis. As a result of the initiative, patients were able to stay at home more frequently. When patients required transport to the ED, it occurred after attempted symptom management in the home. A total of 110 calls were tracked in the first 18 months of the initiative. Of those, 61% ended with the patient staying home, in alignment with their preferred place of care at the end of life. A collaborative approach by care providers in the community enabled patients to stay home despite symptom crisis near the end of life.

  4. Raising The Standard: Palliative Care In Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meier, Diane E; Lim, Betty; Carlson, Melissa D.A

    2010-01-01

    ... from palliative care. Indeed, we would argue that the growing acceptance of the culture-change movement centered on elder-directed goals in nursing homes is promising evidence of the goodness-of-fit of palliative care principles in the long-term care setting. More than 70 percent of long-stay residents in nursing homes are elderly and have moderate-t...

  5. Integrated planning tool for optimisation in municipal home care

    OpenAIRE

    Røhne, Mette; Sandåker, Torjus; Ausen, Dag; Grut, Lisbet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to improve collaboration and enhance quality of care services in municipal, home care services by implementing and developing an integrated planning tool making use of optimisation technology for better decision support. The project will through piloting and action based research establish knowledge on change in work processes to improve collaboration and efficiency. Context: A planning tool called Spider has been piloted in home care in Horten municipality since 201...

  6. Technology Solutions to Support Care Continuity in Home Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn W; Russell, David; Onorato, Nicole; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2017-09-01

    Elevated hospital readmission rates from home care are an indicator of poor care quality, and rates are particularly high for patients with heart failure. Readmissions may be avoided by optimizing continuity of care. To explore perceptions among home care clinicians of the barriers they face and the information they need to improve care continuity for patients with heart failure. Focus groups were conducted with teams of home care clinicians at a large certified home healthcare agency in the Northeastern United states. In total, there were 61 participants across 6 focus groups. Three overarching themes emerged: continuity of care and communication on care transitions, maintaining continuity of care during a home care episode (with subthemes tracking signs and symptoms and patient teaching), and health information technology (HIT) characteristics to support communication and care continuity. Our study highlights areas of improvement for HIT solutions that could support care delivery for patients with heart failure in a home care setting. Home care agencies planning to introduce technology can use these findings to assess if and how potential systems can support nurses to provide continuity of care across healthcare organizations and home care visits.

  7. Dementia Home Care Resources: How Are We Managing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Ward-Griffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the number of people living with dementia expected to more than double within the next 25 years, the demand for dementia home care services will increase. In this critical ethnographic study, we drew upon interview and participant data with persons with dementia, family caregivers, in-home providers, and case managers in nine dementia care networks to examine the management of dementia home care resources. Three interrelated, dialectical themes were identified: (1 finite formal care-inexhaustible familial care, (2 accessible resources rhetoric-Iinaccessible resources reality, and (3 diminishing care resources-increasing care needs. The development of policies and practices that provide available, accessible, and appropriate resources, ensuring equitable, not necessarily equal, distribution of dementia care resources is required if we are to meet the goal of aging in place now and in the future.

  8. [Terminal patient home care: the family caregivers perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Quintana, Alberto Manuel; Denardin-Budó, Maria de Lourdes; de Moraes, Natália de Andrade; Lüdtke, Manoela Fonseca; Cassel, Paula Argemi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at getting to know the relationships built among patients, family caregivers and the health care team, during home care,from the perspective of the family caregiver It is a qualitative study with 11 family caregivers of terminal patients, registered on a home care service of a university hospital in the South of Brazil. Data collection was carried out through narrative interviews that were recorded transcribed and analyzed through content analysis. Three categories were built from data analysis: relationships among the family caregiver, the patient and the health care team; awareness of the patient's terminal condition. the caregiver's perspective; and situation in which patients are unaware of their terminal condition. They approach how the home care relationships are established among the caregivers, such as health care professionals and family caregivers, and the people who are taken care of such as the patients, highlighting the importance of communication in such care related context.

  9. [Animal- assisted therapy in health care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré M, Leonor

    2005-09-01

    Animal-assisted therapy is a novel interventional program with important benefits in the management of patients with chronic diseases and prolonged hospitalization. The relationship between animals and patients facilitates adaptation to a new, stressing hospital environment, helps in diminishing anxiety, stress, pain and blood pressure and increases mobility and muscular strength. This therapy can be developed by pets themselves or by specially trained animals. Dogs are the most frequently used animals because of their training and sociability skills. Patients and animals participating in these programs require special care in order to avoid transmission of infectious diseases associated with pets, hypersensitivity and accidents during their visits. Implementation of animal - assisted therapy in care centers requires a permanent revision of suggested guidelines and program objectives.

  10. Adaptação de instrumento para dimensionar horas diárias de assistência de enfermagem residencial Adaptacion de instrumento para medir horas diarias de atención de enfermería domiciliaria Adaptation of an instrument for the measurement of daily hours for nursing care at patient's home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Watanabe Dal Ben

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available O Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System Intermediate: TISS-Intermediário foi traduzido para a língua portuguesa e adaptado para estabelecer horas diárias de assistência domiciliar. O processo de modificação do instrumento, desenvolvido através da Técnica Delphi, teve como participantes 16 enfermeiros, que atuam em empresas de assistência domiciliar e determinam horas diárias de assistência de enfermagem para pacientes na residência, após a hospitalização. Ao término do estudo obteve-se um instrumento com 104 itens, para ser no futuro validado clinicamente. Tal instrumento ajudará enfermeiros a estender cuidados de enfermagem a pacientes em casa, após a alta hospitalar, especialmente na tomada de decisões relativas à avaliação dos pacientes.El Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System Intermediate: TISS-Intermedio, fue traducido para el idioma portugués y adaptado para establecer las horas diarias de asistencia en el domicilio. Dieciséis enfermeros participaron del proceso de modificación del instrumento desarrollado a través de la Técnica Delphi. Esos enfermeros actúan en empresas de atención a domicilio y determinan las horas diarias de atención de enfermería a los pacientes en su domicilio después del alta. Al término del estudio se obtuvo un instrumento con 104 items para ser validado clínicamente.Tal instrumento ayudará a los enfermeros a extender sus cuidados de enfermería a pacientes que se encuentran en casa, después del alta hospitalario, especialmente en la toma de decisiones relacionadas con la evaluación de los pacientes.The Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System Intermediate: TISS-Intermediate, was translated into Portuguese and adapted to establish the number of hours daily of home care. The adaptation process of the instrument, developed with the Delphi Technique, used 16 nurses, who work in home care service providers and helped in calculating the number of nursing care hours for patients at

  11. The effect of a "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention in a home care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald; Godin, Lori

    2015-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of a unique "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention for community-dwelling elderly individuals in a home care program. A combined propensity-based covariate-matching procedure was used to pair each individual who received the intervention ("treatment" condition, nT = 930) to a similar individual who did not receive the intervention ("control" condition, nC1 = 930) from among a large pool of potential control individuals (nC0 = 4656). The intervention consisted of regularly scheduled telephone calls from a surveillance nurse to proactively assess the individual's well-being, care plan status, use of and need for services (home support, adult day program, physiotherapy, etc.) and home environment (e.g., informal caregiver support). Treatment and control conditions were compared with respect to four service utilization outcomes: (1) rate of survival in the community before institutionalization in an assisted living or nursing home facility or death, (2) rate of emergency room registrations, (3) rate of acute care hospitalizations, and (4) rate of days in hospital, during home care enrollment. Results indicated a beneficial effect of the surveillance nurse intervention on reducing rate of service utilization by increasing the duration of the home care episode. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing an Adapted Cardiac Rehabilitation Training for Home Care Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Mola, Ana; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Lipman, Terri H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: There is limited evidence that home care clinicians receive education on the core competencies of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). This article describes the development and implementation of a CR training program adapted for home care clinicians, which incorporated the viewpoints of homebound patients with cardiovascular disease. Methods: Literature and guideline reviews were performed to glean curriculum content, supplemented with themes identified among patients and clinicians. Semistructured interviews were conducted with homebound patients regarding their perspectives on living with cardiovascular disease and focus groups were held with home care clinicians regarding their perspectives on caring for these patients. Transcripts were analyzed with the constant comparative method. A 15-item questionnaire was administered to home care nurses and rehabilitation therapists pre- and posttraining, and responses were analyzed using a paired sample t test. Results: Three themes emerged among patients: (1) awareness of heart disease; (2) motivation and caregivers' importance; and (3) barriers to attendance at outpatient CR; and 2 additional themes among clinicians: (4) gaps in care transitions; and (5) educational needs. Questionnaire results demonstrated significantly increased knowledge posttraining compared with pretraining among home care clinicians (pretest mean = 12.81; posttest mean = 14.63, P Home care clinicians respond well to an adapted CR training to improve care for homebound patients with cardiovascular disease. Clinicians who participated in the training demonstrated an increase in their knowledge and skills of the core competencies for CR. PMID:28033165

  13. A declaration of healthy dependence: the case of home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Elin

    2014-12-01

    Aging populations have become a major concern in the developed world and are expected to require novel care strategies. Public policies, health-care regimes and technology developers alike stress the need for a more individualized care to meet the increased demand for care services in response to demographic change. Increasingly, care services are offered to individuals with diseases and or disabilities in their homes by means of Personalized Health-Monitoring (PHM) technologies. PHM-based home care is typically portrayed as the key to a cost-effective future care that better can accommodate the needs of an aging population and promote care recipients' independence. In light of the emerging technology-based home care, this article sets forth to investigate the significance and implications of a strong emphasis on independence in relation to this novel care form. Notions of independence as used by care planners, care providers and technology developers are examined in relation to ICT-based home care and the reasonableness of independence as an aim for future health-care is critically discussed. In conclusion, the need for a shift from a strong emphasis on independence to a right to healthy dependence is advocated.

  14. Assistência domiciliar a idosos: fatores associados, características do acesso e do cuidado Asistencia domiciliaria a ancianos: factores asociados, características del acceso y del cuidado Home health care for the elderly: associated factors and characteristics of access and health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Thumé

    2010-12-01

    ón anciana y sus características, según modelos de atención Estrategia Salud de la Familia y modelo tradicional. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal de base poblacional, con muestra representativa de 1.593 individuos con 60 años o más, residentes en la región urbana de Bagé, Sur de Brasil, en 2008. El muestreo fue realizado en múltiples fases. Los datos fueron colectados en entrevistas individuales. Se analizaron las formas de acceso a los servicios, participación de los profesionales, satisfacción y situación de salud de los usuarios posterior a la atención. Fue utilizado modelo de regresión de Poisson para estimar las tasas de prevalencia bruta y ajustada, los respectivos intervalos con 95% de confianza y p-valor (prueba de Wald. RESULTADOS: Asistencia domiciliaria fue estadísticamente asociada a la historia previa de enfermedad vascular cerebral, a la presencia de señales de demencia y a la incapacidad para las actividades de la vida diaria. La familia fue responsable por 75% de las solicitudes de cuidado. En las áreas de la atención tradicional, los médicos respondieron por la mayor promoción de cuidados, mientras que en las áreas de la Estrategia Salud de la Familia, se destacó la participación del equipo de enfermeras. Aproximadamente 78% de las solicitudes fueron atendidas en hasta 24 horas y 95% de los usuarios evaluaron positivamente el cuidado recibido. Dos tercios de los ancianos refirieron mejoría en las condiciones de salud. CONCLUSIONES: Las variables asociadas al recibimiento de asistencia domiciliaria reiteran los indicadores de fragilidad destacados en la Política Nacional de Salud de la Persona Anciana y fortalece la importancia de la estrategia en la promoción de la equidad en el cuidado de los ancianos. La evaluación positiva y el impacto en la situación de salud refuerzan el domicilio como ambiente terapéutico.OBJECTIVE: To assess factors associated with home health care for the elderly and its characteristics based on different

  15. Engagement of Primary Care Physicians in Home Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shiraz; Goldman, Russell; Kevork, Nanor; Wentlandt, Kirsten; Husain, Amna; Merrow, Nancy; Le, Lisa W; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    To describe prevalence and characteristics associated with family physician and general practitioner (FP/GP) provision of home palliative care (HPC). We surveyed FP/GPs in an urban health region of Ontario, Canada, to determine their current involvement in HPC, the nature of services provided, and perceived barriers and enablers. A total of 1439 surveys were mailed. Of the 302 FP/GP respondents, 295 provided replies regarding engagement in HPC: 101 of 295 (33%) provided HPC, 76 (26%) were engageable with further support, and 118 (40%) were not engageable regardless of support. The most substantial barrier was time to provide home visits (81%). Engaged FP/GPs were most likely to be working with another physician providing HPC ( P < .0001). Engageable FP/GPs were younger ( P = .007) and placed greater value on improved remuneration ( P < .001) than the other groups. Nonengageable physicians were most likely to view time as a barrier ( P < .0001) and to lack interest in PC ( P = .03). One-third of FP/GPs provide HPC. A cohort of younger physicians could be engageable with adequate support. Integrated practices including collaboration with specialist PC colleagues should be encouraged and supported.

  16. "Could We Hold Hands?" Older Lesbian and Gay Couples' Perceptions of Long-Term Care Homes and Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlotte, Charles; Gladstone, James W; Cosby, Robert F; Fitzgerald, Kerri-Ann

    2016-12-01

    This qualitative study describes expectations, concerns, and needs regarding long-term care (LTC) homes and home care services of 12 older lesbian and gay couples living in Canada. Our findings reflect four major themes: discrimination, identity, expenditure of energy, and nuanced care. Discrimination involved concerns about covert discrimination; loss of social buffers as one ages; and diminished ability to advocate for oneself and one's partner. Identity involved anticipated risk over disclosing one's sexual identity; the importance of being identified within a coupled relationship; and the importance of access to reference groups of other gay seniors. We conclude that partners were burdened by the emotional effort expended to hide parts of their identity, assess their environments for discrimination, and to placate others. Nuanced care involved a mutual level of comfort experienced by participants and their health care providers. These themes inform understandings of LTC homes and home care services for lesbian and gay older couples.

  17. Nursing homes and end-of-life care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2013-10-01

    To describe end-of-life care in Japanese nursing homes by comparing facility and characteristics of residents dying in nursing homes with those who had been transferred and had died in hospitals, and by comparing the quality of end-of-life care with hospitals and with their respective counterparts in the United States. National sample of 653 nursing homes with responses from 371 (57%) on their facility characteristics, 241 (37%) on their resident characteristics, and 92 (14%) on the residents' quality of life. All 5 hospitals in a city 80 miles from Tokyo cooperated. Nursing home staff answered questionnaires on facility and resident characteristics. Resident level data were obtained from 1158. The questionnaire on the quality of care was responded to by 256 (63%) of the decedents' families in nursing homes and 205 (48%) in hospitals. Facility characteristics included items on physicians, nurse staffing, and the facility's end-of-life care policy. Resident characteristics included basic demographics, level of dementia, and resident's and family's preference for the site of death. The Toolkit was used to measure the quality of end-of-life care. The proportion of those dying within the nursing home was related to the facility's policy on end-of-life care and the family's preference. The quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes was generally better than in hospitals, and than in their respective counterparts in the United States. Financial incentives by the Japanese government to promote end-of-life care in nursing homes may have contributed to increasing the proportion of deaths within the facility. The quality of care in nursing homes was evaluated as being better than hospitals. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  19. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  20. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care

    OpenAIRE

    Nils Olof Hedman; Roine Johansson; Urban Rosenqvist

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Method: Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289). Results: Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The mode...

  1. Patient Health Goals Elicited During Home Care Admission: A Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Chou, Edgar Y; Wojciechowicz, Christine

    2017-11-01

    Home care agencies are initiating "patient health goal elicitation" activities as part of home care admission planning. We categorized elicited goals and identified "clinically informative" goals at a home care agency. We examined patient goals that admitting clinicians documented in the point-of-care electronic health record; conducted content analysis on patient goal data to develop a coding scheme; grouped goal themes into codes; assigned codes to each goal; and identified goals that were in the patient voice. Of the 1,763 patient records, 16% lacked a goal; only 15 goals were in a patient's voice. Nurse and physician experts identified 12 of the 20 codes as clinically important accounting for 82% of goal occurrences. The most frequent goal documented was safety/falls (23%). Training and consistent communication of the intent and operationalization of patient goal elicitation may address the absence of patient voice and the less than universal recording of home care patients' goals.

  2. Palliative home care: A designer′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigmanshu Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development. In the period of 2 weeks, patients and their caregivers were silently observed in their natural surroundings during home care visits in order to listen their problems, identify the pattern of questions for the home care team, their natural way of storytelling, organizational techniques for medicines and medical reports, care givers lives, patient journey, etc. Such observations have enabled the understanding of the phenomena of home palliative care and have led to the identification of certain influential variables of the practice.

  3. [Utility of Smartphone in Home Care Medicine - First Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshige, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Chiho; Nakagawa, Midori; Yoshioka, Rentaro

    2015-12-01

    The use of video calls for home care can reduce anxiety and offer patients peace of mind. The most suitable terminals at facilities to support home care have been iPad Air and iPhone with FaceTime software. However, usage has been limited to specific terminals. In order to eliminate the need for special terminals and software, we have developed a program that has been customized to meet the needs of facilities using Web Real Time Communication(WebRTC)in cooperation with the University of Aizu. With this software, video calls can accommodate the large number of home care patients.

  4. Why Do They Stay? Job Tenure among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Joshua M.; Squillace, Marie R.; Anderson, Wayne L.; Khatutsky, Galina

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study identifies factors related to job tenure among certified nursing assistants (CNAs) working in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The study uses 2004 data from the National Nursing Home Survey, the National Nursing Assistant Survey, and the Area Resource File. Ordinary least squares regression analyses were conducted with length…

  5. Medication errors in home care: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Astrid; Bentsen, Signe Berit

    2017-11-01

    To explore registered nurses' experiences of medication errors and patient safety in home care. The focus of care for older patients has shifted from institutional care towards a model of home care. Medication errors are common in this situation and can result in patient morbidity and mortality. An exploratory qualitative design with focus group interviews was used. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 20 registered nurses in home care. The data were analysed using content analysis. Five categories were identified as follows: lack of information, lack of competence, reporting medication errors, trade name products vs. generic name products, and improving routines. Medication errors occur frequently in home care and can threaten the safety of patients. Insufficient exchange of information and poor communication between the specialist and home-care health services, and between general practitioners and healthcare workers can lead to medication errors. A lack of competence in healthcare workers can also lead to medication errors. To prevent these, it is important that there should be up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers during the transfer of patients from specialist to home care. Ensuring competence among healthcare workers with regard to medication is also important. In addition, there should be openness and accurate reporting of medication errors, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medicines. To prevent medication errors in home care, up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers is important when patients are transferred from specialist to home care. It is also important to ensure adequate competence with regard to medication, and that there should be openness when medication errors occur, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  7. The economies of scale for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wu; Shea, Dennis G

    2004-03-01

    Using a modified hybrid short-term operating cost function and a national sample of nursing homes in 1994, the authors examined the scale economies of nursing home care. The results show that scale economies exist for Medicare postacute care, with an elasticity of -0.15 and an optimal scale of around 4,000 patient days annually. However, more than 68 percent of nursing homes in the analytic sample produced Medicare days at a level below the optimal scale. The financial pressures resulting from the implementation of a prospective payment system for Medicare skilled nursing facilities may further reduce the quantity of Medicare days served by nursing homes. In addition, the results show that chain-owned nursing homes do not have lower short-term operating costs than do independent facilities. This indicates that the rationale behind recent increasing horizontal integration among nursing homes may not be seeking greater cost efficiency but some other consideration.

  8. Supersmart homes: a new meaning for home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S; Larsen, L

    1999-10-01

    In 1908, when four nurses first began to deliver inhome nursing services in Toronto, Ontario, no one realized the organization would experience so much change and opportunity to enhance the care provided to clients and their families. Now, almost a century later, information and communications technologies are enabling an entirely different way of providing health services and supports, including information that promotes self management and more control for clients over their own health and health care.

  9. Present Activities and Problems of Home Medical Care by Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Satomi; Nishimura, Tetsunari

    2017-01-01

    The rapidly aging population in Japan led to the revision of the dispensing fees, with reviews of the system for added fees on prescriptions for home-bound patients by one-pharmacist pharmacies. However, given the current situation, it is difficult for pharmacies to be engaged in home care, so there are few small pharmacies that are willing to do so. This situation led to a decrease in the number of pharmacists who are experienced in home care. Pharmacists are requesting that practical training in home care be included in the Model Core Curriculum. It is difficult for all students to receive Sample Practical Training, so I joined a working group that created case studies that demonstrate simulated experiences of home care. I believe that case studies are an instructional tool that offers essential points for acquiring practical knowledge. Case studies can reduce the anxiety of inexperienced pharmacists to engage in home care, and I expect that this educational approach will contribute to the promotion of business related to home care for pharmacists.

  10. Home care technology through an ability expectation lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbring, Gregor; Lashewicz, Bonnie

    2014-06-20

    Home care is on the rise, and its delivery is increasingly reliant on an expanding variety of health technologies ranging from computers to telephone "health apps" to social robots. These technologies are most often predicated on expectations that people in their homes (1) can actively interact with these technologies and (2) are willing to submit to the action of the technology in their home. Our purpose is to use an "ability expectations" lens to bring together, and provide some synthesis of, the types of utility and disadvantages that can arise for people with disabilities in relation to home care technology development and use. We searched the academic databases Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO ALL, IEEE Xplore, and Compendex to collect articles that had the term "home care technology" in the abstract or as a topic (in the case of Web of Science). We also used our background knowledge and related academic literature pertaining to self-diagnosis, health monitoring, companionship, health information gathering, and care. We examined background articles and articles collected through our home care technology search in terms of ability expectations assumed in the presentation of home care technologies, or discussed in relation to home care technologies. While advances in health care support are made possible through emerging technologies, we urge critical examination of such technologies in terms of implications for the rights and dignity of people with diverse abilities. Specifically, we see potential for technologies to result in new forms of exclusion and powerlessness. Ableism influences choices made by funders, policy makers, and the public in the development and use of home health technologies and impacts how people with disabilities are served and how useful health support technologies will be for them. We urge continued critical examination of technology development and use according to ability expectations, and we recommend increasing incorporation of

  11. The influence of a mental health home visit service partnership intervention on the caregivers' home visit service satisfaction and care burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jui-Fen; Huang, Xuan-Yi; Lin, Mei-Jue; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yeh, Tzu-Pei

    2017-10-27

    To investigate a community-based and hospital-based home visit partnership intervention in improving caregivers' satisfaction with home service and reducing caregiver burden. The community-oriented mental healthcare model prevails internationally. After patients return to the community, family caregivers are the patients' main support system and they also take the most of the burden of caring for patients. It is important to assist these caregivers by building good community healthcare models. A longitudinal quasi-experimental quantitative design. The experimental group (n = 109) involved "partnership" intervention, and the control group (n = 101) maintained routine home visits. The results were measured before the intervention, 6 and 12 months after the partnership intervention. Six months after the partnership intervention, the satisfaction of the experimental group was higher than the control group for several aspects of care. Although the care burden was reduced in the experimental group, there was no significant difference between the two groups. This study confirms that the partnership intervention can significantly improve caregiver satisfaction with home services, without reducing the care burden. The community-based and hospital-based mental health home visit service partnership programme could improve the main caregiver's satisfaction with the mental health home visit services, while the reduction in care burden may need government policies for the provision of more individual and comprehensive assistance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Care of the Chronically Ill at Home: An Unresolved Dilemma in Health Policy for the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Buhler-Wilkerson, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The problems of caring for patients with disabling illnesses who neither get well nor die are not new. Such patients have always required assistance at home from family, benevolent volunteers, or paid caregivers. Despite two centuries of experimentation, however, no agreement exists concerning the balance between the public and private resources to be allocated through state funding, private insurance, and family contributions for the daily and routine care at home for chronically ill persons...

  13. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged...... to their home before they have sufficiently recovered, but knowledge within this area is sparse. In particular the experience of older people is yet to be explored. The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experiences of being back home after a stay in an IC unit. Data were drawn from 12 interviews....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...

  14. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Cautley, Dan [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Francisco, Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Hawkins, Beth A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brennan, Terry M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  15. 24 CFR 982.613 - Group home: Rent and voucher housing assistance payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Group home: Rent and voucher... Special Housing Types Group Home § 982.613 Group home: Rent and voucher housing assistance payment. (a... person plus any PHA-approved live-in aide. (b) Rent to owner: Reasonable rent limit. (1) The rent to...

  16. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  17. HOME BASED CARE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of poor practice of Home Based. Care and hospital re-admission of PLWHA ... Therefore HBC Training is important for family members who are taking care of their relatives ..... Relationships of believed attitude of HBC among family care givers and Hospital re- admission of PLWHA. Hospital re-admission.

  18. Negotiating and valuing spaces: The discourse of space and 'home' in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkmann, Andrea; Poland, Fiona; Burns, Diane; Hyde, Paula; Killett, Anne

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how space in care homes is experienced and negotiated by people who live and work in them. The analysis of qualitative data of five in-depth case studies of care homes in England revealed three key ways in which space is negotiated: a) the way in which values affect interactions inside versus outside the care home environment, b) the negotiation of boundaries and domains within the homes, and c) the sense of being at 'home'. The paper illuminates how the design of the buildings and organisational factors can reinforce or bridge dichotomies between inside and outside spaces. Residents' abilities to re-negotiate boundaries, domains and communal spaces within homes are shown to be affected by organisational factors such as priorities of staff members. Despite 'home' being a common discourse, the spaces within care homes were often organised, ordered and experienced as two distinct, co-present worlds: the dwelling place of residents and the workplace of staff. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The incidence of depression and its risk factors in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, M.; Joling, K.J.; Dussel, M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Frijters, D.H.M.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Nijpels, G.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is known that depression is highly prevalent in institutionalized older adults, little is known about its incidence and risk factors in nursing homes and residential care homes. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the incidence and associated risk factors for

  20. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeden, Karin; Moeke, Dennis; Bekker, René

    2016-09-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible for the daily care of the residents and account for a significant proportion of the total labor expenses. In practice, the lack of reliable data makes it difficult for nursing home managers to make informed staffing decisions. The focus of this study lies on the 'care on demand' process in a Belgian nursing home. Based on the analysis of real-life 'call button' data, a queueing model is presented which can be used by nursing home managers to determine the number of care workers required to meet a specific service level. Based on numerical experiments an 80/10 service level is proposed for this nursing home, meaning that at least 80 percent of the clients should receive care within 10 minutes after a call button request. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to develop a quantitative model for the 'care on demand' process in a nursing home.

  1. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  2. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only)

  3. [Assistance, nursing and participation in old age : Future of domestic care in cases of care dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinger, Josefine; Hämel, Kerstin; Kümpers, Susanne

    2017-07-01

    The future development of home care services for older people in need of care is associated with great challenges. This article begins with a brief summary of the most urgent care problems from the perspective of people requiring care and that of caring relatives. The problems exhibit social and spatial inequalities and are characterized by coordination problems within a fragmented organizational system. Calls for a viable "care mix" are nothing new but have recently gained considerable traction under the label of "caring communities". This model is prioritized by the German government and addressed in its Seventh Report on Older People (Altenbericht). It seeks to assign neighbors and unpaid volunteers a more central role in the provision of care and assistance. In relation to "caring communities" a differentiation between cure and care is also proposed. The article discusses this model and the assumptions about the potential of neighborhood and civic engagement upon which it is based, and analyzes its impact on the nursing profession. It concludes with a critical discussion of the model's prospects of contributing to a resolution of the outlined problems.

  4. Restraint Use in Older Adults Receiving Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepmans, Kristien; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Paquay, Louis; Van Gansbeke, Hendrik; Milisen, Koen

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence, types, frequency, and duration of restraint use in older adults receiving home nursing care and to determine factors involved in the decision-making process for restraint use and application. Cross-sectional survey of restraint use in older adults receiving home care completed by primary care nurses. Homes of older adults receiving care from a home nursing organization in Belgium. Randomized sample of older adults receiving home care (N = 6,397; mean age 80.6; 66.8% female). For each participant, nurses completed an investigator-constructed and -validated questionnaire collecting information demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics and aspects of restraint use. A broad definition of restraint was used that includes a range of restrictive actions. Restraints were used in 24.7% of the participants, mostly on a daily basis (85%) and often for a long period (54.5%, 24 h/d). The most common reason for restraint use was safety (50.2%). Other reasons were that the individual wanted to remain at home longer, which necessitated the use of restraints (18.2%) and to provide respite for the informal caregiver (8.6%). The latter played an important role in the decision and application process. The physician was less involved in the process. In 64.5% of cases, there was no evaluation after restraint use was initiated. Use of restraints is common in older adults receiving home care nursing in Belgium. These results contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of use of restraints in home care, a situation that may be even more complex than in nursing homes and acute hospital settings. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Examining satisfaction with live-in foreign home care in Israel from the perspectives of care recipients, their family members, and their foreign home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2011-04-01

    This pilot study evaluates satisfaction with foreign home care arrangement from the perspectives of older adults, their family members, and their foreign home care workers. A matched cross-sectional sample of 148 family members and foreign home care workers and 90 older care recipients completed a satisfaction survey in the years 2007-2008. Foreign home care workers' satisfaction was directly associated with family members' and care recipients' satisfaction. In addition, the well-being of older care recipients and foreign home care workers was directly associated with their satisfaction with this arrangement. Finally, there was an inverse association between care recipients' cognitive functioning and family members' satisfaction. This study demonstrates the complex associations between the various stakeholders involved in this caregiving arrangement. It is possible that better working conditions would result in improved satisfaction with services of all parties involved.

  6. An evaluation of the implementation of a programme to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, F; Clifford, C; Hewison, A; Thomas, K

    2009-09-01

    The Gold Standards Framework in Care Homes programme aims to improve the quality of end-of-life care for residents. The impact of introducing phase 2 of the programme to homes in England was evaluated. A pre-post survey design was adopted, focusing on indicators identified as markers of good end-of-life care. The 95 homes in phase 2 of the programme were invited to participate in the evaluation. Homes completed a baseline survey of care provision and an audit of the five most recent resident deaths. The survey and audit were repeated post programme completion. Forty-nine homes returned completed pre- and post-surveys, 44 returned pre- and post-data on deaths. Although some staff found completion of the programme challenging, homes that returned pre- and post-data demonstrated improvements in aspects of end-of-life care. There were statistically significant increases in the proportion of residents who died in the care homes and those who had an advanced care plan. Crisis admissions to hospital were significantly reduced. This evaluation indicates that appropriately funded structured programmes have the potential to assist nursing homes improve the provision of end-of-life care to older adults, in line with government health policy.

  7. Palliative home care: A designer′s perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tigmanshu Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development...

  8. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment......, as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory...

  9. Invisible Elderly in Danish and Swedish Residential Care Home Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E Andersson, Jonas; Grangaard, Sidse

    2015-01-01

    This study of two architectural competitions suggests that the fit between architectural design and older users, who depend on regular caregiving due to cognitive or functional disabilities, requires a particular consideration when designing new residential care homes....

  10. Paediatric palliative care at home: a single centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee Ai; Khalid, Farah

    2016-02-01

    There is increased awareness of paediatric palliative care in Malaysia, but no local published data on home care services. We aimed to describe the paediatric experience at Hospis Malaysia, a community-based palliative care provider in Malaysia. We conducted a retrospective case note review of patients aged up to 21 years who were referred to Hospis Malaysia from 2009 to 2013. A total of 137 patients (92 male, 45 female) with a median age of 140 (3-250) months were included in this study. The majority (71.5%) had malignancies. At referral, 62 patients were still in hospital and 17 died prior to discharge. A total of 108 patients received home visits. At the first home visit, 89.8% of patients had at least one physical symptom. Pain was the most common (52.5%) symptom. Patients had various supportive devices: 39 were on feeding tubes, ten had tracheostomies, five were on bilevel positive airway pressure and ten had urinary catheters. 66 families discussed the preferred location of care at end-of-life. Among those who died, 78.9% died at home, as they preferred (p home death and age, diagnosis and number of home visits. Bereavement follow-up occurred for 93.3% of families. Community care referrals tend to occur late, with 25.5% of patients dying within two weeks of referral. At referral, patients often had untreated physical symptoms. The majority of families preferred and had a home death. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  11. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gurp, Jelle; van Selm, Martine; van Leeuwen, Evert; Vissers, Kris; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2016-03-01

    Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual teleconsultations could be a method for integrating palliative care services. This study aims to describe (1) whether and how teleconsultation supports the integration of primary care, specialist palliative care, and patient perspectives and services and (2) how patients and (in)formal caregivers experience collaboration in a teleconsultation approach. This work consists of a qualitative study that utilizes long-term direct observations and in-depth interviews. A total of 18 home-based palliative care patients (16 with cancer, 2 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; age range 24-85 years old), 12 hospital-based specialist palliative care team clinicians, and 17 primary care physicians. Analysis showed that the introduction of specialist palliative care team-patient teleconsultation led to collaboration between primary care physicians and specialist palliative care team clinicians in all 18 cases. In 17/18 cases, interprofessional contact was restricted to backstage work after teleconsultation. In one deviant case, both the patient and the professionals were simultaneously connected through teleconsultation. Two themes characterized integrated palliative care at home as a consequence of teleconsultation: (1) professionals defining responsibility and (2) building interprofessional rapport. Specialist palliative care team teleconsultation with home-based patients leads to collaboration between primary care physicians and hospital-based palliative care specialists. Due to cultural reasons, most collaboration was of a multidisciplinary character, strongly relying on organized backstage work. Interdisciplinary teleconsultations with real-time contact between patient and both professionals were

  12. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient's at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient's symptoms and improve the individual's quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Literature review was done by using the keywords "home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing" from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015.

  13. The home as ethos of caring: A concept determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilli, Yvonne; Eriksson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Within nursing, the concepts of home and homelike have been used indiscriminately to describe characteristics of healthcare settings that resemble a home more than an institution. The aim of this study was to investigate the concept of home ( hem in Swedish). The main questions were as follows: What does the concept of home entail etymologically and semantically? Of what significance is the meaning of the concept to caring science and nursing? This study had a qualitative design with a hermeneutical approach guided by Gadamer. Eriksson's model of concept determination was partly used to determine the etymology and semantics, the essence and epistemic category of the concept of home. In this study, etymological dictionaries and 17 Swedish language dictionaries published between 1850 and 2001 were investigated. Ethical consideration: In all parts of this study, ethical guidelines have been followed concerning both gathering data from dictionaries and other sources and during the interpretation of these sources. The home, framed as the ethos of caring, can be drawn as a three-dimensional picture where the three dimensions have a common core, enclosed and inviolable. Symbolically, the picture of home can be seen as the ethos of the human being's innermost room, the human being's manner of being and the tone expressed in the external or abstract room where the human being lives and interacts with others. Based on the findings in this study, we conclude that home as ethos is an inner ethical dimension within the human being. Human beings who are in contact with their ethos, the self, feel at home and dare to follow the voice of their heart. Nurses who experience at-homeness have an ability to invite the patient into a caring relationship. The home and the feeling of being at home have significant meaning in terms of human beings' health and well-being.

  14. Comparative economic evaluation of home-based and hospital-based palliative care for terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koki; Fukuda, Haruhisa

    2017-11-01

    To quantify the difference between adjusted costs for home-based palliative care and hospital-based palliative care in terminally ill cancer patients. We carried out a case-control study of home-care patients (cases) who had died at home between January 2009 and December 2013, and hospital-care patients (controls) who had died at a hospital between April 2008 and December 2013. Data on patient characteristics were obtained from insurance claims data and medical records. We identified the determinants of home care using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to examine treatment duration in both types of care, and a generalized linear model was used to estimate the reduction in treatment costs associated with home care. The case and control groups comprised 48 and 99 patients, respectively. Home care was associated with one or more person(s) living with the patient (adjusted OR 6.54, 95% CI 1.18-36.05), required assistance for activities of daily living (adjusted OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.12-10.51), non-use of oxygen inhalation therapy (adjusted OR 12.75, 95% CI 3.53-46.02), oral or suppository opioid use (adjusted OR 5.74, 95% CI 1.11-29.54) and transdermal patch opioid use (adjusted OR 8.30, 95% CI 1.97-34.93). The adjusted hazard ratio of home care for treatment duration was not significant (adjusted OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.59-1.53). However, home care was significantly associated with a reduction of $7523 (95% CI $7093-7991, P = 0.015) in treatment costs. Despite similar treatment durations between the groups, treatment costs were substantially lower in the home-care group. These findings might inform the policymaking process for improving the home-care support system. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2247-2254. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Home healthcare teams' assessments of pain in care recipients living with dementia: a Swedish exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Christina Elisabeth; Ernsth Bravell, Marie; Ek, Kristina; Bergh, Ingrid

    2015-09-01

    Pain assessment in people living with dementia is a challenge due to the complexity of pain and dementia and the difficulties in self-reporting. In home healthcare, nurses are frequently involved in pain assessment situations and there is a need to explore how home healthcare teams' manage pain assessment in this setting. The study aimed to explore home healthcare teams' experiences of pain assessment among care recipients with dementia. An exploratory qualitative design was used. Open-ended individual interviews were conducted with thirteen registered nurses and ten nursing assistants, working in three different home healthcare teams in one municipality in western Sweden. Philosophical hermeneutics was utilised to interpret the home healthcare teams' experiences. Four interpretations emerged: the need for trusting collaboration, the use of multiple assessment strategies, maintenance of staff continuity in care and assessment situations, and the need for extended time to assess pain. The home healthcare teams recognise pain assessment in people with dementia as involving a complex interaction of sensory, cognitive, emotional and behavioural components in which efforts to acquire understanding of behavioural changes mainly guides their assessments. The solid team coherence between registered nurses and nursing assistants aided the assessment procedure. To assess pain, the teams used multiple methods that complemented one another. However, no systematic routines or appropriate evidence-based pain tools were used. The team members'concern for care recipients when assessing pain is evident and needs to be acknowledged by the organisation which is responsible for the quality of care. Future studies should focus on further exploration of nurses' experiences with pain and dementia in home healthcare settings and address what nurses identify and how they deal with their findings. It is imperative to investigate how organisations and nurses can ensure best practices and how

  16. Safety Risks Among Home Infusion Nurses and Other Home Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Catherine; Quinn, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, home health care (HHC) is a rapidly growing industry and home infusion therapy is a rapidly growing market. HHC can present substantial occupational safety and health (OSH) risks. This article summarizes major OSH risks relevant to home infusion therapy by illustrating them through real-life scenarios collected systematically using qualitative research methods by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-funded research projects at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. The need for home infusion therapy will continue to grow in the future, and safety interventions to prevent or minimize OSH risks are essential. PMID:28683000

  17. Caring in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Maria; Häggström, Elisabeth; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Pöder, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    Autonomy and participation are threatened within the group of older people living in nursing homes. Evidence suggests that healthcare personnel act on behalf of older people but are still excluding them from decision-making in everyday care. The purpose was to describe registered nurses' experience of caring for older people in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation. A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach was used. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. Analysis was inspired by Giorgi's method. Participants and research context: A total of 13 registered nurses from 10 nursing homes participated. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Regional Research Ethics Committee. Informed consent was achieved and confidentiality guaranteed. The essence of caring for older people in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation consisted of registered nurses' awareness of older people's frailty and the impact of illness to support health and well-being, and awareness of acknowledgement in everyday life and trusting relationships. Paying attention to older people by being open to the persons' wishes were aspects that relied on registered nurses' trusting relationships with older people, their relatives and surrounding healthcare personnel. The awareness reflected challenges in caring to promote older people's right to autonomy and participation in nursing homes. Registered nurses' strategies, hopes for and/or concerns about development of everyday life in nursing homes were revealed and mirrored their engagement in caring for older people. Awareness of older people's frailty in nursing homes and the importance of maintained health and well-being were described as the main source for promoting autonomy and participation. Everyday life and care in nursing homes needs to be addressed from both older people's and healthcare personnel's perspectives, to promote autonomy and participation for residents

  18. The incidence of depression and its risk factors in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorsma, Marijke; Joling, Karlijn; Dussel, Martine; Ribbe, Miel; Frijters, Dinnus; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Nijpels, Giel; van Hout, Hein

    2012-11-01

    Although it is known that depression is highly prevalent in institutionalized older adults, little is known about its incidence and risk factors in nursing homes and residential care homes. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the incidence and associated risk factors for depression in Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes. Data on depression were extracted from the Vrije Universiteit naturalistic cohort on routine care monitoring with the Minimum Data Set of the Resident Assessment Instrument. A total of 1,324 residents in six nursing homes and 1,723 residents in 23 residential care homes with an average follow-up of 1.2 years. Depression was defined as a clinical diagnosis according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria and the use of antidepressants. Residents with prevalent depression at baseline were excluded. The incidence rate was 13.6 per 100 person years in the nursing homes and 10.2 per 100 person years in the residential care homes. The independent risk factors for in-home depression for residents in nursing homes included dementia (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.02-2.95) and a score of 3 or more on the Depression Rating Scale (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-3.70). A protective effect was seen on the use of a hearing aid (OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.12-0.80). In the residential care homes, being male (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.27-3.30), having cancer (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.64-4.95), and a score of 2 or higher on the Cognitive Performance Scale (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.05-2.22) increased the risk to develop depression. Age greater than 85 years (OR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.31-0.67) and hearing impairment (OR: 0.8; 95% CI: 0.60-1.00) appeared to be protective. The incidence rate for depression in residents of Dutch nursing homes and residential care homes was high and the associated risk factors found may have important implications for staff. 2012 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

  19. [Home care services and the role of "caregivers"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, L

    2001-06-01

    The care of children and adolescents with cancer continues to grow in complexity. While in most cases we are winning the fight, now quality of life (QoL) is becoming a problem to face and a challenge. Pediatric total care policy includes also home care to deliver in any stage of the disease. This can become very useful in the terminal stage, when QoL is the primary goal. The WHO has defined palliative care as integrating the psychologic and spiritual aspects of patient care; affirming life, and regarding dying as a normal process; neither hastening nor postponing death, offering a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death; and offering a support system to help the family cope during the patient's illness and their own bereavement&. Recently this aim is considered also for children. The home care team is usually composed by a physician responsible, few physicians, several nurses, social workers, psychologists plus the family/home caregiver. In most countries health professionals now rely on family/home caregivers, who can play an important role in the team. The American College of Physicians has recently edited useful Guidelines. The Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center suggests four key ideas which make the word COPE in order to succeed in solving problems: C for Creativity, O for Optimism, P for Planning, E for Expert information. Not everywhere in Europe home care is included as a part of the Health Care System, even if there are increasing pressures from shrinking budgets. As hospitals can be upsetting for the child, is hospital care always necessary during the long course of the disease? Home care, when feasible, can be an alternative approach. Strong motivations support pediatric home care. The life rhythms are better preserved if the whole family is at home. Parents must be taught how to cope and how to talk with their children, the sick one and his/her siblings. The dialogue is easier at home. Home care respects the

  20. The home care teaching and learning process in undergraduate health care degree courses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Paula Hermann; Maria Ribeiro Lacerda; Mariluci Alves Maftum; Elizabeth Bernardino; Ana Lucia Schaefer Ferreira deMello

    2017-01-01

    .... This study aimed to build a substantive theory that describes experiences of home care teaching and learning during undergraduate degree courses in nursing, pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, dentistry...

  1. Improving safety in care homes: protocol for evaluation of the Walsall and Wolverhampton care home improvement programme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah Damery; Sarah Flanagan; Kiran Rai; Gill Combes

    2017-01-01

    .... Developing a safety culture is associated with beneficial impacts on safety outcomes, but the complex needs of care home residents, coupled with staffing pressures in the sector, pose challenges...

  2. Culture change and nursing home quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; O'Malley, A James; Afendulis, Christopher C; Caudry, Daryl J; Elliot, Amy; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2014-02-01

    Culture change models are intended to improve the quality of life for nursing home residents, but the impact of these models on quality of care is unknown. We evaluated the impact of the implementation of nursing home culture change on the quality of care, as measured by staffing, health-related survey deficiencies, and Minimum Data Set (MDS) quality indicators. From the Pioneer Network, we have data on whether facilities were identified by experts as "culture change" providers in 2004 and 2009. Using administrative data, we employed a panel-based regression approach in which we compared pre-post quality outcomes in facilities adopting culture change between 2004 and 2009 against pre-post quality outcomes for a propensity score-matched comparison group of nonadopters. Nursing homes that were identified as culture change adopters exhibited a 14.6% decrease in health-related survey deficiency citations relative to comparable nonadopting homes, while experiencing no significant change in nurse staffing or various MDS quality indicators. This research represents the first large-scale longitudinal evaluation of the association of culture change and nursing home quality of care. Based on the survey deficiency results, nursing homes that were identified as culture change adopters were associated with better care although the surveyors were not blind to the nursing home's culture change efforts. This finding suggests culture change may have the potential to improve MDS-based quality outcomes, but this has not yet been observed.

  3. Can home care services achieve cost savings in long-term care for older people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V L; Ondrich, J; Laditka, S

    1998-07-01

    To determine whether efficient allocation of home care services can produce net long-term care cost savings. Hazard function analysis and nonlinear mathematical programming. Optimal allocation of home care services resulted in a 10% net reduction in overall long-term care costs for the frail older population served by the National Long-Term Care (Channeling) Demonstration, in contrast to the 12% net cost increase produced by the demonstration intervention itself. Our findings suggest that the long-sought goal of overall cost-neutrality or even cost-savings through reducing nursing home use sufficiently to more than offset home care costs is technically feasible, but requires tighter targeting of services and a more medically oriented service mix than major home care demonstrations have implemented to date.

  4. Quality of Care and Job Satisfaction in the European Home Care Setting: Research Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Van Eenoo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since the European population is ageing, a growing number of elderly will need home care. Consequently, high quality home care for the elderly remains an important challenge. Job satisfaction among care professionals is regarded as an important aspect of the quality of home care. Aim: This paper describes a research protocol to identify elements that have an impact on job satisfaction among care professionals and on quality of care for older people in the home care setting of six European countries. Methods: Data on elements at the macro-level (policy, meso-level (care organisations and micro-level (clients are of importance in determining job satisfaction and quality of care. Macro-level indicators will be identified in a previously published literature review. At meso- and micro-level, data will be collected by means of two questionnaires utilsed with both care organisations and care professionals, and by means of interRAI Home Care assessments of clients. The client assessments will be used to calculate quality of care indicators. Subsequently, data will be analysed by means of linear and stepwise multiple regression analyses, correlations and multilevel techniques. Conclusions and Discussion: These results can guide health care policy makers in their decision making process in order to increase the quality of home care in their organisation, in their country or in Europe.

  5. Quality of Care and Job Satisfaction in the European Home Care Setting: Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eenoo, Liza; van der Roest, Henriëtte; van Hout, Hein; Declercq, Anja

    2016-08-31

    Since the European population is ageing, a growing number of elderly will need home care. Consequently, high quality home care for the elderly remains an important challenge. Job satisfaction among care professionals is regarded as an important aspect of the quality of home care. This paper describes a research protocol to identify elements that have an impact on job satisfaction among care professionals and on quality of care for older people in the home care setting of six European countries. Data on elements at the macro-level (policy), meso-level (care organisations) and micro-level (clients) are of importance in determining job satisfaction and quality of care. Macro-level indicators will be identified in a previously published literature review. At meso- and micro-level, data will be collected by means of two questionnaires utilsed with both care organisations and care professionals, and by means of interRAI Home Care assessments of clients. The client assessments will be used to calculate quality of care indicators. Subsequently, data will be analysed by means of linear and stepwise multiple regression analyses, correlations and multilevel techniques. These results can guide health care policy makers in their decision making process in order to increase the quality of home care in their organisation, in their country or in Europe.

  6. Influence of autonomy and type of home assistance on the prevention of peritonitis in assisted automated peritoneal dialysis patients. An analysis of data from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Christian; Duman, Mirela; Durand, Pierre-Yves; Veniez, Ghislaine; Fabre, Emmanuel; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe

    2007-04-01

    peritonitis free was significantly improved in comparison with those persons who did not receive home visits, from 33.9% to 50.8% at 3 years (P=0.028). APD patients assisted at home by a private nurse have a higher risk of developing peritonitis than family-assisted patients, unless additional regular home visits are organized by the original training centre. Therefore, we recommend that home visits be regularly made for dependent PD patients to optimize the quality of care provided by the helper.

  7. [Post-hospital home care after ambulatory surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussier, Marc; Vons, Corinne

    2014-03-01

    Ambulatory surgery should correspond to mastered acts performed on selected patients. This makes home care unnecessary in the vast majority of the cases. The development of outpatient surgery toward more complex procedures on more vulnerable patients would justify a specific home care in some circumstances. Justification of an overnight hospitalization only because the need for the patient to be reassured on experienced symptoms, supervision of analgesic device, wound incision overseeing or drains removal appears questionable. Home care after ambulatory surgery may be considered as several different modalities. The involvement of general practitioners, home nurses and telemedicine have to be explored for several procedures. Evolutions of surgical and anesthetic practices toward less invasive procedures, as well as improvement in patient's information, are the major challenges for the future of outpatient surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A Home-Based Palliative Care Consult Service for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Adam G; Antoni, Charles; Gammonley, Denise

    2016-11-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a home-based palliative care consult service for Veterans with advanced illness. A retrospective chart review was performed on 73 Veterans who received a home-based palliative care consult. Nearly one-third were 80 years of age or older, and nearly one-third had a palliative diagnosis of cancer. The most common interventions of the consult team included discussion of advance directives, completion of a "do not resuscitate" form, reduction/stoppage of at least 1 medication, explanation of diagnosis, referral to home-based primary care program, referral to hospice, and assessment/support for caregiver stress. The home-based consult service was therefore able to address clinical and psychosocial issues that can demonstrate a direct benefit to Veterans, families, and referring clinicians. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Value and the medical home: effects of transformed primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfillan, Richard J; Tomcavage, Janet; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Davis, Duane E; Graham, Jove; Roy, Jason A; Pierdon, Steven B; Bloom, Frederick J; Graf, Thomas R; Goldman, Roy; Weikel, Karena M; Hamory, Bruce H; Paulus, Ronald A; Steele, Glen D

    2010-08-01

    The primary care medical home has been promoted to integrate and improve patient care while reducing healthcare spending, but with little formal study of the model or evidence of its efficacy. ProvenHealth Navigator (PHN), an intensive multidimensional medical home model that addresses care delivery and financing, was introduced into 11 different primary care practices. The goals were to improve the quality, efficiency, and patient experience of care. To evaluate the ability of a medical home model to improve the efficiency of care for Medicare beneficiaries. Observational study using regression modeling based on preintervention and postintervention data and a propensity-selected control cohort. Four years of claims data for Medicare patients at 11 intervention sites and 75 control groups were analyzed to compute hospital admission and readmission rates, and the total cost of care. Regression modeling was used to establish predicted rates and costs in the absence of the intervention. Actual results were compared with predicted results to compute changes attributable to the PHN model. ProvenHealth Navigator was associated with an 18% (P Investing in the capabilities of primary care practices to serve as medical homes may increase healthcare value by improving the efficiency of care. This study demonstrates that the PHN model is capable of significantly reducing admissions and readmissions for Medicare Advantage members.

  10. Needing smart home technologies: the perspectives of older adults in continuing care retirement communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    At present, the vast majority of older adults reside in the community. Though many older adults live in their own homes, increasing numbers are choosing continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs), which range from independent apartments to assisted living and skilled-nursing facilities. With predictions of a large increase in the segment of the population aged 65 and older, a subsequent increase in demand on CCRCs can be anticipated. With these expectations, researchers have begun exploring the use of smart home information-based technologies in these care facilities to enhance resident quality of life and safety, but little evaluation research exists on older adults' acceptance and use of these technologies. This study investigated the factors that influence the willingness of older adults living in independent and assisted living CCRCs to adopt smart home technology. Participants (n = 14) were recruited from community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 or older, living in one of two mid-western US CCRC facilities (independent living and assisted living type facilities). This study used a qualitative, descriptive approach, guided by principles of grounded theory research. Data saturation (or when no new themes or issues emerged from group sessions) occurred after four focus groups (n = 11 unique respondents) and was confirmed through additional individual interviews (n = 3). The findings from this study indicate that although privacy can be a barrier for older adults' adoption of smart home technology their own perception of their need for the technology can override their privacy concerns. Factors influencing self-perception of need for smart home technology, including the influence of primary care providers, are presented. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home technology need and the development of appropriate interventions is necessary.

  11. The effect of skill mix in non-nursing assistants on work engagements among home visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Sakai, Mahiro; Watai, Izumi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a skill-mix programme intervention on work engagement in home visiting nurses. A skill-mix programme in which home visiting nurses are assisted by non-nursing workers is assumed to foster home visiting nurses' work engagement. Pre- and post-intervention evaluations of work engagement were conducted using self-administered questionnaires. A skill-mix programme was introduced in the intervention group of home visiting nurses. After 6 months, their pre- and post-intervention work engagement ratings were compared with those of a control group. Baseline questionnaires were returned by 174 home visiting nurses (44 in the intervention group, 130 in the control group). Post-intervention questionnaires were returned by 38 and 97 home visiting nurses from each group. The intervention group's average work engagement scores were 2.2 at baseline and 2.3 at post-intervention; the control group's were 3.3 and 2.6. Generalised linear regression showed significant between-group differences in score changes. The skill-mix programme might foster home visiting nurses' work engagement by improving the quality of care for each client. Future research is needed to explain the exact mechanisms that underlie its effectiveness. In order to improve the efficiency of services provided by home visiting nurses and foster their work engagement, skill-mix programmes might be beneficial. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Developing, implementing and sustaining an end-of-life care programme in residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Julie; Stone, Louisa; Butt, Anna; Kenyon, Barbara; Lopes, Nuno Santos

    2017-04-02

    In the UK 15.8% of people aged 85 years and over live in a care home or long-stay hospital setting. With the projection of an ageing population it is realistic to expect that the number of people both living and dying in all care homes will increase. This article describes the implementation of an end-of-life care programme to empower staff to meet their resident's end-of-life care needs. To implement an end-of-life care programme, namely the 'Steps to Success' programme, in residential care homes. Measurable outcomes were collected through audit. Over four years audit of all deceased residents' records in the participating homes was collected. This shows an increase of home deaths in 2011/12 to 2014/15 from 44% (n=8/18) within four residential care homes to 64% (n=74/115) in 23 residential care homes with corresponding increase in advance care plan discussions and completion of 'do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation' forms. Achieving change is any organisation let alone sustaining such change is not easy. Six factors enabled this to occur and these should be considered when implementing other such initiatives in residential care homes.

  13. [Neonatal palliative care at home: Contribution of the regional pediatric palliative care team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojean, N; Strub, C; Kuhn, P; Calvel, L

    2017-02-01

    The "patients' rights and end-of-life care" act, known as the Leonetti law, has allowed implementation of palliative care in neonatology as an alternative to unreasonable therapeutic interventions. A palliative care project can be offered to newborns suffering from intractable diseases. It must be focused on the newborn's quality of life and comfort and on family support. Palliative care for newborns can be provided in the delivery room, in the neonatal unit, and also at home. Going home is possible but requires medical support. Here we describe the potential benefits of the intervention of a regional team of pediatric palliative care for newborns, both in the hospital and at home. Two clinical situations of palliative care at home started in the neonatal period and the neonatal unit are presented. They are completed by a retrospective national survey focusing on the type of support to newborns in palliative care in 2014, which was conducted in 22 French regional pediatric palliative care teams. It shows that 26 newborns benefited from this support at home in 2014. Sixteen infants were born after a pregnancy with a palliative care birth plan and ten entered palliative care after a decision to limit life-sustaining treatments. Twelve of them returned home before the 20th day of life. Sixteen infants died, six of them at home. The regional pediatric palliative care team first receives in-hospital interventions: providing support for ethical reflection in the development of the infant's life project, meeting with the child and its family, helping organize the care pathway to return home. When the child is at home, the regional pediatric palliative care team can support the caregiver involved, provide home visits to continue the clinical monitoring of the infant, and accompany the family. The follow-up of the bereavement and the analysis of the practices with caregivers are also part of its tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Improper sharp disposal practices among diabetes patients in home care settings: Need for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Anindo; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Roy, Gautam; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, outbreaks of blood-borne infections have been reported from assisted living facilities, which were traced back to improper blood glucose monitoring practices. Needle-stick injuries have been implicated in many such cases. This directly raises concerns over sharp disposal practices of diabetic patients self-managing their condition in home care settings. With India being home to a huge diabetic population, this issue, if neglected, can cause substantial damage to the health of the population and a marked economic loss. This article discusses the sharp disposal practices prevalent among diabetes patients, the importance of proper sharp disposal, barriers to safe disposal of sharps, and the options available for doing the same. For adopting an environmentally safe wholesome approach, disposal of plastics generated as a result of diabetes self-care at home is important as well. The article also looks at the possible long-term solutions to these issues that are sustainable in an Indian context.

  15. Registered nurses' experience of delegating the administration of medicine to unlicensed personnel in residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa; Grape, Charlotte; Ringnell, Katarina; Westerbotn, Margareta

    2016-11-01

    The aim was to describe registered nurses' experience in the context of delegating the administration of medication to unlicensed personnel in residential care homes. The residents in residential care homes have a need for extensive care and nursing, and large amounts of medicines are common practice. Registered nurses' workload and difficulties in fulfilling their duties, such as administration of medicines, have led to frequent delegation of this task between the registered nurses and unlicensed assisting personnel. It is, of course, a great responsibility to ensure that the care of the older people remains safe while maintaining quality in the prevailing situation. A qualitative inductive descriptive study. Data were collected using audio-recorded semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of 18 registered nurses and interpreted using manifest content analysis. The study was approved by the ethical research committee. Registered nurses found the organisation unsupportive with regard to nursing interventions. The delegation context was experienced as a grey zone; the rules and regulations were not in line with the unspoken expectation to delegate the administration of medicine to unlicensed personnel, in order to be able to manage their daily work. The slimmed organisation of residential care homes relies upon registered nurses' use of delegation of medicine administration to unlicensed assistant personnel. It becomes an inevitable assignment entailing a challenging responsibility for patient safety and the quality of care. The results of this study may contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of caring for older people in residential care homes and to improving the work environment of all healthcare personnel. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Patient benefit of dog-assisted interventions in health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Martina; Carlsson, Per; Sjödahl, Rune; Theodorsson, Elvar; Levin, Lars-Åke

    2017-07-10

    Dogs are the most common companion animal, and therefore not surprisingly a popular choice for animal-assisted interventions. Dog-assisted interventions are increasingly used in healthcare. The aim of the review was to conduct a systematic literature review of quantitative studies on dog-assisted interventions in healthcare, with the intention of assessing the effects and cost-effectiveness of the interventions for different categories of patients. A systematic review of the scientific literature reporting results of studies in healthcare, nursing home or home care settings, was conducted. The inclusion criteria applied for this review were: quantitative studies, inclusion of at least 20 study subjects, existence of a control and performed in healthcare settings including nursing homes and home care. The electronic databases PubMed, AMED, CINAHL and Scopus were searched from their inception date through January 2017, for published articles from peer-reviewed journals with full text in English. Eighteen studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and were judged to be of at least moderate quality, were included in the analysis. Three of them showed no effect. Fifteen showed at least one significant positive effect but in most studied outcome measures there was no significant treatment effect. Dog-assisted therapy had the greatest potential in treatment of psychiatric disorders among both young and adult patients. Dog-assisted activities had some positive effects on health, wellbeing, depression and quality of life for patients with severe cognitive disorders. Dog-assisted support had positive effects on stress and mood. The overall assessment of the included studies indicates minor to moderate effects of dog-assisted therapy in psychiatric conditions, as well as for dog-assisted activities in cognitive disorders and for dog-assisted support in different types of medical interventions. However, the majority of studied outcome measures showed no significant effect.

  17. Home care for the elderly: the role of relatives, friends and neighbors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalwij, Adriaan; Pasini, G.; Wu, Mingqin

    2014-01-01

    We use data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to examine the hours of home care received by the elderly. The existing empirical literature has mostly examined informal home care from children and formal home care. We identify two additional informal home care providers,

  18. Care professional's experiences about using Liverpool Care Pathway in end-of-life care in residential care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Sofia; Lindqvist, Olav; Fürst, Carl-Johan; Brännström, Margareta

    2017-06-29

    Residential care homes (RCHs) play an important role in end-of-life care, being the most common place of death for elderly people in several European countries. Care pathways such as the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP) are used to improve and ensure quality care at the end of life. There is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the use of care pathways. A descriptive qualitative study. The aim was to describe care professionals' experiences of using the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient in the care of dying residents in residential care homes. Five focus group interviews and two individual interviews with enrolled nurses (n = 10), Registered Nurses (n = 9) and general practitioners (n = 5) were carried out and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Care professionals expressed that they became confident through a shared approach to care, were supported to tailor the care according to the residents' individual needs, were supported to involve family members in decision-making and care and became more aware of the care environment. The results of this study indicate that the LCP might be a useful tool for care professionals in improving end-of-life care in RCHs through increased attention to the goals of care, the individual needs of residents and family involvement. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Feasibility of Home-Use Animal-Assisted Activities in Patients With Implanted Cardiac Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jirak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal-assisted activities (AAAs are mainly carried out in institutions. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to assess the willingness of patients with cardiac implanted electronic devices (IEDs to participate in AAA. The sample included 75 ambulatory patients (18 females, M age = 69 years, who attended an outpatient clinic for control of antibradycardic pacemakers (n = 15 or implanted cardioverter defibrillators (n = 60. Twenty-three percent were current and 48% were previous pet-owners. Current pet-owners were younger than non-pet-owners (63.5 vs. 72.0 years, p = .0003. Twelve patients (16% showed interest in AAA visits. However, only two patients agreed to an AAA visit. Both patients were visited once, but declined further visits. Hence, AAA sessions at home were poorly accepted, mainly because the patients considered themselves too busy or healthy, or due to a general disinterest in AAA. Potential health benefits associated with AAA may not be feasible to investigate during home visits of AAA-teams in patients with IEDs who are healthy enough to leave their homes. For further studies concerning AAA in patients with cardiovascular diseases, we suggest focusing on institutions like rehabilitation centers or day care centers and on more severely sick, homebound patients.

  20. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  1. Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gawon

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

  2. Optimization of complex palliative care at home via teleconsultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselaar, J.; van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; Schers, H.J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; van den Hoven, J.; Doorn, N.; Swierstra, T.; Koops, B.J.; Romijn, H.

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care involves the care for patients with a life threatening disease, often advanced cancer, aiming at an optimal quality of life for the patient and his/her family. Although many patients with advanced cancer live at home in the last phase of disease, hospital transfers are often

  3. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eeden, K.; Moeke, D.; Bekker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible

  4. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Havig Anders; Skogstad Anders; Kjekshus Lars; Romøren Tor

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used ...

  5. A Children's Standpoint: Needs in Out-of-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses research reported in "The Needs of Children in Care" ( Mason and Gibson, 2004) in which children participated in defining their needs in out-of-home care. In this study a central research presumption was that children are knowledgeable about their own needs. The methods used to facilitate the involvement in the project of…

  6. Nursing Leadership in Home and Community Care: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Gail

    2017-01-01

    There is agreement across all provinces that there is transformation needed in the area of home and community care. Yet, where is the collective voice of nurse leaders in this transformation? The guest editor calls on nurses to respond to this unique opportunity to shape the transformation of our health system, and improve care for patients and their caregivers.

  7. Home care in childhood diabetes : a controlled evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Zoeteweij (Moniek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis considers children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and their psychological and medical functioning during 31 months of participation in a home-care program compared to traditional hospital-based care. In general, diabetes mellitus -derived from the greek diabainein

  8. Autism-Specific Primary Care Medical Home Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Allison; Scal, Peter; Wey, Andrew; Gaillard, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six subjects received primary medical care within an autism-specific medical home intervention (www.autismmedicalhome.com) and 157 controls received standard primary medical care. Subjects and controls had autism spectrum disorder diagnoses. Thirty-four subjects (74%) and 62 controls (40%) completed pre and post surveys. Controlling for…

  9. Care Plan Improvement in Nursing Homes: An Integrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariani, E.; Chattat, R.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Koopmans, R.T.; Engels, Y.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Care planning nowadays is a key activity in the provision of services to nursing home residents. A care plan describes the residents' needs and the actions to address them, providing both individualized and standardized interventions and should be updated as changes in the residents'

  10. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Olof Hedman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Method: Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289. Results: Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. Conclusion: The decentralist intention of the reform—to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances—has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change.

  11. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olof Hedman, Nils; Johansson, Roine; Rosenqvist, Urban

    2007-09-12

    To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289). Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units) tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units) with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. The decentralist intention of the reform-to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances-has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change.

  12. Venipuncture: an adjunct to home care services for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, D; Niles, S A

    1995-01-01

    Attention to policy and procedure development specific to home care, and strong communication and collaboration with laboratory personnel at multiple sites have been essential in supporting venipuncture services within a home care agency. Orientation, inservice training, skills verification, updated supplies, and the concise information kept in each nurse's field handbook have supported comprehensive quality services to an older, frail, homebound population. In addition, our quality evaluations from physicians, patients, caregivers, and laboratories indicate a greater than satisfactory level of performance and quality care for this skilled service.

  13. Care home managers' knowledge of palliative care: a Northern Irish study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gary; McGreevy, Jessie; Preshaw, Deborah Hl; Agnelli, Joanne; Diamond, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine care home managers' knowledge of palliative care using the palliative care quiz for nursing (PCQN). Palliative care is strongly advocated for all people living with advancing incurable illness. Within a care home setting there should be a particular emphasis on the importance of palliative care, particularly for those residents who, because of their advancing age, are likely to live with non-malignant diseases such as dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or heart failure to name a few. Before the beginning of a workshop on optimising palliative care for people living in care homes, 56 care home managers (all nurses) completed the PCQN, a validated questionnaire that is used to assess a nurse's knowledge of palliative care, as part of a learning exercise. The quiz consisted of 20 questions for which participants could answer true, false or don't know. The average score was 12.89 correct answers out of a possible 20 (64.45%). This study highlights the need to develop the knowledge and competence of care home managers in relation to palliative care. This is particularly important given the increasing number of people who are living with non-malignant disease within a care home setting.

  14. Preliminary Data on a Care Coordination Program for Home Care Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Katie M; Hatfield, Laura A; Jena, Anupam B; Cristman, David; Flair, Michael; Kator, Kylie; Nudd, Geoffrey; Grabowski, David C

    2016-09-01

    Home care recipients are often hospitalized for potentially avoidable reasons. A pilot program (Intervention in Home Care to Improve Health Outcomes (In-Home)) was designed to help home care providers identify acute clinical changes in condition and then manage the condition in the home and thereby avoid a costly hospitalization. Caregivers answer simple questions about the care recipient's condition during a telephone-based "clock-out" at the end of each shift. Responses are electronically captured in the agency management software that caregivers use to "clock-in," manage care, and "clock-out" on every shift. These are transmitted to the agency's care manager, who follows up on the change in condition and escalates appropriately. A description of the In-Home model is presented, and pilot data from 22 home care offices are reported. In the pilot, caregivers reported a change in condition after 2% of all shifts, representing an average of 1.9 changes per care recipient in a 6-month period. Changes in behavior and skin condition were the most frequently recorded domains. Interviews with participating caregivers and care managers suggested positive attitudes regarding the intervention; challenges included resistance to change on the part of home care staff and difficulties in applying a uniform intervention to individuals with varying needs in home care offices with varying capacities. In an ongoing randomized trial, the success of the overall program will be measured primarily according to the potential reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of home care recipients and the effect this potential reduction has on spending and healthcare outcomes. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Medical assistants' roles in electronic health record processes in primary care practices: the untold story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewale, Victoria; Anthony, David; Borkan, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The role of the medical assistant has been undervalued in the past. Many publications have detailed the integral role of the nursing staff and physicians, but the medical assistant role has come last in formal recognition. As healthcare settings move toward a more Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, the attitudes of this model will need to be adopted, two of which are team-based care and adoption of the electronic health record (EHR). As the EHR continues to gain more traction in healthcare, a thorough understanding of it, by everyone, will be vital for its success. In this article, the medical assistant's relationship with the EHR is outlined through qualitative interviews and observations with medical assistants in PCMH programs. The data describe diverse EHR experiences and how these experiences are influenced by and reflected in workflow issues, training, patient care, and an expanding role of the medical assistant.

  16. 'I accept it [staff assistance]; no choice': an ethnographic study of residents' attitudes towards mobility within nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Janice; Sims, Jane; Haines, Terry P

    2014-12-01

    Mobility contributes to the quality of life and independence of residents in nursing homes. To perform resident-centred mobility care, staff need to understand residents' physical capacity and perspectives of care. The aim of the study was to explore residents' perspectives of intrinsic factors influencing their mobility and associations between these factors with a view to informing resident mobility care practice improvements. The study was part of a larger ethnographic project exploring safe resident mobility care in nursing homes. Semi-structured interviews with nursing home residents supplemented by non-participant observations were conducted over a 20-month period from July 2010. Fifteen residents consented to be interviewed in three nursing homes in Melbourne, Australia. Unobtrusive observations of 46 mobility events took place in three nursing homes over 5 months from September, 2011. Participants identified intrinsic factors that influence their mobility including mobility capacity, strategies to cope with mobility loss, motivation and efforts to remain mobile. Three themes related to resident attitudes and responses to mobility loss emerged: acceptance of mobility loss and staff assistance; motivation to remain mobile; and acquiescence and loss of control during mobility events. A conceptual model developed from the study outlined associations between resident attitudes and mobility and quality of life outcomes. Discussion was framed by theories of ageing and adaptation: selection, optimisation and compensation; learned dependency; and learned helplessness. Resident acceptance of mobility loss, and required staff assistance and realistic determination to remain mobile contribute to residents' quality of life. Mobility care based on considerations of resident choice, autonomy and the value of mobility is important. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. User experience and care for older people transitioning from hospital to home: Patients' and carers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqueline; Hutchinson, Alison M; Brown, Rhonda; Livingston, Patricia M

    2017-11-09

    Transitioning from hospital to home is challenging for many older people living with chronic health conditions. Transitional care facilitates safe and timely transfer of patients between levels of care and across care settings and includes communication between practitioners, assessment and planning, preparation, medication reconciliation, follow-up care and self-management education. To date, there is limited understanding of how to actively involve care recipient service users in transitional care. This study was part of a larger research project. The objective of this article was to report the first study phase, in which we aimed to describe user experience pertaining to patients and carers. The study design was qualitative descriptive using interviews. Patients (n = 19) and carers (n = 7) participated in semi-structured interviews about their experience of transition from hospital to home in an urban Australian health-care setting. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. All participants reported that they needed to become independent in transition. Participants perceived a range of social processes supported their independence at home: supportive relationships with carers, caring relationships with health-care practitioners, seeking information, discussing and negotiating the transitional care plan and learning to self-care. Findings contribute to our understanding that quality transitional care should focus on patients' need to regain independence. Social processes supporting the capacities of patients and carers should be emphasized in future initiatives. Future transitional care interventions should emphasize strategies to enable negotiation for suitable supports and assist care recipients to overcome barriers identified in this study. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument according to care professionals in nursing homes: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Nursing homes are important locations for palliative care. High quality palliative care requires an evaluation of the different care needs of the nursing home residents. The interRAI Palliative Care instrument is a comprehensive assessment that evaluates the needs and preferences of adults receiving palliative care. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument. A qualitative study was conducted, based on the abductive reasoning approach. Fifteen nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Calls for participation were sent out by four umbrella organizations of Flemish nursing homes (Belgium) and at a national conference for nursing home staff. Nineteen care professionals (nurses, certified nursing assistants, psychologists, physiotherapists, quality coordinators and directors) of 15 nursing homes voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. During one year, care professionals evaluated the needs and preferences of all nursing home residents receiving palliative care by means of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument. Data on the usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument were derived from notes, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with participating care professionals and were thematically analyzed and synthesized. Data were gathered between December 2013 and March 2015. In general, the interRAI Palliative Care (interRAI PC instrument) is a useful instrument according to care professionals in nursing homes. However, care professionals made a series of recommendations in order to optimize the usefulness of the instrument. The interRAI PC instrument is not always feasible to complete because of organizational reasons. Furthermore, the face validity of the instrument could be improved since certain items are incomplete, lacking, redundant or too complex. Findings highlight the importance of adapting the content of the interRAI Palliative Care

  19. Factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Hitoshi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Atsushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Maeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Takuya; Nomura, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2017-08-08

    Polypharmacy, which is often observed in elderly patients, has been associated with several unfavorable outcomes, including an increased risk of potentially inappropriate medications, medication non-adherence, drug duplication, drug-drug interactions, higher healthcare costs and adverse drug reactions. A significant association between polypharmacy and adverse outcomes among older people living in the community has also been confirmed. A reduction in the number of medications should thus be pursued for many older individuals. Nevertheless, the factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients have not been reported. Here, we investigated those factors in elderly home-care patients in Japan. We used the data of the participants in the Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical investigation. Polypharmacy was defined as the current use of six or more different medications. We carried out univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations between polypharmacy and each of several factors. A total of 153 home-care patients were registered. The mean number of medications used per patient was 5.9, and 51.5% of the patients belonged to the polypharmacy group. The multivariate model showed that the patients' scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Mini-Nutrition Assessment Short Form were inversely associated with polypharmacy, and potentially inappropriate medication was most strongly associated with polypharmacy (odds ratio 4.992). The present findings showed that polypharmacy was quite common among the elderly home-care patients, and they suggest that home-care physicians should prescribe fewer medications in accord with the deterioration of home-care patients' general condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Development of the interRAI home care frailty scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of frailty, a relative state of weakness reflecting multiple functional and health domains, continues to receive attention within the geriatrics field. It offers a summary of key personal characteristics, providing perspective on an individual’s life course. There have been multiple attempts to measure frailty, some focusing on physiologic losses, others on specific diseases, disabilities or health deficits. Recently, multidimensional approaches to measuring frailty have included cognition, mood and social components. The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate a Home Care Frailty Scale and provide a grounded basis for assessing a person’s risk for decline that included functional and cognitive health, social deficits and troubling diagnostic and clinical conditions. Methods A secondary analysis design was used to develop the Home Care Frailty Scale. The data set consisted of client level home care data from service agencies around the world. The baseline sample included 967,865 assessments while the 6-month follow-up sample of persons still being served by the home care agencies consisted of 464,788 assessments. A pool of 70 candidate independent variables were screened for possible inclusion and 16 problem outcomes referencing accumulating declines and clinical complications served as the dependent variables. Multiple regression techniques were used to analyze the data. Results The resulting Home Care Frailty Scale consisted of a final set of 29 items. The items fall across 6 categories of function, movement, cognition and communication, social life, nutrition, and clinical symptoms. The prevalence of the items ranged from a high of 87% for persons requiring help with meal preparation to 3.7% for persons who have experienced a recent decline in the amount of food eaten. Conclusions The interRAI Home Care Frailty Scale is based on a strong conceptual foundation and in our analysis, performed as

  1. Correlates of Family Satisfaction with Hospice Care: General Inpatient Hospice Care versus Routine Home Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jeremy; Brennsteiner, Alex; Chow, Elizabeth; Hebert, Randy S

    2016-01-01

    The quality of communication and support provided to families is associated with greater satisfaction with hospice care. Prior work has not explored whether the predictors of family satisfaction are different in different hospice care settings. The study objective was to explore whether correlates of family satisfaction are different in general inpatient hospice care versus routine home hospice care. Survey data from bereaved family members of approximately 1600 patients from a nonprofit, midsized hospice in western Pennsylvania were used. Data was obtained from Family Evaluation of Hospice Care (FEHC) survey responses from 2008-2013 and separated into two groups, general inpatient hospice care and routine home hospice care. The analysis was completed using a binomial logistic regression model. Three variables were associated with greater overall satisfaction in both care settings: being kept informed about the patient's condition (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 9.64, CI: 6.56-14.36); being provided with clear/consistent information (AOR: 2.34, CI: 1.47-3.72); and the perception that patients were provided with adequate treatment for anxiety (AOR: 2.64, CI: 1.19-5.81). Two variables, sufficient discussion with hospice team members concerning family members' religious or spiritual beliefs (AOR: 1.64, CI: 1.17-2.30) and being provided with the correct amount of emotional support after the patient's death (AOR: 2.01, CI: 1.10-3.66), were correlated with greater satisfaction in routine home hospice care only. Good communication is strongly associated with greater family satisfaction across hospice care settings. Hospices must ensure that they provide patients and families with consistent information and support.

  2. Home Health Care and Discharged Hospice Care Patients: United States, 2000 and 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 290), other organic psychotic conditions–chronic (294), and Alzheimer’s disease (331.0). Diagnoses —One or more diseases or injuries in the home health care or discharged hospice care patient’s medical record. Diagnoses were recorded as: + Home health ...

  3. The availability and use of allied health care in care homes in the Midlands, UK: commentaries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemrijse, C.; Veenhof, C.; Boer, M.E. de

    2009-01-01

    The demographic trends of continuing growth of the number of older people will lead to an increasing need for long-term services such as nursing homes. The intensive work delivered by the rehabilitative services provided in the nursing homes includes care by a variety of allied health care

  4. [Home care for the high-risk newborn infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, M

    2010-06-01

    With increased survival of extremely low birth weigh (ELBW) and very ill infants, a lot of them are discharged with unresolved medical issues that complicate their subsequent care. Infants born preterm with low birth weight who require neonatal intensive care experience a much higher rate of hospital readmission and death during the first year after birth compared with healthy term infants. Despite initial hospital care which is one of the most expensive of all kind of hospitalization, home care services are sometimes still sparse though the high risk of this group for failure to thrive, respiratory problems, developmental delays, parenting problems. In addition, societal and economic forces have come to bear on the timing and process of discharge and home care. Moreover it takes time for the family of a high-risk infant to prepare to care for their infant in a home setting and to obtain the necessary support services and mobilize community resources. Careful preparation for discharge, good follow-up and medical home after discharge may reduce these risks.

  5. Nursing assistants' behaviour during morning care: effects of the implementation of snoezelen, integrated in 24-hour dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weert, Julia C M; Janssen, Bienke M; van Dulmen, Alexandra M; Spreeuwenberg, Peter M M; Bensing, Jozien M; Ribbe, Miel W

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports an investigation of the effects of the implementation of snoezelen, or multisensory stimulation, on the quality of nursing assistants' behaviour during morning care. Nursing assistants in long-term dementia care are often unaware of the impact of their behaviour on patient functioning. Snoezelen is a psychosocial intervention that might improve the quality of caregiver behaviour by combining a person-centred approach with the integration of sensory stimuli. A quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design was implemented in 12 wards for older mentally infirm patients at six nursing homes. The experimental group intervention was a 4-day in-house 'snoezelen' training, stimulus preference screening and supervision meetings. The control group received usual nursing home care. The effectiveness of the intervention was studied by analysing 250 video recordings, which were assessed by independent observers using a 4-point measurement scale developed for this study and based on Kitwood's Dialectical Framework. The results showed a statistically significant increase in 'Positive Person Work' and decrease in 'Malignant Social Psychology' (total scores) after the implementation of snoezelen. Nursing assistants in the experimental group also improved by statistically significant amounts on all subitems of 'Positive Person Work'. The mean number of sensory stimuli, offered explicitly, increased. The implementation of snoezelen succeeded in effecting a change to a more person-centred approach during morning care. The results indicate that nursing assistants' behaviour can be positively changed provided that the new care model has been successfully implemented.

  6. An Ontology-based Context-aware System for Smart Homes: E-care@home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirezaie, Marjan; Köckemann, Uwe; Kristoffersson, Annica; Karlsson, Lars; Blomqvist, Eva; Voigt, Thiemo; Loutfi, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Smart home environments have a significant potential to provide for long-term monitoring of users with special needs in order to promote the possibility to age at home. Such environments are typically equipped with a number of heterogeneous sensors that monitor both health and environmental parameters. This paper presents a framework called E-care@home, consisting of an IoT infrastructure, which provides information with an unambiguous, shared meaning across IoT devices, end-users, relatives, health and care professionals and organizations. We focus on integrating measurements gathered from heterogeneous sources by using ontologies in order to enable semantic interpretation of events and context awareness. Activities are deduced using an incremental answer set solver for stream reasoning. The paper demonstrates the proposed framework using an instantiation of a smart environment that is able to perform context recognition based on the activities and the events occurring in the home. PMID:28684686

  7. An Ontology-based Context-aware System for Smart Homes: E-care@home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirezaie, Marjan; Renoux, Jennifer; Köckemann, Uwe; Kristoffersson, Annica; Karlsson, Lars; Blomqvist, Eva; Tsiftes, Nicolas; Voigt, Thiemo; Loutfi, Amy

    2017-07-06

    Smart home environments have a significant potential to provide for long-term monitoring of users with special needs in order to promote the possibility to age at home. Such environments are typically equipped with a number of heterogeneous sensors that monitor both health and environmental parameters. This paper presents a framework called E-care@home, consisting of an IoT infrastructure, which provides information with an unambiguous, shared meaning across IoT devices, end-users, relatives, health and care professionals and organizations. We focus on integrating measurements gathered from heterogeneous sources by using ontologies in order to enable semantic interpretation of events and context awareness. Activities are deduced using an incremental answer set solver for stream reasoning. The paper demonstrates the proposed framework using an instantiation of a smart environment that is able to perform context recognition based on the activities and the events occurring in the home.

  8. An Ontology-based Context-aware System for Smart Homes: E-care@home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Alirezaie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart home environments have a significant potential to provide for long-term monitoring of users with special needs in order to promote the possibility to age at home. Such environments are typically equipped with a number of heterogeneous sensors that monitor both health and environmental parameters. This paper presents a framework called E-care@home, consisting of an IoT infrastructure, which provides information with an unambiguous, shared meaning across IoT devices, end-users, relatives, health and care professionals and organizations. We focus on integrating measurements gathered from heterogeneous sources by using ontologies in order to enable semantic interpretation of events and context awareness. Activities are deduced using an incremental answer set solver for stream reasoning. The paper demonstrates the proposed framework using an instantiation of a smart environment that is able to perform context recognition based on the activities and the events occurring in the home.

  9. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    ) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus......Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). Methods An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters...... was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by...

  10. Is it time for a comprehensive approach in older home care clients' care planning in Finland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjamaa, Riitta; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Kangasniemi, Mari; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2015-06-01

    Home-care services require access to high quality information. Apart from the provision of right-time organised planning of care and to document information about clients' needs, in home care, the care planning is intended to facilitate continuity and individual nursing through nursing documentation of the assessment of the client. The aim was to describe the contents of older (+75 years) home-care clients' electronic care and service plans and to evaluate how the clients' resources have been taken into account. The data were collected from the care and service plans (n = 437) of home-care services during July 2010. The data were analysed by quantitative methods and by thematic content analysis. Based on the analysis, medication was the most reported component in all plans (92.7%); other commonly reported components were self-care (85.4%) and coping (78.0%). Components within respiratory, follow-up treatment, life cycle and health behaviour were forgotten. Most of the care and service plans were designed from the home-care professionals' point of view but the plans lacked the perspective of older clients. To be able to promote older home clients' ability to live at home, home-care planning needs to be individually designed and must take into account clients' needs and their perspectives regarding meaningful activities and social relationships. In addition, there is a need to develop a more comprehensive care planning system, based on the clients' individual needs and standards of care planning. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  11. Outcomes from the work of registered nurses working with older people in UK care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Hazel

    2010-06-01

    This research sought to illuminate the distinct contributions made by Registered Nurses (RNs) and Care Assistants (CAs) to outcomes for older people in UK (nursing) care homes and to identify the outcomes of their work. This paper reports on aspects relevant to RNs. Older people living in long-term residential care settings around the world are among the most vulnerable individuals within their communities and those with the most complex needs. Nursing has historically been fundamental in the delivery of these services but, in some countries, the role of Registered Nurses in residential care is coming under increasing scrutiny, particularly in the context of escalating costs and funding restrictions, a questioning of the need for a 24-hour 'health' professional presence in a 'social care' service and a lack of evidence on the distinct contribution that RNs make to outcomes in these settings. A multi-method qualitative interpretive approach, adopting a structure-process-outcome framework and grounded in the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer (2003). For Phase 1 of the study, RNs and CAs from care homes around the UK contributed examples of their work, which they identified as having made a 'significant' difference to older individuals. Phase 2 comprised researcher fieldwork (observations, interviews and documentary analysis) in three care homes around UK. Research participants included RNs, CAs, older residents, relatives, home managers and professionals working in the homes. RN roles in care homes are broad and multifaceted. Distinct outcomes of RN work are consequent to their caring and their knowledge and skills developed through broad experience in a range of healthcare settings. Outcomes for residents from RN work include enhanced personhood and wellbeing, improved health and function, the prevention of problems/adverse outcomes and enhanced quality of life. RN outcomes have positive impact on relatives, staff and the homes in general. There is

  12. Rhetoric and reality of daily life in English care homes: the role of organised activities

    OpenAIRE

    Eyers, Ingrid; Arber, Sara; Luff, Rebekah; Young, Emma; Ellmers, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    In divergent ways, both government policy and care home practices influence the everyday life of older people living in English care homes. The rhetoric of choice for care home residents may be in conflict with the reality of government policy-driven service delivery. The aim of the article is to examine the role of organised activities in facilitating choice and active ageing among care home residents. Findings from a study of ten care homes in South East England exemplify the conflict betwe...

  13. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  14. Home-based Self-care: Understanding and Designing Pervasive Technology to Support Care Management Work at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    management and preventive self-monitoring to further study people’s perspectives on self-care both for health and illness. Second, we combine our initial studies with three additional studies of self-care practices: self-monitoring of pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and heart patients as well as home...

  15. Prevalence and content analysis of guidelines on handling requests for euthanasia or assisted suicide in Dutch nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkate, I; Muller, M T; Cappetti, M; Jonkers, F J; van der Wal, G

    2000-02-14

    The growing number of requests for euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) makes it imperative for health care institutions, such as nursing homes, to have written guidelines on how to handle requests for EAS. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of EAS guidelines in Dutch nursing homes and to analyze the content. Directors of patient care in 324 Dutch nursing homes were asked, by means of a mailed short list of questions, if they had an institutional guideline on EAS and, if so, to provide a copy. Guidelines were analyzed according to a structured list of items based on current jurisprudence, model documents, and opinions of experts. Of the 324 directors, 313 (97%) responded. In 58% of the nursing homes that responded, there existed written guidelines for EAS. Of those guidelines, 74% concerned EAS; in 26%, EAS was integrated in a guideline on terminal care. Of the guidelines, 165 (90%) were based on the policy that EAS is acceptable under specific conditions, and 18 (10%) banned EAS completely. Of the first-mentioned guidelines, 81% described one or more procedures for in-principle objections. In 65% of these guidelines, all official requirements for prudent practice were described. Despite the rapidly growing number of nursing-home guidelines on EAS and the existence of model documents, there is still considerable variation in the guidelines, and they can be improved in many aspects. A basic prerequisite is that the guidelines include all the official requirements for prudent practice.

  16. Development and Validation of A Scheduled Shifts Staffing (ASSiST) Measure of Unit-Level Staffing in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G; Doupe, Malcolm; Ginsburg, Liane; McGregor, Margaret J; Norton, Peter G; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2017-06-01

    To (a) describe A Scheduled Shifts Staffing measure (ASSiST) to derive care aide worked hours per resident day (HCA WHRD) at facility and unit levels in nursing homes, (b) report reliability through comparisons to administrative staffing data; (c) report validity by examining associations between HCA WHRD, staff outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion), and resident quality indicators (QIs) (e.g. falls, delirium, stage 2+ pressure ulcers), and (d) explore intrafacility variation in staffing intensity levels related to unit-level variation in resident and staff outcomes. We used data from 40 care units in 12 Canadian nursing homes between 2007 and 2012. Descriptive statistics and tests of association and difference described relationships of two measures of staffing with resident and staff outcomes. Annualized rates of HCA WHRD from both data sources compared well at the facility level (Pearson Product Correlation; R = 0.847, p validity, and reflects intrafacility variation in health care aide staffing levels.

  17. Care staff perspective on use of texture modified food in care home residents with dysphagia and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austbø Holteng, Lise Birgitte; Frøiland, Christina Tølbøl; Corbett, Anne; Testad, Ingelin

    2017-10-01

    Dysphagia and dementia are conditions, which combined, can lead to complications for the person and require good nutritional care. There is very little evidence-based literature regarding nutritional care for people with dysphagia and dementia. It is clear that care staff plays a vital role, and that communication and informed decision-making are critical to the process, yet little is known regarding the use of available interventions such as texture modified food (TMF), and their acceptability and feasibility for care staff and residents. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of care staff when providing nutritional care for people with dysphagia and dementia, and their impressions and experience of using TMF as a new intervention for nutrition. This was a qualitative study with an inductive approach, which aimed to explore the experience of care staff using TMF in a care home setting. Data were collected using focus group interviews, an approach which is validated as a means of supporting and developing the understanding of a phenomenon, through interactions and discussions in the group. Participants were care staff working in a care home setting in Norway. Twelve participants were recruited to this study across two focus groups. The cohort included four nurses, six practical nurses, one nurse assistants and one student nurse. Four main categories emerged from the focus group discussions regarding the use of TMF. These were: (I) emotional strain; (II) deficient nutritional care; (III) increased self-efficacy with use of TMF; (IV) better nutritional care with TMF. Use of TMF to improve nutritional care for people with dysphagia appears to have merit for both residents and care staff, and should be considered as a means of improving nutritional care for people with dementia in care homes. Minimizing feeding difficulties and increasing nutritional intake is an important goal when caring for this vulnerable group of people, and there is a

  18. Integrating a palliative care approach into nursing care homes for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Brown, Sarah

    2017-10-02

    Societies throughout the world are ageing and the proportion of people over 85 years of age is increasingly rapidly. In many countries a significant number of frail older people live in nursing care homes and will develop palliative care needs as they approach the end of their lives. In the United Kingdom around one fifth of those who die each year do so in a care home. Many of these will be cared for by generalist nurses and doctors without specific skills and knowledge in end-of-life care. Following a one-year pilot of the introduction of a nursing home facilitator post to introduce the principles of a palliative care approach into three nursing care homes for older people, the number of residents dying in hospital reduced by 25%.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of frailty among home care clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Minna; Tiihonen, Miia; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Nykänen, Irma

    2017-11-17

    Frailty is a common problem among older people and it is associated with an increased risk of death and long-term institutional care. Early identification of frailty is necessary to prevent a further decline in the health status of home care clients. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of frailty and associated factors among 75-year-old or older home care clients. The study participants were 75-year-old or older home care clients living in three cities in Eastern and Central Finland. Home care clients who had completed the abbreviated Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (aCGA) for frailty (n = 257) were included in the present study. Baseline data were obtained on functional status, cognitive status, depressive symptoms, self-rated health, ability to walk 400 m, nutritional status, drug use and comorbidities. Most of the home care clients (90%) were screened for frailty using the aCGA. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of malnutrition or malnutrition (OR = 4.27, 95% CI = 1.56, 11.68) and a low level of education (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.07, 1.23) were associated with frailty. Frailty is a prevalent problem among home care clients. The risk of malnutrition or malnourishment and a lower level of education increase the risk of frailty. Screening for frailty should be done to detect the most vulnerable older people for further intervention to prevent adverse health problems. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02214758 .

  20. Predictors for Unplanned Hospitalization of New Home Care Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönneikkö, Jukka K; Mäkelä, Matti; Jämsen, Esa R; Huhtala, Heini; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Noro, Anja; Valvanne, Jaakko N

    2017-02-01

    To identify factors predicting unplanned hospitalization of new home care clients using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC). A register-based study based on RAI-HC assessments and nationwide hospital discharge records. Municipal home care services in Finland. New Finnish home care clients aged 63 and older (N = 15,700). Information from home care clients' first RAI-HC assessment was connected to information regarding their first hospitalization over 1 year of follow-up. Multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the independent risk factors for hospitalization. Forty-three percent (n = 6,812) of participants were hospitalized at least once. The strongest independent risk factors were hospitalization during the year preceding the RAI-HC assessment (odds ratio (OR) = 2.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.87-2.16), aged 90 and older (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.48-1.92), renal insufficiency (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.22-1.69) and using 10 or more drugs (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.26-1.58). Other independent risk factors were male sex, previous emergency department visits or other acute outpatient care use, daily urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, history of falls, cognitive impairment, chronic skin ulcer, pain, unstable health status, housing-related problems, and poor self-rated health. Parkinson's disease, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer were independent prognostic indicators. A body mass index of 24 kg/m2 or greater and the client's own belief that functional capacity could improve had a protective role. Assessing new home care clients using the RAI-HC reveals modifiable risk factors for unplanned hospitalization. Systematic assessment by a multidisciplinary team at the beginning of the service and targeting modifiable risk factors could reduce the risk of unplanned hospitalization. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics

  1. Smart Health Caring Home: A Systematic Review of Smart Home Care for Elders and Chronic Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraitou, Marina; Pateli, Adamantia; Fotiou, Sotiris

    2017-01-01

    As access to health care is important to people's health especially for vulnerable groups that need nursing for a long period of time, new studies in the human sciences argue that the health of the population depend less on the quality of the health care, or on the amount of spending that goes into health care, and more heavily on the quality of everyday life. Smart home applications are designed to "sense" and monitor the health conditions of its residents through the use of a wide range of technological components (motion sensors, video cameras, wearable devices etc.), and web-based services that support their wish to stay at home. In this work, we provide a review of the main technological, psychosocial/ethical and economic challenges that the implementation of a Smart Health Caring Home raises.

  2. 77 FR 45367 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... strategic planning activities, performance, homeless populations, and data collection methods. This... Assistance application which collects data about the CoC's strategic planning activities, performance... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application...

  3. Patient-Centered Medical Home Capacity and Ambulatory Care Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Hearld, Kristine R; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has increasingly received attention as a model of care to potentially remedy the cost and quality problems that confront the US health care system, including and especially ambulatory care-related issues. This study examined the association between physician practices' PCMH capacity and 3 indicators of ambulatory care utilization: (1) emergency department utilization, (2) ambulatory care sensitive hospitalization rate, and (3) 30-day all-cause readmission rate. Results show that overall PCMH capacity is associated with lower rates, and technical aspects of the PCMH in particular were associated with lower utilization rates while interpersonal capabilities were not.

  4. Impact of Home Health Care on Health Care Resource Utilization Following Hospital Discharge: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Zafirau, William J; Gorodeski, Eiran Z; Young, James B

    2017-12-02

    As healthcare costs rise, home health care represents an opportunity to reduce preventable adverse events and costs following hospital discharge. No studies have investigated the utility of home health care within the context of a large and diverse patient population. A retrospective cohort study was conducted between 1/1/2013 and 6/30/2015 at a single tertiary care institution to assess healthcare utilization after discharge with home health care. Control patients discharged with "self-care" were matched by propensity score to home health care patients. The primary outcome was total healthcare costs in the 365-day post-discharge period. Secondary outcomes included follow-up readmission and death. Multivariable linear and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to adjust for covariates. Among 64,541 total patients, 11,266 controls were matched to 6,363 home health care patients across 11 disease-based Institutes. During the 365-day post-discharge period, home health care was associated with a mean unadjusted savings of $15,233 per patient, or $6,433 after adjusting for covariates (p Home health care independently decreased the hazard of follow-up readmission (HR 0.82, p home health care most benefited patients discharged from the Digestive Disease (death HR 0.72, p home health care was associated with significant reduction in healthcare utilization and decreased hazard of readmission and death. These data inform development of value-based care plans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating home health care nursing outcomes with OASIS and NOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia Stocker; Barkauskas, Violet; Keenan, Gail

    2008-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and responsiveness of the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) to the effects of home healthcare nursing interventions. A quasi-experimental before-after study was conducted using a sample of 106 home healthcare participants referred to one of seven participating Midwest home healthcare agencies for treatment of a cardiac condition. Patient outcomes data were collected at home healthcare admission and discharge using OASIS and NOC. Nursing intervention data were collected at each visit using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Intervention intensity was calculated by totaling the number of NIC interventions provided over the episode of care. Neither OASIS nor NOC were sensitive to the effects of home healthcare nursing as measured by intervention intensity. The OASIS was not responsive to clinically discernable changes in patient outcomes; while the NOC was responsive to patient status change in the outcome categories including activities of daily living, cardiopulmonary status, coping, and illness management behavior. Outcome measures that are more condition-specific and discipline-specific are more responsive to the effects of home healthcare nursing. Further research is needed to identify and refine outcome measures that are sensitive and responsive to the effects of nursing care in home health and other nursing settings. The use of outcome measures that are more sensitive and responsive to nursing are more effective in guiding nursing practice.

  6. Assistência domiciliar: a experiência de um hospital privado do interior paulista Atención domiciliaria: la experiencia de un hospital privado del interior del estado de São Paulo Home care: the experience of a private hospital in the state of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzele Cristina Coelho Fabrício

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A Assistência domiciliar (home care, definida como um conjunto de procedimentos hospitalares possíveis de serem realizadas na casa do paciente, abrange ações de saúde desenvolvidas por equipe interprofissional. Este estudo visa a transmitir a experiência do serviço de assistência domiciliar do Hospital São Francisco (HSF, de Ribeirão Preto, apresentando os resultados de 12 meses de atividades (período de setembro de 2001 a agosto de 2002. Durante o período analisado, o serviço prestou atendimento, em sua maioria, a mulheres (57%, com idade predominantemente entre 70-80 anos (30%, com diagnóstico prevalente de doença neurológica (27% e neoplasias (17%. O setor possui, como coordenadoras, enfermeiras, também responsáveis pela captação do cliente. O trabalho é realizado por uma equipe interprofissional que realiza desde procedimentos, como coleta de exames laboratoriais, curativos, cuidados com sondas e ostomias, até internação domiciliar.La atención domiciliaria, definida como un conjunto de procedimientos hospitalarios que pueden ser realizados en la casa del paciente, engloba acciones de salud desarrolladas por un equipo interprofesional. Este estudio visa trasmitir la experiencia del servicio de atención domiciliaria del Hospital São Francisco (HSF de Ribeirão Preto, Brasil, presentando los resultados de 12 meses de actividades (período de septiembre de 2001 a agosto de 2002. Durante el período analizado, el servicio prestó atención a, en su mayoría, mujeres, (57%, con edad predominantemente entre 70-80 años (30% y con diagnóstico predominante de enfermedad neurológica (27% y neoplasias (17%. El sector cuenta con coordinadoras enfermeras, también responsables por la captación del cliente. El trabajo es realizado por un equipo interprofesional que realiza desde procedimientos como recolección de exámenes de laboratorio, curativos, cuidados con sondas y ostomías, hasta la internación domiciliaria.Home

  7. [Role of Visiting Nursing Care in Japanese Home Healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Taiwan's rapidly aging society is expected to make it a super-aged society in 2026. By 2060, people aged 65 or older will account for 40% of the population, a ratio that will approximate that in Japan. In Japan, the elderly population was 27.3% in 2016. By 2025, when the baby-boomers become 75 years old in Japan, issues of long-term care and end-of-life care will be more important and challenging. Since 1976, more Japanese have died in hospital settings than in home settings. Although the percentage of people dying at home increased slightly to 12.7% in 2016, after the recent introduction and promotion of home healthcare, Japan will face a significant challenge to deal with the healthcare 'tsunami' of high natural death rates, which is expected to impose a heavy death burdened on society by 2040, when the death rate is expected to reach 1,670,000/year. Therefore, the Japanese authorities have begun to promote the Community-based Integrated Care System, in which home healthcare and visiting nursing play crucial roles. This article summarizes the historical trend and current situation of visiting nursing in Japan. Japan uses a hybrid payment system for visiting nursing that is financially supported both through private medical insurance policies and Kaigo insurance (Japanese long-term care insurance). The total of 8613 visiting nursing stations that were active in community settings in 2016 cooperated with 14,000 support clinics for home healthcare and cared for 570,000 patients in home settings. We believe that visiting nursing will play an important role in home healthcare in Taiwan in the future.

  8. Parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit: a phenomenological hermeneutical interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellenmark-Blom, Michaela; Wigert, Helena

    2014-03-01

    A descriptive study of parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit. As survival rates improve among premature and critically ill infants with an increased risk of morbidity, parents' responsibilities for neonatal care grow in scope and degree under the banner of family-centred care. Concurrent with medical advances, new questions arise about the role of parents and the experience of being provided neonatal care at home. An interview study with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Parents from a Swedish neonatal (n = 22) home care setting were extensively interviewed within one year of discharge. Data were collected during 2011-2012. The main theme of the findings is that parents experience neonatal home care as an inner emotional journey, from having a child to being a parent. This finding derives from three themes: the parents' experience of leaving the hospital milieu in favour of establishing independent parenthood, maturing as a parent and processing experiences during the period of neonatal intensive care. This study suggests that neonatal home care is experienced as a care structure adjusted to incorporate parents' needs following discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal home care appears to bridge the gap between hospital and home, supporting the family's adaptation to life in the home setting. Parents become empowered to be primary caregivers, having nurse consultants serving the needs of the whole family. Neonatal home care may therefore be understood as the implementation of family-centred care during the transition from NICU to home. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  10. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  11. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  12. Evidence-based practice guidelines for prescribing home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Laura; Coyle, Emma; Todd, Helen; Williams, Cylie

    2018-01-05

    Home modifications maintain people's functional independence and safety. No literature exists to guide the prescription of home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs. With Australia's increasing obesity rate, more evidence is needed to support home modification prescribers. This study aimed to map Australian home modification prescribing practices for clients with bariatric care needs and to establish and evaluate a clinical resource for this prescription process. The study included two phases. Phase 1 conducted a cross-sectional survey of therapists practicing in Australia, and Australian industry partners who prescribe or install home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs. Phase 2 included design, implementation and evaluation of a clinical resource. Data were analysed with means and frequencies; multivariable regression analysis was used to explore prescribing habits. Therapists surveyed (n = 347) reported 11 different bariatric weight definitions. Less than 3% constantly or regularly prescribed home modifications for these clients; rails were most commonly prescribed. Many therapists (n = 171, 58%) 'never' or 'rarely' knew rail load capacity. Therapists' knowledge of rail load capacity was associated with previous experience prescribing home modifications (P = 0.009); rail manufacturer's advice (P = 0.016) and not using advice from builders (P = 0.001). Clinical resources were used by 11% (n = 26) of therapists to support their prescription, and industry sporadically relied on therapists to specify modification design requirements (n = 5, 45%). Post-implementation of a clinical resource increased consensus regarding understanding of the term bariatric and increased consultation with builders and manufacturers. There was a lack of consistency in bariatric terminology, uncertainty of rail load capacities and minimal use of clinical practice guidelines. Additional resources will assist with consistency in prescribing

  13. Patient care. Give psych a home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchik, Gloria Shur

    2005-02-01

    Cuts to mental health services put most hospitals in a bind when treating patients who need such care. But an Alaska hospital has found a creative--and cost-effective--way to provide psychiatric service in the emergency department.

  14. Hospital at home: home-based end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Straus, Sharon E; Wee, Bee

    2016-02-18

    The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and people with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end-of-life care at home. This is the fourth update of the original review. To determine if providing home-based end-of-life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients' symptoms, quality of life, health service costs, and caregivers, compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. We searched the following databases until April 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (from 1950), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1982), and EconLit (from 1969). We checked the reference lists of potentially relevant articles identified and handsearched palliative care publications, clinical trials registries, and a database of systematic reviews for related trials (PDQ-Evidence 2015). Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series, or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end-of-life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible, we reported the results from individual studies. We included four trials in this review and did not identify new studies from the search in April 2015. Home-based end-of-life care increased the likelihood of dying at home compared with usual care (risk ratio (RR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi(2) = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I(2) = 0%; 3 trials; N = 652; high quality evidence). Admission to hospital while receiving home-based end-of-life care varied between trials, and this was

  15. A capacitação de enfermeiros para a assistência domiciliar: uma abordagem psicossocial La capacitación de los enfermeros para la asistencia domiciliaria: un abordaje psicosocial Preparing nurses to provide quality home care: a psychosocial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilanice de Araújo Alves Püschel

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem por objetivo relatar a experiência da realização de um curso de capacitação para a assistência domiciliar na abordagem psicossocial. O curso foi oferecido para sete profissionais com experiência na área. É apresentado o referencial teórico e a metodologia empregada no curso, assim como os resultados das três partes que constituíram o programa de capacitação: a do reconhecimento dos sujeitos e da mobilização afetiva; a da mobilização de conceitos e das representações das práticas profissionais; a da aplicabilidade do modelo psicossocial no domicílio.Este trabajo tiene por objetivo relatar la experiencia de la realización de un curso de capacitación para la asistencia domiciliaria en el abordaje psicosocial. El curso fue ofrecido para siete profesionales con experiencia en el área. Se presenta el referencial teórico y la metodología empleada en el curso, así como los resultados de las tres partes que constituyeron el programa de capacitación: el reconocimiento de los sujetos y de la mobilización afectiva; la mobilización de conceptos y las representaciones de las prácticas profesionales; la aplicabilidad del modelo psicosocial en el domicilio.The objective of this paper is to describe a psychosocial approach in the development and implementation of a course to prepare health care professionals to provide quality home care. This course was implemented among seven health care professionals working in home care. This paper discusses the conceptual framework and methodological underpinning for the development and implementation of the course. In addition, this paper discusses the following phases of implementation of the course: recognition of the subjects and affective mobilization, conceptualization and meaning of professional practice, and applicability of the psychosocial model in home care.

  16. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    . Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health...... care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. METHOD: Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge...

  17. A toolkit for encouraging activities in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Karin

    Activity is vital for the physical and psychological wellbeing of care home residents. It should be an integral part of their daily routine but can be viewed as an additional burden for busy staff. Activity is defined as everything we "do", and even older people who are frail can still be active. Nurses need to consider how activity can be incorporated into residents' daily lives; the Living Well Through Activity in Care Homes toolkit, produced by the College of Occupational Therapists, aims to help staff provide meaningful activities for residents.

  18. Characterizing hazards and injuries among home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Brad; Olson, Ryan; Wright, Robert R; Garrigues, Layla; Lees, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    This project extends research on hazardous exposures and injuries among home care workers. Historical data from Oregon home care workers were analyzed to identify the most common lost time injuries and contributing factors, and 7 focus groups were conducted with workers (n = 53) to gather data on demographics, health, and perceptions of occupational hazards. Results indicate that workers are at particular risk for back, knee, and shoulder injuries during client and material moving tasks and that workers' self-reported task exposures and risk perceptions are highly aligned with injury data.

  19. Characteristics of care and caregivers of Alzheimer's patients in elderly care homes: a qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektatalab, Sh; Kaveh, M H; Sharif, F; Fallahi Khoshknab, M; Petramfar, P

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increase in the number of Alzheimer's patients in Iran and also the limitation of cultural knowledge about caring of these patients, this study was designed to explore the perceptions of Iranian caregivers about caring Alzheimer patients in the elderly care homes. A qualitative content analysis method was conducted on two elderly care homes of Shiraz/Iran, during 2009-2011. Fourteen key informants (10 women and 4 men, between 25-35 years of age), who had been working in elderly care homes caring for the elderly with Alzheimer disease for about 1-11 years (Mean=30 months) were selected by purposive sampling method. The caring experience and ability of transferring their experience to others were the main criteria for selection of the participants. They were participated in 2 focus groups and 4 interviews. Nearly, 800 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 3 groups of "multidimensional care", "going along with the patients" and "need to be professional" and 12 subcategories. Although several aspects of care were mentioned by the participants but the main aspect was physical care. Infantilizing the patients was the main feature of care and caring personality was an important characteristic of caregivers. An appropriate schedule of care considering main categories and subcategories of this research based on cultural context should be prepared. Moreover, consistent promotion of the schedule, employment of trained staff and plans for continued education for them can improve the quality of care and patient's life in elderly care homes.

  20. Investigating staff knowledge of safeguarding and pressure ulcers in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, K; Kaye, V; McCormick, K; Stephenson, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether nursing/care home staff regard pressure ulceration as a safeguarding issue; and to explore reporting mechanisms for pressure ulcers (PUs) in nursing/care homes. Within one clinical commissioning group, 65 staff members from 50 homes completed a questionnaire assessing their experiences of avoidable and unavoidable PUs, grading systems, and systems in place for referral to safeguarding teams. Understanding of safeguarding was assessed in depth by interviews with 11 staff members. Staff observed an average of 2.72 PUs in their workplaces over the previous 12 months, judging 45.6% to be avoidable. Only a minority of respondents reported knowledge of a grading system (mostly the EPUAP/NPUAP system). Most respondents would refer PUs to the safeguarding team: the existence of a grading system, or guidance, appeared to increase that likelihood. Safeguarding was considered a priority in most homes; interviewees were familiar with the term safeguarding, but some confusion over its meaning was apparent. Quality of written documentation and verbal communication received before residents returned from hospital was highlighted. However, respondents expressed concern over lack of information regarding skin integrity. Most staff had received education regarding ulcer prevention or wound management during training, but none reported post-registration training or formal education programmes; reliance was placed on advice of district nurses or tissue viability specialists. Staff within nursing/care homes understand the fundamentals of managing skin integrity and the importance of reporting skin damage; however, national education programmes are needed to develop knowledge and skills to promote patient health-related quality of life, and to reduce the health-care costs of pressure damage. Further research to investigate understanding, knowledge and skills of nursing/care home staff concerning pressure ulcer development and safeguarding will become increasingly

  1. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  2. Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke JR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Joshua R Burke, Rachael Morley, Mustafa Khanbhai Academic Surgery Unit, Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is the continuous or intermittent application of subatmospheric pressure to the surface of a wound that improves the wound environment, accelerates healing, and reduces wound closure time. Since its first documented use, this technology has lent itself to a number of adaptations, most notably, the development of portable devices facilitating treatment in the home care setting. With advancing surgical standards, wound healing is an important rate-limiting factor in early patient discharge and often a major cost of inpatient treatment. The efficacy of NPWT in the home care setting has been investigated through rate of wound closure, time in care, and patient experience. Rate of wound closure is the most appropriate primary end point. Much can be gleaned from patient experience, but the future success of portable NPWT will be measured on time in care and therefore cost effectiveness. However, there is a lack of level 1a evidence demonstrating increased efficacy of portable over inpatient NPWT. The development of portable NPWT is an encouraging innovation in wound care technology, and extending the benefits to the home care setting is both possible and potentially more beneficial. Keywords: portable, negative pressure wound therapy, vacuum-assisted closure, topical negative pressure therapy

  3. Experiência-piloto de assistência domiciliar: idosos acamados de uma Unidade Básica de Saúde, Porto Alegre, Brasil Experiencia piloto de asistencia a domicilio: ancianos encamados en una Unidad Básica de Salud, en Porto Alegre, Brasil Pilot-experience in home care: bedridden aged patients of a Basic Health Unit, Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselda Quintana Marques

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve por objetivos: descrever o processo de desenvolvimento do projeto-piloto de assistência a idosos acamados, da Unidade Básica de Saúde IAPI; e identificar aspectos demográficos, sociais e de saúde desses idosos, bem como aspectos relevantes relatados pela equipe, na implantação da assistência domiciliar. A pesquisa teve características descritivas e avaliativas. Foram revisadas as fichas cadastrais e os prontuários dos pacientes atendidos, assim como os registros de avaliação do projeto. A experiência-piloto permitiu o desenvolvimento de habilidades na equipe, foi enriquecedora e de grande responsabilidade para profissionais e cuidadores. Apontou para a continuidade da assistência domiciliar, fazendo-se necessários ajustes na sua organização, com a finalidade de ampliar os espaços de assistência e a qualidade do que vinha sendo ofertado à população.El estudio tuvo por objetivos describir: el proceso de desarrollo del proyecto piloto de asistencia a ancianos encamados, de la Unidad Básica de Salud IAPI; identificar aspectos demográficos, sociales y de salud de esos ancianos; y, identificar los aspectos relevantes relatados por el equipo, en la implantación de la asistencia a domicilio. La investigación tuvo características descriptivas y de evaluación. Fueron revisadas las fichas de inscripción de los pacientes atendidos, así como los registros de evaluación del proyecto. La experiencia piloto permitió el desarrollo de habilidades en el equipo, fue enriquecedora y de gran responsabilidad para los profesionales y cuidadores. El resultado apuntó para la continuidad de la asistencia a domicilio, siendo necesario realizar ajustes en su organización, con la finalidad de ampliar los espacios de asistencia y la calidad de lo que estaba siendo ofrecido a la población.The objectives of this study were to describe the development of a pilot-project in home care to bedridden aged patients at a Basic Health

  4. Incontinence care in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Manuela; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2015-09-01

    To describe the quality of incontinence care in nursing homes. Main outcome measures were: (1) availability of structural quality indicators on ward and institutional levels; (2) use of nursing interventions as quality indicators on a process level; (3) prevalence of incontinence as an outcome indicator. Incontinence in older people is a major problem in nursing care that presents a high workload for nurses, increases costs and places a high burden on affected individuals. The availability of structural indicators, and the use of nursing interventions, is recommended to improve the quality of care. Only limited amounts of reliable and valid data are available regarding the quality of incontinence care in nursing homes. A cross-sectional multicentre study in 16 nursing homes (N = 1302) in 2013. A standardized and validated questionnaire was used for data collection. Each resident was assessed by two trained nurses. The primary outcome of the study indicated that structural indicators, such as the availability of information brochures, are limited in nursing homes. On a process level, the provision of body worn pads or underlay pads to protect beds or chairs were most frequently used and training interventions were only delivered to a small proportion of residents with incontinence. The prevalence of all types of incontinence, particularly double incontinence, was high (69·2%). Due to the high prevalence of double incontinence and low rate of training interventions regarding this type of incontinence, ongoing efforts to improve the quality of incontinence care are warranted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Administration of care to older patients in transition from hospital to home care services: home nursing leaders' experiences

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    Dale B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale,1 Sigrun Hvalvik21Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, NorwayBackground: Older persons in transition between hospital and home care services are in a particularly vulnerable situation and risk unfortunate consequences caused by organizational inefficiency. The purpose of the study reported here was to elucidate how home nursing leaders experience the administration of care to older people in transition from hospital to their own homes.Methods: A qualitative study design was used. Ten home nursing leaders in two municipalities in southern Norway participated in individual interviews. The interview texts were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by use of a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.Results: Three main themes and seven subthemes were deduced from the data. The first main theme was that the home nursing leaders felt challenged by the organization of home care services. Two subthemes were identified related to this. The first was that the leaders lacked involvement in the transitional process, and the second was that they were challenged by administration of care being decided at another level in the municipality. The second main theme found was that the leaders felt that they were acting in a shifting and unsettled context. Related to this, they had to adjust internal resources to external demands and expectations, and experienced lack of communication with significant others. The third main theme identified was that the leaders endeavored to deliver care in accordance with professional values. The two related subthemes were, first, that they provided for appropriate internal systems and routines, and, second, that they prioritized available professional competence, and made an effort to promote a professional

  6. Occupational therapy for care home residents with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Marion F; Cobley, Christine S; Steultjens, Esther M J; Sackley, Catherine M

    2013-06-05

    Stroke is a worldwide problem and is a leading cause of adult disability, resulting in dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) for around half of stroke survivors. It is estimated that up to 25% of all care home residents in the USA and in the UK have had a stroke. Stroke survivors who reside in care homes are likely to be more physically and cognitively impaired and therefore more dependent than those able to remain in their own home. Overall, 75% of care home residents are classified as severely disabled, and those with stroke are likely to have high levels of immobility, incontinence and confusion, as well as additional co-morbidities. It is not known whether this clinically complex population could benefit from occupational therapy in the same way as community-dwelling stroke survivors. The care home population with stroke differs from the general stroke population living at home, and a review was needed to examine the benefits of occupational therapy provided to this specific group. This review therefore focused on occupational therapy interventions for ADL for stroke survivors residing in care homes. To measure the effects of occupational therapy interventions (provided directly by an occupational therapist or under the supervision of an occupational therapist) targeted at improving, restoring and maintaining independence in ADL among stroke survivors residing in long-term institutional care, termed collectively as 'care homes'. As a secondary objective, we aimed to evaluate occupational therapy interventions for reducing complications such as depression and low mood. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (August 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, September 2012), MEDLINE (1948 to September 2012), EMBASE (1980 to September 2012), CINAHL (1982 to September 2012) and 10 additional bibliographic databases and six trials registers. We also handsearched seven journals, checked

  7. Relationship between home hazards and falling among community-dwelling seniors using home-care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, B-S; Bégin, C; Cadieux, E; Goulet, L; Allaire, J-F; Meloche, J; Leduc, N; Kergoat, M-J

    2010-02-01

    Evidence linking home hazards to falls has not been well established. The evidence-based approach to fall-risk assessment in longitudinal studies becomes difficult because of exposures that change during follow-up. We conducted a cohort study to determine the prevalence of hazards and to resolve whether they are linked to the risk of falls among 959 seniors receiving home-care services. A home hazards assessment was completed at entry and every six months thereafter using a standardized form. The adjusted (for a number of confounding factors) relationship between home hazards and falls was estimated using a survival model taking into account updated time-varying exposures and multiple events. Falls leading to a medical consultation were examined as a secondary outcome, hypothesized as a measure of severity. Home environmental hazards were found in 91% of homes, with a mean of 3.3 risks per individual. The bathroom was the most common place for hazards. The presence of hazards was significantly associated with all falls and fall-related medical consultations, and showed relatively constant effects from one fall to another. The current study is innovative in its approach and useful in its contribution to the understanding of the interaction between home environmental hazards and falls. Our results indicate that inattention to changes in exposure masks the statistical association between home hazards and falls. Each environmental hazard identified in the home increases the risk of falling by about 19%. These findings support the positive findings of trials that demonstrate the effectiveness of this home hazard reduction program, particularly for at-risk people.

  8. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  9. Nursing delegation. Implications for home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Janet A; Tripp, Emily

    2002-09-01

    Consumers are advocating for client-directed care and are influencing legislation that regulates delegation within nurse practice acts. Almost 18 months ago, the Visiting Nurse Association of Texas implemented the delegation of insulin administration for appropriate patients. Results indicate that the program is a success and the time invested in developing the program was well spent.

  10. Characteristics of care management agencies affect expenditure on home help and day care services: A population-based cross-sectional study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Igarashi, Ayumi; Noguchi-Watanabe, Maiko; Yoshie, Satoru; Iijima, Katsuya; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2017-11-01

    The financial interests of care management agencies can affect how care managers assist clients' use of long-term care insurance services. The present study examined the relationship between clients' service expenditures, and whether the home help and day care service agencies belonged to the same organization as the care management agency. Population-based data were obtained from a suburban municipality in Japan. We investigated 4331 persons with care needs certificates (levels 1-5), including those using home help (n = 1780) or day care (n = 2141) services. Data on the service expenditures, and clients' and agencies' characteristics were analyzed using multiple linear regression analyses controlling for potential confounders. Home help service users spent an average of US$558.1 ± 590.1 for home help service, and day care service users spent US$665.0 ± 415.9 for day care service. Living alone, living in a condominium/apartment, higher care needs, more severe cognitive impairment and lower use of other services were associated with higher home help service expenditure. Day care service expenditure increased with older age, female sex, higher care needs, more severe cognitive impairment and higher physical function. Clients whose service agencies and care management agencies belonged to the same organization had higher expenditures, even after adjusting for confounders (home help: β = 0.126, P = 0.007; day care: β = 0.085, P = 0.002, respectively). Financial interests of care management agencies might significantly influence clients' service expenditure. We should develop an effective system to minimize this influence. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2224-2231. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. A systematic review of integrated working between care homes and health care services

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    Davies Sue L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK there are almost three times as many beds in care homes as in National Health Service (NHS hospitals. Care homes rely on primary health care for access to medical care and specialist services. Repeated policy documents and government reviews register concern about how health care works with independent providers, and the need to increase the equity, continuity and quality of medical care for care homes. Despite multiple initiatives, it is not known if some approaches to service delivery are more effective in promoting integrated working between the NHS and care homes. This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Methods A systematic review was conducted using Medline (PubMed, CINAHL, BNI, EMBASE, PsycInfo, DH Data, Kings Fund, Web of Science (WoS incl. SCI, SSCI, HCI and the Cochrane Library incl. DARE. Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of integrated working between primary health care professionals and care homes, or identified barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Studies were quality assessed; data was extracted on health, service use, cost and process related outcomes. A modified narrative synthesis approach was used to compare and contrast integration using the principles of framework analysis. Results Seventeen studies were included; 10 quantitative studies, two process evaluations, one mixed methods study and four qualitative. The majority were carried out in nursing homes. They were characterised by heterogeneity of topic, interventions, methodology and outcomes. Most quantitative studies reported limited effects of the intervention; there was insufficient information to evaluate cost. Facilitators to integrated working included care home managers' support and protected time for staff training. Studies with the potential for

  12. A systematic review of integrated working between care homes and health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sue L; Goodman, Claire; Bunn, Frances; Victor, Christina; Dickinson, Angela; Iliffe, Steve; Gage, Heather; Martin, Wendy; Froggatt, Katherine

    2011-11-24

    In the UK there are almost three times as many beds in care homes as in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Care homes rely on primary health care for access to medical care and specialist services. Repeated policy documents and government reviews register concern about how health care works with independent providers, and the need to increase the equity, continuity and quality of medical care for care homes. Despite multiple initiatives, it is not known if some approaches to service delivery are more effective in promoting integrated working between the NHS and care homes. This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working. A systematic review was conducted using Medline (PubMed), CINAHL, BNI, EMBASE, PsycInfo, DH Data, Kings Fund, Web of Science (WoS incl. SCI, SSCI, HCI) and the Cochrane Library incl. DARE. Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of integrated working between primary health care professionals and care homes, or identified barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Studies were quality assessed; data was extracted on health, service use, cost and process related outcomes. A modified narrative synthesis approach was used to compare and contrast integration using the principles of framework analysis. Seventeen studies were included; 10 quantitative studies, two process evaluations, one mixed methods study and four qualitative. The majority were carried out in nursing homes. They were characterised by heterogeneity of topic, interventions, methodology and outcomes. Most quantitative studies reported limited effects of the intervention; there was insufficient information to evaluate cost. Facilitators to integrated working included care home managers' support and protected time for staff training. Studies with the potential for integrated working were longer in duration. Despite evidence

  13. Examining pediatric emergency home ventilation practices in home health nurses: Opportunities for improved care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Sheila S; Beas, Virginia N; Keens, Thomas G; Ward, Sally S L; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2015-07-01

    To assess the pediatric home health nurses' knowledge in tracheostomy and ventilator emergency care on home mechanical ventilation (HMV). Emergencies are frightening experiences for solo home health nurses and require advanced skills in emergency response and care, especially in pediatric patients who pose unique challenges. Nurses with greater years of nursing experience would perform better on emergency HMV case-based scenarios than nurses with less years of experience. An exploratory online survey was used to evaluate emergency case-based pediatric scenarios. Demographic and professional experiences were profiled. Seventy-nine nurses had an average of 6.73 (SD = 1.41) years in pediatric nursing. Over 70% received their HMV training in their agency, 41% had less than 4 years of experience, and 30.4% had encountered at least one emergency situation at home. The online survey was distributed by managers of 22 home health agencies to nurses providing pediatric HMV care. Nurses scored an average of 4.87 out of 10 possible points. There were no significant differences between nurses with nurses favored more training in HMV from a variety of settings (e.g., agency, on-line training). Nurses did not perform well in case-based ventilator alarm scenarios. Length of nursing experience did not differentiate greater knowledge. It is clear that nurses require and want more training in emergency-based HMV. Recommendations for an enhanced curriculum are suggested. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Patients' perceptions of palliative care quality in hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2016-08-24

    Patients' perceptions of care quality within and across settings are important for the further development of palliative care. The aim was to investigate patients' perceptions of palliative care quality within settings, including perceptions of care received and their subjective importance, and contrast palliative care quality across settings. A cross-sectional study including 191 patients in late palliative phase (73 % response rate) admitted to hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care was conducted, using the Quality from the Patients' Perspective instrument-palliative care (QPP-PC). QPP-PC comprises four dimensions and 12 factors; "medical-technical competence" (MT) (2 factors), "physical-technical conditions" (PT) (one factor), "identity-orientation approach" (ID) (4 factors), "sociocultural atmosphere" (SC) (5 factors), and three single items (S); medical care, personal hygiene and atmosphere. Data were analysed using paired-samples t-test and analysis of covariance while controlling for differences in patient characteristics. Patients' perceptions of care received within settings showed high scores for the factors and single items "honesty" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings and low scores for "exhaustion" (MT) in three out of four settings. Patients' perceptions of importance scored high for "medical care" (S), "honesty" (ID), "respect and empathy" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings. No aspects of care scored low in all settings. Importance scored higher than perceptions of care received, in particular for receiving information. Patients' perceptions of care across settings differed, with highest scores in hospice inpatient care for the dimensions; ID, SC, and "medical care" (S), the SC and "atmosphere" (S) for hospice day care, and "medical care" (S) for palliative units in nursing homes. There were no differences in subjective importance across settings. Strengths of services related to

  15. A system for intelligent home care ECG upload and priorisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Lorenzo T; Tarita, Eugeniu; Zywietz, Tosja K; Lueth, Tim C

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, a system for internet based, automated home care ECG upload and priorisation is presented for the first time. It unifies the advantages of existing telemonitoring ECG systems adding functionalities such as automated priorisation and usability for home care. Chronic cardiac diseases are a big group in the geriatric field. Most of them can be easily diagnosed with help of an electrocardiogram. A frequent or long-term ECG analysis allows early diagnosis of e.g. a cardiac infarction. Nevertheless, patients often aren't willing to visit a doctor for prophylactic purposes. Possible solutions of this problem are home care devices, which are used to investigate patients at home without the presence of a doctor on site. As the diffusion of such systems leads to a huge amount of data which has to be managed and evaluated, the presented approach focuses on an easy to use software for ECG upload from home, a web based management application and an algorithm for ECG preanalysis and priorisation.

  16. The challenges of upskilling health care assistants in community nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Shelley Anne

    2017-06-02

    Community care is at the forefront of the National Health Service reforms. Role redistribution from registered nurses to health care assistants is growing. This paper examines the challenges of upskilling community health care assistants to undertake catheterisation for uncomplicated patients in the community. Social constructivist methods facilitated reflective practice. Challenges included fears around delegation, accountability and the responsibilities involved in supporting the development of health care assistants. Recommendations suggest that community health care assistants offer a valuable and much needed contribution to health care delivery and are enthusiastic to upskill in catheterisation. However, reluctance from community registered nurses around delegation delayed the process. Registered nurses will need to address these fears and engage in workforce planning to proactively influence role developments and safe practice. National guidance needs to be structured around clear pathways to support these valued participants in delivering health care.

  17. MANAJEMEN SARANA PRASARANA DI DAY CARE BABY’S HOME SALATIGA

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    Desi Kusumawati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Day Care is one form of early childhood education in non formal education program that organize nurturing and social welfare of children from birth up to the age of 6 years. This study aimed to identify the suitability of existing infrastructure in Baby's Home day care with the ACT of Minister of Education and Culture No. 137 of 2014 Article 32 Paragraph 3; and to provide an overview why the planning, maintenance and inventory in Baby's Home day care were not optimal. This study was qualitative research. The subject was Baby's Home day care Salatiga. Technique of collecting data using interviews, observation and documents. Data were analyzed using Miles and Huberman Model. Data validation using triangulation technique of data. Facilities and infrastructure in Baby's Home day care which conform with ACT of Minister of Education and Culture No. 137 of 2014 Article 32 Paragraph 3 of were the area of land, space of activities inside and outside, hand washing facilities, showers and latrines, and access to health facilities. While things were not conform included the bedroom, dining room, and covered trash. The cause of the planning, maintenance and inventory of facilities and infrastructure have not optimally done because the plan was not carried out continuously, the lack of personnel to assist in the maintenance, and did not have the administrative staff specifically for inventory. Advice can be given to Baby's Home day care is to conduct procurement planning infrastructure on sleeping room, dining room and trash. In addition, the maintenance to existing infrastructure must be made as well as the inventory of infrastructure in order to facilitate the planning purchasing.

  18. Patient-centered care or cultural competence: negotiating palliative care at home for Chinese Canadian immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Angus, Jan E; Howell, Doris; Husain, Amna; Gastaldo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The literature about Chinese attitudes toward death and dying contains frequent references to strong taboos against open discussion about death; consequently, there is an assumption that dying at home is not the preferred option. This focused ethnographic study examined the palliative home care experiences of 4 Chinese immigrants with terminal cancer, their family caregivers, and home care nurses and key informant interviews with 11 health care providers. Three main themes emerged: (1) the many facets of taboo; (2) discursive tensions between patient-centered care and cultural competence; and (3) rethinking language barriers. Thus, training on cultural competence needs to move away from models that portray cultural beliefs as shared, fixed patterns, and take into account the complicated reality of everyday care provision at end of life in the home. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Attitudes towards care robots among Finnish home care personnel - a comparison of two approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Teemu; Lehto, Paula; Vuorinen, Pertti; Coco, Kirsi

    2017-08-22

    The significance of care robotics has been highlighted in recent years. The article examines the adoption of care robots in home care settings, and in particular Finnish home care personnel's attitudes towards robots. The study compares the importance of the Negative Attitudes towards Robots Scale advanced by Nomura and specific positive attitudes related to the usefulness of care robots for different tasks in the home care. A cross-sectional study conducted by questionnaire. The research data were gathered from a survey of Finnish home care personnel (n = 200). Exploratory factor analysis, Pearson's correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis. The Negative Attitudes towards Robots Scale (NARS), by Nomura, with a specific behavioural intention scale based on Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour, and a measure of positive attitudes towards the usefulness of care robots for different tasks in home care and the promotion of independent living of older persons. The study shows that NARS helps to explain psychological resistance related to the introduction of care robots, although the scale is susceptible to cultural differences. Care personnel's behavioural intentions related to the introduction of robot applications are influenced also by the perception of the usefulness of care robots. The study is based only on a Finnish sample, and the response rate of the study was relatively small (18.2%), which limits the generalisability of the results. The study shows that the examination of home care personnel's attitudes towards robots is not justified to focus only on one aspect, but a better explanation is achieved by combining the perspectives of societal attitudes, attitudes related to psychological reactions and the practical care and promotion of the independent living of older people. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbler, Neale R; Rose, Dorian K; Griffiths, Patricia; Quigley, Patricia; McGee-Hernandez, Nancy; Carlson, Katherine A; Vandenberg, Phyllis; Morey, Miriam C; Sanford, Jon; Hoenig, Helen

    2010-06-30

    Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR) intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT) that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) TR; or (b) Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and increase efficiency. This may be particularly relevant when

  1. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee-Hernandez Nancy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. Methods We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a TR; or (b Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. Discussion For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and

  2. Perceptions of care in women sent home in latent labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosek, Claire; Faucher, Mary Ann; Lankford, Janice; Alexander, James

    2014-01-01

    To assess perceptions of care from woman discharged from an obstetrical (OB) triage unit or a labor and delivery unit with a diagnosis of false or latent labor in order to determine factors that may increase or decrease the woman's satisfaction with care. Descriptive, convenience sample. One hundred low-income pregnant women at term presenting for care in latent labor consented to participate in a telephone survey. The survey was based on the relevant research about care of women in early labor and the Donabedian quality improvement framework assessing structure, process, and outcomes of care. Forty-one percent of women did not want to be discharged home in latent labor. Common reasons included women stating they were in too much pain or they were living too far from the birth setting. Eating, drinking, and comfort measures were the most common measures women cited that would have made them feel better when in the hospital. A reoccurring response from women was their desire for very clear and specific written instructions about how to stay comfortable at home and when to return to the hospital. Comfort measures in the birth setting, including in triage, should include a variety of options including ambulation and oral nutrition. Detailed and specific written instructions about early labor and staying comfortable while at home have value for women in this survey regarding their perceptions of care. Results from this survey of low-income women suggest that a subset of women in latent labor just do not want to go home and this may be related to having too much pain and/or travel distance to the hospital. Hospital birth settings also have an opportunity to create a care environment that provides services and embodies attributes that women report as important for their satisfaction with care in latent labor.

  3. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Anders Kvale; Skogstad, Anders; Kjekshus, Lars Erik; Romøren, Tor Inge

    2011-11-28

    Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r=0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is complex. Increasing staffing levels or the

  4. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havig Anders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78. Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses

  5. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  6. Staffing subsidies and the quality of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrew D; Lee, Yong Suk

    2015-05-01

    Concerns about the quality of state-financed nursing home care has led to the wide-scale adoption by states of pass-through subsidies, in which Medicaid reimbursement rates are directly tied to staffing expenditure. We examine the effects of Medicaid pass-through on nursing home staffing and quality of care by adapting a two-step FGLS method that addresses clustering and state-level temporal autocorrelation. We find that pass-through subsidies increases staffing by about 1% on average and 2.7% in nursing homes with a low share of Medicaid patients. Furthermore, pass-through subsidies reduce the incidences of pressure ulcer worsening by about 0.9%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Geriatric Palliative Care in Long-Term Care Settings with a Focus on Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joan G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Almost 1.7 million older Americans live in nursing homes, representing a large proportion of the frailest, most vulnerable elders needing long-term care. In the future, increasing numbers of older adults are expected to spend time and to die in nursing homes. Thus, understanding and addressing the palliative care needs of this population are critical. The goals of this paper are to describe briefly the current state of knowledge about palliative care needs, processes, and outcomes for nursing home residents; identify gaps in this knowledge; and propose priorities for future research in this area. PMID:23984636

  8. How are service users instructed to measure home furniture for provision of minor assistive devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Anita; Mcintyre, Anne; Spiliotopoulou, Georgia; Money, Arthur; Paraskevopulos, Ioannis

    2017-02-01

    Measurements play a vital role in providing devices that meet the individual needs of users. There is increasing evidence of devices being abandoned. The reasons for this are complex but one key factor that plays a role in non-use of equipment is the lack of fit between the device, environment and person. In addition, the abandonment of devices can be seen as a waste of public money. The aim of this paper is to examine the type, the readability, and the content of existing guidance in relation to measuring home furniture. An online national survey involving health and social care trusts in the UK. We conducted a synthesis of leaflets associated with measurement of furniture to identify existing guidance. The content and readability of this guidance was then evaluated. From the 325 responses received, 64 therapists reported using guidance. From the 13 leaflets that were analysed, 8 leaflets were found to meet Level 3 Adult Literacy Standards (age 9-11). There were differences in the way in which the measurement of furniture items occurred within the leaflets with no measurement guidance reported for baths. There is a need to standardize guidance to ensure that measurements are reliable. Implications for Rehabilitation Our research has highlighted the need to confirm and agree measurement techniques for home furniture in the provision of assistive devices. Inaccurate guidance can lead to abandonment of devices. Inaccurate guidance could prevent service users from not participating within the self-assessment process for devices.

  9. Iowa certified nursing assistants study: self-reported ratings of the nursing home work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Kennith; Ramey, Sandra; Karlman, Susan

    2008-04-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are the principal bedside caregivers in nursing homes, yet little is known about their perceptions of the work environment. This population-based, cross-sectional study used a mailed questionnaire to a random sample of Iowa CNAs (N=584), representing 166 nursing homes. Of the respondents, 88.5% (n=517) were currently employed in long-term care settings; however, 11.5% (n=67) indicated they had left their jobs. When CNA responses were compared with those of other occupational groups, general workers reported higher scores on involvement, coworker cohesion, work pressure, and supervisor support. Those who left their CNA jobs rated their work environment as characteristic of excessive managerial control and task orientation. Results of this study emphasize the importance of the relationship between CNAs and their supervisors, CNAs' need for greater autonomy and innovation, and the need for the work environment to change dramatically in the area of human resource management. Copyright (c) 2008, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Deployment of assistive living technology in a nursing home environment: methods and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloulou, Hamdi; Mokhtari, Mounir; Tiberghien, Thibaut; Biswas, Jit; Phua, Clifton; Kenneth Lin, Jin Hong; Yap, Philip

    2013-04-08

    With an ever-growing ageing population, dementia is fast becoming the chronic disease of the 21st century. Elderly people affected with dementia progressively lose their autonomy as they encounter problems in their Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). Hence, they need supervision and assistance from their family members or professional caregivers, which can often lead to underestimated psychological and financial stress for all parties. The use of Ambient Assistive Living (AAL) technologies aims to empower people with dementia and relieve the burden of their caregivers.The aim of this paper is to present the approach we have adopted to develop and deploy a system for ambient assistive living in an operating nursing home, and evaluate its performance and usability in real conditions. Based on this approach, we emphasise on the importance of deployments in real world settings as opposed to prototype testing in laboratories. We chose to conduct this work in close partnership with end-users (dementia patients) and specialists in dementia care (professional caregivers). Our trial was conducted during a period of 14 months within three rooms in a nursing home in Singapore, and with the participation of eight dementia patients and two caregivers. A technical ambient assistive living solution, consisting of a set of sensors and devices controlled by a software platform, was deployed in the collaborating nursing home. The trial was preceded by a pre-deployment period to organise several observation sessions with dementia patients and focus group discussions with professional caregivers. A process of ground truth and system's log data gathering was also planned prior to the trial and a system performance evaluation was realised during the deployment period with the help of caregivers. An ethical approval was obtained prior to real life deployment of our solution. Patients' observations and discussions allowed us to gather a set of requirements that a system for elders with

  11. [Vacuum assisted closure therapy in dehiscence of abdominal wound after cesarean section treated in a hospital-at-home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cabezón, Carmen; Montes-Olangua, Maria Isabel; García-Suarez, Sara; García-Carretero, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The Hospital at Home is a range of hospital care provided to patients in the comfort of their own homes, so patient and family can actively participate in the process. Cesarean section is a surgical procedure that requires a short hospital stay. However if complications arise during the process, such as a dehiscence of surgical wound, the hospital stay is prolonged, delaying mother-child bonding, which is very important for the growth of the child. Nursing care in wound healing by secondary intention is a priority for the patient's recovery. VAC therapy (vacuum assisted closure) promotes a rapid recovery, although it requires dressings and active medical surveillance, as well as training by the nursing staff for carrying it out at home. We describe the outcome and the process of the healing of a surgical wound after cesarean section, not only because of a complex wound, but the previously mentioned factors that make us consider the Hospital at Home as the best alternative care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  13. Involvement of the Client in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Kjær, Lone; Præstegaard, Jeanette

    with one client, his cohabitant family and the involved healthcare professionals. Results: Client involvement in home care service is shown within the constructed categories: The schism between wishing for and actually being helped; The chronological order can be negotiated; not the content; Liberal...

  14. Understanding the agency of home-based care volunteers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volunteer motivations vary from altruism, to volunteering as a means to be recognised and increasing the chances of self-improvement. We propose that home-based-care volunteering may be viewed as a form of agency in response to a lack of recognition, support and acknowledgement for AIDS caregivers and their ...

  15. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  16. Underweight and malnutrition in home care: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Nils A; Tannen, Antje; Suhr, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to provide representative figures about the prevalence of underweight and malnutrition among home care clients, and to determine the associated risk factors and the provided nutritional nursing interventions. In 2012, a multicenter point prevalence study was conducted among 878 randomly selected clients from 100 randomly selected home care services across Germany. Following a standardized study protocol, demographics, nutritional assessments (Body Mass Index, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Mini nutritional Assessment - short form (MNA-sf), nurses' clinical judgment on nutritional status) and interventions were assessed. Common nutritional risk factors for underweight and malnutrition were analyzed in a logistic regression model. Malnutrition figures varied between 4.8% (MNA-sf) and 6.8% (MUST), underweight between 8.7% (BMI nutritional status. Mental overload (OR 8.1/4.4), needs help with feeding (OR 5.0/2.8) and loss of appetite (OR 3.6/3.9) were highly associated with malnutrition/underweight. Malnutrition and underweight are important issues in home care clients. Regular weighing should be performed in all home care clients so that a potential weight loss can be detected in time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Nursing home policies regarding advance care planning in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gendt, C.; Bilsen, J.; van der Stichele, R.; Deliens, L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to discover how many nursing homes (NHs) in Flanders (Belgium) have policies on advance care planning (ACP) and their content regarding different medical end-of-life decisions. Methods: A structured mail questionnaire was sent to the NH administrators of all 594

  18. Needs for Psychosocial Support in Home Care Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotay, Carolyn Cook

    There is little research documenting the psychosocial support needs of hospice patients and their families. To assess hospice patients' and families' use of and perceptions of need for support, 77 patients and their families were interviewed during home care for terminal illness (Group 1), and 50 family members (84% spouses) were interviewed 1…

  19. Who are good home-based care volunteers?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a joint venture between a local NGO and public sector health workers. During the latter half of 1999, volun- teers were identified through a par- ticipatory process with communities in the area. Ninety-six (96) volun- teers were trained. They all attended one of the five-day introductory courses in home-based care. After.

  20. Predictors of mortality among elderly dependent home care patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify which variables –among those commonly available and used in the primary care setting– best predict mortality in a cohort of elderly dependent patients living at home (EDPLH) that were included in a home care program provided by Primary Care Teams (PCT). Additionally, we explored the risk of death among a sub-group of these patients that were admitted to hospital the year before they entered the home care program. Methods A one-year longitudinal cohort study of a sample of EDPLH patients included in a home care programme provided by 72 PCTs. Variables collected from each individual patient included health and social status, carer’s characteristics, carer’s burden of care, health and social services received. Results 1,001 patients completed the study (91.5%), 226 were admitted to hospital the year before inclusion. 290 (28.9%) died during the one-year follow-up period. In the logistic regression analysis women show a lower risk of death [OR= 0.67 (0.50-0.91)]. The risk of death increases with comorbidity [Charlson index OR= 1.14 (1,06-1.23)], the number of previous hospital admissions [OR= 1,16 (1.03-1.33)], and with the degree of pressure ulcers [ulcers degree 1–2 OR = 2.94 (1.92-4.52); ulcers degree 3–4 OR = 4.45 (1.90-10.92)]. The logistic predictive model of mortality for patients previously admitted to hospital identified male sex, comorbidity, degree of pressure ulcers, and having received home care rehabilitation as independent variables that predict death. Conclusions Comorbidity, hospital admissions and pressure ulcers predict mortality in the following year in EDPLH patients. The subgroup of patients that entered home care programs with a previous record of hospital admission and a high score in our predictive model might be considered as candidates for palliative care. PMID:23947599

  1. Utilizing Trigger Films to Enhance Communication Skills of Home Care Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Cook, Jill; Molloy, Margory A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative method to help home care clinicians better communicate with older adults experiencing normal physiologic changes that impact their ability to communicate effectively. Developmental changes such as hearing, speech, vision, and cognition profoundly impede an older adult's ability to communicate with others, potentially undermining the quality of care delivered. The use of trigger films as an educational intervention can assist home care clinicians to improve communication with their patients. Trigger films are 2- to 4-minute video clips that end abruptly, encouraging learners to analyze clinical situations in a safe environment, such as a staff conference room. Trigger films are easy to make with the use of a smart phone and two staff members portraying the role of home care clinician and patient. Allowing discussion after viewing the trigger film places clinicians in an active learning role, thus fostering the sharing of ideas and best practice. Addressing age-related barriers to communication with this modality serves to improve patient interaction and healthcare outcomes. The use of trigger films is another tool that empowers the clinician to provide improved care for patients with communication deficits.

  2. [Relationship between burden of care at home and functional independence level after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmels, P; Ebermeyer, E; Bethoux, F; Gonard, C; Fayolle-Minon, I

    2002-03-01

    To determine the relationship between functional disability assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and burden of care in hemiplegic stroke patients living at home. The population is constituted of stroke survivors, initially treated in an academic inpatient Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation unit. Assessments included an evaluation of impairments (aphasia, negligence, cognitive impairment, motor impairment : Fugl-Meyer (FM) scale), disability (Functional Independence Measure (FIM) ), and burden of care (physical assistance and supervision). Forty-five subjects and their caregiver completed the assessments. Time spent on physical assistance and supervision were significantly correlated with FM and FIM scores. Cognitive deficits correlated with supervision time but not with physical assistance time. These results confirm the predictive value of functional independence measure relative to burden of care in a population of stroke patients with hemiplegia living at home. These results show that cognitive impairments are more specifically correlated with supervision time. This must be confirmed by studies taking into account functional and cognitive conditions of the patient, functional and psychological conditions of life of caregiver and also economical and environmental conditions of life.

  3. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for any...

  4. Caring for home-based care workers | de Saxe Zerden | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based care has emerged as a service delivery model to cope with the devastation caused by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where medical and traditional care infrastructures have been overwhelmed. In these communities homebased care workers provide critical services, which include physical, ...

  5. Proposta de modelo para dimensionamento do pessoal de enfermagem em assistência domiciliária Propuesta de modelo para la provisión de personal de enfermería en asistencia domiciliaria Proposal for a model for calculating the size of nursing staff in home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Watanabe Dal Ben

    2007-03-01

    previstas y de ausencias no previstas. A partir de esas variables propusimos un modelo para calcular el cuadro de profesionales de enfermería en AD, agilizando el proceso de toma de decisiones.Home care brings up issues related to the number of daily hours and days of nursing service from users of these services. This study was carried out in order to identify the criteria adopted by managers and nurses for calculating the nursing staff needed in home care services. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed according to the method of content analysis. Three categories were identified: patient's eligibility, time spent in care, and professional competency profile. The steps considered were: identification of daily average work load, choice of the proportion of professional categories, nursing workers' daily journey, and identification of the technical safety index for covering planned and unplanned absences. From these variables a model for calculating nursing personnel needed in home care is proposed in order to speed up the decision making process.

  6. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  7. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM: A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Phillips

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large state in the USA. Using classification and regression tree analyses, a case-mix model for long-term pediatric home care was developed. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM grouped children and youth in the study sample into 24 groups, explaining 41% of the variance in annual home care expenditures. The P/ECM creates the possibility of a more equitable, and potentially more effective, allocation of home care resources among children and youth facing serious health care challenges.

  8. Responsibilities and difficulties of caregivers of cancer patients in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, Ozlem; Elcigil, Ayfer; Arslan, Deniz; Sonmez, Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    From having been known as a virulent disease in 1970s, cancer is now considered a chronic disease and about two thirds of cancer patients live for five years after diagnosis. Home care has gradually gained more importance and it is a great burden on the shoulders of caregivers. Caregivers have to undertake the responsibility of the cancer patient's home management, and organize care and arrange health care services according to the ever-changing condition of patients. Caregivers should be prepared for home care so they can provide accurate and complete care. This descriptive study aimed to investigate challenges that caregivers encounter in the home care of patients and the reasons for these challenges. The research group consisted of caregivers of outpatients in a daily treatment center in a university hospital. The research sample consisted of 137 voluntary caregivers of patients who attended the Daily Treatment Center for control, chemotherapy or other supportive cares services between January-June, 2011. Data were collected with face-to-face interviews in the Daily Treatment Center. Ethics Committee approval was taken from the university hospital; caregivers and their patients were informed about the research and their approval was obtained as well. It was found that 54.0% of caregivers helped with patient's nutrition, 50.4% with medicine use, 26.3% with oral hygiene, 26.3% with meeting urinary needs and 51.8% with changing clothes. In addition, 69.3% of caregivers helped to change bed sheets, 38.7% assisted patients to communicate with their environment and 71.5% to bring the patient to hospital or outside. In this study, it was found that Turkish caregivers experience challenges due to following factors: patient nutrition, medicine use, oral and body hygiene, colostomy maintenance and stomach tube feeding, concern of dropping the patient, feeling incompetence in body temperature and fever control, fatigue, and lack of personal time.

  9. [Palliative care in nursing homes : Results of a survey about knowledge and self-efficacy of nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, O; Janig, H; Pinter, G; Cernic, K; Likar, R

    2017-08-01

    Nursing homes are confronted more and more with palliative care patients, which present a challenge for nursing and medical personnel. Deficits in the palliative care of geriatric patients have been repeatedly demonstrated and many nursing home residents, especially those suffering from dementia, are undersupplied regarding pain management. The present study was carried out to measure the knowledge and self-efficacy of nursing staff in the province of Carinthia (Austria) regarding palliative care of nursing home residents. A total of 330 nursing personnel were surveyed using the Bonn test for knowledge in palliative care (BPW), which measures knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing home personnel. In addition to descriptive analyses, the effects of the professional group (registered nurses vs. nursing assistants) and working experience were tested. On average a little more than half of the knowledge items were answered correctly. Nurses' self-efficacy was high. Registered nurses exhibited more knowledge and higher self-efficacy compared to nursing assistants. Effects of working experience could only be demonstrated regarding self-efficacy. The results are to a large extent in line with results from Germany and indicate the necessity of interventions for improving nurses' knowledge as a major basis for adequate palliative care in nursing home residents.

  10. Developing a culture of relationship-centred care in a care home group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christine; Dray, Susan

    2016-09-29

    This article outlines the development of a new way of working across a group of care homes in south east Wales, based on a philosophy of relationship-centred care and an ethos of empowerment for older people in the homes. The underpinning aim was to enable residents to have a good quality of life, reflecting recommendations made by the Older People's Commissioner for Wales in a 2014 review into the quality of life and care of older people living in care homes in the country. After the introduction of the new way of working, the care home group were approached by a university to take part in a collaborative project offering nursing students clinical placements in the care homes, mentored by registered nurses employed there. The collaboration between the university and the care homes meant that nursing students became enveloped in the person-centred culture, receiving positive exposure to nursing older people early in their careers. It is hoped that the clinical placements may encourage them to consider careers in the specialty.

  11. Innovative assistive technology in Finnish public elderly-care services: a focus on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkas, Helinä

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates ways in which technology use may help municipalities improve productivity in elderly-care services. A case study of Finnish elderly-care services provides responses concerning impacts, decisions and options in technology use. The research data were collected during a 'smart home pilot' implemented in four housing service units. Over 60 assistive devices were introduced in the smart homes used during short-term housing periods. Both customers and care staff's experiences as well as processes related to the use of assistive devices were investigated on the basis of survey questionnaires, interviews and feedback. Assistive device-related operational processes were investigated with the help of concepts of 'resource focus', 'lost motion' and 'intermediate storage'. Four central operational processes were identified. Design and desirability as well as costs, such as opportunity costs of assistive devices were also a focus. Significant factors related to productivity were disclosed in this way. Technology use versus productivity needs to be 'circled' from the points of view of individual users, workplaces, service processes, and larger technology options. There must be long-term patience to introduce technology properly into use to produce positive impacts on productivity. Customers and care staff have an interlinked, vital role to play as decision-makers' informants.

  12. Improving the Quality of Home Health Care for Children With Medical Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Golden, Shannon L

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe the quality of home health care services for children with medical complexity, identify barriers to delivering optimal home health care, and discuss potential solutions to improve home health care delivery. In this qualitative study, we conducted 20 semistructured in-depth interviews with primary caregivers of children with medical complexity, and 4 focus groups with 18 home health nurses. During an iterative analysis process, we identified themes related to quality of home health care. There is substantial variability between home health nurses in the delivery of home health care to children. Lack of skills in nurses is common and has serious negative health consequences for children with medical complexity, including hospitalizations, emergency room visits, and need for medical procedures. Inadequate home health care also contributes to caregiver burden. A major barrier to delivering optimal home health care is the lack of training of home health nurses in pediatric care and technology use. Potential solutions for improving care include home health agencies training nurses in the care of children with medical complexity, support for nurses in clinical problem solving, and reimbursement for training nurses in pediatric home care. Caregiver-level interventions includes preparation of caregivers about: providing medical care for their children at home and addressing problems with home health care services. There are problems in the quality of home health care delivered to children with medical complexity. Training nurses in the care of children with medical complexity and preparing caregivers about home care could improve home health care quality. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... informed member of your health care team. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. ... prevent health care mistakes, patients are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or ...

  14. Mobile computing and the quality of home care nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Nahas, Georgette; Templier, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the introduction of mobile computing on the quality of home care nursing practice in Québec. The software, which structured and organized the nursing activities in patients' homes, was installed sequentially in nine community health centres. The completeness of the nursing notes was compared in 77 paper records (pre-implementation) and 73 electronic records (post-implementation). Overall, the introduction of the software was associated with an improvement in the completeness of the nursing notes. All 137 nurse users were asked to complete a structured questionnaire. A total of 101 completed questionnaires were returned (74% response rate). Overall, the nurses reported a very high level of satisfaction with the quality of clinical information collected. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews were conducted and most nurses believed that the new software represented a user-friendly tool with a clear and understandable structure. A postal questionnaire was sent to approximately 1240 patients. A total of 223 patients returned the questionnaire (approximately 18% response rate). Overall, patients felt that the use of mobile computing during home visits allowed nurses to manage their health condition better and, hence, provide superior care services. The use of mobile computing had positive and significant effects on the quality of care provided by home nurses.

  15. Does Continuous Hospice Care Help Patients Remain at Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David; Harrold, Joan; Harris, Pamela S; Bender, Laura; Farrington, Sue; Smither, Eugenia; Ache, Kevin; Teno, Joan

    2015-09-01

    In the U. S., hospices sometimes provide high-intensity "continuous care" in patients' homes. However, little is known about the way that continuous care is used or what impact continuous care has on patient outcomes. To describe patients who receive continuous care and determine whether continuous care reduces the likelihood that patients will die in an inpatient unit or hospital. Data from 147,137 patients admitted to 11 U.S. hospices between 2008 and 2012 were extracted from the electronic medical records. The hospices are part of a research-focused collaboration. The study used a propensity score-matched cohort design. A total of 99,687 (67.8%) patients were in a private home or nursing home on the day before death, and of these, 10,140 (10.2%) received continuous care on the day before death. A propensity score-matched sample (n = 24,658) included 8524 patients who received continuous care and 16,134 patients who received routine care on the day before death. Using the two matched groups, patients who received continuous care on the day before death were significantly less likely to die in an inpatient hospice setting (350/8524 vs. 2030/16,134; 4.1% vs. 12.6%) (odds ratio [OR] 0.29; 95% CI 0.27-0.34; P < 0.001). When patients were cared for by a spouse, the use of continuous care was associated with a larger decrease in inpatient deaths (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.09-0.16; P < 0.001) compared with those patients cared for by other family members (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.32-0.42; P < 0.001). It is possible that unmeasured covariates were not included in the propensity score match. Use of continuous care on the day before death is associated with a significant reduction in the use of inpatient care on the last day of life, particularly when patients are cared for by a spouse. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... projection of demand for nursing home and domiciliary care by veterans who at such time are 65 years of age... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans...

  17. Indicators of the quality of nursing home residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Debra; Schnelle, John F

    2002-08-01

    To identify quality indicators (QIs) that can be used to measure nursing home (NH) residential care processes. Modified-delphi panel process to rate potential QIs that were identified through reported interviews with residents and families and through a review of the scientific literature. Meetings of panel of experts. A national panel of nine experts in NH care rated potential QIs. A content expert and a clinical oversight committee performed external reviews. Panelists' median validity and importance ratings for each QI choice. The panel considered 64 choices for QI content and rated 28 of these as valid and important for measuring residential care quality. These 28 choices translated into 18 QIs. The external review process resulted in the addition of one QI that was not considered by the NH panel. The 19 indicators address areas identified as important by residents and proxies. Ten of these QIs were rated feasible to implement with current resources in average community NHs, and nine were rated feasible only in better NHs. The panelists identified nine as being measured most reliably by direct observations of care. Experts identified 19 specific care processes as valid and important measures of the quality of NH residential care. Nine of these QIs may be measured best by direct observation of NH care, rather than by interviews or review of existing NH records. Almost half of the QIs were viewed as discriminating between better and average NHs. The panel deemed that only well-staffed nursing homes could consistently implement nine of the QIs.

  18. Setting a new standard of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, Kathleen; Lamont, Lori; Krishnan, Preetha

    2009-11-01

    The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority's introduction of a full-time nurse practitioner in a 116-bed non-profit nursing home provided an opportunity to explore a collaborative relationship between an NP acting as the primary care provider and a single physician serving as the consultant for complex care and after-hours care. The outcomes were measured in terms of resident and family satisfaction, quality of care indicators and cost effectiveness. Data were collected from pre-existing quality indicators, including a resident/family satisfaction survey, transfers to acute care, and medication use statistics. Unstructured interviews were also conducted with nursing staff and members of the interdisciplinary team. Dramatic improvements in medication use were observed, including a 17 per cent reduction in overall drug costs, a 55 per cent decrease in polypharmacy rates and a 63 per cent reduction in antipsychotic drug use. Transfers to emergency decreased by 20 per cent. Family satisfaction with the quality of health care provided to residents increased by 24 per cent. The collaborative practice of an NP with physician consultation is an effective way of delivering quality care to nursing home residents.

  19. User friendliness aspects of home care telematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzouranis, E C

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease with a high number of admissions and emergency room visits in pediatric hospitals. Treatment of asthmatic patients is best done by asthma specialists and requires the chronic use of prophylactic medications, additional treatment for acute exacerbations and regular check-ups. In Crete, a Greek island, there are many children with asthma who are not receiving care by an asthma specialist. The only specialty clinic for asthmatic children in Crete is in Heraklion, a city in the center of the island. We attempted to use telemedicine in order to reach and follow children with asthma who live in distant areas in Crete. We set up a pilot telemedicine program with 10 asthmatic children already followed at the Specialty Clinic. Using teleconferencing techniques, we were able to obtain the medical history, examine the patients, educate them about the disease and adjust the treatment. The parents of patients accepted the telemedicine service with a percentage of 90% and showed a special interest in this new service. We conclude that telemedicine for asthmatic children performed by their specialist is feasible and accepted by the majority of patients.

  20. [Care and implications for caregivers of surgical patients at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Roca-Closa, Josep; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Ubeda-Bonet, Inmaculada; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia; Moreno-Casbas, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    To identify the care given by informal caregivers to patients who underwent abdominal surgery in the Consorci Hospitalari of Vic (Barcelona). To compare the responsibility burden for those caregivers in all the different stages of the surgical process. To determine the consequences of the care itself on the caregiver's health and to identify the factors that contribute to the need of providing care and the appearance of consequences for the caregivers in the home. A longitudinal observational study with follow-up at admission, at discharge and 10 days, of 317 non-paid caregivers of patients who suffer underwent surgery. The characteristics of caregivers and surgical patients were studied. The validated questionnaire, ICUB97-R based on the model by Virginia Henderson, was used to measure the care provided by informal caregivers and its impact on patient quality of life. Most of the caregivers were women, with an average age of 52.9±13.7 years without any previous experience as caregivers. The greater intensity of care and impact was observed in the time when they arrived home after hospital discharge (p<0.05). The predictive variables of repercussions were being a dependent patient before the surgical intervention (β=2.93, p=0.007), having a cancer diagnosis (β=2.87, p<.001) and time dedicated to the care process (β=0.07, p=0.018). Caregivers involved in the surgical process provide a great amount of care at home depending on the characteristics of patients they care for, and it affects their quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Barriers to palliative care in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in home care: A qualitative study of the perspective of professional caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousing, Camilla A; Timm, Helle; Lomborg, Kirsten; Kirkevold, Marit

    2017-07-19

    To examine the experiences with palliative care in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among professional caregivers in a Danish home care setting. Many patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease depend on professional caregivers in the primary sector to provide assistance and care. However, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients receive no or only very little palliative care compared to patients with cancer although they may have many burdensome symptoms. Qualitative explorative study. In 2013-2014, ten professional caregivers from three districts in a Danish municipality were followed during home visits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and individual interviews about palliative care were subsequently conducted. In 2014, 66 professional caregivers, representing eleven home care districts, participated in ten group discussions about palliative care needs in this group of patients. Data were analysed using qualitative descriptive analysis. The study revealed a nonawareness of palliative care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among the professional caregivers who expressed vague understanding of palliative care and lack of knowledge about the disease. Organisational barriers, such as lack of time and continuity in patient care, lack of opportunity to discuss palliative care and lack of peer learning were experienced as challenging in the provision of palliative care. Nonawareness and organisational barriers led to difficulties in identifying palliative care needs and reluctance to initiate conversations about palliative care. The findings indicate a need for education, training and reflection among professional caregivers in home care. Also, organisational changes may be needed to reduce the barriers to palliative care. The findings uncovered barriers to palliative care that must be addressed. Targeted educational programmes and organisational changes may increase the ability to

  2. Characteristics of Care and Caregivers of Alzheimer's Patients in Elderly Care Homes: A Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yektatalab, Sh; Kaveh, M H; Sharif,F.; Fallahi Khoshknab, M; Petramfar, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the increase in the number of Alzheimer’s patients in Iran and also the limitation of cultural knowledge about caring of these patients, this study was designed to explore the perceptions of Iranian caregivers about caring Alzheimer patients in the elderly care homes. Methods A qualitative content analysis method was conducted on two elderly care homes of Shiraz/Iran, during 2009-2011. Fourteen key informants (10 women and 4 men, between 25-35 years of age), who had been wor...

  3. Performance-based contracting in home-care work in The Netherlands : Professionalism under pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomkens, Rosanne; Hoogenboom, Marcel; Knijn, Trudie

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to improve the understanding of the relationships between performance-based contracting, management supportiveness and professionalism in home care. Using path analysis, this article explores the relationships between home-care workers' perceptions of management support, implementation

  4. 78 FR 53506 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... comments on the information collection required to obtain patient perspective on satisfaction with the CCHT... forms of information technology. Titles: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

  5. Nursing home care trajectories for older adults following in-hospital palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joan G; Berry, Patricia H; Ersek, Mary

    2017-04-27

    Palliative care consultation (PCC) during hospitalization is increasingly common for older adults with life-limiting illness discharged to nursing homes. The objective of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the care trajectories and experiences of older adults admitted to a nursing home following a PCC during hospitalization. Twelve English-speaking adults, mean age 80 years, who received a hospital PCC and discharge to a nursing home without hospice. Data were collected from medical records at five time points from hospital discharge to 100 days after nursing home admission and care trajectories were mapped. Interviews (n = 15) with participants and surrogates were combined with each participant's medical record data. Content analysis was employed on the combined dataset. All PCC referrals were for goals of care conversations during which the PCC team discussed poor prognosis. All participants were admitted to a nursing home under the Medicare skilled nursing facility benefit. Seven were rehospitalized; six of the 12 died within 6 weeks of initial nursing home admission. The two care trajectories were Focus on Rehabilitative Care and Comfort Care Continuity. There was a heavy emphasis on recovering functional status through rehabilitation and skilled nursing care, despite considerable symptom burden and poor prognosis. Regardless of PCC with recommendations for palliative interventions, frail older adults with limited life expectancy and their family caregivers often perceive that rehabilitation will improve physical function. This perception may contribute to inappropriate, ineffective care. More emphasis is needed to coordinate care between PCC recommendations and post-acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Child Care Assistance: Helping Parents Work and Children Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hannah; Walker, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Quality child care enables parents to work or go to school while also providing young children with the early childhood education experiences needed for healthy development. The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary federal program that provides funding for child care assistance for low-income working parents. Child care…

  7. Indicators of perceived useful dementia care assistive technology: Caregivers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hui-Fen; Chang, Ling-Hui; Yao, Grace; Chen, Wan-Yin; Huang, Wen-Ni Wennie

    2015-08-01

    The study aims to investigate the caregivers' context-specific perceived usefulness of available assistive technology (AT) devices and the professionals' perspectives on the usefulness indicators of AT devices for home-dwelling individuals with mild-to-moderate dementia. A total of 72 caregivers completed a questionnaire rating 82 AT devices with a high-perceived usefulness (HPU) or low-perceived usefulness (LPU). A total of 21 experts rated 10 usefulness indicators of these devices. We compared the mean of each indicator between the HPU and LPU groups. Most caregivers, who are generally amenable to using AT devices, thought they were useful for helping to care for home-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia. The level of perceived usefulness from the experts' perspectives depends on specific design indicators (e.g. familiarity) and the context in which the AT is used (e.g. in everyday life or in emergencies). Indicators for HPU devices were: allows selective accident prevention, has an intuitive interface, is familiar, offers ease of use and simplifies activities. LPU devices featured client prompting. There were no significant differences between HPU and LPU devices with indicators of: is automated, informs caregiver, preserves privacy and preserves autonomy. Safety issues were considered important, and sometimes overshadowed ethical dilemmas, such as privacy and autonomy concern. The present study provides insight into how caregivers perceived the usefulness of AT devices, and how that varied with context. Indicators of devices perceived as useful can serve as guidelines for modifying existing devices and designing new devices. Future application could also incorporate the points of view from the persons with dementia. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Ethics and quality care in nursing homes: Relatives' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Rita; Sellevold, Gerd Sylvi; Egede-Nissen, Veslemøy; Sørlie, Venke

    2017-01-01

    A total of 71,000 people in Norway suffer from some form of dementia in 2013, of whom approximately 30,000 are in nursing homes. Several studies focus on the experiences of those who have close relatives and who are staying in a nursing home. Results show that a greater focus on cooperation between nursing staff and relatives is a central prerequisite for an increased level of care. Benefits of developing systematic collaboration practices include relief for nursing staff, less stress, and greater mutual understanding. Going through studies focusing on the experiences of nursing home patients' relatives, negative experiences are in the majority. In this study, relatives are invited to share positive experiences regarding the care of their loved ones; a slightly different perspective, in other words. The aim of the study is to investigate relatives of persons with dementia's experiences with quality care in nursing homes. The study is a part of a larger project called Hospice values in the care for persons with dementia and is based on a qualitative design where data are generated through narrative interviews. The chosen method of analysis is the phenomenological-hermeneutical method for the study of lived experiences. Participants and research context: Participants in the project were eight relatives of persons with dementia who were living in nursing homes, long-term residences. The sampling was targeted, enrolment happened through collective invitation. All relatives interested were included. Ethical considerations: The Norwegian Regional Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services approve the study. Findings show that relatives have certain expectations as to how their loved ones ought to be met and looked after at the nursing home. The results show that in those cases where the expectations were met, the relatives' experiences were associated with engagement, inclusion and a good atmosphere. When the expectations were not met, the relatives

  9. Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Lillestø, Britt

    2017-01-01

    Background: Physical impairment and dependency on others may be a threat to dignity. Research questions: The purpose of this study was to explore dignity as a core concept in caring, and how healthcare personnel focus on and foster dignity in nursing home residents. Research design: This study has...... a hermeneutic design. Participants and research context: In all, 40 healthcare personnel from six nursing homes in Scandinavia participated in focus group interviews in this study. Ethical considerations: This study has been evaluated and approved by the Regional Ethical Committees and the Social Science Data...... personnel, maintaining human dignity requires slow caring in nursing homes, as an essential approach....

  10. Mental health service delivery in long-term care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, John

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of mental disorders in long-term care (LTC) homes is high, but quality and availability of mental health services to assess and help in management of cases have been criticized. Literature concerning mental health problems in LTC homes was reviewed, especially regarding models of mental health service delivery and factors that affect development, persistence and reduction of symptoms and distress. The advantages of consultation-liaison arrangements and of telepsychiatry were noted. Discussions led to development of recommendations aimed at improving mental health expertise and provision of assessment and intervention services in LTC homes in diverse countries. Prompt recognition of mental health problems among residents is required, with availability of a team working within the facility to deal with these problems. Commonly such multidisciplinary teams are formed by facility staff linking with visiting mental health professionals or services. Quality of care is also affected by the organization, attitudes and education within LTC facilities. Provision of optimal mental health care in LTC settings is dependent on adequate funding, availability of expertise and education, positive and caring attitudes, recognition of needs, and supportive teamwork. The latter should include cooperative links between well-resourced and under-resourced regions.

  11. Adding navigation, artificial audition and vital sign monitoring capabilities to a telepresence mobile robot for remote home care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniel, Sebastien; Letourneau, Dominic; Labbe, Mathieu; Grondin, Francois; Polgar, Janice; Michaud, Francois

    2017-07-01

    A telepresence mobile robot is a remote-controlled, wheeled device with wireless internet connectivity for bidirectional audio, video and data transmission. In health care, a telepresence robot could be used to have a clinician or a caregiver assist seniors in their homes without having to travel to these locations. Many mobile telepresence robotic platforms have recently been introduced on the market, bringing mobility to telecommunication and vital sign monitoring at reasonable costs. What is missing for making them effective remote telepresence systems for home care assistance are capabilities specifically needed to assist the remote operator in controlling the robot and perceiving the environment through the robot's sensors or, in other words, minimizing cognitive load and maximizing situation awareness. This paper describes our approach adding navigation, artificial audition and vital sign monitoring capabilities to a commercially available telepresence mobile robot. This requires the use of a robot control architecture to integrate the autonomous and teleoperation capabilities of the platform.

  12. St Kieran's Care Home, Rathcabban, Roscrea, Tipperary.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tickle, Martin

    2011-10-10

    Abstract Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education) with dental health education alone in young children. Methods\\/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years), fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F) (supplied twice per year), a toothbrush (supplied twice a year) or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit). 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine) or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs which will

  13. Atenção domiciliária e direito à saúde: uma experiência na rede pública brasileira La atención domiciliaria y el derecho a la salud: una experiencia en la red pública brasileña Home care assistance and the right to health: an experience in the Brazilian net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalú Pereira da Costa Kerber

    2010-04-01

    intersectoriales. Por otro lado, busca ser resolutiva en el primer contacto, presta atención continua y longitudinal, tiene territorio definido, promueve relaciones inter-personales (trabajadores y usuarios y actúa tratando de ofrecer un cuidado humanizado.OBJECTIVE: To consider, careful, how the home care has contributed to the population health. METHODS: the study was processed through observation of interviews (with: 7 users, 22 workers, 2 managers and 3 representatives of the Local Board of Health and documentary research, between March and July 2006, in a primary care health unit, in Porto Alegre, RS. RESULTS: The results were systematized using developed indicators, they showed that workers and managers understands the home care as being relevant to community health, however, they do not apply that understanding in their work practice. CONCLUSION: The home care assistance has been conducted focusing on disease; its aim is to work on individual subjects; emphasizes the development of curative care and does not developed inter-sector actions. From another point of view, tries to resolve the situation in the first contact, offers continuous and longitudinal attention, has a defined territory, promotes inter-personal relations (workers and users, and acts trying to provide a humanized care.

  14. Experience with and amount of postpartum maternity care: Comparing women who rated the care they received from the maternity care assistant as 'good' or 'less than good care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, C I; Wiegers, T A; de Cock, T P; Erwich, J J H M; Spelten, E R; Hutton, E K

    2017-12-01

    The postpartum period is an important time in the lives of new mothers, their children and their families. The aim of postpartum care is 'to detect health problems of mother and/or baby at an early stage, to encourage breastfeeding and to give families a good start' (Wiegers, 2006). The Netherlands maternity care system aims to enable every new family to receive postpartum care in their home by a maternity care assistant (MCA). In order to better understand this approach, in this study we focus on women who experienced the postpartum care by the MCA as 'less than good' care. Our research questions are; among postpartum women in the Netherlands, what is the uptake of MCA care and what factors are significantly associated with women's rating of care provided by the MCA. Design and setting This study uses data from the 'DELIVER study', a dynamic cohort study, which was set up to investigate the organization, accessibility and quality of primary midwifery care in the Netherlands. Participants In the DELIVER population 95.6% of the women indicated that they had received postpartum maternity care by an MCA in their home. We included the responses of 3170 women. To assess the factors that were significantly associated with reporting 'less than good (postpartum) care' by the MCA, a full cases backward logistic regression model was built using the multilevel approach in Generalized Linear Mixed Models. The mean rating of the postpartum care by the MCA was 8.8 (on a scale from 1-10), and 444 women (14%) rated the postpartum maternity care by the MCA as 'less than good care'. In the full cases multivariable analysis model, odds of reporting 'less than good care' by the MCA were significantly higher for women who were younger (women 25-35 years had an OR 1.32, CI 0.96-1.81 and women 35 years), multiparous (OR 1.27, CI 1.01-1.60) and had a higher level of education (women with a middle level had an OR 1.84,CI 1.22-2.79, and women with a high level of education had an OR 2

  15. A comparison of home care quality indicator rates in two Canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofina, Amanda M; Guthrie, Dawn M

    2014-01-25

    Home care is becoming an increasingly vital sector in the health care system yet very little is known about the characteristics of home care clients and the quality of care provided in Canada. We describe these clients and evaluate home care quality indicator rates in two regions. A cross-sectional analysis of assessments completed for older (age 65+) home care clients in both Ontario (n = 102,504) and the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (n = 9,250) of Manitoba, using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC). This assessment has been mandated for use in these two regions and the indicators are generated directly from items within the assessment. The indicators are expressed as rates of negative outcomes (e.g., falls, dehydration). Client-level risk adjustment of the indicator rates was used to enable fair comparisons between the regions. Clients had a mean age of 83.2 years, the majority were female (68.6%) and the regions were very similar on these demographic characteristics. Nearly all clients (92.4%) required full assistance with instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), approximately 35% had activities of daily living (ADL) impairments, and nearly 50% had some degree of cognitive impairment, which was higher among clients in Ontario (48.8% vs. 37.0%). The highest quality indicator rates were related to clients who had ADL/rehabilitation potential but were not receiving therapy (range: 66.8%-91.6%) and the rate of cognitive decline (65.4%-76.3%). Ontario clients had higher unadjusted rates across 18 of the 22 indicators and the unadjusted differences between the two provinces ranged from 0.6% to 28.4%. For 13 of the 19 indicators that have risk adjustment, after applying the risk adjustment methodology, the difference between the adjusted rates in the two regions was reduced. Home care clients in these two regions are experiencing a significant level of functional and cognitive impairment, health instability and daily pain. The

  16. Client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care: a critical analysis of power relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, Abram; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol

    2007-08-01

    various levels of the health care system. The insights gained through this investigation may assist nurses and other health professionals in reflecting on and improving practices and policies within home-based palliative care and within home care in general.

  17. Self-care management practices for the home health nurse: staying hale and hearty through enhanced self-care and ergonomics--with a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Jennifer M; Tatum, Eva; McNair, Mary; Harrington, Marilyn; Stanton, Sandra D; Askew, Rebecca; Lofton, Susan; Walker, Jean T; Robertson, Amy

    2012-05-01

    Ergonomics provides a broad framework for home healthcare nurses to improve their individual physical, psychological, cognitive, and spiritual well-being through application of models for self-care planning. As the individual becomes stronger, more resilient and work hardy, the benefits to the individual, along with the work organization and ultimately the clients, grow exponentially. This article seeks to explore the relevant ergonomic domains and assist home healthcare nurses to develop self-care planning practices that lead to healthy lifestyles and improved quality of life.

  18. Home-care nursing staff in self-directed teams are more satisfied with their job and feel they have more autonomy over patient care: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; Groenewegen, Peter P; Francke, Anneke L

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction. Self-directed teams are being introduced in home care in several countries. It is unknown whether working in a self-directed team is related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. It is important to gain insight into this association since self-directed teams may help in retaining nursing staff. A cross-sectional study based on two questionnaire surveys in 2014 and 2015. The study involved 191 certified nursing assistants and registered nurses employed in Dutch home-care organizations (mean age of 50). These were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide panel of nursing staff working in various healthcare settings. Self-direction is positively related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. This relationship is partly mediated by autonomy over patient care. For certified nursing assistants and registered nurses with a bachelor's degree, a greater sense of autonomy over patient care in self-directed teams is positively related to job satisfaction. No significant association was found between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction for registered nurses with an associate degree. This study suggests that home-care organizations should consider the use of self-directed teams as this increases nursing staff's job satisfaction and may therefore help to retain nursing staff in home care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and one home-based care facility in Norway. We examined the reliability and content and construct validity of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test. The items in both the general diabetes subscale and the insulin-use subscale were considered relevant and appropriate. The instrument showed satisfactory properties for distinguishing between groups. Item response theory-based measurements and item information curves indicate maximum information at average or lower knowledge scores. Internal consistency and the item-total correlations were quite weak, indicating that the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a set of items related to various relevant knowledge topics but not necessarily related to each other. The Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a broad range of topics relevant to diabetes care. It is an appropriate instrument for identifying individual and distinct needs for diabetes education among nursing personnel. The knowledge gaps identified by the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test could also provide useful input for the content of educational activities. However, some revision of the test should be considered.

  20. [Quasi-experimental evaluation of a nutritional educational intervention among home support assistants for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberger-Gateau, P; Helmer, C; Ouret, S; Gendron, B

    2006-06-01

    The French National Program on Nutrition and Health has defined two specific objectives targeting older persons: (i) to improve their status in calcium and vitamin D and (ii) to prevent undernutrition. Home help provides support in activities of daily living, including meals, to dependent persons. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a nutritional education intervention on knowledge and practices among home support assistants for the elderly. Three facilities providing home support in Gironde (France) selected 132 home support assistants to follow an education program and 134 controls. Nutrition training was conducted in the intervention group by a dietician during two half-day sessions in May-June 2004. A non randomized controlled trial design was used for evaluation. Nutritional knowledge (20 questions) and practice (5 questions) of home support assistants were assessed by questionnaire before (April 2004) and after (September 2004) the training period in each group. Satisfaction of the intervention group was also assessed. The intervention group included 101 participants and the control group 106 persons who answered both questionnaires before and after the education program. The intervention group was significantly younger (p educated (p = 0.01) and had less often participated to previous nutrition training (p intervention for their mean scores of knowledge or practices. The intervention group significantly improved its knowledge score (mean gain 2.5 points, p nutritional education was very significant (p intervention in multivariate analyses. Satisfaction of trained home support assistants was very high. An education program of home support assistants for elderly persons can improve their nutritional knowledge, but this study cannot conclude that the intervention was efficient to improve the nutritional status of older persons.

  1. Office Home Care Workers' Occupational Health: Associations with Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity

    OpenAIRE

    Zeytinoglu, Isik U.; Denton, Margaret; Davies, Sharon; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

    2009-01-01

    Office home care workers provide support to visiting staff, although their work tends to be invisible in many respects. This paper focuses on managers, supervisors, coor dinators, case managers and office administrative staff in home care. We examine the effects of workplace flexibility and worker insecurity on office home care workers' occupational health, particularly their self-reported stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of 300 home care office staff in a mid-s...

  2. Integration of home care services. Preliminary results from the EURHOMAP study

    OpenAIRE

    Nadine A. Genet; Wienke B. Boerma

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To show the extent to which social and health care services are integrated across European home care systems. Introduction and theory Home care incorporates several types of services. It is part of both the social system and health care system. Different disciplines/providers from different organisational settings, which may be financed differently, provide care at the clients' home. Furthermore, client's access to care may be organised in various ways. A European wide study (EURHOMAP...

  3. [Nursing Home Care Index. Development and validation of a new instrument to evaluate care quality in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppitz, A; Dreizler, J; Hediger, H; Voss, J; Imhof, L

    2013-08-01

    There is currently no adequate tool in the literature for assessing the quality of care in nursing homes. Therefore, we developed and tested a new instrument the Nursing Home Care Index (NCI). Quality of care is defined in the literature by 8 dimensions. An instrument with 42 questions of 12 validated scales was implemented. The new instrument was tested on 320 staff members in 15 nursing homes. The data were examined with the help of factor analysis and Cronbach's α, which reduced the factors to 3 and the questions to 16. Finally the revised scale was tested in a further pilot study with 136 staff members. The revised scale consists of 16 items. Based on the factor analysis, a 3-factor structure, namely social relationships, personal well-being, and self-determination were identified. These 3 factors explained 51.2% of total variance. Overall Cronbach's α was 0.87. The α reliability for the subscales was 0.86 (self-determination), 71 personal well-being, and 0.78 social relationship, respectively. Based on the NCI score, quality of care can be categorized into 3 classes: good, adequate, and urgent need for action. The NCI has a double function. Nursing staff and management can now use the NCI to conduct internal quality assurance regarding their caring efforts. In the future, the NCI can become a useful tool for families and residents to compare the quality of care in different nursing homes.

  4. Trends in child protection and out-of-home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Anne-Marie; Szilagyi, Moira A; Franke, Todd M; Albertin, Christina S; Blumkin, Aaron K; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2013-10-01

    Over the past decades, increased knowledge about childhood abuse and trauma have prompted changes in child welfare policy, and practice that may have affected the out-of-home (OOH) care population. However, little is known about recent national trends in child maltreatment, OOH placement, or characteristics of children in OOH care. The objective of this study was to examine trends in child maltreatment and characteristics of children in OOH care. We analyzed 2 federal administrative databases to identify and characterize US children who were maltreated (National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System) or in OOH care (Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System). We assessed trends between 2000 and 2010. The number of suspected maltreatment cases increased 17% from 2000 to 2010, yet the number of substantiated cases decreased 7% and the number of children in OOH care decreased 25%. Despite the decrease in OOH placements, we found a 19% increase in the number of children who entered OOH care because of maltreatment (vs other causes), a 36% increase in the number of children with multiple (vs single) types of maltreatment, and a 60% increase in the number of children in OOH care identified as emotionally disturbed. From 2000 to 2010, fewer suspected cases of maltreatment were substantiated, despite increased investigations, and fewer maltreated children were placed in OOH care. These changes may have led to a smaller but more complex OOH care population with substantial previous trauma and emotional problems.

  5. Lack of ear care knowledge in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solheim J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jorunn Solheim,1 Olga Shiryaeva,1 Kari J Kvaerner2 1Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, 2C3 Centre for Connected Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Background: Rising life expectancy means an increase in the number of elderly people with hearing loss in the population. Many elderly people live in nursing homes, with varying care needs. A substantial proportion of these people will need help with their hearing aids and other hearing devices. Objective: The objective of the study has been to assess the knowledge, experience, skills, competence, and need for information of staff at nursing homes in relation to residents’ hearing loss and hearing aids. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-five employees at seven nursing homes participated in the study. The main approach was a descriptive study, using questionnaires. Results: The main findings are that 73% of informants found that many residents need help with their hearing aids. Only one-tenth report that they know enough about the residents’ hearing aids. Almost four out of five informants find that the residents become socially isolated as a result of hearing loss. Seventy-eight percent agree to some extent that more residents would benefit from hearing aids. Conclusion: Staff at nursing homes have insufficient knowledge about hearing loss and hearing aids. Increased focus on the elderly with hearing impairment in nursing homes is needed. Contact between nursing homes and audiological specialists should be improved to best follow-up hearing loss and hearing aids. Keywords: hearing aids, nursing staff, hearing impairment, institutionalized elderly

  6. Whose business is dying? : death, the home and palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg, John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of dying at home brings the nexus between the paternalism of conventional palliative care and a social understanding of end of life care into sharp focus. Away from institutional places of care, issues of ownership, compliance and communal responsibility are heightened. At this interface, palliative care services are confronted with the irony of relinquishing their 'ownership' of dying whilst leading communities to reclaim their principal role in the business of dying. This benign – but enduring – paternalism remains a barrier to a paradigmatic shift towards a more complete understanding of the business of dying. Whilst nascent attempts to promote community engagement in end of life issues are evident in the interface between palliative care and public health, dying remains, for the most part, the remit of health care services. In this article, I contend that the business of dying is incompletely attended. This lack of attention will be partially redressed here by considering the home as a fitting death scene.

  7. Whose Business is Dying? Death, the Home and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rosenberg

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The process of dying at home brings the nexus between the paternalism of conventional palliative care and a social understanding of end of life care into sharp focus. Away from institutional places of care, issues of ownership, compliance and communal responsibility are heightened. At this interface, palliative care services are confronted with the irony of relinquishing their 'ownership' of dying whilst leading communities to reclaim their principal role in the business of dying. This benign – but enduring – paternalism remains a barrier to a paradigmatic shift towards a more complete understanding of the business of dying. Whilst nascent attempts to promote community engagement in end of life issues are evident in the interface between palliative care and public health, dying remains, for the most part, the remit of health care services. In this article, I contend that the business of dying is incompletely attended. This lack of attention will be partially redressed here by considering the home as a fitting death scene.

  8. Severe Burnout Is Common Among Critical Care Physician Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Muneer; Lizano, Danny; Carlese, Anthony; Kvetan, Vladimir; Gershengorn, Hayley Beth

    2017-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for burnout among critical care medicine physician assistants. Online survey. U.S. ICUs. Critical care medicine physician assistant members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine coupled with personal contacts. None. We used SurveyMonkey to query critical care medicine physician assistants on demographics and the full 22-question Maslach Burnout Inventory, a validated tool comprised of three subscales-emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and achievement. Multivariate regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with severe burnout on at least one subscale and higher burnout scores on each subscale and the total inventory. From 431 critical care medicine physician assistants invited, 135 (31.3%) responded to the survey. Severe burnout was seen on at least one subscale in 55.6%-10% showed evidence of severe burnout on the "exhaustion" subscale, 44% on the "depersonalization" subscale, and 26% on the "achievement" subscale. After multivariable adjustment, caring for fewer patients per shift (odds ratio [95% CI]: 0.17 [0.05-0.57] for 1-5 vs 6-10 patients; p = 0.004) and rarely providing futile care (0.26 [0.07-0.95] vs providing futile care often; p = 0.041) were independently associated with having less severe burnout on at least one subscale. Those caring for 1-5 patients per shift and those providing futile care rarely also had a lower depersonalization scores; job satisfaction was independently associated with having less exhaustion, less depersonalization, a greater sense of personal achievement, and a lower overall burnout score. Severe burnout is common in critical care medicine physician assistants. Higher patient-to-critical care medicine physician assistant ratios and provision of futile care are risk factors for severe burnout.

  9. Pathway to better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, Olga F; Kang, Youjeong; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-06-02

    Unlike the Magnet Recognition Program, the newer Pathway to Excellence Program designed to improve work environments in a broader range of organizations has not yet been the focus of substantial research. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of Pathway to Excellence Program Standards with better patient care quality and workforce outcomes in home care. Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses yielded informants from 871 home care agencies in the United States. Variables representing each of the 12 Pathway Standards were entered into logistic regression models to determine associations with better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. All Pathway Standards are strongly and significantly associated with better patient care and better workforce outcomes. Home care agencies with better-rated professional work environments consistently had better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. This study validates the Pathway to Excellence Standards as important to patient care quality and nursing workforce outcomes in home care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A home care visit with Congressman Jim Gerlach: fighting to help chronically ill seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Taking your legislator on a home care visit is one of the best ways to make a lasting connection. The more first-hand knowledge they have, the more informed they will be when they address legislation that affects the industry. They need to understand what home care does and how important home care is to the patients it serves. They also need to realize that home care can cut costs and improve the delivery of health care in the United States. This is what Congressman Jim Gerlach (R-PA) concluded after he made a home care visit last month.

  11. Developing palliative care practice guidelines and standards for nursing home-based palliative care teams: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Ladwig, Susan; Caprio, Tom; Norton, Sally; Quill, Timothy; Olsan, Tobie; Cai, Xueya; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-01-01

    Lack of nursing home (NH)-specific palliative care practice guidelines has been identified as a barrier to improving palliative and end-of-life (EOL) quality of care. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess which of the guidelines developed by the National Consensus Project, and the corresponding preferred care practices endorsed by the National Quality Forum, are important and feasible to implement in NHs; and (2) identify the operational standards for palliative care teams in NHs. Two-round mail Delphi study. Based on the existing literature, a set of 7 domains with associated 22 palliative practice guidelines was drafted. We invited 48 NH leaders, including clinicians, to review the importance (10-point Likert scale) and the feasibility (5-point Likert scale) of these guidelines. Participants were also asked about palliative care team composition rounding frequency. The response rate to both rounds was 85%. With regard to importance, the mean rating for all guidelines was 8 or higher (ie, highly important), but there was variability in agreement with regard to 5 of the guidelines. The same 5 guidelines were also considered more difficult to implement (eg, costly, unrealistic). Overall, 17 palliative care guidelines were identified for use by NH palliative care teams. Five disciplines (social work, certified nurse assistant, nurse, physician, and nurse practitioner or physician assistant) were identified as comprising a core team and 3 were proposed as extended or ad hoc members. The palliative