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Sample records for holy cross mountains

  1. Tabulate Corals after the Frasnian/Famennian Crisis: A Unique Fauna from the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland

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    Zapalski, Mikołaj K.; Berkowski, Błażej; Wrzołek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Famennian tabulate corals were very rare worldwide, and their biodiversity was relatively low. Here we report a unique tabulate fauna from the mid- and late Famennian of the western part of the Holy Cross Mountains (Kowala and Ostrówka), Poland. We describe eight species (four of them new, namely ?Michelinia vinni sp. nov., Thamnoptychia mistiaeni sp. nov., Syringopora kowalensis sp. nov. and Syringopora hilarowiczi sp. nov.); the whole fauna consists of ten species (two others described in previous papers). These corals form two assemblages—the lower, mid-Famennian with Thamnoptychia and the upper, late Famennian with representatives of genera ?Michelinia, Favosites, Syringopora and ?Yavorskia. The Famennian tabulates from Kowala represent the richest Famennian assemblage appearing after the F/F crisis (these faunas appear some 10 Ma after the extinction event). Corals described here most probably inhabited deeper water settings, near the limit between euphotic and disphotic zones or slightly above. At generic level, these faunas show similarities to other Devonian and Carboniferous faunas, which might suggest their ancestry to at least several Carboniferous lineages. Tabulate faunas described here represent new recruits (the basin of the Holy Cross mountains was not a refuge during the F/F crisis) and have no direct evolutionary linkage to Frasnian faunas from Kowala. The colonization of the seafloor took place in two separate steps: first was monospecific assemblage of Thamnoptychia, and later came the diversified Favosites-Syringopora-Michelinia fauna. PMID:27007689

  2. Deep in shadows, deep in time: the oldest mesophotic coral ecosystems from the Devonian of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland)

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    Zapalski, Mikołaj K.; Wrzołek, Tomasz; Skompski, Stanisław; Berkowski, Błażej

    2017-09-01

    Recent mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCE) occur at depths between 30 and 150 m and are characterized by dominance of platy corals. Such morphology is an effect of specific adaptation to efficient light harvesting. Here, we describe and analyze platy coral assemblages from two Middle Devonian localities in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) that during this time were located on the southern shelf of Laurussia at tropical latitudes. The Eifelian argillaceous sediments of Skały are dominated by platy and encrusting tabulate corals ( Roseoporella, Platyaxum and Alveolites). Coeval faunas from the shallow-water parts of the Holy Cross Mountains basin display bulbous and branching morphology, thus indicating a Paleozoic coral zonation similar to that known in the Recent. Hence, the Skały site seems to be the oldest known MCE (ca. 390 Ma). A Givetian biostrome from Laskowa Quarry is a second example dominated by platy corals, with abundant branching forms; this site can be recognized as another Devonian MCE. Frondescent Platyaxum, common at both sites, had a growth habit similar to that of Recent Leptoseris, Mycedium or Pavona. Platy morphology is photoadaptive and may evidence photosymbiosis in tabulate ( Alveolites, Roseoporella, Platyaxum) and rugose corals ( Phillipsastrea). Furthermore, it may serve as a tool for recognition of the lower euphotic zone in the fossil record.

  3. Microbialites in the shallow-water marine environments of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) in the aftermath of the Frasnian-Famennian biotic crisis

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    Rakociński, Michał; Racki, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Microbial carbonates, consisting of abundant girvanellid oncoids, are described from cephalopod-crinoid and crinoid-brachiopod coquinas (rudstones) occurring in the lowermost Famennian of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. A Girvanella-bearing horizon (consist with numerous girvanellid oncoids) has been recognised at the Psie Górki section, and represents the northern slope succession of the drowned Dyminy Reef. This occurrence of microbialites in the aftermath of the Frasnian-Famennian event is interpreted as the result of opportunistic cyanobacteria blooms, which, as 'disaster forms', colonised empty shallow-water ecological niches during the survival phase following the Frasnian metazoan reef collapse, due to collapsed activity of epifaunal, grazing, and/or burrowing animals. The anachronistic lithofacies at Psie Górki is linked with catastrophic mass mortality of the cephalopod and crinoid-brachiopod communities during the heavy storm events. This mass occurrence of girvanellid oncoids, along with Frutexites-like microbial shrubs and, at least partly, common micritisation of some skeletal grains, records an overall increase in microbial activity in eutrophic normal marine environments. Microbial communities in the Holy Cross Mountains are not very diverse, being mainly represented by girvanellid oncoids, and stand in contrast to the very rich microbial communities known from the Guilin area (China), Canning Basin (Australia) and the Timan-northern Ural area (Russia). The association from Poland is similar to more diverse microbial communities represented by oncoids, trombolites and stromatolites, well known from the Canadian Alberta basin.

  4. New Famennian colonial coral (Rugosa) from the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland): an example of local evolution after Frasnian-Famennian extinction.

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    Berkowski, Błażej; Zapalski, Mikołaj K; Wrzołek, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Colonial rugose corals are extremely rare in the fossil record after the Late Devonian (Frasnian-Famennian) extinction event. Here, we report a new genus and species, Famastraea catenata, from the late Famennian of the western part of the Holy Cross Mountains (Kowala) in Poland. Although this taxon is colonial, it displays many morphological characters very close to the typically late Famennian solitary species Palaeosmilia aquisgranensis (Frech, 1885), described earlier from the same locality. Hence, we postulate that F. catenata is derived from P. aquisgranensis. In contrast to other Famennian colonial rugose corals, the new taxon represents an example of local evolution within the group of so-called 'Strunian' corals. Consequently, we postulate that the new taxon represents a new colonial rugose fauna, which, however, did not survive the subsequent Late Devonian crisis (i.e. Hangenberg event). F. catenata most probably inhabited deeper water settings, possibly near the boundary between the euphotic and dysphotic zones, as inferred from many other benthic taxa described from this locality.

  5. Sedimentological interpretation and stratigraphical position of glacigenic deposits in the Napęków area (Holy Cross Mountains, Poland

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    Ludwikowska-Kędzia Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The identification of depositional conditions and stratigraphical position of glacigenic deposits in the Napęków area is important for the genetic and stratigraphical interpretation of Quaternary deposits in the central part of the Holy Cross Mountains, as well as for a revision of the course and extent of Middle Polish (Saalian glaciations. These deposits comprise a series of diamictons which occur between sandy-gravelly deposits. Based on results of macro- and microscopic sedimentological investigations, analysis of heavy mineral composition, roundness and frosting of quartz grains, as well as OSL dating, this complex must have formed during the Odranian Glaciation (Drenthe, Saalian, MIS 6. Sandy-gravelly deposits are of fluvioglacial and melt-out origin. Diamictons represent subglacial traction till. Their facies diversity is a result of variations in time and space, complex processes of deposition and deformation, responsible for their formation at the base of the active ice sheet. This glacigenic depositional complex was transformed by erosion-denudation and aeolian processes in a periglacial environment during the Vistulian (Weichselian, MIS 5d-2.

  6. Thermal evolution of Lower Paleozoic sedimentary successions from organic and inorganic studies: the case history of the Holy Cross Mountains (central Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolese, Matteo; Stefano Celano, Antonio; Corrado, Sveva; Caricchi, Chiara; Schito, Andrea; Aldega, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The rapid increase in shale gas production in the USA has triggered a growing interest in unconventional resources in Eastern and Northern Europe. In this framework, the potential shale gas reserves in Poland are the most promising in Europe, extending from the Baltic Sea to the Ukraine border. In this area, the Baltic, Podlasie and Lublin basins have already become objective of shale gas exploration and the Holy Cross Mountains (HCM, Central Poland) represents the outcropping analog of the buried targeted Lower Paleozoic successions, providing a unique opportunity to study and assess source rock potential. In this work, we provide new thermal maturity data of Paleozoic rocks exposed in the HCM. A multi-method approach, coupling organic matter/graptolites (i.e., marine organoclasts) optical analysis and X-ray diffraction of clay-sized fraction of sediments, was applied to constrain the burial - thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. The investigated area of the HCM includes two different tectonic blocks: the Łysogóry region to the North and the Kielce region to the South, separated by the Holy Cross Fault (HCF). lllite content in mixed layer illite-smectite determinations and vitrinite/graptolites reflectance measurements (Roeq%), performed on samples (Cambrian - Devonian) collected from both the regions, show a substantial difference between the two blocks in terms of thermal maturity and burial history. Roeq% values in the southern block range from 0.5% to 1.0%, with few exceptions, indicating early to mid-mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. Samples collected in the northern block show much higher values, mainly from 1.2% up to 1.7%, representative of the gas generation window. The I-S ordering type also shows relevant differences in the two blocks. In the southern block, mixed-layered clay minerals varies from R1 (short-range) to R3 (long-range), whereas R3 structures are recorded in the northern block. Vitrinite reflectance and mixed-layer I

  7. Short history of Autonomous Church of Holy Mountain Sinai

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    Ks. Doroteusz Sawicki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Holy Mountain Sinai was known and venerated in the Old Testament. On this mountain, Moses saw God in the form of a burning bush and heard His name – Jahwe (I am, who I am. When returning from bondage in Egypt, Moses received the ten commandments on stone tablets and instructed Israel. Also, the Prophet Elijah hid himself from the wrath of Queen Isabel on Mount Sinai.In the times of the New Testament, the caves of Sinai became a dwelling place for Christian recluses in the III century. After the relics of St. Catherine the Martyr were found on the top of Mount Sinai, anchoritic monasticism began to give way to monastic communities. The first church was built by St. Helen here in the IV century, and later in the VI century, a monastery was established by the Emperor Justinian. The monks of this monastery, such as St. John Climacus and St. Gregory of Sinai, significantly contributed to the development of Christian teaching and asceticism. The monastery on Mount Sinai engaged itself in the theological debates of this time, fighting against monotheletism and iconoclasm. Mount Sinai did not lose its importance when the Arabs and later Turks occupied the whole Sinai Peninsula.In the VII century, the Monastery of St. Catherine was made the seat of the bishop of Pharan. In the IX century, it was raised to the honour of archbishop. The diocese was made into an autonomous Church by the Patriarch of Constantinople in 1575. Although Sinai was canonically dependant on Jerusalem, it was granted much independence.The Church safely survived both world wars and Israeli-Egyptian conflicts. Although the Church in Sinai consists of the fewest people in any local church, its importance still remains. The icon collection is the richest in the world, the archives and library is second largest in the world and the Codex Sinaiticus of the Holy Scriptures is a world treasure. The relics of St. Catherine and the Burning Bush of Moses also give loftiness to the image

  8. Deserts and holy mountains of medieval Serbia: Written sources, spatial patterns, architectural designs

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    Popović Danica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential concepts in Christian thought and practice, the desert and holy mountain denote a particular kind of monastic and sacral space. They are secluded from the world, intended for asceticism, and ambivalent in nature they are inhospitable and menacing zones populated with demons, but also a monastic paradise, places for spiritual conversion and encounter with the divine. From earliest times, deserts and holy mountains had a few distinguishing characteristics. All forms of monastic life, from communal to solitary, were practiced side by side there. Monks of a special make-up and distinction known as holy men who were also often founders of illustrious communities, future saints and miracle-workers acted there. Furthermore these locales were important spiritual and bookmaking centre's, and therefore, strongholds of Orthodoxy. When trying to research Serbian material on this topic, we face a specific situation: few surviving sources on the one hand, and devastated monuments on the other. The ultimate consequence is that the entire subject has been neglected. Therefore the study of the Serbian deserts and holy mountains requires a very complex interdisciplinary approach with systematic field work as its essential part. It should address the following issues: corroboration, on the basis of written sources, of the reception of the concept of the monastic desert and holy mountain in a particular, regional, context; the distinct means and mechanisms employed in their physical realization; interpretation of their function; the recognition of patterns preserved in the surviving physical structures. Even the results obtained so far appear to be relevant enough to become included in the sacral topography of the Christian world. The author of this study gives particular attention to the detailed analysis of written sources of various genres - diplomatic sources, hagiographic material, liturgical texts, observation notes - in order to establish the

  9. Late Cretaceous crinoids (Echinodermata) from the southwestern margin of the Holy Cross Mts. (southern Poland) and phylogenetic relationships among bourgueticrinids.

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    Lach, Rafał; Salamon, Mariusz A

    2016-01-01

    A systematic account of crinoids from the Upper Coniacian-Lower Campanian of the southwestern margin of the Holy Cross Mountains in southern Poland is presented. Seven crinoid taxa [Marsupites testudinarius (von Schlotheim), Bourgueticrinus ellipticus (Miller), Bourgueticrinus sp., I.? granosus Valette, Isocrinus? sp., Nielsenicrinus carinatus Roemer and Austinocrinus bicoronatus (von Hagenow)] are described and illustrated. The new material from Poland extends down the stratigraphic range of Austinocrinus bicoronatus to the Lower Campanian. Morphometric data support that Bourgueticrinus ellipicus and B.? suedicus are conspecific. Taphonomy and paleoecology of recorded crinoid assemblages are discussed. Phylogeny of Cretaceous bourgueticrinids is also revisited.

  10. Mathematical-geographical analysis of orientation of church of the Holy Cross in Nin

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    Tadić Milutin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains mathematical-geographical and topographical analysis of the medieval XI century church of the Holy Cross in the city of Nin (Croatia. The motive for performing the analysis was a widely accepted opinion, which was based on the statements presented in the book “Number of the Light” (Pejaković, 1978 - that the orientation of the church has a solar meaning, or, more precisely, that the obvious irregularities in the construction of the church were a result of the master builder’s intention to create a building which would simultaneously serve as a house of prayer, a calendar and a sundial. However, the results of this analysis do not prove this tempting story: the orientation of the church of the Holy Cross is dictated by the orientation of the surrounding earlier buildings, in the midst of which the church was constructed, while the distortions of the ground plan are a consequence of the medieval master builder’s lack of education (and not of his intention to adapt the ground plan to the geometry of the Sun. Although it is a misperception, the theory on the solar meaning of orientation of the church of the Holy Cross is not completely without meaning: for the first time on the territory of ex Yugoslavia, this theory drew attention to the importance of investigating the meaning of orientation of medieval churches.

  11. Dermatoses among Children from Celebration of "Holi," the Spring Festival, in India: A Cross-sectional Observational Study.

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    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Agarwal, Megha; Rudra, Olympia

    2016-01-01

    "Holi" is a spring festival celebrated primarily in the Indian subcontinent and also abroad by expatriate Indians. It is a festival of colors, traditionally celebrated by mutual application of colors in different forms on a particular day of the year. These colors frequently comprise a range of synthetic dyes which have harmful effects on the skin and mucosae. Children take part in this colorful festival with much enthusiasm and vigor, making them prone to develop different "Holi"-related dermatoses. Our objective was to find out the different patterns of "Holi"-related dermatoses in a group of pediatric patients. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out over a period of 6 years (2010-2015). Consecutive patients of pediatric age group who attended dermatology outpatient department (OPD) with different dermatoses following application of "Holi" color were included in this study. A total of 63 patients (mean age 11 years; range 1-16 years) were evaluated with a female to male ratio of 1.3:1. Itching is the predominant presenting symptom followed by burning sensation, dryness, scaling, oozing, and loss of hair. Examination revealed that eczematous lesion was the most common (69.8%) reaction pattern followed by xerosis, desquamation, excoriation, erythema, morbilliform eruption, erosion, alopecia, ulceration, acute paronychia, and hyperpigmentation. The face was the most common (76.4%) site of affection. A sizable number of patients of pediatric age group may be affected by "Holi"-related dermatoses necessitating precautionary measures.

  12. Selected Properties and Systematic Position of Soils Developed from Red Sandstones and Clays of the Lower Triassic Buntsandstein in the Nw Part of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland / Niektóre właściwości i pozycja systematyczna gleb wytworzonych z czerwonych piaskowców i iłów dolnego triasu w NW obrzeżeniu Gór Świętokrzyskich

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    Zagórski Zbigniew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the properties of soils developed from the Lower Triassic Buntsandstein sediments in the north-western part of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland. These are deposits of continental genesis and unique features such as red beds. Two representative soil pedons - the Bartków profile (pBK developed from clay and the Góra Czerwona profile (pGC developed from sandstone were selected for detailed analyzes. The morphology of profiles, their micromorphological features, mineralogical composition, and physico-chemical properties were examined. Most of the properties of the soils are a consequence of the original parent rock lithology. A specific feature of the morphology of the soils are the presence of red color (about 10R by the Munsell color scale related to the presence of hematite. As shown by the XRD data, hematite is not the product of the current soil-forming processes, but it is a lithogenic component, which was inherited from the parent rock. Under the influence of climatic factors primary rock structure has been transformed into a new pedogenic one. Soils developed from clays have a characteristic angular blocky structure. Micromorphological analysis showed that an important role in the formation of soil structure involves geogenic susceptibility of Triassic clays to specific cuboid disintegration. This is indicated by the pore system of planes as an orthogonal nets visible in thin section. The soils developed from sandstone have a weak (unstable subangular blocky structure. The main reason is the insufficient dispersion of the clay-ferruginous fraction from the sandstone matrix. Microscopic observations indicate that fine factions occurs as loose microaggregates, which results in a feature that smaller rock fragments and individual quartz grains are not bonded into soil aggregates. The studied soils are characterized by specific physical-chemical properties. Some of them strongly depend on the mineralogical

  13. The sacrament of Holy Baptism

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    Ks. Doroteusz Sawicki

    2014-11-01

    the newly baptized.The following ceremonies take place after the Chrismation: clothing the newly baptized in white vestments, putting on a cross, procession, and cleansing of the anointed areas and tonsuring all hold lesser meaning. They call the baptized to maintain purity and to work on constant self perfection in Christian virtues. That which we receive in Holy Baptism and Chrismation, however can be lost. God does not save us without our participation. This also concerns the power of the sacraments.

  14. Understanding Jerusalem and its Cross-Cultural Dilemmas in Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles From the Holy City

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    Gavrilă Ana-Maria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City (2011 is a nonfictional graphic novel which narrates the experiences during a year that the Canadian artist and his family spent living far from home, in the occasionally dangerous and perilous city of the ancient Middle East. Part humorous memoir filled with “the logistics of everyday life,” part an inquisitive and sharp-eyed travelogue, Jerusalem is interspersed with enthralling lessons on the history of the region, together with vignettes of brief strips of Delisle’s encounters with expatriates and locals, with Jewish, Muslim, and Christian communities in and around the city, with Bedouins, Israeli and Palestinians. Since the comic strip is considered amongst the privileged genres able to disseminate stereotypes, Jerusalem tackles cultural as well as physical barriers, delimiting between domestic and foreign space, while revealing the historical context of the Israeli-Palestinian present conflict. Using this idea as a point of departure, I employ an imagological method of interpretation to address cross-cultural confusions in analysing the cartoonist’s travelogue as discourse of representation and ways of understanding cultural transmission, paying attention to the genre’s convention, where Delisle’s drawing style fits nicely the narrative techniques employed. Through an imagological perspective, I will also pay attention to the interaction between cultures and the dynamics between the images which characterise the Other (the nationalities represented or the spected and those which characterise - not without a sense of irony - his own identity (self-portraits or auto-images. I shall take into account throughout my analysis that the source of this graphic memoir is inevitably a subjective one: even though Delisle professes an unbiased mind-set from the very beginning, the comic is at times coloured by his secular views. Delisle’s book is a dark, yet gentle comedy, and his

  15. Historic Church of the Holy Cross in Kielce – Valuable Substance and Cultural Heritage in the Space of the Modern City

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    Gil-Mastalerczyk, Joanna

    2017-10-01

    In the frequently modified city fabrics, sacral architecture still plays an important role defining aspects of spatial forms and their compositional relations to the surroundings. The historic church of the Holy Cross in Kielce (1903-1939) has been a characteristic sight, a landmark and a contributing factor to the structure of the modern city. Large dimensions and dominant vertical shapes give a sturdy, recognizable form to the church architecture. The body of this Neogothic church, original and distinguishable from its surroundings, has been highly appreciated by the community members. The church provides an example of the aesthetics of the time in which it was built, it also documents changes in the people’s lives and attitudes. It shows Poland’s economic, legal and social transformation. The church has gained a status of one of the symbols of the city.

  16. Methaemoglobinaemia during Holi festival.

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    Zaki, S A; Jadhav, A; Chandane, P

    2009-09-01

    We report eight children who developed methaemoglobinaemia after exposure to contaminated colours used during Holi, a traditional festival celebrated in India. Methaemoglobinaemia can be life-threatening, but outcome is good if treated in time with intravenous methylene blue. Physicians might encounter such cases after exposure to Holi colours and hence should be aware of this life-threatening but easily treatable complication.

  17. Some aspects of lithological and exogenic control of sandstone morphology, the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) Mts. case study, Poland

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    Urban, Jan; Górnik, Marek

    2017-10-01

    Various morphologies of cliffs built of different quartzose rocks in the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) Mts. (upland region, central Poland) - from Cambrian quartzites and Devonian quartzitic sandstones to Triassic and Jurassic porous sandstones - were described in order to examine the constraints of their lithological and spatial occurrence. The quantitative study of the occurrence of these morphologies on cliffs makes it possible to distinguish two principal groups of morphologies: angular relief produced by rock splitting (crumbling), typical of quartzites indurated in silica and of open porosity less than 1.5%, and morphologies developed due to granular disintegration and exfoliation of sandstones of open porosity higher than 1.5%. Among the relief types of this second group, morphology reflecting sedimentary and diagenetic structures as well as smooth surfaces are the most common and are referred to sandstones of a wide range of porosity, whereas honeycombs and surfaces suffering fast granular decay and scaling are characteristic of rocks of specific porosity (respectively: 5-8% and 3.5-8%). The occurrence of honeycombs on rock surfaces is also conditioned by exogenic factors: sun, wind and rain, since this morphology tends to occur on cliffs with aspects ranging from south-east, through south, to west-north-west.

  18. TCP HolyWood

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Núñez Mori

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a new end-to-end, sender side Transport Control Protocol called TCP HolyWood or in short TCP-HW. In a simulated wired environment, TCP HolyWood outperforms in average throughput, three of the more important TCP protocols ever made, we are talking about TCP Reno, TCP Westwood, and TCP Vegas; and in average jitter to TCP Reno and TCP Vegas too. In addition, according to Jain’s index, our proposal is as fair as TCP Reno, the Standard. Apresentamos um novo Protocolo de Controle de...

  19. Holy springs and holy water: underestimated sources of illness?

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    Kirschner, Alexander K T; Atteneder, Michael; Schmidhuber, Angelika; Knetsch, Sonja; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Sommer, Regina

    2012-09-01

    Use of holy springs and holy water is inherent in religious activities. Holy spring water is also used extensively for personal drinking water, although not assessed according to drinking water standards. Holy water in churches and chapels may cause infections via wetting of lips and sprinkling on persons. Our aim was to assess the microbiological and chemical water quality of holy springs and holy water in churches and hospital chapels. Of the holy springs investigated, only 14% met the microbiological and chemical requirements of national drinking water regulations. Considering results from sanitary inspections of the water catchments, no spring was assessed as a reliable drinking water source. All holy water samples from churches and hospital chapels showed extremely high concentrations of HPC; fecal indicators, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus occurred only in the most frequently visited churches. We conclude that it is highly necessary to include holy springs in programs for assessment and management of water quality. Public awareness has to be raised to perceive holy springs as potential sources of illness. Holy water can be another source of infection, especially in hospital chapels and frequently visited churches. Recommendations are made for proper water quality management of both water types.

  20. America's Holy War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, John

    2006-01-01

    .... He also contends that the Global War On Terrorism (GWOT) is intrinsically a strategy to combat a "tactic" used by Islamic Extremists versus focusing on the true enemy, the Muslim people who support this Holy War in the name of Islam...

  1. Durkheim on power and holiness

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    Berndt Gustafsson

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available Emile Durkheim has as nobody else brought together power and holiness as pre-requisites for each other. Power was holiness, and holiness was power. Power should here be understood as the ability to act collectively or on the behalf of the collective. Power comes—and not only for Durkheim- from out of the collective. The collective is, however, for Durkheim, holy, all imperative and uncompromising, unapproachable and incorruptible. The holy, "le sacré", is thus always of social origin and can only be explained sociologically. Durkheim may well call the holy for a religious category, but the religious phenomena are in themselves products direct from collective feelings, phenomena, through which the collective expresses itself in holiness and thereby continually celebrates and strengthens itself.

  2. Holy Nations. Global Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Along with the processes of globalisation and the end of the cold war we have seen an upsurge in religious nationalism and an increasing focus on the role of religion as a legitimising force in democratic secular states. Holy Nations & Global Identities draws on the combined theoretical and histo......Along with the processes of globalisation and the end of the cold war we have seen an upsurge in religious nationalism and an increasing focus on the role of religion as a legitimising force in democratic secular states. Holy Nations & Global Identities draws on the combined theoretical...... and historical insight of historians, political scientists and social scientists on the question of nationalism and globalisation with the methodological knowledge of religion presented by sociologists of religion. The book brings genuine theoretical explorations and original case studies on civil religion......, nationalism and globalization. It also provides an introduction to the research history of the fields and aims to develop and elaborate on the theories and methodology of the investigated subjects....

  3. Mountains

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    Regina M. Rochefort; Laurie L. Kurth; Tara W. Carolin; Robert R. Mierendorf; Kimberly Frappier; David L. Steenson

    2006-01-01

    This chapter concentrates on subalpine parklands and alpine meadows of southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and western Montana. These areas lie on the flanks of several mountain ranges including the Olympics, the Cascades of Oregon and Washington, and the Coast Mountains in British Columbia.

  4. Holy gardener and holy bishop: The images and cult of holy martyrs named Phokas

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    Starodubcev Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Holy martyrs by the name of Phokas, a gardener and a bishop, both from Sinope, were not frequently portrayed in the Eastern Christian world. They were sometimes depicted with objects relating them to seafaring, and the holy bishop in particular was shown holding a paddle. The source of such images can be traced to the writings devoted to the martyrs. The issue of why the holy bishop was depicted mainly in the Byzantine empire and the Russian principality is also discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177036: Srpska srednjovekovna umetnost i njen evropski kontekst

  5. Physical Properties of the Mountain Soils of Cross River State, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical Properties of the Mountain Soils of Cross River State, Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Soil Science ... The surface soil horizon values at the Obudu mountains ranged between 33.96 and 70.08%, giving a mean of 50.63% while the subsurface values ranged from 19.62 to 55.47%, with the mean of 29.08%. Oban hills ...

  6. Case Report: Infectious Diseases in Pilgrims Visiting the Holy Land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Orna; Blum, Arnon; Marva, Esther; Katz, Adina; Tzadok, Bat-Sheva; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Baneth, Gad; Peretz, Avi

    2017-08-01

    Every year Christian pilgrims from around the world visit the holy sites located around the Sea of Galilee. Some become ill during their stay with infectious diseases that were acquired in their country of origin, and are hospitalized at Poriya Medical Center. They pose a diagnostic challenge due to language barriers, the rarity of these infections in Israel, and the fact that diagnostic tests are not readily available. All patient records from 2015 of Holy Land tourists hospitalized at Poriya Medical Center were screened for the diagnosis of imported zoonotic diseases that are not commonly diagnosed in Israel. Three patients who were on a Holy Land tour were hospitalized during 2015 with laboratory-confirmed diagnostically challenging zoonotic infectious diseases: a 91-year-old priest from Ethiopia diagnosed with relapsing fever due to Borrelia recurrentis, an 85-year-old retired mountaineer from New Hampshire diagnosed with human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and a 57-year-old farmer from central Brazil diagnosed with leptospirosis. These case reports emphasize the importance of considering imported zoonotic infectious diseases and obtaining appropriate diagnostic tests when treating Holy Land travelers to Israel.

  7. Genome-wide cross-amplification of domestic sheep microsatellites in bighorn sheep and mountain goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poissant, J; Shafer, A B A; Davis, C S; Mainguy, J; Hogg, J T; Côté, S D; Coltman, D W

    2009-07-01

    We tested for cross-species amplification of microsatellite loci located throughout the domestic sheep (Ovis aries) genome in two north American mountain ungulates (bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis, and mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus). We identified 247 new polymorphic markers in bighorn sheep (≥ 3 alleles in one of two study populations) and 149 in mountain goats (≥ 2 alleles in a single study population) using 648 and 576 primer pairs, respectively. Our efforts increased the number of available polymorphic microsatellite markers to 327 for bighorn sheep and 180 for mountain goats. The average distance between successive polymorphic bighorn sheep and mountain goat markers inferred from the Australian domestic sheep genome linkage map (mean ± 1 SD) was 11.9 ± 9.2 and 15.8 ± 13.8 centimorgans, respectively. The development of genomic resources in these wildlife species enables future studies of the genetic architecture of trait variation. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The effect of mountain bike wheel size on cross-country performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different wheel size diameters on indicators of cross-country mountain bike time trial performance. Nine competitive male mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) performed 1 lap of a 3.48 km mountain bike (MTB) course as fast as possible on 26″, 27.5″ and 29″ wheeled MTB. Time (s), mean power (W), cadence (revs · min -1 ) and velocity (km · h -1 ) were recorded for the whole lap and during ascent and descent sections. One-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to determine significant differences. Results revealed no significant main effects for any variables by wheel size during all trials, with the exception of cadence during the descent (F (2, 16)  = 8.96; P = .002; P 2  = .53). Post hoc comparisons revealed differences lay between the 26″ and 29″ wheels (P = .02). The findings indicate that wheel size does not significantly influence performance during cross-country when ridden by trained mountain bikers, and that wheel choice is likely due to personal choice or sponsorship commitments.

  9. Holy Grandeur Enough for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novrianna Gloria Hutagalung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural degradation is not merely a competition between ecology and economy. The destruction of nature is closely related to religiosity and human relationships to fellow human beings, the environment, and God. Ecotheology becomes a self-criticism of the classical doctrines of Christianity, which are considered to exalt humankind as the “crown of creation” and marginalize non-human creatures as commodities of economic value for human interests. Ecotheology seems to have talked too often about damaged nature, or even extinct plants or animals, and forgetting the other side of the bountiful biodiversities, which is the holy beauty of nature. Ecotheology needs to ponder that God, the Holy Grandeur, who manifests the cosmic wisdom in the beauty of all creation, is enough for all.

  10. LAND MEASUREMENT IN HOLY BOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Nelu Leu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Data and facts presented here will show measurement methods for time, land, buildings and first map designs of Israel County used during time. There are also described the instruments and measurement units used to perform these types of measurements, like the plot of land, the cubit, the mason string, the cane and the pole. Like any scientific approach, the land measurement domain begins with training specialists to elaborate all projects needed. This can be done “with the help of the Holy Ghost that gives us wisdom, skills and patience”, like those that made the Tent of God, the Temple of God and the surroundings, House of Solomon and others. All measurement methods are presented and supported with quotations from the Holy Book. In the end there are presented the modern equivalents for these antique measure units for weight, length, capacity and coins mentioned in the Old and New Testament.

  11. Conceptualising holiness in the Gospel of John: The mode and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Gospel of John, the holiness of the trinity constitutes the theological environment for the code of holiness and forms the basis for the exhortation to holiness. The code of holiness is described in the light of the interaction of three levels of relationships: the unity between Father and the Son as the example of holiness, ...

  12. "Rivers of Living Water": The Movements and Mobility of Holiness-Pentecostals, 1837-1910

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation follows the fluid and dynamic movements of holiness and pentecostal worshipers who crossed boundaries of race, gender, language, and region at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century. It demonstrates how the changeable, decentralized, and anti-institutional character of the holiness-pentecostal movement allowed for both radical social behavior and dynamic geographic mobility. The movement was in a constant state of flux as the sanctified tra...

  13. The distribution of pace adopted by cyclists during a cross-country mountain bike World Championships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiss, Chris R; Ross, Megan L R; Garvican, Laura A; Ross, Neil; Pottgiesser, Torben; Gregory, John; Martin, David T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of pace self-selected by cyclists of varying ability, biological age and sex performing in a mountain bike World Championship event. Data were collected on cyclists performing in the Elite Male (ELITEmale; n = 75), Elite Female (ELITEfemale; n = 50), Under 23 Male (U23male; n = 62), Under 23 Female (U23female; n = 34), Junior Male (JNRmale; n = 71) and Junior Female (JNRfemale; n = 30) categories of the 2009 UCI Cross-Country Mountain Bike World Championships. Split times were recorded for the top, middle and bottom 20% of all finishers of each category. Timing splits were positioned to separate the course into technical and non-technical, uphill, downhill and rolling/flat sections. Compared with bottom performers, top performers in all male categories (ELITEmale, U23male, JNRmale) maintained a more even pace over the event as evidenced by a significantly lower standard deviation and range in average lap speed. Top performers, males, and ELITEmale athletes spent a lower percentage of overall race time on technical uphill sections of the course, compared with middle and bottom placed finishers, females, and JNRmale athletes, respectively. Better male performers adopt a more even distribution of pace throughout cross-country mountain events. Performance of lower placed finishers, females and JNRmale athletes may be improved by enhancing technical uphill cycling ability.

  14. A geomorphic approach to the design of pipeline crossings of mountain streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, M.; Porter, M.; Savigny, K.W. [BGC Engineering Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yaremko, E. [Northwest Hydraulic Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The safe and efficient operation of pipelines that cross streams can be severely affected by flow transformations. Flow characterization is particularly important in determining pipeline alignment and designing pipeline crossings that avoid repeated pipeline interruptions resulting from catastrophic discharges. There are 3 basic options for pipelines that cross streams. These include conventional burial, horizontal directional drilling or aerial crossing. In addition to cost, the choice of crossing method depends on the dominant geomorphic processes at the stream crossing and the environmental constraints. In order to design conventional crossings, data is needed for estimates of scour and bank erosion. For aerial crossings, data is needed on peak flood discharge along with estimates of the type of debris that will be transported during floods to ensure that the infrastructure will be located outside of the debris impact zone. Several hydrological methods exist to determine this information. However, although they are appropriate for streams dominated by purely hydrological processes, they fail where other, more hazardous processes occur within the design recurrence interval. Therefore, this paper recommended that a geomorphic approach should be taken in recognizing and quantifying the potential for non-fluvial processes. Several case studies from Bolivia and Canada were presented to illustrate the importance of geomorphic processes in mountain streams on pipeline operation. A systematic method was presented to evaluate watersheds with respect to geomorphic processes that can affect the frequency, peak flow, scour and occurrence of hazardous events associated with stream channels. 29 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Dermatoses among children from celebration of “Holi,” the spring festival, in India: A cross-sectional observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Kumar Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Holi” is a spring festival celebrated primarily in the Indian subcontinent and also abroad by expatriate Indians. It is a festival of colors, traditionally celebrated by mutual application of colors in different forms on a particular day of the year. These colors frequently comprise a range of synthetic dyes which have harmful effects on the skin and mucosae. Children take part in this colorful festival with much enthusiasm and vigor, making them prone to develop different “Holi”-related dermatoses. Our objective was to find out the different patterns of “Holi”-related dermatoses in a group of pediatric patients. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out over a period of 6 years (2010–2015. Consecutive patients of pediatric age group who attended dermatology outpatient department (OPD with different dermatoses following application of “Holi” color were included in this study. Results: A total of 63 patients (mean age 11 years; range 1–16 years were evaluated with a female to male ratio of 1.3:1. Itching is the predominant presenting symptom followed by burning sensation, dryness, scaling, oozing, and loss of hair. Examination revealed that eczematous lesion was the most common (69.8% reaction pattern followed by xerosis, desquamation, excoriation, erythema, morbilliform eruption, erosion, alopecia, ulceration, acute paronychia, and hyperpigmentation. The face was the most common (76.4% site of affection. Conclusion: A sizable number of patients of pediatric age group may be affected by “Holi”-related dermatoses necessitating precautionary measures.

  16. Dermatoses among Children from Celebration of “Holi,” the Spring Festival, in India: A Cross-sectional Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Agarwal, Megha; Rudra, Olympia

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Holi” is a spring festival celebrated primarily in the Indian subcontinent and also abroad by expatriate Indians. It is a festival of colors, traditionally celebrated by mutual application of colors in different forms on a particular day of the year. These colors frequently comprise a range of synthetic dyes which have harmful effects on the skin and mucosae. Children take part in this colorful festival with much enthusiasm and vigor, making them prone to develop different “Holi”-related dermatoses. Our objective was to find out the different patterns of “Holi”-related dermatoses in a group of pediatric patients. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out over a period of 6 years (2010–2015). Consecutive patients of pediatric age group who attended dermatology outpatient department (OPD) with different dermatoses following application of “Holi” color were included in this study. Results: A total of 63 patients (mean age 11 years; range 1–16 years) were evaluated with a female to male ratio of 1.3:1. Itching is the predominant presenting symptom followed by burning sensation, dryness, scaling, oozing, and loss of hair. Examination revealed that eczematous lesion was the most common (69.8%) reaction pattern followed by xerosis, desquamation, excoriation, erythema, morbilliform eruption, erosion, alopecia, ulceration, acute paronychia, and hyperpigmentation. The face was the most common (76.4%) site of affection. Conclusion: A sizable number of patients of pediatric age group may be affected by “Holi”-related dermatoses necessitating precautionary measures. PMID:27688442

  17. Astronomical Knowledge in Holy Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, Sona V.; Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate religious myths related to astronomy from different cultures in an attempt to identify common subjects and characteristics. The paper focuses on astronomy in religion. The initial review covers records from Holy books about sky related superstitious beliefs and cosmological understanding. The purpose of this study is to introduce sky related religious and national traditions (particularly based on different calendars; Solar or Lunar). We carried out a comparative study of astronomical issues contained in a number of Holy books: Ancient Egyptian Religion (Pyramid Texts), Zoroastrianism (Avesta), Hinduism (Vedas), Buddhism (Tipitaka), Confucianism (Five Classics), Sikhism (Guru Granth Sahib), Christianity (Bible), Islam (Quran), Druidism (Mabinogion) and Maya Religion (Popol Vuh). These books include various information on the creation of the Universe, Sun and Moon, the age of the Universe, Cosmic sizes, understanding about the planets, stars, Milky Way and description of the Heavens in different religions. We come to the conclusion that the perception of celestial objects varies from culture to culture, and from religion to religion and preastronomical views had a significant impact on humankind, particularly on religious diversities. We prove that Astronomy is the basis of cultures, and that national identity and mythology and religion were formed due to the special understanding of celestial objects.

  18. The Role of the Holy Spirit in Human Deification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Ławreszuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on introducing the teaching on the Holy Spirit and His relation with man. This article’s main objective is to demonstrate the role of the Holy Spirit in human deification (theosis and the experience of human relations with the Holy Spirit in Orthodox theology. When speaking of the gifts of the Holy Spirit and His grace, Orthodox theology also speaks of the kenosis of the Third Person of the Holy Trinity and human participation in the Holy Spirit.

  19. Holy feigning in the Apophthegmata Patrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wheeler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to uncover the meaning of holy feigning in the late-antique Christian text the Apophthegmata Patrum, or Sayings of the Desert Fathers [and Mothers]. Whereas stories in this text depict demonic feigning as a regular occurrence (demons often appearing in the guise of a fellow desert dweller, what I call ‘holy feigning’ depicts one desert Christian expressing empathy for the situation of another – and helping the other to change. By looking at two stories that are paradigmatic of holy feigning, I show that exemplary deceptive behaviour, though explicitly defying the otherwise consistent rhetoric of ‘radical self-honesty’ in the Apophthegmata Patrum, paradoxically marks out the person who feigns as holy, discerning and imitative of Christ. In this article, I offer several suggestions for accounting for this seeming contradiction in the desert literature and propose how a spirituality of holy feigning might remain meaningful to readers of this literature today.

  20. Conceptualising holiness in the Gospel of John: The mode and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-02-24

    ). The fourth and the ultimate objective is the glorification of God (17:4). Conceptualising holiness in the Gospel of John: The mode and objectives of holiness (part 1). Read online: Scan this QR code with your smart phone or.

  1. Acquired Methemoglobinemia - A Sporadic Holi Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masavkar, Sanjeevani Satish; Mauskar, Anupama; Patwardhan, Gaurav; Bhat, Vasudeva; Manglani, Mamta V

    2017-06-15

    To study clinical profile and outcome in patients with methemoglobinemia following exposure to toxic colors during Holi festival. This retrospective study included 112 children (5 to 12 years) admitted with methemoglobinemia after playing Holi. Clinical and treatment details were reviewed. The common symptoms were giddiness, vomiting and headache. Treatment included thorough skin wash, intravenous fluid and methylene blue in 111 children. Age 7-9 and > 11 years, vomiting, giddiness, cyanosis, PaO2 < 80 mm Hg and oxygen saturation < 95% were associated with higher need for methylene blue. All children had a good outcome. Timely diagnosis and management of acquired methemoglobinemia can save lives.

  2. Representing holy foolishness: an investigation of the holy fool as a critical figure in European cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Birzache, Alina Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I investigate the evolving figure of the holy fool as a critical figure in European cinema. Three national cinemas - Soviet and post-Soviet cinema, French cinema, and Danish cinema – form the primary focus of my analysis. These cinemas correspond broadly to the three main orientations in European Christianity: Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant. The cinematic holy fool of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries is interpreted in this thesis as a protean ...

  3. In search of the Holy grail

    CERN Multimedia

    Grant, Eric

    2008-01-01

    "Our knowledge of the universe has evolved considerably over the pas ten years - and perhaps it might do so even more dramatically when CERN, the European organization for nuclear research located in Geneva, inaugurates its new particle accelerator this summer: the tool for discovery of the "God Particle" and a step towards the holy grail of science." (4 pages + photos)

  4. Influence of wheel size on muscle activity and tri-axial accelerations during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of different mountain bike wheel diameters on muscle activity and whether larger diameter wheels attenuate muscle vibrations during cross-country riding. Nine male competitive mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) participated in the study. Riders performed one lap at race pace on 26, 27.5 and 29 inch wheeled mountain bikes. sEMG and acceleration (RMS) were recorded for the full lap and during ascent and descent phases at the gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, biceps brachii and triceps brachii. No significant main effects were found by wheel size for each of the four muscle groups for sEMG or acceleration during the full lap and for ascent and descent (P > .05). When data were analysed between muscle groups, significant differences were found between biceps brachii and triceps brachii (P mountain biking. However, more activity was observed in the biceps brachii during 26 inch wheel descending. This is possibly due to an increased need to manoeuvre the front wheel over obstacles.

  5. A multidimensional approach to performance prediction in Olympic distance cross-country mountain bikers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Andrew R; Bennett, Kyle J M; Fransen, Job; Dascombe, Ben J

    2018-01-01

    This study adopted a multidimensional approach to performance prediction within Olympic distance cross-country mountain biking (XCO-MTB). Twelve competitive XCO-MTB cyclists (VO2max 60.8 ± 6.7 ml · kg-1 · min-1) completed an incremental cycling test, maximal hand grip strength test, cycling power profile (maximal efforts lasting 6-600 s), decision-making test and an individual XCO-MTB time-trial (34.25 km). A hierarchical approach using multiple linear regression analyses was used to develop predictive models of performance across 10 circuit subsections and the total time-trial. The strongest model to predict overall time-trial performance achieved prediction accuracy of 127.1 s across 6246.8 ± 452.0 s (adjusted R2 = 0.92; P < 0.01). This model included VO2max relative to total cycling mass, maximal mean power across 5 and 30 s, peak left hand grip strength, and response time for correct decisions in the decision-making task. A range of factors contributed to the models for each individual subsection of the circuit with varying predictive strength (adjusted R2: 0.62-0.97; P < 0.05). The high prediction accuracy for the total time-trial supports that a multidimensional approach should be taken to develop XCO-MTB performance. Additionally, individual models for circuit subsections may help guide training practices relative to the specific trail characteristics of various XCO-MTB circuits.

  6. A Brief Description of Ceremony Mangongkal Holi in Toba Batak

    OpenAIRE

    Pardosi, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Judul kertas karya ini adalah A Brief Description of Ceremony of Mangongkal Holi in Toba Batak. Mangongkal holi adalah suatu upacara yang dilakukan oleh orang batak terutama suku Batak Toba dengan mengali kembali kuburan nenek moyangnya dan kemudian mengumpulkan seluruh tulang-tulangnya dan kemudian dipindahkan ketempat yang baru atau disebut dengan tugu. Kertas karya ini menjelaskan tentang pengertian dari mangongkal holi serta tata cara jalannya upacara tersebut. Selain itu juga, dalam kert...

  7. A longitudinal analysis of start position and the outcome of World Cup cross-country mountain bike racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Morton, R Hugh

    2012-01-01

    For any athlete competing at the highest level it is vital to understand the components that lead to successful performance. World cup cross-country mountain biking is a complex sport involving large numbers of athletes (100-200) competing for positional advantage over varied off-road terrain. The start has been deemed a major part of performance outcome in such races. The purpose of the present study was to establish the relationship between start and finish position in cross-country mountain bike World Cup events over a 10 year (1997-2007) period and to make comparisons with a model manipulating start position based on predicted athletic capabilities. Data collection and comparisons included results from World Cup events from 1997 to 2007 (males and females), and modelled race data based on potential performance capabilities over the same period. Analyses involved the association of annual plus pooled start and finish position (Kendall's tau) along with banded mean, standard deviation for number of changes in position, while non-constrained linear regression enabled comparison between seasons. Actual race data showed significant positive correlations between starting position and finishing position (P 0.05) for both males and females. In conclusion, finishing position is highly dependent on start position and strategies need to be devised for competing athletes to progress in the sport.

  8. Lichens of the Holy Hill orthodox sanctuary in Grabarka (NE Poland)

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Matwiejuk

    2013-01-01

    The Holy Hill Grabarka is one of the most important orthodox sanctuaries in Poland. The sanctuary is situated in Podlasie region between Bug and Narew rivers. It grew in the shade of well developing (in the first centuries of the second millennium) towns Mielnik and Drohiczyn. The most striking thing is that the church is surrounded by a forest of thousands of crosses brought by pilgrims. The study present 64 species of epiphytic, epixylic, epilythic and epigeic lichens. Among 64 lichen speci...

  9. Early Ordovician (Tremadocian brachiopods from the Eastern Alborz Mountains, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid E. Popov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Six linguliform and two rhynchonelliform brachiopods, including three new species Eurytreta ahmadii, Wahwahlingula kharbashi and Nanorthis bastamensis are described from Tremadocian strata (Paltodus deltifer deltifer conodont Biozone in the Deh-Molla area southwest of Shahrud, Northern Iran. The fauna is dominated by micromorphic lingulides and acrotretides and shows distinct similarity to the contemporaneous micromorphic brachiopod association from Tremadocian chalcedonites of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. New data on the early ontogeny of the enigmatic lingulide Diencobolus show a very distinct pattern, including the presence of a metamorphic protegulum ornamented with flat-based pits and a single pair of larval setal bundles, which links this taxon to Paterula and suggests close phylogenetic relationships of both taxa to the Discinoidea.

  10. Pre-construction geologic section along the cross drift through the potential high-level radioactive waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, C.J.; Day, W.C.; Sweetkind, D.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Juan, C.S.; Drake, R.M. II [Pacific Western Technologies, Ltd., Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Site Characterization effort for the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, tunnels excavated by tunnel boring machines provide access to the volume of rock that is under consideration for possible underground storage of high-level nuclear waste beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Exploratory Studies Facility, a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel, has been excavated, and a 2.8-km-long, 5-m-diameter Cross Drift will be excavated in 1998 as part of the geologic, hydrologic and geotechnical evaluation of the potential repository. The southwest-trending Cross Drift branches off of the north ramp of the horseshoe-shaped Exploratory Studies Facility. This report summarizes an interpretive geologic section that was prepared for the Yucca Mountain Project as a tool for use in the design and construction of the Cross Drift.

  11. Contestation of 'the holy places in the Zimbabwean Religious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Places that are regarded as holy are highly esteemed in most religious institutions. Such places are revered because they denote the converging points of human beings and the divine. The fundamental questions addressed in this study are: what makes a place holy? Do Christians share sacred places with other religious ...

  12. Extraction of cross sections from digital elevation model for one-dimensional dam-break wave propagation in mountain valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Shallow Water Equations (SWE) provide a fundamental component for the quantification and mapping of hydraulic hazard. In steep mountain valleys, the use of one-dimensional SWE (also known as St. Venant Equations, SVE) is often legitimate and computationally competitive against two-dimensional solvers. However, in the same environment, the solution of SVE is hindered by the need of an accurate bathymetric reconstruction, which implies a number of cross sections which cannot be readily acquired by conventional field surveys. On the other hand, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) with resolution adequate for studies of flood propagation are available in many areas of the world. In this paper, I propose to compute cross sections automatically by operating along the channel network derived from a valley's raster DEM, on the basis of algorithms that hitherto have been used for geomorphological and hydrological purposes. The extraction process can be refined by varying cross section inter-distance and width, in order to prevent superimpositions that might occur due to the sinuosity of the thalweg and to better capture the valley's local topography. At the end of this process, the geometric functions needed by SVE solvers can be computed for each cross section. A software tool that implements the described algorithm is provided to the scientific community.

  13. "Rickettsia amblyommii" induces cross protection against lethal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Lucas S; Mendell, Nicole L; Walker, David H; Bouyer, Donald H

    2014-08-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a severe illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii for which there is no available vaccine. We hypothesize that exposure to the highly prevalent, relatively nonpathogenic "Rickettsia amblyommii" protects against R. rickettsii challenge. To test this hypothesis, guinea pigs were inoculated with "R. amblyommii." After inoculation, the animals showed no signs of illness. When later challenged with lethal doses of R. rickettsii, those previously exposed to "R. amblyommii" remained well, whereas unimmunized controls developed severe illness and died. We conclude that "R. amblyommii" induces an immune response that protects from illness and death in the guinea pig model of RMSF. These results provide a basis for exploring the use of low-virulence rickettsiae as a platform to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to prevent severe rickettsioses.

  14. Prevalence of Mental Health Problems and Factors Associated with Psychological Distress in Mountain Exercisers: A Cross-Sectional Study in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Niedermeier

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about potential protective factors against mental health problems is highly needed. Regular physical activity (PA in an outdoor environment, like mountain exercising, might reduce psychological distress. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of mental health problems in mountain exercisers and to detect factors associated with psychological distress. In a cross-sectional design, we collected self-reported data of 1,536 Austrian mountain exercisers. The prevalence of mental health problems and psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, the level of PA International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and affective valence during PA (Feeling Scale were obtained. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to assess factors influencing psychological distress. The prevalence of mental health problems in Austrian mountain exercisers was 14%. Health-enhancing PA level and higher affective valence during PA were significantly associated with lower psychological distress. Minimal PA level was not significantly associated with lower psychological distress compared to inactive PA level. Marital status, education, alpine association membership, and body mass index did not show a significant influence on psychological distress. The prevalence of mental health problems seems to be lower in Austrian mountain exercisers compared to the European population. A health-enhancing PA level and affective valence increasing forms of PA were shown to be associated with lower psychological distress. Results might lead to interventional studies focusing on the potential of outdoor PA, e.g., mountain exercise, as an adjunct treatment in people at risk or with mental health problems.

  15. Small fishes crossed a large mountain range: Quaternary stream capture events and freshwater fishes on both sides of the Taebaek Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daemin; Hirt, M Vincent; Won, Yong-Jin; Simons, Andrew M

    2017-07-01

    The Taebaek Mountains in Korea serve as the most apparent biogeographic barrier for Korean freshwater fishes, resulting in 2 distinct ichthyofaunal assemblages on the eastern (East/Japan Sea slope) and western (Yellow Sea and Korea Strait slopes) sides of the mountain range. Of nearly 100 species of native primary freshwater fishes in Korea, only 18 species occur naturally on both sides of the mountain range. Interestingly, there are 5 rheophilic species (Phoxinus phoxinus, Coreoleuciscus splendidus, Ladislavia taczanowskii, Iksookimia koreensis and Koreocobitis rotundicaudata) found on both sides of the Taebaek Mountains that are geographically restricted to the Osip River (and several neighboring rivers, for L. taczanowskii and I. koreensis) on the eastern side of the mountain range. The Osip River and its neighboring rivers also shared a rheophilic freshwater fish, Liobagrus mediadiposalis, with the Nakdong River on the western side of the mountain range. We assessed historical biogeographic hypotheses on the presence of these rheophilic fishes, utilizing DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Results of our divergence time estimation indicate that ichthyofaunal transfers into the Osip River (and several neighboring rivers in East Sea slope) have occurred from the Han (Yellow Sea slope) and Nakdong (Korea Strait slope) Rivers since the Late Pleistocene. The inferred divergence times for the ichthyofaunal transfer across the Taebaek Mountains were consistent with the timing of hypothesized multiple reactivations of the Osip River Fault (Late Pleistocene), suggesting that the Osip River Fault reactivations may have caused stream capture events, followed by ichthyofaunal transfer, not only between the Osip and Nakdong Rivers, but also between the Osip and Han Rivers. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. A resposta de frequência cardíaca durante as competições de "mountain bike cross-country" Heart rate response during mountain bike cross-country races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Pereira Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a resposta de frequência cardíaca (FC durante as competições de "Cross-country" Olímpico (XCO. Quatorze "mountain bikers" foram separados em dois grupos: elite (n = 6; 26,5 ± 3,6 anos; 69,1 ± 2,1 kg; 174,0 ± 1,2 cm; 5,9 ± 0,9 % G; 9,0 ± 1,3 anos de treinamento e amadores (n = 8; 25,6 ± 7,7 anos; 67,7 ± 7,0 kg; 175,5 ± 5,5 cm; 5,8 ± 2,1 % G; 8,3 ± 5,7 anos de treinamento. Os participantes foram submetidos a um teste progressivo para a identificação dos limiares metabólicos e seus respectivos valores de frequência cardíaca (FC em cada zona de intensidade de esforço. Após intervalo mínimo de quatro dias os atletas da categoria elite foram avaliados através de monitores de FC durante a etapa brasileira da Copa do Mundo de XCO. Após 15 dias, todos os atletas foram avaliados no Campeonato Brasileiro de XCO. Os resultados indicaram que em ambas as competições, a média percentual da FC foi correspondente a 91-92 % da FCmáx. Nas competições, os atletas permaneceram durante diferentes tempos percentuais nas zonas de intensidade de esforço sendo 10,0-14,8% no domínio leve; 23,1-30,1% moderado e 55,1-66,9% intenso. Assim, este estudo apresenta que as competições de XCO são realizadas em alta intensidade, principalmente após a largada.The aim of this study was to verify and describe the intensity profile of cross-country mountain-biking races using heart rate (HR recorded during races. Fourteen mountain bikers participated in two groups: elite (n = 6; 26.5 ± 3.6 years old; 69.1 ± 2.1 kg; 174.0 ± 1.2 cm; 5.9 ± 0.9 % BF; 9.0 ± 1.3 years of training and amateurs (n = 8; 25.6 ± 7.7 years; 67.7 ± 7.0 kg; 175.5 ± 5.5 cm; 5.8 ± 2.1 % BF; 8.3 ± 5.7 years of training. Each cyclist was submitted to an incremental exercise test to determine the metabolic thresholds and the HR values at each threshold. After four days, only the athletes of elite category were tested during Brazilian

  17. Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among tuberculosis suspects attending spiritual holy water sites in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derseh, Dejene; Moges, Feleke; Tessema, Belay

    2017-01-26

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. In Ethiopia, tuberculosis patients have different pattern of health care seeking behavior. They usually adopt other approaches like traditional healers and spiritual holy water sites before consulting public health facilities. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among tuberculosis suspects attending spiritual holy water sites. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 01, 2015 to March 30, 2015 in seven selected holy water sites in Northwest Ethiopia. During the study period, a total of 1384 adult holy water users were screened for PTB symptoms. A total of 382 pulmonary tuberculosis suspects participated in the study. Socio-demographic data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Spot-morning-spot sputum specimens were collected and examined for acid fast bacilli using Auramine O fluorescence staining technique. Smear positive sputum samples were tested by GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for rifampicin resistance. Descriptive statistics, binary and multivariate logistic regression analysis were employed using SPSS-16 software. The prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 2.9% with point prevalence of 795/100, 000 holy water users. History of contact with tuberculosis patient (AOR = 9.174, 95% C.I = 2.195-38.34) and the number of family members > 5 per household (AOR = 9.258, 95% C.I = 1.14-74.97) were significantly associated with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Rifampicin resistance was not detected from all smear positives by GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay. The prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in spiritual holy water sites was 7.4 fold higher than the general population. History of contact with active tuberculosis patients and increased family size were significantly associated with smear positive pulmonary TB. The national tuberculosis

  18. The impact of uphill cycling and bicycle suspension on downhill performance during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Miller, Matthew C; Stannard, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Non-propulsive work demand has been linked to reduced energetic economy of cross-country mountain biking. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical, physiological and performance differences and observe economy while riding a downhill section of a cross-country course prior to and following the metabolic "load" of a climb at race pace under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension) expected to alter vibration damping mechanics. Participants completed 1 lap of the track incorporating the same downhill section twice, under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension). Performance was determined by time to complete overall lap and specific terrain sections. Power, cadence, heart rate and oxygen consumption were sampled and logged every second while triaxial accelerometers recorded accelerations (128 Hz) to quantify vibration. No differences between performance times (P = 0.65) or power outputs (P = 0.61) were observed while physiological demand of loaded downhill riding was significantly greater (P  0.05) measures. This study showed minimal advantage of a full suspension bike in our trial, with further investigations over a full race distance warranted.

  19. Procopius of Gaza and the Water of the Holy City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Jones

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In Procopius' encomium of Anastasius, the "holy city" in need of water is not Hierapolis in Syria but Jerusalem, whose system of aqueducts is attested by archaeology and inscriptions.

  20. the holy places in the Zimbabwean Religious Landscape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contestation of “the holy places in the Zimbabwean. Religious Landscape”: A study of the Johane Masowe. Chishanu yeNyenyedzi. Church's sacred places',. HTS Teologiese Studies/. Theological Studies 72(1), a3269. http://dx.doi.

  1. Compass orientation drives naïve pelagic seabirds to cross mountain ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Ken; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Sakiko; Müller, Martina; Yamamoto, Maki

    2017-11-06

    Wildlife migration is a spectacular phenomenon [1]. Studies using telemetry - tracking devices attached on free-living animals - have shown that large topographic barriers and obstacles, such as oceans and deserts, elicit extreme feats of migration [2]. Overcoming the challenges of these obstacles might require experience and skill that young individuals lack [2-5]. Further, younger, inexperienced animals might determine their migration routes using navigation strategies different from those of older animals [6-9], but our knowledge of how orientation mechanisms and experience drive migration strategy is limited. We have studied how experienced (adults) and inexperienced (first-time migrating fledglings) streaked shearwaters (Calonectris leucomelas) approach the challenge of migration using animal-borne tracking devices. The study birds migrate from a colony on the north of a large topographic barrier, Honshu Island, Japan. Shearwaters use a wind- and wave-based flight pattern-dynamic soaring-to extract energy for highly efficient travel over oceans [10]. We therefore expected that shearwaters migrating southward from the colony would make substantial detours to avoid any landmasses. We found that migrating adults followed one of two paths that detour around landmasses that hinder direct southerly migration. In contrast, inexperienced fledglings followed a straight course in a south-oriented direction that forced them to complete a trans-mountain journey, suggesting that the birds rely on an innate compass. Thus, we suggest that fledglings would eventually override the simple compass navigation, which appears to be the primary driver for their extreme migration, before being able to interact appropriately with the marine environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lichens of the Holy Hill orthodox sanctuary in Grabarka (NE Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Matwiejuk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Holy Hill Grabarka is one of the most important orthodox sanctuaries in Poland. The sanctuary is situated in Podlasie region between Bug and Narew rivers. It grew in the shade of well developing (in the first centuries of the second millennium towns Mielnik and Drohiczyn. The most striking thing is that the church is surrounded by a forest of thousands of crosses brought by pilgrims. The study present 64 species of epiphytic, epixylic, epilythic and epigeic lichens. Among 64 lichen species 11 are considered to be threatened in Poland.

  3. Cross-scale analysis of the region effect on vascular plant species diversity in southern and northern European mountain ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lenoir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The divergent glacial histories of southern and northern Europe affect present-day species diversity at coarse-grained scales in these two regions, but do these effects also penetrate to the more fine-grained scales of local communities? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a cross-scale analysis to address this question for vascular plants in two mountain regions, the Alps in southern Europe and the Scandes in northern Europe, using environmentally paired vegetation plots in the two regions (n = 403 in each region to quantify four diversity components: (i total number of species occurring in a region (total γ-diversity, (ii number of species that could occur in a target plot after environmental filtering (habitat-specific γ-diversity, (iii pair-wise species compositional turnover between plots (plot-to-plot β-diversity and (iv number of species present per plot (plot α-diversity. We found strong region effects on total γ-diversity, habitat-specific γ-diversity and plot-to-plot β-diversity, with a greater diversity in the Alps even towards distances smaller than 50 m between plots. In contrast, there was a slightly greater plot α-diversity in the Scandes, but with a tendency towards contrasting region effects on high and low soil-acidity plots. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that there are strong regional differences between coarse-grained (landscape- to regional-scale diversity components of the flora in the Alps and the Scandes mountain ranges, but that these differences do not necessarily penetrate to the finest-grained (plot-scale diversity component, at least not on acidic soils. Our findings are consistent with the contrasting regional Quaternary histories, but we also consider alternative explanatory models. Notably, ecological sorting and habitat connectivity may play a role in the unexpected limited or reversed region effect on plot α-diversity, and may also affect the larger-scale diversity

  4. Cross-scale analysis of the region effect on vascular plant species diversity in southern and northern European mountain ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Jonathan; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Guisan, Antoine; Vittoz, Pascal; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Dullinger, Stefan; Pauli, Harald; Willner, Wolfgang; Grytnes, John-Arvid; Virtanen, Risto; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2010-12-22

    The divergent glacial histories of southern and northern Europe affect present-day species diversity at coarse-grained scales in these two regions, but do these effects also penetrate to the more fine-grained scales of local communities? We carried out a cross-scale analysis to address this question for vascular plants in two mountain regions, the Alps in southern Europe and the Scandes in northern Europe, using environmentally paired vegetation plots in the two regions (n = 403 in each region) to quantify four diversity components: (i) total number of species occurring in a region (total γ-diversity), (ii) number of species that could occur in a target plot after environmental filtering (habitat-specific γ-diversity), (iii) pair-wise species compositional turnover between plots (plot-to-plot β-diversity) and (iv) number of species present per plot (plot α-diversity). We found strong region effects on total γ-diversity, habitat-specific γ-diversity and plot-to-plot β-diversity, with a greater diversity in the Alps even towards distances smaller than 50 m between plots. In contrast, there was a slightly greater plot α-diversity in the Scandes, but with a tendency towards contrasting region effects on high and low soil-acidity plots. We conclude that there are strong regional differences between coarse-grained (landscape- to regional-scale) diversity components of the flora in the Alps and the Scandes mountain ranges, but that these differences do not necessarily penetrate to the finest-grained (plot-scale) diversity component, at least not on acidic soils. Our findings are consistent with the contrasting regional Quaternary histories, but we also consider alternative explanatory models. Notably, ecological sorting and habitat connectivity may play a role in the unexpected limited or reversed region effect on plot α-diversity, and may also affect the larger-scale diversity components. For instance, plot connectivity and/or selection for high dispersal

  5. Draft of the Orthodox theology about Holy Spirit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ks. Henryk Paprocki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of the Holy Spirit is much more in the centre of spirituality of the Eastern Church than is the case in the Western Church. Nevertheless, to say that Orthodox thought has finally and fully developed systematic theology of the Holy Spirit, would be excessive. The science of the Holy Spirit is based primarily on the experience of the community (liturgy and on individual experience (personal prayer. It is these two aspects that the article is devoted to. At the same time it attempts to present Orthodox Church’s teaching of the Holy Spirit not only on the basis of dogmatic formulation, but principally through the experience of the mystics, which found resonance in the practice and theory of hesychasm. Especially helpful in this approach is the Orthodox liturgy, rich in inexhaustible theological perspective. Hesychia is also linked to the contemplation of icons. The combination of these different threads leads to deep spiritual experiences. However, it was the Church where a clear revelation of the Holy Spirit succeeded, which is particularly emphasized by St. Gregory of Nazianzus, the Theologian: “The Old Testament proclaimed the Father clearly, but the Son more obscurely. The New Testament revealed the Son and gave us a glimpse of the divinity of the Spirit. Now the Spirit dwells among us and grants us a clearer vision of himself ”.

  6. Holi colours contain PM10 and can induce pro-inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Bossmann, Katrin; Bach, Sabine; H?flich, Conny; Valtanen, Kerttu; Heinze, Rita; Neumann, Anett; Straff, Wolfgang; S?ring, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Background At Holi festivals, originally celebrated in India but more recently all over the world, people throw coloured powder (Holi powder, Holi colour, Gulal powder) at each other. Adverse health effects, i.e. skin and ocular irritations as well as respiratory problems may be the consequences. The aim of this study was to uncover some of the underlying mechanisms. Methods We analysed four different Holi colours regarding particle size using an Electric field cell counting system. In additi...

  7. The Ceremony of Mangongkal holi in Batak Toba society, Samosir : Lontung

    OpenAIRE

    Situmorang, Rani Monika

    2017-01-01

    142202014 Kertas karya ini berjudul ?The Ceremony of Mangongkal holi in Batak Toba society, Samosir : Lontung?. Mangongkal holi merupakan salah satu kebiasaan masyarakat Batak Toba, kebiasaan ini dianggap juga sebagai suatu acara adat yang ingin mengangkat tulang belulang leluhur ketempat yang lebih baik. Mangongkal holi dianggap sebagi tanda penghormatan kepada keluarga yang telah meninggal. Acara adat mangongkal holi mencerminkan keyakinan bahwa seseorang akan mendapat hidup yang lebih b...

  8. Bingo! Holy play in experience-oriented society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Kees

    2017-01-01

    What place is there for holy play in experience-oriented society? Is it possible and useful to make analytic distinctions between the liturgical quality of events? I explored these questions by doing research on the boundaries between the religious field and the field of leisure. Fifty site visits

  9. Holy Motors: da experiência de ser em vida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Karam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio se articula a partir da curiosidade e do encantamento em relação ao filme Holy Motors de Leos Carax, tendo em vista a sua potência como narrativa e experiência da imaginação do cinema, e da própria vida.

  10. Neonatal pain management: Still in search of the Holy Grail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Allegaert (Karel); J.N. van den Anker (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractInadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neuro-developmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention,

  11. The discourse of the Holy Spirit in earliest Christianity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-30

    Sep 30, 2015 ... the Lord and Giver of Live, who proceeds from the Father, who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified, who ..... The book opens with the magisterial dedication: 'To my grand-daughters Helen,. Anna ... later, patristic concept, and although Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are of the utmost.

  12. Performing the Holy Spirit: Ritualised Manifestation of Faith in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research examines the aesthetic manifestations of religious belief, particularly in the Holy Spirit, through consideration of the performative dimensions and ritualised behaviours in the church services of an African Independent Church, namely, the New Gospel Church in Zion of Africa (NGCZA). The significance of ...

  13. Holy Cards/Immaginette: The Extraordinary Literacy of Vernacular Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Diana; Salvatori, Mariolina Rizzi

    2008-01-01

    Like other seemingly ordinary materials (cookbooks, street art, scrapbooks, etc.) the subject of our investigation--holy cards or (in Italian) "immaginette"--often function as rich repositories of personal and cultural memory as well as indicators of popular literacy practices. But to relegate them to the category of ephemera, as is customary with…

  14. Holiness in Victorian and Edwardian England: Some ecclesial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition to the 'sensibility' and 'sentiment' that characterised society, notions of holiness were shaped by, and developed in reaction to, dominant philosophical movements; notably, the Enlightenment and Romanticism. It then considers how these notions found varying religious expression in four Protestant traditions ...

  15. The Holy as an Epistemic Category and a Political Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Esther Oluffa

    2008-01-01

    and as an artificial weapon in the service of modern politics. Cassirer's concept of myth is analyzed regarding a primary source of inspiration from the German theologian Rudolf Otto. It is shown how Cassirer can make use of Otto's phenomenological description of the transcendent experience of the holy....

  16. Diseases pattern among patients attending Holy Mosque (Haram) Medical Centers during Hajj 1434 (2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, Abdulrahman R.; Sindy, Abdulfattah I.; Baljoon, Mostafa J.; Dhafar, Khalid O.; Gazzaz, Zohair J.; Baig, Mukhtiar; Deiab, Basma A.; Hothali, Fauzea T. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diseases pattern among pilgrims attending the 2 Holy Mosque (Haram) Health Care Centers during the Hajj season 2013 (Hijra 1434). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data was collected from 2 medical centers located in the Holy Mosque in Makkah city, Saudi Arabia, from the first of Dhul-Hijjah to sixteenth Dhul-Hijjah 1434. The present study was completed in 16 days (6th October to 21st October 2013). Results: Over 16 days, 1008 patients attended the medical centers during Hajj 1434, (2013), out of which 554 (55%) were males and 454 (45%) were females. Most of the patients were Egyptians (n=242, 24%), followed by Saudis (n=116, 11.5%), Pakistani (n=114, 11.3%), Turkish (n=50, 5%), and other nationalities (n=404). According to age distribution, mostly were in the 51-60 years age group (n=237, 23.5%), followed by other age groups. Out of 1008 patients, 842 (83.5%) patients were treated and subsequently discharged, while 166 patients (16.5%) were referred to the tertiary centers. According to the diseases pattern, most of the patients were suffering from respiratory problems (n=177, 17.6%) followed by skin diseases (n=158, 15.7%), gastrointestinal tract (GIT) diseases (n=133, 13.2%), and others. Conclusion: Most of the patients were suffering from respiratory problems followed by skin and GIT diseases, and <25% of patients were referred to tertiary care centers. PMID:26219447

  17. Bingo! Holy play in experience-oriented society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Kees

    2017-06-01

    What place is there for holy play in experience-oriented society? Is it possible and useful to make analytic distinctions between the liturgical quality of events? I explored these questions by doing research on the boundaries between the religious field and the field of leisure. Fifty site visits to public events in the Netherlands (2006-2014) resulted in a collection of ethnographic data. I used the concept of play as introduced by the Dutch historian Johan Huizinga and the tools of ritual studies to explore whether these could help to produce an account of the liturgical quality of ritualized meetings. Holy play might be found in unexpected places, such as in a bingo hall. Huizinga's broad diagnosis of modernity may be outdated, but the tools he introduced remain useful to distinguish the elements that constitute late-modern meetings as more or less playful - even when this involves combinations that seem contradictory from Huizinga's own point of view.

  18. Holy sci-fi! where science fiction and religion intersect

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Can a computer have a soul? Are religion and science mutually exclusive? Is there really such a thing as free will? If you could time travel to visit Jesus, would you (and should you)? For hundreds of years, philosophers, scientists, and science fiction writers have pondered these questions and many more. In Holy Sci-Fi!, popular writer Paul Nahin explores the fertile and sometimes uneasy relationship between science fiction and religion. With a scope spanning the history of religion, philosophy, and literature, Nahin follows religious themes in science fiction from Feynman to Foucault, and from Asimov to Aristotle. An intriguing journey through popular and well-loved books and stories, Holy Sci-Fi! shows how sci-fi has informed humanity's attitudes towards our faiths, our future, and ourselves.

  19. Holy Grails for Computational Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, K N; Liu, Fang

    2017-03-21

    Computational chemistry and biochemistry began with Isaac Newton's classical mechanics in the 17th century and the establishment of quantum mechanics in the 1920s. Enabled by extraordinary advances in computers, in the last half century, this field has become a robust partner with experiment. The challenges facing computational chemists and biochemists, the Holy Grails of the field, are described. These include the development of a highly accurate density functional, ideally one that has universal chemical accuracy, and accurate polarizable force fields, as well as methods to handle efficiently the massive number of computations that must be performed for molecular dynamics and for the computation of flexible systems such as proteins. We estimate when the breakthroughs that will make computation a powerful engine for chemical discovery and design will be achieved. The Holy Grails of this field involve methods to enable the accurate and efficient prediction of structures and properties of complex biological systems and materials. The principal Holy Grail is a routine computational method for the prediction and design of multicomponent, often heterogeneous, functional systems and devices.

  20. Bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis following exposure to Holi colors: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Deepender; Arora, Ritu; Das, Sima; Shroff, Daraius; Narula, Ritesh

    2007-01-01

    Holi festival is celebrated in India traditionally by applying colors on one another. Various ocular adverse effects of these colors have been reported including conjunctivitis and corneal abrasion. We report a case of bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis, following exposure to Holi colors. General physicians might encounter more such cases after exposure to Holi colors. In India, these colors are prepared on a small scale and lack any quality checks. Use of such toxic colors should be...

  1. Performing the Holy Spirit: Ritualised Manifestations of Faith in an African Independent Church

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skelton, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This research examines the aesthetic manifestations of religious belief, particularly in the Holy Spirit, through consideration of the performative dimensions and ritualised behaviours in the church...

  2. Holi colours contain PM10 and can induce pro-inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, Katrin; Bach, Sabine; Höflich, Conny; Valtanen, Kerttu; Heinze, Rita; Neumann, Anett; Straff, Wolfgang; Süring, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    At Holi festivals, originally celebrated in India but more recently all over the world, people throw coloured powder (Holi powder, Holi colour, Gulal powder) at each other. Adverse health effects, i.e. skin and ocular irritations as well as respiratory problems may be the consequences. The aim of this study was to uncover some of the underlying mechanisms. We analysed four different Holi colours regarding particle size using an Electric field cell counting system. In addition, we incubated native human cells with different Holi colours and determined their potential to induce a pro-inflammatory response by quantifying the resulting cytokine production by means of ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and the resulting leukocyte oxidative burst by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, we performed the XTT (2,3-Bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) and Propidium iodide cytotoxicity tests and we measured the endotoxin content of the Holi colour samples by means of the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate test (LAL test). We show here that all tested Holi colours consist to more than 40 % of particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm, so called PM10 particles (PM, particulate matter). Two of the analysed Holi powders contained even more than 75 % of PM10 particles. Furthermore we demonstrate in cell culture experiments that Holi colours can induce the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (Tumor necrosis factor-α), IL-6 (Interleukine-6) and IL-1β (Interleukine-1β). Three out of the four analysed colours induced a significantly higher cytokine response in human PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) and whole blood than corn starch, which is often used as carrier substance for Holi colours. Moreover we show that corn starch and two Holi colours contain endotoxin and that certain Holi colours display concentration dependent cytotoxic effects in higher concentration. Furthermore we reveal that in principle Holi

  3. Graphic Novels Explore an (Un-)Holy Land

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Fischer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, graphic novels have staked a claim for cultural respectability, especially through their often-bold analysis of divisive social and political issues; for instance, in travelogues exploring today’s Israel and Palestine. This article analyses Joe Sacco’s Palestine (1993-6) and Footnotes in Gaza (2009), Sarah Glidden’s How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less (2010), and Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City (2012) to demonstrate how graphic artists update th...

  4. Philo of Alexandria: Holiness as self-possession and selftranscendence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Decock

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Philo’s writings can be seen as a crucial link between Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity, particularly in his way of drawing on Greek philosophy in reading the scriptures. Pierre Hadot has pointed out how Graeco-Roman philosophy was seen at that time as a practical subject aiming at the care of self in its twofold movement of interiorisation and exteriorisation. This article explores how Philo draws on these aspects of philosophy to articulate his Jewish understanding of the journey towards perfection or holiness.

  5. Mistranslations of the Prophets' Names in the Holy Quran: A Critical Evaluation of Two Translations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Izzeddin M. I.

    2017-01-01

    This study is devoted to discuss the renditions of the prophets' names in the Holy Quran due to the authority of the religious text where they reappear, the significance of the figures who carry them, the fact that they exist in many languages, and the fact that the Holy Quran addresses all mankind. The data are drawn from two translations of the…

  6. Holy Nations and Global Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Along with the processes of globalisation and the end of the cold war we have seen an upsurge in religious nationalism and an increasing focus on the role of religion as a legitimising force in democratic secular states. Holy Nations & Global Identities draws on the combined theoretical and histo......, nationalism and globalisation. It also provides an introduction to the research history of the fields and aims to develop and elaborate on the theories and methodology of the investigated subjects.......Along with the processes of globalisation and the end of the cold war we have seen an upsurge in religious nationalism and an increasing focus on the role of religion as a legitimising force in democratic secular states. Holy Nations & Global Identities draws on the combined theoretical...... and historical insight of historians, political scientists and social scientists on the question of nationalism and globalisation with the methodological knowledge of religion presented by sociologists of religion. The book brings genuine theoretical explorations and original case studies on civil religion...

  7. Human embryology and the holy quran: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Sabiha

    2009-01-01

    Man's quest to know about his origin has led him to search his roots and the best source for him has been religious scriptures. The greatest miracle is the Holy Quraan. There is an elegant description of origin, development and step by step developmental stages of intra-uterine life in Quraan. Muslims had this knowledge in 7th century and the Prophet Muhammad's Ahadeeth (sayings, deeds, approvals narrated by authentic narrators) had explained almost everything about natal and even postnatal events. These findings once presented to experts in the field of Anatomy and Embryology surprised them and they believed that the knowledge given to the Prophet Muhammad was indeed divine. Who else would provide this knowledge to the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) except the Creator Himself.Modern embryology is a fairly recent development which has its beginning with the invention of microscope in the 17th century. However the concept of the human being developing in stages was not recognised until much later. But the scientists then and most Muslim and non-Muslim scholars do not even know that the holy Quran and Sunnah [words, deeds, approvals of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) collected by authentic narrators] had provided a detailed description of the significant events in human development from the stages of gametes and conception until the full term pregnancy and delivery or even post partum. Actually information in the Quran and Hadith corrected many superstitious and vague ideas about human development that were prevalent before.

  8. Effect of the Holy Month of Ramadan on Coping Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Akuchekian

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress is one of the risk factors for the development of so many physical and especially psychological disorders. Now, the impression is focused on coping strategies versus previous emphasis on nature and severity of stress. The present study was performed to evaluate if fasting, not only as a religious behavior but also as a coping strategy can influence the way of coping with stress in humans. Methods: In a pre-test / post-test survey, 100 medical students were evaluated for stress coping strategies before and after the holy month of Ramadan using CS-R scale. Results: The results revealed that the use of ineffective coping strategies was significantly decreased after the holy month with no alterations in other strategies. In details, uses of superstitiousness, wishful thinking and self-medication coping strategies were statistically lower after Ramadan compared to values before it (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The present study showed that Ramadan fasting (a religious behavior or belief as a coping strategy has beneficial effect on the way of coping with stress in humans. Keywords: Stress, Coping Strategies, Religion, Ramadan, Medical Student

  9. Biblical basics of the Holy Family’s dimension of Christian spirituality according to the teaching of God’s Servant Jean Berthier, founder of the Congregation Missionaries of the Holy Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Józef Sobczyk

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the biblical basics of the Holy Family’s dimension of Christian spirituality drawn by Jean Berthier shows his impressive knowledge of the Holy Bible. God’ Servant uses many quotations to show biblical grounds for Christ’s imitation according to the pattern of the Holy Family. There are a few virtues of the Holy Family which deserve to be highlighted: trust and obedience to God’s Will, love to God and to neighbor, humility and mortification. Berthier not only enumerates those virtues, but also encourages everyone to realize them in everyday life, such as the Holy Family did it.

  10. Hope through Steadfastness: The Journey of "Holy Land Trust"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Dyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Established in 1998, ‘Holy Land Trust’ (HLT serves to empower the Palestinian community in Bethlehem to discover its strengths and resources to confront the present and future challenges of life under occupation. The staff, through a commitment to the principles of nonviolence, seeks to mobilize the local community, regardless of religion, gender, or political affiliation, to resist oppression in all forms and build a model for the future based on justice, equality, and respect. This article places the work of HLT in the literature of nonviolent action and amid the nonviolent movement set by predecessors in the tumultuous history of Palestinian-Israeli relations. HLT programs and projects are presented to demonstrate the progression of nonviolent resistance from lofty goals to strategic empowerment. In a region so often defined by extremes, HLT embodies the Palestinian nonviolent resistance movement.

  11. Book Review: Gift & Giver: The Holy Spirit for Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Lathrop

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Craig Keener has established himself as a highly respected New Testament scholar. Over the years he has written a number of very significant commentaries including works on the gospels of Matthew and John, and the book of Acts. His highly acclaimed IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament is one of his best known works. In addition, he has produced books devoted to specific biblical topics such as miracles, women in marriage and ministry, and divorce and remarriage. He is not one to shy away from controversial subjects. In this present volume Keener writes about the Holy Spirit including the sometimes controversial charismatic aspects of His ministry. Gift & Giver was first published in theUnited States in 2001. More recently it has been translated into Indonesian and published inIndonesia.

  12. Rewriting the Holy Grail : The Grail-Hero (From Arthurian Romance to Pop Culture)

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Ana Rita

    2016-01-01

    Usually identified as the dish, plate or cup used by Jesus Christ at the Last Supper, the Holy Grail is, since the late twelfth century, a key part of the Arthurian Cycle. Although some authors (such as R.S. Loomis and J. Weston) have claimed its origin to rest in pagan traditions, the Holy Grail has become deeply intertwined with Christian myth, particularly with the legend of the Holy Chalice. In the earliest Arthurian romances the Grail-Hero(es) had to prove himself (themsel...

  13. The International Legal Status of the Vatican/Holy See Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morss, John R

    2015-01-01

    ...), focusing on claims to statehood. The problematic 'effect' of Vatican City, of the Holy See, of the papacy and of associated entities is interrogated at the level of international law, entering as little as possible...

  14. Bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis following exposure to Holi colors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Deepender; Arora, Ritu; Das, Sima; Shroff, Daraius; Narula, Ritesh

    2007-01-01

    Holi festival is celebrated in India traditionally by applying colors on one another. Various ocular adverse effects of these colors have been reported including conjunctivitis and corneal abrasion. We report a case of bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis, following exposure to Holi colors. General physicians might encounter more such cases after exposure to Holi colors. In India, these colors are prepared on a small scale and lack any quality checks. Use of such toxic colors should be discouraged, and all doctors should caution people against using synthetic dyes. This case report highlights the need to put manufacturing of Holi colors under guidelines of the Food and Drug Cosmetic Act and the Bureau of Indian Standards.

  15. Bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis following exposure to Holi colors: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Deepender

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Holi festival is celebrated in India traditionally by applying colors on one another. Various ocular adverse effects of these colors have been reported including conjunctivitis and corneal abrasion. We report a case of bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis, following exposure to Holi colors. General physicians might encounter more such cases after exposure to Holi colors. In India, these colors are prepared on a small scale and lack any quality checks. Use of such toxic colors should be discouraged, and all doctors should caution people against using synthetic dyes. This case report highlights the need to put manufacturing of Holi colors under guidelines of the Food and Drug Cosmetic Act and the Bureau of Indian Standards.

  16. Holy Places that Have Played a Role in the Urban Evolution of Damascus

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    GHALEB ANABSEH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes some of the shrines that contributed to the urban development of Damascus from the emergence of Islam to the middle ages. It also discusses the connection between the existence of holy places which attract pilgrims for religious and spiritual reasons, and the expansion of cities. The main sources for this study are writings in the ‘virtues of the Holy Land’ genre, augmented by the publications on this subject by Orientalists and Arab scholars.

  17. Nutritional Concepts and Frequency of Foodstuffs Mentioned in the Holy Quran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarighat-Esfanjani, Ali; Namazi, Nazli

    2016-06-01

    The Holy Quran is a religious book of Muslims. In many verses of Quran, various foods are discussed. It seems that limited studies were performed on identification the nutritional verses and their frequencies in the Holy Quran. Therefore, the aims of present study were to establish a numerical model system for studying nutritional verses of Quran, determination of verses with nutritional concepts and frequency of foodstuffs in the Holy Quran. In this descriptive analytical study, "Ghamoos e Quran" and "Vazheyab" online softwares were used to determine the nutritional keywords in Quran. For searching, translating, and interpretation of verses, "Noor-e-Jami Tafasir version 2.1"; "Zekr" and "Pars Quran"softwares were applied. Sixty-four nutritional keywords and 257 nutritional verses were identified. Findings indicated that aliment/foods, eating, water/drinking words, and their derivatives are repeated 171, 109, and 131 times in the Holy Quran, respectively. According to the Holy Quran, except Haram foods (pork meat, wine, carrion meat, blood, and meat of animals not slaughtered properly in the Islamic manner), all foods are tayyeb (lawful). The Holy Quran contains many foodstuffs and verses with nutritional concepts and it recommends eating varied and balanced diet.

  18. Proposal: To Examine Potential Effects of Corridors such as Cross-County Ski Trials, Logging Roads, etc. on Populations of Cheat Mountain Salamanders

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Cheat Mountain Salamanders (Plethodon nettingi) are known to occur in only 5 counties and the western edge of Grant County along the Allegheny Front in the eastern...

  19. [Holy Trinity monument in the city of Osijek].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalić, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Plague was one of the most deadly epidemic diseases of the Baroque period. Responses to it were not only medical, but religious as well. A good example of the latter is the Most Holy Trinity monument in the city of Osijek, which was in the 18th century the biggest town of the Kingdom of Slavonia and today is the regional centre in the Republic of Croatia. The monument was erected between 1729 and 1730 on the main square of the Osijek military fortress Tvrđa by the widow of the General Maksimilijan Petraš who died during the 1728 plague epidemic. Inscription on it implores the mercy of God as a protection against plague. Its foundation could be also interpreted as a part of the Catholic Revival, which was implemented by the Habsburgs in Osijek and Slavonia after their liberation from the Ottomans. But although, on the one hand, it could be interpreted as a symbol of the successful implementation of the Habsburg unifying religious policies due to its strong resemblance with the similar columns throughout the Habsburg Monarchy, on the other hand, it represented a continuation of the theurgic understanding of medicine, which could be interpreted as the failure of the Habsburg enlightened medical policies. Thus the archival documents from the Osijek State Archive together with the Osijek plague column itself were analysed with the aim of explaining the above mentioned ambiguities.

  20. A Finnic holy word and its subsequent history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauno Koski

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This article concentrates on a specific ancient holy word in Finnish and its subsequent development, hiisi. In the Finnish language region hiisi appears as an element in place names in over 230 villages established by the end of the thirteenth century, and at least a majority of these must have existed since prehistoric times. In Finland as well as in Estonia it is possible to demonstrate an earlier sacral function in places which contain hiisi as a component of their name, partly with the help of archeological discoveries, and partly with the help of oral folk tradition. It is particularly among the earliest settlement areas of Southwest Finland, Satakunta and Häme that hiisi features in the names of sacrificial sites or trees, in other words in the same areas where it features in the names of burial grounds. Names in which the hiisi element precedes a word meaning a lake, pond, or other water formation, occur particularly in the eastern Finnish dialect regions, as well as in the regions of Karelian, Olonets, Lydian, and Vepsian. In addition to its factual meaning of cult place, the Finnish word hiisi has come to denote a supernatural entity both in terms of its reference to a place and in terms of its reference to a being.

  1. Fasting in the holy month of Ramadan and Lipid profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Alireza Mirsane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is a fasting month .Fasting is one of the islamic obligations. This annual ritual is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam according to hadith of fifth Shia imam.In the other hand, Lipid profile is a type of blood tests and this's very important for body health, Specialy individuals with abnormal range of it. A complete lipid profile involves routine tests such as Total Cholesterol(TC, Triglycerides (TG,high-density lipoprotein (HDL,good cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL,bad cholesterol.Our goal is determination of Ramadan fasting efficacy on the Lipid profile. With regards to the present study, it can be concluded that fasting have a good effects on the Lipid profile , according to the above fields. But this subject needs to have multiple studies, so it was advised to conduct more study, in order to obtain the comprehensive and exact results. Finally, Holy month of Ramadan and fasting have a lot miracles in different fields of health ,So fasting is a godliness way that it have multiple remedial effects.

  2. The Pharmacology and Toxicology of the 'Holy Trinity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, Joseph T; Sprague, Jon E

    2017-02-01

    Combining opioids with benzodiazepines and skeletal muscle relaxants ('The Holy Trinity') has been reported to potentiate the 'high'. Through unique interactions with colocalized μ-opioid and GABAA receptors, the combined use of these agents induces a synergistic increase in dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and depression of respiration. The inhibition of GABA release mediated by μ1 -opioid receptor activation results in a subsequent increase in dopamine in the NAc. Benzodiazepines activate the GABAA R to suppress respiration in the medullary respiratory centres. The skeletal muscle relaxant, carisoprodol, appears to bind to a unique binding domain within the GABAA R to further enhance the respiratory depressant effects of the benzodiazepines. Therefore, the opioids, the benzodiazepines and carisoprodol alone or in combination are capable of inducing respiratory depression. Current guidelines for opioid prescribing recommend against the concomitant use of benzodiazepines but do not recognize the potential risk associated with the addition of skeletal muscle relaxants. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Divine empowerment: The Holy Spirit and church revitalisation

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    Brian A. DeVries

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available How do principles of church revitalisation correlate with the divine work of the Holy Spirit? This article argues that the Spirit is the primary agent of church revitalisation, and churchleaders should cooperate with the Spirit as he works for revitalisation. Thus the Spirit empowers church leaders who are used by him to revive, renew, and revitalise a church community. After briefly defining the Spirit’s empowerment with biblical examples, this article examines the underlying principles of empowerment for church leaders, followed by briefly considering methodology for church revitalisation. The author concludes by suggesting several signs of biblical empowerment in a local church community. Goddelike bemagtiging: Die Heilige Gees en kerkherstel. Watter plek beklee die goddelike werking van die Heilige Gees in die beginsels van kerkherstel? Hierdie artikel poneer dat die Heilige Gees die primêre agent is om nuwe lewe in die kerk te bring en kerkleiers behoort onder leiding van die Heilige Gees hulle hiervoor te beywer. Die Heilige Gees bemagtig dus die kerkleiers wat Hy gebruik om ’n kerklike gemeenskap te laat herleef, te vernuwe en hulle te besiel met lewenskragtigheid. Die Gees se bemagtiging word kortliks aan die hand van bybelse voorbeelde gedefineer, waarna die grondliggende beginsels vir die bemagtiging van die kerkleiers ondersoek word. Daarna word die metodologie om nuwe lewenskrag in die kerk te bring kortliks oorweeg. Die outeur sluit af deur verskeie tekens uit te lig wat op skriftuurlike bemagtiging van die Heilige Gees in die plaaslike kerkgemeenskap dui.

  4. Towards Maturity in 1 Peter: Freedom, Holiness, Immortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Decock

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Growth towards maturity is dependent on the presence of freedom, holiness and immortality. These are presented as divine qualities that are utterly lacking in human beings. However, while human beings are ignorant and weak, sinful and mortal the addressees of 1 Peter1 are reminded that they have also been begotten anew by the imperishable seed of God’s Word, the Good News of Jesus Christ in order to share immortal life. This article looks first at human beings who as God’s creatures are ‘flesh’, but are also enabled to acknowledge their ‘fleshly’ state, to appreciate (‘desire’ and ‘taste’ (2:2–3 the Gospel and to submit to God. The second part considers the saving role of Christ as the powerful yet rejected ‘stone’ placed and offered by God as the model and means to transcend the ‘flesh’ in the flesh (4:1–2. A final part focuses on the new birth and the growth process in which the fleshly desires and ways of living give way to a manner of life, which is a witness to God’s saving power.

  5. The continuing quest for the 'Holy Braille' of tactile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Noel H.; Blazie, Deane B.

    2011-10-01

    The Boston-based National Braille Press has established a Center for Braille Innovation (CBI), whose mission is to research and develop affordable braille literacy products. The primary focus has been to facilitate the development of dramatically lower cost electronic braille display devices, and the much-sought-after "Holy Braille" of a full-page electronic braille display. Developing affordable new braille technologies is crucial to improving the extremely low braille literacy rate (around 12%) of blind students. Our CBI team is working to aid developers of braille technology by focusing attention and resources on the development of the underlying braille actuator technologies. We are also developing braille-related information resources to aid braille display developers. The CBI braille requirements summary (available through the NBP website (http://www.nbp.org) is one of these resources. The braille specifications include braille dot dimensions, spacing, displacement, lifting force, and response time requirements. In addition, mentoring, helping to evaluate new braille display ideas, and openly sharing braille display technology are all part of the activities of the NBP braille innovation team. NBP has expanded the CBI project with domestic and international partners including the China Braille Press, World Braille Foundation, National Federation of the Blind, American Printing House for the Blind, American Foundation for the Blind, and many university and research partners.

  6. IWRM Discourses, Institutional Holy Grail and Water Justice in Nepal

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    Floriane Clement

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM still stands today as one of the most influential governance models in the water sector. Whereas previous analyses of IWRM have focused on the effectiveness of the institutional models it embodies and on policy implementation gaps, we examine the meanings that IWRM discourses have given to water management issues and how these meanings have in turn supported certain policy choices, institutions and practices. We use discourse analysis to study IWRM discourses in Nepal, where IWRM was introduced as the guiding policy principle for water management more than a decade ago, but not yet operationalised. We argue that IWRM discourses have operated a discursive closure in policy debates, thereby limiting the range of policy and institutional choices perceived as politically possible. In particular, we found that the promotion of IWRM as an institutional holy grail has obscured critical issues of social (injustice related to water resources development by promoting an apolitical and techno-managerial vision of water development, largely centralised and relying on expert knowledge. We defend the need to move away from institutional panaceas and towards deliberative processes that allow alternative voices, discourses and knowledge.

  7. Holy month of Ramadan and increase in organ donation willingness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizadeh, Katayoun; Ghorbani, Fariba; Hamidinia, Sajjad; Emamhadi, Mohammad Ali; Moinfar, Mohammad Ali; Ghobadi, Omid; Assari, Shervin

    2010-05-01

    Organ shortage is the most significant factor in restricting the activities of transplantation systems. We herein report the positive impact of Muslims' holy month of Ramadan on willingness to donate organs in Iran. Data were derived from the database of Donation Willingness Registries, affiliated to the organ procurement unit of Masih Daneshvari Hospital during March 2007 till March 2008. The number of applications for organ donation was compared between Ramadan and its previous month, and the socio-economic characteristics of the applicants were compared between those who applied in Ramadan and those who did so in the previous month. In addition, the mean number of daily applications was compared between Ramadan and the other months of the same year. A total of 11528 applications for organ donation cards were registered for the Ramadan of 2007 as opposed to 4538 applications in the previous month, showing an increasing rate of 154%. The mean number of daily applications was significantly higher in Ramadan than that of the other months of the same year (P media and religious organizations. Ramadan seems to provide a great opportunity to promote organ donation across the Muslim world.

  8. Holy month of Ramadan and increase in organ donation willingness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najafizadeh Katayoun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ shortage is the most significant factor in restricting the activities of trans-plantation systems. We herein report the positive impact of Muslims′ holy month of Ramadan on willingness to donate organs in Iran. Data were derived from the database of Donation Willing-ness Registries, affiliated to the organ procurement unit of Masih Daneshvari Hospital during March 2007 till March 2008. The number of applications for organ donation was compared bet-ween Ramadan and its previous month, and the socio-economic characteristics of the applicants were compared between those who applied in Ramadan and those who did so in the previous month. In addition, the mean number of daily applications was compared between Ramadan and the other months of the same year. A total of 11528 applications for organ donation cards were registered for the Ramadan of 2007 as opposed to 4538 applications in the previous month, sho-wing an increasing rate of 154%. The mean number of daily applications was significantly higher in Ramadan than that of the other months of the same year (P< 0.001. There was also a significant difference in terms of the socio-economic characteristics between the applicants in Ramadan and those in the previous month. The increase in organ donation willingness in Ramadan may be the result of the propagation of altruism by the mass media and religious organizations. Ramadan seems to provide a great opportunity to promote organ donation across the Muslim world.

  9. Rosa damascena as holy ancient herb with novel applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese

    2016-01-01

    Rosa damascena as an ornamental plant is commonly known as "Gole Mohammadi" in Iran. Iranian people have been called this plant, the flower of Prophet "Mohammad". R. damascena is traditionally used for treatment of abdominal and chest pains, strengthening the heart, menstrual bleeding, digestive problems and constipation. This paper reviews the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmaceutical investigations on R. damascena. All relevant databases and local books on ethnopharmacology of R. damascena were probed without limitation up to 31st March 2015 and the results of these studies were collected and reviewed. R. damascena has an important position in Iranian traditional medicine. It is economically a valuable plant with therapeutic applications in modern medicine. The antimicrobial, antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-depressant properties of R. damascena have been confirmed. Citronellol and geraniol as the main components of R. damascena essential oil are responsible for pharmacological activities. Overall, R. damascena as holy ancient plant with modern pharmacological investigations should be more investigated as traditional uses in large preclinical and clinical studies.

  10. Holy Orders of the Clergy given by Jan Rzeszowski

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    Krzysztof Kaczmarek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents Holy Orders of the Clergy given by Jan Rzeszowski the bishop of Cracow. Two registers of acolytes ordained by the Cracow ordinary between the years 1473 and 1473 in Kunow and Bodzentyn were used as the source of the study. The registers were included in the bishop’s book of duties, presently kept in the Archives of Metropolitan Curia in Cracow. The registers contain data of 21 persons who were ordained acolytes by the Cracow bishop. It is interesting that both ceremonies took place on Sunday. In 1473 as well as in 1475 the bishop ordained the presented clergy in places which were the capitals of groups of land estates of the Cracow bishoprics holding prominent places in the structure of the diocese. The registers of persons ordained by Jan Rzeszowski from 1473 and 1475 are the oldest relics of that kind, coming from the lands belonging to Poland and described in the subject literature so far.

  11. Viewpoints in the Translation of the Holy QURAN

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    Ahmed Gumaa Siddiek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is too much literature about the untranslatability of the Quran from its Arabic text into another language. Most Muslims: Arab and Non-Arab, and almost everyone with Arabic language background, will not find any difficulty to prove the untranslatability of the Holy Quran into another language. The Quran is the Word of Allah Almighty to his messenger Mohammed (PBUH in Arabic. It was intentionally revealed in Arabic to serve specific purpose: To defy the Arabs in their own trade and craftsmanship of producing highly rhetorical and poetic composition in their literature.  Although all the scientific, geographical and historical facts mentioned in the Quran have been found true, nevertheless, the Quran remains a book of miracles, but its miraculous ability is in its inimitability (as no one has made similar sura the like of it since its revelation and untranslatability into another form  of reproduction in other languages (as  hundreds of translations were made and are still made, but would not come to the absolute final perfect  form of translation. These translations are incomplete, as they are mere human efforts. This paper aims to shed some light on the opinions of some Islamic scholars on this issue, as well as to suggest some strategies to help in coming out with some sound translations to help Non-Arab Muslims and other Non-Arabic speakers to understand the truth about the Quran as a true WORD from Allah to all human beings on Earth.

  12. The Letters of the Holy Martyr Benjamin, Metropolitan of Petrograd to Holy hierarch Tikhon, the Patriarch Moscow and All Russia (the publication

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    Smoliakova Inna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The publication off ers the unknown letter metropolitan Benjamin to Holy Patriarch Tikhon (the Moscow metropolitan in that time in September, 1917 — July, 1918. In letters the actual questions of the church life in the revolutionary era were raise

  13. The Topicality and the Utility of the Teachings of the Holy Fathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Petcu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Holy Fathers, “great scholars and teachers”, are considered as the normative representatives of the doctrinarian tradition of the Church, as especially authorized witnesses of faith. They led a holy life and also distinguished themselves through the fact that they preached the teachings received from the Saviour and the Holy Apostles.They are not only the representatives of the doctrinarian tradition of the Church, but also the witnesses and criteria of true faith, the judges of Orthodoxy – this feature has not only a historic value and dimension, but also atemporal and generally spiritual ones. The Holy Fathers are extremely “contemporary”, as they reach directly the Christians in our times and provide answers to the essential questions of mankind. By studying the patristic literature, we acquire the way of thinking of the saints, which is helpful at anytime and in any circumstance and allows us to show our faith and answer topical issues as they themselves would have done if they were still alive now. By a careful and pious reading of the works of the Holy Fathers, contemporary human beings may find the solutions to their problems and thean swers to their questions, as they are models of Christian living, wisdom and simplicity, and their theological knowledge and the truths they preached were un animously accepted and admired by the whole Church.

  14. Myostatin--the holy grail for muscle, bone, and fat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehring, B; Binkley, N

    2013-12-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, was first described in 1997. Since then, myostatin has gained growing attention because of the discovery that myostatin inhibition leads to muscle mass accrual. Myostatin not only plays a key role in muscle homeostasis, but also affects fat and bone. This review will focus on the impact of myostatin and its inhibition on muscle mass/function, adipose tissue and bone density/geometry in humans. Although existing data are sparse, myostatin inhibition leads to increased lean mass and 1 study found a decrease in fat mass and increase in bone formation. In addition, myostatin levels are increased in sarcopenia, cachexia and bed rest whereas they are increased after resistance training, suggesting physiological regulatory of myostatin. Increased myostatin levels have also been found in obesity and levels decrease after weight loss from caloric restriction. Knowledge on the relationship of myostatin with bone is largely based on animal data where elevated myostatin levels lead to decreased BMD and myostatin inhibition improved BMD. In summary, myostatin appears to be a key factor in the integrated physiology of muscle, fat, and bone. It is unclear whether myostatin directly affects fat and bone, or indirectly via muscle. Whether via direct or indirect effects, myostatin inhibition appears to increase muscle and bone mass and decrease fat tissue-a combination that truly appears to be a holy grail. However, at this time, human data for both efficacy and safety are extremely limited. Moreover, whether increased muscle mass also leads to improved function remains to be determined. Ultimately potential beneficial effects of myostatin inhibition will need to be determined based on hard outcomes such as falls and fractures.

  15. Divineness regarding the words of the Holy Qur'an

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    Sheibani Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the many questions concerning the words of the Holy Qur'an is whether their content and meaning were truly a divine revelation or they were revealed to the Prophet from God and then transferred into the form of words. In this regard, there are two perspectives. First, as all Muslims believe, the words of the Qur'an are the result of a divine revelation, where­as the second viewpoint is that the words of the Qur'an are written by a human and not God. According to this latter perspective, the words of the Qur'an are sayings of the Prophet of which only the contents are based on a divine revelation. The theory of the words of the Qur'an not being a divine revelation has been an abandoned and rejected one throughout the Islamic history. This is the reason it has not been the subject of any pertinent discussions. How can the words of the Qur'an be created by Muhammad or Gabriel even though it is believed that the Qur'an is a miracle? This article first defines the concept of revelation and then analyzes various viewpoints and opinions regarding this topic in order to conclude (with evidence that the Qur'an is the word of God and not the word of the Prophet. If he had composed the words of the Qur'an and expressed the meaning of the revelation in his own words, then the Qur'an would not be the word of God. In this case, the term 'word of God' indicates that the concept of the 'word' should be considered. Thus, it is clear that the words of the Qur'an are divine and they can be referred and attributed to God.

  16. An Assessment of Air Quality in the Surrounding Holy Places of Mecca, Saudi Arabia during Hajj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, H. A.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Hussain, M. M.; Khatib, F.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The associations of exposure to air pollution and adverse human health effects have been demonstrated in many epidemiologic studies. Hajj, an annual pilgrimage of Islam, draws millions of pilgrims from more than 200 countries for religious rituals in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The city is surrounded by mountains with a population of 1.7 million, which gets doubles or even more during Hajj. The city centers on the Grand Mosque (Masjid Al-haram), connected with the network of tunnels. Main Hajj pilgrimage route for five days extends 20 km to the east and includes "Mina", "Arafat", and "Muzdalifah". A detailed study was conducted in Mecca, its tunnels, and surrounding holy places during Hajj (October 13-17, 2013). Spatial and temporal variations in total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10 , PM7 , PM2.5 , PM1 , ozone (O3), and black carbon (BC) levels along the route were recorded using portable monitors and GPS to assess the status of air quality. This is the first study to elucidate the exposure to air pollutants among pilgrims. Extremely high levels of all pollutants were observed during the intensive measuring periods. For example, the PM7 , PM2.5 , O3, and BC concentrations of up to 9,433 µg/m3, 484 µg/m3, 444 ppb, and 468 µg/m3, respectively, were observed. Results of this investigation revealed that most routes had on average exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) standards for PM10 and PM2.5 . The reasons for the high air pollutants concentrations are most probably high volume of traffic, construction work, re-suspension of particles, and geographical conditions (arid regions). The pilgrim's longer trip duration lead to their highest whole trip exposure to air pollutants, which indicate that they are possibly subject to higher health risk. Better understanding of air pollution exposure and their determinants in the environments will contribute to the development of more appropriate exposure reductive strategies and have significant public health meanings.

  17. Custodians of Sacred Space : Constructing the Franciscan Holy Land through texts and sacri monti (ca. 1480-1650)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema van Eck, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the construction of the Franciscan Holy Land as an ideological construct during the late medieval and early modern period. Based on an extensive corpus of texts, defined as Franciscan Holy Land writing, and a (re-)consideration of the sacri monti of Varallo and La

  18. The Holy Dose: Spiritual adventures with Southern Oregon's psychedelic crusaders

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Alex L

    2011-01-01

    Ashland, Oregon is a smart little community nestled in the foothills of the Siskiyou Mountains about 20 minutes north of the California border. Home to Southern Oregon University and host to the yearly Shakespeare Festival, Ashland is one of those places both progressive and picturesque that often occupies a top spot on waiting-room magazines' “Best Small Towns” or “Best Places to Retire” lists. It's got a walkable business district with cozy fine-dining bistros, new-age book shops and old-sc...

  19. Merging Geometric Documentation with Materials Characterization and Analysis of the History of the Holy Aedicule in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, A.; Lambrou, E.; Pantazis, G.; Agrafiotis, P.; Papadaki, A.; Kotoula, L.; Lampropoulos, K.; Delegou, E.; Apostolopoulou, M.; Alexakis, M.; Moropoulou, A.

    2017-05-01

    The National Technical University of Athens undertook the compilation of an "Integrated Diagnostic Research Project and Strategic Planning for Materials, Interventions Conservation and Rehabilitation of the Holy Aedicule of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem". This paper focuses on the work merging the geometric documentation with the characterization of materials, the identification of building phases and the diagnosis of decay and pathology through the use of analytical and non-destructive techniques. Through this integrated approach, i.e. through the documentation and characterization of the building materials, through the diagnosis of decay and pathology, through the accurate geometric documentation of the building and through the non-destructive prospection of its internal structure, it was feasible to identify the construction phases of the Holy Aedicule, identifying the remnants of the preserved earlier constructions and the original monolithic Tomb. This work, thus, demonstrates that the adoption of an interdisciplinary approach for integrated documentation is a powerful tool for a better understanding of monuments, both in terms of its structural integrity, as well as in terms of its state of preservation, both prerequisites for effective rehabilitation.

  20. MERGING GEOMETRIC DOCUMENTATION WITH MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE HISTORY OF THE HOLY AEDICULE IN THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE IN JERUSALEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Georgopoulos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Technical University of Athens undertook the compilation of an "Integrated Diagnostic Research Project and Strategic Planning for Materials, Interventions Conservation and Rehabilitation of the Holy Aedicule of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem". This paper focuses on the work merging the geometric documentation with the characterization of materials, the identification of building phases and the diagnosis of decay and pathology through the use of analytical and non-destructive techniques. Through this integrated approach, i.e. through the documentation and characterization of the building materials, through the diagnosis of decay and pathology, through the accurate geometric documentation of the building and through the non-destructive prospection of its internal structure, it was feasible to identify the construction phases of the Holy Aedicule, identifying the remnants of the preserved earlier constructions and the original monolithic Tomb. This work, thus, demonstrates that the adoption of an interdisciplinary approach for integrated documentation is a powerful tool for a better understanding of monuments, both in terms of its structural integrity, as well as in terms of its state of preservation, both prerequisites for effective rehabilitation.

  1. Holiness in Victorian and Edwardian England: Some ecclesial patterns and theological requisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Goroncy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay begins by offering some observations about how holiness was comprehended andexpressed in Victorian and Edwardian England. In addition to the ‘sensibility’ and ‘sentiment’that characterised society, notions of holiness were shaped by, and developed in reaction to, dominant philosophical movements; notably, the Enlightenment and Romanticism. It thenconsiders how these notions found varying religious expression in four Protestant traditions – he Oxford Movement, Calvinism, Wesleyanism, and the Early Keswick movement. Injuxtaposition to what was most often considered to be a negative expression of holinessassociated primarily with anthropocentric and anthroposocial behaviour as evidenced in thesetraditions, the essay concludes by examining one – namely, P.T. Forsyth – whose voice calledfrom within the ecclesial community for a radical requisition of holiness language as afundamentally positive reality describing the divine life and divine activity. The relevance of astudy of the Church’s understanding of holiness and how it sought to develop its doctrinewhile engaging with larger social and philosophical shifts endure with us still.

  2. The role of the Holy spirit in Calvin's doctrine of the sacraments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baptism signifies the forgiveness of our sins and regeneration, although the beginning of that regeneration may precede or follow the act of baptism. In the Lord's Supper the Holy Spirit performs two related functions: he unites that which is separated by time and space, viz., the ascended Lord and the believer, and in the ...

  3. Fostering Community through the House System at Most Holy Trinity Catholic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Most Holy Trinity Catholic School in Phoenix, Arizona, has experienced a decrease in student enrollment over the last decade, resulting in a reduction to a single class per grade across the PreK-8 community. Recent concerns have surfaced regarding student and teacher isolation, marginalization, and their effects on the broader relationships within…

  4. The Spirit of the Body of Christ: The Holy Spirit's indwelling in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the author argues that the church is the exclusive place of the work of the Holy Spirit, with reference to early church fathers such as Cyprian and Augustine, and to the New Testament. The Spirit is the presence of Christ who indwells his body. Therefore, the concept of social Trinity is rejected. As the Spirit of the Crucified, ...

  5. Psalm 51: Take not your Holy Spirit away from me | Maré | Acta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even a cursory reading of the New Testament makes one aware of numerous references to the Holy Spirit. The New Testament is thus normally the focus for studies on pneumatology. However, there are many references to jwr in the Old Testament of which 107 refer to God's activities in nature and in the lives of human ...

  6. Effects of listening to Holy Qur'an recitation and physical training on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifty-three male haemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group (listening to Holy Qur'an recitation in combination with endurance–resistance training, n = 28) or a control group (endurance–resistance training only, n = 25). Functional capacity was assessed using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) ...

  7. Holiness in Victorian and Edwardian England: Some ecclesial patterns and theological requisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Goroncy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay begins by offering some observations about how holiness was comprehended andexpressed in Victorian and Edwardian England. In addition to the ‘sensibility’ and ‘sentiment’that characterised society, notions of holiness were shaped by, and developed in reaction to, dominant philosophical movements; notably, the Enlightenment and Romanticism. It thenconsiders how these notions found varying religious expression in four Protestant traditions – he Oxford Movement, Calvinism, Wesleyanism, and the Early Keswick movement. Injuxtaposition to what was most often considered to be a negative expression of holinessassociated primarily with anthropocentric and anthroposocial behaviour as evidenced in thesetraditions, the essay concludes by examining one – namely, P.T. Forsyth – whose voice calledfrom within the ecclesial community for a radical requisition of holiness language as afundamentally positive reality describing the divine life and divine activity. The relevance of astudy of the Church’s understanding of holiness and how it sought to develop its doctrinewhile engaging with larger social and philosophical shifts endure with us still.

  8. The 'holi' dermatoses: annual spate of skin diseases following the spring festival in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Saha, Debabrata

    2009-07-01

    'Holi' is an annual spring festival celebrated all over India. The central ritual of Holi involves throwing of colors on one another. Playing with toxic industrial dyes often results in various dermatological complaints in a significant number of people immediately following the celebration. To describe patterns of various skin manifestations directly or indirectly related to the use of different colors in the celebration of Holi. Observational clinical study on consecutive patients presenting to a teaching hospital in Kolkata, India. Forty-two patients with a mean age of 24.2 years were studied. Itching was the commonest symptom (25, 59.5%), followed by burning sensation, pain, oozing, and scaling. Eleven patients' symptoms were attributed to activities related to preparation of colors and the removal of colors from the skin surface. Eczematous lesions were the most common pattern (24, 57.1%) followed by erosions, xerosis and scaling, erythema, urticaria, acute nail-fold inflammation, and abrasions. Thirteen (30.9%) patients reported aggravation of preexisting dermatoses (acne, eczema, and paronychia). Secondary pyoderma occurred in 3 (7.1%). Face was the commonest site affected (24, 57.1%), followed by dorsum of the hands, scalp, forearm, palms, arms, and trunk. Ocular complaints in the form of redness, watering, and grittiness occurred in 7 (16.7%) patients. Various forms of cutaneous manifestations, often associated with ocular complaints, occur commonly due to Holi colors. Public awareness and regulatory actions are needed to avoid these preventable conditions.

  9. Effects of listening to Holy Qur'an recitation and physical training on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bechir Frih

    2017-09-10

    Sep 10, 2017 ... listening to Holy Qur'an recitation and physical training on dialysis efficacy, functional capacity, and psychosocial outcomes in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis, Libyan Journal of Medicine,. 12:1, 1372032, DOI: .... muscles, triceps brachia muscles, biceps brachia mus- cles, and hamstrings were ...

  10. The “Holy Grail” Experience or Heightened Awareness? | Gow | Indo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contextual elements of prior social isolation and sensory deprivation are investigated as possible contributions to this unique phenomenon. In this conceptual article, the author explores the Holy Grail experience from both spiritual and secular viewpoints. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, Volume 6, Edition 1 May ...

  11. The Cry in the Holy Quran and the Effect on the Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Domi, Mohammad Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This study aims that cry is the ideal way to release the negative emotions distress, sorrow, and sadness. Which sometimes is also a way to express situations of joy and pleasure of humans. The Almighty Allah also said about cry in The Holy Quran. The prophet pbuh also cry for the expressions of reverence and fear of Allah in perhaps the sort of…

  12. Linguistic Precautions That to Be Considered When Translating the Holy Quran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiek, Ahmed Gumaa

    2017-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to raise some points that should be considered when translating the Quranic Text into English. We have looked into some samples of translations, selected from well known English translations of the Holy Quran and critically examined them. There were some errors in those translations, due to linguistic factors, owing…

  13. Laugh and Smile upon the Holy Quran: The Study of Analytical Objectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Domi, Mohammad Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the positive impact of The Holy Quran based on the laugh and smile. This kind of derivatives in which context of praise, expression the feeling of happiness and joyful in the positive senses. Everyone needs to relieve his heart so that happiness and joy on their faces can be seen. Laughter also are some of attribute…

  14. E-Halagat: An E-Learning System for Teaching the Holy Quran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadj, Yahya O. Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great interest in Islamic software that try to harness computer to serve the religion. This brought about some applications and programs for the Holy Quran and its sciences, Hadith "[image omitted]" (Prophet's Tradition) and its methodology, Fiqh "[image omitted]" (Islamic jurisdiction), and Islamic law in general.…

  15. Pharmacological and Medicinal Aspects of the Verses Containing Fig (At-tin in Holy Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rameshrad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Holy Quran, the last religious reference book, describes the importance of various plants in different chapters (Sura. Herbs have always been the principal form of traditional medicine in some countries. In this review article, the authors attempted to describe the impact of one of the Quranic plants (fig from medicinal aspects. This is a review article that was conducted using verses, regarding At-tin, which were gathered from Holy Quran and internet database. The electronic search of the scientific literature was mainly conducted on ‘PubMed’. One chapter of Holy Quran has been named "At-tin", which shows the importance of this fruit. Pharmacological aspects of fig, both in traditional and modern medicine, prove its benefits in many disorders. Different parts of this plant have been used to treat various disorders such as infections, diabetes, gastric problems, inflammation, and cancer. Among the various medical uses of fig, anticancer activity has the most considerable effect. Scientists of the current century have just realized some properties and applications of fig in medicine. Fourteen centuries ago, Holy Quran indicated the importance of ""

  16. 'Do not quench the Spirit!' The discourse of the Holy Spirit in earliest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Trinitarian discourse of the 4th and 5th centuries grew out of earlier developments, whilst at the same time reflecting a renewal over against the language of the earliest Christian sources. This article reflects on the way in which early Christianity thought about the Holy Spirit and developed a new discourse on the basis ...

  17. Mountain medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain...... medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women...

  18. Peak oxygen uptake in a sprint interval testing protocol vs. maximal oxygen uptake in an incremental testing protocol and their relationship with cross-country mountain biking performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebisz, Rafał; Hebisz, Paulina; Zatoń, Marek; Michalik, Kamil

    2017-04-01

    In the literature, the exercise capacity of cyclists is typically assessed using incremental and endurance exercise tests. The aim of the present study was to confirm whether peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2peak) attained in a sprint interval testing protocol correlates with cycling performance, and whether it corresponds to maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) determined by an incremental testing protocol. A sample of 28 trained mountain bike cyclists executed 3 performance tests: (i) incremental testing protocol (ITP) in which the participant cycled to volitional exhaustion, (ii) sprint interval testing protocol (SITP) composed of four 30 s maximal intensity cycling bouts interspersed with 90 s recovery periods, (iii) competition in a simulated mountain biking race. Oxygen uptake, pulmonary ventilation, work, and power output were measured during the ITP and SITP with postexercise blood lactate and hydrogen ion concentrations collected. Race times were recorded. No significant inter-individual differences were observed in regards to any of the ITP-associated variables. However, 9 individuals presented significantly increased oxygen uptake, pulmonary ventilation, and work output in the SITP compared with the remaining cyclists. In addition, in this group of 9 cyclists, oxygen uptake in SITP was significantly higher than in ITP. After the simulated race, this group of 9 cyclists achieved significantly better competition times (99.5 ± 5.2 min) than the other cyclists (110.5 ± 6.7 min). We conclude that mountain bike cyclists who demonstrate higher peak oxygen uptake in a sprint interval testing protocol than maximal oxygen uptake attained in an incremental testing protocol demonstrate superior competitive performance.

  19. Investigating the condition of medical counseling and some of clinical aspects for fasting in holy month of Ramadan from the perspective of diabetic and hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahmoudian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although fasting has many benefits for health, it can be dangerous for patients. So it is necessary that physicians have adequate information about clinical aspects of fasting and they should advice patients. Therefore in this study we analyses the condition of physicians counseling about fasting from the perspective of patients. Methods:In this descriptive analytical cross-sectional study, patients with diabetes and hypertension who were going to doctors in Isfahan in holy month of Ramadan of 2012 and 2013 completed the questionnaires. A valid self-regulation questionnaire including patient`s satisfaction from the quality of physicians counseling about fasting (In the area of education, evaluation of the patient condition, communication /relationship with patients, caring for diseases in holy Ramadan and the incidence of symptoms in fasting had been used with  = 0.76. The patients completed the questionnaire after visit. The data was analyzed by Independent t-test, chi-square, Regression, one-way ANOVA in the19 spss software. Results: 285 patients, 199(69.8% female and 86(30.2% male, were selected. The mean satisfaction score of counseling was 70.50 ±13.23. The highest score (75.36±14.16 was referred to counseling of physician, and the least score (66.09±18.84 to patient assessment by physician. Mean score of Patients' satisfaction of specialists was higher than of general practitioner (p-value

  20. Holy Koran\\\\\\'s Pattern in the Cultural Communication of Islam and Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Arzani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Holy Koran, the last scared scripture sent by Allah, recommends, based on the verses frequency, seven methods to communicate with the Christians. The important point about these seven models that may be considered interesting is their sequence as they may be applied one after another in the following order: 1-        Affirmation of some of the Christianity foundations (the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ, Saint Mary and the  Apostles 2-        Invitation to unity 3-        Annunciation of blessing for the true Christians 4-        Warning and threats to the Christians 5-        Invitation to consider the truth by the Christians 6-        Explanation of the infidel Christians and their damnation  7-        Order to mubahala (debate and mutual cursing and wage war against the Christians. These are the seven methods, based on Holy Koran, which are considered to be used in communicating with the Christians:   1-         The background for an efficient dialog is firstly based by affirmation of some of the Christianity foundations such as the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ, Saint Mary and the Apostles. The existence of a constructive and unifying dialog can have a vital role to directly eliminate the world problems; but this needs some suitable backgrounds. One of these backgrounds is the dialog based on the common matters. Relying on lots of common positive issues such as beliefs, ideas, aspirations, pains and common feelings, the humankind can establish such a dialog. 2-        In the second phase, the Holy Koran, accepting some beliefs of the Christians, invites them to unite with Muslims based on the monotheism and rejection of idolatry and idolatrous in order to reach a common understanding in communicating with each other. 3-        After a Christian receives confirmations about his/her religious ideals by Islam and is ready to unite with Muslims  based on the Monotheism, there is

  1. Holy Koran's Pattern in the Cultural Communication of Islam and Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Ehtemam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Holy Koran, the last scared scripture sent by Allah, recommends, based on the verses frequency, seven methods to communicate with the Christians. The important point about these seven models that may be considered interesting is their sequence as they may be applied one after another in the following order: 1-        Affirmation of some of the Christianity foundations (the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ, Saint Mary and the  Apostles 2-        Invitation to unity 3-        Annunciation of blessing for the true Christians 4-        Warning and threats to the Christians 5-        Invitation to consider the truth by the Christians 6-        Explanation of the infidel Christians and their damnation  7-        Order to mubahala (debate and mutual cursing and wage war against the Christians. These are the seven methods, based on Holy Koran, which are considered to be used in communicating with the Christians:   1-         The background for an efficient dialog is firstly based by affirmation of some of the Christianity foundations such as the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ, Saint Mary and the Apostles. The existence of a constructive and unifying dialog can have a vital role to directly eliminate the world problems; but this needs some suitable backgrounds. One of these backgrounds is the dialog based on the common matters. Relying on lots of common positive issues such as beliefs, ideas, aspirations, pains and common feelings, the humankind can establish such a dialog. 2-        In the second phase, the Holy Koran, accepting some beliefs of the Christians, invites them to unite with Muslims based on the monotheism and rejection of idolatry and idolatrous in order to reach a common understanding in communicating with each other. 3-        After a Christian receives confirmations about his/her religious ideals by Islam and is ready to unite with Muslims  based on the Monotheism, there is

  2. Different pollinator assemblages ensure reproductive success of Cleisostoma linearilobatum (Orchidaceae) in fragmented holy hill forest and traditional tea garden

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qiang; Han, Jessie Yc; Gao, JiangYun

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, we investigated the reproductive ecology of Cleisostoma linearilobatum, an epiphytic tropical orchid, in a holy hill forest fragment and a traditional tea garden in SW China using comparable methods. C...

  3. Assessment of diabetes care and the healthcare system in economically and transport underdeveloped rural mountain areas of western China: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Linqiu; Zhang, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaoqian; Li, Shengyong; Yang, Wei; Tong, Nanwei

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of diabetes care and characteristics of the healthcare system in underdeveloped rural mountain areas of western China. Questionnaires were used to collect data from 288 diabetic patients with a multistage cluster sampling method in Zhongjiang County (Sichuan Province) between October 2009 and April 2010. Sixty-two village clinics, 23 town health centers, and a county central hospital were included to assess the availability of diabetes-related medical resources, in addition to diabetes-related medical insurance, reimbursement policies, and manpower. Of 288 patients, 38.2 % monitored their blood glucose regularly. Targets for fasting blood glucose (≤7 mmol/L) and blood pressure (≤130/80 mmHg) were achieved by 7.6 % and 9.7 % of patients, respectively. On average, each patient paid US$120 out of pocket annually for out-patient diabetes care, with a maximum US$86 reimbursed. The county central hospital was the only healthcare facility in the county that could provide all essential diabetes-related drugs and process-of-care measures and tests, except measures of HbA1c and the urinary albumin: creatinine ratio. Insulin was not available at village clinics, and only 29 % of village clinics had glucometers. "Certified" doctors were not available to provide primary care in village clinics. The quality of diabetes care was quite poor in underdeveloped rural mountain areas of western China. Recommendations for further intervention research to improve diabetes healthcare include increasing investment in medical infrastructure, improving the availability of essential drugs and process measures, organizing regular diabetes patient education, and recruiting village doctors. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Silence in liturgy as the space for the Holy Ghost’s activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelajda Sielepin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to clarify the essential and often neglected function of liturgical silence. In practice silence is usually intended to prepare the participants for listening or reflecting upon the word, especially when proclaimed by the minister. Whereas it is vital to know that silence constitutes a creative element of the liturgy, because the involvement of the Holy Spirit. In His action and cooperation with the participants He enables them to get into communion with Christ the Word and the Person and eventually to join effectively His mission. In that sense silence helps the Holy Ghost to fulfill His function in continuing the dialogue between God and man as well as in enhancing one’s spiritual skills for the fruitful participation in the Mystery of Christ and the Church.

  5. Archeological Survey and Testing in the Holy Cross Historic District, New Orleans, Louisiana. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    Woman Private Family, W, 0 Celestine (d) 30 B LA LA LA Cook Private Family, W, 0 Roseanna (d) 19 B LA LA LA House- girl Private Family, W, 3 Levy, John 31...None Ownership status: Rent 859 1910 Census Data (4715 Dauphine) Gamer , Madeline* 74 W GER GER GER None Jacob (s) 44 W LA GER GER Laborer Odd jobs, W

  6. Archeological Survey and Testing in the Holy Cross Historic District, New Orleans, Louisiana. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    whereas whiteware is nonvitreous. Ironstone fractures evenly and smoothly. The surface appearance is hard and smooth, usually with an opaque-looking...the feldspathic glaze during firing. The ware fractures conchoidally. The surface appearance is hard and smooth, and the surface color ranges from...Unfused Fused TOTAL Early fusing: Humerus, distal 2 2 Radius, proximal 1 1 Acetabulum Metapodials, proximal Phalanx, proximal 1 1 Middle fusing Tibia

  7. A narrative review on fasting of pregnant women in the holy month of Ramadan

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Alireza Mirsane; Shima Shafagh

    2016-01-01

    One of the basic rituals of Islam is fasting during Ramadan. In this month, all able-bodied Muslims abstain from food, fluids, smoking, and oral medications from sunrise to sunset. According to the Quran, if fasting poses major health risks to individuals, fasting during this holy month is not allowed. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fasting on maternal and fetal health. Therefore, we investigated studies in three different areas, including fetal growth and development, intrauteri...

  8. PSALM 51: “TAKE NOT YOUR HOLY SPIRIT AWAY FROM ME”

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even a cursory reading of the New Testament makes one aware of numerous references to the Holy Spirit. The New Testament is thus normally the ... Such analysis reveals that the. Spirit of God lived permanently in the life of an Old ..... GoldinGay, J. 1978. Psalm 51:16a (English 51:14a). CBQ 40:388-390. HildeBrandT, w.

  9. 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8: The Thessalonians should live a holy life

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    Paul wants the Thessalonians to live a holy life in order to always be with the Lord; see 1 Thessalonians 4:15-18. 2. SOME REMARKS ON 1 THESSALONIANS 4:1-2. The beginning of this pericope is marked by knho n[m nt)}m, furthermore then.4 In several manuscripts the preceding paragraph, 1 Thessalonians 3:11-13, is.

  10. St. Theophan the Recluse on the translation of the Holy Scripture into Russian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashirina Varvara Viktorovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses opinions of the famous spiritual writer and theologian of the 19th century, St. Theophan the Recluse (1815-1894, on the new translation of the Holy Bible (1875 from Masoretic texts into Russian. His point of view reflected in the articles of such periodicals as “Dushepoleznoe chtenie”, “Domashnyaya beseda”, “Tserkovny vestnik” is a significant chapter in the history of the Russian Bible Studies.

  11. On the Present-day Veneration of Sacred Trees in the Holy Land

    OpenAIRE

    Amots Dafni

    2011-01-01

    This article surveys the current pervasiveness of the phenomenon ofsacred trees in the Holy Land, with special reference to the official attitudes of local religious leaders and the attitudes of Muslims in comparison with the Druze as well as in monotheism vs. polytheism. Field data regarding the reasons for the sanctification of trees and the common beliefs and rituals related to them are described, comparing the form which the phenomenon takes among different ethnic groups. In addition, I d...

  12. Encounters of a Third Kind: Mark Twain, William C. Prime and Protestant American Holy Land Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milette Shamir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available William C. Prime’s Tent Life in the Holy Land (1857 is mostly remembered now as the target of parody in The Innocents Abroad (1869, where, eager to promote his own “honest” and “impartial” account of Palestine, Mark Twain mocked the maudlin style of his old-fashioned predecessor. Readers since took their cue from Twain and tagged American Holy-Land narratives as “secular” or “religious,” “realist” or “sentimental,” “factual” or “fictitious.” But an intertextual consideration of Tent Life and The Innocents shows the limits of such taxonomies. This essay traces the various thematic and stylistic strands shared by Twain and Prime in order to reveal the intricate texture of the 19th-century Protestant Holy Land archive, its resistance to linear narratives of secularization. This methodology also addresses some lingering tensions between poststructuralist and humanistic positions in the study of Orientalism.

  13. Implications of some early Jewish sources for estimates of earthquake hazardin the Holy Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Karcz

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available For the past two millennia the Holy Land was under the yoke of successive invaders and oppressors, not a fertile ground for growth of historiographic traditions. Consequently, earthquake cataloguers had to rely largely on chronicles and texts written at distant administrative and cultural centers of the day, where earthquake destruction suffered by a culturally and economically depressed province may have been overshadowed by damage in more important parts of the empire. On this assumption, and aided by an implicit notion that the lands bounded by the Dead Sea Rift and Anatolian Fault systems are seismically contiguous, early cataloguers often extended the impact of earthquakes documented in nearby East Mediterranean countries to the Holy Land. Once published, such reports of supposed destructive intensities in Israel were used by Judaic scholars and archaeologists to date poorly defined, often metaphoric, literary seismic echoes, and to justify assigning seismic origin to equivocal signs of damage, asymmetry, or abandonment at archaeological sites of corresponding age. The spread of damage and intensity portraits are therefore enhanced and distorted, and so is their application in palaeoseismic analysis. Four test cases are presented, illustrating the use and misuse of local Judaic sources in identifying destructive intensities supposedly generated in the Holy Land by earthquakes of 92 B.C., 64 B.C. and 31 B.C., and in postulating a regional seismic catastrophe in 749 A.D..

  14. Depictions of holy monks in the western bay of the Church of the Virgin in Studenica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is dedicated to the figures of holy monks in the west bay of the Church of the Virgin in Studenica, painted during the restoration of the original murals in 1568. The paper seeks to establish the identity of some saints who were previously incorrectly identified, as well as the identity of those who were unobserved in previous studies. It also discusses to what extent the choice of holy monks to be depicted was determined by the original iconographic program. The research results confirm the hypothesis that has for long been present in scholarly literature; according to it, during the restoration of frescoes in the Studenica katholikon, the painters largely repeated the original painted program. Nevertheless, judging by the example of the holy monks depicted in west bay, it may be concluded that in some cases they departed from the original iconographic program. In selecting new saints to be depicted they must have relied on the Menologion. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177032: Tradicija, inovacija i identitet u vizantijskom svetu

  15. Effects of Sprint versus High-Intensity Aerobic Interval Training on Cross-Country Mountain Biking Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Allan; Impellizzeri, Franco M.; Pires, Flávio O.; Pompeu, Fernando A. M. S.; Deslandes, Andrea C.; Santos, Tony M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The current study compared the effects of high-intensity aerobic training (HIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) on mountain biking (MTB) race simulation performance and physiological variables, including peak power output (PPO), lactate threshold (LT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). Methods Sixteen mountain bikers (mean ± SD: age 32.1 ± 6.4 yr, body mass 69.2 ± 5.3 kg and VO2max 63.4 ± 4.5 mL∙kg-1∙min-1) completed graded exercise and MTB performance tests before and after six weeks of training. The HIT (7–10 x [4–6 min—highest sustainable intensity / 4–6 min—CR100 10–15]) and SIT (8–12 x [30 s—all-out intensity / 4 min—CR100 10–15]) protocols were included in the participants’ regular training programs three times per week. Results Post-training analysis showed no significant differences between training modalities (HIT vs. SIT) in body mass, PPO, LT or OBLA (p = 0.30 to 0.94). The Cohen’s d effect size (ES) showed trivial to small effects on group factor (p = 0.00 to 0.56). The interaction between MTB race time and training modality was almost significant (p = 0.08), with a smaller ES in HIT vs. SIT training (ES = -0.43). A time main effect (pre- vs. post-phases) was observed in MTB race performance and in several physiological variables (p = 0.001 to 0.046). Co-variance analysis revealed that the HIT (p = 0.043) group had significantly better MTB race performance measures than the SIT group. Furthermore, magnitude-based inferences showed HIT to be of likely greater benefit (83.5%) with a lower probability of harmful effects (0.8%) compared to SIT. Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that six weeks of either HIT or SIT may be effective at increasing MTB race performance; however, HIT may be a preferable strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01944865 PMID:26789124

  16. THE REPERCUSSION OF GRAMMATICAL AND CULTURAL CULPABILITY OF THE HOLY QUR’AN TRANSLATION TO RELIGIOUS HARMONY IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muta'ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, among the sources of Islamic radicalization in Indonesia is the interpretation of certain terminology in the holy Qur’an. In a relatively long period, religious understanding of Indonesian society is shaped by the official Translation of the Holy Qur’an by Ministry of Religious Affairs. However, this translation contains several mistakes, including mistakes in translating key terms relating to the issue of warfare, non-Muslims and killing. This eventually contributes to radicalization of some element of Muslim society in Indonesia. The purpose of this research is to analyze error translation of The Holy Qur’an verses. Content analysis theory is applied in this research with grammatical and cultural approach against the Holy Qur’an translation by Ministry of Religious Affairs of Indonesia (MORA. The research shows that 90 fatal errors in translation of The Holy Qur’an verses regarding infidels and polytheists are confirmed. The errors might be play role in the increasing religious disharmony in Indonesia. Furthermore, they arguably have fueled Islam-based terrorism acts.

  17. [Legitimation of Andries Van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father, by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Fifth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2006-06-01

    Andries van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father and a court pharmacist of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the fifth, was an illegitimate son of Everard van Wesele, a court physician of the Hapsburgs. In the year of 1531, Andries was legitimated by the Emperor. The legitimation letter was written in French. The author tried to translate and analyze the letter. By this legitimation, not only Andries himself was legitimated but also his successors were approved to succeed Andries. By this letter, Andreas Vesalius obtained his position as a hereditary member of a family serving the court of the Hapsburgs, and as a result, he started his career as a physician of the court.

  18. John Punch, Scotist Holy War, and the Irish Catholic Revolutionary Tradition in the Seventeenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian W

    2016-07-01

    During the 1640s, the Irish Franciscan theologian John Punch taught his theology students in Rome that war against Protestants was made just by their religion alone. Jesuits like Luis de Molina identified the holy war tradition in which Punch stood as a Scotist one, and insisted that the Scotists had confused the natural and supernatural spheres. Among Irishmen, Punch was unusual. The main Irish Catholic revolutionary tradition employed Jesuit and Thomist theory. They argued that the Stuarts had lost the right to rule Ireland for natural reasons, not supernatural ones; because the Stuarts were tyrants, not because they were Protestants.

  19. Sado-Masochism in Clare Boylan’s Home Rule and Holy Pictures

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanette Roberts Shumaker

    2011-01-01

    In Holy Pictures  (1983) and Home Rule  (1993), Clare Boylan deconstructs the family dynamics of urban Ireland a century earlier, portraying mothers who contradict the Irish ideal of maternal selflessness. Boylan critiques the Irish family structure of the late 1800s and early 1900s by showing how it can pressure mothers to become sadists. In addition, Boylan complicates the stereotypical heterosexual romance by portraying cruel wives. This essay draws upon Freud, Julia Kristeva, Michelle Mas...

  20. EAP actuators aid the quest for the 'Holy Braille' of tactile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Noel; Blazie, Deane

    2010-04-01

    The authors present the worldwide need for electronic Braille displays to promote literacy among the blind. The use of of EAP's to produce Braille displays is encouraged and detailed descriptions of the technology of Braille are presented. Prior art is covered since the early 1950's through present day displays based mostly on piezoelectric technologies. EAP's offer the promise of the "Holy Braille", the ability to display a full page of Braille electronically. Details on "how not to make a Braille display" are covered in prior art.

  1. The physiology of mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impellizzeri, Franco M; Marcora, Samuele M

    2007-01-01

    Mountain biking is a popular outdoor recreational activity and an Olympic sport. Cross-country circuit races have a winning time of approximately equal 120 minutes and are performed at an average heart rate close to 90% of the maximum, corresponding to 84% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). More than 80% of race time is spent above the lactate threshold. This very high exercise intensity is related to the fast starting phase of the race; the several climbs, forcing off-road cyclists to expend most of their effort going against gravity; greater rolling resistance; and the isometric contractions of arm and leg muscles necessary for bike handling and stabilisation. Because of the high power output (up to 500W) required during steep climbing and at the start of the race, anaerobic energy metabolism is also likely to be a factor of off-road cycling and deserves further investigation. Mountain bikers' physiological characteristics indicate that aerobic power (VO2max >70 mL/kg/min) and the ability to sustain high work rates for prolonged periods of time are prerequisites for competing at a high level in off-road cycling events. The anthropometric characteristics of mountain bikers are similar to climbers and all-terrain road cyclists. Various parameters of aerobic fitness are correlated to cross-country performance, suggesting that these tests are valid for the physiological assessment of competitive mountain bikers, especially when normalised to body mass. Factors other than aerobic power and capacity might influence off-road cycling performance and require further investigation. These include off-road cycling economy, anaerobic power and capacity, technical ability and pre-exercise nutritional strategies.

  2. The notion of the Holy Spirit as Paraclete from a Pentecostal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Nel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pentecostals share an interest in the work and person of the Holy Spirit although not at the cost of a well-developed Christology. The term Paraclete (παράκλητος appears four times in the Gospel according to John in reference to the Holy Spirit (Jn 14:16, 26; 15:26; 16:7, and once in 1 John 2:1 in reference to Jesus. The question the article asks is: What is meant by the notion of the Spirit as Paraclete from a primarily Pentecostal perspective? To answer the question it is necessary to ask where John’s Paraclete fits into the pneumatology of the early Christian Church before investigating the different contexts in the Johannine literature and what they suggest about the Spirit (and Jesus as Paraclete. Lastly the meaning of the term in the Graeco-Roman world of the 1st century CE is observed before some suggestions are made for interpreting Paraclete, specifically in forensic terms.

  3. The rhetoric of architecture in the Byzantine context: The case study of the Holy Sepulchre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the rhetorical capacity of architecture, and in particular, “the rhetoric of architecture” rather than the usually examined “rhetoric about architecture.” In this work, the rhetoric of architecture is understood as codified visual and architectural conventions as a series of transpositions that frame specific meanings other than and beyond visible and spatial. Here the proposed “rhetoric of architecture” is also more about its capacity as a “mnemonic tool” and about the “craft of composition” rather than about persuading others or about representation based on exact likeness. This concept is particularly significant in the creation of the sacred. By focusing on the architecture of the critical building of the Holy Sepulchre that enclosed the Tomb Shrine in Jerusalem as described by Patriarch Photios in the ninth and Abbot Daniel in the early twelfth centuries, this paper argues for the recognition of the mnemonic links that the Byzantines may have used not only for remembering the Tomb of Christ, but also for their several reconstructions of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem as well as for embedding the meaning of Jerusalem and New Jerusalem in their churches built elsewhere.

  4. GENDER COGNITION IN RELIGIOUS DISCOURSE: A STUDY OF FRAMING IN THEMATIC HOLY KORAN INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang S. Anshori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at describing gender cognition phenomenon in religious discourse in thematic interpretation (tafsir of the Holy Koran published by the Ministry of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia. Each interpretation book as a written discourse is different from each other due to author’s cognition frame. This study employs a constructive qualitative approach with technical framing analysis. The data are language data (religious text that are obtainable from thematic interpretation of the Koran of the Ministry of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia. Data analysis was performed on the following topics: the origins of the creation of men and women, women's leadership, women and inheritance rights, women and ownership, and women's testimony. The research findings show: (1 The lingual and religious discourse containing gender cognition are present in the forms of words, phrases, and sentences. The lingual form of religious discourse is related to the meaning of technical vocabulary that contains appropriate understanding of the discourse topic. (2 Discourse representing gender cognition is found on three topics: women leadership (nation leadership, waris (inheritance, and women’s testimony. In terms of inheritance and women’s testimony, this interpretation refers to conditions that are explicitly stated in the Holy Koran. Meanwhile, this interpretation views leadership of the nation as more worthy to be given to men than women. book looks is more worthy of leadership in the countries was given to men than women.

  5. The Catholics and Organ Disagreements in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan SATIŞ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Church of the Holy Sepulchre has a very important place in Christianity, every Christian denomination has wanted to be in control of the place. This has led to violation of each other’s rights and a series of disputes and fights between the concerned sects. These disputes and fights have generally broken out among Greek Orthodox, Armenian and Catholic Latin communities. The Ottoman administration used to proclaim the rights on the Church they granted to these religious communities by issuing edicts. Thus, they not only protected their rights but also prevented disputes from arising. The fact that Catholics wanted to install an organ in the Church in the 19th. Century led to disputes among Greek and Armenian churches. Since this was not an old problem, it was not resolved by edicts but by deciding to go on using the organ as it had been used before. After the issue was resolved, the Catholics installed a second big organ in the Church and rekindled the old disputes. This study gives information on the rights and number of the Catholic community in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and deals with the disputes regarding the organ they want to install in the Church. Also, the solution the Ottoman Administration found for the organ problem and their attitude towards the problem are dealt with in this study

  6. Holy Chic...

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    Tiivistelmä Opinnäytetyöni on kansainvälisille markkinoille suunnattu yksilöllisistä tuotteista ja laadukkaista materiaaleista koostuva mallisto nykypäivän nomadi naiselle. Lähtökohtina on minun subjektiivinen näkemys siitä miltä haluan kansainvälisen naisen näyttävän kun puhutaan globaaleista nomadeista jotka kiertävät maailmaa etsiessään omaa paikkaansa tai haluttomuudestaan asettua aloilleen vain yhteen maantieteelliseen lokaatioon. Mallistoni yhtenä tärkeimpänä periaatte...

  7. Holy Smoke!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2011-01-01

    On 27 September WADA announced that nicotine has been added to the monitoring program. "It is NOT WADA’s intention to target smokers, rather to monitor the effects nicotine can have on performance when taken in oral tobacco products such as snus". This means that snus will not be on the prohibited...... and snus users? The editorial discusses theses questions and concludes with a challenging hypothesis on the motives for WADA's initiative....

  8. Holy Mackerel

    OpenAIRE

    Carrigy, Aoife

    2014-01-01

    Hi folks. My name is Aoife Carrigy and I’m a freelance food, wine and travel writer based in Dublin, Ireland. Having spent many happy years working front-of-house in restaurants – combined with dallies in book publishing, stints of teaching English and journalism, posts as restaurant reviewer for various free-sheets, and adventures in travel including a job as a cook on a 4WD tour of Australia’s north-west outback – I was lucky enough to work full-time as Deputy Editor of Ireland’s FOOD&WI...

  9. How High Can A Mountain Be ?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    tain is limited by a weak stratum in gently sloping sedimentary rock—a case not uncommon on earth. However, the simple argument below shows that it is not a sufficient condition in the simplest case of a mountain made of a homogeneous rock. Consider a long hill, i.e. a ridge, of uniform cross section as shown in Fig.

  10. Mountain Plover [ds109

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Point locations representing observations of mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) feeding and roosting flocks (and occasional individuals) documented during an...

  11. Effect of Vocalization of the Holy Quran With and Without Translation on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Sehhati Shafaie, Fahimeh; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Jabbari, Batoul

    2016-09-01

    During recent decades, research in Iran in the area of the Quran and medical science has been seriously engaged in. With respect to the tendency toward spirituality and alternative medicine, we tried to find other aspects of the influence of the Quran. This study aimed to determine the effect of vocalizations of the Holy Quran with and without translation on the consequences of pregnancy (the prevalence of preterm delivery, caesarean delivery, and neonatal anthropometric indices) in women admitted to health care centers in Urmia, Iran. This was a three-armed parallel-group randomized clinical trial in which 168 pregnant women (25-28 weeks) in their first and second pregnancies were divided into three groups of 56 (Holy Quran with translation, Holy Quran without translation, and control group) by randomized blocking. The intervention was implemented once a week for three weeks in the health center, and on other days of the week, the participants listened at home to a CD they were given. The intervention and the control groups all received routine pregnancy care once a week. These mothers were tracked during their labor. Outcomes including gestational age at delivery, delivery type, and neonatal anthropometric indices were recorded based on the mother's records. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of demographic and obstetric characteristics before the intervention. In comparison with the control group, the probability of preterm delivery was lower in the Holy Quran with translation group (odds ratio: 0.3, CI 95%: 0.1-1.2) and in the Holy Quran without translation group (0.6, 0.2-1.9) as compared to the control group. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Similarly, the probability of caesarean delivery was lower in the Holy Quran with translation group (0.6, 0.3-1.4) and the Holy Quran without translation group (0.5, 0.2-1.2) as compared to the control group. Based on one-way ANOVA, there was no

  12. The cosmic statements in the Holy Quran as introduction to the public understanding of space science in the Islamic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalam Shaltout, M. A.

    The Holy Quran contains more than 800 cosmic statements speak about: sun, moon, planets, stars, Sirius, zodiac, day, night, twilights, position of stars, navigation, blue sky, night sky, dawn, noon, sunrise and sunset, eclipses, lunar months, release to the sky, landing to the earth, and so on. Due to the new discoveries in the 19th and 20th centuries in astronomy and space sciences, some of the Arabian-Islamic scientists and astronomers wished to find the significance of the cosmic statements in the Holy Quran on the light of these new discoveries. This current started at the end of the 19th century, and was growing through the 20th century. Hundreds of the articles published in the Daily news, and in the Weekly, Monthly, Quarterly, Annually Journals. Also, tens of the books published for different authors, from different Arabian and Islamic countries about the significance of the cosmic statements in the Holy Quran on the light of modern astronomy and Space sciences. Also, Radio and TV play an important role in this field, specially after the releasing of the Human kind to the space in the second half of the 20th century. This activity led to construct the International Commission on Scientific Signs in the Holy Quran and the Sunnah, which follow to the Muslim World League in Makkah Al-Mukarramah in Saudi Arabia. Where, there is a Quarterly Journal for this purpose, and periodic International conference for the same purpose, the seventh conference was held in February 2004. This paper speak about the activity of the different Arabian-Islamic Scientists and Astronomers in the field of interpretations of the cosmic statements in the Holy Quran on the light of modern astronomy and space science, and their role of increasing the public understanding of space science in the Arabian and Islamic countries.

  13. A narrative review on fasting of pregnant women in the holy month of Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Alireza Mirsane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic rituals of Islam is fasting during Ramadan. In this month, all able-bodied Muslims abstain from food, fluids, smoking, and oral medications from sunrise to sunset. According to the Quran, if fasting poses major health risks to individuals, fasting during this holy month is not allowed. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fasting on maternal and fetal health. Therefore, we investigated studies in three different areas, including fetal growth and development, intrauterine and early-life conditions, and laboratory findings. According to the results, fasting had no significant effect on pregnant and healthy women. However, further studies should be conducted in this area in order to obtain more comprehensive and accurate results. Furthermore, it is suggested that healthy pregnant women be monitored by physicians during fasting.

  14. Variation of Zipf's exponent in one hundred live languages: A study of the Holy Bible translations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, Ali; Jamaati, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Zipf's law, as a power-law regularity, confirms long-range correlations between the elements in natural and artificial systems. In this article, this law is evaluated for one hundred live languages. We calculate Zipf's exponent for translations of the holy Bible to several languages, for this purpose. The results show that, the average of Zipf's exponent in studied texts is slightly above unity. All studied languages in some families have Zipf's exponent lower/higher than unity. It seems that geographical distribution impresses the communication between speakers of different languages in a language family, and affect similarity between their Zipf's exponent. The Bible has unique concept regardless of its language, but the discrepancy in grammatical rules and syntactic regularities in applying stop words to make sentences and imply a certain concept, lead to difference in Zipf's exponent for various languages.

  15. Tolerance in heart transplantation: the Holy Grail, or an attainable goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N

    2007-01-01

    The father of cardiac transplantation, Norman Shumway, famously predicted that tolerance was the future of the field, and always would be. Although his prediction remains true to date, significant progress has been made toward this goal, the "Holy Grail" for transplant clinicians. Current efforts are fueled by disappointing long-term outcomes associated with chronic immunosuppression, and the promise that partial or complete tolerance will impact long-term results favorably. This article provides a clinical definition of tolerance primarily based on lessons learned from animal heart allograft models. It reviews several promising strategies for inducing tolerance and detecting its presence through the use of biomarkers in peripheral blood or the graft, and outlines a possible path toward making this vision a clinical reality.

  16. Models of Holiness: Devotionals and Hagiographies to Saint Benedict of Palermo in New Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael CASTAÑEDA GARCÍA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is the hagiographies and novenas to San Benito de Palermo that circulated in the territories of New Spain, most of which were produced locally in the 18th and 19th centuries. While these devotional books can be used as a means of taking the measure of official holiness during the years of their publication, upon closer analysis this body of religious literature reveals the virtues and attributes of this Sicilian Saint that descended upon, among others, people of African descent. For this reason, the discussion surrounding his «skin color» constituted the principal obstacle against which this Negro Franciscan found himself struggling constantly. In the final section, the paper highlights the role of the Franciscans in New Spain during the colonial period in America as the community that, through the medium of the printing press, most strongly promoted the cult of this illustrious figure. 

  17. Mountain Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene D. Amman; Mark D. McGregor; Robert E. Jr. Dolph

    1989-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a member of a group of beetles known as bark beetles: Except when adults emerge and attack new trees, the mountain pine beetle completes its life cycle under the bark. The beetle attacks and kills lodgepole, ponderosa, sugar, and western white pines. Outbreaks frequently develop in lodgepole pine stands that...

  18. Model for predicting mountain wave field uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe; Plougonven, Riwal

    2017-04-01

    Studying the propagation of acoustic waves throughout troposphere requires knowledge of wind speed and temperature gradients from the ground up to about 10-20 km. Typical planetary boundary layers flows are known to present vertical low level shears that can interact with mountain waves, thereby triggering small-scale disturbances. Resolving these fluctuations for long-range propagation problems is, however, not feasible because of computer memory/time restrictions and thus, they need to be parameterized. When the disturbances are small enough, these fluctuations can be described by linear equations. Previous works by co-authors have shown that the critical layer dynamics that occur near the ground produces large horizontal flows and buoyancy disturbances that result in intense downslope winds and gravity wave breaking. While these phenomena manifest almost systematically for high Richardson numbers and when the boundary layer depth is relatively small compare to the mountain height, the process by which static stability affects downslope winds remains unclear. In the present work, new linear mountain gravity wave solutions are tested against numerical predictions obtained with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For Richardson numbers typically larger than unity, the mesoscale model is used to quantify the effect of neglected nonlinear terms on downslope winds and mountain wave patterns. At these regimes, the large downslope winds transport warm air, a so called "Foehn" effect than can impact sound propagation properties. The sensitivity of small-scale disturbances to Richardson number is quantified using two-dimensional spectral analysis. It is shown through a pilot study of subgrid scale fluctuations of boundary layer flows over realistic mountains that the cross-spectrum of mountain wave field is made up of the same components found in WRF simulations. The impact of each individual component on acoustic wave propagation is discussed in terms of

  19. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Timeline

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document details all of the major events having occurred at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal from it's establishment on May 2, 1942 up through the document's release...

  20. Diurnal variation of mountain waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain waves could be modified as the boundary layer varies between stable and convective. However case studies show mountain waves day and night, and above e.g. convective rolls with precipitation lines over mountains. VHF radar measurements of vertical wind (1990–2006 confirm a seasonal variation of mountain-wave amplitude, yet there is little diurnal variation of amplitude. Mountain-wave azimuth shows possible diurnal variation compared to wind rotation across the boundary layer.

  1. Study on Corrosion Inhibition Efficiency of Stem Alkaloid Extract of Different Varieties of Holy Basil on Aluminium in HCl Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpawat, Nutan; Chaturvedi, Alok; Upadhyay, R. K. [Synthetic and Surface Science Laboratory, Ajmer (India)

    2012-08-15

    Corrosion inhibition efficiencies of holy basil on Al in HCl solution were studied by weight loss and thermometric methods in presence and in absence of stem extract of three different varieties of holy basil viz. ocimum basilicum (E{sub B}), ocimum canum (E{sub C}) and ocimum sanctum (E{sub S}). Inhibition efficiency increases with the increasing concentration of stem extract and decreases with increases in acid strength. Results show that all varieties under study are good corrosion inhibitors, among which, E{sub B} is most effective. Maximum inhibition efficiency was found 97.09% in 0.5N HCl solution with 0.6% stem extract. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm indicates that surface coverage also increases with increasing in the concentration of extract of stem in HCl solution.

  2. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  3. Effects of fasting in the holy month of Ramadan on the uric acid, urea, and creatinine levels: A narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Alireza Mirsane; Shima Shafagh; Nasrin Oraei

    2016-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. During this holy month, healthy Muslims abstain from eating, drinking, and smoking from dawn to dusk. Although fasting is obligatory for every adult Muslim, if it has hazardous effects on the body, it is prohibited. Due to some Islamic principles, patients are exempted from fasting; however, due to the willingness of some individuals to fast, there are concerns about its effects on urea, uric acid, and creatine levels. A...

  4. The Effect of Holy Qur'an Recitation on Depressive Symptoms in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Sotodehasl, Nemat; Koenig, Harold G; Al Zaben, Faten; Jahani, Changiz; Ghorbani, Raheb

    2017-02-01

    Patients with advanced renal failure often face considerable sociopsychological stress as a result of lifestyle changes due to the disease and its treatment. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of the Holy Qur'an recitation on depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients. In this clinical trial, 54 hemodialysis patients were randomized to either an experimental (n = 27) or a control (n = 27) group. Patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline and at 1 month after the intervention. Participants in the experimental group listened to recitation of the Holy Qur'an, while those in the control group received no intervention. The mean BDI-II score at baseline was 33.6 (±6.7) for the experimental group and 29.3 (±9.0) for the control group; at the end of treatment, BDI-II scores in the experimental and control groups were 14.5 (±4.8) and 31.6 (±9.2), respectively. Results from the repeated-measures general linear model controlling for baseline differences indicated a significant treatment effect (F = 9.30, p = 0.004, Cohen's d = 0.85). Holy Qur'an recitation has a significant effect on lowering depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients. Holy Qur'an recitation is an easy-to-implement and cost-effective strategy that may be used to supplement the treatment of depression in this setting in Iran.

  5. The Holy Office Against Fascism: Book Censorship and the Political Independence of the Church (1928–1931

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies into the activity of the Congregation of the Index and of the Holy Office have examined extensively the history of Vatican’s practices of book censorship. While up until the sixteenth century the Church imposed substantial modifications to literary texts, mainly in order to moralise them, in the seventeenth and eighteenth century it used book censorship to preserve ecclesiastical doctrine and its own power. In the nineteenth century the Roman Inquisition aimed to discredit noxious literature – and the dangerous ideas it contained – through its inclusion in the Index of Prohibited Books. In the twentieth century, when the Church’s secular power was fading, the Holy Office reacted against modernism thus intensifying its campaign against pernicious literature, seen as the main medium through which modernist ideas could infiltrate public opinion.During the papacy of Pius XI, in particular, the policies of the Holy Office mainly aimed to support the interventionism of the Holy See and its attempts to ‘catholicise’ public opinion and society. The Italian case renders a clear picture of a transformed Roman Inquisition: analysing the proceedings against Gabriele d’Annunzio (Opera omnia, 1928 and Mario Missiroli (Date a Cesare, 1929 this paper will demonstrate how the Roman Index and literary censorship stood out as the core of the Church’s relentless attempt to forge a ‘catholicised’ society between the two wars and to regain – through the forbiddance of authors and books closely linked to fascism – the political and social influence that Mussolini threatened to take-over before and in the aftermath of the Concordate of 1929. 

  6. The Culture of Experimentalism in the Holy Roman Empire: Johann Christoph Sturm (1635-1703) and the Collegium Experimentale

    OpenAIRE

    Ahnert, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    From the second half of the seventeenth century systematic experimentation had increasingly come to be seen as a crucial means of producing and testing natural philosophical theories. The institutions, that are most famous for applying this experimental method, are societies such as the Royal Society in London or the Accademia del Cimento in Florence. In my paper I focus on an important example of experimentalist culture and its context in the Holy Roman Empire which has received little atten...

  7. The Significant Role of the Intellect in Confronting Contemporary Global Challenges: The Taught of the Holy Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Naghipour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Islamic world is confronting constant challenges in terms of physical and spiritual, as a whole. Living in such challenging atmosphere persuades Muslims to develop proper strategies for handling ongoing crises in a way arguably compatible with the Islamic codes and practices, as well as the fast growing universal demands. This paper, based on the taught of the Holy Quran, aimed to finding out a modest approach to handling the contemporary challenges. The Islamic approach towards the historical challenges, such as the way in dealing with unbelievers and intellectuals of other religions, was of special interest in this paper. Deep analysis of selected verses of the Holy Quran reveals that paying full attention to the special requirements for every time and place and having precise understanding of different nations’ haracteristics; their values and way of thinking are among the most important factors of tackling challenges in every time. The Holy Quran teaches us that having rational and intellectual exchanges even with unbelievers are among the most important tools for the Muslims to overcome their challenges. In conclusion, Islam appreciates the role of the intellect and chooses a reasonable and convincing manner in confronting important challenges all over the time.

  8. A comparison of cross-country mountain destination importance performance as perceived by international and domestic tourists: a cast study of Mt. Huang (China and Mt. Seorak (South Korea

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    Renuka Newpaney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examine visitor’s importance and destination performance with respect to tourist attractions such as the environment, adventure, social culture, accessibility and relaxation of participants at Mt. Huang and Mt. Seorak respectively. This study identified the demographic characteristics of visitors to both mountain destinations. The researchers used the Importance Performed Analysis (IPA method to identify the importance and satisfaction levels of various attributes of both Mt. Huang and Mt. Seorak. They identified that the most important attributes sought after related to the natural environment, mountaineering, knowledge and information sharing, value of money and escape from a mundane daily job routine, while the least important would relate to mountain sports and the localities' inviting ambience for both mountain destinations. Using a simple questionnaire sample procedure, 247 visitors were considered in order to determine what the visitor’s deemed to be important, and what was satisfying from a destination performance perspective. SPSS 17 was used to analyze the data in different stages and pilot testing was conducted. The finding of this study can be helpful for tourist decision-makers in the public and private sectors. It is also useful to improve tourism services and to develop strategies for greater tourism promotion to the two destinations. Furthermore, this study can be a powerful source of input for destination promotion and positioning activities.

  9. Impacts of glacier recession and declining meltwater on mountain societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, Mark; Molden, Olivia C.; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2017-01-01

    Glacierized mountains are often referred to as our world's water towers because glaciers both store water over time and regulate seasonal stream flow, releasing runoff during dry seasons when societies most need water. Ice loss thus has the potential to affect human societies in diverse ways, inc...... around ice and climate. By systematically evaluating human impacts in different mountain regions, the article strives to stimulate cross-regional thinking and inspire new studies on glaciers, hydrology, risk, adaptation, and human–environment interactions in mountain regions....

  10. TL glow curve analysis of UV, beta and gamma induced limestone collected from Amarnath holy cave

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    Vikas Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports themoluminescence glow curve analysis of UV (ultraviolet, β (beta and γ (gamma induced limestone collected from Amarnath holy cave. The collected natural sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD technique and crystallite size calculated by Scherer's formula. Surface morphology and particle size was calculated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM study. Effect of annealing temperature on collected lime stone examined by TL glow curve study. The limestone was irradiated by UV radiation (254 nm source and the TL glow curve recorded for different UV exposure time. For beta irradiation Sr90 source was used and is shows intense peak at 256 °C with a shoulder peak at higher temperature range. For gamma radiation Co60 source and TL glow curve recorded for different doses of gamma. The kinetic parameters calculation was performed for different glow curve by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD technique. The chemical composition of natural limestone was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS.

  11. The Chief Procurator of the Holy Synod А. А. Yakovlev and his Memoirs

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    Bezhanidze Georgii

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sphere of activities of the Chief Procurator of the Holy Synod A. Yakovlev, A. Herzen’s uncle, who left memoirs about his work in the Synod. The paper examines his origins and background, family life and personal qualities. The authors of the paper have compared Yakovlev’s memoirs with archival materials. It is shown that Yakovlev’s memoirs cannot be considered a reliable source. According to the opinion widespread in historiography, Yakovlev’s activities were the fi rst step in increasing the role of the Chief Procurator’s office. Yakovlev’s projects, aimed at strengthening the control functions of the Chief Procurator, gained no support from the Emperor. The monarch did not take the side of the Chief Procurator in his confl ict with the episcopate. Yakovlev’s resignation was caused by the need to find a post for A. Golitsin, the personal friend of Alexander I. Yakovlev did not wish to resign, which led to his resentment being reflected in his notes. This fact cannot be ignored when using Yakovlev’s memoirs as a historical source. The ministerial principle in church administration indeed came to be implemented in the 19th century, but the activities of the Chief Procurator A. Yakovlev had nothing to do with this process.

  12. Holy Terror, Batman! Frank Miller’s Dark Knight and the Superhero as Hardboiled Terrorist

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    Daniele Croci

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Conceived in the late thirties as “bold humanist response to Depression-era fears of runaway scientific advance and soulless industrialism” (Morrison 2012, 6, the superhero has flourished as one of the most resilient archetypes of American popular culture. This essay analyses the literary and cultural contaminations that have engendered an unprecedented revision of the paradigm since the 1980s. In particular, it will take into account three graphic novels by American cartoonist Frank Miller (1957 - , one of leading figures of the mainstream comics renaissance, whose ideas have indelibly influenced the artistic development of both medium and genre. The Dark Knight Returns (1986, The Dark Knight Strikes Again (2002 and Holy Terror (2011 constitute an ideal Batman trilogy that charts the character’s evolution as political counterpoint to the perceived crisis of American identity. In this regard, Reaganism and 9/11 are polarized as historical discontinuities triggering the need for a new kind of a criminal (superhero. It will be in fact demonstrated how the novels hybridise the latent generic links to hardboiled pulp novels (R. Chandler, D. Hammet with narrative and aesthetics elements appropriated from the culturally-received concepts of terrorism and terrorists. This fruitful contamination on the one hand “play[s] with reader assumptions about genre” (Baetens and Frey 2015, 46, while on the other hand deconstructs the ideological underpinnings of the archetype, as the moral dichotomy and the alienation of justice from the law.

  13. Erosion protection Phytoreinforcement of SCARP steep slopes of the holy virgin’s DITCH

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    Darchiya Valentina Ivanovna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Erosion protection landscaping embedment of steep subsoil slopes is a time-sensitive issue of road construction and planning of recreational area that are often fit on a challenging picturesque terrain unsuitable for site development. The article provides the results of a 4-year experiment on landscaping and plant fixing of up to 4.5 m soil slopes with 1:1 and 2:1 grades; the experiment was carried out by the MGSU on the territory of a convent in the south of the Nizhniy Novgorod region. The site has slopes oriented towards all cardinals. At some places the slopes are bedimmed by trees. All these factors create a wide range of geo-ecological conditions for lawns. All the slopes are fixed with geo-fibrefill grids; slopes with 2:1 grade are strengthened by auxiliary grids made of reinforced metal bars, anchors and braces on the bottom of the Holy Moat. The paper recommends composition of grass plants as well as techniques to build up lawns suitable for various micro-climate conditions. It also advises the structure of multi-tier plant entity. The suggested methods are tested during a 3-year maintenance of slopes built for constant use.

  14. Loyalty and Disavowal in Holy Qur’an Descriptive linguistic study

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    Iman Kanani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to clarify the meaning of loyalty and disavowal from linguistic point of view, between the views of linguists, and the exegetes in the Lexicons and exegeses with analysis and debate. First of all, the researcher Indicates definition of loyalty as stated in the dictionaries, with bringing the examples from the Holy Qur’an and the views of the commentators about this issue, then analysis and discussion. Second, he defines Disavowal in the language, with a point of view from linguists, and interpreters, by analyzing and discussion the examples from the Noble Qur’an. Finally, it illustrates the application of the legal and practical concept of loyalty and disavowal, to enhance the significance of language. The importance of the current study is- according to researcher’s information- due to its doctrinal and sociological matter and nobody precede such a linguistic study of Loyalty. This research approaches the issue, using the method of descriptive and analytical, based on the description and analysis of the phenomenon.

  15. Radio protective effects of the Ayurvedic medicinal plant Ocimum sanctum Linn. (Holy Basil: A memoir

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    Manjeshwar Shrinath Baliga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of compounds which can selectively protect normal tissues against radiation injury is of immense use because in addition to it protecting the normal tissue, will also permits use of higher doses of radiation to obtain better cancer control and possible cure. However, most of the radio protective compounds investigated possess inadequate clinical application principally due to their inherent systemic toxicity at their optimal protective concentrations. Plants commonly used as medicinal and dietary agents have recently been the focus of attention and studies have shown that Ocimum sanctum Linn. commonly known as the Holy Basil and its water soluble flavonoids, orientin and vicenin protects experimental animals against the radiation-induced sickness and mortality at nontoxic concentrations. Studies with tumor bearing mice have also shown that both Tulsi extract and its flavonoids selectively protect the normal tissues against the tumoricidal effects of radiation. Preclinical studies have also shown that the aqueous extract of the Tulsi leaves; its flavanoids orientin and vicenin, and eugenol, the principal nonpolar constituent present in Tulsi prevent radiation-induced clastogenesis. Mechanistic studies have indicated that free radical scavenging, antioxidant, metal chelating and anti-inflammatory effects may contribute toward the observed protection. In addition, clinical studies with a small number of patients have shown that Tulsi was effective as a radio protective agent. This review summarizes the results related to the radio protective properties of Tulsi and its phytochemicals and also emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research to establish its use as a radio protective agent.

  16. Radio protective effects of the Ayurvedic medicinal plant Ocimum sanctum Linn. (Holy Basil): A memoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Rao, Suresh; Rai, Manoj P; D'souza, Prema

    2016-01-01

    The use of compounds which can selectively protect normal tissues against radiation injury is of immense use because in addition to it protecting the normal tissue, will also permits use of higher doses of radiation to obtain better cancer control and possible cure. However, most of the radio protective compounds investigated possess inadequate clinical application principally due to their inherent systemic toxicity at their optimal protective concentrations. Plants commonly used as medicinal and dietary agents have recently been the focus of attention and studies have shown that Ocimum sanctum Linn. commonly known as the Holy Basil and its water soluble flavonoids, orientin and vicenin protects experimental animals against the radiation-induced sickness and mortality at nontoxic concentrations. Studies with tumor bearing mice have also shown that both Tulsi extract and its flavonoids selectively protect the normal tissues against the tumoricidal effects of radiation. Preclinical studies have also shown that the aqueous extract of the Tulsi leaves; its flavanoids orientin and vicenin, and eugenol, the principal nonpolar constituent present in Tulsi prevent radiation-induced clastogenesis. Mechanistic studies have indicated that free radical scavenging, antioxidant, metal chelating and anti-inflammatory effects may contribute toward the observed protection. In addition, clinical studies with a small number of patients have shown that Tulsi was effective as a radio protective agent. This review summarizes the results related to the radio protective properties of Tulsi and its phytochemicals and also emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research to establish its use as a radio protective agent.

  17. A new network on mountain geomorphosites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Christian

    2013-04-01

    economy are quite scarce. There is, therefore, a real need to fill the gap of empirical data on the social-economical impacts of geotourism, and on the relationship between the geotourist products developed by the scientific community and the expectations of the public and the tourist sector. The collaboration with social scientists (economists, sociologists) will help to fulfill this objective. - Environmental education: During the last years, a lot of work has been done on the assessment of geoheritage and the selection of sites worthy of promotion and/or protection but few attempts have addressed the question of using geoheritage to communicate on more general issues such as the dynamics and sensitivity of mountain environments or the impacts of climate change on mountain areas. It is, therefore, necessary to develop communication and learning methods - in particular by using new communication technologies - to improve environmental education based on geoheritage site promotion for several kinds of publics, in particular tourists (to improve their awareness of the sensitivity of mountain environments) and scholars. These three research objectives will be fulfilled by the development of common research, in particular cross-border case studies, and by the elaboration of specific courses for Ph.D. and master students. Collaboration with existing mountain networks (scientific, nature parks, etc.) is expected.

  18. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  19. The behavior of Turkish cancer patients in fasting during the holy month of Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Faruk; Karabulut, Senem; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Keskin, Serkan; Kilic, Leyla; Disci, Rian

    2014-08-01

    Fasting during the holy month of Ramadan is one of the major obligations for all adult Muslims. We performed a survey of Turkish Muslim cancer patients to examine the extent of their fasting status and to compare various clinical characteristics of fasting and non-fasting cancer patients during the month of Ramadan. This study was conducted on 701 adult cancer patients who attended ambulatory patient care units answered the questionnaires. The population comprised 445 women (63.5%), and the median age was 54 years. Before diagnosis of cancer, 93.1% of the patients used fast consists of completely (78.3%) and partial (14.8%). However, 15% of cases were fasting on the day of interview, either partially (7.4%) or completely (7.6%) with equal distributions. Patients who were females, those with good performance status, those without any comorbid disease, who had non-metastatic disease, those with history of surgery, those treated with radiotherapy and those being treated with oral chemotherapeutic agents were more likely to be fasting than others. The fasting ones had more prevalent among patients with lymphoma, urogenital cancer and breast cancer; conversely, the rate of fasting status among patients with lung and gastrointestinal cancer was quite low. Only 20.8% of all patients asked their physician whether it was alright for them to fast and physicians generally had a negative attitude towards fasting (83.2%). Majority of cancer patients are not fasting during the month of Ramadan, and a small part of patients consult this situation to their physician. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Ceramics Praises the Psalms.”The Holy Trinity” Church from Siret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Simionescu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ”The Holy Trinity” (”Sfânta Treime” church from Siret by tradition, should be the oldest monument in the form a clover of the religious architecture of Moldavia. By its architectural and decorative elements, the exterior of this church entirely foreshadows the artistic virtues of monuments from the time of Petru I Muşat. Therefore, the apses have a series of niches elongated at their edges with semicircular arches and decorated in tambourines with bricks. Values are plan and decoration items speaking about relations with the Byzantine-Balkan world. The outside consisting of rough gray-green stone of the monument is refreshed by a bright and harmonious scenery of ceramic ornaments made out of bricks, leg discs in the form of mushrooms and cruciform colored flowers. At the top of the monument, about two thirds of the height of the walls (from the pedestal upwards, there can be seen a frieze consisting of two rows of discs alternating with cruciform flowers. They range from the apses (the south side as well all the way up to the window of the narthex. The semicircular arches of brick niches are also sharpened by a row of discs alternating with cruciform flowers. The windows with the exception of the one of the northern apse are decorated at the top with one rectangular frame consisting of two rows of glazed discs and three cruciform flowers, all framed by glazed bricks (either plain or coloured. The same decoration can also be seen at the niche above the entrance door destined for the church icon. Above this frame, there can be seen a cornice made out of bricks arranged in a zig zag pattern. The continuous development and enrichment of the ceramic façade during the next century will lead to the finishing touches, in the reign of Stefan cel Mare (Stephen the Great, of a harmonious and original decorative.

  1. Air Quality in Mecca and Surrounding Holy Places in Saudi Arabia during Hajj: Initial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Barletta, B.; Blake, N. J.; Gartner, A.; Khwaja, H. A.; Meinardi, S.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Peninsula experiences severe air pollution yet is highly understudied in terms of surface measurements of ozone and its precursors. Every year the air pollution in Saudi Arabia is intensified by additional traffic and activities during Hajj, the world's largest religious pilgrimage that draws 3‒4 million pilgrims to Mecca (population of 2 million). Using whole air sampling and high-precision measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and 97 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), we performed an initial survey of air quality in Mecca, its tunnels, and surrounding holy sites during the 2012 Hajj (October 24-27; n = 77). This is the first time such a campaign has been undertaken. Levels of the combustion tracer CO and numerous VOCs were strongly elevated along the pilgrimage route, especially in the tunnels of Mecca, and are a concern for human health. For example CO reached 57 ppmv in the tunnels, exceeding the 30-min exposure guideline of 50 ppmv. Benzene, a known carcinogen, reached 185 ppbv in the tunnels, exceeding the 1-hr exposure limit of 9 ppbv. The gasoline evaporation tracer i-pentane was the most abundant VOC during Hajj, reaching 1200 ppbv in the tunnels. Even though VOC concentrations were generally lower during a follow-up non-Hajj sampling period (April, 2013), many were still comparable to other large cities suffering from poor air quality. Major VOC sources during Hajj included vehicular exhaust, gasoline evaporation, liquefied petroleum gas, and air conditioners. Of the measured compounds, reactive alkenes (associated with gasoline evaporation) and CO showed the strongest potential to form ground-level ozone. Therefore efforts to curb ozone formation likely require dual targeting of both combustive and evaporative fossil fuel sources. However, modeling and other measurements (e.g., nitrogen oxides) are also needed to fully understand Mecca's oxidative environment. We also present specific recommendations to reduce VOC emissions and exposure in

  2. Dust in the wind: Soiling of solar devices : Is there a Holy Grail solution? (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence; Costa, Suellen C.; Machado, Marcelo; Diniz, Antonia Sonia A. C.

    2016-09-01

    Soiling, the sedimentation of particulate matter (on the size scale of 1/10 the diameter of a human hair) on the exposed surfaces of solar collectors, is a growing area of concern for solar-system performance, reliability, maintenance, and cost. In the case of photovoltaics (PV), the condition of this first-surface of interaction of the incident photons is critical for ensuring that the maximum-possible light reaches the conversion devices. This paper begins with a more than seven-decade historical look at the research invested into this problem, highlighting the motivation and milestones; the researchers and the progress. The current growing terrestrial markets for solar have brought a new focus on soiling and dust issues. That is because many of these new markets in the solar-rich geographic regions of our world are ironically also in the most dust-rich and soiling-prone ones as well. This paper continues to provide an overview of the status of current research efforts toward understanding the basic soiling mechanisms, the relationships to the PV technology approaches, the geographical differences (highlighting Brasil, India, and the MENA region) in the severity of the problem, the dust physics and chemistry—all relating to the current and future mitigation approaches. Included are some fundamental microscale through nanoscale examinations at how individual dust particles adhere to module glass surfaces—as well as how the particles might stick to each other under certain environmental conditions. These observations are used to show how fundamental science may lead to the macroscale engineering solutions of these soiling problems. This presentation is designed to both overview the soiling area and highlight some of the current and future research directions, speculate on short-term approaches preventing solar showstoppers, and speculate on some "holy-grail" schemes that might lead to the final solutions.

  3. Rocky Mountain Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jody Steiner, Ed.

    This publication features articles detailing the state of educational programs in the Rocky Mountain area. The articles address: 1) the impact of physical geography on culture, education, and lifestyle; 2) the education of migrant and/or agricultural workers and their children; 3) educational needs of children in rural areas; 4) outdoor education;…

  4. Rocky Mountain High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes Colorado's Eagle Rock School, which offers troubled teens a fresh start by transporting them to a tuition- free campus high in the mountains. The program encourages spiritual development as well as academic growth. The atmosphere is warm, loving, structured, and nonthreatening. The article profiles several students' experiences at the…

  5. Ocular hazards of the colors used during the festival-of-colors (Holi) in India--malachite green toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpandian, T; Saha, K; Ravi, A K; Kumari, S S; Biswas, N R; Ghose, S

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the nature of the colors used and their toxicity to the eye upon exposure to them during celebration of Holi (our festival-of-colors). Color powders and formulations were procured at random in and around Delhi during the festival. The green/bluish-green colors reported with the higher incidence of ocular toxicity were subjected for further evaluation. Eyewash fluid collected from the patients exposed to the colors was also subjected for analysis. This study was further extended to evaluate the corneal penetration of malachite green using goat cornea in perfusion chamber. In 16/18 color samples collected, malachite green or 4-[(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-phenyl-methyl]-N,N-dimethyl-aniline was detected at different concentrations. In the eyewash fluid of four patients, HPLC estimation confirmed the presence of malachite green at concentrations of 1.3, 0.18, 3.5 and 5.4 microg in 250 ml which was responsible for its reported toxicity. The in vitrotrans-corneal penetration studies did not show any detectable amount of malachite green in effluent fluid-in vitro tissue retention studies revealed that increasing the contact time increases tissue concentration. After 2 min of exposure, the tissue concentration was significantly higher. To conclude, malachite green was extensively used in our festival of Holi and has caused severe ocular irritation with epithelial defect upon exposure, though it did not penetrate through the cornea-further in vitro and in vivo studies are required on colors used in Holi.

  6. The Debate about the Procession of the Holy Spirit in Constantinople in the 30s of the 14th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaeva Elga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an episode of the controversy focussed on the Filioque doctrine between the Eastern and Western Churches in the 30s of the 14th century. We put aside the issue of methodological differences between the participants of the debate and consider only its dogmatic content. We present the historical context and the interrelationship of sources. The reconstruction of Catholic argumentation based on the analysis of recently published original versions of the basic texts of their Orthodox opponents, Barlaam the Calabrian and St. Gregory Palamas (preserved only in Serbian-Church-Slavonic translation is proposed. It is shown that in terms of content the argumentation of Barlaam and Palamas coincides in many aspects. Their main argument is based on the distinction between “natural” and “hypostatic” properties in the Trinity, as well as on the distinction between the eternal procession of the Holy Spirit and his descent to the creature. The only signifi cant difference between their positions is their perception of the Latins’ thesis of procession of the Holy Spirit from the Father and the Son, “as from the one Source”. This very difference caused the continuation of discussions on the Orthodox ground. We note the development in reasoning, proposed by both authors during the second stage of the discussion. It is concluded that Barlaam’s and Palama’s defense of the doctrine of the procession of the Holy Spirit “a solo Patre” starts from common points and that the negative assessment of Barlaam’s work by St. Gregory Palamas should not be associated with it’s dogmatic content, but with different methodological orientations of the authors, as well as with the Gregory’s misunderstanding of the Barlaam’s thesis.

  7. The Adaption of the Idea of Divine Message in Both Old and New Testamnets and the Holy Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemati Pirali, D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The way by which god communicates with human is considered as one of the most importatnt issues in the theological discussions of Abrahamic religions. According to the old testament teachings, the purpose of the inculcation of divine message is to notify god religion to B'nai Israel (children of Isreal through the chosen god servants and to establish a divine orders obliged based monotheistic society in the holy land. On the other hand, due to its specific understanding of human and divine message , the Christianity offers different concepts, ways and objectives. In this construe, the concept of divine message has been digressioned from its original definition and has been changed to the visualization of Allah (God within the shape of human aiming at complete exploration of divine attributes through making god to be attended among his servants and relasing them from the bound of god orders as well as purification them form inherent sins. In this idea, human is unable to promote himself without visualizing god. The holy Quran Kareem, determines divine message through methods similar to and adopted from those of old testament. The only difference is that in this definition the addressees of the divine message are not given groups of human and its purpose is to promote human being up to "god servant" level as well as to manifest divine attributes inside people by making them to be obliged to religion requirements and to be submit to the will of god. According to the teachings of these religions, the holy text of each of them has been guaranteed by god and their texts are reliable and are considered as complete proof.

  8. The Adaption of the Idea of Divine Message in Both Old and New Testamnets and the Holy Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delara Nemati Pirali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The way by which god communicates with human is considered as one of the most importatnt issues in the theological discussions of Abrahamic religions. According to the old testament teachings, the purpose of the inculcation of divine message is to notify god religion to B'nai Israel (children of Isreal through the chosen god servants and to establish a divine orders obliged based monotheistic society in the holy land. On the other hand, due to its specific understanding of human and divine message , the Christianity offers different concepts, ways and objectives. In this construe, the concept of divine message has been digressioned from its original definition and has been changed to the visualization of Allah (God within the shape of human aiming at complete exploration of divine attributes through making god to be attended among his servants and relasing them from the bound of god orders as well as purification them form inherent sins. In this idea, human is unable to promote himself without visualizing god. The holy Quran Kareem, determines divine message through methods similar to and adopted from those of old testament. The only difference is that in this definition the addressees of the divine message are not given groups of human and its purpose is to promote human being up to "god servant" level as well as to manifest divine attributes inside people by making them to be obliged to religion requirements and to be submit to the will of god. According to the teachings of these religions, the holy text of each of them has been guaranteed by god and their texts are reliable and are considered as complete proof.

  9. The Adaption of the Idea of Divine Message in Both Old and New Testamnets and the Holy Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delara Nemati Pirali

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available   The way by which god communicates with human is considered as one of the most importatnt issues in the theological discussions of Abrahamic religions. According to the old testament teachings, the purpose of the inculcation of divine message is to notify god religion to B'nai Israel (children of Isreal through the chosen god servants and to establish a divine orders obliged based monotheistic society in the holy land. On the other hand, due to its specific understanding of human and divine message , the Christianity offers different concepts, ways and objectives. In this construe, the concept of divine message has been digressioned from its original definition and has been changed to the visualization of Allah (God within the shape of human aiming at complete exploration of divine attributes through making god to be attended among his servants and relasing them from the bound of god orders as well as purification them form inherent sins. In this idea, human is unable to promote himself without visualizing god. The holy Quran Kareem, determines divine message through methods similar to and adopted from those of old testament. The only difference is that in this definition the addressees of the divine message are not given groups of human and its purpose is to promote human being up to "god servant" level as well as to manifest divine attributes inside people by making them to be obliged to religion requirements and to be submit to the will of god. According to the teachings of these religions, the holy text of each of them has been guaranteed by god and their texts are reliable and are considered as complete proof.

  10. Prediction: The Modern-Day Sport-Science and Sports-Medicine "Quest for the Holy Grail".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Alan; Fanchini, Maurizio; Coutts, Aaron J

    2017-05-01

    In high-performance sport, science and medicine practitioners employ a variety of physical and psychological tests, training and match monitoring, and injury-screening tools for a variety of reasons, mainly to predict performance, identify talented individuals, and flag when an injury will occur. The ability to "predict" outcomes such as performance, talent, or injury is arguably sport science and medicine's modern-day equivalent of the "Quest for the Holy Grail." The purpose of this invited commentary is to highlight the common misinterpretation of studies investigating association to those actually analyzing prediction and to provide practitioners with simple recommendations to quickly distinguish between methods pertaining to association and those of prediction.

  11. Holy Grails in Chemistry: Investigating and Understanding Fast Electron/Cation Coupled Transport within Inorganic Ionic Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2017-03-21

    Typically, power and energy are competing concepts in electrochemical energy storage, where one can be optimized only at the expense of the other. However, the specialized and diverse needs of new applications exceed the functional boundaries of existing battery chemistries, where both high power and high energy content are critical. The needed battery paradigms may not be realized by optimization of previous electrochemical energy storage technologies but rather require new basic science breakthroughs involving new materials chemistry. Here we propose that fundamental understanding of electron/cation coupled transport within inorganic ionic matrices is a holy grail that can potentially transform the energy storage landscape.

  12. The holy fool as a TV hero : about Pavel Lungin’s film The Island and the problem of authenticity

    OpenAIRE

    Bodin, Per-Arne

    2011-01-01

    Holy foolishness (jurodstvo in Russian), a special monastic practice in the Orthodox Church, has become an important theme in the post-Soviet Russian culture. The example that perhaps has had the greatest impact is a feature film, Ostrov, The Island from 2006 directed by Pavel Lungin. The film tells the story of one fool in Christ, father Anatolij, who after committing a serious crime has become a monk in a small monastery in the Arctic. The film gives some examples of his provocative practic...

  13. Biblical motives from the Book of Joshua and Book of Judges in the Hours about the Immaculate Conception of the Most Holy Virgin Mary

    OpenAIRE

    Krystian Ziaja

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the article is better understanding of the Hours concerning the Immaculate Conception of the Most Holy Virgin Mary. Following motives from the books of Joshua and Judges were taken into consideration: The light from Gabaon (Joshua 10, 10–13), Gedeon’s fleece (Judges 6, 36–40), Samson’s honeycomb (Judges 14, 1–11). After the discussion of the above mentioned three texts we may ascertain that the author of Hours about the Immaculate Conception of the Most Holy Virgin Mary with accura...

  14. Snowy Mountains. Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri, B.

    1959-02-01

    Full Text Available El gran macizo de Snowy Mountains sigue la dirección norte-sur en una extensión de unos 160 km, alcanzando una altitud de 2.225 metros en su pico más alto. A esta región se la llama los Alpes australianos, que están cubiertos de nieve durante casi seis meses del año.

  15. Yucca Mountain Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Rod

    1997-06-09

    The Department of Energy project to determine if the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is suitable for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste reached a major milestone in late April when a 25-foot-diameter tunnel boring machine ``holed through'' completing a five-mile-long, horseshoe-shaped excavation through the mountain. When the cutting-head of the giant machine broke through to daylight at the tunnel's south portal, it ended a 2 1/2-year excavation through the mountain that was completed ahead of schedule and with an outstanding safety record. Video of the event was transmitted live by satellite to Washington, DC, where it was watched by Secretary of Energy Frederico Pena and other high-level DOE officials, signifying the importance of the project's mission to find a repository for high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel produced by nuclear power plants. This critical undertaking is being performed by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The tunnel is the major feature of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which serves as an underground laboratory for engineers and scientists to help determine if Yucca Mountain is suitable to serve as a repository for the safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Morrison Knudsen's Environmental/Government Group is providing design and construction-management services on the project. The MK team is performing final design for the ESF and viability assessment design for the underground waste repository that will be built only if the site is found suitable for such a mission. In fact, if at anytime during the ESF phase, the site is found unsuitable, the studies will be stopped and the site restored to its natural state.

  16. Yield, Composition and Antioxidant Capacity of the Essential Oil of Sweet Basil and Holy Basil as Influenced by Distillation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwakoti, Santosh; Saleh, Osama; Poudyal, Shital; Barka, Abdulssamad; Qian, Yanping; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D

    2017-04-01

    The profile and bioactivity of essential oil (EO) depends on genetic, environmental, and other factors. We hypothesized that the basil EO may be influenced by the distillation methods. Hence, a study was conducted to evaluate the effect of steam distillation (SD) and hydrodistillation (HD) extraction method on the yield, composition, and bioactivity of EO of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and holy basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum). In both basil species, the EO yield (content) was significantly higher from SD than from HD. There were significant differences in the compounds' concentrations of EO obtained from SD and HD as well, however, the same compounds were identified in the EO from HD and SD. In the EO of O. basilicum, the concentration of 74% of the identified compounds were higher in SD than HD, whereas in the EO of O. tenuiflorum, the concentration of 84% of identified compounds were higher in SD than in HD. However, the concentrations of two of the major compounds of O. basilicum EO (estragole and methyl cinnamate) and a major compound of O. tenuiflorum EO (methyl eugenol) were significantly higher in HD than in SD. The type of distillation did not affect the antioxidant capacity of basil EO within the species. This study demonstrated that the type of distillation may significantly affect oil yield and composition but not the antioxidant capacity of the EO from sweet and holy basil. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  17. Compatibility of Education and Training in the Light of The Seerah of the Holy Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Khadija Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Humankind has been granted a special status due to its being vicegerent of Allah on earth for he has been entrusted with the responsibility to keep order in the world according to the directives of its Creator. Humans are guided by Prophets in history. Some of these Prophets have got greater value, sphere and depth of influence on humanity due to different factors. Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him is the last Prophet of Allah, for the eternity and whole humanity. After him, Islam is completed for all times to come. Islam is a complete code of life; education and training constituting its crux. Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him was greatly concerned and cognizant of education and training of his followers which is evident from multifarious events of his life. Major emphasis was laid on training coupled with education and both are, thus, inevitably interlocked with each other. It is clear that education was considered an assimilation of knowledge and training was taken as its reflection in daily life. The verses of the Holy Quran and sayings of the Holy Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him bear a perfect testimony to this aspect of foremost significance. The earlier people in the fold of Islam were much concerned about training and nurturing, hence they avoided mere memorization of facts. The present paper is an attempt to discover the compatibility between education and training in the light of the paradigm of secret of the Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him of Islam.

  18. Different pollinator assemblages ensure reproductive success of Cleisostoma linearilobatum (Orchidaceae) in fragmented holy hill forest and traditional tea garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qiang; Han, Jessie Yc; Gao, JiangYun

    2016-02-24

    Orchids are generally recognized to have specialist pollination systems and low fruit set is often thought to be characteristic of the family. In this study, we investigated the reproductive ecology of Cleisostoma linearilobatum, an epiphytic tropical orchid, in a holy hill forest fragment and a traditional tea garden in SW China using comparable methods. C. linearilobatum is self-compatible and dependent on insects for pollination. Fruit production in natural conditions was both pollinator- and resource-limited. However, the natural fruit set remained stable over multiple years at both sites. Pollination observations showed that C. linearilobatum has a generalized pollination system and seven insect species were observed as legitimate pollinators. Although the visit frequencies of different pollinators were different in the two sites, the pollinator assemblages ensured reproductive success of C. linearilobatum in both study sites over multiple years. The results partly explain why C. linearilobatum is so successful in the area, and also suggest that holy hill forest fragments and traditional tea gardens in Xishuangbanna are important in preserving orchids, especially those with generalist pollination.

  19. Road Cycling and Mountain Biking Produces Adaptations on the Spine and Hamstring Extensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, J M; Zabala, M

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were as follows: 1) to analyse the influence of training in road cycling or cross-country mountain biking on sagittal spinal curvatures, pelvic tilt and trunk inclination in cyclists of both cycling modalities; 2) to evaluate the specific spinal posture and pelvic tilt adopted on the road bicycle and cross-country mountain bike; and 3) to compare the spinal sagittal capacity of flexion and pelvic tilt mobility as well as hamstring muscle extensibility among road cyclists, cross-country mountain bikers and non-cyclists. Thirty matched road cyclists, 30 mountain bikers and 30 non-cyclists participated in this study. The road cyclists showed significantly greater thoracic kyphosis and trunk inclination than did the mountain bikers and non-cyclists in a standing posture. On the bicycle, the road bicycling posture was characterised by greater lumbar flexion and more significant anterior pelvic tilt and trunk inclination compared with the mountain biking posture. The thoracic spine was more flexed in mountain biking than in road cycling. Road cyclists had significantly greater hamstring muscle extensibility in the active knee extension test, and showed greater anterior pelvic tilt and trunk inclination capacity in the sit-and-reach test, compared with mountain bikers and non-cyclists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Key issues for mountain areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Martin F; Jansky, Libor; Iatsenia, Andrei A

    2004-01-01

    ... and livelihood opportunities . . . ... Safdar Parvez and Stephen F. Rasmussen 86 6 Mountain tourism and the conservation of biological and cultural diversity... Wendy Brewer Lama and Nikhat Sattar 11...

  1. Mountain treelines: A roadmap for research orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanson, George P.; Resler, Lynn M.; Bader, Maaike Y.; Holtmeier, Fredrich-Karl; Butler, David R.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Daniels, Lori D.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    For over 100 years, mountain treelines have been the subject of varied research endeavors and remain a strong area of investigation. The purpose of this paper is to examine aspects of the epistemology of mountain treeline research-that is, to investigate how knowledge on treelines has been acquired and the changes in knowledge acquisition over time, through a review of fundamental questions and approaches. The questions treeline researchers have raised and continue to raise have undoubtedly directed the current state of knowledge. A continuing, fundamental emphasis has centered on seeking the general cause of mountain treelines, thus seeking an answer to the question, "What causes treeline?" with a primary emphasis on searching for ecophysiological mechanisms of low-temperature limitation for tree growth and regeneration. However, treeline research today also includes a rich literature that seeks local, landscape-scale causes of treelines and reasons why treelines vary so widely in three-dimensional patterns from one location to the next, and this approach and some of its consequences are elaborated here. In recent years, both lines of research have been motivated greatly by global climate change. Given the current state of knowledge, we propose that future research directions focused on a spatial approach should specifically address cross-scale hypotheses using statistics and simulations designed for nested hierarchies; these analyses will benefit from geographic extension of treeline research.

  2. Complications of Translating the Meanings of the Holy Qur'an at Word Level in the English Language in Relation to Frame Semantic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Asjad Ahmed Saeed; Siddiek, Ahmed Gumaa

    2017-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the problems resulting from the lexical choice in the translation of the Holy Qur'an to emphasize the importance of the theory of "Frame Semantics" in the translation process. It has been conducted with the aim of measuring the difference in concept between the two languages Arabic and…

  3. The Utopia of ‘Holy Russia’ in Today’s Geopolitical Imagination of the Russian Orthodox Church: a Case Study of Patriarch Kirill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Suslov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the myth of ‘Holy Russia,’ as restored and promoted by the Russian Orthodox Church under Patriarch Kirill (Gundiaev, and explores the new imagining identities and spatial configurations generated by this myth. While before ‘Holy Russia’ was a metaphor, associated with relics, deposited in Russian monasteries and churches, Kirill ‘geo-politicized’ it, informing it with practical political meaning, and as such it is viewed as including Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and on many occasions Moldova, and less often – Kazakhstan. The paper discusses the metaphor of ‘Holy Russia’ as a geopolitical utopia, as a postcolonial invention, and as a method of mental mapping. It uncovers Kirill’s modernist philosophy of history, based on Messianic meta-narrations of enslavement and subsequent liberation. As such, ‘Holy Russia’ does not stop colonial practices, but perpetuates them in many aspects. It continues the ‘internal re-colonization’ of the Russian population by ‘re-churchizing’ it, and by claiming to be the cultural center of the Western civilization.

  4. A thousand mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Lindenberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In creating a series of short dances and presenting them in a variety of informal settings, my Thesis Project examines the encounter of emotion to body movement and the transfer of feeling that occurs when movement is witnessed by a live audience. In making the dances in this series I have borrowed performance practices and structures from song-writing traditions in order to frame this body of trans-performance work. The performance of A Thousand Mountains serves as an archive of my artistic ...

  5. Effects of Recitation of Holy Quran on Anxiety of Women before Cesarean Section: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mir Bagher AjorPaz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Anxiety is a kind of agitation and concern stemming from the feeling of threat or hazard in human. It can decrease or increase the understanding ability of individuals. Most clinical patients have anxiety in confronting a new and unknown environment such as hospitals. A non-pharmacological method such as pleasant sound of Holy Quran recitation can be used as a useful and effective procedure to decrease the anxiety. The aim of this research was to study the recitation effects of Holy Quran on anxiety of woman before cesarean.

    Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 80 women expecting cesarean section were randomly selected regarding their characteristics and divided into two groups: control group (30 members and experimental group (50 members. Data collection instrument was a two-part questionnaire including demographic characteristics, and Spilburge’s state-trait anxiety inventory. The degree of anxiety for the two groups was evaluated before cesarean, then before innate cesarean, the Holy Quran recitation was played for experimental group for 20 minutes by the sound of famous recite, Abdol Basset. Data were analyzed using Chi-Square, single sample & paired T-test, and a Pvalue of 0<0.05 was considered as statistically significant.

    Results: The results showed that the degree of anxiety decreased in experimental group after intervention (P=0.0001, but not in the control group.(P=0.98 Comparison of the two groups showed a significant difference after intervention (P=0.002.

    Conclusion: According to the results of this research and because of the agreeable rhythmic intonation of the Quran as gnostic music and its miracle aspect, we can use its tone as a non medicinal method for reducing anxiety before cesarean women.

  6. Protected areas in mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, L. S.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The importance of a global Protected Areas Network in sustaining appropriate mountain development is presented in this paper. Present status of the world’s “official” Protected Areas in the UN List, and the proportion that are in mountain areas, and including international designations (World Heritage and Biosphere Reserves. Current and future challenges in the management of these special areas are also commented.



    El autor destaca la importancia de una Red Mundial de Espacios Protegidos para el desarrollo sostenible de las montañas. Comenta luego el estatus actual de las Áreas Protegidas “oficiales” del Mundo en la Lista de las Naciones Unidas y qué proporción de ellas forma parte de las montañas, sin olvidar las figuras internacionales de protección como Patrimonio de la Humanidad y Reservas de Biosfera. Para terminar, se discuten los problemas de gestión actuales y futuros de estas áreas tan especiales

  7. Artificial Snowfall from Mountain Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Ludlam, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    A tentative theory of provoking snowfall from simple orographic clouds is composed, using simplifying assumptions, and it is shown reasonable to suppose that winter snowfall on Central Swedish mountains might be substantially increased by skillful seeding of supercooled mountain clouds.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1955.tb01164.x

  8. Bedrock geology and physiography of the Monadhliath Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Emrys R.; Boston, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    The Monadhliath Mountains comprise of an extensive area of plateau in the Central Highlands of Scotland, which is bounded to the north by the Great Glen and to the south by Strathspey. The region is located immediately to the northwest of the Cairngorm Mountains, to the north of Creag Meagaidh and to the northeast of the Ben Nevis Range, forming a nearly continuous area of upland from Glen Roy westwards to where the A9 crosses Slochd Summit (Fig. A). The upland consists of r...

  9. The New Age of faith tourism and Fruska Gora mountain (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stamenković

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In general, pilgrimage is a journey from home to a far sacred place for the purpose of spiritual enrichment (Raj, Morpeth, 2007. This paper is concerned with the possibility for development of religious tourism on Fruska Gora mountain. Nowdays, monasteries and sacred objects and places are the pilgrimage destinations for Orthodox and other Christians and religious belivers, in the Serbia. For instance, the Krušedol monastery is one of sixteen Serb’s Orthodox monasteries on the Fruška Gora mountain in the northern Serbian province of Vojvodina. The monastery is the legacy of the last Serbian despot family of Srem - Branković. As a form of movement, pilgrimage has always been an active encounter with uncertainty. The main issue of this paper is to emphasize the importance of gaining modern management and marketing strategies and suggests, in order to make a better relationship between Orthodox church and religious tourism. Also, the purpose of this paper is to represent this Christian Holy place as strong touristic destinations that are visited by thousands of tourists and pilgrims. The Year of Faith Tourism 2009, hosted by the World Religious Travel Association (WRTA, is a year dedicated to the promotion of and participation in Faith Tourism. All sectors of society are encouraged to become involved including the media, governments, travel providers/suppliers, and people of faith.

  10. BLENDED LEARNING METHOD BASED ON LOCAL WISDOM AS A SPIRITUAL GUIDANCE HOLY TRINITY COMMUNITY IN DISTRICT BENGKAYANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska Vasantan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bengkayang is one of the districts the outermost in Indonesia. The district has limitations and underdevelopment in various fields, one of which is in the field of education. Writing this article aims to show that blended learning based on local wisdom is very helpful coaching Holy Trinity Community (HTC in the district Bengkayang. It has been proven from previous studies, suggesting that coaching HTC with blended learning to be more flexible, effective and efficient . Blended learning has been applied HTC with a combination of conventional learning and e-learning in most areas in Indonesia. With the blended learning, the process of spiritual guidance becomes more flexible, effective and efficient so as to improve student in district Bengkayang.

  11. The religious and social principles of patients' rights in holy books (Avesta, Torah, Bible, and Quran) and in traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami, Hossein; Hatami, Maryam; Hatami, Neda

    2013-03-01

    Health protection and promotion in healthy people and restoring patients' health have been the most important themes in medicine and health throughout our history. Therefore, discussion of different aspects of patients' rights includes implementation of these objectives by the medical community, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, etc., and the people in charge of health affairs. The principal objective of our research is the study of medical ideology and the approaches of our ancestors in relation to different aspects of patients' rights. To study the different ideologies of traditional medicine in relation to patients' rights, appropriate data were extracted from the original resources of traditional medicine and from religious books. By means of library research we studied these resources in addition to electronic versions of the Alhavi book (by Rhazes), the Kamel-al-Sanaah (by Ahvazi), the Canon of Medicine (by Avicenna), the Zakhireye Khawrazmshahi (by Jorjani), the Avesta, the Torah, the Bible, the Quran, and many other resources, and, finally, after searching, gathering, and encoding the findings, analyzed them qualitatively for thematic content. The holy Avesta book clearly insists on the competence of physicians and setting the appointment fee in accordance with peoples' income. The Old Testament (holy Torah) warned government officials who did not observe patients' rights. In the four gospels (holy Bible) the importance of treatment and taking care of the patient is stressed. After the emergence of Islam, medical students, before beginning the principal courses, had to study Islamic jurisprudence, ethics, logic sciences, natural sciences, geometry, astrology, calculus, and similar courses so that after purifying their soul they could enter the saintly profession of physicians. The holy Quran refers to saving the life of a human irrespective of social class, race, and religion, and insists on exemption of patients from physical activity, including

  12. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2003-08-05

    This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

  13. Mountain migrations in recent Alpine anthropology: some critical remarks to Braudel's residual sedentarism and immobilism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Baskar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is argued in this paper that Braudel's view of mountain communities (which he, though allowing for numerous exceptions, depicted as isolated, largely immobile and prolific remains heavily indebted to the tradition of the Vidalian School of Human Geography, characterized by its immobilism and anti-urban bias. Braudel is famous for “dynamizing” the Mediterranean and thereby opposing Vidalian immobilism. However, Braudel's dynamism and his stress on mobility and connectivity applies only to his view of the urban part, whereas his view of the rural, and especially mountainous, hinterlands remains largely exempted from it. This questioning of the Braudelian model of mountain migrations is based on the recent developments within Alpine anthropology made possible by its cross-fertilization with historical demography (Pier Paolo Viazzo and his “school” as well as within recent mountain studies in general. The new picture of mountain communities emerging from these studies is one of highly mobile mountain populations who are characterized by entrepreneurial spirit and proactive strategies of migration, and is often based on prosperity instead of misery and hunger, and it aims at making the survival of mountain communities possible. As this “Alpine model” has been progressively expanded and tested on other mountain environments, this paper argues for the continuities between the Alps and the mountains of the Balkan peninsula.

  14. Theology of Jesus’ words from the cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Zbroja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theological message of the last words that Jesus spoke from the height of the cross. Layout content is conveyed in three kinds of Christ’s relations: the words addressed to God the Father; the words addressed to the good people standing by the cross; the so-called declarations that the Master had spoken to anyone but uttered them in general. All these words speak of the Master’s love. They express His full awareness of what is being done and of His decision voluntarily taken. Above all, it is revealed in the Lord’s statements His obedience to the will of God expressed in the inspired words of the Holy Scriptures. Jesus fulfills all the prophecies of the Old Testament by pronounced words and accomplished works that will become content of the New Testament.

  15. Glacial effects limiting mountain height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egholm, D L; Nielsen, S B; Pedersen, V K; Lesemann, J-E

    2009-08-13

    The height of mountain ranges reflects the balance between tectonic rock uplift, crustal strength and surface denudation. Tectonic deformation and surface denudation are interdependent, however, and feedback mechanisms-in particular, the potential link to climate-are subjects of intense debate. Spatial variations in fluvial denudation rate caused by precipitation gradients are known to provide first-order controls on mountain range width, crustal deformation rates and rock uplift. Moreover, limits to crustal strength are thought to constrain the maximum elevation of large continental plateaus, such as those in Tibet and the central Andes. There are indications that the general height of mountain ranges is also directly influenced by the extent of glaciation through an efficient denudation mechanism known as the glacial buzzsaw. Here we use a global analysis of topography and show that variations in maximum mountain height correlate closely with climate-controlled gradients in snowline altitude for many high mountain ranges across orogenic ages and tectonic styles. With the aid of a numerical model, we further demonstrate how a combination of erosional destruction of topography above the snowline by glacier-sliding and commensurate isostatic landscape uplift caused by erosional unloading can explain observations of maximum mountain height by driving elevations towards an altitude window just below the snowline. The model thereby self-consistently produces the hypsometric signature of the glacial buzzsaw, and suggests that differences in the height of mountain ranges mainly reflect variations in local climate rather than tectonic forces.

  16. 23 March 2015 - Tree planting ceremony Chemin Auguer, by His Holiness the XIIth Gyalwang Drukpa and CERN Director-General, on the occasion of the event Connecting Worlds: Science Meets Buddhism Great Minds, Great Matters.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    23 March 2015 - Tree planting ceremony Chemin Auguer, by His Holiness the XIIth Gyalwang Drukpa and CERN Director-General, on the occasion of the event Connecting Worlds: Science Meets Buddhism Great Minds, Great Matters.

  17. Mountain time trial in handcycling : exercise intensity and predictors of race time in people with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Postma, Karin; van Vliet, Linda; Timmermans, Remco; Valent, L J M

    Study design: Cross-sectional analyses. Objectives: To analyze exercise intensity during a mountain time trial in handcycling and to determine predictors of race time. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centers and Austrian mountain. Methods: Forty participants with spinal cord injury (SCI; high

  18. Waste management outlook for mountain regions: Sources and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semernya, Larisa; Ramola, Aditi; Alfthan, Björn; Giacovelli, Claudia

    2017-09-01

    Following the release of the global waste management outlook in 2015, the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment), through its International Environmental Technology Centre, is elaborating a series of region-specific and thematic waste management outlooks that provide policy recommendations and solutions based on current practices in developing and developed countries. The Waste Management Outlook for Mountain Regions is the first report in this series. Mountain regions present unique challenges to waste management; while remoteness is often associated with costly and difficult transport of waste, the potential impact of waste pollutants is higher owing to the steep terrain and rivers transporting waste downstream. The Outlook shows that waste management in mountain regions is a cross-sectoral issue of global concern that deserves immediate attention. Noting that there is no 'one solution fits all', there is a need for a more landscape-type specific and regional research on waste management, the enhancement of policy and regulatory frameworks, and increased stakeholder engagement and awareness to achieve sustainable waste management in mountain areas. This short communication provides an overview of the key findings of the Outlook and highlights aspects that need further research. These are grouped per source of waste: Mountain communities, tourism, and mining. Issues such as waste crime, plastic pollution, and the linkages between exposure to natural disasters and waste are also presented.

  19. Hydrology and the natural heritage of the Scottish mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R C; Thompson, D B

    2002-07-22

    The physical natures of the Scottish mountains and their geographical position have created a montane environment, which can be considered as unique in European terms. The mountains of Scotland have been subjected to major environmental changes throughout the past centuries including climate change, deforestation, hydropower developments and more recently the expansion of plantation forestry. Mountain ecosystems have the ability to withstand large climatic variations and extreme events but it is suggested that they may not withstand some of the climatic barriers, which have recently been crossed. The greatest recent land use change in Scotland's mountains has been the expansion of plantation forests. The effects on headwater catchment hydrology are mainly in the reduction in runoff. It is suggested that plantation forestry has a more significant impact on the natural heritage through other influences such as water chemistry and river sediments. Future management of the Scottish mountains needs to consider the great natural heritage value in addition to other interests such as water resources, hydropower generation, commercial forestry and tourism.

  20. Proposal for definition of mountain and under-mountain areas

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Navrátil

    2005-01-01

    Spatial definitions of study areas for specific projects are of crucial importance for these projects. It is necessary to come out from the aims of the project for spatial definition of mountain and under-mountain areas in South- Bohemian Region. There are many ways of solution and the definition should be strictly connected with the structured goals of this project. The methods and usage of criteria for definition of study areas will depend on aim identification. There are several possibilit...

  1. Heavy metals in precipitation waters under conditions of varied anthropopressure in typical of European low mountain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabajczyk A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The environment is a dynamic system, subject to change resulting from a variety of physicochemical factors, such as temperature, pressure, pH, redox potential and human activity. The quantity and variety of these determinants cause the inflow of substances into individual environmental elements to vary in both time and space, as well as in terms of substance types and quantities. The energy and matter flow in the environment determines its integrity, which means that the processes occurring in one element of the environment affect the others. A certain measure of the energy and matter flow is the migration of chemical substances in various forms from one place to another. In a particular geographical space, under natural conditions, a specific level of balance between individual processes appears; in areas subject to anthropopressure, the correlations are different. In small areas, varying deposition volumes and chemism of precipitation waters which reach the substratum directly can both be observed. The study area is similar in terms of geological origins as well as morphological, structural and physico-chemical properties, and is typical of European low mountain regions. A qualitative and quantitative study of wet atmospheric precipitation was conducted between February 2009 and May 2011 in the Bobrza river catchment in the Holy Cross (Świętokrzyskie Mountains (Poland, at three sampling sites of varying land development and distance from sources of various acidic-alkaline emissions. Field and laboratory work was conducted over 29 months, from February 2009 to May 2011. Atmospheric precipitation measurements were carried out in a continuous manner by means of a Hellman rain gauge (200cm2. The collecting surface was placed at ground level (0m AGL. The application of a collecting funnel and an adequately prepared polyethylene collecting can in the rain gauge enabled the measurement of precipitation volume and water sampling for chemical

  2. The Study on Diurnal Changes in Leaf Gas Exchange of Lemon Balm, Catnip, Holy Basil and Sweet basil in Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahmoodi Sourestani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediterranean climate conditions induce several stresses that plants have to cope with, especially during summer months when high temperature and radiation levels along with low water availability in the soil prevail for long periods. Variation in physiological traits such as photosynthesis and plant water status and their association with morphological characters can play an important role in the adaptability of the species to environmental constraints. The previous studies show that scorching weather not only affects the rate of gas exchange, but also results in diurnal changes in activity. Thus, the impact of environmental stresses on plants growing in these conditions should be assessed by examining the evolution of their diurnal variations on leaf gas exchange. Aromatic plants represent a renewable source of valuable compounds that can be used in food, perfumery, and pharmaceutical industry. Among these plants, sweet basil (Ocimumbasilicum, holy basil (Ocimum sanctum, lemon balm (Melissa officinalisL. and catnip (Nepetacataria are very important for different industries. Studies on environmental physiology of medicinal plants are relatively scarce and very few information is available concerning the physiological basis of medicinal plant response to heat stress that is one of the most important factors limiting production of medicinal plants in Khuzestan province. Material and methods: In order to evaluate the diurnal fluctuation of gas exchange of mentioned plants, an experiment was carried out in 2013 at research farm of Horticultural Science, Shahid Chamran University (31°20'N latitude and 48°40'E longitude and 22.5m mean sea level, Ahvaz (Iran, a site characterized by a semidry and scorching weather during late spring and summer. The experiment was arranged based on randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications and 4×8 factorial scheme (Four plants including lemon balm, catnip, holy basil and basil; and

  3. Loyalty and Disavowal in Holy Qur’an Descriptive linguistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Kanani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to clarify the meaning of loyalty and disavowal from linguistic point of view, between the views of linguists, and the exegetes in the Lexicons and exegeses with analysis and debate. First of all, the researcher Indicates definition of loyalty as stated in the dictionaries, with bringing the examples from the Holy Qur’an and the views of the commentators about this issue, then analysis and discussion. Second, he defines Disavowal in the language, with a point of view from linguists, and interpreters, by analyzing and discussion the examples from the Noble Qur’an. Finally, it illustrates the application of the legal and practical concept of loyalty and disavowal, to enhance the significance of language. The importance of the current study is- according to researcher’s information- due to its doctrinal and sociological matter and nobody precede such a linguistic study of Loyalty. This research approaches the issue, using the method of descriptive and analytical, based on the description and analysis of the phenomenon. يهدف هذا البحث إلى بيان معنى الولاء والبراء من الناحية اللغوية عند علماء اللغة والتفسير في كتبهم المشهورة، ويناقشها مبيّناً الراجحً منها؛ فيتناول اولاً مفهوم الولاء كما ورد في كتب اللغة والمعاجم، و يستدل بالشواهد القرآنية في ذلك ويعرض آراء المفسرين، ثم يقوم بالتحليل والمناقشة الموضوعية، ثمّ يتناول ثانياً: مفهوم البراء في اللغة، ويورد آراء اللغويين والمفسرين ويعرضهابالتحليل والمناقشة مع ذكر الشواهد من القرآن الكريم. وكما وتبين الدراسة التطبيق الشرعي والعملي لمفهوم الولاء والبراء، تعزيزاً

  4. Numerical studies of rock-gas flow in Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, B.; Amter, S.; Lu, Ning [Disposal Safety, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-02-01

    A computer model (TGIF -- Thermal Gradient Induced Flow) of two-dimensional, steady-state rock-gas flow driven by temperature and humidity differences is described. The model solves for the ``fresh-water head,`` a concept that has been used in models of variable-density water flow but has not previously been applied to gas flow. With this approach, the model can accurately simulate the flows driven by small differences in temperature. The unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are being studied as a potential site for a repository for high-level nuclear waste. Using the TGIF model, preliminary calculations of rock-gas flow in Yucca Mountain are made for four east-west cross-sections through the mountain. Calculations are made for three repository temperatures and for several assumptions about a possible semi-confining layer above the repository. The gas-flow simulations are then used to calculate travel-time distributions for air and for radioactive carbon-14 dioxide from the repository to the ground surface.

  5. A mountain of millipedes IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Two species of the genus Prionopetalum Attems, 1909, are recorded from the Udzungwa Mountains: P. asperginis sp. nov. and P. kraepelini (Attems, 1896). Prionopetalum stuhlmanni Attems, 1914, is synonymized under P. kraepelini. Odontopyge fasciata Attems, 1896, is transferred from Prionopetalum...

  6. Rocky Mountain Arsenal NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit CO-0035009, the U.S. Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to discharge from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal recycled water pipeline to Lower Derby Lake in Adams County, Colo.

  7. The Table Mountain Field Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Table Mountain Field Site, located north of Boulder, Colorado, is designated as an area where the magnitude of strong, external signals is restricted (by State...

  8. Camera Geolocation From Mountain Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    be reliably extracted from query images. However, in real-life scenarios the skyline in a query image may be blurred or invisible , due to occlusions...extracted from multiple mountain ridges is critical to reliably geolocating challenging real-world query images with blurred or invisible mountain skylines...Buddemeier, A. Bissacco, F. Brucher, T. Chua, H. Neven, and J. Yagnik, “Tour the world: building a web -scale landmark recognition engine,” in Proc. of

  9. Yucca Mountain Project public interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, B.E.

    1990-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to keeping the citizens of Nevada informed about activities that relate to the high-level nuclear waste repository program. This paper presents an overview of the Yucca Mountain Project`s public interaction philosophy, objectives, activities and experiences during the two years since Congress directed the DOE to conduct site characterization activities only for the Yucca Mountain site.

  10. Mountain Child: Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Annie; Wallace, Rebecca M M; Price, Martin F

    2016-12-01

    Objectives This systematic review identifies and reviews both peer-reviewed and 'grey' literature, across a range of disciplines and from diverse sources, relating to the condition of children living in mountain communities in low- and middle-income countries. Findings The literature on poverty in these communities does not generally focus on the particular vulnerabilities of children or the impact of intersecting vulnerabilities on the most marginalised members of communities. However, this literature does contribute analyses of the broader context and variety of factors impacting on human development in mountainous areas. The literature on other areas of children's lives-health, nutrition, child mortality, education, and child labour-focuses more specifically on children's particular vulnerabilities or experiences. However, it sometimes lacks the broader analysis of the many interrelated characteristics of a mountainous environment which impact on children's situations. Themes Nevertheless, certain themes recur across many disciplines and types of literature, and point to some general conclusions: mountain poverty is influenced by the very local specificities of the physical environment; mountain communities are often politically and economically marginalised, particularly for the most vulnerable within these communities, including children; and mountain communities themselves are an important locus for challenging and interrupting cycles of increasing inequality and disadvantage. While this broad-scale review represents a modest first step, its findings provide the basis for further investigation.

  11. Relief Evolution in Tectonically Active Mountain Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Kelin X.

    2004-01-01

    The overall aims of this 3-yr project, as originally proposed were to: (1) investigate quantitatively the roles of fluvial and glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions, and (2) test rigorously the quality and accuracy of SRTM topographic data in areas of rugged relief - both the most challenging and of greatest interest to geomorphic, neotectonic, and hazards applications. Natural laboratories in both the western US and the Southern Alps of New Zealand were identified as most promising. The project has been both successful and productive, despite the fact that no SRTM data for our primary field sites in New Zealand were released on the time frame of the work effort. Given the delayed release of SRTM data, we pursued the scientific questions of the roles of fluvial and, especially, glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions using available digital elevation models (DEMs) for the Southern Alps of New Zealand (available at both 25m and 50m pixel sizes), and USGS 10m and 30m DEMs within the Western US. As emphasized in the original proposal, we chose the emphasis on the role of glacial modification of topographic relief because there has been little quantitative investigation of glacial erosion processes at landscape scale. This is particularly surprising considering the dramatic sculpting of most mid- and high-latitude mountain ranges, the prodigious quantities of glacially-derived sediment in terrestrial and marine basins, and the current cross-disciplinary interest in the role of denudational processes in orogenesis and the evolution of topography in general. Moreover, the evolution of glaciated landscapes is not only a fundamental problem in geomorphology in its own right, but also is at the heart of the debate over Late Cenozoic linkages between climate and tectonics.

  12. The Effects of Educational Multimedia for Scientific Signs in the Holy Quran in Improving the Creative Thinking Skills for Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusaleh, Sumaya; Abdelfattah, Eman; Alabadi, Zain; Sharieh, Ahmad

    This paper investigates the role of the scientific signs in the holy Quran in improving the creative thinking skills for the deaf children using multimedia. The paper investigates if the performance made by the experimental group's individuals is statistically significant compared with the performance made by the control group's individuals on Torrance Test for creative thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality and the total degree) in two cases:

  13. Biblical motives from the Book of Joshua and Book of Judges in the Hours about the Immaculate Conception of the Most Holy Virgin Mary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystian Ziaja

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is better understanding of the Hours concerning the Immaculate Conception of the Most Holy Virgin Mary. Following motives from the books of Joshua and Judges were taken into consideration: The light from Gabaon (Joshua 10, 10–13, Gedeon’s fleece (Judges 6, 36–40, Samson’s honeycomb (Judges 14, 1–11. After the discussion of the above mentioned three texts we may ascertain that the author of Hours about the Immaculate Conception of the Most Holy Virgin Mary with accurate aim refers the texts to the Most Holy Virgin Mary. Mary is the light from Gabaon, which showed people that he, whose mother she is, will make a salvation, the real victory that had been expected since Adam and Eve’s times. Moreover, she is the fleece of Gedeon because God made her a wonderful exception as among people only she was not stained by a sin. Furthermore, she is Samson’s honeycomb as inside her the one who is our Savior and our best food was born.

  14. The origins of mountain geoecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ives, Jack D.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mountain geoecology, as a sub-discipline of Geography, stems from the life and work of Carl Troll who, in turn, was inspired by the philosophy and mountain travels of Alexander von Humboldt. As founding chair of the IGU Commission on High-Altitude Geoecology (1968, Troll laid the foundations for inter-disciplinary and international mountain research. The paper traces the evolution of the Commission and its close links with the UNESCO Man and Biosphere Programme (1972- and the United Nations University’s mountain Project (1978-. This facilitated the formation of a major force for inclusion of a mountain chapter in AGENDA 21 during the 1992 Rio de Janeiro Herat Summit (UNCED and the related designation by the United Nations of 2002 as the International Year of Mountains. In this way, mountain geoecology not only contributed to worldwide mountain research but also entered the political arena in the struggle for sustainable mountain development and the well-being of mountain people.La geoecología de montaña, como sub-disciplina de la Geografía, entronca con la vida y trabajo de Carl Troll, quien, a su vez, fue inspirado por la filosofía y viajes de Alexander von Humboldt. Como presidente fundador de la comisión de la UGI sobre High Altitude Geoecology (1968, Troll colocó las bases para la investigación interdisciplinar e internacional de las montañas. Este trabajo presenta la evolución de la Comisión y sus estrechas relaciones con el Programa Hombre y Biosfera de UNESCO (1972- y con el Proyecto de montaña de la Universidad de Naciones Unidas (1978-. Esto facilitó la inclusión de un capítulo sobre la montaña en AGENDA 21 durante la Cumbre de la Tierra de Río de Janeiro (UNCED, y la consiguiente designación de 2002 como el Año Internacional de las Montañas por parte de Naciones Unidas. En este sentido, la geoecología de montaña no sólo contribuyó a la investigación de las montañas del mundo sino que también empujó a la pol

  15. The holy fool as a TV hero: about Pavel Lungin's film The Island and the problem of authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Arne Bodin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Holy foolishness (jurodstvo in Russian, a special monastic practice in the Orthodox Church, has become an important theme in the post-Soviet Russian culture. The example that perhaps has had the greatest impact is a feature film, Ostrov, The Island from 2006 directed by Pavel Lungin. The film tells the story of one fool in Christ, father Anatolij, who after committing a serious crime has become a monk in a small monastery in the Arctic. The film gives some examples of his provocative practice: clairvoyance, healing, and exorcism. What is demonstrated and interpreted is how an important phenomenon in the Russian Orthodox tradition is mediated, discussed, used, and changed in its new context. The material for the study is the film itself and the discussions around it in Russian mass media. The focus will be on the concept of authenticity. I argue that this concept has a crucial interpreting capacity for creating meaning in the film combining an Orthodox form of piety, a demand on art, and a crux in the postmodern condition.

  16. Effects of fasting in the holy month of Ramadan on the uric acid, urea, and creatinine levels: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Alireza Mirsane

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. During this holy month, healthy Muslims abstain from eating, drinking, and smoking from dawn to dusk. Although fasting is obligatory for every adult Muslim, if it has hazardous effects on the body, it is prohibited. Due to some Islamic principles, patients are exempted from fasting; however, due to the willingness of some individuals to fast, there are concerns about its effects on urea, uric acid, and creatine levels. Atypical levels of these compounds can cause serious disorders or indicate abnormal renal function. The present narrative review is aimed to investigate the effect of abnormally high levels of urea, uric acid, and creatinine on one’s health and effects of fasting during Ramadan on these indicators. Articles were searched from PubMed, Elsevier and Google Scholar and then they were evaluated. It can be concluded that fasting does not have any adverse effects on the urea, uric acid, and creatinine levels according to the above-mentioned studies.

  17. Ocimum sanctum L (Holy Basil or Tulsi) and its phytochemicals in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Jimmy, Rosmy; Thilakchand, Karadka Ramdas; Sunitha, Venkatesh; Bhat, Neeta Raghavendra; Saldanha, Elroy; Rao, Suresh; Rao, Pratima; Arora, Rajesh; Palatty, Princy L

    2013-01-01

    Ocimum sanctum L. or Ocimum tenuiflorum L, commonly known as the Holy Basil in English or Tulsi in the various Indian languages, is a important medicinal plant in the various traditional and folk systems of medicine in Southeast Asia. Scientific studies have shown it to possess antiinflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, antistress, and immunomodulatory activities. Preclinical studies have also shown that Tulsi and some of its phytochemicals eugenol, rosmarinic acid, apigenin, myretenal, luteolin, β-sitosterol, and carnosic acid prevented chemical-induced skin, liver, oral, and lung cancers and to mediate these effects by increasing the antioxidant activity, altering the gene expressions, inducing apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis and metastasis. The aqueous extract of Tulsi and its flavanoids, orintin, and vicenin are shown to protect mice against γ-radiation-induced sickness and mortality and to selectively protect the normal tissues against the tumoricidal effects of radiation. The other important phytochemicals like eugenol, rosmarinic acid, apigenin, and carnosic acid are also shown to prevent radiation-induced DNA damage. This review summarizes the results related to the chemopreventive and radioprotective properties of Tulsi and also emphasizes aspects that warrant future research to establish its activity and utility in cancer prevention and treatment.

  18. The Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houze, Robert A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; McMurdie, Lynn A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Petersen, Walter A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama; Schwaller, Mathew R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Baccus, William [Olympic National Park, Port Angeles, Washington; Lundquist, Jessica D. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Mass, Clifford F. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Nijssen, Bart [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Rutledge, Steven A. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; Hudak, David R. [Environment and Climate Change Canada, King City, Ontario, Canada; Tanelli, Simone [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California; Mace, Gerald G. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Poellot, Michael R. [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota; Lettenmaier, Dennis P. [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Zagrodnik, Joseph P. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Rowe, Angela K. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; DeHart, Jennifer C. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Madaus, Luke E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; Barnes, Hannah C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2017-10-01

    the Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX) took place during the 2015-2016 fall-winter season in the vicinity of the mountainous Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. The goals of OLYMPEX were to provide physical and hydrologic ground validation for the U.S./Japan Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission and, more specifically, to study how precipitation in Pacific frontal systems is modified by passage over coastal mountains. Four transportable scanning dual-polarization Doppler radars of various wavelengths were installed. Surface stations were placed at various altitudes to measure precipitation rates, particle size distributions, and fall velocities. Autonomous recording cameras monitored and recorded snow accumulation. Four research aircraft supplied by NASA investigated precipitation processes and snow cover, and supplemental rawinsondes and dropsondes were deployed during precipitation events. Numerous Pacific frontal systems were sampled, including several reaching "atmospheric river" status, warm and cold frontal systems, and postfrontal convection

  19. WHITE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. If mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significanlty, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  20. Yearly report, Yucca Mountain project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, J.N.

    1992-09-30

    We proposed to (1) Develop our data logging and analysis equipment and techniques for analyzing seismic data from the Southern Great Basin Seismic Network (SGBSN), (2) Investigate the SGBSN data for evidence of seismicity patterns, depth distribution patterns, and correlations with geologic features (3) Repair and maintain our three broad band downhole digital seismograph stations at Nelson, nevada, Troy Canyon, Nevada, and Deep Springs, California (4) Install, operate, and log data from a super sensitive microearthquake array at Yucca Mountain (5) Analyze data from micro-earthquakes relative to seismic hazard at Yucca Mountain.

  1. [Organization and management of mountain rescues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Mountain rescue is a matter for specialists. Specific training, a model of organisation under state control, emergency protocols and information and prevention campaigns have helped to improve morbidity and mortality rates in the mountains.

  2. IL-6, IL-17 and STAT3: a holy trinity in auto-immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Annalisa; Poli, Valeria

    2012-06-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in the regulation of the cross talk between haematopoietic/immune cells and stromal cells, including the onset and resolution of inflammation, responses to infection, tissue remodelling and cancer. It is produced, among others, by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, macrophages and lymphocytes. IL-6 can interact with both membrane-bound and soluble forms of its ligand-binding receptor, the IL-6Ralpha, triggering signalling via dimerization of gp130, the signalling subunit of the IL-6 receptor complex. This leads to the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway and mainly culminates in the activation of the STAT3 transcription factor. Both IL-6 and STAT3 have recently emerged as main regulators of the differentiation and function of Th17 cells, via a positive feedback loop enhancing expression and/or activation of IL-6 itself, IL-17 and STAT3. Dysregulated IL-6 production and signalling are associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, auto-immunity and cancer, and are the object of intense translational research as promising therapeutic targets.

  3. Storymakers: Hopa Mountain's Early Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Hopa Mountain's StoryMakers program is an innovative, research-based program for donating high quality young children's books to parents. Hopa Mountain is a nonprofit organization based in Bozeman, Montana. Hopa Mountain works with groups of rural and tribal citizen leaders who form StoryMakers Community Teams to talk one-on-one with local parents…

  4. 27 CFR 9.205 - Chehalem Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... located in Clackamas, Yamhill, and Washington Counties, Oregon. The boundary of the Chehalem Mountains... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chehalem Mountains. 9.205... Chehalem Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chehalem...

  5. Economists, parsifal and the search of holy grail Los economistas, Parsifal y la búsqueda del Santo Grial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morong Cyrill

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The economics profession finds itself unsatisfied with the state of economic theory. The most prestigious economists are the main critics of formalism and the abuse of mathematics, despite the success they have had doing what they now criticize in their Nobel speeches. This article analyzes why economists do not ask the pertinent questions from the outset of their careers, using an interpretation of the myth of the Holy Grail based on the psychology of Carl Jung. It compares the formation of economists with the formation of the knights of the middle ages and shows that one of the socioloqical reasons for excessive
    formalism is that scientists seek not only the truth, but also the
    approval of other scientists.La profesión economíca se encuentra insatisfecha con la situación de la teoría económica. Los economistas más prestigiosos son los principales críticos del formalismo y del abuso de las matemáticas pese al éxito que obtuvieron haciendo lo que hoy critícan en sus discursos Nobel. Este artículo analiza por qué los economistas no se hacen las preguntas pertinentes desde el comienzo de la carrera, acudiendo a una interpretación del mito del Santo Grial basada en la psicología de Carl Jung. Compara la formación de los economistas con la formación de la caballeros de la edad media y muestra que una de las razones sociológicas del formalismo excesivo es que los científicos no sólo buscan la verdad sino que también buscan la aprobación de otros científicos.

  6. Some Peculiarities of the Use of Perfect Tense Forms in the Narration of the Holy Martyrs Boris and Gleb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Kuzovenkova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some results of the analysis of the perfect tense forms functioning in the copies of the Narration of the Holy Martyrs Boris and Gleb created in the 12th – 15th centuries. The relevance and urgency of this problem are determined by the ongoing debates on the semantic and functional status of this preterite. New data on representation of this verbal category in the above mentioned manuscript have been provided. The following texts have been in the focus of attention: the earliest extant copy of the Narration from the Assumption Collection of the 12th – 13th centuries; the copy of the second half of the 14th century from the Sylvester Codex; and the copy of the 15th century from the Book of Degrees of the Royal Genealogy. The complete set of examples of the perfect tense forms functioning has shown that the verbal form appeared in this literary manuscript due to the following reasons: 1 usage, as a rule, in the direct (or indirect discourse; 2 intention to avoid the homonymous forms of 2 and 3 person singular that occurred in the aorist paradigm; 3 interaction with present, imperative forms in the context. The later copies of the Narration reveal the expansion of the perfect tense forms usage, their penetration into the monologic narrative context. The conclusion on the stylistic nature of perfect tense forms as of an oral speech phenomenon has been made on the basis of the copies of the Narration that occurred at different times and the scientific literature on this problem.

  7. Fasting among Muslim cancer patients during the holy month of Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma M

    2012-01-01

    Muslims constitute more than 20% of the world's population and have a significant share of its cancer cases. Many Muslim cancer patients witness the fasting month of Ramadan but we do not know which individuals elect to fast. Cross-sectional study conducted among Muslim cancer patients at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Egypt, during Ramadan, Hijri 1430 (the month of fasting) August-September 2009. One-hundred and two patients being treated at the NCI were interviewed. The most common diagnoses were breast cancer (31%), acute leukemia (24%), colorectal cancer (7%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (5%), bladder cancer (4%), lung cancer (4%), and laryngeal cancer (4%). The two sexes were equally represented and so were metastatic and nonmetastatic diseases. The outpatient:inpatient ratio was 3:1. Treatments being received by these patients included chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, and nonspecific therapy in 42%, 31%, 10%, and 17%, respectively. Other concomitant diseases were present in 22% of the patients. While 40% of patients did not fast at all during Ramadan, 36% and 24% were partial and complete fasters, respectively. Female patients, those with performance status (PS) 0 to 1, those whose disease was a nonmetastatic solid tumor, and those receiving non-intravenous chemotherapy as outpatients were more likely to be fasting than their corresponding counterparts. Being a female, having PS 0 to 1, and receiving treatment as an outpatient were the only factors that were significant on multivariate analysis. Only 46% of patients sought the treating oncologist advice on whether they could fast. Most cancer patients fast during Ramadan, but only half of them discuss the issue with their oncologists. We hope that our study stimulates more research on this topic.

  8. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  9. A mountain of millipedes V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Three new genera of Odontopygidae are described, all based on new species from the Udzungwa mountains, Tanzania, and all monotypic: Casuariverpa gen. nov. (type species: C. scarpa gen. et sp. nov.), Yia gen. nov. (type species: Y. geminispina gen. et sp. nov.), and Utiliverpa gen. nov. (type...

  10. A mountain of millipedes I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Twenty new species of the millipede genus Chaleponcus Attems, 1914, are described from the Udzungwa Mountains: C. netus sp. nov., C. quasimodo sp. nov., C. malleolus sp. nov., C. scopus sp. nov., C. nikolajscharffi sp. nov., C. mwanihanensis sp. nov., C. basiliscus sp. nov., C. krai sp. nov., C...

  11. A mountain of millipedes III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The new genus Geotypodon gen. nov. is described. It includes two species from the Udzungwa Mountains: G. millemanus gen. et sp. nov. (type species) and G. submontanus gen. et sp. nov., one species from nearby Iringa: G. iringensis gen. et sp. nov., and 18 previously described species hitherto...

  12. The Mountaineer-Malaysia Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    A 26-day summer field course of West Virginia University's (WVU) Recreation and Parks Department took students to Malaysia's mountains and rainforests to observe how Malaysians are managing national parks, problem elephants, and population pressures on parks. The adventure provided powerful learning experiences. Further exchanges between WVU and…

  13. Archbishop Danilo I: The donor of the frescoes in the prothesis of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Peć

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Sreten

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The frescoes in the prothesis of the Church of the Holy Apostles in the Patriarchate of Peć in Kosovo, date from around 1260. They are in poor condition and little has been written about them. Only the portraits of the Serbian hierarchs and saints in the apsis, Sava and Arsenije, have drawn attention, chiefly because the image of the second Serbian archbishop Arsenije - is believed to have been painted during his lifetime. The scenes of the prophet Daniel and the composition The Penitence of King David, are considered to have been painted for their symbolic meaning, primarily regarding to the Holy Communion. Among the compositions, one can see that besides The David rebuked by Nathan, all of them are linked with the life and visions of the prophet Daniel [Daniel in the Lions' Den, The Prophet's Vision of the Kingdom of Heaven (Daniel 7, 1-28. The Archangel Gabriel Foretells Future Events to the Prophet Daniel (Daniel 8, 3; 8, 16-27 and perhaps, The Three Youths in the Fiery Furnace. The small, painted area in the interior (2 *3.70 meters, mostly with scenes devoted to the prophet Daniel, clearly indicates that the prothesis was dedicated to this Old Testament character. In Byzantine churches, the lateral sections of the altar area, the prothesis and the diakonikon - like the parecclesion - were dedicated to the Mother of God and the saints, in most cases, St. Nikolas and St. John the Forerunner. The choice of the prophet Daniel, as the patron of the Peć prothesis was quite unusual. This was obviously done according to the wishes of the Serbian archbishop, Danilo, who thereby wished to pay tribute to his Old Testament namesake. There are several instances in medieval times when Serbian donors dedicated churches to the saints, who were their namesakes. The donor ship of archbishop Danilo 1 also determines mi-date when the frescoes in the prothesis came into being. As he administered the Serbian church for a brief period of less than two years

  14. The epidemiology of injury in mountaineering, rock and ice climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Morrison, Audry; Schöffl, Isabelle; Küpper, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Climbing and mountaineering sports are gaining more and more public interest. This chapter reviews scientific studies on injuries and accidents in climbing and mountaineering sports to evaluate the danger of these sports and their specific injuries and preventive measures. An initial PubMed query was performed using the key words 'rock climbing', 'sport climbing', 'mountaineering', 'alpine injuries' and 'climbing injuries'. More than 500 extracted papers were analyzed which gave information on injury, mortality/fatality, prevention and risk factors. Cross-references were also scanned according to the above given criteria. Also the data sources of the UIAA and IFSC Medical Commissions were analyzed. Overall, alpine (traditional) climbing has a higher injury risk than sport climbing, especially indoor climbing. Alpine and ice climbing have more objective dangers which can affect climber safety. Overall injury rates are low, nevertheless fatalities do occur in all climbing disciplines. Altitude-related illnesses/injuries also occur in mountaineering. Most injuries in sport climbing are overstrain injuries of the upper extremity. In alpine climbing, injuries mostly occur through falls which affect the lower extremity. Objective reporting of the injury site and severity varied in most studies according to the injury definition and methodology used. This creates differences in the injury and fatality results and conclusions, which in turn makes inter-study comparisons difficult. In future studies, the UIAA MedCom score for mountain injuries should be used to guarantee inter-study comparability. Evidence in preventive measures is low and further studies must be performed in this field. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The Analysis of Basic Sentence Patterns in English Translation of the Holy Qur’an In Surah Ad Dukhan By Abdulloh Yousuf Ali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifah Wulandari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at the analysis of basic sentence patterns in English translation of the holy Qur’an in surah Ad Dukhan. Focusing on the problem statements, there are two cases in this study. They are “What are types of the basic sentence patterns that is found in English translation of the Holy Qur’an in surah Ad Dukhan and what is the dominant of the basic sentence patterns types that is found in English translation of the holy Qur’an in surah Ad Dukhan. This research, applied descriptive qualitative method. The data is collected by documentation. The primary data is taken from surah Ad Dukhan in Abdullah Yousuf Ali’s English translation of the noble Al Qur’an. The secondary data is taken from many literary books and some relevant materials to support and complete the primary data source. The procedure of analyzing the data start by analyzing about basic sentence patterns types based on Nichols’s theory in his book English Syntax. Then find the dominant of the basic sentence patterns types of the holy Qur’an English by Abdullah Yusuf ‘Ali, in 1934 that is focus in surah Ad Dukhan. The overall findings showed that there were basic sentence patterns found in 52 cases are in sentence patterns 1consist of 12 cases, in sentence patterns 2 there are 19 cases, in sentence patterns 3 there are 7 cases, in sentence patterns 4 there are 10 cases, in sentence patterns 5 there are 4 cases. From the result the dominant cases that occurred of sentence patterns that found in Abdullah Yusuf Ali’s translation. The most dominant is sentence patterns 2. After analysis in this paper, the writer suggests in analyzing basic sentence pattern of English, we find that selection is an important syntactic process. The learner will get new idea doing observe as the writer done and they can possibly provide more book to have deeper analysis about that.

  16. Spiders in mountain habitats of the Giant Mountains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Vaněk, J.; Šmilauer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 4 (2012), s. 341-347 ISSN 1067-4136 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Giant Mountain s (Krkonoše, Karkonosze) * spiders * anemo-orographic systems Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.236, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/0k5g721q1155r146/fulltext.pdf

  17. Acute mountain sickness in Iranian pilgrims around to Damavand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halabchi F "

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the incidence and risk factors of acute mountain sickness (A - AMS in pilgrims. Although it is well known that western trekkers suffer from acute mountain sickness (AMS in other mountains, not much is documented about the incidence of AMS in the Damavand Mountains, Iranian population that go to high altitude and its related contributing factors. Materials and Methods: The design was a cross sectional study. During six weeks (in summer 2000 a population of 459 pilgrims was studied. The period of the study was six weeks in summer AMS symptoms, were assessed by an extensively used standard questionnaier (Lake Louise, applied at 2900 m, after than arrive at 4200 m above sea level, and during descent from summit Damavand (at 4200 m at Damavand in Iran Alborz Mountain. Results: The overall incidence of A.M.S. was 60.8 percent. Climbers had 13-71 years and 67.8 percent of the study population was men. Men did not differ significantly higher rate of AMS from women. The incidence being increased in those who residence at an altitude below 600 m, climbed fast, amateur climbers, a previous AMS experience or high altitude illness, a history of AMS at ascent to Damavand and ascent time at night (6pm-6am. It was weakly dependent to rate of ascent (from 2800 m up 4200 m less that 4 hours and sleep in 4200 m. The incidence of AMS was unrelated to sex, age, body mass index (BMI, height, weight, smoking, to the load carried and knapsack and spent more than 15 hours in shelter (at 4200 m. So it was independent of rate of ascent in the higher altitude (from 4200 m to 5671 m, speed of descent and family history of AMS. Conclusions: Data show a strong relation between experiences mountaineer, history of AMS, ascent time at night and the incidence of acute mountain sickness in 459 climbers studied at high altitudes that didn’t report previously.

  18. Faith Moves Mountains-Mountains Move Faith: Two Opposite Epidemiological Forces in Research on Religion and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidt, N C; Hvidtjørn, D; Christensen, K; Nielsen, J B; Søndergaard, J

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests opposite epidemiological forces in religion and health: (1). Faith seems to move mountains in the sense that religion is associated with positive health outcomes. (2). Mountains of bad health seem to move faith. We reflected on these forces in a population of 3000 young Danish twins in which all religiosity measures were associated with severe disease. We believe the reason for this novel finding is that the sample presents as a particularly secular population-based study and that the second epidemiological force has gained the upper hand in this sample. We suggest that all cross-sectional research on religion and health should be interpreted in light of such opposite epidemiological forces potentially diluting each other.

  19. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  20. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified.

  1. Trout Creek Mountain project, Oregon

    OpenAIRE

    Hatfield, Doc; Hatfield, Connie

    1995-01-01

    The Trout Creek Mountain experience is an example of how the land and the people can win by building bridges of understanding and common interest between concerned constituencies. Love of the land, its natural resources, and realization of a need for changing grazing practices to reverse the degradation of riparian areas were the common interests that caused environmentalists, ranchers, the BLM, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to work togethe...

  2. Micrometeorites from the transantarctic mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, P; Folco, L; Suavet, C; van Ginneken, M; Gattacceca, J; Perchiazzi, N; Braucher, R; Harvey, R P

    2008-11-25

    We report the discovery of large accumulations of micrometeorites on the Myr-old, glacially eroded granitic summits of several isolated nunataks in the Victoria Land Transantarctic Mountains. The number (>3,500) of large (>400 mum and up to 2 mm in size) melted and unmelted particles is orders of magnitudes greater than other Antarctic collections. Flux estimates, bedrock exposure ages and the presence of approximately 0.8-Myr-old microtektites suggest that extraterrestrial dust collection occurred over the last 1 Myr, taking up to 500 kyr to accumulate based on 2 investigated find sites. The size distribution and frequency by type of cosmic spherules in the >200-mum size fraction collected at Frontier Mountain (investigated in detail in this report) are similar to those of the most representative known micrometeorite populations (e.g., South Pole Water Well). This and the identification of unusual types in terms of composition (i.e., chondritic micrometeorites and spherulitic aggregates similar to the approximately 480-kyr-old ones recently found in Antarctic ice cores) and size suggest that the Transantarctic Mountain micrometeorites constitute a unique and essentially unbiased collection that greatly extends the micrometeorite inventory and provides material for studies on micrometeorite fluxes over the recent ( approximately 1 Myr) geological past.

  3. Restudy of Conception of “House” in Islam: An Approach to Describe Functional Aspects of House According to Verses of Holy Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Azemati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Islam specified some rules for supplying real needs of human communities so that the human beings may live together with upmost security and health far from the concerns and problems by observing such principles, and one of the most important endowments pointed by the Quran is human’s place of residence. Conception of house in Islam is a subject studied in this paper. House, in fact, is one of the most important human requirements, and Muslims shall live under conditions and based on the religious values that they may worship God and provide the immortal life. The religious teachings in human life -lead the men to have a special imagination- based on the functional and aesthetic values are defined. Architecture and house construction are a field for the creation and description of human religious beliefs, and also a criterion for evaluation of meeting the said values. The purpose of this paper is to express necessary recognition of the principles and philosophy of verses of Holy Quran in terms of the house and shelter, and also its compliance with the social, cultural and functional structure in designing architectural buildings. Therefore, the verses of the Holy Quran are used in this research as the source of the principles and fundamentals of Islamic thinking and ontology in explaining the functional dimensions of house by enjoying the analytical-descriptive methodology.

  4. Considerations preliminary phonetic-phonological ’Language-of-saint’ and ’Language-of-the-holy people’ in Yards of Candomblé Rio Branco - AC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océlio Lima de Oliveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to give a description of preliminary phonetic-phonological 'tongue-in-holy' and 'tongue-in-us-de-santo' (Pessoa de Castro, 1968a and 1968b, 1977, 1980, 1983 spoken in a yard of candomblé in the city of Rio Branco - AC. Initially, he was made a general survey of the main headphones worn by followers of Candomblé in three songs offered to the orisha EXU and lexical items used in everyday situations by supporters of the yard. Subsequently the survey of headphones, we analyzed the occurrence of these pairs of headphones, particularly the phonetically similar to check the status phonemic, based on the theoretical and methodological assumptions of structuralist phonemic (PIKE, 1947. From the analysis of phonetic-phonological general, it was found that the 'tongue-in-holy' and 'tongue-in-saint-people' have the repertoire phonetic and phonemic characteristics similar to Brazilian Portuguese analyzed by Mattoso Jr . (2008 and Cristófaro-Silva (2007.

  5. The origin, development and a brief appraisal of the doctrine of the baptism in the Holy Spirit in Christ Apostolic Church, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George O. Folarin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the development of the Christ Apostolic Church’s (CAC doctrine of the baptism in the Holy Spirit, its current official stance and the church ministers’ interpretations of the doctrine. To gather data for this work, focus-group discussions were held with groups of CAC ministers in 1992 and 2012. Data gathered were analysed. Selected leaders of CAC were interviewed, and the data from the two sources were compared, interpreted and discussed in terms of related literature. A theological appraisal concluded the work. The findings are that, whilst CAC tenets appear to conform to the Classical Pentecostal model, the opinions of the church’s ministers are divided along Pentecostal and Evangelical lines. The official view of the CAC is that the baptism in the Holy Spirit is distinct from the initial work of salvation and that the visible signs of receiving this baptism are multiple, but there are significant disagreements amongst the church ministers to this. The appraisal reveals that the tenet of the church needs to be reworked to conform to the teaching of the Scripture.

  6. The effects of three days of sub-maximal-intensity mountain biking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pro- posed that each individual has a threshold of duration and intensity of exercise. Once this threshold is exceeded, sleep is negatively af- fected by the exercise. Possibly the most physically taxing exercise events are multi- day stage races of either cross-country skiing, running, road cycling, mountain biking or adventure ...

  7. His Holiness the Ambassador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beek, Martijn van

    1996-01-01

    A portrait of Kushok Bakula Rinpoche, the Indian ambassador to Mongolia at the time of writing, and Ladakh's most influential religious leader.......A portrait of Kushok Bakula Rinpoche, the Indian ambassador to Mongolia at the time of writing, and Ladakh's most influential religious leader....

  8. 'Holy Grails' of Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other during a collision, will lead to such a barrier. The horizon- tal axis in Figure 1 c represents all these .... saddle point along the reaction path, the corresponding force constant is negative. The force constant (k) is ... is, therefore defined as a state of dynamical instability, motion to one side is qualitatively different from the ...

  9. Incense and holy bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Sara Lei; Galal, Lise Paulsen

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how two Middle Eastern Christian churches in Denmark are constructed as particular sensorial spaces that invite attendees to participate in and identify with specific times and spaces. As with other Christian groups, rituals of the Sunday mass constitute a highlight of t...

  10. Incense and Holy Bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galal, Lise Paulsen; Sparre, Sara Lei

    In Denmark, Christian immigrants from the Middle East encounter a Christian church very different from the churches to which they belong. After the first relief having arrived in a Christian country, Middle Eastern congregations are on a very practical level confronted with their differences vis-...

  11. Incense and Holy Bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Sara Cathrine Lei; Galal, Lise Paulsen

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how two Middle Eastern Christian churches in Denmark are constructed as particular sensorial spaces that invite attendees to participate in and identify with specific times and spaces. As with other Christian groups, rituals of the Sunday mass constitute a highlight of t...

  12. Holy graal of physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Bührke, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    With the biggest "catapult" for elementar particles, the physicists want to explain why there is actually matter. Like in the USA some years ago, big accelerator started to find that black light would perhaps exist. (1 page)

  13. VT Green Mountain National Forest Roadless Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Revising the 2006 Green Mountain National Forest's Land and Resource Management Plan included a requirement to evaluate opportunities for...

  14. Landscape, Mountain Worship and Astronomy in Socaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Ricardo

    The spatiotemporal analysis of mountain worship in the indigenous community of Socaire, Atacama, northern Chile, relates to cultural, geographical, climatic, psychological, and astronomical information gathered from ethno archaeological studies. We identify a system of offerings to the mountains that incorporates concepts such as ceque (straight line), mayllku (mountain lord or ancestor), and pacha (space and time). Here, the mountains on the visible horizon (Tumisa, Lausa, Chiliques, Ipira, and Miñiques) feature as the fingers on the left hand (PAH Triad). This structure regulates annual activities and rituals and sets the basis for the Socaireños' worldview raised on a humanized landscape.

  15. History of the College of the Holy Cross American Sign Language Program and Its Collaborative Partnerships with the Worcester Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jami N.

    2014-01-01

    Most postsecondary American Sign Language programs have an inherent connection to their local Deaf communities and rely on the community's events to provide authentic linguistic and cultural experiences for their students. While this type of activity benefits students, there is often little effort toward meaningful engagement or attention to…

  16. OS X Mountain Lion bible

    CERN Document Server

    Gruman, Galen

    2012-01-01

    The complete guide to Mac OS X, fully updated for the newest release! The Mac's solid, powerful operating system and the exploding popularity of iOS devices are fueling a strong increase in market share for Apple. Previous editions of this book have sold more than 75,000 copies, and this new edition is fully updated with all the exciting features of OS X Mountain Lion, including Game Center, Messages, and Notifications. Written by industry expert Galen Gruman, it covers all the basics and then delves deep into professional and higher-end topics, making it the one book you need to succeed with

  17. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges. 

  18. Report on the Status of the Cheat Mountain Salamander in the Cabin Mountain Area of West Virginia 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This outlines the results of field surveys that were conducted for the Cheat Mountain salamander on the Kelley property on three mountains in the Cabin Mountain area...

  19. Early Ordovician (Tremadocian) brachiopods from the Eastern Alborz Mountains, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Popov, Leonid E.; Mansoureh Ghobadi Pour; Mohammad Reza Kebriaee-Zadeh

    2011-01-01

    Six linguliform and two rhynchonelliform brachiopods, including three new species Eurytreta ahmadii, Wahwahlingula kharbashi and Nanorthis bastamensis are described from Tremadocian strata (Paltodus deltifer deltifer conodont Biozone) in the Deh-Molla area southwest of Shahrud, Northern Iran. The fauna is dominated by micromorphic lingulides and acrotretides and shows distinct similarity to the contemporaneous micromorphic brachiopod association from Tremadocian chalcedonites of the Holy Cros...

  20. Mountain prophecies | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-23

    Dec 23, 2010 ... Looking to the mountains may give us an early indication of what's in store for the entire planet. For many people, the United Nations' designation of 2002 as the International Year of Mountains may seem an unlikely choice. After all, 60 per cent of the world's population lives within 500 km of a coastline.

  1. Can wolves help save Japan's mountain forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-meyer, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Japan’s wolves were extinct by 1905. Today Japan's mountain forests are being killed by overabundant sika deer and wild boars. Since the early 1990s, the Japan Wolf Association has proposed wolf reintroduction to Japan to restore rural ecology and to return a culturally important animal. In this article I discuss whether the return of wolves could help save Japan's mountain forests.

  2. Flinders Mountain Range, South Australia Province, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Classic examples of folded mountain ranges and wind erosion of geologic structures abound in the Flinders Mountain Range (30.5S, 139.0E), South Australia province, Australia. Winds from the deserts to the west gain speed as they blow across the barren surface and create interesting patterns as they funnel through the gullies and valleys.

  3. Rocky Mountain Research Station: 2011 Annual Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Research Station is one of seven regional units that make up the USDA Forest Service Research and Development organization ­ the most extensive natural resources research organization in the world. We maintain 12 field laboratories throughout a 12-state territory encompassing the Great Basin, Southwest, Rocky Mountains, and parts of the Great Plains...

  4. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rocky Mountain Research Station: 2010 Research Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick Fletcher

    2010-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Research Station is one of seven regional units that make up the USDA Forest Service Research and Development organization ­ the most extensive natural resources research organization in the world. We maintain 12 field laboratories throughout a 12-state territory encompassing the Great Basin, Southwest, Rocky Mountains, and parts of the Great Plains...

  6. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mountain climbing. 13.910 Section 13.910 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley or Mount Foraker without a permit is...

  7. Mountain Bike Wheel Endurance Testing and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: Mountain biking; wheels; failure testing 1. Introduction Mountain bike ( MTB ) wheels are subject to a wide range of...accumulates over the life of the wheel and leads to part failure. MTB wheels must be designed to withstand many miles of this loading before failure

  8. Annotated checklist and database for vascular plants of the Jemez Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxx, T. S.; Pierce, L.; Tierney, G. D.; Hansen, L. A.

    1998-03-01

    Studies done in the last 40 years have provided information to construct a checklist of the Jemez Mountains. The present database and checklist builds on the basic list compiled by Teralene Foxx and Gail Tierney in the early 1980s. The checklist is annotated with taxonomic information, geographic and biological information, economic uses, wildlife cover, revegetation potential, and ethnographic uses. There are nearly 1000 species that have been noted for the Jemez Mountains. This list is cross-referenced with the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS database species names and acronyms. All information will soon be available on a Web Page.

  9. Zoonotic infections among employees from Great Smoky Mountains and Rocky Mountain National Parks, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjemian, Jennifer; Weber, Ingrid B; McQuiston, Jennifer; Griffith, Kevin S; Mead, Paul S; Nicholson, William; Roche, Aubree; Schriefer, Martin; Fischer, Marc; Kosoy, Olga; Laven, Janeen J; Stoddard, Robyn A; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Smith, Theresa; Bui, Duy; Wilkins, Patricia P; Jones, Jeffery L; Gupton, Paige N; Quinn, Conrad P; Messonnier, Nancy; Higgins, Charles; Wong, David

    2012-11-01

    U.S. National Park Service employees may have prolonged exposure to wildlife and arthropods, placing them at increased risk of infection with endemic zoonoses. To evaluate possible zoonotic risks present at both Great Smoky Mountains (GRSM) and Rocky Mountain (ROMO) National Parks, we assessed park employees for baseline seroprevalence to specific zoonotic pathogens, followed by evaluation of incident infections over a 1-year study period. Park personnel showed evidence of prior infection with a variety of zoonotic agents, including California serogroup bunyaviruses (31.9%), Bartonella henselae (26.7%), spotted fever group rickettsiae (22.2%), Toxoplasma gondii (11.1%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (8.1%), Brucella spp. (8.9%), flaviviruses (2.2%), and Bacillus anthracis (1.5%). Over a 1-year study period, we detected incident infections with leptospirosis (5.7%), B. henselae (5.7%), spotted fever group rickettsiae (1.5%), T. gondii (1.5%), B. anthracis (1.5%), and La Crosse virus (1.5%) in staff members at GRSM, and with spotted fever group rickettsiae (8.5%) and B. henselae (4.3%) in staff at ROMO. The risk of any incident infection was greater for employees who worked as resource managers (OR 7.4; 95% CI 1.4,37.5; p=0.02), and as law enforcement rangers/rescue crew (OR 6.5; 95% CI 1.1,36.5; p=0.03), relative to those who worked primarily in administration or management. The results of this study increase our understanding of the pathogens circulating within both parks, and can be used to inform the development of effective guidelines and interventions to increase visitor and staff awareness and help prevent exposure to zoonotic agents.

  10. Icon of the Holy Mandylion and representation of multi-layered visual identity of Božidar Vuković

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borozan Igor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was in the monastery of Saint Francis in Venice in the year 1520 when Božidar Vuković purchased the icon of the Holy Mandylion. By that particular acquisition, this prominent publisher originating from Zeta has visualized his new position in the sixteenth century Venice. The multi-layered identity of Božidar Vuković was manifested by the subsequent inclusion of the noble coat of arms of the House of Vuković on the back of the icon. By the use of verbal and visual language the artificial initiation of Božidar Vuković within the distinguished members of Venetian society has been confirmed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177001: Predstave identiteta u verbalno-vizuelnoj kulturi novog doba

  11. Last Judgement in the Hospital Church of the Holy Spirit in Slovenj Gradec as a Medium of Coalescence of the Real and the Metaphysical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Bartol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the Last Judgement in the Church of the Holy Spirit in Slovenj Gradec, focussing on its function as a devotional image. The contemporary spread of mysticism was accompanied by specific icon-like devotional images, and such holds true also for the Last Judgement fresco. The church which houses it was closely connected with the activities of the nearby hospital, whose main concern was pro cura animarum, to prepare the soul for the blessings of paradise. In other words, with little earthly hope the sick and the poor had to endure pain and suffering as they prepared for the afterlife. However, this suffering was seen as a guarantee of their salvation, by means of imitatio Christi. The fresco served as an Andachtsbild, and while observing it, the sickly felt relief and consolation and, at least for a while, tasted the sweetness of heavenly realms.

  12. A sightability model for mountain goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, C.G.; Jenkins, K.J.; Chang, W.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Unbiased estimates of mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) populations are key to meeting diverse harvest management and conservation objectives. We developed logistic regression models of factors influencing sightability of mountain goat groups during helicopter surveys throughout the Cascades and Olympic Ranges in western Washington during summers, 20042007. We conducted 205 trials of the ability of aerial survey crews to detect groups of mountain goats whose presence was known based on simultaneous direct observation from the ground (n 84), Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry (n 115), or both (n 6). Aerial survey crews detected 77 and 79 of all groups known to be present based on ground observers and GPS collars, respectively. The best models indicated that sightability of mountain goat groups was a function of the number of mountain goats in a group, presence of terrain obstruction, and extent of overstory vegetation. Aerial counts of mountain goats within groups did not differ greatly from known group sizes, indicating that under-counting bias within detected groups of mountain goats was small. We applied HorvitzThompson-like sightability adjustments to 1,139 groups of mountain goats observed in the Cascade and Olympic ranges, Washington, USA, from 2004 to 2007. Estimated mean sightability of individual animals was 85 but ranged 0.750.91 in areas with low and high sightability, respectively. Simulations of mountain goat surveys indicated that precision of population estimates adjusted for sightability biases increased with population size and number of replicate surveys, providing general guidance for the design of future surveys. Because survey conditions, group sizes, and habitat occupied by goats vary among surveys, we recommend using sightability correction methods to decrease bias in population estimates from aerial surveys of mountain goats.

  13. Determination of Importance Evaluation for the ESF Enhanced Charcterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    2002-01-09

    The objective of this DIE is to determine whether the ECRB-Cross-Drift-related activities, as identified in Section 6.0, could potentially impact (1) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) testing or (2) the waste isolation capabilities of a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site. Any controls necessary to limit such potential impacts are also identified herein.

  14. Quantity and location of groundwater recharge in the Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico (USA), and their relation to the adjacent Roswell Artesian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawling, Geoffrey C.; Newton, B. Talon

    2016-06-01

    The Sacramento Mountains and the adjacent Roswell Artesian Basin, in south-central New Mexico (USA), comprise a regional hydrologic system, wherein recharge in the mountains ultimately supplies water to the confined basin aquifer. Geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and climatologic data were used to delineate the area of recharge in the southern Sacramento Mountains. The water-table fluctuation and chloride mass-balance methods were used to quantify recharge over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Extrapolation of the quantitative recharge estimates to the entire Sacramento Mountains region allowed comparison with previous recharge estimates for the northern Sacramento Mountains and the Roswell Artesian Basin. Recharge in the Sacramento Mountains is estimated to range from 159.86 × 106 to 209.42 × 106 m3/year. Both the location of recharge and range in estimates is consistent with previous work that suggests that ~75 % of the recharge to the confined aquifer in the Roswell Artesian Basin has moved downgradient through the Yeso Formation from distal recharge areas in the Sacramento Mountains. A smaller recharge component is derived from infiltration of streamflow beneath the major drainages that cross the Pecos Slope, but in the southern Sacramento Mountains much of this water is ultimately derived from spring discharge. Direct recharge across the Pecos Slope between the mountains and the confined basin aquifer is much smaller than either of the other two components.

  15. The characteristics of mountain waves observed by radar near the west coast of Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. T. Prichard

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Radar observations at 46.5 MHz of vertical-velocity perturbations at Aberystwyth (52.4°N, 4.1°W have been used to examine the incidence of mountain waves and their dependence on local topography and the wind vector at low heights. A contrast is drawn between the effects of easterly winds passing over major topographical features to the east of the radar site and those of westerly winds crossing low coastal topographical features to the west. Estimates are made of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum associated with mountain waves, and the general influence of mountain-wave activity on vertical-velocity measurements at the site is assessed.

  16. Subsurface investigations for the area surrounding Tortugas Mountain, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, J.; Icerman, L.

    1983-12-01

    The local geology in the vicinity of Tortugas Mountain, adjacent to the New Mexico State University and Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. geothermal well fields, was examined in terms of structure and stratigraphy. Nine lithologic logs and eight graphic columns, based on 912 drilling samples from nine geothermal wells, were prepared to identify the local subsurface geology. A 13,000-foot geologic cross section, extending from Tortugas Mountain to the east to approximately Interstate Highway 25 to the west, was generated from the lithologic data. A two-segment 1.6-mile seismic reflection survey was conducted to further define the subsurface structure in the area. The results of this work contribute to the understanding of the local subsurface geologic structure controlling the known geothermal reservoir and should be a valuable input to the selection of the optimal drilling strategy for future geothermal energy production walls located adjacent to Tortugas Mountain.

  17. AHP 21: Review: Moving Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Noseworthy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Moving Mountains stands out among recent discussions of the Southeast Asian Highlands, drawing from twelve contributors with extensive field experience living and working in locales closed to nonCommunist academics between 1945 and 1990 (3. The authors' methodologies focus on the anthropological approach of participant observation combined with oral history. Previously, substantial research had been confined to the experience of "hill tribes" in Northern Thailand (11, unless one gained access to the massive collections of French language research under the École Française d'Extrême Orient (EFEO or the Société Asiatique (SA, both in Paris. As such, this volume's contributors are able to ring out the voices of Southeast Asian Massif populations in a way that demonstrates a mindful assembly of research, while carefully narrating a more complex view of the region than that presented by Scott's (2009:22 "zones of refuge." ...

  18. Occupational Health in Mountainous Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhusupov, Kenesh O; Colosio, Claudio; Tabibi, Ramin; Sulaimanova, Cholpon T

    2015-01-01

    In the period of transition from a centralized economy to the market economy, occupational health services in Kyrgyzstan have survived through dramatic, detrimental changes. It is common for occupational health regulations to be ignored and for basic occupational health services across many industrial enterprises and farms to be neglected. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the present situation and challenges facing occupational health services in Kyrgyzstan. The transition from centralized to the market economy in Kyrgyzstan has led to increased layoffs of workers and unemployment. These threats are followed by increased workload, and the health and safety of workers becomes of little concern. Private employers ignore occupational health and safety; consequently, there is under-reporting of occupational diseases and accidents. The majority of enterprises, especially those of small or medium size, are unsanitary, and the health status of workers remains largely unknown. The low official rates of occupational diseases are the result of data being deliberately hidden; lack of coverage of working personnel by medical checkups; incompetent management; and the poor quality of staff, facilities, and equipment. Because Kyrgyzstan is a mountainous country, the main environmental and occupational factor of enterprises is hypoxia. Occupational health specialists have greatly contributed to the development of occupational medicine in the mountains through science and practice. The enforcement of existing strong occupational health legislation and increased financing of occupational health services are needed. The maintenance of credible health monitoring and effective health services for workers, re-establishment of medical services and sanitary-hygienic laboratories in industrial enterprises, and support for scientific investigations on occupational risk assessment will increase the role of occupational health services in improving the health of the working population

  19. Mapping Forest Fire Susceptibility in Temperate Mountain Areas with Expert Knowledge. A Case Study from Iezer Mountains, Romanian Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Bogdan; Savulescu, Ionut

    2014-05-01

    Forest fires in Romanian Carpathians became a frequent phenomenon during the last decade, although local climate and other environmental features did not create typical conditions. From 2004, forest fires affect in Romania more than 100 hectares/year of different forest types (deciduous and coniferous). Their magnitude and frequency are not known, since a historical forest fire inventory does not exist (only press papers and local witness for some selected events). Forest fires features the summer dry periods but there are dry autumns and early winter periods with events of different magnitudes. The application we propose is based on an empirical modeling of forest fire susceptibility in a typical mountain area from the Southern Carpathians, the Iezer Mountains (2462 m). The study area features almost all the altitudinal vegetation zones of the European temperate mountains, from the beech zone, to the coniferous zone, the subalpine and the alpine zones (Mihai et al., 2007). The analysis combines GIS and remote sensing models (Chuvieco et al., 2012), starting from the ideas that forest fires are featured by the ignition zones and then by the fire propagation zones. The first data layer (ignition zones) is the result of the crossing between the ignition factors: lightning - points of multitemporal occurence and anthropogenic activities (grazing, tourism and traffic) and the ignition zones (forest fuel zonation - forest stands, soil cover and topoclimatic factor zonation). This data is modelled from different sources: the MODIS imagery fire product (Hantson et al., 2012), detailed topographic maps, multitemporal orthophotos at 0.5 m resolution, Landsat multispectral imagery, forestry cadastre maps, detailed soil maps, meteorological data (the WorldClim digital database) as well as the field survey (mapping using GPS and local observation). The second data layer (fire propagation zones) is the result of the crossing between the forest fuel zonation, obtained with the

  20. Mountain biodiversity, its causes and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Christian

    2004-11-01

    The personal safety and well-being of one fifth, and water supply for almost half of all people depend directly or indirectly on the functional integrity of mountain ecosystems, the key component of which is a robust vegetation cover. The green 'coat' of the world's mountains is composed of specialized plants, animals and microbes, all nested in a great variety of microhabitats. Because a single mountain may host a series of climatically different life zones over short elevational distances, mountains are hot spots of biodiversity and priority regions for conservation. With their diverse root systems, plants anchor soils on slopes and prevent erosion. Both landuse and atmospheric changes such as elevated CO2 and climatic warming affect mountain biodiversity. Sustained catchment value depends on sustained soil integrity, which in turn depends on a diverse plant cover. Whether landuse in mountains is sustainable is a question of its consequences for water yield and biodiversity. Given their dependence on mountains, lowlanders should show concern for the highlands beyond their recreational value.

  1. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  2. What can we learn from fluvial incision in high mountains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Krbetschek, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    High and actively deforming mountain ranges attract the attention of geoscientists as they provide natural laboratories of fast evolving process-response systems. Tectonic compressional settings, often linked to perpendicular extension, control the topographic growth and hence, erosion, transport pathways and sedimentation. High altitude differences within short horizontal distances promote material re-organisation and high rates of surface processes. Furthermore, high mountains constitute orographic barriers that affect atmospheric circulations as well as host different climate regimes similar to those of widely separated latitudinal belts. Both cause a high sensitivity of surface processes to changes in climatic conditions. However, feedbacks between climatic and tectonic forcing are complex. Additionally, the dominance of one or the other varies in space and also over time, inheriting various traces of the paleo-morphodynamic conditions to the subsequent process regimes. To unravel the forces driving the evolution of relief in active mountains, numerous studies employ the drainage network of the corresponding mountains as a proxy of landscape evolution. Especially the rates of river incision provide a powerful tool to characterize the surface response and infer causes behind it. Several parameters of river incision are available to describe the fluvial incision at individual sites (e.g. terrace incision rates), along the river course (e.g. longitudinal river profiles, Hack index) and in its perpendicular dimension (e.g. valley cross sections, valley shape ratios). But they require careful interpretation. They are sensitive to both, climatic and tectonic forcing. Therefore, the synopsis of such indices for fluvial incision is essential to evaluate the role of climatic versus tectonic forcing. Here, we use the Panj river system, the major river draining the Pamir mountains of Central Asia, as an example. The Panj experiences high altitude changes of more than 4000

  3. Late Neogene deformation of the Chocolate Mountains Anticlinorium: Implications for deposition of the Bouse Formation and early evolution of the Lower Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sue; Haxel, Gordon B.; Dorsey, Rebecca J.; McDougall, Kristin A.; Jacobsen, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Deformation related to late Neogene dextral shear can explain a shift from an estuarine to lacustrine depositional environment in the southern Bouse Formation north of Yuma, Arizona. We infer that late Neogene deformation in the Chocolate Mountain Anticlinorium (CMA) created a barrier that blocked an estuary inlet, and that pre-existing and possibly active structures subsequently controlled the local course of the lower Colorado River. Structural patterns summarized below suggest that the CMA absorbed transpressional strain caused by left-stepping segments of dextral faults of the San Andreas fault system and/or the eastern California shear zone and Gulf of California shear zone. For this hypothesis to be correct, about 200-250 m of post-6 Ma, pre- ~5.3 Ma uplift along the CMA crest would be required to cut off a marine inlet. The 220-km-long CMA, cored by the early Paleogene Orocopia Schist subduction complex, extends from the Orocopia Mountains (Calif.) southeastward through the Chocolate Mountains (parallel to the southern San Andreas fault). Where Highway 78 crosses the Chocolate Mountains (Fig. 1), the CMA turns eastward through the Black Mountain-Picacho area (Calif.) and Trigo Mountains (Ariz.) into southwest Arizona. It separates southernmost Bouse Formation outcrops of the Blythe basin from subsurface Bouse outcrops to the south in the Yuma area. South of Blythe basin the CMA is transected by the lower Colorado River along a circuitous path. Here we focus on the geology of an area between the central Chocolate Mountains and the Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona. Specific landmarks include the southeast Chocolate Mountains, Midway Mountains, Peter Kane Mountain, Black Mountain, Picacho Peak, and Gavilan Hills. For simplicity, we refer to this as the eastern Chocolate Mountains.

  4. Modeling the biophysical impacts of global change in mountain biosphere reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugmann, H.K.M.; Bjornsen, F. Ewert; Haeberli, W.; Guisan, Antoine; Fagre, Daniel B.; Kaab, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mountains and mountain societies provide a wide range of goods and services to humanity, but they are particularly sensitive to the effects of global environmental change. Thus, the definition of appropriate management regimes that maintain the multiple functions of mountain regions in a time of greatly changing climatic, economic, and societal drivers constitutes a significant challenge. Management decisions must be based on a sound understanding of the future dynamics of these systems. The present article reviews the elements required for an integrated effort to project the impacts of global change on mountain regions, and recommends tools that can be used at 3 scientific levels (essential, improved, and optimum). The proposed strategy is evaluated with respect to UNESCO's network of Mountain Biosphere Reserves (MBRs), with the intention of implementing it in other mountain regions as well. First, methods for generating scenarios of key drivers of global change are reviewed, including land use/land cover and climate change. This is followed by a brief review of the models available for projecting the impacts of these scenarios on (1) cryospheric systems, (2) ecosystem structure and diversity, and (3) ecosystem functions such as carbon and water relations. Finally, the cross-cutting role of remote sensing techniques is evaluated with respect to both monitoring and modeling efforts. We conclude that a broad range of techniques is available for both scenario generation and impact assessments, many of which can be implemented without much capacity building across many or even most MBRs. However, to foster implementation of the proposed strategy, further efforts are required to establish partnerships between scientists and resource managers in mountain areas.

  5. Periglacial landforms in the Pohorje Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Natek

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the well-studied Pleistocene glaciation, periglacial phenomena in Slovenia have been given less scientific attention because they are not particularly evident in high mountains due to prevailing carbonate rocks. This, however, is not the case in the Pohorje Mountains: built of igneous and metamorphic rocks, it was not glaciated due to its insufficient elevation, but was subject to periglacial processes. In the article, some of the periglacial landforms of the Pohorje Mountains are presented for the first time, especially nivation hollows in the uppermost zone, and the Jezerc cirque where a smaller glacier, unknown until recently, existed at the peak of the glaciation.

  6. Hydraulics and morphology of mountain rivers; literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieben, J.

    1993-01-01

    Present knowledge on fluvial processes in mountain rivers should be expanded to enable the development of projects dealing with mountain rivers or mountain-river catchment areas. This study reviews research on hydraulic and morphological features of mountain rivers. A major characteristic of

  7. Holy flux: Spatial and temporal variation in massive pulses of emerging insect biomass from western U.S. rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David; Wesner, Jeff S.; Zuellig, Robert E.; Kowalski, Dan A.; Kondratieff, Matt C.

    2018-01-01

    The river stonefly, Pteronarcys californica (aka salmonfly), is an iconic insect in rivers of western North America due to its large size and its support of economically important species like wild trout (Nehring et al. 2011). Their emergence generates a large economic subsidy to local communities, as anglers from around the world travel to western rivers to fish the salmonfly “hatch” (e.g., Willoughby 2013). Salmonflies, which have a 4-yr lifespan in the central Rocky Mountains (Nehring et al. 2011), emerge en masse during 1 week in late spring (Sheldon 1999), and more than 20 terrestrial species, including humans, are known to eat adult salmonflies (Muttkowski 1925, Sutton 1985, Rockwell et al. 2009). How they influence populations of insectivores or the broader river-riparian ecosystem is unknown; this itself is an issue because salmonflies are disappearing from some rivers (Nehring et al. 2011).

  8. Recent population trends of mountain goats in the Olympic Mountains, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Beirne, Katherine F.; Hoffman, Roger A.; Griffin, Paul C.; Baccus, William T.; Fieberg, John

    2012-01-01

    Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) were introduced in Washington's Olympic Mountains during the 1920s. The population subsequently increased in numbers and expanded in range, leading to concerns by the 1970s over the potential effects of non-native mountain goats on high-elevation plant communities in Olympic National Park. The National Park Service (NPS) transplanted mountain goats from the Olympic Mountains to other ranges between 1981 and 1989 as a means to manage overabundant populations, and began monitoring population trends of mountain goats in 1983. We estimated population abundance of mountain goats during 18–25 July 2011, the sixth survey of the time series, to assess current population status and responses of the population to past management. We surveyed 39 sample units, comprising 39% of the 59,615-ha survey area. We estimated a population of 344 ± 72 (90% confidence interval [CI]) mountain goats in the survey area. Retrospective analysis of the 2004 survey, accounting for differences in survey area boundaries and methods of estimating aerial detection biases, indicated that the population increased at an average annual rate of 4.9% since the last survey. That is the first population growth observed since the cessation of population control measures in 1990. We postulate that differences in population trends observed in western, eastern, and southern sections of the survey zone reflected, in part, a variable influence of climate change across the precipitation gradient in the Olympic Mountains.

  9. Annual Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Stephen F. [Front Range Scientific, Inc., Lake City, CO (United States)

    2016-03-25

    This project supported the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, held from 2007 to 2015, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. The subject of the Copper Mountain Conference Series alternated between Multigrid Methods in odd-numbered years and Iterative Methods in even-numbered years. Begun in 1983, the Series represents an important forum for the exchange of ideas in these two closely related fields. This report describes the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, 2007-2015. Information on the conference series is available at http://grandmaster.colorado.edu/~copper/.

  10. Holy land, lost lands, Realpolitik. Imperial Byzantine thinking about Syria and Palestine in the later 10th and 11th centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepard, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews Byzantine attitudes and state policy towards the region between Antioch and Mount Sinai, stressing the general cautiousness of imperial strategy and, from the late tenth century onwards, the government’s preference for peaceful coexistence and commerce with the Fatimid caliphate. Caliph al-Ḥākim’s destruction of the church of the Holy Sepulchre in 1009 did not overturn this state of affairs, and the main bone of contention between Cairo and Constantinople was the city of Aleppo, not Jerusalem. Even here, the two powers were inclined to leave the initiative to local parties, rather than insisting on direct rule, and communications between Muslim and Byzantine-ruled territories were mostly fairly straightforward. During the relative détente of the first half of the eleventh century, pilgrimages to the Holy Land increased, and it may well have been primarily in order to impress pilgrims – those travelling from Byzantium itself, but especially those from the Christian west – that emperors lavished resources on reconstructing the church of the Holy Sepulchre in the 1030s and 1040s. Militant intervention on behalf of the Christian populations of south ern Syria and Palestine was not on their agenda. These conclusions rest on the collation of miscellaneous evidence, whose components are mostly well-known but have seldom received consideration side by side. The study highlights the value of trade to Fatimids and Byzantines alike, the esteem for ‘the holy places’ among Byzantines besides westerners, and the emperors’ desire to demonstrate concern for the Holy Sepulchre without jeopardising relations with the FatimidsEste estudio pasa revista a la política oficial del estado bizantino con respecto a la región situada entre Antioquía y el Monte Sinaí, haciendo énfasis en la prudencia adoptada por lo general en la estrategia imperial así como, a partir de finales del siglo X, en la voluntad del gobierno a favor de

  11. Effects of Foliar Application of Nano Zinc Chelate and Zinc Sulfate on Zinc Content, Pigments and Photosynthetic Indices of Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Moghimi pour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Holy basil is a perennial plant belongs to Lamiaceae family. The plant is a perennial and thrives well in the hot and humid climate. Its aerial parts have been in use for food, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and perfumery industries. Leaves contain 0.5-1.5% essential oil and main oil components are eugenol, methyl eugenol, carvacrol, methyl chavicol and1,8-cineole. A balanced fertilization program with macro and micronutrients is very important in producing high quality yield. Zinc is involved in IAA production, chlorophyll biosynthesis, carbon assimilation, saccharids accumulation, reactive oxygen radicals scavenging and finally carbon utilization in volatile oil biosynthesis. Material and methods: In order to evaluate the effect on zinc foliar application on zinc content of leaves, photosynthetic indices and pigments of holy basil, an experiment was carried out in 2013 at a research farm of Horticultural Science, Shahid Chamran University (31°20'N latitude and 48°40'E longitude and 22.5 m mean sea level, Ahvaz (Iran, a region characterized by semi-dry climate. The experiment was arranged based on Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD with six treatments and three replications. The treatments were nano zinc chelate (0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 g.l-1 and zinc sulfate (1 and 1.5 g.l-1 fertilizers. Land preparation includes disking and the formation of raising beds (15cm high and 45cm wide across the top using a press-pan-type bed shaper. Holy basil seeds were sown on two rows on each bed, with 15 cm in-row and 40 cm between-row spacing. The plants were irrigated weekly as needed. Foliar application of zinc fertilizers was done at six-eight leaf stage and were repeated with interval 15 days until full bloom stage. Zinc content, stomata conductance (gs, CO2 under stomata (Ci, transpiration rate (E, net photosynthesis (Pn, light use efficiency (LUE, water use efficiency (WUE and also chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll a+b and carotenoid

  12. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety for the Whole Family Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Hey! A Tick Bit Me! Bug Bites and Stings Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Lyme Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  13. Cheat Mountain Salamander Survey Summary for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary goal for this project is to establish baseline information on populations of the Cheat Mountain salamander on the refuge. In the future, an additional...

  14. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Units of Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Vicinity, Tennessee and North Carolina consists of geologic units mapped as area (polygon)...

  15. Nuclear Waste Disposal: Alternatives to Yucca Mountain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Congress designated Yucca Mountain, NV, as the nation's sole candidate site for a permanent high-level nuclear waste repository in 1987, following years of controversy over the site-selection process...

  16. Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 2006 vegetation management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Vegetation Management Plan (VMP) is to describe the approach for implementing vegetation management activities at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal...

  17. THE HIMALAYAN TAHR ON T ABLE MOUNTAIN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    apill esculenta. Nature, Lond. 167: 900-901. HYNES, H B N 1950. The food of freshwater sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatw and Pygos- tew pungitiw), with a review of methods used in. THE HIMALAYAN TAHR ON. T ABLE MOUNTAIN.

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 2007 vegetation management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Vegetation Management Plan (VMP) is to describe the approach for implementing vegetation management activities at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal...

  19. VT Green Mountain National Forest - Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) GMNFTRAILS contains minor Forest Service roads and all trails within the proclamation boundary of the Green Mountain National Forest and many of...

  20. VT Green Mountain National Forest - Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) GMNFTRAILS contains minor Forest Service roads and all trails within the proclamation boundary of the Green Mountain National Forest and many of...

  1. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tick Diseases transmitted by ticks More Statistics and Epidemiology Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Rocky Mountain ... lower case fatality rate observed in recent decades. Epidemiology Figure 1 – Reported incidence and case fatality of ...

  2. Fishery management scenarios : Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The fishery resources at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) have been managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service since the early 1960's. Management activities included...

  3. Mountain ranges favour vigorous Atlantic meridional overturning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bablu Sinha; Adam T. Blaker; Joël J.-M. Hirschi; Sarah Bonham; Matthew Brand; Simon Josey; Robin S. Smith; Jochem Marotzke

    2012-01-01

      We use a global Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model (OAGCM) to show that the major mountain ranges of the world have a significant role in maintenance of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC...

  4. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Hydro Plus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Park Hydro Plus is a value-added attribution of data produced by Great Smoky Mountains National Park and published by the USGS NHD. Not to be confused with the USGS...

  5. Vegetation resources of Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents the results of plant ecological studies conducted at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in 1986 and 1987. The studies were performed by...

  6. VT Green Mountain Power Pole Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Green Mountain Power (GMP) pole and OVERHEAD linear distribution/sub-transmission model data. THE LINEAR DISTRIBUTION LAYER ONLY INCLUDES OVERHEAD...

  7. [FY 1990 Budget Summary : Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains information related to Rocky Mountain Arsenal's budget for the 1990 fiscal year. The specifics are broken down into seven tasks, task #1 being...

  8. [FY 1996 Budget Summary : Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains information related to Rocky Mountain Arsenal's budget for the 1996 fiscal year. Page 1 is the memorandum from the Service to the U.S. Army...

  9. [FY 1989 Budget Summary : Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a single page document summarizing Rocky Mountain Arsenal's Budget for the 1989 fiscal year. There are three mentioned tasks; Operations & Planning, Law...

  10. Owl Mountain Partnership : An external assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — External review of the Owl Mountain Partnership (OMP) to identify benefits and successes associatedwith collaborative work through the perceptions of participating...

  11. Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

  12. Excessive deforestation of Gishwati Mountainous forest ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    sigp1. Excessive deforestation of Gishwati. Mountainous forest & biodiversity changes. Introduction. The Change in Forest cover in. Rwanda is result of the high growth of population density. The latter has doubled between 1978 and 2002. Over.

  13. [Nontraumatic medical emergencies in mountain rescues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Quintana, Eva; Martínez Caballero, Carmen María; Batista Pardo, Sara Abigail; Abella Barraca, Salas; de la Vieja Soriano, María

    2017-10-01

    To describe the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with nontraumatic medical problems rescued by a Spanish mountain emergency response service (061 Aragon). Retrospective observational analysis of records of mountain rescues completed between July 2010 and December 2016. A total of 164 patients with nontraumatic medical emergencies were rescued; 82.3% were males. Most patients were between the ages of 50 and 59 years. Environmentally related problems, most often hypothermia, accounted for 36.6% of the emergencies. Cardiac problems led to 20.7% and digestive problems to 12.8%. Eighty-two percent of the patients were hiking or engaged in general mountain activities (other than rock climbing, canyoning, hunting, or skiing). Recent years have seen a rise in the number of patients requiring rescue from mountains for nontraumatic medical emergencies, particularly heart problems. The typical patient to expect would be a man between the ages of 50 and 59 years who is hiking in the summer.

  14. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Fish Distribution

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Background and History The brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is the only trout native to the southern Appalachian Mountains. It was once widespread in Great Smoky...

  15. Tectonic and neotectonic framework of the Yucca Mountain Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweickert, R.A.

    1992-09-30

    Highlights of major research accomplishments concerned with the tectonics and neotectonics of the Yucca Mountain Region include: structural studies in Grapevine Mountains, Bullfrog Hills, and Bare Mountain; recognition of significance of pre-Middle Miocene normal and strike-slip faulting at Bare Mountain; compilation of map of quaternary faulting in Southern Amargosa Valley; and preliminary paleomagnetic analysis of Paleozoic and Cenozoic units at Bare Mountain.

  16. Rockfall exposures in Montserrat mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontquerni Gorchs, Sara; Vilaplana Fernández, Joan Manuel; Guinau Sellés, Marta; Jesús Royán Cordero, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Mountain. It is important to mention that the exposure level calculation has been obtained from natural hazard data do not protected by defense works. Results of this work enable us to consider best strategies to reduce rockfalls risk in the PNMM. It is clear that, apart from the required structural defense works, some of them already made, implementation of strategies not involving structural defense is, in the medium and long term, the best policy to mitigate the risk. In the PNMM case, rethinking of mobility and traffic management on the mountain access would be definitely helpful to achieve a minimized geological risk.

  17. Spatial variation in the power of mountain streams in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonstad, Mark A.

    2003-09-01

    The principle indicator of river energy expenditure, stream power, has a significant influence on many forms and process attributes of the fluvial system, yet few basin-wide analyses of stream power variations have ever been conducted. Recent studies hypothesize a peak in the mean stream power distribution in small (10 km 2)- to intermediate (100 km 2)-sized basins. To test hypothetical stream power profiles in a high mountain setting, 129 cross-sections of stream networks within the Costilla basin of northern New Mexico and southern Colorado were measured for channel form, local sediment conditions, and basin characteristics. Geomorphic and hydrologic analysis of these river sites throughout the Costilla basin yielded evidence of abundant local control over fluvial processes and forms. Within the basin, the spatial deviations of stream power from the hypothetical patterns derived from hydraulic geometry, in some cases >200% deviation, match areas of specific geologic and hydrogeologic control. As an alternative to traditional hydraulic descriptions of downstream channel form, a probabilistic process-response model can incorporate local and basin-scale variables and allow more realistic feedback mechanisms than in traditional regime theory. The probabilistic nature of this type of model also allows prediction of multiple modes of channel adjustment, an ever-present challenge to extremal and physically based simulations.

  18. Acid fog deposition and the declining forest in Tanzawa mountains, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, M.; Shigihara, A.; Goto, S.; Nanzai, B.

    2010-07-01

    Since 1988, we have investigated fog chemistry in Mt. Oyama, Tanzawa mountains, Japan, and acid fog has been frequently observed there. We have observed fog on Mt. Oyama by using a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain, by using a visibility meter at the top of the mountain, and by an active fog sampler at the mountainside. We have reported the fog frequency at the top of Mt. Oyama to be 46% measured by the video camera, but it was overestimated. The visibility measured at the top of the mountain is the most reliable index, and the top of the mountain is covered with fog for about 30%. The frequency of about 15% was added for the case of the visibility of a few km when it was measured by a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain (8.5 km far from the top). Fog-water deposition increases with the increasing altitude to be much larger than the rain-water deposition. The factors affecting on the occult precipitation intensity were investigated by the simultaneous measurement of the rainfall intensity under a canopy, the wind speed and direction, and the visibility at the top of the mountain. Air pollution has been improved recently in Japan, but acid fog is not improved and has been affecting the leaves of the trees. In Tanzawa mountains, many fir trees and beech trees are declining, while cedar trees show no decline symptoms. We have investigated the effect of acid fog on the trees of these species by exposing simulated acid fog on the seedlings of the species. Seedlings of fir and beech are much damaged by the long term exposure of pH 3 fog, while cedar seedlings are not affected by the acid fog. By the exposure of simulated acid fog, the epicuticle wax is eroded at first, then the cross linking polycation between sugar chains of cell wall is ion-exchanged with proton and the cell wall is swollen, and the membrane calcium is desorbed from the membrane, which lowers the tolerance of the trees to the climate change. Fir and beech

  19. Using prescribed fire to regenerate Table Mountain pine in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick H. Brose; Thomas A. Waldrop

    2000-01-01

    Stand-replacing prescribed fires are recommended to regenerate stands of Table Mountain pine (Pinus pungens) in the southern Appalachian Mountains because the species has serotinous cones and its seedlings require abundant sunlight and a thin forest floor. A 350-hectare prescribed fire in northeastern Georgia provided an opportunity to observe...

  20. Globalization and Marginalization in Mountain Regions: Assets and Challenges in Mountain Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zac Robinson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Globalization and Marginalization in Mountain Regions: Assets and Challenges in Mountain Regions Edited by Raghubir Chand and Walter Leimgruber. Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2016. xvi + 240 pp. € 74.96. ISBN 978-3-319-32648-1.

  1. Historic Frequency and Severity of Fire in Whitebark Pine Forests of the Cascade Mountain Range, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Michael P. Murray; Joel Siderius

    2018-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) is a foundation species of high elevation forest ecosystems in the Cascade Mountain Range of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. We examined fire evidence on 55 fire history sites located in the Cascade Range. To estimate dates of historic fires we analyzed 57 partial cross-sections from fire-scarred trees plus 700 increment cores. The resulting 101 fire events indicate fire has been a widespread component of Cascadian whitebark pine stands. Res...

  2. Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco formed as a result of the collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates about 80 million years ago. This collision destroyed the Tethys Ocean; the limestone, sandstone, claystone, and gypsum layers that formed the ocean bed were folded and crumpled to create the Atlas and Anti-Atlas Mountains. In this ASTER image, short wavelength infrared bands are combined to dramatically highlight the different rock types, and illustrate the complex folding. The yellowish, orange and green areas are limestones, sandstones and gypsum; the dark blue and green areas are underlying granitic rocks. The ability to map geology using ASTER data is enhanced by the multiple short wavelength infrared bands, that are sensitive to differences in rock mineralogy. This image was acquired on June 13, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and

  3. Rurality, ethnicity and mountain areas:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In a Latin American context where indigenous populations have had to wait until the end of the XXth century to recover a certain visibility, the definition of Andean identity is still an issue. In this paper, an analysis of the various steps in a territorially based collective movement provides insights into this identity that was for so long denied or repressed on account of socio-political conditions. The possible re-assertion of “Andeanity” is very complex, as the case study of the “Aymaras Sin Fronteras” (Aymaras without borders movement reveals. In this movement, the territorialisation process is based on the dialectics between its rural, ethnic and mountain (Andean components.Dans un contexte latinoaméricain où les populations autochtones ont dû attendre la fin du XXème siècle pour regagner en visibilité, l’identité andine pose question. Dans cet article, l’analyse des étapes d’une mobilisation collective à base territoriale permet de suivre la  redécouverte d’un ancrage identitaire longtemps nié ou refoulé du fait des conditions socio-politiques. L’affirmation retrouvée de l’ethnicité, voire de l’« andinité » s’avère très  complexe, comme le cas étudié, l’alliance « Aymaras sin Fronteras » (Aymaras sans frontières le révèle. Dans ce cas, le processus de territorialisation se fonde sur une interaction dialectique entre ses composantes rurale, ethnique, et montagnarde (andine.

  4. The dangerousness of mountain recreation: A quantitative overview of fatal and non-fatal accidents in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulé, Bastien; Lefèvre, Brice; Boutroy, Eric

    2017-08-01

    In France, there is a growing enthusiasm for outdoor sports and recreation. In the meantime, the risk of both severe and frequent injury associated with active pursuits in mountain areas is acknowledged. This paper tackles accidents related to mountain sports, with a focus on three critical activities: hiking, mountaineering and ski touring. The aim consists of estimating the actual number of accidents (whether they entailed deaths or injuries) in the three above-mentioned activities. In order to align the information collected, then provide estimations based on the reasoned crossing of these secondary data, we consulted and summarised all the databases available on the French territory. Results address the trauma-related mortality in absolute values, and a comparison with the death rate of other sports. The calculation of a mortality index, including secondary mortality, is then provided. Elements of mountain sports accidentality are also presented, intending to clarify how many casualities occur each year in the French mountains. Last, a focus on the particularities of each mountain sport is provided.

  5. Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in extratropical cyclones passing over mountain ranges: KH Waves in Extratropical Cyclones over Mountain Ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Socorro [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Houze, Robert A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Kelvin–Helmholtz billows with horizontal scales of 3–4 km have been observed in midlatitude cyclones moving over the Italian Alps and the Oregon Cascades when the atmosphere was mostly statically stable with high amounts of shear and Ri < 0.25. In one case, data from a mobile radar located within a windward facing valley documented a layer in which the shear between down-valley flow below 1.2 km and strong upslope cross-barrier flow above was large. Several episodes of Kelvin–Helmholtz waves were observed within the shear layer. The occurrence of the waves appears to be related to the strength of the shear: when the shear attained large values, an episode of billows occurred, followed by a sharp decrease in the shear. The occurrence of large values of shear and Kelvin–Helmholtz billows over two different mountain ranges suggests that they may be important features occurring when extratropical cyclones with statically stable flow pass over mountain ranges.

  6. Sustainable Land Use in Mountain Regions Under Global Change: Synthesis Across Scales and Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Huber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mountain regions provide essential ecosystem goods and services (EGS for both mountain dwellers and people living outside these areas. Global change endangers the capacity of mountain ecosystems to provide key services. The Mountland project focused on three case study regions in the Swiss Alps and aimed to propose land-use practices and alternative policy solutions to ensure the provision of key EGS under climate and land-use changes. We summarized and synthesized the results of the project and provide insights into the ecological, socioeconomic, and political processes relevant for analyzing global change impacts on a European mountain region. In Mountland, an integrative approach was applied, combining methods from economics and the political and natural sciences to analyze ecosystem functioning from a holistic human-environment system perspective. In general, surveys, experiments, and model results revealed that climate and socioeconomic changes are likely to increase the vulnerability of the EGS analyzed. We regard the following key characteristics of coupled human-environment systems as central to our case study areas in mountain regions: thresholds, heterogeneity, trade-offs, and feedback. Our results suggest that the institutional framework should be strengthened in a way that better addresses these characteristics, allowing for (1 more integrative approaches, (2 a more network-oriented management and steering of political processes that integrate local stakeholders, and (3 enhanced capacity building to decrease the identified vulnerability as central elements in the policy process. Further, to maintain and support the future provision of EGS in mountain regions, policy making should also focus on project-oriented, cross-sectoral policies and spatial planning as a coordination instrument for land use in general.

  7. Combined effects of holy basil essential oil and inlet temperature on lipid peroxidation and survival of Lactobacillus reuteri KUB-AC5 during spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodklongtan, Akkaratch; Chitprasert, Pakamon

    2017-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation induced by oxidative stress plays an important role in reducing probiotic survival during spray drying. In this study, the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri KUB-AC5 was co-encapsulated with holy basil essential oil, HBEO (0, 6, and 12mg/ml), by spray drying using skim milk at inlet air temperatures of 130, 140, and 150°C. The microcapsule properties in terms of morphology, size, moisture content, water activity, surface oil, microencapsulation efficiency, antioxidant activity, lipid peroxidation, and cell survival were determined. The result showed that the microcapsules with HBEO had much higher antioxidant activity than the ones without HBEO. The optimal condition of HBEO (6mg/ml) with inlet temperature (130°C) was effective in reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) level and enhancing survival of probiotics. This study indicates the potential role of HBEO in decreasing oxidative stress in probiotics during spray drying, which contributed to an increase in cell survival and health benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. On the donors' composition and the new dating of the fresco painting of the Church of the Holy Virgin in Mateič

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrova Elizabeta

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The painted decoration of the Church of the Holy Virgin in Mateič, the second largest fresco ensemble from the 14th century in the Balkans' region comprises one of the most interesting donors' compositions of the Late-Byzantine period. The figures comprised by the donors' composition are united by the conception of the Deesis scene, composed by the image of Christ in the lunette of the southern wall, the representation of the Virgin Hodegetria above the entrance to the diaconicon and the figure of John the Baptist, depicted in the southern part of the eastern wall of the naos. The broader context of the donor's composition, in addition to the images of the donors - tzarina Jelena and young king Uroš, who in the presence of tzar Dušan, present the model of their endowment to the patron saint, contains also the image of the patriarch Joanikije, depicted as the head of Serbian Orthodox Church. Within the donor's composition, one can see the images of Makarije, the abbot of the monastery and St. Stephan the great martyr dressed in deacon attire, represented with his traditional role as a defender of the rulers and donors from the Nemanjić dynasty...

  9. Effects of multi-metal toxicity on the performance of sewage treatment system during the festival of colors (Holi) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Bhatia, Akanksha; Gaur, Rubia Zahid; Khan, Abid Ali; Ali, Muntajir; Khursheed, Anwar; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2012-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of heavy metals (Ni, Zn, Cd, Cu, and Pb) toxicity on the performance of 18 MLD activated sludge process-based sewage treatment plant (STP) during celebration of Holi (festival of colors in India). The composite sampling (n = 32) was carried out during the entire study period. The findings show a significant decrease in chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency (20%) of activated sludge system, after receiving the heavy metals laden wastewater. A significant reduction of 40% and 60% were observed in MLVSS/MLSS ratio and specific oxygen uptake rate, which eventually led to a substantial decrease in biomass growth yield (from 0.54 to 0.17). The toxic effect of metals ions was also observed on protozoan population. Out of the 12 mixed liquor species recorded, only two ciliates species of Vorticella and Epistylis exhibited the greater tolerance against heavy metals toxicity. Furthermore, activated sludge shows the highest metal adsorption affinity for Cu, followed by Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd (Cu > Zn > Pb > Ni > Cd). Finally, this study proves the robustness of activated sludge system against the sudden increase in heavy metal toxicity since it recovered the earlier good quality performance within 5 days.

  10. La Gran Sala del Hospital del Santo Espíritu de Roma (Italia The Great Hall-Hospital of the Holy Spirit- Sassia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Teresa Miralles Sangro

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando la historia como hilo conductor, esta lectura repasa la trayectoria del Hospital del Santo Espíritu en Sassia, considerado como uno de los primeros hospitales de la Europa medieval. Se apuntan formas de vida cotidiana en las que enfermos y enfermeras, conciben el sufrimiento y los cuidados como vía de salvación eterna, conviviendo y perdurando en las instituciones sanitarias el escenario sanitarioreligioso característico de los hospitales hasta bien entrado el siglo XX.With these few words and using history as transmitter we will attempt to skim through the history of one of the most important hospitals originating in Medieval Europe; The Hospital of the Holy Spirit in Sassia. We point out the day-to-day life of patients and their nurses. Both perceived suffering and caring as means to eternal salvation. Together they lived there enduring institutionalised and medico-religious lives. These were the characteristics of the hospitals of the time until well into the XX century.

  11. Geology of the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sandra H.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains includes the Blue Ridge province and parts of four other physiographic provinces. The Blue Ridge physiographic province is a high, mountainous area bounded by several named mountain ranges (including the Unaka Mountains and the Great Smoky Mountains) to the northwest, and the Blue Ridge Mountains to the southeast. Metamorphic rocks of the mountains include (1) fragments of a billion-year-old supercontinent, (2) thick sequences of sedimentary rock that were deposited in subsiding (sinking) basins on the continent, (3) sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited on the sea floor, and (4) fragments of oceanic crust. Most of the rocks formed as sediments or volcanic rocks on ocean floors, islands, and continental plates; igneous rocks formed when crustal plates collided, beginning about 450 million years ago. The collision between the ancestral North American and African continental plates ended about 270 million years ago. Then, the continents began to be stretched, which caused fractures to open in places throughout the crust; these fractures were later filled with sediment. This product (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 2830) consists of a geologic map of the Southern Appalachian Mountains overlain on a shaded-relief background. The map area includes parts of southern Virginia, eastern West Virginia and Tennessee, western North and South Carolina, northern Georgia and northeastern Alabama. Photographs of localities where geologic features of interest can be seen accompany the map. Diagrams show how the movement of continental plates over many millions of years affected the landscapes seen today, show how folds and faults form, describe important mineral resources of the region, and illustrate geologic time. This two-sided map is folded into a convenient size (5x9.4 inches) for use in the field. The target audience is high school to college earth science and geology teachers and students; staffs of

  12. Mountains on Titan observed by Cassini Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, J.; Lorenz, R.D.; Kirk, R.L.; Lunine, J.I.; Stofan, E.R.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar mapper has observed elevated blocks and ridge-forming block chains on Saturn's moon Titan demonstrating high topography we term "mountains." Summit flanks measured from the T3 (February 2005) and T8 (October 2005) flybys have a mean maximum slope of 37?? and total elevations up to 1930 m as derived from a shape-from-shading model corrected for the probable effects of image resolution. Mountain peak morphologies and surrounding, diffuse blankets give evidence that erosion has acted upon these features, perhaps in the form of fluvial runoff. Possible formation mechanisms for these mountains include crustal compressional tectonism and upthrusting of blocks, extensional tectonism and formation of horst-and-graben, deposition as blocks of impact ejecta, or dissection and erosion of a preexisting layer of material. All above processes may be at work, given the diversity of geology evident across Titan's surface. Comparisons of mountain and blanket volumes and erosion rate estimates for Titan provide a typical mountain age as young as 20-100 million years. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Superior endurance performance in aging mountain runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, Martin; Förster, Holger; Burtscher, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold (VO(2)AT) is considered as the main determinant for endurance performance in humans. Endurance performance steeply decreases with aging but seems to be kept exceedingly high in elite mountain runners. To obtain the age- and gender-related upper limits of endurance performance in this sport, we analyzed the results of the World Masters Athletic Championships in Mountain Running 2007. Additionally, to investigate the relationship between the individual VO(2)AT values and running times, laboratory tests were performed in 10 mountain runners. The World Championships race times of the first 5 finishers of the 5-year age groups did not differ significantly from 35 to 49 years. The corresponding mean (+/- SD) values of the VO(2)AT were 68.0 +/- 1.7 ml/min/kg in males and 58.1 +/- 1.9 ml/min/kg in females. In the following age groups up to 70+ there was a decrease in the VO(2)AT of 29.1% in males and 33.9% in females. Thus, at the beginning of the 3rd millennium, elite mountain runners demonstrate that VO(2)AT and probably also VO(2max) may be held at top levels in humans up to the age of 45-49 years in both sexes. Despite the following decrease, endurance capacity remains about 3.5-fold higher in elite mountain runners up to 70+ years when compared to their untrained peers. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. DANGERS AND SAFETY MEASURES IN A MOUNTAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovica Petković

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mountaineering and everything that is connected with it is a sport with con¬tro¬lled risk. Mountaineers, alpinists, climbers, cavers and all the others who visit and sojourn in mountains are faced with many risks and dangers, which are caused by na¬ture and also by their own mistakes. The dangers in the mountains, like dangers in any other environment, are mainly predictable, so it is best to deal with them with good esti¬mation, knowledge and skill. One has to be aware of his surroundings – the moun¬tain, to respect it and to know what is dangerous and how much it is dangerous at any moment. The organization of the mountaineering expeditions and leadership per¬haps re¬present the highest level of security control. To develop skills for organizing and lead¬ing a group means to ensure the safety of the entire group – to work pre¬ven¬ti¬ve¬ly at the level of the entire group, not only at the level of an individual. The success of the enti¬re group as well as safety depends on the organization and leadership.

  15. Mountain Permafrost in the Yukon Territory, Canada: Mapping and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, A. G.; Bonnaventure, P.; Schultz, E.; Etzelmuller, B.

    2006-12-01

    , PISR was not significant, likely reflecting the much more maritime climate of this area and the frequent fogs that are present. More than 50 new air and ground temperature monitoring stations were installed in spring 2006 as the first step to extend the modelling to the remaining mountainous parts of the Yukon Territory. We selected sites within the four climatic regions encompassing discontinuous permafrost that we had not previously sampled: the Faro area (Central Yukon Basin region, extensive discontinuous zone), Johnson's Crossing (Pelly-Cassiar Mountains region, sporadic discontinuous zone), Sa Dena Hes mine (Liard Basin region, extensive discontinuous zone) and the Keno area (Ogilvie-Mackenzie Mountains region, extensive discontinuous zone). Each of the stations is equipped to measure air temperature, ground surface temperature, ground temperature at a depth of 1 m (to evaluate the thermal offset), and snow depth (interpreted from I-button miniature loggers installed on a stake). These measurements will not only be used for permafrost modelling but will generate a unique data-set of air and ground surface temperatures which will be employed to investigate the frequency of air temperature inversions, their relation to topography and their effect on permafrost. The first complete monthly results (July 2006) demonstrate the expected wide variability in air and ground surface temperatures at both regional and local scales that makes modelling mountain permafrost so challenging.

  16. Periurban landscapes in mountain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Bertrand

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Les mutations des paysages régionaux dues aux pressions urbaines questionnent l’usage du sol. Elles interpellent à la fois des enjeux économiques, sociaux et environnementaux voire spatiaux sous-tendus par l’étalement urbain, l’accroissement des déplacements domicile-travail, le mitage de l’espace. Ces évolutions et dysfonctionnements renvoient à la question de la durabilité du développement des régions, et particulièrement des Alpes, espace contraint géographiquement et objet de nombreuses pressions anthropiques et riche en biotopes remarquables. Cet article est basé sur deux ans de travaux menés par des socio-économistes et des écologues sur les effets sur le paysage et l’environnement de la périurbanisation d’un massif alpin. Nous avons pris en compte l’espace dans les processus environnementaux, économiques ou sociaux. Intrinsèque dans les analyses écologiques, elle a longtemps posé problème à l’économie pour intégrer l’espace comme dimension à part entière des processus économiques. Trois thèmes sont ici développés : l’approche du point de vue du paysage, les problèmes d’échelles spatiales et temporelles, le choix d’indicateurs. Ils demandent de hiérarchiser les questions et de pratiquer le travail en commun. Aller au-delà nécessite de développer une interrogation plus écologique ou plus économique et/ou sociale en quittant de ce fait l’interface pour favoriser des interrogations disciplinaires particulières.Changes in regional landscapes due to urban pressures raise questions regarding land use. They also give rise to economic, social and environmental issues related to urban sprawl, increases in daily commuting, and land consumption. These changes and dysfunctions are ultimately underpinned by the question of sustainable regional development. Mountain regions such as the Alps, with their various outstanding biotopes in a restricted space, are particularly vulnerable.

  17. Intracardiac thrombosis in the Cape Mountain Zebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Bath

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available The Cape mountain zebra (Equus zebra zebra is one of the rarest species of mammals in South Africa, and is threatened with extinction. At present there are less than 200 in existence, of which approximately 160 occur in the Mountain Zebra National Park near Cradock. Because of the rarity of the species and the undesirable concentration of the majority in an area of only 6 536 ha, a post-mortem examination is performed, if possible, on all animals to establish cause of death with the purpose of preventing large-scale mortalities. This is done even if the carcass is in a fairly advanced state of decomposition. Amongst the examinations so performed were two zebra which were believed to have died as a result of intraventricular thrombosis. The rarity of this condition and of the Cape mountain zebra makes a report on these cases necessary.

  18. No Otters in the Tassili Mountains (Sahara)

    OpenAIRE

    Smet K. de

    1987-01-01

    The Tassill Mountains are situated in the centre of the Sahara Desert and as they are rather high (summits over 2,000 m), they have a rainfall of more than 50 mm/year. There are many rivers in these mountains and although they only flow after the occasional rains, a great number of small lakes (locally called Guelta) remain in the deep canyons. Some river systems always have running water (Oued Imirhou, Oued Iherir) and most of them contain large quantities of fish (Barbus sp., Tilapia sp.) ...

  19. Consequences of early snowmelt in Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-01-01

    Snow melted significantly earlier in the Rocky Mountains in 2012 than in previous years, with serious consequences for plants and animals, scientists reported at the AGU Fall Meeting. David Inouye of the University of Maryland, College Park, and the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory said that "the timing of winter's end is changing." He has been observing snowmelt dates and flowering of plants at a site at 2900 meters altitude. This year's snowmelt occurred 23 April, whereas the previous year, snow melted 19 June, he reported.

  20. Prototype testing for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalia, H.N.; Oliver, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Girdley, W.A. [USDOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Yucca Mountain Project Office

    1990-02-01

    The US Department of Energy, through its Yucca Mountain Project Office, has been conducting prototype activities in welded and non-welded tuff. These activities are in preparation for characterization of the Yucca Mountain area, which is under consideration as a site for a geologic repository in which high-level nuclear waste could be safely stored. Investigators from organizations that will conduct the site investigation have been afforded opportunity, through the prototype program, to test, evaluate, and develop instruments, equipment, and methods. The Exploratory Shaft Facility will be used to collect significant amounts of underground site characterization data. The prototype tests are conducted under similar conditions. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Periglacial landforms in the Pohorje Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Natek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the well-studied Pleistocene glaciation, periglacial phenomena in Slovenia havebeen given less scientific attention because they are not particularly evident in high mountainsdue to prevailing carbonate rocks. This, however, is not the case in the Pohorje Mountains:built of igneous and metamorphic rocks, it was not glaciated due to its insufficient elevation,but was subject to periglacial processes. In the article, some of the periglacial landforms ofthe Pohorje Mountains are presented for the first time, especially nivation hollows in theuppermost zone, and the Jezerc cirque where a smaller glacier, unknown until recently, existedat the peak of the glaciation.

  2. 2012: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  3. CMS Survey / Bald Knob for Cheat Mountain Salamanders 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Several survey reports and summary dated: 1.) Bald Knob was surveyed on 05 June 2002 for Cheat Mountain Salamanders. No Cheat Mountain Salamanders (CMS) were...

  4. 2014: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  5. 2011: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  6. 2013: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  7. ( Arundinaria alpina ) in the Choke Mountain, Northwestern Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Propagation Techniques for Highland Bamboo ( Arundinaria alpina ) in the Choke Mountain, Northwestern Ethiopia. ... Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural Sciences ... A. alpina landraces (TIFRO, WELELE and WONDE) were evaluated for their performance under field condition in the Choke Mountain, northwestern Ethiopia.

  8. 2016: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  9. 2017: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  10. 2008: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  11. [Exit Strategy - Issues Summary : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : January 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the Exit Strategy spreadsheet developed in a joint meeting between the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Council and the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Committee...

  12. 2015: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  13. MOUNTAIN TOURISM INTERCONNECTIONS. VARIATION OF MOUNTAIN TOURIST FLOW IN SUCEAVA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George CHEIA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mountain tourism, in addition to one of the most common types of tourism, is generated by a complex of factors and at the same time, triggers a series of processes involving tourism phenomenon, especially the environment where it is taking place. This paper aims to discuss some of these causal factors, and the relationship between this type of tourism and the tourist area itself (1. By using SPSS analytical methods , it can be practically demonstrated the impact of mountain tourist flow in spas (2 and mountain resorts (3 in Suceava county.

  14. Effects of topographic smoothing on the simulation of winter precipitation in High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Forest; Carvalho, Leila M. V.; Jones, Charles; Norris, Jesse; Bookhagen, Bodo; Kiladis, George N.

    2017-02-01

    Numerous studies have projected future changes in High Mountain Asia water resources based on temperature and precipitation from global circulation models (GCMs) under future climate scenarios. Although the potential benefit of such studies is immense, coarse grid-scale GCMs are unable to resolve High Mountain Asia's complex topography and thus have a biased representation of regional weather and climate. This study investigates biases in the simulation of physical mechanisms that generate snowfall and contribute to snowpack in High Mountain Asia in coarse topography experiments using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Regional snowpack is event driven, thus 33 extreme winter orographic precipitation events are simulated at fine atmospheric resolution with 6.67 km resolution topography and smoothed 1.85° × 1.25° GCM topography. As with many modified topography experiments performed in other regions, the distribution of precipitation is highly dependent on first-order orographic effects, which dominate regional meteorology. However, we demonstrate that topographic smoothing enhances circulation in simulated extratropical cyclones, with significant impacts on orographic precipitation. Despite precipitation reductions of 28% over the highest ranges, due to reduced ascent on windward slopes, total precipitation over the study domain increased by an average of 9% in smoothed topography experiments on account of intensified extratropical cyclone dynamics and cross-barrier moisture flux. These findings identify an important source of bias in coarse-resolution simulated precipitation in High Mountain Asia, with important implications for the application of GCMs toward projecting future hydroclimate in the region.

  15. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  16. Intention of mountain bikers to return | Kruger | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mountain biking forms part of cycle tourism and is a growing segment in sport tourism. Yet, information about the underlying motives of those who participate in mountain bike events, while a tourist at the same time, appears to be scant. The purpose of this research was to determine the motives of mountain bikers and what ...

  17. Mountain range specific analog weather forecast model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 5. Mountain range specific ... Mountain range specific analog weather forecast model is developed utilizing surface weather observations of reference stations in each mountain range in northwest Himalaya (NW-Himalaya).The model searches past ...

  18. Risk management among mountain bikers in selected clubs in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mountain biking is the best pedal sport on road and off road trails. The element of adventure in this sport make many people like to join this challenging sports. This study examined the risk among mountain bikers in selected clubs in Malaysia. The main objective of this study is to reveal injuries among mountain bikers ...

  19. The ABSA Cape Epic Mountain Bike Challenge: impacts and legacies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Absa Cape Epic mountain bike race is held in and around the mountainous areas outside Cape Town, in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, since 2004. The 700km-plus race, along farm roads and mountain tracks, extends over an eight day period. The race is limited to 600 two-person male and female teams, ...

  20. Novel application of cultured roots of mountain ginseng ( Panax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mountain ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer), which belongs to Araliaceae family, grows naturally in the mountains of Korea. It is highly valued owing to its enhanced pharmacology effects such as immunostimulating, antioxidant, anti-cancer and antiaging activity. An alternative to accessing the sparse mountain ...

  1. Aspen biology, community classification, and management in the Blue Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    David K. Swanson; Craig L. Schmitt; Diane M. Shirley; Vicky Erickson; Kenneth J. Schuetz; Michael L. Tatum; David C. Powell

    2010-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is a valuable species that is declining in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. This publication is a compilation of over 20 years of aspen management experience by USDA Forest Service workers in the Blue Mountains. It includes a summary of aspen biology and occurrence in the Blue Mountains, and a...

  2. A comparison of northern and southern table mountain pine stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick H. Brose; Thomas A. Waldrop; Helen H. Mohr

    2010-01-01

    Table Mountain pine (Pinus pungens) stands occur throughout the Appalachian Mountains, but ecological research has concentrated on the southern part of this region. In 2006, research was initiated in northern Table Mountain pine stands growing in PA to compare some basic attributes of those stands with previously described ones in TN. Overall, the...

  3. Snow impact on groundwater recharge in Table Mountain Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snowmelt in the mountainous areas of the Table Mountain Group (TMG) in South Africa is believed to be one of sources of groundwater recharge in some winter seasons. This paper provides a scientific assessment of snow impact on groundwater recharge in Table Mountain Group Aquifer Systems for the first time.

  4. Stream Crossings

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Physical measurements and attributes of stream crossing structures and adjacent stream reaches which are used to provide a relative rating of aquatic organism...

  5. Ecology and evolution of mountain butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    KLEČKOVÁ, Irena

    2014-01-01

    The thesis deals with speciation processes, thermal ecology and habitat use in Holarctic mountain and arctic butterflies. It demonstrates a crucial role of environmental heterogeneity for speciation, survival of butterfly lineages, coexistence of closely related species and, finally, for resource use of sexes with different habitats demands at the level of individual species.

  6. Experiments on sediment pulses in mountain rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Cui; T. E. Lisle; J. E. Pizzuto; G. Parker

    1998-01-01

    Pulses of sediment can be introduced into mountain rivers from such mechanisms as debris flows, landslides and fans at tributary confluences. These processes can be natural or associated with the activities of humans, as in the case of a pulse created by sediment derived from timber harvest or the removal of a dam. How does the river digest these pulses?

  7. F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    i AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain by Jared P. White, Maj, USAF...Modular mission computer ( MMC ) 6.2 OFP introduced auto-ground collision avoidance software into the digital flight control computer (DFLCC). AGCAS

  8. Mountain Biking with Groups: A "Safe" Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Terry

    2001-01-01

    A survey mailed to 200 British mountain bike leaders found that rates of cycling accidents and injuries were greater in forests and woodlands than on terrain where a license is required to lead groups of young cyclists. Excessive speed was mentioned in most accidents, coupled with poor use of breaks in many cases. (SV)

  9. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Krier

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report, ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', is to present information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a repository at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report provides information to four other reports: ''Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion'', (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170001]); ''Atmospheric Dispersal and Deposition of Tephra from Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170026]); ''Dike/Drift Interactions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170028]); ''Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027], Section 6.5). This report is organized into seven major sections. This section addresses the purpose of this document. Section 2 addresses quality assurance, Section 3 the use of software, Section 4 identifies the requirements that constrain this work, and Section 5 lists assumptions and their rationale. Section 6 presents the details of the scientific analysis and Section 7 summarizes the conclusions reached.

  10. Landscape dynamics of mountain pine beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Lundquist; Robin M. Reich

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude and urgency of current mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the western United States and Canada have resulted in numerous studies of the dynamics and impacts of these insects in forested ecosystems. This paper reviews some of the aspects of the spatial dynamics and landscape ecology of this bark beetle. Landscape heterogeneity influences dispersal patterns...

  11. Air pollution: worldwide effects on mountain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne M. Rosenthal; Andrzej Featured: Bytnerowicz

    2004-01-01

    Widespread forest decline in remote areas of the Carpathian Mountains has been linked to air pollution from urban and industrial regions. Besides injuring plant tissues directly, pollutants may deposit to soils and water, drastically changing susceptible ecosystems. Researcher Andrzej Bytnerowicz has developed effective methods for assessing air quality over wildlands...

  12. Cerebral blood flow in acute mountain sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Wright, Anne; Lassen, N A

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using the radioactive xenon technique and were related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In 12 subjects, ascending from 150 to 3,475 m, CBF was 24% increased at 24 h [45.1 to 55.9 initial slope index (ISI) units] and 4% increased...

  13. Anelastic Semigeostrophic Flow Over a Mountain Ridge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bannon, Peter R; Chu, Pe-Cheng

    1987-01-01

    ...) characterize the disturbance generated by the steady flow of a uniform wind (U0, V0) incident on a mountain ridge of width alpha in an isothermal, uniformly rotating, uniformly stratified, vertically semi-infinite atmosphere. Here mu = h(0)/H(R...

  14. Mountain Guides: Between Ethics and Socioeconomic Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Thierry; Bazin, Damien; Massiera, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    This study analysed mountain guides' representations of environmental responsibility and explored the paradox that these professionals face: using nature as a source of income while trying to preserve it. The study was mainly guided by the philosophical literature on this topic and made use of the concepts of sustainable development and nature.…

  15. Effects of forest expansion on mountain grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidi, Claudia; Magid, Jakob; Rodeghiero, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Grassland abandonment followed by forest succession is the dominant land-use change in the European Alps. We studied the impact of current forest expansion on mountain grassland on changes in physical soil organic carbon (SOC) fractions along a land-use and management gradient...

  16. Association between avian assemblages and mountain bushveld ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the bird species diversity associated with vegetation communities found on a single mountain slope in the Usuthu Gorge Community Conservation Area, northern KwaZulu-Natal. Thirteen sample sites were surveyed on a monthly basis for 12 months. Over this period, 279 birds and 55 species were ...

  17. Equipment of medical backpacks in mountain rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsensohn, Fidel; Soteras, Inigo; Resiten, Oliver; Ellerton, John; Brugger, Hermann; Paal, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a survey of equipment in medical backpacks for mountain rescuers and mountain emergency physicians. The aim was to investigate whether there are standards for medical equipment in mountain rescue organizations associated with the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MEDCOM). A questionnaire was completed by 18 member organizations from 14 countries. Backpacks for first responders are well equipped to manage trauma, but deficiencies in equipment to treat medical emergencies were found. Paramedic and physicians' backpacks were well equipped to provide advanced life support and contained suitable drugs. We recommend that medical backpacks should be equipped in accordance with national laws, the medical emergencies in a given region, and take into account the climate, geography, medical training of rescuers, and funding of the organization. Automated external defibrillator provision should be improved. The effects of temperature on the drugs and equipment should be considered. Standards for training in the use and maintenance of medical tools should be enforced. First responders and physicians should only use familiar tools and drugs.

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Kamakura, Orson; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Horta, Mauricio C; Pacheco, Richard C

    2009-03-01

    Clinical illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in dogs has been reported solely in the United States. We report 2 natural clinical cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs in Brazil. Each case was confirmed by seroconversion and molecular analysis and resolved after doxycycline therapy.

  19. The mountain Cer: Potentials for tourism development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grčić Mirko D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In northwest of Serbia in the meridians directions an elongated mountain range of Cer with Iverak and Vlašić stretches itself. On the north it goes down to Mačva and Posavina, on the west to Podrinje, on the east to the valley of Kolubara, on the south to the basins and valleys of Jadar and upper Kolubara, which separate it from the mountains of Valjevo and Podrinje area. Cer mountain offers extremely good condition for development of eco-tourism. The variety of relief with gorgeous see-sites, natural rarities, convenient bio-climatic conditions, significant water resources, forest complexes, medieval fortresses, cultural-historic monuments, richness of flora and fauna, preserved rural environment, traditions and customs of local population, were all neglected as strategic factors in the development of tourism. This mountain’s potentials are quite satisfactory for the needs of eco-tourism, similar to the National Park of Fruška Gora, but it has lacked an adequate ecotourist strategy so far. This study aims to pointing to the potential and possibilities of ecotourist valorization of this mountain.

  20. [Mountain biking : Breezy ups and traumatic downs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, G

    2010-05-01

    For more than two decades the popularity of mountain biking as a national pastime as well as a competitive sport has been undiminished. However, its related risks are not monitored as closely as those, for example, of skiing. The injuries caused by mountain biking are specific and cannot be compared with those caused by other cycling sports. This is due not only to the characteristics of the terrain but also to the readiness to assume a higher risk compared to cycle racing.The particular value of radiology is in the acute trauma setting. Most often musculoskeletal lesions must be examined and digital radiography and MRI are the most useful techniques. Severe trauma of the cranium, face, spine, thorax and abdomen are primarily evaluated with CT, particularly in dedicated trauma centers. Therefore, radiology can play a role in the rapid diagnosis and optimal treatment of the trauma-related injuries of mountain biking. Thus, the unnecessarily high economical damage associated with mountain biking can be avoided.

  1. The glacial relief in the Leaota Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George MURĂTOREANU

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of glacial relief in the Romanian medium height massifs is still controversial. The medium height mountains, such as theLeaota Mountains (in the Bucegi group, with maximum altitudes of almost 2000 m andmedium altitudes of approximately 1250 m, can display traces of glacial relief dating from theUpper Pleistocene. The aim of this article is to provide evidence about the presence of theglacial morphology in the northern part of the Leaota Peak, the main orographic node in themassif with the same name. Thus, on the basis of field observations, of topographical mapanalysis and by using the geographic information systems which made possible a detailedmorphometric analysis, I was able to gather evidence proving the existence of a glacial cirquein the Leaota Mountains. The arguments put forward in this article show that the glacial reliefis represented in the Leaota Mountains through a small-size suspended glacial cirque, whichdisplays all the morphologic elements proving the existence of glaciation in this massif.

  2. Toward mountains without permanent snow and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, M.; Bookhagen, B.; Huggel, C.; Jacobsen, D.; Bradley, R. S.; Clague, J. J.; Vuille, M.; Buytaert, W.; Cayan, D. R.; Greenwood, G.; Mark, B. G.; Milner, A. M.; Weingartner, R.; Winder, M.

    2017-05-01

    The cryosphere in mountain regions is rapidly declining, a trend that is expected to accelerate over the next several decades due to anthropogenic climate change. A cascade of effects will result, extending from mountains to lowlands with associated impacts on human livelihood, economy, and ecosystems. With rising air temperatures and increased radiative forcing, glaciers will become smaller and, in some cases, disappear, the area of frozen ground will diminish, the ratio of snow to rainfall will decrease, and the timing and magnitude of both maximum and minimum streamflow will change. These changes will affect erosion rates, sediment, and nutrient flux, and the biogeochemistry of rivers and proglacial lakes, all of which influence water quality, aquatic habitat, and biotic communities. Changes in the length of the growing season will allow low-elevation plants and animals to expand their ranges upward. Slope failures due to thawing alpine permafrost, and outburst floods from glacier- and moraine-dammed lakes will threaten downstream populations. Societies even well beyond the mountains depend on meltwater from glaciers and snow for drinking water supplies, irrigation, mining, hydropower, agriculture, and recreation. Here, we review and, where possible, quantify the impacts of anticipated climate change on the alpine cryosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere, and consider the implications for adaptation to a future of mountains without permanent snow and ice.

  3. A seal of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher of the 17th century from the State Hermitage Museum collection, Saint Petersburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pyatnitsky

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focusing on a small metal medallion engraved with the scene “Descent into Hell” and the Greek inscription from the Hermitage Museum collection. This item has been published several times by Hermitage researcher Vera Zalessk as “lid from a piksidy brought by a pilgrim from Jerusalem, which could also be used as a matrix for making Eulogy copies”. This fantastic interpretation was repeated in several publications; she also wanted to publish it again in the catalog of the exhibition dedicated to the 150th anniversary of Academician Nikolai Likhachev. The later prompted me to write in 2011 a special article with another interpretation of this object and two other similar ones. Studying Greek documents in the Archives of Ancient Acts in Moscow, I noticed that the stamps from the documents issued by the Jerusalem Patriarchate are extremely similar to the object from Hermitage Museum by the typology, iconography and inscriptions. Continuing research in this direction, I found strong arguments for the identification of this object as a stamp of the Jerusalem Brotherhood of the Holy Sepulchre Temple of the 17th century. Comparison with the document of the first quarter of the 17th century by Patriarch of Jerusalem Theophanes, made us believe that manufacturing of this stamp was commissioned in Constantinople by the patriarch before his trip to Russia to appoint the Moscow Patriarch Filaret Nikitich, father of Tsar Mikhail Romanov. The time it was made may be considered as in the first quarter of 17th century through analogy with the personal seal of Patriarch Theophanes.

  4. The Effect of Listening to Holy Quran Recitation on Weaning Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadak, Mohammad; Ansari, Khalid Aziz; Qutub, Hatem; Al-Otaibi, Hajed; Al-Omar, Omar; Al-Onizi, Nawal; Farooqi, Faraz Ahmed

    2017-09-30

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) causes high level of stress in hospitalized patients. Weaning is the gradual process of decreasing ventilator support that in turn lead to termination of MV and increased respiratory effort, which may exacerbate symptoms and prolong MV. This study aimed to investigate the effect of listening to Holy Quran recitation (HQR) as a non-pharmacological intervention in patients during weaning from mechanical ventilation. This is a randomized controlled trial in which 55 patients admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU) and on mechanical ventilation were recruited. Patients were divided into experimental (case) and control group. In the experimental group, patients received 30 min of HQR, whereas in the control group, patients had 30 min of rest in bed before the start of the weaning. The physiological and/or clinical parameters of weaning were recorded. These parameters include rapid shallow breathing index, respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, exhaled carbon dioxide, and blood pressure. The baseline demographic data for groups were presented in tables. The mean age was 54 ± 0.5 years for the experimental and 56.4 ± 18.5 years for the control groups. The physiological and clinical parameters were compared between case and control and found no significant difference. The preliminary findings of this pilot study suggest that there is no negative effect of HQR on weaning patients from mechanical ventilation in the ICU. The results also outline and explorthe possible utility of HQR further in ICU patients as an intervention in weaning patients off from ventilator in the ICU. Although there remains much to be done, our work generates important findings in the field of critical care management.

  5. Monitoring the condition of mountain zebra habitat in the Mountain Zebra National Park

    OpenAIRE

    P.A. Novellie

    1994-01-01

    The study aimed at determining an appropriate sampling design for monitoring the quality of mountain zebra habitat. The parameter used for monitoring was an index of habitat suitability. The value of this index was greater than 20 in the habitat that was most favoured by the mountain zebras, whereas values below 20 were characteristic of moderate to poor habitat. It is recommended that if the index in the most favoured habitat declines to below 20, management intervention in the form of a red...

  6. Mountain Snow System Interactions - An Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, C. C.; Painter, T. H.; Barrett, A. P.

    2004-12-01

    Snow scientists now have capabilities and opportunities unimagined in the 1950's due to refinements in field techniques and instrumentation, and the advent of remote sensing platforms. These technical advances enable snow scientists to observe the mountain snow system at virtually any spatial scale. Mountain snow covers are essential water resources in many regions and are increasingly recognized as sensitive bellwethers of global change. Earth system science requires datasets that capture the 'vital signs' of system states and interactions at multiple spatio/temporal scales. Snowmelt processes are influenced by complex interactions that occur over a range of spatial scales. Surface energy exchange states and storage of melt water within the snowpack are expected to dominate snowmelt at the point scale. At larger spatial scales, the influence on lateral movement of water through the snowpack by basin topography and stream network traits may begin to dominate runoff. At still larger scales, reductions in basin- scale snow albedo caused by aerosols or dusts originating from distant sources may become the dominant forcing agent. Models based on an understanding of snowpack processes at the point scale will tend to allow point-scale processes to dominate when integrated to the basin scale. Knowledge of how processes at different scales interact, and which processes dominate at which scales, is essential to the development of new models. Traditional snow observation protocols and existing datasets often fail to capture or represent earth-surface interactions and processes in ways that enhance the integrated investigation of the mountain snow system as a system. The Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies and its collaborators seek to facilitate the interdisciplinary, integrative development of a ?mountain snow system observation protocol? or MSSOP. A multi-modal, multi-scale, integrative MSSOP observation set would identify proxy measures of system behavior for routine

  7. Extreme ground motions and Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Thomas C.; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Baker, Jack W.; Boore, David M.; Board, Mark; Brune, James N.; Cornell, C. Allin; Whitney, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Yucca Mountain is the designated site of the underground repository for the United States' high-level radioactive waste (HLW), consisting of commercial and military spent nuclear fuel, HLW derived from reprocessing of uranium and plutonium, surplus plutonium, and other nuclear-weapons materials. Yucca Mountain straddles the western boundary of the Nevada Test Site, where the United States has tested nuclear devices since the 1950s, and is situated in an arid, remote, and thinly populated region of Nevada, ~100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Mountain was originally considered as a potential underground repository of HLW because of its thick units of unsaturated rocks, with the repository horizon being not only ~300 m above the water table but also ~300 m below the Yucca Mountain crest. The fundamental rationale for a geologic (underground) repository for HLW is to securely isolate these materials from the environment and its inhabitants to the greatest extent possible and for very long periods of time. Given the present climate conditions and what is known about the current hydrologic system and conditions around and in the mountain itself, one would anticipate that the rates of infiltration, corrosion, and transport would be very low—except for the possibility that repository integrity might be compromised by low-probability disruptive events, which include earthquakes, strong ground motion, and (or) a repository-piercing volcanic intrusion/eruption. Extreme ground motions (ExGM), as we use the phrase in this report, refer to the extremely large amplitudes of earthquake ground motion that arise at extremely low probabilities of exceedance (hazard). They first came to our attention when the 1998 probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Yucca Mountain was extended to a hazard level of 10-8/yr (a 10-4/yr probability for a 104-year repository “lifetime”). The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the principal results of the ExGM research program

  8. MOUNTAIN NATURAL BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Tishkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High biodiversity and degree of endemism of mountain biota strengthen the mountain regions’ status for the territorial nature conservation. Analysis of the protected areas’ representativeness in various mountain regions of Russia shows some discrepancy between their quantity, square and regional biodiversity originality. The biggest divergences are marked for the Northern Caucasus. The main problems: small area of the protected territories and also cluster character of their spatial distribution, mostly in the high mountains are not supposed to conform with the highest values of the regional flora’s and fauna’s uniqueness, to compensate representativeness of the protected biota and, in anyway, to correspond with the purpose of nature protection frame—the protected territories ecologic network’s forming. The situation in the Urals, Siberia and the Far East seems to be better. The large areas of the protected territories are in general agreement with the high originality of the nature ecosystems. Nevertheless each concrete case needs analysis of the regional biota’s and ecosystems’ biodiversity distribution within the protected areas, including character and (or unique elements of the regional biodiversity to be held. The development of the effectual territorial conservation of mountain regions needs differential approach. The creation of the large representative parcels of nature landscapes in the key-areas has the considerable meaning in the low-developed regions, difficult to access. And well-developed regions have the necessity of nature protected territories’ network development and the planning of the ecological frame’s forming. The territorial biodiversity conservation, including the system of federal, regional and local levels with protective conservation of the rare species has to be combined with ecosystem’s restoration, especially in the zones disturbed by erosion, recreation and military actions. Also it is

  9. Potential for Applying Intergenerational Practice to Protected Area Management in Mountainous Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Mitrofanenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One way of preserving the natural and cultural diversity of mountain areas and supporting their sustainable development is the establishment of protected areas. The scientific literature acknowledges the importance of participation by local stakeholders and of considering social cohesion in protected area management. Intergenerational practice has been shown to enhance participation and improve social cohesion; however, its potential role in natural resource management has not been considered by the research community. This paper explores the potential for integrating intergenerational practice into protected area management in mountainous regions, guided by 3 research questions: What challenges of protected area management could benefit from intergenerational practice? How can intergenerational practice help to address these challenges? And how could intergenerational practice be more strongly integrated into current protected area management? The paper focuses on selected management challenges, mostly related to the development function of protected areas, and suggests intergenerational practice solution pathways for each challenge, derived from qualitative content analysis of the literature, interviews with protected area and regional development experts, and participation in the project Big Foot: Crossing Generations, Crossing Mountains, which tested intergenerational learning approaches in 3 rural municipalities—one each in Bulgaria, Greece, and Italy. Recommendations are proposed for integrating intergenerational practice into protected area management policy and practice at the global, regional, and local levels.

  10. Geographic Elevation and Cognitive Function among Elderly Residents in Rural Mountainous Areas: Shimane CoHRE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hamano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test whether there is an association between elevation and cognitive function among elderly residents in rural mountainous areas. Data were collected in 2012 from a cross-sectional study conducted in Ohnan Town, which is located in a rural mountainous area in the southern part of Shimane Prefecture, Japan. Cognitive function was evaluated using CADi (Cognitive Assessment for Dementia, iPad version and elevation was estimated by using Geographic Information Systems according to the participant’s address. After excluding subjects with missing data, 866 participants were analyzed. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, higher elevation was significantly associated with decreased cognitive function. This finding suggests that it is important to consider the physical environment, i.e., elevation, that would affect accessibility to health-promoting goods, services, and resources when seeking to maintain cognitive function in elderly people living in rural mountainous areas.

  11. Ski mountaineering competition: fit for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Kai; Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Ferrari, Marcello

    2011-03-01

    To examine the physiological characteristics of experienced ski mountaineers and to determine the physical demands of ski mountaineering competition. Descriptive field study. An international ski mountaineering competition characterized by 20 400 m distance and 1869 m altitude difference that took place in March 2009 in the South Tyrolean Alps (Italy). Nine healthy and experienced male ski mountaineers. Bioimpedance measurements for body composition definition; maximal exercise testing (Bruce protocol) to determine maximal heart rate (HRmax), maximal oxygen uptake (.VO2max), and ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2) and to define individual exercise intensity zones; HR registration during competition. Exercise intensity distribution, occurrence of respiratory symptoms. Ventilatory thresholds were found on average at 70.5% ± 5.0% (VT1) and 90.9% ± 2.6% (VT2) of .VO2max (68.18 ± 6.11 mL·kg⁻¹·minute⁻¹). The overall exercise intensity, defined by the ratio between mean HR during competition and maximal HR in the laboratory (0.87 ± 0.02), was high. Partial times (% of race time) spent competing in 4 defined performance zones were on average 20.4% ± 17.0% (maximal intensity), 59.8% ± 12.5% (high intensity), 12.8% ± 5.6% (moderate intensity), and 7.0% ± 5.9% (low intensity). Five participants reported respiratory discomfort during competition, with cough being the most frequent symptom. Statistical analysis revealed percent body fat mass to correlate with the partial time performed above VT2 (r = 0.782, P < 0.05); the latter was associated with a worse final placement (r = 0.734, P < 0.05). Competitive ski mountaineering is characterized by an important cardiopulmonary strain and requires a high degree of physical fitness.

  12. ARCOS Network: A Sustainable Mountain Development Hub for Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Muvunankiko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The African continent is endowed with mountains of high productivity, biodiversity, endemism, and cultural diversity. African mountain ecosystems play an important role in economic development, poverty alleviation, and environmental protection. However, climate change and extreme events, as well as human activities, alter the capacity of mountains to provide such services to millions of Africans who depend on them. Since the creation in 1995 of the Albertine Rift Conservation Society (ARCOS, mountains have been at the core of its programs, and collaboration among stakeholders is a key aspect of its search for sustainable solutions to threats affecting African mountains.

  13. Misty Mountain clustering: application to fast unsupervised flow cytometry gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sealfon Stuart C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many important clustering questions in computational biology for which no satisfactory method exists. Automated clustering algorithms, when applied to large, multidimensional datasets, such as flow cytometry data, prove unsatisfactory in terms of speed, problems with local minima or cluster shape bias. Model-based approaches are restricted by the assumptions of the fitting functions. Furthermore, model based clustering requires serial clustering for all cluster numbers within a user defined interval. The final cluster number is then selected by various criteria. These supervised serial clustering methods are time consuming and frequently different criteria result in different optimal cluster numbers. Various unsupervised heuristic approaches that have been developed such as affinity propagation are too expensive to be applied to datasets on the order of 106 points that are often generated by high throughput experiments. Results To circumvent these limitations, we developed a new, unsupervised density contour clustering algorithm, called Misty Mountain, that is based on percolation theory and that efficiently analyzes large data sets. The approach can be envisioned as a progressive top-down removal of clouds covering a data histogram relief map to identify clusters by the appearance of statistically distinct peaks and ridges. This is a parallel clustering method that finds every cluster after analyzing only once the cross sections of the histogram. The overall run time for the composite steps of the algorithm increases linearly by the number of data points. The clustering of 106 data points in 2D data space takes place within about 15 seconds on a standard laptop PC. Comparison of the performance of this algorithm with other state of the art automated flow cytometry gating methods indicate that Misty Mountain provides substantial improvements in both run time and in the accuracy of cluster assignment. Conclusions

  14. [Comparative study of theoretical literature on cold pathogenic disease in Wai tai mi yao fang (Arcane Essentials from the Imperial Library) and Tai ping sheng hui fang (Taiping Holy Prescriptions for Universal Relief)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huirui; Liang, Yongxuan

    2014-09-01

    In the Wai tai mi yao fang (Arcane Essentials from the Imperial Library) compiled in 752, its portion on cold pathogenic disorders embodies the achievements before the mid Tang Dynasty, whereas that in the Tai ping sheng hui fang (Taiping Holy Prescriptions for Universal Relief), compiled in 992 embodies those before the early Song Dynasty. Comparison on the theory of cold disorders in both books reveal that, during the 2 centuries period from mid Tang to early Song Dynasties, the texts as a carrier for the transmission of such theory in both show no distinct changes, but only with minor revisions and improvements.

  15. Preliminary description of quaternary and late pliocene surficial deposits at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    The Yucca Mountain area, in the south-central part of the Great Basin, is in the drainage basin of the Amargosa River. The mountain consists of several fault blocks of volcanic rocks that are typical of the Basin and Range province. Yucca Mountain is dissected by steep-sided valleys of consequent drainage systems that are tributary on the east side to Fortymile Wash and on the west side to an unnamed wash that drains Crater Flat. Most of the major washes near Yucca Mountain are not integrated with the Amargosa River, but have distributary channels on the piedmont above the river. Landforms in the Yucca Mountain area include rock pediments, ballenas, alluvial pediments, alluvial fans, stream terraces, and playas. Early Holocene and older alluvial fan deposits have been smoothed by pedimentation. The semiconical shape of alluvial fans is apparent at the junction of tributaries with major washes and where washes cross fault and terrace scarps. Playas are present in the eastern and southern ends of the Amargosa Desert. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Single-vehicle crashes along rural mountainous highways in Malaysia: An application of random parameters negative binomial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Rusdi; Haque, Md Mazharul; King, Mark; Voon, Wong Shaw

    2017-05-01

    Mountainous highways generally associate with complex driving environment because of constrained road geometries, limited cross-section elements, inappropriate roadside features, and adverse weather conditions. As a result, single-vehicle (SV) crashes are overrepresented along mountainous roads, particularly in developing countries, but little attention is known about the roadway geometric, traffic and weather factors contributing to these SV crashes. As such, the main objective of the present study is to investigate SV crashes using detailed data obtained from a rigorous site survey and existing databases. The final dataset included a total of 56 variables representing road geometries including horizontal and vertical alignment, traffic characteristics, real-time weather condition, cross-sectional elements, roadside features, and spatial characteristics. To account for structured heterogeneities resulting from multiple observations within a site and other unobserved heterogeneities, the study applied a random parameters negative binomial model. Results suggest that rainfall during the crash is positively associated with SV crashes, but real-time visibility is negatively associated. The presence of a road shoulder, particularly a bitumen shoulder or wider shoulders, along mountainous highways is associated with less SV crashes. While speeding along downgrade slopes increases the likelihood of SV crashes, proper delineation decreases the likelihood. Findings of this study have significant implications for designing safer highways in mountainous areas, particularly in the context of a developing country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Teach yourself visually OS X Mountain Lion

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Get to know the new cat in the pride-Mac OS X Mountain Lion-with this VISUAL guide Apple's new Mac OS X Mountain Lion is impressive, with features and functions that will be familiar to Mac users from their iPhones and iPads. Make sure you get the most out of your new big cat with this practical guide. Using step-by-step instructions and full-color screenshots or illustrations on virtually every page-the hallmark of the practical Teach Yourself VISUALLY series-this book clearly shows you how to accomplish tasks, rather than burying you with paragraphs of text. You'll learn how to customize

  18. OS X Mountain Lion Portable Genius

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, Dwight

    2012-01-01

    Essential tips and techniques on the Mac OS X features you use most! If you want the kind of hip, friendly help you'd get from friends on how to get the most of out of Mac OS X Mountain Lion, this is the guide you need. Jump right into the coolest new Mac OS X features like Game Center, Messages, and Notification, or get a better handle on the basic tools and shortcuts that will help keep your mountain cat purring. From customizing to using multimedia to syncing your Mac to other devices, this book saves you time and hassle, avoids fluff, and covers what you want to know most. New addition t

  19. Interference of lee waves over mountain ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Makarenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal waves in the atmosphere and ocean are generated frequently from the interaction of mean flow with bottom obstacles such as mountains and submarine ridges. Analysis of these environmental phenomena involves theoretical models of non-homogeneous fluid affected by the gravity. In this paper, a semi-analytical model of stratified flow over the mountain range is considered under the assumption of small amplitude of the topography. Attention is focused on stationary wave patterns forced above the rough terrain. Adapted to account for such terrain, model equations involves exact topographic condition settled on the uneven ground surface. Wave solutions corresponding to sinusoidal topography with a finite number of peaks are calculated and examined.

  20. On the dynamic smoothing of mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, S.; Porporato, A.

    2017-06-01

    After their formation, mountainous landscapes gradually evolve toward smoother geometries controlled by the interplay of erosion and sedimentation. The statistical mechanical properties of this process and the link between topography and geology have remained largely unexplored. We analyze the slope statistics of different mountains worldwide, showing that landscape age is fingerprinted in their distribution tails. Data reveal a universal relaxation process, through an algebraic decay progressively replaced by an exponential one, with exponents described by a global monotonic function. We then investigate the dominant components of this dynamic smoothing using a landscape evolution model, showing that the time evolution of slope statistics results from a delicate balance between diffusive soil creep, noise, and advective river incision, with the relaxation phase mainly dominated by diffusion. Results may suggest ways to formulate reduced order topographic evolution models for geomorphological and climatological applications, and to explore similarities in surface evolution in different contexts.

  1. East Mountain Area 1995 air sampling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deola, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Air Quality Dept.

    1996-09-01

    Ambient air samples were taken at two locations in the East Mountain Area in conjunction with thermal testing at the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS). The samples were taken to provide measurements of particulate matter with a diameter less than or equal to 10 micrometers (PM{sub 10}) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report summarizes the results of the sampling performed in 1995. The results from small-scale testing performed to determine the potentially produced air pollutants in the thermal tests are included in this report. Analytical results indicate few samples produced measurable concentrations of pollutants believed to be produced by thermal testing. Recommendations for future air sampling in the East Mountain Area are also noted.

  2. Zen Mountains: An Illusion of Perceptual Transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Susan G; Carlson, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The human visual system is usually very successful in segmenting complex natural scenes. During a trip to the Nepalese Himalayas, we observed an impossible example of Nature's beauty: "transparent" mountains. The scene is captured in a photograph in which a pair of mountain peaks viewed in the far distance appear to be transparent. This illusion results from a fortuitous combination of lighting and scene conditions, which induce an erroneous integration of multiple segmentation cues. The illusion unites three classic principles of visual perception: Metelli's constraints for perceptual transparency, the Gestalt principle of good continuation, and depth from contrast and atmospheric scattering. This real-world "failure" of scene segmentation reinforces how ingeniously the human visual system typically integrates complex sources of perceptual information using heuristics based on likelihood as shortcuts to veridical perception.

  3. Zen Mountains: An Illusion of Perceptual Transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G. Wardle

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system is usually very successful in segmenting complex natural scenes. During a trip to the Nepalese Himalayas, we observed an impossible example of Nature's beauty: “transparent” mountains. The scene is captured in a photograph in which a pair of mountain peaks viewed in the far distance appear to be transparent. This illusion results from a fortuitous combination of lighting and scene conditions, which induce an erroneous integration of multiple segmentation cues. The illusion unites three classic principles of visual perception: Metelli's constraints for perceptual transparency, the Gestalt principle of good continuation, and depth from contrast and atmospheric scattering. This real-world “failure” of scene segmentation reinforces how ingeniously the human visual system typically integrates complex sources of perceptual information using heuristics based on likelihood as shortcuts to veridical perception.

  4. Rail Access to Yucca Mountain: Critical Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.; Moore, R. C.

    2003-02-25

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository site currently lacks rail access. The nearest mainline railroad is almost 100 miles away. Absence of rail access could result in many thousands of truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Direct rail access to the repository could significantly reduce the number of truck shipments and total shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified five potential rail access corridors, ranging in length from 98 miles to 323 miles, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain. The FEIS also considers an alternative to rail spur construction, heavy-haul truck (HHT) delivery of rail casks from one of three potential intermodal transfer stations. The authors examine the feasibility and cost of the five rail corridors, and DOE's alternative proposal for HHT transport. The authors also address the potential for rail shipments through the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

  5. Border Crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rivera, Alex

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that communities, cities, and nations are no longer culturally and ethnically monolithic and examines the possibilities of human fellowships based on faith. Highlights intermarriage, migration, and changes in family structure as sources of complexity, but argues that we must learn how to live together after having crossed traditional…

  6. Nuclear Waste Disposal: Alternatives to Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-06

    to manage nuclear waste, including spent fuel reprocessing. One of the studies, by a consortium led by the French firm Areva , called a government...1936). In a 2008 report for GNEP, a consortium led by the French nuclear firm Areva recommended that U.S. spent fuel be reprocessed overseas from...shipment rate to Yucca Mountain. Many decades would be required to implement a reprocessing and recycling strategy. For example, the Areva consortium

  7. Environmental history of European high mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Galop, Didier; Catto, Norm

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This volume brings together 16 papers which investigate various aspects of high mountain areas, primarily in Europe. Dietre et al. investigated the influence of settlement in the Silv-retta Alps, Switzerland/Austria. Festi et al. combined an extensive archaeological survey and pollen analyses in the high altitudes of the € Otztal Alps to elucidate the palaeo-environmental and past cultural implications that triggered the onset and development of seasonal transhumance a...

  8. Rocky Mountain futures: An ecological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill S.

    2002-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain West is largely arid and steep, with ecological scars from past human use visible for hundreds of years. Just how damaging were the past 150 years of activity? How do current rates of disturbance compare with past mining, grazing, and water diversion activities? In the face of constant change, what constitutes a "natural" ecosystem? And can a high quality of life be achieved for both human and natural communities in this region.

  9. Mountaineering-induced bilateral plantar paresthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kyle K; Parker, Justine; Heinking, Kurt P

    2014-07-01

    Flat feet (pes planus) have been implicated in multiple musculoskeletal complaints, which are often exacerbated by lack of appropriate arch support or intense exercise. To investigate the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on a patient (K.K.H.) with mountaineering-induced bilateral plantar paresthesia and to assess the association of pes planus with paresthesia in members of the mountaineering expedition party that accompanied the patient. A patient history and physical examination of the musculoskeletal system were performed. The hindfoot, midfoot, forefoot, big toe, and distal toes were evaluated for neurologic function, specifically pin, vibration, 10-g weight sensitivity, and 2-point discrimination during the 4-month treatment period. To determine if OMT could augment recovery, the patient volunteered to use the contralateral leg as a control, with no OMT performed on the sacrum or lower back. To determine if pes planus was associated with mountaineering-induced paresthesia, a sit-to-stand navicular drop test was performed on members of the expedition party. Osteopathic manipulative treatment improved fibular head motion and muscular flexibility and released fascial restrictions of the soleus, hamstring, popliteus, and gastrocnemius. The patient's perception of stiffness, pain, and overall well-being improved with OMT. However, OMT did not shorten the duration of paresthesia. Of the 9 expedition members, 2 experienced paresthesia. Average navicular drop on standing was 5.1 mm for participants with no paresthesia vs 8.9 mm for participants with paresthesia (t test, P<.01; Mann-Whitney rank sum test, P=.06). These preliminary findings suggest that weakened arches may contribute to mountaineering-induced plantar paresthesia. Early diagnosis of pes planus and treatment with orthotics (which may prevent neuropathies)--or, less ideally, OMT after extreme exercise--should be sought to relieve tension and discomfort. © 2014 The American Osteopathic

  10. Clidar Mountain Boundary Layer Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Nimmi C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A CCD Camera Lidar system called the CLidar system images a vertically pointing laser from the side with a spatially separated CCD camera and wide angle optics. The system has been used to investigate case studies of aerosols in mountain boundary layers in in the times following sunset. The aerosols detected by the system demonstrate the wide variation of near ground aerosol structure and capabilities of the CLidar system.

  11. Revised mineralogic summary of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1989-03-01

    We have evaluated three-dimensional mineral distribution at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using quantitative x-ray powder diffraction analysis. All data were obtained on core cuttings, or sidewall samples obtained from drill holes at and around Yucca Mountain. Previously published data are included with corrections, together with new data for several drill holes. The new data presented in this report used the internal standard method of quantitative analysis, which yields results of high precision for the phases commonly found in Yucca Mountain tuffs including opal-CT and glass. Mineralogical trends with depth previously noted are clearly shown by these new data. Glass occurrence is restricted almost without exception to above the present-day static water level (SWL), although glass has been identified below the SWL in partially zeolitized tuffs. Silica phases undergo well-defined transitions with depth, with tridymite and cristobalite occurring only above the SWL, opal-CT occurring with clinoptilolite-mordenite tuffs, and quartz most abundant below the SWL. Smectite occurs in small amounts in most samples but is enriched in two distinct zones. These zones are at the top of the vitric nonwelded base of the Tiva Canyon Member and at the top of the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Member. Our data support the presence of several zones of mordenite and clinoptilolite-heulandite as shown previously. New data on several deep clinoptililite-heulandite samples coexisting with analcime show that they are heulandite. Phillipsite has not been found in any Yucca Mountain samples, but erionite and chabazite have been found once in fractures. 21 refs., 17 figs.

  12. Prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness by Dexamethasone,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-27

    extracellular cerebral edema. Dexamethasone is a potent synthetic glucocorticoid with demonstrated efficacy in the management of vasogenic cerebral edema of...administration, most showed a decline in urine output (Figure 2). It is possible that dexamethasone may have had a mild diuretic effect. Diuresis has been observed...the severity of AMS (1), and conversely, mountain lore has it that diuresis upon exposure to altitude (the so-called "Hohendiurese" of alpinists) is

  13. Estimates of cloud water deposition at mountain acid deposition program sites in the Appalachian Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph E. Baumgardner, Jr.; Selma S. Isil; Thomas F. Lavery; Christopher M. Rogers; Volker A. Mohnen [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)

    2003-03-01

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high-elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY; Whitetop Mountain, VA; and Clingman s Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). This paper provides a summary of cloud water chemistry, cloud liquid water content, cloud frequency, estimates of cloud water deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species, and estimates of total deposition of sulfur and nitrogen at these sites. Other cloud studies in the Appalachians and their comparison to MADPro are also summarized. Whiteface Mountain exhibited the lowest mean and median concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen ions in cloud water, while Clingman s Dome exhibited the highest mean and median concentrations. This geographic gradient is partly an effect of the different meteorological conditions experienced at northern versus southern sites in addition to the difference in pollution content of air masses reaching the sites. All sites measured seasonal cloud water deposition rates of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} greater than 50 kg/ha and NO{sub 3}{sup -} rates of greater than 25 kg/ha. These high-elevation sites experienced additional deposition loading of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} on the order of 6 20 times greater compared with lower elevation Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) sites. Approximately 80 90% of this extra loading is from cloud deposition. 56 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs., 1 app.

  14. Floristic study of Khargushan Mountain, Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Dehshiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was plant identification, introduction to the flora, determination of life forms and geographical distribution in Khargushan Mountain. This Mountain, with 6000 hectares, situated on the east of Poldokhtar and south-west of Khorramabad. The maximum altitude of this mountain is thought 2329 m. Plant specimens were collected from different parts of the area during two growing seasons 2013-2014. The plant biological spectrum of the area was plotted by means of life forms results. The position of the area within Iran’s phytogeography classification was studied based on geographical distribution data and references. From 211 identified species in the studied area, 3 Pteridophytes, 1 Gymnosperm, 176 dicotyledons and 31 monocotyledons were presented. These species belong to 50 families and 150 genera. The important families are Fabaceae, Asteraceae, Apiaceae and Lamiaceae with 12.79%, 10.42%, 8.05% and 7.58%, respectively. Life forms of the plant species include Therophytes 36.49%, Hemicryptophytes 31.28%, Cryptophytes 18.96%, Phanerophytes 8.06%, and Chamaephytes 5.21%. 138 species (65.4% were endemics of Irano-Turanian region; 32 species of them were endemics of Iran which among them, distribution of 4 species (Astragalus lurorum, Dionysia gaubae, Hedysarum gypsophilum and Phlomis lurestanica limited to Lorestan province.

  15. On St. Sava’s (svetosavski redaction of Holy Monks images in Mileševa church narthex: Contribution to research in iconographic common places in the Nemanjićs’ church foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović Vesna D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the possibility of further completing the to-date analyses on the content and scope of the painting program in the Mileševa narthex, representing a striking two-band frieze of the images of holy monks. This new examination does not ignore the already recognized distinguishing marks, and pays special attention to investigating possible relationships and links with the solutions in some other monuments of the same era not having been previously researched in detail. The undertaking of the author was in this case determined by an attempt to look into and throw some light onto the hardly discernible, and to date unexplained, original content of a smaller, only fragmentarily saved, and indeed the most challenging segment of that numerous and complex gathering of the images of holy monks. That segment included several extremely damaged and rather faded images of holy monks in the lower zone of the narthex southern wall (the band of standing figures, and the figure in the southern end of the adjoining, west wall, in all probability, belonged to it as well. Furthermore, according to the faded traces of previous iconographic characteristics of these figures, it could be seen that they constituted a compact and specific group with regard to the nearest images or groups of images, related to them by belonging to the same, more general category of the holiness. Bearing in mind the damage to heads and faces, as well as the disappearance of the inscription with the names and texts on the scrolls in their hands, the only way to discovering, or at least to closer determining the identity of the images presented was by means of to date unused circumstantial data, which could be provided by more extensive iconographic materials from the other monuments of the time. This way was, up to a certain extent, already open by previous numerous notes of the researchers on the essential closeness of solutions in Mileševa with those of Studenica and

  16. Al-qarāfa, la Città dei Morti del Cairo. Il circuito delle sette tombe sacre - Al-Qarāfa: the pilgrimage to the holy seven tombs in Cairene Muslim cemetery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tozzi Di Marco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect of al-Qarāfa, the Muslim inhabitated cemetery in Cairo is the devotion to seven ancient sacred tombs and its relative pilgrimage. The Cairene graveyard was renowned for the local and interregional pilgrimages because of its high concentration of awliyā’s graves (literally friends of God, as holders of baraka, the divine grace. In particular, in the XIII century the famous circuit of the Seven tombs was formalized by the shaykh al- Fārsī who, according to the scholar El Kadi, also called it “pilgrimage of the seven sleepers”. Hence the multitude of Muslim pilgrims who spent the night on the holy spot without taking into account the social code about the separation between sexes. Nowadays some mausoleums of the circuit have disappeared and local people have no memories of them, whereas the most renowned holy men’ tombs are still venerated by a large crowd of devotees, even if the nightly practice of incubation is missing. The author, in considering the scholars’ studies on this issue, explores the current veneration and the contemporary pilgrims’ pattern of habits, comparing it with the Medieval ones.

  17. Early Winter Habitat Use by Mountain Caribou in the North Cariboo and Columbia Mountains, British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terry

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Winter habitat use was compared between two mountain caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations in British Columbia. Regional differences were apparent during November and December. Radio-collared caribou inhabiting the gentle plateaus of the northern Cariboo Mountains, near Prince George, B.C. primarily used mid-elevation balsam-spruce stands on moderate slopes (<30%. In contrast, radio-collared caribou in the North Columbia Mountains, near Revelstoke, B.C. used low elevation hemlock-cedar stands and relatively steeper slopes (>30%. To adequately address habitat requirements of caribou, forest management plans should incorporate varying regional and seasonal habitat use patterns. Hypotheses on observed differences in habitat use are discussed.

  18. Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Continental deformation in the diffuse western Mediterranean plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Francisco Gustavo

    The Atlas Mountains of North Africa, located in the African foreland of the Alpine mountain belts, comprise a 2,000 km long Cenozoic mountain chain whose development was guided by older Mesozoic rift structures. This dissertation examines one component, the Middle Atlas Mountains of Morocco, using geological and geophysical data to constrain the tectonic development of the mountain chain. These results are then placed in the broader context of regional deformation. The NE-SW trending Middle Atlas Mountains are obliquely oriented within the late Cenozoic regional stress field, resulting in deformation partitioned into strike-slip faulting and thrust-related folding. Kinematic analyses of fault-slip data and earthquake focal mechanisms demonstrate that compressional deformation dominates the Folded Middle Atlas, whereas strike-slip faulting, with possible horizontal extension, predominates in the Tabular Middle Atlas. Geological field observations, digital topography, LANDSAT imagery, and seismicity provide evidence for recent tectonics in the Middle Atlas. In the central Middle Atlas, cross-section balancing across the 20 km wide fold belt demonstrates about 4.7 km of Cenozoic horizontal shortening producing 800 m of structural relief. Other constraints on crustal thickening suggest a discrepancy between contraction and thickening. One possible explanation involves partitioning crustal deformation with depth: The upper crust shortens by thickening (faulting and folding), whereas the lower crust deforms laterally. At the northern extent of the mountain chain, the Guercif Basin developed where the Middle Atlas abut the Rif thrust belt. Similar timing of extensional deformation and proximity with the Rif, suggest that the Guercif Basin has been influenced by Rif tectonics. Stratal relations demonstrate that uplift of the Middle Atlas is a late Cenozoic phenomenon. In Morocco, shortening of the High and Middle Atlas Mountains accommodated 20--45% of the total African

  19. Geology of Gable Mountain-Gable Butte Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, K.R.

    1978-09-01

    Gable Mountain and Gable Butte are two ridges which form the only extensive outcrops of the Columbia River Basalt Group in the central portion of the Pasco Basin. The Saddle Mountains Basalt and two interbedded sedimentary units of the Ellensburg Formation crop out on the ridges. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Asotin Member (oldest), Esquatzel Member, Selah Interbed, Pomona Member, Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed, and Elephant Mountain Member (youngest). A fluvial plain composed of sediments from the Ringold and Hanford (informal) formations surrounds these ridges. The structure of Gable Mountain and Gable Butte is dominated by an east-west-trending major fold and northwest-southeast-trending parasitic folds. Two faults associated with the uplift of these structures were mapped on Gable Mountain. The geomorphic expression of the Gable Mountain-Gable Butte area resulted from the comlex folding and subsequent scouring by post-basalt fluvial systems.

  20. Recent plant diversity changes on Europe's mountain summits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Harald; Gottfried, Michael; Dullinger, Stefan; Abdaladze, Otari; Akhalkatsi, Maia; Benito Alonso, José Luis; Coldea, Gheorghe; Dick, Jan; Erschbamer, Brigitta; Fernández Calzado, Rosa; Ghosn, Dany; Holten, Jarle I; Kanka, Robert; Kazakis, George; Kollár, Jozef; Larsson, Per; Moiseev, Pavel; Moiseev, Dmitry; Molau, Ulf; Molero Mesa, Joaquín; Nagy, Laszlo; Pelino, Giovanni; Puşcaş, Mihai; Rossi, Graziano; Stanisci, Angela; Syverhuset, Anne O; Theurillat, Jean-Paul; Tomaselli, Marcello; Unterluggauer, Peter; Villar, Luis; Vittoz, Pascal; Grabherr, Georg

    2012-04-20

    In mountainous regions, climate warming is expected to shift species' ranges to higher altitudes. Evidence for such shifts is still mostly from revisitations of historical sites. We present recent (2001 to 2008) changes in vascular plant species richness observed in a standardized monitoring network across Europe's major mountain ranges. Species have moved upslope on average. However, these shifts had opposite effects on the summit floras' species richness in boreal-temperate mountain regions (+3.9 species on average) and Mediterranean mountain regions (-1.4 species), probably because recent climatic trends have decreased the availability of water in the European south. Because Mediterranean mountains are particularly rich in endemic species, a continuation of these trends might shrink the European mountain flora, despite an average increase in summit species richness across the region.

  1. Symposium 9: Rocky Mountain futures: preserving, utilizing, and sustaining Rocky Mountain ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill S.; Seastedt, Timothy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Hicke, Jeffrey A.; Tomback, Diana; Garcia, Elizabeth; Bowen, Zachary H.; Logan, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 we published Rocky Mountain Futures, an Ecological Perspective (Island Press) to examine the cumulative ecological effects of human activity in the Rocky Mountains. We concluded that multiple local activities concerning land use, hydrologic manipulation, and resource extraction have altered ecosystems, although there were examples where the “tyranny of small decisions” worked in a positive way toward more sustainable coupled human/environment interactions. Superimposed on local change was climate change, atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and other pollutants, regional population growth, and some national management policies such as fire suppression.

  2. Effect of Hybridization on Carcass Traits and Meat Quality of Erlang Mountainous Chickens

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    H. D. Yin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Native chickens hold a significant share of the market in China. In response to the huge demand from the market, the productivity of Chinese native chickens needs to be improved. Cross breeding is an effective method to increase productivity, although it might affect meat quality. In this study, two pure lines (SD02 and SD03 of Erlang mountainous chickens were hybridized with a yellow feather and faster growing line (SD01. The effect of hybridization on carcass and meat quality (physiochemical and textural traits was measured in the F1 population at d 91 of age. The hybrids exhibited higher body weight and dressed weight, and amount of semi-eviscerated, eviscerated, breast muscle and abdominal fat (p<0.05. Abdominal fat yield also increased (p<0.05 compared to the offspring of the two pure-lines. Meanwhile, there was no significant difference in meat quality traits except for the myofiber diameter and density and the shear force of the breast muscle. Overall, the offspring of cross-lines were similar to pure lines in meat color, pH value, inosinic acid, crude protein, crude fat, dry matter, moisture content and amino acid composition in the breast muscle. These results suggest that productivity can be improved via cross-breeding while maintaining meat quality of the Erlang mountainous chicken.

  3. Effect of hybridization on carcass traits and meat quality of erlang mountainous chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H D; Gilbert, E R; Chen, S Y; Wang, Y; Zhang, Z C; Zhao, X L; Zhang, Yao; Zhu, Q

    2013-10-01

    Native chickens hold a significant share of the market in China. In response to the huge demand from the market, the productivity of Chinese native chickens needs to be improved. Cross breeding is an effective method to increase productivity, although it might affect meat quality. In this study, two pure lines (SD02 and SD03) of Erlang mountainous chickens were hybridized with a yellow feather and faster growing line (SD01). The effect of hybridization on carcass and meat quality (physiochemical and textural traits) was measured in the F1 population at d 91 of age. The hybrids exhibited higher body weight and dressed weight, and amount of semi-eviscerated, eviscerated, breast muscle and abdominal fat (pmeat quality traits except for the myofiber diameter and density and the shear force of the breast muscle. Overall, the offspring of cross-lines were similar to pure lines in meat color, pH value, inosinic acid, crude protein, crude fat, dry matter, moisture content and amino acid composition in the breast muscle. These results suggest that productivity can be improved via cross-breeding while maintaining meat quality of the Erlang mountainous chicken.

  4. Blue Mountain Lake, New York, earthquake of October 7, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, G.

    1984-01-01

    The October 7 earthquake near Blue Mountain Lake in the central Adirondack Mountains registered a preliminary Richter magnitude of 5.2. It was widely felt throughout the Northeastern United States and Canada and occurred in an area that has been periodically shaken by earthquakes throughout recorded history. Since 1737, at least 346 felt earthquakes have occurred in New York; an earthquake of similar magnitude last shook the Blue Mountain Lake area on June 9, 1975.    

  5. Mountaineering and photography. Contacts between 1880 and 1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Andorno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the nineteenth century, the photograph produced in high altitude mountain (mountaineering photography gives rise to peculiar images that do not belong to the tradition of landscape painting. Mountaineering is similar to the art of performance, if we talk about physical and mental commitment. Therefore, photos taken during the ascent of a peak shows both conceptual and formal values.

  6. Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    been edited and appeared in the journal Boundary Layer Meteorology. It is entitled: Mountainous Terrain: Results from MATERJ-IORN-X (June 2016...Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Evolution on a Slope at the Foot of a Desert Mountain , Journal of Applied Meteorology. 54( 4), 732-751. Marjanovic, N., Wharton...Layer Heights over an Isolated Mountain : Cases from the MA TERHORN-2012 Experiment. Journal o.f Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 55, 1927- 1952

  7. The Swiss-Austrian Alliance for Mountain Research

    OpenAIRE

    Scheurer, Thomas; Björnsen, Astrid; Borsdorf, Axel; Braun, Valerie; Weingartner, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Switzerland and Austria are committed to addressing sustainable mountain development in Europe through a joint effort. In June 2013, more than 140 researchers as well as representatives of the 2 countries' funding ministries participated in the “Mountain Days” event in Mittersill, Austria, thereby marking the official launch of the Swiss-Austrian Alliance. The resulting Mittersill Commitment Paper highlights 8 research areas and calls for international cooperation between mountain researchers...

  8. A case of "chronic mountain sickness" in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Hetch, Hans H.; Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, Estados Unidos; McClement, John H.; Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, Estados Unidos

    2014-01-01

    1.-A case of Chronic Mountain Sickness is described at a resident of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. There have been clinical, electrocardiographic and cardiopulmonary physiology studies. Symptoms, signs and electrocardiographic abnormalities disappeared when the patient down to sea level. However, it has been possible to bring out a intensely lightweight persistent lung disease after residence at sea level for more than two years. 2. can be assumed that some cases of chronic mountain sickne...

  9. OPPORTUNITIES FOR TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN A MOUNTAIN HOTEL

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    Elena Dimitrova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper makes study of conditions and opportunities for development of tourism in a typical mountain hotel in Bulgaria, presenting conditions and resources for diverse tourism practices and an analysis of potential markets and competitors. Through the example of Ecohotel "Zdravets" situated in the Rhodope Mountains, the study highlights the importance and shares a good example in the management of a mountain hotel near to a large administrative and cultural center.

  10. Yucca Mountain Task 4, Final report FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, J.N.

    1993-09-30

    Four major projects at UNRSL have been supported by NWPO-Neotectonics Yucca Mountain Task 4 funds during the last year: (1) Operation and analysis of data from the UNRSL microearthquake network at Yucca Mountain. (2) Continued operation, maintenance, and calibration of three broadband stations. Limited data analysis was also initiated. (3) Continued review by Dr. Brune of documents and literature related to seismic hazard and tectonics of the Yucca Mountain region. (4) Testing of noise levels in boreholes.

  11. THE MOUNTAIN REGIONS IN CONTEXT OF STRATEGY 2020

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    ANTONESCU Daniela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mountain regions in Romania and European Union represent a special territory of interest, with a huge economic, social, environmental and cultural potential. More, mountain area is considerate a natural-economic region and constitutes an important objective for regional development policy. The main sectors of mountain area are presented in agriculture and tourism fields that lead the key role in safeguarding the sensitive eco-system and thereby maintaining the general living and working space.Mountain areas should have a specific policy defined by the sustainable development principle, which meets the needs of the present without compromising the opportunities of future generations. The specific mountain policy aims to reduce the imbalance between favored and disadvantaged mountain regions, permanently marked by natural, economic, social, cultural and environmental constraints. In previous programming period, mountain regions among have profited from the intensive regional support, in specially, for constructing of and connecting them to fresh water and waste water networks, in particular for increasing of life quality. In context of 2020 Strategy, the Member States will concentrate investments on a small number of thematic objectives. In advanced regions, 60 % of funds will used for only two of these objectives (competitiveness of SME and research/innovation. The all less developed regions will received about 50% of Structural Funds In Romania, mountain representing 29.93% out of the total national surface and 20.14% from UAA (Utilised Agricultural Area of total national. The mountain territory has around 20% of the national population and is overlapping almost 100% with the Carpathian Mountains. Due to these conditions, Romania's regional development policy must take into account the specificities of mountain area, the problems they faced, and the requirements of 2020 Strategy.This paper presents the main aspects to be taken into account

  12. Use of bioimpedianciometer as predictor of mountain marathon performance

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente Suárez, Vicente Javier; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relation among body composition, training experience and race time during a mountain marathon. Body composition and training pre-race experience analyses were conducted previous to a mountain marathon in 52 male athletes. A significant correlation between race time and mountain marathon with chronological age, body fat mass, percentage of body fat (BF), level of abdominal obesity, sport experience and daily training volume was revealed. In addition, BF and athl...

  13. Mountain goat abundance and population trends in the Olympic Mountains, northwestern Washington, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Beirne, Katherine F.; Baccus, William T.

    2016-11-30

    Executive SummaryWe estimated abundance and trends of non-native mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) in the Olympic Mountains of northwestern Washington, based on aerial surveys conducted during July 13–24, 2016. The surveys produced the seventh population estimate since the first formal aerial surveys were conducted in 1983. This was the second population estimate since we adjusted survey area boundaries and adopted new estimation procedures in 2011. Before 2011, surveys encompassed all areas free of glacial ice at elevations above 1,520 meters (m), but in 2011 we expanded survey unit boundaries to include suitable mountain goat habitats at elevations between 1,425 and 1,520 m. In 2011, we also began applying a sightability correction model allowing us to estimate undercounting bias associated with aerial surveys and to adjust survey results accordingly. The 2016 surveys were carried out by National Park Service (NPS) personnel in Olympic National Park and by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) biologists in Olympic National Forest and in the southeastern part of Olympic National Park. We surveyed a total of 59 survey units, comprising 55 percent of the 60,218-hectare survey area. We estimated a mountain goat population of 623 ±43 (standard error, SE). Based on this level of estimation uncertainty, the 95-percent confidence interval ranged from 561 to 741 mountain goats at the time of the survey.We examined the rate of increase of the mountain goat population by comparing the current population estimate to previous estimates from 2004 and 2011. Because aerial survey boundaries changed between 2004 and 2016, we recomputed population estimates for 2011 and 2016 surveys based on the revised survey boundaries as well as the previously defined boundaries so that estimates were directly comparable across years. Additionally, because the Mount Washington survey unit was not surveyed in 2011, we used results from an independent survey of the Mount

  14. Synthesis of Subsurface Fracture Characteristics at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, K. J.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Landis, P. S.; Waiting, D. J.

    2005-12-01

    Fractures are among the most abundant geologic structures found in rocks. Although individual fractures are rarely of great importance, the sheer number of fractures makes them a key component of many geologic and engineering-related processes. Fractures directly affect geotechnical processes for stability of underground openings and indirectly influence processes such as thermal stress accommodation. Near-surface water infiltration and flow, and unsaturated zone radionuclide transport are tunnel- and mountain-scale processes influenced by fractures. Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the site of the United States' potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This presentation provides an up-to-date synthesis of subsurface fracture data collected in the repository host horizon interval from two tunnels, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) cross-drift at Yucca Mountain. The primary goals are to: (1) summarize fracture data collected by both detailed line survey and full-periphery geologic mapping techniques; and (2) provide a rigorous analysis of key fracture characteristics, including fracture orientation, spacing and size. Definitive cooling joints and vapor phase partings are present in all zones within the Topopah Spring Tuff (the proposed repository host horizon), but are not abundant and represent only 5 to 11% of all recorded fractures. Fractures with measurable displacement are also present, but account for only 3 to 4% of the total population. These fractures, however, are predominantly subvertical with either a northwest or northeast strike. Regardless of lithostratigraphic interval (i.e., presence or absence of lithophysae), distinctive orientation-based fracture sets are present -- fractures are not randomly distributed. This observation holds for analyses of long and short fractures. The overall distribution of fracture size based on observed trace length is strongly skewed with short

  15. The hydrological significance of mountains: from regional to global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Viviroli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mountain regions supply a large share of the world’s population with fresh water. Quantification of the hydrological significance of mountains, however, is subject to great uncertainty. Instead of focusing on global averages in advance, the present analysis follows a catchment-based approach using discharge data provided by the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC. The River Rhine originating in the European Alps is chosen as a first study area, revealing the hydrological relationship between mountainous and lowland regions in a well-documented area. Following the findings from this analysis, different aspects of runoff characteristics for a total of 22 case-study river basins world-wide have been investigated and compared, for a global view. The view has been extended through aspects of climate and human use of mountain runoff. The particular hydrological characteristics of mountain areas are characterised by disproportionately large discharges. In humid areas, mountains supply up to 20–50% of total discharge while in arid areas, mountains contribute from 50–90% of total discharge, with extremes of over 95%. The overall assessment of the hydrological significance of mountain areas reveals that the world’s major 'water towers' are found in arid or semi-arid zones where they provide essential fresh water for a significant proportion of a quickly growing global population. Keywords: mountain hydrology, global comparative assessment, runoff, water resources, sustainability, Rhine River, European Alps

  16. Blessed by the Holy People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Men-women and women-men have a long tradition in Diné (Navajo) culture where they were, and sometimes still are, held in high esteem. Their supernatural prototypes figure prominently in parts of the Diné Origin Story. It is in this cosmological worldview and tradition of acceptance that Carrie, a multi-dualistic spirit, grew up to be a female-bodied man supported and respected by his/her family and community. He/she has worked in various professions defined as "masculine" in Diné and Western contexts, such as fire fighter, heavy equipment operator, truck driver, and building contractor. In addition, Carrie is a keeper of Diné traditions, and has also been active educating Native and Non-Native audiences on 2SpiritLesbianGayBiTransIntersexQueer issues.

  17. Male contraception: another Holy Grail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Fern E; Goldberg, Erwin

    2014-01-15

    The idea that men should participate in family planning by playing an active role in contraception has become more acceptable in recent years. Up to the present the condom and vasectomy have been the main methods of male contraception. There have been and continue to be efforts to develop an acceptable hormonal contraceptive involving testosterone (T) suppression. However the off target affects, delivery of the analogs and the need for T replacement have proven difficult obstacles to this technology. Research into the development of non-hormonal contraception for men is progressing in several laboratories and this will be the subject of the present review. A number of promising targets for the male pill are being investigated. These involve disruption of spermatogenesis by compromising the integrity of the germinal epithelium, interfering with sperm production at the level of meiosis, attacking specific sperm proteins to disrupt fertilizing ability, or interfering with the assembly of seminal fluid components required by ejaculated sperm for acquisition of motility. Blocking contractility of the vas deferens smooth muscle vasculature to prevent ejaculation is a unique approach that prevents sperm from reaching the egg. We shall note the lack of interest by big pharma with most of the support for male contraception provided by the NIH. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Alpine infrastructure in Central Europe: integral evaluation of wastewater treatment systems at mountain refuges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbacher, N; Mayr, E; Niederberger, T; Aschauer, C; Lebersorger, S; Steinbacher, G; Haberl, R

    2008-01-01

    Planning, construction and operation of onsite wastewater treatment systems at mountain refuges is a challenge. Energy supply, costly transport, limited water resources, unfavourable climate and load variations are only some of the problems that have to be faced. Additionally, legal regulations are different between and even within countries of the Alps. To ensure sustainability, integrated management of the alpine infrastructure management is needed. The energy and water supply and the wastewater and waste disposal systems and the cross-relations between them were analysed for 100 mountain refuges. Wastewater treatment is a main part of the overall 'mountain refuge' system. The data survey and first analyses showed the complex interaction of the wastewater treatment with the other infrastructure. Main criteria for reliable and efficient operation are training, technical support, user friendly control and a relatively simple system set up. Wastewater temperature, alkalinity consumption and high peak loads have to be considered in the planning process. The availability of power in terms of duration and connexion is decisive for the choice of the system. Further, frequency fluctuations may lead to damages to the installed aerators. The type of water source and the type of sanitary equipment influence the wastewater quantity and quality. Biosolids are treated and disposed separately or together with primary or secondary sludge from wastewater treatment dependent on the legal requirements. IWA Publishing 2008.

  19. Relating severity of a mountain pine beetle outbreak to forest management history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorster, Anthony

    The availability of remote sensing imagery before, during, and after the recent mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) epidemic in the southern Rocky Mountains presents exciting opportunities for assessing the current state of forests and how forest management in previous decades influenced outbreak severity across the landscape. I mapped outbreak severity at a 30-m resolution using integrative spatial modeling. I predicted that: 1) outbreak severity can be accurately predicted and mapped at Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado using stand characteristics with a boosted regression tree model, Landsat imagery, geographic information system (GIS) data, and field data; and 2) forest stands that were unmanaged since the 1950s will have higher outbreak severity compared to stands that were treated since the 1950s. Outbreak severity, measured by the ratio of dead lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) basal area to the basal area of all trees, was mapped across Fraser Experimental Forest with a cross-validation correlation of 0.86 and a Spearman correlation with independently observed values of 0.64. The outbreak severity at stands harvested between 1954 and 1985 was lower than comparable uncut stands. Lessons learned about past treatments will inform forest management for future mountain pine beetle outbreaks.

  20. Restoring sedges and mosses into frost heaving iron fens, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Chimner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rare iron fens in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado are frequently in poor condition due to mining, roads and ditches, which have left much of the fen completely bare of vegetation. Natural revegetation is slow to occur in the bare areas because of severe frost heave in the cold mountain climate. Therefore, experimental revegetation plots were conducted in a factorial design with mulching and no mulching, crossed with moss diaspores, sedge transplants, and moss and sedge combined. Mulching influenced surface soil temperatures by reducing the midday highs and increasing the night-time lows, which decreased the frequency and amount of frost heave. Peat moisture also modified frost heave, with the greatest frost heaving occurring near 75 % peat moisture content (water table 10–20 cm below the surface and the least when soils were either wetter or drier. Moss survival was dependent on mulch, with no moss surviving in plots without mulch. Mulching also increased sedge transplant survival. In summary, mulching significantly increased the success of vegetation restoration efforts for frost heave areas in mountain fens.

  1. Assess Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Solid Waste Management in Taghbostan Mountain Climbers from Kermanshah City in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Alireza Mosavi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The performance of Cultural programs with environmental aims needs to check the status of knowledge, attitude and practice of community towards the subject as is desired, which one of those programs is solid waste management programs in the mountainous areas as a general duty. In the meantime, Mountaineers play role in the environmental cultural activities This study aimed to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice of people Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study of knowledge, attitude and behavior towards the management of solid waste in the mountain climbers of Kermanshah Taqbstan in 2014. Based on random sampling of 385 questionnaires were distributed among mountain climbers Taqbstan. The results of this study have been analyzed based on a statistical approach; ANOVA, by using SPPS version 16 Results: The results show an insignificant relationship between job and gender with awareness and performance. However, the age as a main variable has a significant relation with the knowledge but has an insignificant relation with attitude and performance. The results of correlation studies of education level with the knowledge and practice with p equal to 0.045 is statistically significant Conclusions: Solid Waste Management mountain climbers' education level is the most influential parameter. So that people with higher education have better performance. On the other hand, suffer climbers aged 20 to 40 and higher had better awareness about the Solid Waste Management. The results of this study should be noted that in any job can be diligent in protecting the mountain environment and includes a certain occupational group not be affected

  2. Environmental Impacts of Forest Road Construction on Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Caliskan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2 and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient. Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  3. Winter severity and snowiness and their multiannual variability in the Karkonosze Mountains and Jizera Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Grzegorz; Richterová, Dáša; Kliegrová, Stanislava; Zusková, Ilona; Pawliczek, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    This paper analyses winter severity and snow conditions in the Karkonosze Mountains and Jizera Mountains and examines their long-term trends. The analysis used modified comprehensive winter snowiness (WSW) and winter severity (WOW) indices as defined by Paczos (1982). An attempt was also made to determine the relationship between the WSW and WOW indices. Measurement data were obtained from eight stations operated by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute (IMGW-PIB), from eight stations operated by the Czech Hydrological and Meteorological Institute (CHMI) and also from the Meteorological Observatory of the University of Wrocław (UWr) on Mount Szrenica. Essentially, the study covered the period from 1961 to 2015. In some cases, however, the period analysed was shorter due to the limited availability of data, which was conditioned, inter alia, by the period of operation of the station in question, and its type. Viewed on a macroscale, snow conditions in the Karkonosze Mountains and Jizera Mountains (in similar altitude zones) are clearly more favourable on southern slopes than on northern ones. In the study area, negative trends have been observed with respect to both the WSW and WOW indices—winters have become less snowy and warmer. The correlation between the WOW and WSW indices is positive. At stations with northern macroexposure, WOW and WSW show greater correlation than at ones with southern macroexposure. This relationship is the weakest for stations that are situated in the upper ranges (Mount Śnieżka and Mount Szrenica).

  4. Comparison of extreme precipitation characteristics between the Ore Mountains and the Vosges Mountains (Europe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minářová, Jana; Müller, Miloslav; Clappier, Alain; Kašpar, Marek

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the characteristics of extreme precipitation events (EPEs) not only helps in mitigating the hazards associated with it but will also reduce the risks by improved planning based on the detailed information, and provide basis for better engineering decisions which can withstand the recurring and likely more frequent events predicted in future in the context of global climate change. In this study, extremity, temporal and spatial characteristics, and synoptic situation of the 54 EPEs that occurred during 1960-2013 were compared between two low mountain ranges situated in Central Europe: the Ore Mountains (OM) and Vosges Mountains (VG). The EPEs were defined using the Weather Extremity Index, which quantifies the extremity, duration, and spatial extent of events. Comparative analysis of EPE characteristics showed that in both regions the EPEs were mostly short (lasted 1-2 days) and their seasonal occurrence significantly depended on the synoptic situation and duration of EPEs; the low was related to summer short EPEs, while zonal circulation to winter long EPEs. The EPEs were generally related to lows in OM and to troughs in VG. The lows often moved to OM from the Mediterranean area, i.e. along the Vb track. However, five EPEs in VG occurred during a low with Vb track significantly deflected westwards. The EPEs in VG affected smaller area as compared to that in OM. The comparison of EPEs between the two low mountain ranges is first of its kind and contributes to the understanding of EPE characteristics in the regions.

  5. Sustaining the land, people, and economy of the Blue Mountains: The Blue Mountains Natural Resources Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn Starr; James McIver; Thomas M. Quigley

    2000-01-01

    The Blue Mountains Natural Resources Institute approaches issues by deciding if a critical issue is one of information needs or of differing values. If a values issue, we arrange local forums for discussion; if an information issue, we disseminate available information, or undertake research projects as appropriate. One issue we have researched involving both values...

  6. Creating advanced web map for mountain biking

    OpenAIRE

    Pasarić, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The diploma presents the creation of a web map designed for mountain bikers. The web map is based on Google’s application Google maps. This means that we use Google’s maps to show the route and its markers. The thesis mostly describes web programming and the interface Google Maps JavaScript API v3 that enables us, to integrate the interactive map onto web page. It also describes the markup language for web pages (HTML). In the thesis we discuss chapters such as HTML, Google maps, the b...

  7. Geology of the Oquirrh Mountains, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    United States Geological Survey

    1999-01-01

    The Oquirrh Mountains are located in north-central Utah, immediately south of the Great Salt Lake, in the easternmost part of the Basin and Range physiographic province. The range consists of northerly-trending aligned peaks 56 kilometers long flanked on the west by Tooele and Rush Valleys and on the east by Jordan and Cedar Valleys. The range hosts several of the more prominent base- and precious-metal and desseminated-gold mining areas in the western United States. The 130-year old Bingh...

  8. Liverworts (Marchantiophyta flora of Bolu Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan ŞİMŞEK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The liverwort (Marchantiophyta flora of Bolu mountains was investigated in this study. 310 specimens were collected between period of September 2009 and September 2011. After identifications of these specimens 34 liverwort taxa belonging 18 families and 22 genera have been reported. Also, Marsupella funckii (F. Weber & D. Mohr. Dumort. was reported for the first time from A2 sqaure of Turkey which adopted by Henderson (1961. Scapaniaceae is the rishest family with 6 species and 17,65% rates in the study area. The second family is Lophocoleaceae with 5 species and the rate of this family to all families at the study area is 14,71%.

  9. What's new in Rocky Mountain spotted fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) remains an important illness despite an effective therapy because it is difficult to diagnose and is capable of producing a fatal outcome. The pathogenesis of RMSF remains, in large part, an enigma. However, recent research has helped shed light on this mystery. Importantly, the diagnosis of RMSF must be considered in all febrile patients who have known or possible exposure to ticks, especially if they live in or have traveled to endemic regions during warmer months. Decisions about giving empiric therapy to such patients are difficult and require skill and careful judgement.

  10. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gertz, C.P.; Bartlett, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) and establish an approved YMP baseline against which overall YMP progress and management effectiveness shall be measured. For the sake of brevity, this document will be referred to as the Project Plan throughout this document. This Project Plan only addresses activities up to the submittal of the repository license application (LA) to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A new Project Plan will be submitted to establish the technical, cost, and schedule baselines for the final design and construction phase of development extending through the start of repository operations, assuming that the site is determined to be suitable.

  11. Volcanic Pipe of the Namuaiv Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir K. Karzhavin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at reconstructing thermodynamic conditions required for the studied mineral assemblages to be created and exist in nature. The results of the investigations confirm to the recent ideas about an important, even leading, role of temperature, pressure and dioxide carbon in diamond formation in volcanic pipers. The results of this theoretical research allows assuming that one of the reasons for the absence of diamonds in the Namuaiv Mountain volcanic pipe may lie in the increased content of water and oxidizing environmental conditions of their formation

  12. Human Infection in Wild Mountain Gorillas

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-25

    This podcast discusses a study about the transmission of Human Metapneumovirus Infection to wild mountain gorillas in Rwanda in 2009, published in the April 2011 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. Dr. Ian Lipkin, Director of the Center for Infection and Immunity and Dr. Gustavo Palacios, investigator in the Center of Infection & Immunity share details of this study.  Created: 4/25/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/2/2011.

  13. Local and regional characterisation of the diurnal mountain wind systems in the Guadarrama mountain range (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrillaga, Jon A.; Cano, Darío; Sastre, Mariano; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Morales, Gema; Viana, Samuel; Inclán, Rosa M.; Fidel González-Roúco, J.; Santolaria, Edmundo; Durán, Luis; Yagüe, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Diurnal mountain wind systems that develop in the surroundings of the Guadarrama mountain range (Spain) are studied in this work. This area is highly interesting: the city of Madrid is located at approximately 50 km towards the SE; and on the other hand, unlike in other mountainous regions, the summers are characterised to be significantly dry, providing an interesting case study of energy balance in the context of complex orography. Slope and basin circulations formed play an important role in the development of fog and pollution episodes in the whole region. On top of that, when upslope basin winds strengthened by diurnal convection exceed 10 m s-1, the runway configuration at the airport of Madrid needs to be modified. Continuous meteorological data and turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapour, momentum and heat are provided since June 2016 from measurements at a 10 m tower at La Herrería site, which is located at the foot of the Guadarrama mountain range. Besides, a 4 m high portable station is available for complementary measurements. La Herrería is part of the Guadarrama Monitoring Network (GuMNet; www.ucm.es/gumnet/), an atmospheric and subsurface observational facility distributed over the Guadarrama mountain range. As a support for the analysis, data from conventional meteorological stations within the region and a wind profiler at the airport are also employed. The wind roses for the period analysed (summer 2016) show how the diurnal cycle of the flows is influenced by local slopes and by the configuration of the basin. The irruption of the downslope flow in the evening produces a significant increase of the turbulence intensity and the eventual breakdown of the surface-based thermal inversion. However, the severe drying out of the soil throughout the summer, evident from the evolution of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes, seems to play a role in altering the characteristics of the mountain-breeze system and its impact on turbulence

  14. Miocene−Pleistocene deformation of the Saddle Mountains: Implications for seismic hazard in central Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisch, Lydia; Kelsey, Harvey; Sherrod, Brian; Möller, Andreas; Paces, James B.; Blakely, Richard J.; Styron, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The Yakima fold province, located in the backarc of the Cascadia subduction zone, is a region of active strain accumulation and deformation distributed across a series of fault-cored folds. The geodetic network in central Washington has been used to interpret large-scale N-S shortening and westward-increasing strain; however, geodetic data are unable to resolve shortening rates across individual structures in this low-strain-rate environment. Resolving fault geometries, slip rates, and timing of faulting in the Yakima fold province is critically important to seismic hazard assessment for nearby infrastructure and population centers.The Saddle Mountains anticline is one of the most prominent Yakima folds. It is unique within the Yakima fold province in that the syntectonic strata of the Ringold Formation are preserved and provide a record of deformation and drainage reorganization. Here, we present new stratigraphic columns, U-Pb zircon tephra ages, U-series caliche ages, and geophysical modeling that constrain two line-balanced and retrodeformed cross sections. These new constraints indicate that the Saddle Mountains anticline has accommodated 1.0−1.3 km of N-S shortening since 10 Ma, that shortening increases westward along the anticline, and that the average slip rate has increased 6-fold since 6.8 Ma. Provenance analysis suggests that the source terrane for the Ringold Formation was similar to that of the modern Snake River Plain. Using new slip rates and structural constraints, we calculate the strain accumulation time, interpretable as a recurrence interval, for earthquakes on the Saddle Mountains fault and find that large-magnitude earthquakes could rupture along the Saddle Mountains fault every 2−11 k.y.

  15. Factors Influencing the Variability of Mountain Gap Wind Events over the Gulf of Tehuantepec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, E.; Nair, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain gap winds (MGW) are a low-level jet feature that results from the interaction between the large-scale flow and mountain gaps. The focus of this study is the MGW events that occur over the Gulf of Tehuantepec, originating from the Chivela Pass in the Sierra Madre mountain range. MGW at this location can attain speeds in excess of 25 meters per second and can extend for a long distance over the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The high winds and seas associated with an MGW event pose a hazard to both aviation and shipping industries within the area. In this context, it is important to understand processes that modulate the intensity of the jet, its diurnal variation, and the ability of numerical models to forecast these events. We utilized nested grid configuration of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over the Chivela Pass region to simulate the evolution of twelve different gap wind events. The case days considered includes gale, storm, and hurricane force events. Output from the 1km spacing inner most grid is compared against Cross-Calibrated, Multi-Platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind product. These events are also analyzed to determine processes that are most responsible for variability in jet intensity within and between the different event categories. Numerical simulations show distinct differences in the vertical structure of the jet as a function of the force categories. Distribution of pressure gradient in the vicinity of the Chivela Pass also shows substantial difference depending upon the force category. Intensity of the jet is also modulated by other factors including stability aloft and boundary layer evolution at the entrance and exit regions of the jet. The relationship of these factors to synoptic precursor patterns and the processes through which these factors impact the intensity of the jet will be discussed in context of conceptual models of mountain gap winds.

  16. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor (SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated (R 2  = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site

  17. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  18. Snow avalanche activity in the High Tatras Mountains: new data achieved by means of dendrogeomorphic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichavsky, R.

    2016-12-01

    The High Tatras Mountains are permanently affected by the occurrence of hazardous geomorphic processes. Snow avalanches represent a common hazard that threatens the infrastructure and humans living and visiting the mountains. So far, the spatio-temporal reconstruction of snow avalanche histories was based only on existing archival records, orthophoto interpretation and lichenometric dating in the High Tatras Mountains. Dendrogeomorphic methods allow for the intra-seasonal dating of scars on tree stems and branches and have been broadly used for the dating of snow avalanche events all over the world. We extracted the increment cores and cross sections from 189 individuals of Pinus mugo var. mugo growing on four tali in the Great Cold Valley and dated all the past scars that could correspond with the winter to early spring occurrence of snow avalanches. The dating was supported by the visual analysis of three orthophoto images from 2004, 2009 and 2014. In total, nineteen event years of snow avalanches (10 certain events, and 9 probable events) were identified since 1959. Historical archives provided evidence only for nine event years since 1987, and three of them were confirmed dendrogeomorphically. Geomorphic effect of recent snow avalanches identified by the spatial distribution of scarred trees in individual years corresponds with the extent of events visible from the orthophotos. We can confirm higher frequency of snow avalanche events since 1980s (17 out of 19 events) and significant increase during the last ten years. The future expected climatic changes associated with the changes in temperature and precipitation regime could significantly influence on the frequency of snow avalanches. Therefore, our results can become the starting line for more extensive dendrogeomorphic survey in the High Tatras Mountains in order to create a catalogue of all natural hazards for the future prediction and modelling of these phenomena in context of environmental changes.

  19. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor ( SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated ( R 2 = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site productivity.

  20. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Abbasi

    Full Text Available Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros and desert zones (Kavir, with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU. At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was