WorldWideScience

Sample records for holographic particle image

  1. A review on noise suppression and aberration compensation in holographic particle image velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.F. Tamrin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding three-dimensional (3D fluid flow behaviour is undeniably crucial in improving performance and efficiency in a wide range of applications in engineering and medical fields. Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV is a potential tool to probe and characterize complex flow dynamics since it is a truly three-dimensional three-component measurement technique. The technique relies on the coherent light scattered by small seeding particles that are assumed to faithfully follow the flow for subsequent reconstruction of the same the event afterward. However, extraction of useful 3D displacement data from these particle images is usually aggravated by noise and aberration which are inherent within the optical system. Noise and aberration have been considered as major hurdles in HPIV in obtaining accurate particle image identification and its corresponding 3D position. Major contributions to noise include zero-order diffraction, out-of-focus particles, virtual image and emulsion grain scattering. Noise suppression is crucial to ensure that particle image can be distinctly differentiated from background noise while aberration compensation forms particle image with high integrity. This paper reviews a number of HPIV configurations that have been proposed to address these issues, summarizes the key findings and outlines a basis for follow-on research.

  2. Holographic particle image velocimetry measurements of hairpin vortices in a subcritical air channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizher, Alexander; Cohen, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) system is employed to study the evolution of coherent structures artificially generated in a plane Poiseuille air flow. As a first step the hot-wire technique and two-dimensional flow visualization are used to determine the generation conditions and dimensions of the coherent structures, their shedding frequency, trajectory, and convection velocity. Then, the HPIV method is utilized to obtain the instantaneous topology of the hairpin vortex and its associated three-dimensional distribution of the two (streamwise and spanwise) velocity components as well as the corresponding wall-normal vorticity. Finally, the experimental data are compared with results of related experimental and numerical studies. The present experimental results support the view that the generation of hairpins under various base flow conditions is governed by a basic mechanism, the important common elements of which are the shear of the base flow and an initial disturbance having a sufficiently large amplitude.

  3. Electromagnetically Induced Quantum Holographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian-Hui; Xie, Min; Ma, Hong-Yang; Zheng, Chun-Hong; Chen, Li-Bo

    2016-05-01

    We study the quantum holographic imaging of one-dimensional electromagnetically induced grating created by a strong standing wave in an atomic medium. Entangled photon pairs, generated in a spontaneous parametric down-conversion process, are employed as the imaging light to realize coincidence recording. By theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, we find that both the amplitude and phase information of the object can be imaged with the characteristic of imaging nonlocally and of arbitrarily controllable image variation in size.

  4. Heterodyne holographic microscopy of gold particles

    CERN Document Server

    Atlan, Michael; Desbiolles, Pierre; Absil, Emilie; Tessier, Gilles; Coppey-Moisan, Maité

    2007-01-01

    We report experimental results on heterodyne holographic microscopy of subwavelength-sized gold particles. The apparatus uses continuous green laser illumination of the metal beads in a total internal reflection configuration for dark-field operation. Detection of the scattered light at the illumination wavelength on a charge-coupled device array detector enables 3D localization of brownian particles in water

  5. Feasibility of automated dropsize distributions from holographic data using digital image processing techniques. [particle diameter measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, S. P.; Girard, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automated technique for measuring particle diameters and their spatial coordinates from holographic reconstructions is being developed. Preliminary tests on actual cold-flow holograms of impinging jets indicate that a suitable discriminant algorithm consists of a Fourier-Gaussian noise filter and a contour thresholding technique. This process identifies circular as well as noncircular objects. The desired objects (in this case, circular or possibly ellipsoidal) are then selected automatically from the above set and stored with their parametric representations. From this data, dropsize distributions as a function of spatial coordinates can be generated and combustion effects due to hardware and/or physical variables studied.

  6. Holographic quantum imaging: reconstructing spatial properties via two-particle interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Nils; Ferenczi, Gergely; Croke, Sarah; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2017-05-01

    Two particle interference phenomena, such as the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect, are a direct manifestation of the nature of the symmetry properties of indistinguishable particles as described by quantum mechanics. The HOM effect has recently been applied as a tool for pure state tomography of a single photon. In this article, we generalize the method to extract additional information for a pure state and extend this to the full tomography of mixed states as well. The formalism is kept general enough to apply to both boson and fermion based interferometry. Our theoretical discussion is accompanied by two proposals of interferometric setups that allow the measurement of a tomographically complete set of observables for single photon quantum states.

  7. LDA optical setup using holographic imaging configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes one of the possible ways for improving fringe quality at LDA measuring volume using a holographic imaging configuration consisting of a single hololens. For its comparative study with a conventional imaging configuration, a complete characterization of fringes formed at the measurement volume by both the configuration is presented. Results indicate the qualitative as well as quantitative improvement of the fringes formed at measurement volume by the holographic imaging configuration. Hence it is concluded that use of holographic imaging configuration for making LDA optical setup is a better choice than the conventional one.

  8. Imaging characteristics of a volume holographic lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Jiang, Zhu-qing; Xu, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Shao-jie; Sun, Ya-jun; Tao, Shi-quan

    2009-07-01

    A volume holographic grating lens can reconstruct the three-dimensional information by conducting multiple optical slicing of an object based on Bragg selectivity of the volume holographic grating. In this paper, we employ the point-spread function of volume holographic imaging system to theoretically analyze its imaging resolution. In the experiments, the volume holographic gratings are made with a spherical reference (SR) and a planar reference (PR), respectively, and used as volume holographic imaging lens in our imaging system. The longitudinal and lateral defocusing characteristics of volume holographic lens with SR and with PR are investigated experimentally by displacing the interested objects from original reference location, respectively. The effects of the parameters of the volume holographic lens on the longitudinal and lateral resolution are also discussed. The experimental results show that increasing the size of the volume holographic lens can improve the depth resolution, and in particular, it has greater influence on SR VHI. The lateral selectivity of SR VHI is more sensitive than that of PR VHI, and the Bragg degenerate diffraction of PR VHI on the y axis is obviously observed.

  9. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  10. Image Resolution of a Holographic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    transfer function and linear systems theory to optical systems. This has also been applied to holographic image analysis (Refs. l I and 12). The...view point, the linear systems theory is applied in correlating the intensity distribution of a known point or line radiation source with the intensity...function of a holographic system, (2) a discussion of linear systems theory to allow a thorough description of a method for obtaining the line

  11. Holographic Dual to Conical Defects III: Improved Image Method

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya; Tikhanovskaya, M D

    2016-01-01

    The geodesics prescription in holographic approach in Lorentzian signature is valid only for geodesics which connect spacelike-separated points at the boundary, since there is no timelike geodesics which reach the boundary. There is also no straightforward analytic Euclidean continuation for a general background, such as e. g. moving particle in AdS. We propose an improved geodesic image method for two-point Lorentzian correlators which is valid for arbitrary time intervals in case of the bulk spacetime deformed by point particles. We illustrate that our prescription is consistent with the case when the analytic continuation exists and with the quasigeodesics prescription used in previous work. We also discuss some other applications of the improved image method, such as holographic entanglement entropy and multiple particles in AdS3.

  12. Propagation phasor approach for holographic image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yibo; Göröcs, Zoltán; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    To achieve high-resolution and wide field-of-view, digital holographic imaging techniques need to tackle two major challenges: phase recovery and spatial undersampling. Previously, these challenges were separately addressed using phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution algorithms, which utilize the diversity of different imaging parameters. Although existing holographic imaging methods can achieve large space-bandwidth-products by performing pixel super-resolution and phase retrieval sequentially, they require large amounts of data, which might be a limitation in high-speed or cost-effective imaging applications. Here we report a propagation phasor approach, which for the first time combines phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution into a unified mathematical framework and enables the synthesis of new holographic image reconstruction methods with significantly improved data efficiency. In this approach, twin image and spatial aliasing signals, along with other digital artifacts, are interpreted as noise terms that are modulated by phasors that analytically depend on the lateral displacement between hologram and sensor planes, sample-to-sensor distance, wavelength, and the illumination angle. Compared to previous holographic reconstruction techniques, this new framework results in five- to seven-fold reduced number of raw measurements, while still achieving a competitive resolution and space-bandwidth-product. We also demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging biological specimens including Papanicolaou and blood smears.

  13. Magnonic holographic imaging of magnetic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, D.; Chiang, H.; Bhowmick, T.; Volodchenkov, A. D.; Ranjbar, M.; Liu, G.; Jiang, C.; Warren, C.; Khivintsev, Y.; Filimonov, Y.; Garay, J.; Lake, R.; Balandin, A. A.; Khitun, A.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves. In this approach, the object of interest is placed on top of a magnetic testbed made of material with low spin wave damping. There are micro-antennas incorporated in the testbed. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation while another one is used for the detecting of inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. The measurements are repeated for different phase differences between the spin wave generating antennas which is equivalent to changing the angle of illumination. The collected data appear as a 3D plot - the holographic image of the object. We present experimental data showing magnonic holographic images of a low-coercivity Si/Co sample, a high-coercivity sample made of SrFe12O19 and a diamagnetic copper sample. We also present images of the three samples consisting of a different amount of SrFe12O19 powder. The imaging was accomplished on a Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 testbed at room temperature. The obtained data reveal the unique magnonic signatures of the objects. Experimental data is complemented by the results of numerical modeling, which qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the images. Potentially, magnonic holographic imaging may complement existing techniques and be utilized for non-destructive in-situ magnetic object characterization. The fundamental physical limits of this approach are also discussed.

  14. Biometric identification using holographic radar imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlen P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first "biometric" application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  15. Spiral holographic imaging through quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Ming, Yang; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2017-07-01

    Spiral holographic imaging in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference scheme is introduced. Using spontaneous parametric down-conversion as a source of photon pairs, we analyze the joint orbital angular momentum spectrum of a reference photon and the photon encoding information of the object. The first-order interference of light beams in standard holographic imaging is replaced by the quantum interference of two-photon probability amplitudes. The difficulty in retrieving the amplitude and phase structure of an unknown photon is thereby avoided as classical interferometric techniques such as optical holography do not apply. Our results show that the full information of the object's transmission function can be recorded in the spiral hologram, which originates directly from the joint orbital angular momentum spectrum. This presents a lateral demonstration of compressive imaging and can potentially be used for remote sensing.

  16. Quantitative measurement of holographic image quality using Adobe Photoshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesly, E.

    2013-02-01

    Measurement of the characteristics of image holograms in regards to diffraction efficiency and signal to noise ratio are demonstrated, using readily available digital cameras and image editing software. Illustrations and case studies, using currently available holographic recording materials, are presented.

  17. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images and measur......Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k...

  18. Extremely simple holographic projection of color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Michal; Ducin, Izabela; Kakarenko, Karol; Suszek, Jaroslaw; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Sypek, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    A very simple scheme of holographic projection is presented with some experimental results showing good quality image projection without any imaging lens. This technique can be regarded as an alternative to classic projection methods. It is based on the reconstruction real images from three phase iterated Fourier holograms. The illumination is performed with three laser beams of primary colors. A divergent wavefront geometry is used to achieve an increased throw angle of the projection, compared to plane wave illumination. Light fibers are used as light guidance in order to keep the setup as simple as possible and to provide point-like sources of high quality divergent wave-fronts at optimized position against the light modulator. Absorbing spectral filters are implemented to multiplex three holograms on a single phase-only spatial light modulator. Hence color mixing occurs without any time-division methods, which cause rainbow effects and color flicker. The zero diffractive order with divergent illumination is practically invisible and speckle field is effectively suppressed with phase optimization and time averaging techniques. The main advantages of the proposed concept are: a very simple and highly miniaturizable configuration; lack of lens; a single LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) modulator; a strong resistance to imperfections and obstructions of the spatial light modulator like dead pixels, dust, mud, fingerprints etc.; simple calculations based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) easily processed in real time mode with GPU (Graphic Programming).

  19. Holographic time-resolved particle tracking by means of three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry allows tracking particle trajectories in time and space by means of holography. However, the drawback of the technique is that in the three-dimensional particle distribution reconstructed from a hologram, the individual particles can hardly be resolved due to the superimposed out-of-focus signal from neighboring particles. We demonstrate here a three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution applied to the reconstructed wavefront which results in resolving all particles simultaneously in three-dimensions. Moreover, we apply the three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution to reconstructions of a time-dependent sequence of holograms of an ensemble of polystyrene spheres moving in water. From each hologram we simultaneously resolve all particles in the ensemble in three dimensions and from the sequence of holograms we obtain the time-resolved trajectories of individual polystyrene spheres.

  20. Characterization of the holographic imaging grating of GOMOS UVIS spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeffe, Jussi; Saari, Heikki K.; Astola, Heikki; Rainio, Kari; Mazuray, Lorand; Pierot, Dominique; Craen, Pierre; Gruslin, Michel; Lecat, Jean-Herve; Bonnemason, Francis; Flamand, Jean; Thevenon, Alain

    1996-11-01

    A Finnish-French group has proposed an imaging spectrometer- based instrument for the ENVISAT Earth observation satellite of ESA, which yields a global mapping of the vertical profile of ozone and other related atmospheric gases. The GOMOS instrument works by measuring the UV-visible spectrum of a star that is occulting behind the Earth's atmosphere. The prime contractor of GOMOS is Matra Marconi Space France. The focal plane optics are designed and manufactured by Spacebel Instrumentation S.A. and the holographic grating by Jobin-Yvon. VTT Automation, Measurement Technology has participated in the GOMOS studies since 1989 and is presently responsible for the verification tests of the imaging quality and opto-mechanical interfaces of the holographic imaging grating of GOMOS. The UVIS spectrometer of GOMOS consists of a holographic, aberration corrected grating and of a CCD detector. The alignment of the holographic grating needs as an input very accurate knowledge of the mechanical interfaces. VTT Automation has designed, built and tested a characterization system for the holographic grating. This system combines the accurate optical imaging measurements with the absolute knowledge of the geometrical parameters at the accuracy of plus or minus 10 micrometers which makes the system unique. The developed system has been used for two breadboard gratings and the qualification model grating. The imaging quality results and their analysis together with alignment procedure utilizing of the knowledge of mechanical interfaces is described.

  1. Circularly polarized antennas for active holographic imaging through barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Severtsen, Ronald H [Richland, WA; Lechelt, Wayne M [West Richland, WA; Prince, James M [Kennewick, WA

    2011-07-26

    Circularly-polarized antennas and their methods of use for active holographic imaging through barriers. The antennas are dielectrically loaded to optimally match the dielectric constant of the barrier through which images are to be produced. The dielectric loading helps to remove barrier-front surface reflections and to couple electromagnetic energy into the barrier.

  2. 3D tracking the Brownian motion of colloidal particles using digital holographic microscopy and joint reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Fournel, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In-line digital holography is a valuable tool for sizing, locating and tracking micro- or nano-objects in a volume. When a parametric imaging model is available, Inverse Problems approaches provide a straightforward estimate of the object parameters by fitting data with the model, thereby allowing accurate reconstruction. As recently proposed and demonstrated, combining pixel super-resolution techniques with Inverse Problems approaches improves the estimation of particle size and 3D-position. Here we demonstrate the accurate tracking of colloidal particles in Brownian motion. Particle size and 3D-position are jointly optimized from video holograms acquired with a digital holographic microscopy set up based on a "low-end" microscope objective ($\\times 20$, $\\rm NA\\ 0.5$). Exploiting information redundancy makes it possible to characterize particles with a standard deviation of 15 nm in size and a theoretical resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 nm$^3$ for position under additive white Gaussian noise assumption.

  3. RGB imaging volumes alignment method for color holographic displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaperty, Weronika; Kozacki, Tomasz; Gierwiało, Radosław; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in holographic displays include increased interest in multiplexing techniques, which allow for extension of viewing angle, hologram resolution increase, or color imaging. In each of these situations, the image is obtained by a composition of a several light wavefronts and therefore some wavefront misalignment occurs. In this work we present a calibration method, that allows for correction of these misalignments by a suitable numerical manipulation of holographic data. For this purpose, we have developed an automated procedure that is based on a measurement of positions of reconstructed synthetic hologram of a target object with focus at two different reconstruction distances. In view of relatively long reconstruction distances in holographic displays, we focus on angular deviations of light beams, which result in a noticeable mutual lateral shift and inclination of the component images in space. A method proposed in this work is implemented in a color holographic display unit (single Spatial Light Modulator - SLM) utilizing Space- Division Method (SDM). In this technique, also referred as Aperture Field Division (AFD) method, a significant wavefront inclination is introduced by a color filter glass mosaic plate (mask) placed in front of the SLM. It is verified that an accuracy of the calibration method, obtained for reconstruction distance 700mm, is 34.5 μm and 0.02°, for the lateral shift and for the angular compensation, respectively. In the final experiment the presented method is verified through real-world object color image reconstruction.

  4. Compressive sensing for direct millimeter-wave holographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Shen, Zongjun; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-10

    Direct millimeter-wave (MMW) holographic imaging, which provides both the amplitude and phase information by using the heterodyne mixing technique, is considered a powerful tool for personnel security surveillance. However, MWW imaging systems usually suffer from the problem of high cost or relatively long data acquisition periods for array or single-pixel systems. In this paper, compressive sensing (CS), which aims at sparse sampling, is extended to direct MMW holographic imaging for reducing the number of antenna units or the data acquisition time. First, following the scalar diffraction theory, an exact derivation of the direct MMW holographic reconstruction is presented. Then, CS reconstruction strategies for complex-valued MMW images are introduced based on the derived reconstruction formula. To pursue the applicability for near-field MMW imaging and more complicated imaging targets, three sparsity bases, including total variance, wavelet, and curvelet, are evaluated for the CS reconstruction of MMW images. We also discuss different sampling patterns for single-pixel, linear array and two-dimensional array MMW imaging systems. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate the feasibility of recovering MMW images from measurements at 1/2 or even 1/4 of the Nyquist rate.

  5. Inertial mass of an elementary particle from the holographic scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giné, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    Various attempts have been made to fully explain the mechanism by which a body has inertial mass. Recently, it has been proposed that this mechanism is as follows: when an object accelerates in one direction, a dynamical Rindler event horizon forms in the opposite direction, suppressing Unruh radiation on that side by a Rindler-scale Casimir effect whereas the radiation on the other side is only slightly reduced by a Hubble-scale Casimir effect. This produces a net Unruh radiation pressure force that always opposes the acceleration, just like inertia, although the masses predicted are twice those expected, see Ref. 17. In a later work, an error was corrected so that its prediction improves to within 26% of the Planck mass, see Ref. 10. In this paper, the expression of the inertial mass of a elementary particle is derived from the holographic scenario giving the exact value of the mass of a Planck particle when it is applied to a Planck particle.

  6. Cloud particle size distributions measured with an airborne digital in-line holographic instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Fugal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Holographic data from the prototype airborne digital holographic instrument HOLODEC (Holographic Detector for Clouds, taken during test flights are digitally reconstructed to obtain the size (equivalent diameters in the range 23 to 1000 μm, three-dimensional position, and two-dimensional profile of ice particles and then ice particle size distributions and number densities are calculated using an automated algorithm with minimal user intervention. The holographic method offers the advantages of a well-defined sample volume size that is not dependent on particle size or airspeed, and offers a unique method of detecting shattered particles. The holographic method also allows the volume sample rate to be increased beyond that of the prototype HOLODEC instrument, limited solely by camera technology.

    HOLODEC size distributions taken in mixed-phase regions of cloud compare well to size distributions from a PMS FSSP probe also onboard the aircraft during the test flights. A conservative algorithm for detecting shattered particles utilizing the particles depth-position along the optical axis eliminates the obvious ice particle shattering events from the data set. In this particular case, the size distributions of non-shattered particles are reduced by approximately a factor of two for particles 15 to 70 μm in equivalent diameter, compared to size distributions of all particles.

  7. Imaging through flesh tissue using fs electronic holographic gating method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯比学; 陈国夫; 郝志琦; 丰善; 王淑岩; 王屹山; 王国志

    1999-01-01

    The experimental results of imaging through flesh tissue using fs electronic holographic gating method is reported. In the experiment, Ti: sapphire mode-locked laser is used as light source, of which the repetition rate is 100 MHz, central wavelength 800 mn, duration of pulse 20 fs, output power 80 mW. Tissue is a 7 mm thick chicken slice, and the imaged object is a metal wire with diameter of 0.5 mm. A general CCD is used to record holograms and a clear image of metal wire is obtained. Several relevant problems are discussed.

  8. Numerical simulations of volume holographic imaging system resolution characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yajun; Jiang, Zhuqing; Liu, Shaojie; Tao, Shiquan

    2009-05-01

    Because of the Bragg selectivity of volume holographic gratings, it helps VHI system to optically segment the object space. In this paper, properties of point-source diffraction imaging in terms of the point-spread function (PSF) are investigated, and characteristics of depth and lateral resolutions in a VHI system is numerically simulated. The results show that the observed diffracted field obviously changes with the displacement in the z direction, and is nearly unchanged with displacement in the x and y directions. The dependence of the diffracted imaging field on the z-displacement provides a way to possess 3-D image by VHI.

  9. Parallel computing of a digital hologram and particle searching for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin-Ichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Sato, Kazuho; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Yamamoto, Keisuke

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a parallel algorithm for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry. The algorithm is used in (1) numerical reconstruction of a particle image computer using a digital hologram, and (2) searching for particles. The numerical reconstruction from the digital hologram makes use of the Fresnel diffraction equation and the FFT (fast Fourier transform), whereas the particle search algorithm looks for local maximum graduation in a reconstruction field represented by a 3D matrix. To achieve high performance computing for both calculations (reconstruction and particle search), two memory partitions are allocated to the 3D matrix. In this matrix, the reconstruction part consists of horizontally placed 2D memory partitions on the x-y plane for the FFT, whereas, the particle search part consists of vertically placed 2D memory partitions set along the z axes. Consequently, the scalability can be obtained for the proportion of processor elements, where the benchmarks are carried out for parallel computation by a SGI Altix machine.

  10. Coherent imaging with incoherent light in digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelik, Radim

    2012-01-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) allows for imaging with a quantitative phase contrast. In this way it becomes an important instrument, a completely non-invasive tool for a contrast intravital observation of living cells and a cell drymass density distribution measurement. A serious drawback of current DHMs is highly coherent illumination which makes the lateral resolution worse and impairs the image quality by a coherence noise and a parasitic interference. An uncompromising solution to this problem can be found in the Leith concept of incoherent holography. An off-axis hologram can be formed with arbitrary degree of light coherence in systems equipped with an achromatic interferometer and thus the resolution and the image quality typical for an incoherent-light wide-field microscopy can be achieved. In addition, advanced imaging modes based on limited coherence can be utilized. The typical example is a coherence-gating effect which provides a finite axial resolution and makes DHM image similar to that of a confocal microscope. These possibilities were described theoretically using the formalism of three-dimensional coherent transfer functions and proved experimentally by the coherence-controlled holographic microscope which is DHM based on the Leith achromatic interferometer. Quantitative-phase-contrast imaging is demonstrated with incoherent light by the living cancer cells observation and their motility evaluation. The coherence-gating effect was proved by imaging of model samples through a scattering layer and living cells inside an opalescent medium.

  11. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of pulsatile blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bencteux, Jeffrey; Kostas, Thomas; Bayat, Sam; Atlan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile motion induced by blood flow using heterodyne holographic interferometry on the thumb of a healthy volunteer, in real-time. Optical Doppler images were measured with green laser light by a frequency-shifted Mach-Zehnder interferometer in off-axis configuration. The recorded optical signal was linked to local instantaneous out-of-plane motion of the skin at velocities of a few hundreds of microns per second, and compared to blood pulse monitored by plethysmoraphy during an occlusion-reperfusion experiment.

  12. Resolution of electro-holographic image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Young; Chernyshov, Oleksii; Lee, Hyoung; Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Park, Min-Chul

    2016-06-01

    The resolution of the reconstructed image from a hologram displayed on a DMD is measured with the light field images along the propagation direction of the reconstructed image. The light field images reveal that a point and line image suffers a strong astigmatism but the line focusing distance differences for lines with different directions. This will be astigmatism too. The focusing distance of the reconstructed image is shorter than that of the object. The two lines in transverse direction are resolved when the gap between them is around 16 pixels of the DMD's in use. However, the depth direction is difficult to estimate due to the depth of focus of each line. Due to the astigmatism, the reconstructed image of a square appears as a rectangle or a rhombus.

  13. Holographic images reconstructed from GMR-based fringe pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a magneto-optical spatial light modulator (MOSLM using giant magneto-resistance (GMR structures for realizing a holographic three-dimensional (3D display. For practical applications, reconstructed image of hologram consisting of GMR structures should be investigated in order to study the feasibility of the MOSLM. In this study, we fabricated a hologram with GMR based fringe-pattern and demonstrated a reconstructed image. A fringe-pattern convolving a crossshaped image was calculated by a conventional binary computer generated hologram (CGH technique. The CGH-pattern has 2,048 × 2,048 with 5 μm pixel pitch. The GMR stack consists of a Tb-Fe-Co/CoFe pinned layer, a Ag spacer, a Gd-Fe free layer for light modulation, and a Ru capping layer, was deposited by dc-magnetron sputtering. The GMR hologram was formed using photo-lithography and Krion milling processes, followed by the deposition of a Tb-Fe-Co reference layer with large coercivity and the same Kerr-rotation angle compared to the free layer, and a lift-off process. The reconstructed image of the ON-state was clearly observed and successfully distinguished from the OFF-state by switching the magnetization direction of the free-layer with an external magnetic field. These results indicate the possibility of realizing a holographic 3D display by the MOSLM using the GMR structures.

  14. Low-energy electron holographic imaging of gold nanorods supported by ultraclean graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas, E-mail: longchamp@physik.uzh.ch; Escher, Conrad; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-10-15

    An ideal support for an electron microscopy should be as thin as possible and be able to interact as little as possible with the primary electrons. Since graphene is atomically thin and made up of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, the potential to use graphene as a substrate in electron microscopy is enormous. Until now graphene has hardly ever been used for this purpose because the cleanliness of freestanding graphene before or after deposition of the objects of interest was insufficient. We demonstrate here by means of low-energy electron holographic imaging that freestanding graphene prepared with a platinum-metal catalysis method remains ultraclean even after re-exposure to ambient conditions and deposition of gold nanorods from the liquid phase. In the holographic reconstruction of gold particles the organic shell surrounding the objects is apparent while it is not detectable in SEM images of the very same sample, demonstrating the tremendous potential of low-energy electron holography for imaging of graphene-supported single biomolecules. - Highlights: • Deposition of nanometre-sized objects onto ultraclean freestanding graphene. • TEM imaging of ultraclean freestanding graphene. • Low-energy electron imaging of gold-nanorods deposited onto freestanding graphene.

  15. Single-random-phase holographic encryption of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed for encrypting an optical image onto a phase-only hologram, utilizing a single random phase mask as the private encryption key. The encryption process can be divided into 3 stages. First the source image to be encrypted is scaled in size, and pasted onto an arbitrary position in a larger global image. The remaining areas of the global image that are not occupied by the source image could be filled with randomly generated contents. As such, the global image as a whole is very different from the source image, but at the same time the visual quality of the source image is preserved. Second, a digital Fresnel hologram is generated from the new image, and converted into a phase-only hologram based on bi-directional error diffusion. In the final stage, a fixed random phase mask is added to the phase-only hologram as the private encryption key. In the decryption process, the global image together with the source image it contained, can be reconstructed from the phase-only hologram if it is overlaid with the correct decryption key. The proposed method is highly resistant to different forms of Plain-Text-Attacks, which are commonly used to deduce the encryption key in existing holographic encryption process. In addition, both the encryption and the decryption processes are simple and easy to implement.

  16. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of microvascular blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Magnain, C; Boucneau, T; Simonutti, M; Ferezou, I; Rancillac, A; Vitalis, T; Sahel, J A; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2014-01-01

    We report on local superficial blood flow monitoring in biological tissue from laser Doppler holographic imaging. In time averaging recording conditions, holography acts as a narrowband bandpass filter, which, combined with a frequency shifted reference beam, permits frequency selective imaging in the radiofrequency range. These Doppler images are acquired with an off axis Mach Zehnder interferometer. Microvascular hemodynamic components mapping is performed in the cerebral cortex of the mouse and the eye fundus of the rat with near-infrared laser light without any exogenous marker. These measures are made from a basic inverse method analysis of local first order optical fluctuation spectra at low radiofrequencies, from 0 Hz to 100 kHz. Local quadratic velocity is derived from Doppler broadenings induced by fluid flows, with elementary diffusing wave spectroscopy formalism in backscattering configuration. We demonstrate quadratic mean velocity assessment in the 0.1 to 10 millimeters per second range in vitro ...

  17. Generalized dual-plane digital holographic imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Panezai, Spozmai; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-12-01

    A generalized dual-plane technique for digital holographic imaging is proposed. Two holograms are recorded at two slightly displaced planes. The complex amplitude of the plane reference wave is obtained according to the measured intensity of the reference beam and the spectrum of hologram. The holograms are modified with the known information of the reference wave. Then, the modified holograms are reconstructed by the dual-plane algorithm. The zero-order and the twin images are removed in the reconstructed image. The simulation and experiments demonstrate that this method is valid for both on-axis and off-axis digital holography and high resolution reconstruction is achieved even with a very small offset angle of the reference beam.

  18. A framework for holographic scene representation and image synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Remo; Kaufmann, Peter; Gross, Markus

    2007-01-01

    We present a framework for the holographic representation and display of graphics objects. As opposed to traditional graphics representations, our approach reconstructs the light wave reflected or emitted by the original object directly from the underlying digital hologram. Our novel holographic graphics pipeline consists of several stages including the digital recording of a full-parallax hologram, the reconstruction and propagation of its wavefront, and rendering of the final image onto conventional, framebuffer-based displays. The required view-dependent depth image is computed from the phase information inherently represented in the complex-valued wavefront. Our model also comprises a correct physical modeling of the camera taking into account optical elements, such as lens and aperture. It thus allows for a variety of effects including depth of field, diffraction, interference, and features built-in anti-aliasing. A central feature of our framework is its seamless integration into conventional rendering and display technology which enables us to elegantly combine traditional 3D object or scene representations with holograms. The presented work includes the theoretical foundations and allows for high quality rendering of objects consisting of large numbers of elementary waves while keeping the hologram at a reasonable size.

  19. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  20. Water detection in thermal insulating materials by high resolution imaging with holographic radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Becthel, T.; Ivashov, S.; Razevig, V.; Zhuravlev, A.

    2017-01-01

    The present research is aimed at the application of high resolution holographic images for the detection and characterization of low water content (0.2-1 g) water patches in insulating materials. The images acquired with manual scanning with high frequency (7 GHz) holographic radar with I/Q outputs are compared with a high speed electromechanical scanner with 4 GHz holographic radar. Small patches of the order of 22 mm  ×  22 mm buried at 18 mm into insulating materials with a low dielectric constant, have been accurately reconstructed with the high frequency holographic radar but they can also be detected with the lower frequency holographic radar at even greater depths.

  1. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  2. Optimization of multiplexed holographic gratings in PQ-PMMA for spectral-spatial imaging filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger, Paul J; Barton, Jennifer K; Barbastathis, George; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-03-15

    Holographic gratings formed in thick phenanthrenquinone- (PQ-) doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) can be made to have narrowband spectral and spatial transmittance filtering properties. We present the design and performance of angle-multiplexed holographic filters formed in PQ-PMMA at 488 nm and reconstructed with a LED operated at approximately 630 nm. The dark delay time between exposure and the preillumination exposure of the polymer prior to exposure of the holographic area are varied to optimize the diffraction efficiency of multiplexed holographic filters. The resultant holographic filters can enhance the performance of four-dimensional spatial-spectral imaging systems. The optimized filters are used to simultaneously sample spatial and spectral information at five different depths separated by 50 microm within biological tissue samples.

  3. Non-iterative phase hologram computation for low speckle holographic image projection

    OpenAIRE

    Ürey, Hakan; Ulusoy, Erdem; Mengü, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used in holographic display applications, including holographic image projection (HIP). Most phase computer generated hologram (CGH) calculation algorithms have an iterative structure with a high computational load, and also are prone to speckle noise, as a result of the random phase terms applied on the desired images to mitigate the encoding noise. In this paper, we present a non-iterative algorithm, where simple Discrete Fourier Transfo...

  4. Terahertz in-line digital holographic multiplane imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Li, Weihua; Wang, Yunxin

    2017-05-01

    Terahertz waves of which frequency spans from 0.1 to 10 THz bridge the gap between the infrared spectrum and microwaves. Owing to the special features of terahertz wave, such as penetrability and non-ionizing, terahertz imaging technique is a very significant and important method for inspections and detections. Digital holography can reconstruct the amplitude and phase distributions of a sample without scanning and it already has many successful applications in the area of visible and infrared light. The terahertz in-line digital holographic multi-plane imaging system which is presented in this paper is the combination of a continuous-wave terahertz source and the in-line scheme of digital holography. In order to observe a three dimensional (3D) shape sample only a portion of which appears in good focus, the autofocusing algorithm is brought to the data process. The synthetic aperture method is also applied to provide the high resolution imaging effect in the terahertz waveband. Both intrinsic twin images and defocused objective images confuse the quality of the image in an individual reconstructed plane. In order to solve this issue, phase retrieval iteration algorithm is used for the reconstruction. In addition, the reconstructed amplitude image in each plane multiplies the mask of which the threshold depends on the values of the autofocusing curve. A sample with simple artificial structure is observed which verifies that the present method is an authentic tool to acquire the multi-plane information of a target in terahertz waves. It can expect a wide application in terahertz defect detecting, terahertz medical inspection and other important areas in the future.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  6. HoloGondel: in situ cloud observations on a cable car in the Swiss Alps using a holographic imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alexander; Henneberger, Jan; Schöpfer, Sarah; Fugal, Jacob; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    In situ observations of cloud properties in complex alpine terrain where research aircraft cannot sample are commonly conducted at mountain-top research stations and limited to single-point measurements. The HoloGondel platform overcomes this limitation by using a cable car to obtain vertical profiles of the microphysical and meteorological cloud parameters. The main component of the HoloGondel platform is the HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO 3G), which uses digital in-line holography to image cloud particles. Based on two-dimensional images the microphysical cloud parameters for the size range from small cloud particles to large precipitation particles are obtained for the liquid and ice phase. The low traveling velocity of a cable car on the order of 10 m s-1 allows measurements with high spatial resolution; however, at the same time it leads to an unstable air speed towards the HoloGondel platform. Holographic cloud imagers, which have a sample volume that is independent of the air speed, are therefore well suited for measurements on a cable car. Example measurements of the vertical profiles observed in a liquid cloud and a mixed-phase cloud at the Eggishorn in the Swiss Alps in the winters 2015 and 2016 are presented. The HoloGondel platform reliably observes cloud droplets larger than 6.5 µm, partitions between cloud droplets and ice crystals for a size larger than 25 µm and obtains a statistically significantly size distribution for every 5 m in vertical ascent.

  7. Reusable holographic velocimetry system based on polarization multiplexing in Bacteriorhodopsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Chan, V.S.S.; Ooms, T.A.; Bhattacharya, N.; Westerweel, J.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) system using a reversible holographic material as the recording medium. In HPIV the three-dimensional flow field throughout a volume is detected by adding small tracer particles to a normally transparent medium. By recording the

  8. Laser Doppler holographic microscopy in transmission: application to fish embryo imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Gross, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We have extended Laser Doppler holographic microscopy to transmission geometry. The technique is validated with living fish embryos imaged by a modified upright bio-microcope. By varying the frequency of the holographic reference beam, and the combination of frames used to calculate the hologram, multimodal imaging has been performed. Doppler images of the blood vessels for different Doppler shifts, images where the flow direction is coded in RGB colors or movies showing blood cells individual motion have been obtained as well. The ability to select the Fourier space zone that is used to calculate the signal, makes the method quantitative.

  9. Revolving lantern display using holographic 3D images with 1/f fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Koji; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    The authors developed the revolving lantern using images of the holographic display. Our revolving lantern playbacks the virtual images which are floating in the air. These spatial images have unexpected motions and changes. The prototype imaging unit consists of the hologram, turn table and illumination system which can change the light with 1/f fluctuation so as to reconstruct various spatial images. In this paper, we describe the spatial imaging with a holographic technology and the reconstruction system which playbacks the rotating motion and various images. A hologram playbacks images. These reconstructions are generally static images. The rotating image like a revolving lantern can be produced when a hologram is spinning on the turn table. A hologram can record and reconstruct various images using the different illumination. When the illumination system changes the illumination light, a hologram reconstructs other images.

  10. Holographic imaging of crowded fields: high angular resolution imaging with excellent quality at very low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, R.; Yelda, S.; Ghez, A.; Girard, J. H.; Labadie, L.; Rebolo, R.; Pérez-Garrido, A.; Morris, M. R.

    2013-02-01

    We present a method for speckle holography that is optimized for crowded fields. Its two key features are an iterative improvement of the instantaneous point spread functions (PSFs) extracted from each speckle frame and the (optional) simultaneous use of multiple reference stars. In this way, high signal-to-noise ratio and accuracy can be achieved on the PSF for each short exposure, which results in sensitive, high-Strehl reconstructed images. We have tested our method with different instruments, on a range of targets, and from the N[10 μm] to the I[0.9 μm] band. In terms of PSF cosmetics, stability and Strehl ratio, holographic imaging can be equal, and even superior, to the capabilities of currently available adaptive optics (AO) systems, particularly at short near-infrared to optical wavelengths. It outperforms lucky imaging because it makes use of the entire PSF and reduces the need for frame selection, thus, leading to higher Strehl and improved sensitivity. Image reconstruction a posteriori, the possibility to use multiple reference stars and the fact that these reference stars can be rather faint means that holographic imaging offers a simple way to image large, dense stellar fields near the diffraction limit of large telescopes, similar to, but much less technologically demanding than, the capabilities of a multiconjugate AO system. The method can be used with a large range of already existing imaging instruments and can also be combined with AO imaging when the corrected PSF is unstable.

  11. Rainbow Particle Imaging Velocimetry

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-04-27

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. This work tackles this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a “rainbow”), such that each depth corresponds to a specific wavelength of light. A diffractive component in the camera optics ensures that all planes are in focus simultaneously. With this setup, a single color camera is sufficient to track 3D trajectories of particles by combining 2D spatial and 1D color information. For reconstruction, this thesis derives an image formation model for recovering stationary 3D particle positions. 3D velocity estimation is achieved with a variant of 3D optical flow that accounts for both physical constraints as well as the rainbow image formation model. The proposed method is evaluated by both simulations and an experimental prototype setup.

  12. Optical correlation aspect of holography: from ghost-imaging to static phase-conjugation holographic associative memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskii, P. V.; Husak, Ye. M.

    2013-12-01

    We highlight the milestones of fifty-year history of emerging holographic associative memory as the chronologically first proposed practical application of the laser holographic techniques (van Heerden, 1963). Holographic associative memories are considered here as an important aspect of correlation optics, and the forming associative response is interpreted with account of fine phase relations among numerous partial images involved into discrimination mechanism of reconstruction. Three main approaches proposed for implementation of holographic associative memories are discussed and compared, namely, classical 'linear' ghost-image holography, the associateve memories based on resonator architectures using optical feedback and thresholding algorithms, and the quadric (second-order) hologrambased associative memories.

  13. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  14. Holographic storage of three-dimensional image and data using photopolymer and polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Yue; Liu, Pan; Zeng, Chao; Yao, Qiu-Xiang; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jicheng; Zheng, Huadong; Yu, Ying-Jie; Zeng, Zhen-Xiang; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    We present holographic storage of three-dimensional (3D) images and data in a photopolymer film without any applied electric field. Its absorption and diffraction efficiency are measured, and reflective analog hologram of real object and image of digital information are recorded in the films. The photopolymer is compared with polymer dispersed liquid crystals as holographic materials. Besides holographic diffraction efficiency of the former is little lower than that of the latter, this work demonstrates that the photopolymer is more suitable for analog hologram and big data permanent storage because of its high definition and no need of high voltage electric field. Therefore, our study proposes a potential holographic storage material to apply in large size static 3D holographic displays, including analog hologram displays, digital hologram prints, and holographic disks. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474194, 11004037, and 61101176) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1415500).

  15. Optimization of the window function for digital hologram apodization in reconstructing the holographic image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yancao; Fan, Qi; Li, Xinchao; Shi, Jianjun; Yang, Baiyu

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, an optimal window function used for digital hologram apodization in reconstructing the holographic image is presented, which is generated by a cosine window convolving with a rectangle window and has a flat top because of the rectangle shape of the hologram. The window’s parameters are optimized using a genetic algorithm to make sure that the sidelobes of the window are minimum. Numerical simulation results show that the new window has a sidelobe lower than that of the Tukey window, and experimental results show that apodization using this window can suppress the diffraction effectively in reconstructing the holographic image.

  16. Holographic trapping of non-spherical particles with 3D refractive index measurements (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) have been utilized for trapping microscopic particles in three dimensions with multiple foci generated by wavefront shaping of light, which can manipulate three-dimensional (3-D) positions of colloidal particles as well as exerting an optical force on particles. So far, most experiments using HOTs have been conducted for trapping spherical particles because optical principles can easily predict optical forces and the responding motion of microspheres. For non-spherical particles, however, calculation of optical forces and torques exerting on samples is very complicated, and the orientation control of non-spherical particles is limited since the non-spherical particles tend to align along the optic axis of the trapping beam. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate 3-D trapping of non-spherical particles by wavefront shaping of light based on the measurement of 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of samples. The 3-D RI distribution of non-spherical particles was measured by optical diffraction tomography and the phase hologram which can generate stable optical traps for the samples was calculated by iterative 3-D Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm from the measured 3-D RI distribution. We first validate the proposed method for stable trapping and orientation control of 2-μm colloidal PMMA ellipsoids. The proposed method is also exploited for rotating, folding and assembly of red blood cells.

  17. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan O Isikman

    Full Text Available We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2. This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total. Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50° and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3 across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode.

  18. Real-time optical image subtraction by a holographic shear lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. Venkateswara; Joenathan, C.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1985-08-01

    A new optical method of image subtraction by employing a holographic shear lens is proposed. The principle underlying this technique is that of optical interference between two sheared fields produced by the holographic shear lens (HSL). Two dissimilar inputs with some common characters are subtracted in real time while keeping the HSL at the Fourier plane of a well corrected lens. The difference is detectable only when zero fringe is obtained in the interferogram. Experimental verification is presented with the results. The basic advantages of this technique are the simplicity in aligning the input transparencies and the real time operation.

  19. Holographic and light-field imaging for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jong-Young; Jang, Changwon; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Chang-Kun

    2017-02-01

    We discuss on the recent state of the augmented reality (AR) display technology. In order to realize AR, various seethrough three-dimensional (3D) display techniques have been reported. We describe the AR display with 3D functionality such as light-field display and holography. See-through light-field display can be categorized by the optical elements which are used for see-through property: optical elements controlling path of the light-fields and those generating see-through light-field. Holographic display can be also a good candidate for AR display because it can reconstruct wavefront information and provide realistic virtual information. We introduce the see-through holographic display using various optical techniques.

  20. The development of a subsea holographic camera for the imaging and analysis of marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John

    2004-06-01

    In this overview of the entire HoloMar system, we describe the design, development and field deployment of the fully-functioning, prototype, underwater holographic camera (HoloCam) followed by the dedicated replay facility (HoloScan) and the associated image processing and extraction of data from the holograms. The HoloCam consists of a laser and power supply, holographic recording optics and holographic plate holders, a water-tight housing and a support frame. It incorporates two basic holographic geometries, in-line and off-axis such that a wide range of species, sizes and concentrations can be recorded. After holograms have been recorded and processed thay are reconstructed in full three-dimensional detail in air in a dedicated replay facility. A computer controlled microscope, using video cameras to record the image at a given depth, is used to digitize the scene. Specially developed software extracts a binarized image of an object in its true focal plane and is classified using a neural network. The HoloCam was deployed on separate cruises in a Scottish sea loch (Loch Etive) to a depth of 100 m and over 300 holograms recorded.

  1. A low-cost digital holographic imager for calibration and validation of cloud microphysics remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Murray W.; Reid, Iain M.

    2016-10-01

    Clouds cover approximately 70% of the Earth's surface and therefore play a crucial rule in governing both the climate system and the hydrological cycle. The microphysical properties of clouds such as the cloud particle size distribution, shape distribution and spatial homogeneity contribute significantly to the net radiative effect of clouds and these properties must therefore be measured and understood to determine the exact contribution of clouds to the climate system. Significant discrepancies are observed between meteorological models and observations, particularly in polar regions that are most sensitive to changes in climate, suggesting a lack of understanding of these complex microphysical processes. Remote sensing techniques such as polarimetric LIDAR and radar allow microphysical cloud measurements with high temporal and spatial resolution however these instruments must be calibrated and validated by direct in situ measurements. To this end a low cost, light weight holographic imaging device has been developed and experimentally tested that is suitable for deployment on a weather balloon or tower structure to significantly increase the availability of in situ microphysics retrievals.

  2. Target recognition and phase acquisition by using incoherent digital holographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Munseob; Lee, Byung-Tak

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we proposed the Incoherent Digital Holographic Imaging (IDHI) for recognition and phase information of dedicated target. Although recent development of a number of target recognition techniques such as LIDAR, there have limited success in target discrimination, in part due to low-resolution, low scanning speed, and computation power. In the paper, the proposed system consists of the incoherent light source, such as LED, Michelson interferometer, and digital CCD for acquisition of four phase shifting image. First of all, to compare with relative coherence, we used a source as laser and LED, respectively. Through numerical reconstruction by using the four phase shifting method and Fresnel diffraction method, we recovered the intensity and phase image of USAF resolution target apart from about 1.0m distance. In this experiment, we show 1.2 times improvement in resolution compared to conventional imaging. Finally, to confirm the recognition result of camouflaged targets with the same color from background, we carry out to test holographic imaging in incoherent light. In this result, we showed the possibility of a target detection and recognition that used three dimensional shape and size signatures, numerical distance from phase information of obtained holographic image.

  3. Simplified calculation method for computer-generated holographic stereograms from multi-view images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Kyohei

    2013-04-22

    A simple calculation method to synthesize computer-generated holographic stereograms, which does not involve diffraction calculations, is proposed. It is assumed that three-dimension (3D) image generation by holographic stereograms is similar to that of multi-view autostereoscopic displays, in that multiple parallax images are displayed with rays converging to corresponding viewpoints. Therefore, a wavefront is calculated, whose amplitude is the square root of an intensity distribution of a parallax image and whose phase is a quadric phase distribution of a spherical wave converging to a viewpoint. Multiple wavefronts calculated for multiple viewpoints are summed up to obtain an object wave, which is then used to determine a hologram pattern. The proposed technique was experimentally verified.

  4. Holographic Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Shvets, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-07-31

    In the 1870s, English photographer Eadweard Muybridge captured motion pictures within one cycle of a horse’s gallop, which settled a hotly debated question of his time by showing that the horse became temporarily airborne. In the 1940s, Manhattan project photographer Berlin Brixner captured a nuclear blast at a million frames per second, and resolved a dispute about the explosion’s shape and speed. In this project, we developed methods to capture detailed motion pictures of evolving, light-velocity objects created by a laser pulse propagating through matter. These objects include electron density waves used to accelerate charged particles, laser-induced refractive index changes used for micromachining, and ionization tracks used for atmospheric chemical analysis, guide star creation and ranging. Our “movies”, like Muybridge’s and Brixner’s, are obtained in one shot, since the laser-created objects of interest are insufficiently repeatable for accurate stroboscopic imaging. Our high-speed photographs have begun to resolve controversies about how laser-created objects form and evolve, questions that previously could be addressed only by intensive computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions. Resolving such questions helps develop better tabletop particle accelerators, atmospheric ranging devices and many other applications of laser-matter interactions. Our photographic methods all begin by splitting one or more “probe” pulses from the laser pulse that creates the light-speed object. A probe illuminates the object and obtains information about its structure without altering it. We developed three single-shot visualization methods that differ in how the probes interact with the object of interest or are recorded. (1) Frequency-Domain Holography (FDH). In FDH, there are 2 probes, like “object” and “reference” beams in conventional holography. Our “object” probe surrounds the light-speed object, like a fleas swarming around a

  5. Holographic Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Shvets, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-07-31

    In the 1870s, English photographer Eadweard Muybridge captured motion pictures within one cycle of a horse’s gallop, which settled a hotly debated question of his time by showing that the horse became temporarily airborne. In the 1940s, Manhattan project photographer Berlin Brixner captured a nuclear blast at a million frames per second, and resolved a dispute about the explosion’s shape and speed. In this project, we developed methods to capture detailed motion pictures of evolving, light-velocity objects created by a laser pulse propagating through matter. These objects include electron density waves used to accelerate charged particles, laser-induced refractive index changes used for micromachining, and ionization tracks used for atmospheric chemical analysis, guide star creation and ranging. Our “movies”, like Muybridge’s and Brixner’s, are obtained in one shot, since the laser-created objects of interest are insufficiently repeatable for accurate stroboscopic imaging. Our high-speed photographs have begun to resolve controversies about how laser-created objects form and evolve, questions that previously could be addressed only by intensive computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions. Resolving such questions helps develop better tabletop particle accelerators, atmospheric ranging devices and many other applications of laser-matter interactions. Our photographic methods all begin by splitting one or more “probe” pulses from the laser pulse that creates the light-speed object. A probe illuminates the object and obtains information about its structure without altering it. We developed three single-shot visualization methods that differ in how the probes interact with the object of interest or are recorded. (1) Frequency-Domain Holography (FDH). In FDH, there are 2 probes, like “object” and “reference” beams in conventional holography. Our “object” probe surrounds the light-speed object, like a fleas swarming around a

  6. Hidden images of holography: wavefront reconstruction of abnormalities within pulsed holographic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Unplanned images recorded within holographic space are of candid interest that can reshape audience definition crossing intellectual boundaries. This paper details three examples of off-axis Pulsed Laser transmission holograms that involve holographic portraits. These are movie director Martin Scorsese, former Royal Photographic Society President Mike Austin and a unique recently discovered early pulsed recording of Nick Phillips together with Anton Furst recorded in 1977. Each example was made when operating conditions for the pulsed ruby lasers were optimum, offering a coherence of several meters time-compressed into 25 ns. This gave rise to not only the portrait capture but also others present during the recording session inside the room. This optimum condition captured more than was intended resulting in images that, until now, have remained un-documented.

  7. Large range rotation distortion measurement for remote sensing images based on volume holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Tian; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2012-10-01

    Volume holographic optical correlator can compute the correlation results between images at a super-high speed. In the application of remote imaging processing such as scene matching, 6,000 template images have been angularly multiplexed in the photorefractive crystal and the 6,000 parallel processing channels are achieved. In order to detect the correlation pattern of images precisely and distinguishingly, an on-off pixel inverted technology of images is proposed. It can fully use the CCD's linear range for detection and expand the normalized correlation value differences as the target image rotates. Due to the natural characteristics of the remote sensing images, the statistical formulas between the rotation distortions and the correlation results can be estimated. The rotation distortion components can be estimated by curve fitting method with the data of correlation results. The intensities of the correlation spots are related to the distortion between the two images. The rotation distortion could be derived from the intensities in the post processing procedure. With 18 rotations of the input image and sending them into the volume holographic system, the detection of the rotation variation in the range of 180° can be fulfilled. So the large range rotation distortion detection is firstly realized. It offers a fast, large range rotation measurement method for image distortions.

  8. Holographic imaging through a scattering medium by diffuser-aided statistical averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Michael J; Kumar, Manish; Rand, Stephen C; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a practical digital holographic method capable of imaging through a diffusive or scattering medium. The method relies on statistical averaging from a rotating ground glass diffuser to negate the adverse effects caused by speckle introduced by a static diffuser or scattering medium. In particular, a setup based on Fourier transform holography is used to show that an image can be recovered after scattering by introducing an additional diffuser in the optical setup. This method is capable of recovering object information from behind a scattering layer in biomedical or military imaging applications.

  9. Holographic imaging through a scattering medium by diffuser-aided statistical averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, Michael J; Rand, Stephen C; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a practical digital holographic method capable of imaging through a diffusive or scattering medium. The method relies on statistical averaging from a rotating ground glass diffuser to negate the adverse effects caused by speckle introduced by a first, static diffuser or scattering medium. In particular, a setup based on Fourier transform holography is used to show that an image can be recovered after scattering by introducing an additional diffuser in the optical setup. This method is capable of recovering object information from behind a scattering layer in biomedical or military imaging applications.

  10. Holographic microscopy reconstruction in both object and image half spaces with undistorted 3D grid

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Tessier, Gilles; Gross, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a holographic microscopy reconstruction method, which propagates the hologram, in the object half space, in the vicinity of the object. The calibration yields reconstructions with an undistorted reconstruction grid i.e. with orthogonal x, y and z axis and constant pixels pitch. The method is validated with an USAF target imaged by a x60 microscope objective, whose holograms are recorded and reconstructed for different USAF locations along the longitudinal axis:-75 to +75 {\\mu}m. Since the reconstruction numerical phase mask, the reference phase curvature and MO form an afocal device, the reconstruction can be interpreted as occurring equivalently in the object or in image half space.

  11. Self-interference polarization holographic imaging of a three-dimensional incoherent scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziyi; Shi, Zhimin

    2016-08-01

    We present a self-interference polarization holographic imaging (Si-Phi) technique to capture the three-dimensional information of an incoherent scene in a single shot. The light from the scene is modulated by a polarization-dependent lens, and a complex-valued polarization hologram is obtained by measuring directly the polarization profile of the light at the detection plane. Using a backward-propagating Green's function, we can numerically retrieve the transverse intensity profile of the scene at any desired focus plane. We demonstrate experimentally our Si-Phi technique by imaging, in real time, three-dimensional mimicked incoherent scenes created by a fast spatial light modulator.

  12. Ultra wide band millimeter wave holographic ``3-D`` imaging of concealed targets on mannequins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; Gribble, R.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Acoustics & Electromagnetic Imaging Group

    1994-08-01

    Ultra wide band (chirp frequency) millimeter wave ``3-D`` holography is a unique technique for imaging concealed targets on human subjects with extremely high lateral and depth resolution. Recent ``3-D`` holographic images of full size mannequins with concealed weapons illustrate the efficacy of this technique for airport security. A chirp frequency (24 GHz to 40 GHz) holographic system was used to construct extremely high resolution images (optical quality) using polyrod antenna in a bi-static configuration using an x-y scanner. Millimeter wave chirp frequency holography can be simply described as a multi-frequency detection and imaging technique where the target`s reflected signals are decomposed into discrete frequency holograms and reconstructed into a single composite ``3-D`` image. The implementation of this technology for security at airports, government installations, etc., will require real-time (video rate) data acquisition and computer image reconstruction of large volumetric data sets. This implies rapid scanning techniques or large, complex ``2-D`` arrays and high speed computing for successful commercialization of this technology.

  13. Reduction of blurring in broadband volume holographic imaging using a deconvolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanlu; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yuan; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Volume holographic imaging (VHI) is a promising biomedical imaging tool that can simultaneously provide multi-depth or multispectral information. When a VHI system is probed with a broadband source, the intensity spreads in the horizontal direction, causing degradation of the image contrast. We theoretically analyzed the reason of the horizontal intensity spread, and the analysis was validated by the simulation and experimental results of the broadband impulse response of the VHI system. We proposed a deconvolution method to reduce the horizontal intensity spread and increase the image contrast. Imaging experiments with three different objects, including bright field illuminated USAF test target and lung tissue specimen and fluorescent beads, were carried out to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can significantly improve the horizontal contrast of the image acquire by broadband VHI system. PMID:27570703

  14. Quantitative photothermal phase imaging of red blood cells using digital holographic photothermal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C K; Lin, Zhiping; Ng, Beng Koon

    2015-05-10

    Photothermal microscopy (PTM), a noninvasive pump-probe high-resolution microscopy, has been applied as a bioimaging tool in many biomedical studies. PTM utilizes a conventional phase contrast microscope to obtain highly resolved photothermal images. However, phase information cannot be extracted from these photothermal images, as they are not quantitative. Moreover, the problem of halos inherent in conventional phase contrast microscopy needs to be tackled. Hence, a digital holographic photothermal microscopy technique is proposed as a solution to obtain quantitative phase images. The proposed technique is demonstrated by extracting phase values of red blood cells from their photothermal images. These phase values can potentially be used to determine the temperature distribution of the photothermal images, which is an important study in live cell monitoring applications.

  15. Dynamic Holographic Lock-In Imaging of Ultrasonic Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Datta, S.K.

    1999-05-01

    A laser imaging approach is presented that utilizes the adaptive property of photorefractive materials to produce a real-time measurement of ultrasonic traveling wave surface displacement and phase in all planar directions simultaneously without scanning. The imaging method performs optical lock-in operation. A single antisymmetric Lamb wave mode image produces direct quantitative determination of the phase velocity in all planar directions showing plate stiffness anisotropy. Excellent agreement was obtained with modeling calculations of the phase velocity in all planar directions for an anisotropic sheet material. The approach functions with diffusely scattering surfaces, subnanometer motions and at frequencies from Hz to GHz.

  16. Dynamic Holographic Lock-In Imaging of Ultrasonic Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Telschow; S. K. Datta (University of Colorado); V. A. Deason (INEEL)

    1999-05-01

    A laser imaging approach is presented that utilizes the adaptive property of photorefractive materials to produce a real-time measurement of ultrasonic traveling wave surface displacement and phase in all planar directions simultaneously without scanning. The imaging method performs optical lock-in operation. A single antisymmetric Lamb wave mode image produces direct quantitative determination of the phase velocity in all planar directions showing plate stiffness anisotropy. Excellent agreement was obtained with modeling calculations of the phase velocity in all planar directions for an anisotropic sheet material. The approach functions with diffusely scattering surfaces, subnanometer motions and at frequencies from Hz to GHz.

  17. Microscope Image of Scavenged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows a strongly magnetic surface which has scavenged particles from within the microscope enclosure before a sample delivery from the lander's Robotic Arm. The particles correspond to the larger grains seen in fine orange material that makes up most of the soil at the Phoenix site. They vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter. As the microscope's sample wheel moved during operation, these particles also shifted, clearing a thin layer of the finer orange particles that have also been collected. Together with the previous image, this shows that the larger grains are much more magnetic than the fine orange particles with a much larger volume of the grains being collected by the magnet. The image is 2 milimeters across. It is speculated that the orange material particles are a weathering product from the larger grains, with the weathering process both causing a color change and a loss of magnetism. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Research on particle imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Much instrumentation has been developed for imaging the trajectories of elementary particles produced in high energy collisions. Since 1968, gaseous detectors, beginning with multiwire chambers and drift chambers, have been used for the visualisation of particle trajectories and the imaging of X-rays, neutrons, hard gamma rays, beta rays and ultraviolet photons. This book commemorates the groundbreaking research leading to the evolution of such detectors carried out at CERN by Georges Charpak, Nobel Prizewinner for Physics in 1992. Besides collecting his key papers, the book also includes original linking commentary which sets his work in the context of other worldwide research.

  19. Sparse sampling and enhanced axial resolution in millimeter-wave holographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Wikner, David A.; Mattheiss, Michael; Mait, Joseph N.; Brady, David

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes an active millimeter-wave (MMW) holographic imaging system used for the study of compressive measurement for concealed weapons detection. We record a digitized on-axis, Gabor hologram using a single pixel incoherent receiver that is translated at the detector plane to form an image composite. Capturing measurements in the MMW regime can be costly since receiver circuits are expensive and scanning systems can be plagued by their long data acquisition times. Thus, we leverage recent advances in compressive sensing with a traditional holographic method in order to estimate a 3D (x,y,z) object distribution from a 2D recorded image composite. To do this, we minimize a convex quadratic function using total variation (TV) regularization. Gabor holograms are recorded of semi-transparent objects, in the MMW, mimicking weapons and other objects. We present preliminary results of 3D reconstructions of objects at various depths estimated from a 2D recorded hologram. We compare backpropagation results with our decompressive inference algorithm. A possible application includes remote concealed weapons detection at security checkpoints.

  20. X-ray holographic microscopy: Improved images of zymogen granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, C.; Howells, M.; Kirz, J.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.

    1988-10-01

    Soft x-ray holography has long been considered as a technique for x-ray microscopy. It has been only recently, however, that sub-micron resolution has been obtained in x-ray holography. This paper will concentrate on recent progress we have made in obtaining reconstructed images of improved quality. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Optimization of holographic real images for subsea hologrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Foster, E.; Ross, Gary A.

    1995-07-01

    Hologrammetry has many advantages over conventional imaging techniques for subsea visual inspection. Holograms recorded underwater can be replayed in the laboratory to provide an optical replica of the original subject. Real-image reconstruction allows planar 'optical sections' to be isolated and measured directly. However, these advantages can be removed by poor optimization of the reconstructed image. Furthermore, recording the hologram in water and replaying in air increases the magnitude of the optical aberrations which may be apparent. Such aberrations can be minimized using index compensation whereby the hologram is replayed in air with a wavelength which is equivalent to the effective wavelength of the beam in water. To monitor the influence of these effects and to establish the validity of the index compensation method, reconstruction takes place in a micrometer-controlled plate holder to allow precise positioning about all three rotational axes and the three translational axes. The image is viewed using a lensless TV camera or measuring microscope which is accurately moved through the image volume to provide dimensional information. Index compensation has been shown to work well for both back-lit and front-lit off-axis holograms and is effective over a wide range of field angles. Typically an on-axis resolution of around 1 1p/mm for a front-lit hologram replayed at the recording wavelength will increase to over 20 1p/mm when reconstruction takes place at the compensation wavelength. The corresponding astigmatic difference reduces from around 100 mm to less than 2 mm on employing compensation.

  2. Automatic Compensation of Total Phase Aberrations in Digital Holographic Biological Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-Zhuo; WANG Da-Yong; WANG Yun-Xin; TAO Shi-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy has been a powerful metrological technique for phase-contrast imaging. However inherent phase aberrations always exist and degrade the quality of the phase-contrast images. A surface fitting method based on an improved mathematic model is proposed, which can be used to remove the phase aberrations without any pre-knowledge of the setup or manual operation. The improved mathematic model includes not only the usual terms but also the cross terms and the high order terms to describe the phase aberrations with high accuracy. Meanwhile, a non-iterative algorithm is used to solve the parametersand thus less computational load is imposed. The proposed method is applied to the live imaging of cells. The experimental results verify its validity.%Digital holographic microscopy has been a powerful metrological technique for phase-contrast imaging.However inherent phase aberrations always exist and degrade the quality of the phase-contrast images.A surface fitting method based on an improved mathematic model is proposed,which can be used to remove the phase aberrations without any pre-knowledge of the setup or manual operation.The improved mathematic model includes not only the usual terms but also the cross terms and the high order terms to describe the phase aberrations with high accuracy.Meanwhile,a non-iterative algorithm is used to solve the parametersand thus less computational load is imposed.The proposed method is applied to the live imaging of cells.The experimental results verify its validity.Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been a powerful metrological technique which permits realtime quantitative phase-contrast imaging.The hologram is recorded by a CCD or a CMOS camera while the reconstruction is performed numerically.Many digital signal processing techniques have been introduced to enhance DHM for speckle removal,[1,2] aperture truncation,[3] phase unwrapping[4,5] etc.It has been widely used in biomedical optics for

  3. Holographic 3D imaging through diffuse media by compressive sampling of the mutual intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falldorf, Claas; Klein, Thorsten; Agour, Mostafa; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2017-05-01

    We present a method for holographic imaging through a volume scattering material, which is based on selfreference and light with good spatial but limited temporal coherence. In contrast to existing techniques, we do not require a separate reference wave, thus our approach provides great advantages towards the flexibility of the measurement system. The main applications are remote sensing and investigation of moving objects through gaseous streams, bubbles or foggy water for example. Furthermore, due to the common path nature, the system is also insensitive to mechanical disturbances. The measurement result is a complex amplitude which is comparable to a phase shifted digital hologramm and therefore allows 3D imaging, numerical refocusing and quantitative phase contrast imaging. As an example of application, we present measurements of the quantitative phase contrast of the epidermis of an onion through a volume scattering material.

  4. High-resolution three-dimensional holographic display using dense ray sampling from integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakunami, Koki; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-12-15

    We present a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) holographic display using a set of elemental images obtained by passive sensing integral imaging (II). Hologram calculations using a high-density ray-sampling plane are achieved from the elemental images captured by II. In II display, ray sampling by lenslet array and light diffraction limits the achievable resolution. Our approach can improve the resolution since target objects are captured in focus and then light-ray information is interpolated and resampled with higher density on ray-sampling plane located near the object to be converted into the wavefront. Numerical experimental results show that the 3D scene, composed of plural objects at different depths from the display, can be reconstructed with order of magnitude higher resolution by the proposed technique.

  5. Improved Reconstruction of Radio Holographic Signal for Forward Scatter Radar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Rui; Zeng, Tao

    2016-05-07

    Forward scatter radar (FSR), as a specially configured bistatic radar, is provided with the capabilities of target recognition and classification by the Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR) imaging technology. This paper mainly discusses the reconstruction of radio holographic signal (RHS), which is an important procedure in the signal processing of FSR SISAR imaging. Based on the analysis of signal characteristics, the method for RHS reconstruction is improved in two parts: the segmental Hilbert transformation and the reconstruction of mainlobe RHS. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the method's applicability is presented by distinguishing between the near field and far field in forward scattering. Simulation results validated the method's advantages in improving the accuracy of RHS reconstruction and imaging.

  6. Improved Reconstruction of Radio Holographic Signal for Forward Scatter Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Forward scatter radar (FSR, as a specially configured bistatic radar, is provided with the capabilities of target recognition and classification by the Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging technology. This paper mainly discusses the reconstruction of radio holographic signal (RHS, which is an important procedure in the signal processing of FSR SISAR imaging. Based on the analysis of signal characteristics, the method for RHS reconstruction is improved in two parts: the segmental Hilbert transformation and the reconstruction of mainlobe RHS. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the method’s applicability is presented by distinguishing between the near field and far field in forward scattering. Simulation results validated the method’s advantages in improving the accuracy of RHS reconstruction and imaging.

  7. High-speed image matching with coaxial holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    A computation speed of more than 100 Gbps is experimentally demonstrated using our developed ultrahigh-speed optical correlator. To verify this high computation speed practically, the computation speeds of our optical correlator and conventional digital image matching are quantitatively compared. We use a population count function that achieves the fastest calculation speed when calculating binary matching by a central processing unit (CPU). The calculation speed of the optical correlator is dramatically faster than that using a CPU (2.40 GHz × 4) and 16 GB of random access memory, especially when the calculation data are large-scale.

  8. Comparison of PDE based and other techniques for speckle reduction from digitally reconstructed holographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rajeev; Gupta, JRP; Parthasarthy, Harish

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the partial differential equation (PDE) based homomorphic filtering technique is proposed for speckle reduction from digitally reconstructed holographic images based on the concepts of complex diffusion processes. For digital implementations, the proposed scheme was discretized using finite differences scheme. Further, the performance of the proposed PDE-based technique is compared with other speckle reduction techniques such as homomorphic anisotropic diffusion filter based on extended concept of Perona and Malik (1990) [2], homomorphic Weiner filter, Lee filter, Frost filter, Kuan filter, speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) filter and hybrid filter in the context of digital holography. For the comparison of various speckle reduction techniques, the performance is evaluated quantitatively in terms of all possible parameters that justify the applicability of a scheme for a specific application. The chosen parameters are mean-square-error (MSE), normalized mean-square-error (NMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), speckle index, average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), effective number of looks (ENL), correlation parameter (CP), mean structure similarity index map (MSSIM) and execution time in seconds. For experimentation and computer simulation MATLAB 7.0 has been used and the performance is evaluated and tested for various sample holographic images for varying amount of speckle variance. The results obtained justify the applicability of proposed schemes.

  9. Exploiting the speckle-correlation scattering matrix for a compact reference-free holographic image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-10-01

    The word `holography' means a drawing that contains all of the information for light--both amplitude and wavefront. However, because of the insufficient bandwidth of current electronics, the direct measurement of the wavefront of light has not yet been achieved. Though reference-field-assisted interferometric methods have been utilized in numerous applications, introducing a reference field raises several fundamental and practical issues. Here we demonstrate a reference-free holographic image sensor. To achieve this, we propose a speckle-correlation scattering matrix approach; light-field information passing through a thin disordered layer is recorded and retrieved from a single-shot recording of speckle intensity patterns. Self-interference via diffusive scattering enables access to impinging light-field information, when light transport in the diffusive layer is precisely calibrated. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate direct holographic measurements of three-dimensional optical fields using a compact device consisting of a regular image sensor and a diffusor.

  10. Self-referencing digital holographic microscope for dynamic imaging of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arun; Chhaniwal, Vani; Mahajan, Swapnil; Trivedi, Vismay; Singh, Amardeep; Leitgeb, Rainer; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    Digital holographic microscope is an ideal tool for quantitative phase contrast imaging of living cells. It yields the thickness distribution of the object under investigation from a single hologram. From a series of holograms the dynamics of the cell under investigation can be obtained. But two-beam digital holographic microscopes has low temporal stability due to uncorrelated phase changes occurring in the reference and object arms. One way to overcome is to use common path techniques, in which, the reference beam is derived from the object beam itself. Both the beams travel along the same path, increasing the temporal stability of the setup. In self-referencing techniques a portion of the object beam is converted into reference beam. It could be achieved by example, using a glass plate to create two laterally sheared versions of the object beam at the sensor, which interfere to produce the holograms/interferograms. This created a common path setup, leading to high temporal stability (~0.6nm). This technique could be used to map cell membrane fluctuations with high temporal stability. Here we provide an overview of our work on the development of temporally stable quantitative phase contrast techniques for dynamic imaging of micro-objects and biological specimen including red blood cells.

  11. Coherent label-free imaging through turbidity: a holographic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Marchesano, V.; Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    A challenging issue has to be faced in microscopy whenever samples are immersed inside a dynamic turbid medium, as occluding objects provoke severe light scattering or unpredictable time-variable phase delays that scramble the object information. In these cases, the transmission matrix of the medium cannot be fully characterized. Here we show a simple technique, named Multi-Look Digital Holography (MLDH), able to fully recover the useful signal of biological specimens dipped inside a turbid liquid phase. Multiple hologram recordings are incoherently combined to synthesize the whole complex field diffused by the sample, which is revealed through turbidity providing quantitative phase-contrast information. Moreover, we show that the presence of a turbid medium can have a positive effect on a coherent imaging system, helping to reduce the effect of speckle artifacts. In other words, occluding biological elements, like e.g. Red Blood Cells (RBCs), can be thought as useful optical components providing denoising capabilities.

  12. Holographic display system of a three-dimensional image with distortion-free magnification and zero-order elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Qiaofeng; Jin, Guofan

    2012-07-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) holographic display system which consists of a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) and a modified 4-f system. The 3-D scene is generated from OpenGL, and the point source algorithm with anti-aliasing technique is used to generate the Fresnel hologram. A modified 4-f system is proposed to produce distortion-free magnification of the 3-D image and eliminate the zero-order interruption of the 3-D holographic imaging system. This method can make efficient utilization of the space-bandwidth product of the SLM, which promises the image quality and keeps the 3-D imaging zone unchanged. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed, and the results show that our proposed method can reconstruct enlarged 3-D optical image with correct magnification factor and low image noise.

  13. Extraction of density distributions and particle locations from hologram images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Koh; Okamoto, Koji [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Kato, Fumitake; Shimizu, Isao

    1996-11-01

    In this study, the simultaneous measurement technique for three-dimensional density and three-dimensional velocity distributions was evaluated. The Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV) was the technique to record the three-dimensional position of the tracer particle on the hologram. In the hologram, the interferogram between reference beam and particle scattering were recorded. When there were density distributions in the interrogation region, the plane optical wave may be modulated because of the difference of the refraction indices. Then, both of the plane wave modulated by density and the spherical wave by particle scatter were interfered with the reference beam, being recorded on the hologram. With reconstructing the hologram, the both of the modulated plane wave and spherical wave were reconstructed. Since the plane wave and spherical wave had low and high frequency, respectively, the plane wave was reconstructed with the low-pass filter, resulting in the information of the density distributions to be obtained. With the high-pass filter, the particle three-dimensional positions was determined, i.e., the same procedure with the original HPIV technique. In the experiment, a jet of carbon-dioxide into air with mist were measured. Both mist particle position and the fringe shift caused by the density distribution were well observed, showing the effectiveness of the proposed technique. (author)

  14. Holographic And Microscopic Study Of Morphology And Velocity Distribution Of Solidifying Particles In Rapidly Stirred Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeulders, R. J.; Mischgofsky, F. H.; Frankena, H. J...

    1983-12-01

    A technique is described to observe shape development and particle displacements of fast moving solidifying particles during stir casting. The optical set-up consists of a Ruby la-ser (generating pulse pairs), a frequency doubled Nd3+:YAG laser (generating single pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate), a model device of an actual metal stir casting apparatus filled with a transparent organic alloy and three different recording systems. Double exposure holograms and microphotographs are used to analyse the three- and two-dimensional particle displacements, respectively. Simultaneously recorded videotapes, microphotographs and holograms provide the opportunity to study the shape development at a repetition rate of 10 Hz over periods of 103 seconds in an imaging volume of 3 x 2 x 2 mm3. We found that a NPA-water alloy nucleates initially as equiaxed dendritic particles. After a period of stirring, the dendrite tips become more rounded. Finally the particles obtain the shape of a bunch of grapes. This final state is in good agreement with the morphology of stir casted metal alloys. Further we found that the flow behaviour at the start of the experiment can be decisive for the solidification process. We observed Taylor vortices and measured particle displacements, that occur in the direction of rotation and also along the axis of rotation (although there was no flow pressure excerted in that direction) and in the radial direction, too.

  15. Traveling Wave Magnetic Particle Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) ist eine noch sehr junge Technologie unter den nicht-invasiven tomographischen Verfahren. Seit der ersten Veröffentlichung 2005 wurden einige Scannertypen und Konzepte vorgestellt, welche durch die Messung des Antwortsignals von superparamagnetischen Eisennanopartikeln (SPIOs) auf wechselnde Magnetfelder ein dreidi-mensionales Bild ihrer Verteilung berechnen können. Durch die direkte Messung des Tracers handelt es sich beim MPI um eine sehr sensitive und hochsp...

  16. 3Dtrapping and manipulation of micro-particles using holographic optical tweezers with optimized computer-generated holograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Tao; Jing Li; Qian Long; Xiaoping Wu

    2011-01-01

    A multi-plane adaptive-additive algorithm is developed for optimizing computer-generated holograms for the reconstruction of traps in three-dimensional (3D) spaces. This algorithm overcomes the converging stagnation problem of the traditional multi-plane Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and improves the diffraction efficiency of the holograms effectively. The optimized holograms are applied in a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) platform. Additionally, a computer program is developed and integrated into the HOT platform for the purpose of achieving the interactive control of traps. Experiments demonstrate that the manipulation of micro-particles into the 3D structure with optimized holograms can be carried out effectively on the HOT platform.%A multi-plane adaptive-additive algorithm is developed for optimizing computer-generated holograms for the reconstruction of traps in three-dimensional (3D) spaces.This algorithm overcomes the converging stagnation problem of the traditional multi-plane Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and improves the diffraction efficiency of the holograms effectively.The optimized holograms are applied in a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) platform.Additionally,a computer program is developed and integrated into the HOT platform for the purpose of achieving the interactive control of traps.Experiments demonstrate that the manipulation of micro-particles into the 3D structure with optimized holograms can be carried out effectively on the HOT platform.

  17. Formation of the Holographic Image of a Diffuse Object in Second-Harmonic Radiation Generated by a Nonlinear Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisyuk, Yu. N.; Andreoni, A.; Bondani, M.; Potenza, M. A. S.

    2000-09-01

    Results of experiments on recording three-dimensional holographic images of extended diffuse objects using an SHG hologram generating the second harmonic are presented. In this case, the object image is formed by the second-harmonic radiation whose wavelength is smaller than the wavelength of object and reference waves recorded on a hologram by a factor of two. Elements of the theory of an SHG hologram are considered. A holographic image of a transparency object illuminated with diffuse light is obtained. It is shown that the resolving power of this image is close to the limit determined by diffraction effects. An experiment on defocusing the reconstructed image showed that it was localized in one spatial plane and, therefore, was three-dimensional.

  18. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mouse were also investigated.

  19. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  20. HOLOGondel: A novel in-situ cloud measurement platform on a cable car with a digital holographic imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alexander; Henneberger, Jan; Kanji, Zamin; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    Cloud particle properties observed in-situ are commonly conducted from airborne or ground-based measurements. When compared to airborne measurements, the advantages of ground-based measurements are a higher spatial resolution and much less costly to perform. However, ground-based observations allow only single-point measurements within a cloud. To overcome this disadvantage, a novel measurement platform with a digital holographic imager has been developed to allow in-situ cloud observations on the roof of a cable car cabin. With a traveling velocity of a cable car of a few m/s, such a measurement platform yields a spatial resolution comparable to those of ground-based measurements. In addition, it is possible to obtain vertical profiles of the microphysical properties within the cloud, because of the vertical distance covered by the cable car of approximately 800m. The major technical challenges for such a measurement platform are the lack of an external power supply and the additional weight constrain on a cable car cabin. To allow continuous operation for eight hours with a battery and to stay within the weight limit of 25kg at the same time, a compact design with carefully chosen material and components with a low power consumption was necessary. The new measurement platform HOLOGondel is equipped with a HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO 3G). Digital in-line holography offers the advantages of measuring simultaneously an ensemble of cloud particles within a well-defined detection volume over a large range of particle size. The image captured, a hologram, yields information about the three-dimensional position, size and a shadow-graph of each particle within the detection volume. The HOLIMO 3G instrument is equipped with a 30MP camera and a 1.8 times magnifying, both-sided telecentric lens system. At a frame rate of six pictures per second a sample volume rate of about 100 cm3s-1 at a maximum resolution of 7 µm is achieved. This configuration

  1. Compact multispectral fluorescence imaging system with spectral multiplexed volume holographic grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanlu; Cai, Chuangjian; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-12-01

    Traditional spectral imaging systems mainly rely on spatial scanning or spectral scanning methods to acquire spatial and spectral features. The acquisition is time-consuming and cannot fully satisfy the need of monitoring dynamic phenomenon and observing different structures of the specimen simultaneously. To overcome these barriers, we develop a video-rate simultaneous multispectral imaging system built with a spectral multiplexed volume holographic grating (VHG) and few optical components. Four spectral multiplexed volume holograms optimized for four discrete spectral bands (centered at 488 nm, 530 nm, 590 nm and 620 nm) are recorded into an 8×12 mm photo-thermal refractive glass. The diffraction efficiencies of all the holograms within the multiplexed VHG are greater than 80%. With the high throughout multiplexed VHG, the system can work with both reflection and fluorescence modes and allow simultaneous acquisition of spectral and spatial information with a single exposure. Imaging experiments demonstrate that the multispectral images of the target illuminated with white light source can be obtained. Fluorescence images of multiple fluorescence objects (two glass beads filled with 20 uL 1.0 mg/mL quantum dots solutions that emit 530 +/- 15 nm and 620 +/- 15 nm fluorescence, respectively) buried 3 mm below the surface of a tissue mimicking phantom are acquired. The results demonstrate that the system can provide complementary information in fluorescence imaging. The design diagram of the proposed system is given to explain the advantage of compactness and flexibility in integrating with other imaging platforms.

  2. Holographic metasurface systems for beam-forming and imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials offer an alternative perspective for the design of new materials and devices. The advantage of the metamaterial description is that certain device solutions can more easily be recognized. Here, we discuss broadly the impact of the metamaterial design philosophy on quasi-optical apertures based on patterned holographic metasurfaces. In a guided wave format, in which radiating complementary metamaterial irises are patterned on the upper plate of a microstrip or parallel plate waveguide, the reference wave is equivalent to the guided wave and the entire structure becomes a compact, efficient holographic, aperture antenna. We have developed a millimeter-wave imaging system that makes use of a set of complementary metamaterial waveguide panels to form a frequency-diverse aperture. In this context, the metamaterial aperture produces a complex radiation pattern that varies spatially as a function of the driving frequency; a frequency sweep over a selected bandwidth thus illuminates a region of space with a set of distinct radiation patterns. Collecting the returned signal reflected by illuminated objects within the scene, a set of measurements can be made from which an image of the scene can be reconstructed. This imaging application provides a useful example of the introduction, integration and optimization of a metamaterial aperture into a complete system, where all other aspects of the system—including algorithms, calibration, software and electronics—must be tailored for the particulars of the metamaterial component. As metamaterials transition from science to technology, these aspects may prove just as challenging and interesting as the underlying metamaterial components.

  3. Mueller imaging polarimetry of holographic polarization gratings inscribed in azopolymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ponce, Geminiano

    2016-09-19

    Three types of polarization gratings have been recorded in azopolymer films by the symmetrical superposition of different orthogonal pairs of polarized beams. The inscribed holographic elements have been analyzed microscopically in a Mueller polarimeter in order to image the optical anisotropies photoinduced in the film. In the most of cases, the spatial modulation of diattenuation, birefringence, and optical rotation reproduced quite well previous results reported in the literature. Nevertheless, in the particular case of coherent superposition of p- and s-polarized beams, the spatial frequency for optical rotation (related to the Stokes parameter V) was different from the one observed in linear anisotropy (related to the Stokes parameter U). It is shown by theory and experiment that, in the polarized field used to record this polarization grating, the fourth-Stokes parameter changes sign, which implies a change in circular polarization handedness, practically once between two adjacent maxima.

  4. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  5. Hot embossing holographic images in BOPP shrink films through large-area roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Menglin; Lin, Shiwei, E-mail: linsw@hainu.edu.cn; Jiang, Wenkai; Pan, Nengqian

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • High-quality holographic images were replicated in large-area shrink film. • Surface morphology evolution was analyzed in films embossed at different temperatures. • Optical, mechanical, and thermal characteristics were systematically analyzed. - Abstract: Diffraction grating-based holographic images have been successfully replicated in biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) shrink films through large-area roll-to-roll nanoimprint technique. Such hot embossing of holographic images on BOPP films represents a promising means of creating novel security features in packaging applications. The major limitation of the high-quality replication is the relatively large thermal shrinkage of BOPP shrink film. However, although an appropriate shrinkage is demanded after embossing, over-shrinking not only causes distortion in embossed images, but also reduces the various properties of BOPP shrink films mainly due to the disappearance of orientation. The effects of embossing temperature on the mechanical, thermal and optical properties as well as polymer surface morphologies were systematically analyzed. The results show that the optimal process parameters are listed as follows: the embossing temperature at 104–110 °C, embossing force 6 kg/cm{sup 2} and film speed 32 m/min. The variation in flow behavior of polymer surface during hot embossing process is highly dependent on the temperature. In addition, the adhesion from the direct contact between the rubber press roller and polymer surfaces is suggested to cause the serious optical properties failure.

  6. The shifting appearance/disappearance of holographic images and the dynamic ontology of perceptual and cognitive processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissonnet, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The French philosopher M Merleau-Ponty captured the dynamic of perception with his idea of the intertwining of perceiver and perceived. Light is what links them. In the case of holographic images, not only is spatial and colour perception the pure product of light, but this light information is always in the process of self-construction with our eyes, according to our movements and the point of view adopted. According to the aesthetic reception of a work of art, Holographic images vary greatly from those of cinema, photography and even every kind of digital 3D animation. This particular image's status truly makes perceptually apparent the "co-emergence" of light and our gaze. But holography never misleads us with respect to the precarious nature of our perceptions. We have no illusion as to the limits of our empirical understanding of the perceived reality. Holography, like our knowledge of the visible, thus brings to light the phenomenon of reality's "co-constitution" and contributes to a dynamic ontology of perceptual and cognitive processes. The cognitivist Francico Varela defines this as the paradigm of enaction,i which I will adapt and apply to the appearance/disappearance context of holographic images to bring out their affinities on a metaphorical level.

  7. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  8. Sequential processing of quantitative phase images for the study of cell behaviour in real-time digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund, T; Kvasnica, L; Týč, M; Křížová, A; Colláková, J; Chmelík, R

    2014-11-01

    Transmitted light holographic microscopy is particularly used for quantitative phase imaging of transparent microscopic objects such as living cells. The study of the cell is based on extraction of the dynamic data on cell behaviour from the time-lapse sequence of the phase images. However, the phase images are affected by the phase aberrations that make the analysis particularly difficult. This is because the phase deformation is prone to change during long-term experiments. Here, we present a novel algorithm for sequential processing of living cells phase images in a time-lapse sequence. The algorithm compensates for the deformation of a phase image using weighted least-squares surface fitting. Moreover, it identifies and segments the individual cells in the phase image. All these procedures are performed automatically and applied immediately after obtaining every single phase image. This property of the algorithm is important for real-time cell quantitative phase imaging and instantaneous control of the course of the experiment by playback of the recorded sequence up to actual time. Such operator's intervention is a forerunner of process automation derived from image analysis. The efficiency of the propounded algorithm is demonstrated on images of rat fibrosarcoma cells using an off-axis holographic microscope.

  9. Field of Particle Filters Image Inpainting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuzol, Anne; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Nielsen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for solving the image inpainting problem based on a field of locally interacting particle filters. Image inpainting, also known as image completion, is concerned with the problem of filling image regions with new visually plausible data. In order to avoid the difficulty...... of solving the problem globally for the region to be inpainted, we introduce a field of local particle filters. The states of the particle filters are image patches. Global consistency is enforced by a Markov random field image model which connects neighbouring particle filters. The benefit of using locally...... interacting particle filters is that several competing hypotheses on inpainting solutions are kept active, allowing the method to provide globally consistent solutions on problems where other local methods may fail. We provide examples of applications of the developed method. Keywords: Inpainting · Image...

  10. Live tissue viability and chemosensitivity assays using digital holographic motility contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Matei, Daniela Elena; Nolte, David

    2013-01-01

    Holographic optical coherence imaging is an en face form of optical coherence tomography that uses low-coherence digital holography as a coherence gate to select light from a chosen depth inside scattering tissue. By acquiring successive holograms at a high camera frame rate at a fixed depth, dynamic speckle provides information concerning dynamic light scattering from intracellular motility. Motility contrast imaging (MCI) uses living motion as a label-free and functional biomarker. MCI provides a new form of viability assay and also is applicable for proliferation and cytotoxicity assays. The results presented here demonstrate that low-coherence digital holography can extract viability information from biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) tissue based on multicellular tumor spheroids by moving beyond the format of two-dimensional cell culture used for conventional high-content analysis. This paper also demonstrates the use of MCI for chemosensitivity assays on tumor exgrafts of excised ovarian cancer tumors responding to standard-of-care cisplatin chemotherapy. This ex vivo application extends the applicability of MCI beyond 3D tissue culture grown in vitro.

  11. Holographic Imaging Reveals the Mechanism of Wall Entrapment in Swimming Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Silvio; Saglimbeni, Filippo; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Self-propelled particles, both biological and synthetic, are stably trapped by walls and develop high concentration peaks over bounding surfaces. In swimming bacteria, like E. coli, the physical mechanism behind wall entrapment is an intricate mixture of hydrodynamic and steric interactions with a strongly anisotropic character. The building of a clear physical picture of this phenomenon demands direct and full three-dimensional experimental observations of individual wall entrapment events. Here, we demonstrate that, by using a combination of three-axis holographic microscopy and optical tweezers, it is possible to obtain volumetric reconstructions of individual E. coli cells that are sequentially released at a controlled distance and angle from a flat solid wall. We find that hydrodynamic couplings can slow down the cell before collision, but reorientation only occurs while the cell is in constant contact with the wall. In the trapped state, all cells swim with the average body axis pointing into the surface. The amplitude of this pitch angle is anticorrelated to the amplitude of wobbling, thus indicating that entrapment is dominated by near-field couplings between the cell body and the wall. Our approach opens the way to three-dimensional quantitative studies of a broad range of fast dynamical processes in motile bacteria and eukaryotic cells.

  12. Holographic Imaging Reveals the Mechanism of Wall Entrapment in Swimming Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Bianchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-propelled particles, both biological and synthetic, are stably trapped by walls and develop high concentration peaks over bounding surfaces. In swimming bacteria, like E. coli, the physical mechanism behind wall entrapment is an intricate mixture of hydrodynamic and steric interactions with a strongly anisotropic character. The building of a clear physical picture of this phenomenon demands direct and full three-dimensional experimental observations of individual wall entrapment events. Here, we demonstrate that, by using a combination of three-axis holographic microscopy and optical tweezers, it is possible to obtain volumetric reconstructions of individual E. coli cells that are sequentially released at a controlled distance and angle from a flat solid wall. We find that hydrodynamic couplings can slow down the cell before collision, but reorientation only occurs while the cell is in constant contact with the wall. In the trapped state, all cells swim with the average body axis pointing into the surface. The amplitude of this pitch angle is anticorrelated to the amplitude of wobbling, thus indicating that entrapment is dominated by near-field couplings between the cell body and the wall. Our approach opens the way to three-dimensional quantitative studies of a broad range of fast dynamical processes in motile bacteria and eukaryotic cells.

  13. SAR Image Enhancement using Particle Filters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this paper, we propose a novel approach to reduce the noise in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images using particle filters. Interpretation of SAR images is a...

  14. Analysis of particle kinematics in spheronization via particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Martin; Thommes, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Spheronization is a wide spread technique in pellet production for many pharmaceutical applications. Pellets produced by spheronization are characterized by a particularly spherical shape and narrow size distribution. The particle kinematic during spheronization is currently not well-understood. Therefore, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was implemented in the spheronization process to visualize the particle movement and to identify flow patterns, in order to explain the influence of various process parameters. The spheronization process of a common formulation was recorded with a high-speed camera, and the images were processed using particle image velocimetry software. A crosscorrelation approach was chosen to determine the particle velocity at the surface of the pellet bulk. Formulation and process parameters were varied systematically, and their influence on the particle velocity was investigated. The particle stream shows a torus-like shape with a twisted rope-like motion. It is remarkable that the overall particle velocity is approximately 10-fold lower than the tip speed of the friction plate. The velocity of the particle stream can be correlated to the water content of the pellets and the load of the spheronizer, while the rotation speed was not relevant. In conclusion, PIV was successfully applied to the spheronization process, and new insights into the particle velocity were obtained.

  15. Combined narrowband imager-spectrograph with volume-phase holographic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimov, Eduard R.; Fabrika, Sergei N.; Valyavin, Gennady G.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we discuss a possibility to build an instrument with two operation modes - spectral and imaging ones. The key element of such instrument is a dispersive and filtering unit consisting of two narrowband volume-phase holographic gratings. Each of them provides high diffraction efficiency in a relatively narrow spectral range of a few tens of nanometers. Besides, the position of this working band is highly dependent on the angle of incidence. So we propose to use a couple of such gratings to implement the two operational modes. The gratings are mounted in a collimated beam one after another. In the spectroscopic mode the gratings are turned on such angle that the diffraction efficiency curves coincide, thus the beams diffracted on the first grating are diffracted twice on the second one and a high-dispersion spectrum in a narrow range is formed. If the collimating and camera lenses are corrected for a wide field it is possible to use a long slit and register the spectra from its different points separately. In the imaging mode the gratings are turned to such angle that the efficiency curves intersect in a very narrow wavelength range. So the beams diffracted on the first grating are filtered out by the second one except of the spectral component, which forms the image. In this case the instrument works without slit diaphragm on the entrance. We provide an example design to illustrate the proposed concept. This optical scheme works in the region around 656 nm with F/# of 6.3. In the spectroscopic mode it provides a spectrum for the region from 641 to 671 nm with reciprocal linear dispersion of 1.4 nm/mm and the spectral resolving power higher than 14000. In the imaging mode it covers linear 12mm x 12mm field of view with spatial resolution of 15- 30 lines/mm.

  16. 3D holographic printer: fast printing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander V; Putilin, Andrey N; Kopenkin, Sergey S; Borodin, Yuriy P; Druzhin, Vladislav V; Dubynin, Sergey E; Dubinin, German B

    2014-02-10

    This article describes the general operation principles of devices for synthesized holographic images such as holographic printers. Special emphasis is placed on the printing speed. In addition, various methods to increase the printing process are described and compared.

  17. Holographic and e-Beam Image Recording in Ge5As37S58-Se Nanomultilayer Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronski, A.; Achimova, E.; Paiuk, O.; Meshalkin, A.; Abashkin, V.; Lytvyn, O.; Sergeev, S.; Prisacar, A.; Triduh, G.

    2016-01-01

    Processes of e-beam and holographic recording of surface relief structures using Ge5As37S58-Se multilayer nanostructures as registering media were studied in this paper. Optical properties of Ge5As37S58, Se layers, and Ge5As37S58-Se multilayer nanostructures were investigated. Spectral dependencies of refractive index were analyzed within the frames of single oscillator model. Values of optical band gaps for Ge5As37S58, Se layers, and Ge5As37S58-Se multilayer nanostructures were obtained from Tauc dependencies. Using e-beam and holographic recording, diffraction gratings were fabricated in Ge5As37S58-Se multilayer nanostructures. Images of Ukraine and Moldova state emblems were obtained by e-beam recording. Image size consisted of 512 × 512 pixels (size of 1 pixel was ~2 μm). Ge5As37S58-Se multilayer nanostructures are perspective for the direct recording of holographic diffraction gratings and other optical elements.

  18. Deep-turbulence wavefront sensing using digital-holographic detection in the off-axis image plane recording geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Mark F.; Raynor, Robert A.; Banet, Matthias T.; Marker, Dan K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper develops wave-optics simulations which explore the estimation accuracy of digital-holographic detection for wavefront sensing in the presence of distributed-volume or "deep" turbulence and detection noise. Specifically, the analysis models spherical-wave propagation through varying deep-turbulence conditions along a horizontal propagation path and formulates the field-estimated Strehl ratio as a function of the diffraction-limited sampling quotient and signal-to-noise ratio. Such results will allow the reader to assess the number of pixels, pixel field of view, pixel-well depth, and read-noise standard deviation needed from a focal-plane array when using digital-holographic detection in the off-axis image plane recording geometry for deep-turbulence wavefront sensing.

  19. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Volume phase holographic grating performance testing and discussion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shaojie; Wright, Shelley A; Moore, Anna M; Larkin, James E; Maire, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Simard, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing the grating efficiency is a key goal for the first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) currently being designed to sample the diffraction limit of the TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope). Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings have been shown to offer extremely high efficiencies that approach 100% for high line frequencies (i.e., 600 to 6000l/mm), which has been applicable for astronomical optical spectrographs. However, VPH gratings have been less exploited in the near-infrared, particularly for gratings that have lower line frequencies. Given their potential to offer high throughputs and low scattered light, VPH gratings are being explored for IRIS as a potential dispersing element in the spectrograph. Our team has procured near-infrared gratings from two separate vendors. We have two gratings with the specifications needed for IRIS current design: 1.51-1.82{\\mu}m (H-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 4000 and 1.19- 1.37 {\\mu}m (J-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 8000....

  20. On the performance of compressed sensing-based methods for millimeter-wave holographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiao; Alomainy, Akram; Hao, Yang

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates compressed sensing (CS) based methods for reducing data-acquisition time in 2D millimeter-wave holographic imaging systems. Specific attention is paid to situations where the array element spacing does not satisfy the Nyquist criterion due to physical limitations. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that CS methods achieve better reconstruction than the conventional backpropagation method with undersampled data at the cost of increased computational complexity. Specifically, the definition-based CS (D-CS) method derived by discretizing the scattering model achieves the best image resolution but can produce ghost targets when the sampling interval is greater than approximately twice the Nyquist sampling interval. On the contrary, the Fourier-transform-based CS (FT-CS) method has relatively lower resolution but performs well in the case of low number of measurements, large sampling interval, and low transmit power. In addition, the D-CS method requires much higher time complexity and space complexity than the FT-CS method because the 2D data needs to be processed in vector form. Particularly, the space complexity of constructing and loading the dictionary matrix makes the D-CS method extremely inefficient in dealing with real-time applications. The overall algorithm running time of the D-CS method can be up to 50 times greater than the FT-CS method with a scanning aperture of 81×81 and 121×121 grid size in reconstruction. An efficient method is to use the FT-CS method for coarse imaging and then use the D-CS method for specific regions where better precision is required.

  1. A Prototype Experiment to Study Charmed Particle Production and Decay using a Holographic High Resolution Hydrogen Chamber (HOLEBC) and the European Hybrid Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The high resolution Hydrogen bubble chamber LEBC has already been used in experiments at the SPS to detect particles with lifetime @$>$ 5.10|-|1|3s (NA13 & NA16). For this experiment, a new version of LEBC called HOLEBC, has been constructed. This chamber and the NA26 version of the spectrometer have been used with classical optics in the NA27 experiment. A significant improvement in resolution was achieved (@= 20 microns compared with @= 40@mm in LEBC) and hence a good sensitivity all (known) charmed particle decays. The development of holographic recording techniques with HOLEBC is in progress. The prototype NA26 experiment is designed to evaluate the feasibility of the high sensitivity, high resolution holographic hydrogen bubble chamber technique and evaluate various possible charm selective triggers using the information from the spectrometer.

  2. GPU accelerated holographic microscopy for the inspection of quickly moving fluids for applications in pharmaceutical manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Nazim; Healy, John J.; Ryle, James P.; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2014-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is suitable for the detection of microbial particles in a rapidly flowing fluid since in this technique the focusing can be carried out as post-processing of a single captured image. This image, known as a digital hologram, contains the full complex wave front information emanating from the object which forms an interference pattern with a known reference beam. Post-processing is computationally intense and it constitutes a bottleneck for real time inspection of fast moving scenes. In the current work, GPU computation is used to accelerate the post-processing of the holographic images captured by digital holographic microscopy. Efficiency and reliability of a pre-processing step in order to eliminate low information content holographic images is also investigated.

  3. Pulsatile microvascular blood flow imaging by short-time Fourier transform analysis of ultrafast laser holographic interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Puyo, L; Rancillac, A; Simonutti, M; Paques, M; Sahel, J A; Fink, M; Atlan, M

    2015-01-01

    We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile microvascular blood flow in the exposed cerebral cortex of a mouse by holographic interferometry. We recorded interferograms of laser light backscattered by the tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam with a 50 kHz framerate camera. Videos of local Doppler contrasts were rendered numerically by Fresnel transformation and short-time Fourier transform analysis. This approach enabled instantaneous imaging of pulsatile blood flow contrasts in superficial blood vessels over 256 x 256 pixels with a spatial resolution of 10 microns and a temporal resolution of 20 ms.

  4. Simple and fast spectral domain algorithm for quantitative phase imaging of living cells with digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Junwei; Yao, Baoli; Ketelhut, Steffi; Engwer, Christian; Greve, Burkhard; Kemper, Björn

    2017-01-15

    We present a simple and fast phase aberration compensation method in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for quantitative phase imaging of living cells. By analyzing the frequency spectrum of an off-axis hologram, phase aberrations can be compensated for automatically without fitting or pre-knowledge of the setup and/or the object. Simple and effective computation makes the method suitable for quantitative online monitoring with highly variable DHM systems. Results from automated quantitative phase imaging of living NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the method.

  5. Lossless and lossy compression of quantitative phase images of red blood cells obtained by digital holographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Gholami, Samaneh; Moon, Inkyu

    2016-12-20

    In this paper, we evaluate lossless and lossy compression techniques to compress quantitative phase images of red blood cells (RBCs) obtained by an off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC phase images are numerically reconstructed from their digital holograms and are stored in 16-bit unsigned integer format. In the case of lossless compression, predictive coding of JPEG lossless (JPEG-LS), JPEG2000, and JP3D are evaluated, and compression ratio (CR) and complexity (compression time) are compared against each other. It turns out that JP2k can outperform other methods by having the best CR. In the lossy case, JP2k and JP3D with different CRs are examined. Because some data is lost in a lossy way, the degradation level is measured by comparing different morphological and biochemical parameters of RBC before and after compression. Morphological parameters are volume, surface area, RBC diameter, sphericity index, and the biochemical cell parameter is mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Experimental results show that JP2k outperforms JP3D not only in terms of mean square error (MSE) when CR increases, but also in compression time in the lossy compression way. In addition, our compression results with both algorithms demonstrate that with high CR values the three-dimensional profile of RBC can be preserved and morphological and biochemical parameters can still be within the range of reported values.

  6. Holographic imaging of full-color real-existing three-dimensional objects with computer-generated sequential kinoforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huadong Zheng; Tao Wang; Linmao Dai; Yingjie Yu

    2011-01-01

    We propose a computational method for generating sequential kinoforms of real-existing full-color threedimensional (3D) objects and realizing high-quality 3D imaging. The depth map and color information are obtained using non-contact full-color 3D measurement system based on binocular vision. The obtained full-color 3D data are decomposed into multiple slices with RGB channels. Sequential kinoforms of each channel are calculated and reconstructed using a Fresnel-diffraction-based algorithm called the dynamicpseudorandom-phase tomographic computer holography (DPP-TCH). Color dispersion introduced by different wavelengths is well compensated by zero-padding operation in the red and green channels of object slices. Numerical reconstruction results show that the speckle noise and color-dispersion are well suppressed and that high-quality full-color holographic 3D imaging is feasible. The method is useful for improving the 3D image quality in holographic displays with pixelated phase-type spatial light modulators (SLMs).%@@ We propose a computational method for generating sequential kinoforms of real-existing full-color three-dimensional (3D) objects and realizing high-quality 3D imaging.The depth map and color information are obtained using non-contact full-color 3D measurement system based on binocular vision.The obtained full-color 3D data are decomposed into multiple slices with RGB channels.Sequential kinoforms of each channel are calculated and reconstructed using a Fresnel-diffraction-based algorithm called the dynamic-pseudorandom-phase tomographic computer holography (DPP-TCH).Color dispersion introduced by dif-ferent wavelengths is well compensated by zero-padding operation in the red and green channels of object slices.Numerical reconstruction results show that the speckle noise and color-dispersion are well suppressed and that high-quality full-color holographic 3D imaging is feasible.The method is useful for improving the 3D image quality in holographic

  7. Holographic movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, Joseph C.; Miller, Mark E.

    1996-09-01

    A unique method for the construction and display of a 3D holographic movie is developed. An animated film is produced by rotating a 3D object in steps between successive holographic exposures. Strip holograms were made on 70-mm AGFA 8E75 Holotest roll film. Each hologram was about 11-mm high and 55-mm high and 55-mm wide. The object was rotated 2 deg between successive exposures. A complete cycle of the object motion was recorded on 180 holograms using the lensless Fourier transform construction. The ends of the developed film were spliced together to produce a continuous loop. Although the film moves continuously on playback and there is not shutter, there is no flicker or image displacement because of the Fourier transform hologram construction, as predicted by the theoretical analysis. The movie can be viewed for an unlimited time because the object motion is cyclical and the film is continuous. The film is wide enough such that comfortable viewing with both eyes is possible, enhancing the 3D effect. Viewers can stand comfortably away from the film since no viewing slit or aperture is necessary. Several people can simultaneously view the movie.

  8. New developments in ground probing radar: the possibility of reconstructing a holographic image of underground reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sambuelli

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade GPR has developed rapidly: instruments have become more compact and more digital, the field of application has broadened from non-destructive testing to humanitarian demining. Studies have been carried out to analyse the full information content of the backscattered wavefield trying to go beyond the time and amplitude analysis. In recent years, many researchers have focused on the possibility of applying holographic acquisition and processing to GPR data. This paper proposes a theoretical outline of a holographic acquisition and processing techniques; a block diagram of the proposed holographic radar; the outlines of the design and the realisation of a custom-built full-scale test-site and the results of the first simulations carried out with newly developed software. The basic rules for an optimum choice of the main acquisition parameters are also given together with a discussion of the main advantages and disadvantages of the proposed techniques.

  9. ENVISION, from particle detectors to medical imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Technologies developed for particle physics detectors are increasingly used in medical imaging tools like Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d

  10. Influence of limited random-phase of objects on the image quality of 3D holographic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, He; Liu, Juan; Yang, Minqiang; Li, Xin; Xue, Gaolei; Wang, Yongtian

    2017-02-01

    Limited-random-phase time average method is proposed to suppress the speckle noise of three dimensional (3D) holographic display. The initial phase and the range of the random phase are studied, as well as their influence on the optical quality of the reconstructed images, and the appropriate initial phase ranges on object surfaces are obtained. Numerical simulations and optical experiments with 2D and 3D reconstructed images are performed, where the objects with limited phase range can suppress the speckle noise in reconstructed images effectively. It is expected to achieve high-quality reconstructed images in 2D or 3D display in the future because of its effectiveness and simplicity.

  11. Laser addressed holographic memory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gange, R. A.; Wagle, E. M.; Steinmetz, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Holographic recall and storage system uses red-lipid microcrystalline wax as storage medium. When laser beam strikes wax, its energy heats point of incidence enough to pass wax through transition temperature. Holograph image can then be written or erased in softened wax.

  12. Hot embossing holographic images in BOPP shrink films through large-area roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Menglin; Lin, Shiwei; Jiang, Wenkai; Pan, Nengqian

    2014-08-01

    Diffraction grating-based holographic images have been successfully replicated in biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) shrink films through large-area roll-to-roll nanoimprint technique. Such hot embossing of holographic images on BOPP films represents a promising means of creating novel security features in packaging applications. The major limitation of the high-quality replication is the relatively large thermal shrinkage of BOPP shrink film. However, although an appropriate shrinkage is demanded after embossing, over-shrinking not only causes distortion in embossed images, but also reduces the various properties of BOPP shrink films mainly due to the disappearance of orientation. The effects of embossing temperature on the mechanical, thermal and optical properties as well as polymer surface morphologies were systematically analyzed. The results show that the optimal process parameters are listed as follows: the embossing temperature at 104-110 °C, embossing force 6 kg/cm2 and film speed 32 m/min. The variation in flow behavior of polymer surface during hot embossing process is highly dependent on the temperature. In addition, the adhesion from the direct contact between the rubber press roller and polymer surfaces is suggested to cause the serious optical properties failure.

  13. Problems on holographic imaging technique and adapt lasers for bubble chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Bjelkhagen, H I

    1982-01-01

    Different types of holographic recording technique for bubble chambers are presented and compared. The influence of turbulence on resolution is discussed as well as the demand on laser equipment. Experiments on a test model of HOLEBC using a pulsed ruby laser are also presented.

  14. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  15. Stochastic image reconstruction for a dual-particle imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, M.C., E-mail: mchamel@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Polack, J.K., E-mail: kpolack@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Poitrasson-Rivière, A., E-mail: alexispr@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Flaska, M., E-mail: mflaska@psu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 137 Reber Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Clarke, S.D., E-mail: clarkesd@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pozzi, S.A., E-mail: pozzisa@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Tomanin, A., E-mail: alice.tomanin@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 21027 Ispra, VA (Italy); Lainsa-Italia S.R.L., via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra, VA (Italy); Peerani, P., E-mail: paolo.peerani@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 21027 Ispra, VA (Italy)

    2016-02-21

    Stochastic image reconstruction has been applied to a dual-particle imaging system being designed for nuclear safeguards applications. The dual-particle imager (DPI) is a combined Compton-scatter and neutron-scatter camera capable of producing separate neutron and photon images. The stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) method was investigated as an imaging method for the DPI because only a minimal estimation of system response is required to produce images with quality that is comparable to common maximum-likelihood methods. This work contains neutron and photon SOE image reconstructions for a {sup 252}Cf point source, two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel canisters representing point sources, and the MOX fuel canisters representing a distributed source. Simulation of the DPI using MCNPX-PoliMi is validated by comparison of simulated and measured results. Because image quality is dependent on the number of counts and iterations used, the relationship between these quantities is investigated.

  16. Hyperspectral holographic Fourier-microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalenkov, G S [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kalenkov, S G [Moscow State University of Mechanical Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shtan' ko, A E [Moscow State University of Technology ' Stankin' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    A detailed theory of the method of holographic recording of hyperspectral wave fields is developed. New experimentally obtained hyperspectral holographic images of microscopic objects are presented. The possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally using the examples of urgent microscopy problems: speckle noise suppression, obtaining hyperspectral image of a microscopic object, as well as synthesis of a colour image and obtaining an optical profile of a phase object. (holography)

  17. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  18. Holographic microrheology of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong Cheong, Fook; Duarte, Simone; Grier, David

    2008-03-01

    We present microrheological measurements of polymeric matrices, including the extra-cellular polysaccharide gel synthesized by the dental pathogen S. mutans. As part of this study, we introduce the use of precision three-dimensional particle tracking based on video holographic microscopy. This technique offers nanometer-scale resolution at video rates, thereby providing detailed information on the gels' complex viscoelastic moduli, including insights into their heterogeneity. The particular application to dental biofilms complements previous studies based on macroscopic rheology, and demonstrates the utility of holographic microrheology for soft-matter physics and biomedical research.

  19. Triple Encrypted Holographic Storage and Digital Holographic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yi-Chao; ZHANG Jia-Sen; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    We propose a triple encrypted holographic memory containing a digital holographic system. The original image is encrypted using double random phase encryption and stored in a LiNbO3:Fe crystal with shift-multiplexing. Both the reference beams of the memory and the digital holographic system are random phase encoded. We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the encryption and decryption of multiple images and the results show high quality and good fault tolerance. The total key length of this system is larger than 4.7×1033.

  20. Quantitative phase imaging of cell division in yeast cells and E.coli using digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) is an emerging quantitative phase imaging technique with unique imaging scales and resolutions leading to multitude of applications. DHM is promising as a novel investigational and applied tool for cell imaging, studying the morphology and real time dynamics of cells and a number of related applications. The use of numerical propagation and computational digital optics offer unique flexibility to tune the depth of focus, and compensate for image aberrations. In this work, we report imaging the dynamics of cell division in E.coli and yeast cells using a DHM platform. We demonstrate 3-D and depth imaging as well as reconstruction of phase profiles of E.coli and yeast cells using the system. We record a digital hologram of E.coli and yeast cells and reconstruct the image using Fresnel propagation algorithm. We also use aberration compensation algorithms for correcting the aberrations that are introduced by the microscope objective in the object path using linear least square fitting techniques. This work demonstrates the strong potential of a DHM platform in 3-D live cell imaging, fast clinical quantifications and pathological applications.

  1. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-05-03

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  2. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, P.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rappaz, B.; Depeursinge, C.; Jourdain, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  3. A Submersible Holographic Camera for the Undisturbed Characterization of Optically Relevant Particles in Water (HOLOCAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    conducted a joint field test of the HOLOCAM in East Sound, WA in conjunction with instrument testing ( LIDAR , LISST-HOLO, CytoSense, etc.) being...both widely used in the community and easily modified by end users (i.e. Matlab ). Along with image analysis techniques, our JHU partners have developed...optical properties (e.g. remote sensing reflectance, diffuse attenuation) and the performance of 7 operational systems (e.g. LIDAR , laser line scanners

  4. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  5. Accurate particle position measurement from images

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Bin; 10.1063/1.2735920

    2011-01-01

    The moment method is an image analysis technique for sub-pixel estimation of particle positions. The total error in the calculated particle position includes effects of pixel locking and random noise in each pixel. Pixel locking, also known as peak locking, is an artifact where calculated particle positions are concentrated at certain locations relative to pixel edges. We report simulations to gain an understanding of the sources of error and their dependence on parameters the experimenter can control. We suggest an algorithm, and we find optimal parameters an experimenter can use to minimize total error and pixel locking. Simulating a dusty plasma experiment, we find that a sub-pixel accuracy of 0.017 pixel or better can be attained. These results are also useful for improving particle position measurement and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using video microscopy, in fields including colloids, biology, and fluid mechanics.

  6. MDF: Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format

    CERN Document Server

    Knopp, Tobias; Bringout, Gael; Ahlborg, Mandy; Rahmer, Jürgen; Hofmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a tomographic method to determine the spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles. In this document a file format for the standardized storage of MPI data is introduced. The aim of the Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format (MDF) is to provide a coherent way of exchanging MPI data acquired with different MPI scanners worldwide. The focus of the file format is on sequence parameters, raw measurement data, calibration data, and reconstruction data. The format is based on the hierarchical document format (HDF) in version 5 (HDF5).

  7. Low-energy electron holographic imaging of individual tobacco mosaic virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas, E-mail: longchamp@physik.uzh.ch; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner [Physics Department, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-28

    Modern structural biology relies on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), X-ray crystallography, and cryo-electron microscopy for gaining information on biomolecules at nanometer, sub-nanometer, or atomic resolution. All these methods, however, require averaging over a vast ensemble of entities, and hence knowledge on the conformational landscape of an individual particle is lost. Unfortunately, there are now strong indications that even X-ray free electron lasers will not be able to image individual molecules but will require nanocrystal samples. Here, we show that non-destructive structural biology of single particles has now become possible by means of low-energy electron holography. As an example, individual tobacco mosaic virions deposited on ultraclean freestanding graphene are imaged at 1 nm resolution revealing structural details arising from the helical arrangement of the outer protein shell of the virus. Since low-energy electron holography is a lens-less technique and since electrons with a deBroglie wavelength of approximately 1 Å do not impose radiation damage to biomolecules, the method has the potential for Angstrom resolution imaging of single biomolecules.

  8. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kroc, Lukas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krakala, Florent [ESPCI; Vergassola, M [CNRS

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  9. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kroc, Lukas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krakala, Florent [ESPCI; Vergassola, M [CNRS

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  10. Heterodyned holographic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, NG

    1997-01-01

    In holographic spectroscopy an image of an interference pattern is projected onto a detector and transformed back to the input spectrum. The general characteristics are similar to those of Fourier transform spectroscopy, but the spectrum is obtained without scanning. In the heterodyned arrangement o

  11. Magnonic Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitun, Alexander; Kozhevnikov, Alexander; Gertz, Frederick; Filimonov, Yuri

    2015-03-01

    Collective oscillation of spins in magnetic lattice known as spin waves (magnons) possess relatively long coherence length at room temperature, which makes it possible to build sub-micrometer scale holographic devices similar to the devices developed in optics. In this work, we present a prototype 2-bit magnonic holographic memory. The memory consists of the double-cross waveguide structure made of Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 with magnets placed on the top of waveguide junctions. Information is encoded in the orientation of the magnets, while the read-out is accomplished by the spin waves generated by the micro-antennas placed on the edges of the waveguides. The interference pattern produced by multiple spin waves makes it possible to build a unique holographic image of the magnetic structure and recognize the state of the each magnet. The development of magnonic holographic devices opens a new horizon for building scalable holographic devices compatible with conventional electronic devices. This work was supported in part by the FAME Center, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and by the National Science Foundation under the NEB2020 Grant ECCS-1124714.

  12. The holographic universe

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot, Michael

    1991-01-01

    'There is evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it - from snowflakes to maple trees to falling stars and spinning electrons - are only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality literally beyond both space and time.' This is the astonishing idea behind the holographic theory of the universe, pioneered by two eminent thinkers: physicist David Bohm, a former protege of Albert Einstein, and quantum physicist Karl Pribram. The holographic theory of the universe encompasses consciousness and reality as we know them, but can also explain such hitherto unexplained phenomena as telepathy, out-of-body experiences and even miraculous healing. In this remarkable book, Michael Talbot reveals the extraordinary depth and power of the holographic theory of the universe, illustrating how it makes sense of the entire range of experiences within our universe - and in other universes beyond our own.

  13. Field free line magnetic particle imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Erbe, Marlitt

    2014-01-01

    Marlitt Erbe provides a detailed introduction into the young research field of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and field free line (FFL) imaging in particular. She derives a mathematical description of magnetic field generation for FFL imaging in MPI. To substantiate the simulation studies on magnetic FFL generation with a proof-of-concept, the author introduces the FFL field demonstrator, which provides the world's first experimentally generated rotated and translated magnetic FFL field complying with the requirements for FFL reconstruction. Furthermore, she proposes a scanner design of consi

  14. Optofluidic bioimaging platform for quantitative phase imaging of lab on a chip devices using digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2016-01-20

    We propose a versatile 3D phase-imaging microscope platform for real-time imaging of optomicrofluidic devices based on the principle of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Lab-on-chip microfluidic devices fabricated on transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glass substrates have attained wide popularity in biological sensing applications. However, monitoring, visualization, and characterization of microfluidic devices, microfluidic flows, and the biochemical kinetics happening in these devices is difficult due to the lack of proper techniques for real-time imaging and analysis. The traditional bright-field microscopic techniques fail in imaging applications, as the microfluidic channels and the fluids carrying biological samples are transparent and not visible in bright light. Phase-based microscopy techniques that can image the phase of the microfluidic channel and changes in refractive indices due to the fluids and biological samples present in the channel are ideal for imaging the fluid flow dynamics in a microfluidic channel at high resolutions. This paper demonstrates three-dimensional imaging of a microfluidic device with nanometric depth precisions and high SNR. We demonstrate imaging of microelectrodes of nanometric thickness patterned on glass substrate and the microfluidic channel. Three-dimensional imaging of a transparent PDMS optomicrofluidic channel, fluid flow, and live yeast cell flow in this channel has been demonstrated using DHM. We also quantify the average velocity of fluid flow through the channel. In comparison to any conventional bright-field microscope, the 3D depth information in the images illustrated in this work carry much information about the biological system under observation. The results demonstrated in this paper prove the high potential of DHM in imaging optofluidic devices; detection of pathogens, cells, and bioanalytes on lab-on-chip devices; and in studying microfluidic dynamics in real time based on phase changes.

  15. Second International Workshop on Magnetic Particle Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Borgert, Jörn; Magnetic Particle Imaging : A Novel SPIO Nanoparticle Imaging Technique

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a novel imaging modality. In MPI superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used as tracer materials. The volume is the proceeding of the 2nd international workshop on magnetic particle imaging (IWMPI). The workshop aims at covering the status and recent developments of both, the instrumentation and the tracer material, as each of them is equally important in designing a well performing MPI. For instance, the current state of the art in magnetic coil design for MPI is discussed. With a new symmetrical arrangement of coils, a field-free line (FFL) can be produced that promises a significantly higher sensitivity compared with the standard arrangement for a FFP. Furthermore, the workshop aims at presenting results from phantom and pre-clinical studies.

  16. Particle imaging through planar shock waves and associated velocimetry errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Orlicz, G.C.

    2015-01-01

    When imaging particles through a shock wave, the resulting particle image appears blurred and at the wrong location, which is referred to as a position error. Particle image doublets are observed if only part of the light scattered by a particle is deflected or reflected by the shock. These optical

  17. Holographic Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Holme, NCR; Berg, RH

    1999-01-01

    A Two-dimensional holographic memory for archival storage is described. Assuming a coherent transfer function, an A4 page can be stored at high resolution in an area of 1 mm(2). Recently developed side-chain liquid crystalline azobenzene polyesters are found to be suitable media for holographic...... storage. They exhibit high resolution, high diffraction efficiency, have long storage life, are fully erasable and are mechanically stable....

  18. Holographic Skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Paul M.

    Skyrmions are topological solitons that describe baryons within a nonlinear theory of pions. In holographic QCD, baryons correspond to topological solitons in a bulk theory with an extra spatial dimension: thus the three-dimensional Skyrmion lifts to a four-dimensional holographic Skyrmion in the bulk. We begin this review with a description of the simplest example of this correspondence, where the holographic Skyrmion is exactly the self-dual Yang-Mills instanton in flat space. This places an old result of Atiyah and Manton within a holographic framework and reveals that the associated Skyrme model extends the nonlinear pion theory to include an infinite tower of vector mesons, with specific couplings for a BPS theory. We then describe the more complicated curved space version that arises from the string theory construction of Sakai and Sugimoto. The basic concepts remain the same but the technical difficulty increases as the holographic Skyrmion is a curved space version of the Yang-Mills instanton, so self-duality and integrability are lost. Finally, we turn to a low-dimensional analogue of holographic Skyrmions, where aspects such as multi-baryons and finite baryon density are amenable to both numerical computation and an approximate analytic treatment.

  19. Photoinitiation and Inhibition under Monochromatic Green Light for Storage of Colored 3D Images in Holographic Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guannan; Ni, Mingli; Peng, Haiyan; Huang, Feihong; Liao, Yonggui; Wang, Mingkui; Zhu, Jintao; Roy, V A L; Xie, Xiaolin

    2017-01-18

    Holographic photopolymer composites have garnered a great deal of interest in recent decades, not only because of their advantageous light sensitivity but also due to their attractive capabilities of realizing high capacity three-dimensional (3D) data storage that is long-term stable within two-dimensional (2D) thin films. For achieving high performance holographic photopolymer composites, it is of critical importance to implement precisely spatiotemporal control over the photopolymerization kinetics and gelation during holographic recording. Though a monochromatic blue light photoinitibitor has been demonstrated to be useful for improving the holographic performance, it is impractical to be employed for constructing holograms under green light due to the severe restriction of the First Law of Photochemistry, while holography under green light is highly desirable considering the relatively low cost of laser source and high tolerance to ambient vibration for image reconstruction. Herein, we disclose the concurrent photoinitiation and inhibition functions of the rose bengal (RB)/N-phenylglycine (NPG) system upon green light illumination, which result in significant enhancement of the diffraction efficiency of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) gratings from zero up to 87.6 ± 1.3%, with an augmentation of the RB concentration from 0.06 × 10(-3) to 9.41 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). Interestingly, no detectable variation of the ϕ(1/2)kp/kt(1/2), which reflects the initiation efficiency and kinetic constants, is given when increasing the RB concentration. The radical inhibition by RBH(•) is believed to account for the greatly improved phase separation and enhanced diffraction efficiency, through shortening the weight-average polymer chain length and subsequently delaying the photopolymerization gelation. The reconstructed colored 3D images that are easily identifiable to the naked eye under white light demonstrate great potential to be applied for advanced

  20. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M'(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σ(v), equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI.

  1. Handbook of particle detection and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Buvat, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The handbook centers on detection techniques in the field of particle physics, medical imaging and related subjects. It is structured into three parts. The first one is dealing with basic ideas of particle detectors, followed by applications of these devices in high energy physics and other fields. In the last part the large field of medical imaging using similar detection techniques is described. The different chapters of the book are written by world experts in their field. Clear instructions on the detection techniques and principles in terms of relevant operation parameters for scientists and graduate students are given.Detailed tables and diagrams will make this a very useful handbook for the application of these techniques in many different fields like physics, medicine, biology and other areas of natural science.

  2. ENVISION, developing SPECT imaging for particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. ENVISION aims at developing medical imaging tools to improve the dose delivery to the patient, to ensure a safer and more effective treatment. The animation illustrates the use of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for monitoring the dose during treatment. Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d

  3. Generalized Semi-Holographic Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    We study the semi-holographic idea in context of decaying dark components. The energy flow between dark energy and the compensating dark matter is thermodynamically generalized to involve a particle number variable dark component with non-zero chemical potential. It's found that, unlike the original semi-holographic model, no cosmological constant is needed for a dynamical evolution of the universe. A transient phantom phase appears while a non-trivial dark energy-dark matter scaling solution keeps at late time, which evades the big-rip and helps to resolve the coincidence problem. For reasonable parameters, the deceleration parameter is well consistent with current observations. The original semi-holographic model is extended and it also suggests that the concordance model may be reconstructed from the semi-holographic idea.

  4. Superresolution imaging system by color-coded tilted-beam illumination in digital in-line holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, L.; Micó, V.; Ferreira, C.; Zalevsky, Z.; García, J.

    2016-04-01

    Digital in-line holographic microscopy (DIHM) relates with the capability to achieve microscopic imaging working without lensless in the regime of holography. In essence, DIHM proposes a simple layout where a point source of coherent light illuminates the sample and the diffracted wavefront is recorded by a digital sensor. However, DIHM lacks high numerical aperture (NA) due to both geometrical distortion and the mandatory compromise between the illumination pinhole diameter, the illumination wavelength, and the need to obtain a reasonable light efficiency. One way to improve the resolution in DIHM, is by allowing superresolution imaging by angular multiplexing using tilted beam illumination. This illumination allows the on-axis diffraction of different spatial frequency content of the sample's spectrum, different in comparison to the case when on-axis illumination is used. And after recover this additional spectral content, a synthetic numerical aperture (SNA) expanding up the cutoff frequency of the system in comparison with the on-axis illumination case can be assembled in a digital post-processing stage. In this contribution, we present a method to achieve one-dimensional (1-D) superresolved imaging in DIHM by a SINGLE SHOT illumination, using color-coded tilted beams. The method has been named as L-SESRIM (Lensless Single-Exposure Super-Resolved Interferometric Microscopy). Although the technique was previously presented showing very preliminary results [34], in this contribution we expand the experimental characterization (USAF resolution test target) as well as derive the theoretical frame for SNA generation using different illumination wavelengths.

  5. Magnetic particle imaging: introduction to imaging and hardware realization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzug, Thorsten M; Bringout, Gael; Erbe, Marlitt; Gräfe, Ksenija; Graeser, Matthias; Grüttner, Mandy; Halkola, Aleksi; Sattel, Timo F; Tenner, Wiebke; Wojtczyk, Hanne; Haegele, Julian; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Lüdtke-Buzug, Kerstin

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a recently invented tomographic imaging method that quantitatively measures the spatial distribution of a tracer based on magnetic nanoparticles. The new modality promises a high sensitivity and high spatial as well as temporal resolution. There is a high potential of MPI to improve interventional and image-guided surgical procedures because, today, established medical imaging modalities typically excel in only one or two of these important imaging properties. MPI makes use of the non-linear magnetization characteristics of the magnetic nanoparticles. For this purpose, two magnetic fields are created and superimposed, a static selection field and an oscillatory drive field. If superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) are subjected to the oscillatory magnetic field, the particles will react with a non-linear magnetization response, which can be measured with an appropriate pick-up coil arrangement. Due to the non-linearity of the particle magnetization, the received signal consists of the fundamental excitation frequency as well as of harmonics. After separation of the fundamental signal, the nanoparticle concentration can be reconstructed quantitatively based on the harmonics. The spatial coding is realized with the static selection field that produces a field-free point, which is moved through the field of view by the drive fields. This article focuses on the frequency-based image reconstruction approach and the corresponding imaging devices while alternative concepts like x-space MPI and field-free line imaging are described as well. The status quo in hardware realization is summarized in an overview of MPI scanners.

  6. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Kenya, E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  7. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kenya; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl2 to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The "MPI value" was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  8. Projection x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Konkle, Justin J; Zheng, Bo; Saritas, Emine U; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-05-01

    Projection magnetic particle imaging (MPI) can improve imaging speed by over 100-fold over traditional 3-D MPI. In this work, we derive the 2-D x-space signal equation, 2-D image equation, and introduce the concept of signal fading and resolution loss for a projection MPI imager. We then describe the design and construction of an x-space projection MPI scanner with a field gradient of 2.35 T/m across a 10 cm magnet free bore. The system has an expected resolution of 3.5 × 8.0 mm using Resovist tracer, and an experimental resolution of 3.8 × 8.4 mm resolution. The system images 2.5 cm × 5.0 cm partial field-of views (FOVs) at 10 frames/s, and acquires a full field-of-view of 10 cm × 5.0 cm in 4 s. We conclude by imaging a resolution phantom, a complex "Cal" phantom, mice injected with Resovist tracer, and experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted x-space spatial resolution.

  9. DHMI: dynamic holographic microscopy interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuefei; Zheng, Yujie; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a powerful in-vitro biological imaging tool. In this paper, we report a fully automated off-axis digital holographic microscopy system completed with a graphical user interface in the Matlab environment. The interface primarily includes Fourier domain processing, phase reconstruction, aberration compensation and autofocusing. A variety of imaging operations such as region of interest selection, de-noising mode (filtering and averaging), low frame rate imaging for immediate reconstruction and high frame rate imaging routine ( 27 fps) are implemented to facilitate ease of use.

  10. Holographic Photosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There are successful applications of the holographic AdS/CFT correspondence to high energy and condensed matter physics. We apply the holographic approach to photosynthesis that is an important example of nontrivial quantum phenomena relevant for life which is being studied in the emerging field of quantum biology. Light harvesting complexes of photosynthetic organisms are many-body quantum systems, in which quantum coherence has recently been experimentally shown to survive for relatively long time scales even at the physiological temperature despite the decohering effects of their environments. We use the holographic approach to evaluate the time dependence of entanglement entropy and quantum mutual information in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein-pigment complex in green sulfur bacteria during the transfer of an excitation from a chlorosome antenna to a reaction center. It is demonstrated that the time evolution of the mutual information simulating the Lindblad master equation in some cases can be obt...

  11. Holographic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, E

    2004-01-01

    Using the de Sitter/CFT correspondence we describe a scenario of holographic inflation which is driven by a three dimensional boundary field theory. We find that inflationary constraints severely restrict the $\\beta$--function, the anomalous dimensions and the value of the $C$--function of the boundary theory. The scenario has model independent predictions such as $\\epsilon<< \\eta$, $n_T<0.04$, $P_{tensor}/P_{scalar}<0.08$ and $H<10^{14} GeV$. We consider some simple boundary theories and find that they do not lead to inflation. Thus, building an acceptable holographic inflation model remains a challenge. We also describe holographic quintessence and find that it closely resembles a cosmological constant.

  12. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  13. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    digital holography, laser, active imaging, remote sensing, laser imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 8...slow speed tunable lasers, while relaxing the need to precisely track the transceiver or target motion. In the following section we describe a scenario...contrast targets. As shown in Figure 28, augmenting holographic ladar with range compression relaxes the dependence of image reconstruction on

  14. Holographic telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhner, Jefferson E.

    2016-07-01

    Holographic optical elements (HOEs) work on the principal of diffraction and can in some cases replace conventional optical elements that work on the principal of refraction. An HOE can be thinner, lighter, can have more functionality, and can be lower cost than conventional optics. An HOE can serve as a beam splitter, spectral filter, mirror, and lens all at the same time. For a single wavelength system, an HOE can be an ideal solution but they have not been widely accepted for multispectral systems because they suffer from severe chromatic aberration. A refractive optical system also suffers from chromatic aberration but it is generally not as severe. To color correct a conventional refractive optical system, a flint glass and a crown glass are placed together such that the color dispersion of the flint and the crown cancel each other out making an achromatic lens (achromat) and the wavelengths all focus to the same point. The color dispersion of refractive lenses and holographic lenses are opposite from each other. In a diffractive optical system, long wavelengths focus closer (remember for HOEs: RBM "red bends more") than nominal focus while shorter wavelengths focus further out. In a refractive optical system, it is just the opposite. For this reason, diffractives can be incorporated into a refractive system to do the color correction and often cut down on the number of optical elements used [1.]. Color correction can also be achieved with an all-diffractive system by combining a holographic optical element with its conjugate. In this way the color dispersion of the first holographic optical element can be cancelled by the color dispersion of the second holographic optic. It is this technique that will be exploited in this paper to design a telescope made entirely of holographic optical elements. This telescope could be more portable (for field operations) the same technique could be used to make optics light enough for incorporation into a UAV.

  15. A Mach-Zender digital holographic microscope with sub-micrometer resolution for imaging and tracking of marine micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Jonas; Niraula, Bimochan; Liewer, Kurt; Kent Wallace, J.; Serabyn, Eugene; Graff, Emilio; Lindensmith, Christian; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is an ideal tool for investigation of microbial motility. However, most designs do not exhibit sufficient spatial resolution for imaging bacteria. In this study we present an off-axis Mach-Zehnder design of a holographic microscope with spatial resolution of better than 800 nm and the ability to resolve bacterial samples at varying densities over a 380 μm × 380 μm × 600 μm three-dimensional field of view. Larger organisms, such as protozoa, can be resolved in detail, including cilia and flagella. The instrument design and performance are presented, including images and tracks of bacterial and protozoal mixed samples and pure cultures of six selected species. Organisms as small as 1 μm (bacterial spores) and as large as 60 μm (Paramecium bursaria) may be resolved and tracked without changes in the instrument configuration. Finally, we present a dilution series investigating the maximum cell density that can be imaged, a type of analysis that has not been presented in previous holographic microscopy studies.

  16. Digital holographic microscopy for longitudinal volumetric imaging of growth and treatment response in three-dimensional tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; La, Jeffrey; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-11-01

    We report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, nondestructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro three-dimensional (3-D) tumor models. Following established methods, we prepared 3-D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple time points throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify the nodule thickness over time under normal growth and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner, total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time-dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3-D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3-D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  17. Multi-wavelength sensitive holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal grating applied within image splitter for autostereoscopic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gao, Hui; Lu, Feiyue; Sun, Lijia; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    Multi-wavelength sensitive holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) grating and its application within image splitter for autostereoscopic display are reported in this paper. Two initiator systems consisting of photoinitiator, Methylene Blue and coinitiator, p-toluenesulfonic acid as well as photoinitiator, Rose Bengal and coinitiator, Nphenylglycine are employed. We demonstrate that Bragg gratings can be formed in this syrup polymerized under three lasers simultaneously including 632.8nm from He-Ne laser, 532nm from Verdi solid state laser, and 441.6nm from He- Cd laser. The diffraction efficiency of three kinds of gratings with different exposure wavelength are 57%, 75% and 33%, respectively. The threshold driving voltages of those gratings are 2.8, 3.05, and 2.85 V/μm, respectively. We also present the results for the feasibility of this proposed H-PDLC grating applied into image splitter without color dispersion for autostereoscopic display according to experimental splitting effect.

  18. Particle image velocimetry a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Raffel, Marcus; Wereley, Steve T; Kompenhans, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The development of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), a measurement technique, which allows for capturing velocity information of whole ?ow ?elds in fractions of a second, has begun in the eighties of the last century. In 1998, when this book has been published ?rstly, the PIV technique emerged from laboratories to applications in fundamental and industrial research, in par- lel to the transition from photo-graphicalto video recording techniques. Thus this book, whose objective was and is to serve as a practical guide to the PIV technique, found strong interest within the increasing group of us

  19. New synthesizing feature parameter of wear particles image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper outlines the application of wavelet analysis method to computering wear par-ticles image processing and introduces the concept of grain parameter for wear particle imagebased on statistical feature parameters. The feature of wear particles image can be obtained fromthe wavelet decomposition and the statistics analysis. Test results showed that grain parametercan be used as a synthesizing feature parameter for wear particle image.

  20. Experimental Study on Quantitative Phase Imaging by Digital Holographic Microscopy%数字全息显微定量相位成像的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马利红; 王辉; 金洪震; 李勇

    2012-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy apparatus with pre-magnification has been set up, which can well acquire the quantitative phase images for living biological specimens. In addition, a series of digital holograms can be automatically recorded and movies of holographic phase images of living biological specimens can be created. The accuracy of quantitative imaging is verified by a self-produced stepped transparent sample with known height and refraction. Onion epidermal cells and red blood cells are measured and quantitative high-quality phase images are obtained. The movies of phase images for paramecium are achieved. Experimental results demonstrate that the established system can achieve real-time quantitative high-resolution holographic phase image and can be effectively applied to living biological specimens phase imaging.%建立了一套预放大式数字全息显微成像系统,通过对样品进行显微放大,实现了高分辨率的定量相位成像;并通过计算机控制相机自动曝光记录序列的数字全息图实现了动态相位成像.用标准样品验证了系统测量的准确性;以活体洋葱表皮细胞和血红细胞为样品,获得了清晰的定量相位像;以置于水环境的草履虫为样品,实现了动态成像.实验结果表明建立的系统可以实现高分辨率的动态定量相位成像,可以应用于生物活体样品的显微研究.

  1. Coherent diffraction and holographic imaging of individual biomolecules using low-energy electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2013-01-01

    Modern microscopy techniques are aimed at imaging an individual molecule at atomic resolution. Here we show that low-energy electrons with kinetic energies of 50-250 eV offer a possibility of overcome the problem of radiation damage, and obtaining images of individual biomolecules. Two experimental schemes for obtaining images of individual molecules, holography and coherent diffraction imaging, are discussed and compared. Images of individual molecules obtained by both techniques, using low-energy electrons, are shown.

  2. A plane wave analysis of coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Jeffrey J; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging plays a critical role in a myriad of scientific endeavors, particularly in the biological sciences. Three-dimensional imaging of fluorescent intensity often requires serial data acquisition, that is voxel-by-voxel collection of fluorescent light emitted throughout the specimen with a non-imaging single-element detector. While non-imaging fluorescence detection offers some measure of scattering robustness, the rate at which dynamic specimens can be imaged is severely limited. Other fluorescent imaging techniques utilize imaging detection to enhance collection rates. A notable example is light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, also known as selective-plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), which illuminates a large region within the specimen and collects emitted fluorescent light at an angle either perpendicular or oblique to the illumination light sheet. Unfortunately, scattering of the emitted fluorescent light can cause blurring of the collected images in highly turbid biological media. We rec...

  3. Digital Holographic Microscopy Principles, Techniques, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Myung K

    2011-01-01

    Digital holography is an emerging field of new paradigm in general imaging applications. By replacing the photochemical procedures with electronic imaging and having a direct numerical access to the complex optical field, a wide range of new imaging capabilities become available, many of them difficult or infeasible in conventional holography. An increasing number of researchers—not only in optical physics and optical engineering, but also in diverse applications areas such as microbiology, medicine, marine science, particle analysis, microelectromechanics, and metrology—are realizing and exploiting the new capabilities of digital holography. Digital Holographic Microscopy: Principles, Techniques, and Applications, by Dr. Myung K. Kim, is intended to provide a brief but consistent introduction to the principles of digital holography as well as to give an organized overview of the large number of techniques and applications being developed. This will also shed some light on the range of possibilities for f...

  4. Stereo-particle image velocimetry uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2017-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are subject to multiple elemental error sources and thus estimating overall measurement uncertainty is challenging. Recent advances have led to a posteriori uncertainty estimation methods for planar two-component PIV. However, no complete methodology exists for uncertainty quantification in stereo PIV. In the current work, a comprehensive framework is presented to quantify the uncertainty stemming from stereo registration error and combine it with the underlying planar velocity uncertainties. The disparity in particle locations of the dewarped images is used to estimate the positional uncertainty of the world coordinate system, which is then propagated to the uncertainty in the calibration mapping function coefficients. Next, the calibration uncertainty is combined with the planar uncertainty fields of the individual cameras through an uncertainty propagation equation and uncertainty estimates are obtained for all three velocity components. The methodology was tested with synthetic stereo PIV data for different light sheet thicknesses, with and without registration error, and also validated with an experimental vortex ring case from 2014 PIV challenge. Thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the relative impact of the various parameters to the overall uncertainty. The results suggest that in absence of any disparity, the stereo PIV uncertainty prediction method is more sensitive to the planar uncertainty estimates than to the angle uncertainty, although the latter is not negligible for non-zero disparity. Overall the presented uncertainty quantification framework showed excellent agreement between the error and uncertainty RMS values for both the synthetic and the experimental data and demonstrated reliable uncertainty prediction coverage. This stereo PIV uncertainty quantification framework provides the first comprehensive treatment on the subject and potentially lays foundations applicable to volumetric

  5. The Holographic Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    I give a critical review of the holographic hypothesis, which posits that a universe with gravity can be described by a quantum field theory in fewer dimensions. I first recall how the idea originated from considerations on black hole thermodynamics and the so-called information paradox that arises when Hawking radiation is taken into account. String Quantum Gravity tried to solve the puzzle using the AdS/CFT correspondence, according to which a black hole in a 5-D anti-de Sitter space is like a flat 4-D field of particles and radiation. Although such an interesting holographic property, also called gauge/gravity duality, has never been proved rigorously, it has impulsed a number of research programs in fields as diverse as nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, general relativity and cosmology. I finally discuss the pros and cons of the holographic conjecture, and emphasizes the key role played by black holes for understanding quantum gravity and possible dualities between distant fields of theoretical p...

  6. Holographic Vitrification

    CERN Document Server

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Peeters, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    We establish the existence of stable and metastable stationary black hole bound states at finite temperature and chemical potentials in global and planar four-dimensional asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. We determine a number of features of their holographic duals and argue they represent structural glasses. We map out their thermodynamic landscape in the probe approximation, and show their relaxation dynamics exhibits logarithmic aging, with aging rates determined by the distribution of barriers.

  7. 3D tracking and phase-contrast imaging by twin-beams digital holographic microscope in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Finizio, A.; Paturzo, M.; Merola, F.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2012-06-01

    A compact twin-beam interferometer that can be adopted as a flexible diagnostic tool in microfluidic platforms is presented. The devise has two functionalities, as explained in the follow, and can be easily integrated in microfluidic chip. The configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, furnishes Quantitative Phase-Contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy. Experimental demonstration of its effectiveness and compatibility with biological field is given on for in vitro cells in microfluidic environment. Nowadays, several microfluidic configuration exist and many of them are commercially available, their development is due to the possibility for manipulating droplets, handling micro and nano-objects, visualize and quantify processes occurring in small volumes and, clearly, for direct applications on lab-on-a chip devices. In microfluidic research field, optical/photonics approaches are the more suitable ones because they have various advantages as to be non-contact, full-field, non-invasive and can be packaged thanks to the development of integrable optics. Moreover, phase contrast approaches, adapted to a lab-on-a-chip configurations, give the possibility to get quantitative information with remarkable lateral and vertical resolution directly in situ without the need to dye and/or kill cells. Furthermore, numerical techniques for tracking of micro-objects needs to be developed for measuring velocity fields, trajectories patterns, motility of cancer cell and so on. Here, we present a compact holographic microscope that can ensure, by the same configuration and simultaneously, accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. The system, simple and solid, is based on twin laser beams coming from a single laser source. Through a easy conceptual design, we show how these two different functionalities can be accomplished by the same optical setup. The working principle, the optical setup and the mathematical

  8. Holographic Optical Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Although the basic idea may be traced back to the earlier X-ray diffraction studies of Sir W. L. Bragg, the holographic method as we know it was invented by D. Gabor in 1948 as a two-step lensless imaging technique to enhance the resolution of electron microscopy, for which he received the 1971 Nobel Prize in physics. The distinctive feature of holography is the recording of the object phase variations that carry the depth information, which is lost in conventional photography where only the intensity (= squared amplitude) distribution of an object is captured. Since all photosensitive media necessarily respond to the intensity incident upon them, an ingenious way had to be found to convert object phase into intensity variations, and Gabor achieved this by introducing a coherent reference wave along with the object wave during exposure. Gabor's in-line recording scheme, however, required the object in question to be largely transmissive, and could provide only marginal image quality due to unwanted terms simultaneously reconstructed along with the desired wavefront. Further handicapped by the lack of a strong coherent light source, optical holography thus seemed fated to remain just another scientific curiosity, until the field was revolutionized in the early 1960s by some major breakthroughs: the proposition and demonstration of the laser principle, the introduction of off-axis holography, and the invention of volume holography. Consequently, the remainder of that decade saw an exponential growth in research on theory, practice, and applications of holography. Today, holography not only boasts a wide variety of scientific and technical applications (e.g., holographic interferometry for strain, vibration, and flow analysis, microscopy and high-resolution imagery, imaging through distorting media, optical interconnects, holographic optical elements, optical neural networks, three-dimensional displays, data storage, etc.), but has become a prominent am advertising

  9. Intelligent holographic databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbastathis, George

    Memory is a key component of intelligence. In the human brain, physical structure and functionality jointly provide diverse memory modalities at multiple time scales. How could we engineer artificial memories with similar faculties? In this thesis, we attack both hardware and algorithmic aspects of this problem. A good part is devoted to holographic memory architectures, because they meet high capacity and parallelism requirements. We develop and fully characterize shift multiplexing, a novel storage method that simplifies disk head design for holographic disks. We develop and optimize the design of compact refreshable holographic random access memories, showing several ways that 1 Tbit can be stored holographically in volume less than 1 m3, with surface density more than 20 times higher than conventional silicon DRAM integrated circuits. To address the issue of photorefractive volatility, we further develop the two-lambda (dual wavelength) method for shift multiplexing, and combine electrical fixing with angle multiplexing to demonstrate 1,000 multiplexed fixed holograms. Finally, we propose a noise model and an information theoretic metric to optimize the imaging system of a holographic memory, in terms of storage density and error rate. Motivated by the problem of interfacing sensors and memories to a complex system with limited computational resources, we construct a computer game of Desert Survival, built as a high-dimensional non-stationary virtual environment in a competitive setting. The efficacy of episodic learning, implemented as a reinforced Nearest Neighbor scheme, and the probability of winning against a control opponent improve significantly by concentrating the algorithmic effort to the virtual desert neighborhood that emerges as most significant at any time. The generalized computational model combines the autonomous neural network and von Neumann paradigms through a compact, dynamic central representation, which contains the most salient features

  10. The research of Digital Holographic Object Wave Field Reconstruction in Image and Object Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-Chang; PENG Zu-Jie; FU Yun-Chang

    2011-01-01

    @@ For conveniently detecting objects of different sizes using digital holography, usual measurements employ the object wave transformed by an optical system with different magnifications to fit charge coupled devices (CCDs), then the object field reconstruction involves the diffraction calculation of the optic wave passing through the optical system.We propose two methods to reconstruct the object field.The one is that, when the object is imaging in an image space in which we reconstruct the image of the object field, the object field can be expressed according to the object-image relationship.The other is that, when the object field reaching CCD is imaged in an object space in which we reconstruct the object field, the optical system is described by introducing matrix optics in this paper.The reconstruction formulae which easily use classic diffraction integral are derived.Finally, experimental verifications are also accomplished.%For conveniently detecting objects of different sizes using digital holography, usual measurements employ the object wave transformed by an optical system with different magnifications to fit charge coupled devices (CCDs), then the object Reid reconstruction involves the diffraction calculation of the optic wave passing through the optical system. We propose two methods to reconstruct the object field. The one is that, when the object is imaging in an image space in which we reconstruct the image of the object field, the object field can be expressed according to the object-image relationship. The other is that, when the object field reaching CCD is imaged in an object space in which we reconstruct the object field, the optical system is described by introducing matrix optics in this paper. The reconstruction formulae which easily use classic diffraction integral are derived. Finally, experimental verifications are also accomplished.

  11. Reconstruction of static line images with reduced speckle using interlaced holograms for holographic laser cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwihyeong; Park, Sangwoo; Jeon, Byoung Goo; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-07-01

    A hologram can be used for high-power laser processing applications such as cutting, drilling, patterning, or welding. However, not much progress has been made in cutting application compared to the others, because it requires optical reconstruction of static and uniform line images using holograms which have a high damage threshold. These static and uniform line images are difficult to be reconstructed with a single hologram, since they usually suffer from speckle between neighboring spots. We propose a method to reconstruct reduced-speckle static line images using two interlaced holograms which reconstruct odd and even pixel line images, corresponding to two orthogonal polarizations. Then, the two orthogonally polarized line images are superposed for interlacing in the image plane. The proposed method was studied by numerical simulations and demonstrated experimentally. The experimental results show that speckle contrast decreased by about one-third, compared to that of a non-interlaced hologram. This method can be applied also for complex-shaped images which include curved lines as well as straight lines, and we have a plan for laser cutting with this method in the near future.

  12. Visualizing aerosol-particle injection for diffractive-imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Awel, Salah; Eckerskorn, Niko; Wiedorn, Max; Horke, Daniel A; Rode, Andrei V; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N

    2015-01-01

    Delivering sub-micrometer particles to an intense x-ray focus is a crucial aspect of single-particle diffractive-imaging experiments at x-ray free-electron lasers. Enabling direct visualization of sub-micrometer aerosol particle streams without interfering with the operation of the particle injector can greatly improve the overall efficiency of single-particle imaging experiments by reducing the amount of time and sample consumed during measurements. We have developed in-situ non-destructive imaging diagnostics to aid real-time particle injector optimization and x-ray/particle-beam alignment, based on laser illumination schemes and fast imaging detectors. Our diagnostics are constructed to provide a non-invasive rapid feedback on injector performance during measurements, and have been demonstrated during diffraction measurements at the FLASH free-electron laser.

  13. Stochastic dual-plane on-axis digital holographic imaging on irregular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-10

    An imaging method based on dual-plane on-axis digital holography is proposed for the situation in which an object is on the irregular surface of a transparent medium. Light propagation of the object on the uneven surface of the medium is analyzed and simulated. The diffracted pattern of the object is deformed or destroyed by the refracted light of the medium. Dual-plane on-axis digital holography is used to eliminate the twin image. In order to retrieve the information lost in the reconstructed image due to destructive interference, the object is illuminated by a stochastic beam that is a speckle wave produced by a ground glass. Simulated and experimental results are presented, to demonstrate that the proposed method can be used for imaging on the irregular surface of a transparent medium.

  14. Human red blood cell recognition enhancement with three-dimensional morphological features obtained by digital holographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Moon, Inkyu

    2016-12-01

    The classification of erythrocytes plays an important role in the field of hematological diagnosis, specifically blood disorders. Since the biconcave shape of red blood cell (RBC) is altered during the different stages of hematological disorders, we believe that the three-dimensional (3-D) morphological features of erythrocyte provide better classification results than conventional two-dimensional (2-D) features. Therefore, we introduce a set of 3-D features related to the morphological and chemical properties of RBC profile and try to evaluate the discrimination power of these features against 2-D features with a neural network classifier. The 3-D features include erythrocyte surface area, volume, average cell thickness, sphericity index, sphericity coefficient and functionality factor, MCH and MCHSD, and two newly introduced features extracted from the ring section of RBC at the single-cell level. In contrast, the 2-D features are RBC projected surface area, perimeter, radius, elongation, and projected surface area to perimeter ratio. All features are obtained from images visualized by off-axis digital holographic microscopy with a numerical reconstruction algorithm, and four categories of biconcave (doughnut shape), flat-disc, stomatocyte, and echinospherocyte RBCs are interested. Our experimental results demonstrate that the 3-D features can be more useful in RBC classification than the 2-D features. Finally, we choose the best feature set of the 2-D and 3-D features by sequential forward feature selection technique, which yields better discrimination results. We believe that the final feature set evaluated with a neural network classification strategy can improve the RBC classification accuracy.

  15. Holographic microscopy in low coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelík, Radim; Petráček, Jiří; Slabá, Michala; Kollárová, Věra; Slabý, Tomáš; Čolláková, Jana; Komrska, Jiří; Dostál, Zbyněk.; Veselý, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Low coherence of the illumination substantially improves the quality of holographic and quantitative phase imaging (QPI) by elimination of the coherence noise and various artefacts and by improving the lateral resolution compared to the coherent holographic microscopy. Attributes of coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) designed and built as an off-axis holographic system allowing QPI within the range from complete coherent to incoherent illumination confirmed these expected advantages. Low coherence illumination also furnishes the coherence gating which constraints imaging of some spatial frequencies of an object axially thus forming an optical section in the wide sense. In this way the depth discrimination capability of the microscope is introduced at the price of restricting the axial interval of possible numerical refocusing. We describe theoretically these effects for the whole range of illumination coherence. We also show that the axial refocusing constraints can be overcome using advanced mode of imaging based on mutual lateral shift of reference and object image fields in CCHM. Lowering the spatial coherence of illumination means increasing its numerical aperture. We study how this change of the illumination geometry influences 3D objects QPI and especially the interpretation of live cells QPI in terms of the dry mass density measurement. In this way a strong dependence of the imaging process on the light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data including a chance of time-lapse watching of live cells even in optically turbid milieu.

  16. New holographic overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Anthony I.

    1991-10-01

    This paper discusses a new type of holographic overlay, FLASHPRINT, which may be used in both security and packaging applications. Unlike the more common embossed holograms currently used, FLASHPRINT leads to reduced set-up costs and offers a simpler process. This reduces the long lead times characteristic of the existing technology and requires the customer to provide only two-dimensional artwork. The overlay material contains a covert 2-D image. The image may be switched on or off by simply tilting the overlay in a light source. The overlay is replayed in the 'on' position to reveal the encoded security message as a highly saturated gold colored image. This effect is operable for a wide range of lighting conditions and viewing geometries. In the 'off' position the overlay is substantially transparent. These features make the visual effect of the overlay attractive to incorporate into product design. They may be laminated over complex printed artwork such as labels and security passes without masking the printed message. When switched 'on' the image appears both sharp and more than seven times brighter than white paper. The image remains sharp and clear even in less favorable lighting conditions. Although the technique offers a low set-up cost for the customer, through its simplicity, it remains as technically demanding and difficult to counterfeit as any holographic process.

  17. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  18. High-Resolution X-Ray Lensless Imaging by Differential Holographic Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Diling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Wu, Benny [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Scherz, Andreas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Acremann, Yves [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE); Tyliszczak, Tolek [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Fischer, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for X-ray Optics; Friedenberger, Nina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Ollefs, Katharina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Farle, Michael [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Fienup, James R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Stöhr, Joachim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    2010-07-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by split and- delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with state of-the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  19. Challenges and opportunities in image guided particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, M; Baroni, G

    2015-01-01

    The application of biomedical imaging and image processing to radiation therapy with accelerated particles has unique challenges. The potential of particle therapy to precisely tailor the dose distribution around the target volume needs to account for the intrinsic sensitivity to uncertainties in dose deposition. These peculiar features motivate the use of image guided methods to consistently verify the accuracy in dose delivery. Dedicated imaging and image processing methods are required, from treatment planning to treatment verification phases, in order to reduce the effects of uncertainties. The scenario is also complicated by the lack of standardized layouts of treatment bunkers, which implies the relatively increased use of custom solutions. Conversely, imaging can be applied to verify the actual delivered dose, representing a valuable opportunity to validate specific protocols and visualize the efficacy of the intended treatment. In this contribution, challenges and opportunities in image guided particle therapy are overviewed, with a clear focus on research perspectives in biomedical imaging and image processing.

  20. Moving through a multiplex holographic scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrongovius, Martina

    2013-02-01

    This paper explores how movement can be used as a compositional element in installations of multiplex holograms. My holographic images are created from montages of hand-held video and photo-sequences. These spatially dynamic compositions are visually complex but anchored to landmarks and hints of the capturing process - such as the appearance of the photographer's shadow - to establish a sense of connection to the holographic scene. Moving around in front of the hologram, the viewer animates the holographic scene. A perception of motion then results from the viewer's bodily awareness of physical motion and the visual reading of dynamics within the scene or movement of perspective through a virtual suggestion of space. By linking and transforming the physical motion of the viewer with the visual animation, the viewer's bodily awareness - including proprioception, balance and orientation - play into the holographic composition. How multiplex holography can be a tool for exploring coupled, cross-referenced and transformed perceptions of movement is demonstrated with a number of holographic image installations. Through this process I expanded my creative composition practice to consider how dynamic and spatial scenes can be conveyed through the fragmented view of a multiplex hologram. This body of work was developed through an installation art practice and was the basis of my recently completed doctoral thesis: 'The Emergent Holographic Scene — compositions of movement and affect using multiplex holographic images'.

  1. Cascaded Fresnel holographic image encryption scheme based on a constrained optimization algorithm and Henon map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yonggang; Tang, Chen; Chen, Xia; Li, Biyuan; Xu, Wenjun; Lei, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    We propose an image encryption scheme using chaotic phase masks and cascaded Fresnel transform holography based on a constrained optimization algorithm. In the proposed encryption scheme, the chaotic phase masks are generated by Henon map, and the initial conditions and parameters of Henon map serve as the main secret keys during the encryption and decryption process. With the help of multiple chaotic phase masks, the original image can be encrypted into the form of a hologram. The constrained optimization algorithm makes it possible to retrieve the original image from only single frame hologram. The use of chaotic phase masks makes the key management and transmission become very convenient. In addition, the geometric parameters of optical system serve as the additional keys, which can improve the security level of the proposed scheme. Comprehensive security analysis performed on the proposed encryption scheme demonstrates that the scheme has high resistance against various potential attacks. Moreover, the proposed encryption scheme can be used to encrypt video information. And simulations performed on a video in AVI format have also verified the feasibility of the scheme for video encryption.

  2. Wavefront printing technique with overlapping approach toward high definition holographic image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakunami, K.; Oi, R.; Senoh, T.; Sasaki, H.; Ichihashi, Y.; Yamamoto, K.

    2016-06-01

    A hologram recording technique, generally called as "wavefront printer", has been proposed by several research groups for static three-dimensional (3D) image printing. Because the pixel number of current spatial light modulators (SLMs) is not enough to reconstruct the entire wavefront in recording process, typically, hologram data is divided into a set of subhologram data and each wavefront is recorded sequentially as a small sub-hologram cell in tiling manner by using X-Y motorized stage. However since previous works of wavefront printer do not optimize the cell size, the reconstructed images were degraded by obtrusive split line due to visible cell size caused by too large cell size for human eyesight, or by diffraction effect due to discontinuity of phase distribution caused by too small cell size. In this paper, we introduce overlapping recording approach of sub-holograms to achieve both conditions: enough smallness of apparent cell size to make cells invisible and enough largeness of recording cell size to suppress diffraction effect by keeping the phase continuity of reconstructed wavefront. By considering observing condition and optimization of the amount of overlapping and cell size, in the experiment, the proposed approach showed higher quality 3D image reconstruction while the conventional approach suffered visible split lines and cells.

  3. Tracking of colloidal particles using microscopic image sequence analysis - Application to particulate microelectrophoresis and particle deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, PJ; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    A method for colloidal particle tracking in microscopic video image sequences is presented, based upon minimization of a matrix containing the distances between predicted and measured particle positions within a field of view. The software required for particle tracking can be easily implemented in

  4. Instrumentation for 2D and 3D Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry in Axial Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    This DURIP grant provided the instrumentation needed for measuring the flow structure and turbulence in axial turbomachines . The main components are... turbomachines and to use the data for addressing a series of turbulence modeling issues.

  5. Poor man's adaptive optics with high Strehl and low anisoplanatic effects: holographic imaging in crowded fields

    CERN Document Server

    Schoedel, R; Ghez, A; Girard, J H V; Labadie, L; Rebolo, R; Perez-Garrido, A

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm for speckle holography that is optimised for crowded fields. The key features of this algorithm are an iterative approach, the possibility to use several guide stars simultaneously, and cleaning of the instantaneous PSFs of the reference stars from faint secondary sources. High signal-to-noise and accuracy can in this way be reached on the PSFs extracted from the speckle frames. We find that relatively faint (K~12) reference stars are sufficient to reconstruct images with Strehl ratios. If the instrumental FOV is larger than the isoplanatic angle, then the algorithm can be used to reconstruct small sub-fields if the density of reference sources is sufficiently high. The reconstructed sub-images can then be combined to a final mosaic that is largely free of anisoplanatic effects. We have performed experiments with near-infrared and optical speckle data that show the excellent performance of the algorithm. A Strehl ratio of almost 20% was reached on I-band speckle data under average seei...

  6. Direct holographic imaging of ultrafast laser damage process in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaulys, Nerijus; Gallais, Laurent; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2014-04-01

    Dynamic process of femtosecond laser-induced damage formation in dielectric thin films is reconstructed from a series of time-resolved images. Ta2O5 single-layer coatings of four different thicknesses have been investigated in transmission mode by means of time-resolved off-axis digital holography. Different processes overlapped in time were found to occur; namely, the Kerr effect, free-electron generation, ultrafast lattice heating, and shockwave generation. The trends in contribution of these effects are qualitatively reproduced by numerical models based on electron-rate equations and Drude theory, which take into account transient changes in the films and interference effects of the pump and probe pulses.

  7. Study on direct measurement method of vorticity from particle images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaodong; FU Xin; YANG Huayong

    2007-01-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods for vorticity measurement,a new direct measurement of vorticity (DMV) method extracting vorticity from particle images was proposed.Based on the theory of fluid flow,two matched particle patterns were extracted from particle images in the DMV method.The pattern vorticity was determined from the average angular displacement of rotation between the two matched particle patterns.The method was applied on standard particle images,and was compared with the second and third order central finite difference methods.Results show that the accuracy of DMV method is independent of the spatial resolution of the sampling,and the uncertainty errors in the velocity measurement are not propagated into the vorticity.The method is applicable for measuring vorticity of a stronger rotational flow.The time interval of image sampling should be shortened to increase the measurement ranges for higher shearing distortion flows.

  8. Holographic codes

    CERN Document Server

    Latorre, Jose I

    2015-01-01

    There exists a remarkable four-qutrit state that carries absolute maximal entanglement in all its partitions. Employing this state, we construct a tensor network that delivers a holographic many body state, the H-code, where the physical properties of the boundary determine those of the bulk. This H-code is made of an even superposition of states whose relative Hamming distances are exponentially large with the size of the boundary. This property makes H-codes natural states for a quantum memory. H-codes exist on tori of definite sizes and get classified in three different sectors characterized by the sum of their qutrits on cycles wrapped through the boundaries of the system. We construct a parent Hamiltonian for the H-code which is highly non local and finally we compute the topological entanglement entropy of the H-code.

  9. Holographic SQUID

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a holographic model of the SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) composed of two Josephson junctions connected each other in a circle with the magnetic flux penetrating the circuit of the SQUID and the supercurrents flowing in both Josephson junction. The gravity in this paper is the Einstein-Maxwell-complex scalar field model on the four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black brane geometry in which one space direction is compactified into a circle, and we arrange the profile of the coefficient of the time component of the gauge field having the role for the chemical potential of the cooper pair. The magnetic flux is involved by the rewriting of the surface integral of the magnetic field to the contour integral of the gauge field.

  10. Test of high-angular-resolution X-ray photoelectron diffraction and holographic imaging for c(2 × 2)S on Ni(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, R. S.; Kaduwela, A. P.; Kim, Y. J.; Friedman, D. J.; Osterwalder, J.; Thevuthasan, S.; Fadley, C. S.

    1992-12-01

    We have obtained azimuthal X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) data with a high angular resolution of ± 1.5° for S2p emission from the well-defined surface structure of c(2 × 2)S on Ni(001). The relatively high position of the adsorbate with respect to the substrate makes this a stringent test case of the structural sensitivity of forward-scattering-dominated XPD. With this higher resolution, the data are nonetheless found to be sensitive to atomic structure, including in particular both the vertical height of S above Ni ( z) and the first-to-second layer Ni interplanar spacing ( d12). A single scattering cluster (SSC) theoretical analysis using R-factors to judge goodness of fit yields z = 1.39 ± 0.05 Å and d 12 = 1.86 ± 0.05 Å, in excellent agreement with other recent experimental and theoretical studies. This analysis also indicates that clusters of up to at least 25 Å in radius (200-250 atoms) are needed to accurately describe all of the diffraction fine structure observed; thus, although XPD is primarily a short-range order probe, high-resolution data provides sensitivity to order that may go out as far as 10-15 neighbor shells. For takeoff angles with respect to the surface of less than about 10°, multiple scattering effects appear to become more important, as verified by fully converged multiple scattering cluster (MSC) calculations; however, for takeoff angles larger than 10°, these effects fall away rapidly, making a single-scattering analysis of such data still a useful approach. Finally, we have analyzed our experimental data and SSC simulations of it using recently suggested Fourier-transform holographic inversion methods. Although our data are too limited to permit fully accurate holographic imaging, features associated with the nearest neighbor S atoms in the adsorbate overlayer are seen in both experimental and theoretical images. In addition, the theoretical calculations indicate that the atomic images can be improved if: the solid angle

  11. Numerical simulation of digital holographic microscopy through transparent samples based on pupil imaging and finite-difference time-domain methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadachi, Hirotaka; Saito, Takashi

    2013-04-20

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been used to determine the morphology and shape of transparent objects. However, the obtained shape is often inaccurate depending on the object properties and the setup of the optical imaging system. To understand these effects, we developed a new DHM model on the basis of a hybrid pupil imaging and finite-difference time-domain method. To demonstrate this model, we compared the results of an experiment with those of a simulation using borosilicate glass microspheres and a mold with a linear step structure. The simulation and experimental results showed good agreement. We also showed how the curvature and refractive index of objects affect the accuracy of thickness measurements.

  12. Holographic tachyon model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jingfei; ZHANG Xin; Liu, Hongya

    2007-01-01

    We propose in this Letter a holographic model of tachyon dark energy. A connection between the tachyon scalar-field and the holographic dark energy is established, and accordingly, the potential of the holographic tachyon field is constructed. We show that the holographic evolution of the universe with $c\\geqslant 1$ can be described completely by the resulting tachyon model in a certain way.

  13. Fuzzy entropy image segmentation based on particle Swarm optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linyi Li; Deren Li

    2008-01-01

    Partide swaFnl optimization is a stochastic global optimization algorithm that is based on swarm intelligence.Because of its excellent performance,particle swarm optimization is introduced into fuzzy entropy image segmentation to select the optimal fuzzy parameter combination and fuzzy threshold adaptively.In this study,the particles in the swarm are constructed and the swarm search strategy is proposed to meet the needs of the segmentation application.Then fuzzy entropy image segmentation based on particle swarm opti-mization is implemented and the proposed method obtains satisfactory results in the segmentation experiments.Compared with the exhaustive search method,particle swarm optimization can give the salne optimal fuzzy parameter combination and fuzzy threshold while needing less search time in the segmentation experiments and also has good search stability in the repeated experiments.Therefore,fuzzy entropy image segmentation based on particle swarm optimization is an efficient and promising segmentation method.

  14. Magnetic particle imaging an introduction to imaging principles and scanner instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Knopp, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    This is an overview of recent progress in magnetic particle imaging, which uses various static and oscillating magnetic fields and tracer materials made from iron oxide nanoparticles to perform background-free measurements of the particles' local concentration.

  15. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2014-09-22

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed.

  16. Study of Associated α Particle Imaging Technique for Explosives Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The explosive detecting technique about neutron mainly include the thermal neutron analysis (TNA), the fast neutron analysis (FNA), the pulse fast and thermal neutron analysis (PFTNA) and the associated α particle imaging technique about fast neutron (API).

  17. Ultrasound imaging for quantitative measurement of immersed plastic waste particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanaee, S.A.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging techniques are proposed for measuring the shape and thickness of immersed waste particles (10-20 mm size) using a linear sensor array from a fixed position. For these purposes both the front and back surface of a particle needs to be reconstructed. Raw ultrasound pulse-echo and pl

  18. Measurement of particle size based on digital imaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong; TANG Hong-wu; LIU Yun; WANG Hao; LIU Gui-ping

    2013-01-01

    To improve the analysis methods for the measurement of the sediment particle sizes with a wide distribution and of irregular shapes,a sediment particle image measurement,an analysis system,and an extraction algorithm of the optimal threshold based on the gray histogram peak values are proposed.Recording the pixels of the sediment particles by labeling them,the algorithm can effectively separate the sediment particle images from the background images using the equivalent pixel circles with the same diameters to represent the sediment particles.Compared with the laser analyzer for the case of blue plastic sands,the measurement results of the system are shown to be reasonably similar.The errors are mainly due to the small size of the particles and the limitation of the apparatus.The measurement accuracy can be improved by increasing the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD) camera resolution.The analysis method of the sediment particle images can provide a technical support for the rapid measurement of the sediment particle size and its distribution.

  19. Estimation of coal particle size distribution by image segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zelin; Yang Jianguo; Ding Lihua; Zhao Yuemin

    2012-01-01

    Several industrial coal processes are largely determined by the distribution of particle sizes in their feed.Currently these parameters are measured by manual sampling,which is time consuming and cannot provide real time feedback for automatic control purposes.In this paper,an approach using image segmentation on images of overlapped coal particles is described.The estimation of the particle size distribution by number is also described.The particle overlap problem was solved using image enhancement algorithms that converted those image parts representing material in lower layers to black.Exponential high-pass filter (EHPF) algorithms were used to remove the texture from particles on the surface.Finally,the edges of the surface particles were identified by morphological edge detection.These algorithms are described in detail as is the method of extracting the coal particle size.Tests indicate that using more coal images gives a higher accuracy estimate.The positive absolute error of 50 random tests was consistently less than 2.5% and the errors were reduced as the size of the fraction increased.

  20. Plenoptic Imaging for Three-Dimensional Particle Field Diagnostics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hall, Elise Munz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising emerging technology for single-camera, 3D diagnostics of particle fields. In this work, recent developments towards quantitative measurements of particle size, positions, and velocities are discussed. First, the technique is proven viable with measurements of the particle field generated by the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water. Next, well cont rolled experiments are used to verify diagnostic uncertainty. Finally, an example is presented of 3D plenoptic imaging of a laboratory scale, explosively generated fragment field.

  1. The traveltime holographic principle

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Y.

    2014-11-06

    Fermat\\'s interferometric principle is used to compute interior transmission traveltimes τpq from exterior transmission traveltimes τsp and τsq. Here, the exterior traveltimes are computed for sources s on a boundary B that encloses a volume V of interior points p and q. Once the exterior traveltimes are computed, no further ray tracing is needed to calculate the interior times τpq. Therefore this interferometric approach can be more efficient than explicitly computing interior traveltimes τpq by ray tracing. Moreover, the memory requirement of the traveltimes is reduced by one dimension, because the boundary B is of one fewer dimension than the volume V. An application of this approach is demonstrated with interbed multiple (IM) elimination. Here, the IMs in the observed data are predicted from the migration image and are subsequently removed by adaptive subtraction. This prediction is enabled by the knowledge of interior transmission traveltimes τpq computed according to Fermat\\'s interferometric principle. We denote this principle as the ‘traveltime holographic principle’, by analogy with the holographic principle in cosmology where information in a volume is encoded on the region\\'s boundary.

  2. Particle sizing in rocket motor studies utilizing hologram image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, David; Powers, John

    1987-01-01

    A technique of obtaining particle size information from holograms of combustion products is described. The holograms are obtained with a pulsed ruby laser through windows in a combustion chamber. The reconstruction is done with a krypton laser with the real image being viewed through a microscope. The particle size information is measured with a Quantimet 720 image processing system which can discriminate various features and perform measurements of the portions of interest in the image. Various problems that arise in the technique are discussed, especially those that are a consequence of the speckle due to the diffuse illumination used in the recording process.

  3. Digital image multiplexing/demultiplexing method using spatial spectral diffusion and virtual phase conjugation technique for reduction of dynamic range consumption in holographic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yuta; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Tomita, Akihisa

    2017-09-01

    The recording density in holographic data storage (HDS) systems is determined by the dynamic range of the recording medium. If a hologram is recorded with a small exposure, the consumption amount of the dynamic range per hologram is reduced, and the recording density can be improved. In this report, we propose a digital image multiplexing/demultiplexing method using spatial spectral diffusion and a virtual phase conjugation technique to reduce the consumption amount of the dynamic range in a recording medium. In our method, multiple signals are simultaneously recorded in a medium by multiplexing those signals using a beam combiner before recording, unlike the general multiplexing method of HDS. Then, each original signal can be reproduced independently by utilizing the property of a random diffuser and a phase-conjugated light. In the simulation, we confirmed that our method can improve the recording density because the consumption of the dynamic range is reduced.

  4. Removal of Atmospheric Particles in Poor Visibility Outdoor Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen Al-Zubaidy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The visibility of a scene is degraded by weather phenomena such as rain drizzle, fog and haze. The degradation of image scene is due the substantial presence of particles in the atmosphere that scatter and absorb light. As the light spreads from object to the observer, the color and intensity is changed by the atmospheric particles. In this research, we suggest new methods to precisely detect airlight and correctly estimate the atmospheric veil from image that captured in bad weather. The result of suggested methods will be used in scattering atmospheric model to remove atmospheric particles namely, rain drizzle, fog and haze from a single image. Therefore a higher visibility image will be produced.

  5. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  6. Lens-free imaging of magnetic particles in DNA assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Frederik; Vercruysse, Dries; Peeters, Sara; Liu, Chengxun; Stakenborg, Tim; Lagae, Liesbet; Del-Favero, Jurgen

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel opto-magnetic system for the fast and sensitive detection of nucleic acids. The system is based on a lens-free imaging approach resulting in a compact and cheap optical readout of surface hybridized DNA fragments. In our system magnetic particles are attracted towards the detection surface thereby completing the labeling step in less than 1 min. An optimized surface functionalization combined with magnetic manipulation was used to remove all nonspecifically bound magnetic particles from the detection surface. A lens-free image of the specifically bound magnetic particles on the detection surface was recorded by a CMOS imager. This recorded interference pattern was reconstructed in software, to represent the particle image at the focal distance, using little computational power. As a result we were able to detect DNA concentrations down to 10 pM with single particle sensitivity. The possibility of integrated sample preparation by manipulation of magnetic particles, combined with the cheap and highly compact lens-free detection makes our system an ideal candidate for point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  7. Development of Wavelet Image Compression Technique to Particle Image Velocimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiLi

    2000-01-01

    In order to reduce the noise in the images and the physical storage,the wavelet-based image compression technique was applied to PIV processing in this paper,To study the effect of the wavelet bases,the standard PIV images were compressed by some known wavelet families,Daubechies,Coifman and Baylkin families with various compression ratios.It was found that a higher order wavelet base provided good compression performance for compressing PIV images,The error analysis of velocity field obtained indicated that the high compression ratio even up to 64:1,can be realized without losing significant flow information in PIV processing.The wavelet compression technique of PIV was applied to the experimental images of jet flow and showed excellent performance,A reduced number of erroneous vectors can be realized by varying compression ratio.It can say that the wavelet image compression technique is very effective in PIV system.

  8. Shake-The-Box: Lagrangian particle tracking at high particle image densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, Daniel; Gesemann, Sebastian; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    A Lagrangian tracking method is introduced, which uses a prediction of the particle distribution for the subsequent time-step as a mean to seize the temporal domain. Errors introduced by the prediction process are corrected by an image matching technique (`shaking' the particle in space), followed by an iterative triangulation of particles newly entering the measurement domain. The scheme was termed `Shake-The-Box' and previously characterized as `4D-PTV' due to the strong interaction with the temporal dimension. Trajectories of tracer particles are identified at high spatial accuracy due to a nearly complete suppression of ghost particles; a temporal filtering scheme further improves on accuracy and allows for the extraction of local velocity and acceleration as derivatives of a continuous function. Exploiting the temporal information enables the processing of densely seeded flows (beyond 0.1 particles per pixel, ppp), which were previously reserved for tomographic PIV evaluations. While TOMO-PIV uses statistical means to evaluate the flow (building an `anonymous' voxel space with subsequent spatial averaging of the velocity information using correlation), the Shake-The-Box approach is able to identify and track individual particles at numbers of tens or even hundreds of thousands per time-step. The method is outlined in detail, followed by descriptions of applications to synthetic and experimental data. The synthetic data evaluation reveals that STB is able to capture virtually all true particles, while effectively suppressing the formation of ghost particles. For the examined four-camera set-up particle image densities N I up to 0.125 ppp could be processed. For noise-free images, the attained accuracy is very high. The addition of synthetic noise reduces usable particle image density ( N I ≤ 0.075 ppp for highly noisy images) and accuracy (still being significantly higher compared to tomographic reconstruction). The solutions remain virtually free of ghost

  9. Focal depth research of digital holographic reconstructed image%数字全息重建图像的焦深研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊昌

    2012-01-01

    将来自物体的散射光视为物体表面相位随机取值的大量点源发出光波的叠加,对数字全息重建像及离焦像的衍射场进行研究.基于重建像以像素为单位显示的特点,对焦深作出新的定义,然后,根据重建像的像素物理尺寸与计算方法相关的特点,推导出不同重建算法重建图像的焦深表达式,最后给出相关的实验证明.%Regarding the object scattering light as a superposition of light waves emitting from a lots of point sources on object surface of which phases have random values, in the paper, wee investigate the diffracted field of digital holographic reconstructed image and defocused image. The definition of depth of focal (DOF) is also given based on the feature that the reconstructed image is displayed in pixels. According to the characteristic that the physical dimensions of pixel are associated with computation method, focal depth expressions are deduced when image is reconstructed with different algorithms. Finally, experimental verification is given.

  10. 2D Detectors for Particle Physics and for Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H

    2005-01-01

    The demands on detectors for particle detection as well as for medical and astronomical X-ray imaging are continuously pushing the development of novel pixel detectors. The state of the art in pixel detector technology to date are hybrid pixel detectors in which sensor and read-out integrated circuits are processed on different substrates and connected via high density interconnect structures. While these detectors are technologically mastered such that large scale particle detectors can be and are being built, the demands for improved performance for the next generation particle detectors ask for the development of monolithic or semi-monolithic approaches. Given the fact that the demands for medical imaging are different in some key aspects, developments for these applications, which started as particle physics spin-off, are becomming rather independent. New approaches are leading to novel signal processing concepts and interconnect technologies to satisfy the need for very high dynamic range and large area ...

  11. Dual-frequency magnetic particle imaging of the Brownian particle contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Thilo; Kuhlmann, Christian; Draack, Sebastian; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging medical imaging modality based on the non-linear response of magnetic nanoparticles to an exciting magnetic field. MPI has been recognized as a fast imaging technique with high spatial resolution in the mm range. For some applications of MPI, especially in the field of functional imaging, the determination of the particle mobility (Brownian rotation) is of great interest, as it enables binding detection in MPI. It also enables quantitative imaging in the presence of Brownian-dominated particles, which is otherwise implausible. Discrimination of different particle responses in MPI is possible via the joint reconstruction approach. In this contribution, we propose a dual-frequency acquisition scheme to enhance sensitivity and contrast in the detection of different particle mobilities compared to a standard single-frequency MPI protocol. The method takes advantage of the fact, that the magnetization response of the tracer is strongly frequency-dependent, i.e. for low excitation frequencies a stronger Brownian contribution is observed.

  12. Digital compositing a full-color holographic animated stereogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Mark C.

    1995-02-01

    The paper addresses the use of hybrid cinematography, computer graphics, and electronic imaging to create a full color, animated, holographic stereogram for embossed replication. Several methods of stereoscopic techniques for pre-visualization of holographic stereogram subjects are discussed as well.

  13. Strongly Localized Image States of Spherical Graphitic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Gumbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the localization of charged particles by the image potential of spherical shells, such as fullerene buckyballs. These spherical image states exist within surface potentials formed by the competition between the attractive image potential and the repulsive centripetal force arising from the angular motion. The image potential has a power law rather than a logarithmic behavior. This leads to fundamental differences in the nature of the effective potential for the two geometries. Our calculations have shown that the captured charge is more strongly localized closest to the surface for fullerenes than for cylindrical nanotube.

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  15. Holographic entropy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-10-01

    The suspicion that gravity is holographic has been supported mainly by a variety of specific examples from string theory. In this paper, we propose that such a holography can actually be observed in the context of Einstein's gravity and at least a class of generalized gravitational theories, based on a definite holographic principle where neither is the bulk space-time required to be asymptotically AdS nor the boundary to be located at conformal infinity, echoing Wilson's formulation of quantum field theory. After showing the general equilibrium thermodynamics from the corresponding holographic dictionary, in particular, we provide a rather general proof of the equality between the entropy production on the boundary and the increase of black hole entropy in the bulk, which can be regarded as strong support to this holographic principle. The entropy production in the familiar holographic superconductors/superfluids is investigated as an important example, where the role played by the holographic renormalization is explained.

  16. Holographic Entropy Production

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hong-Bao

    2014-01-01

    The suspicion that gravity is holographic has been supported mainly by a variety of specific examples from string theory. In this paper, we propose that such a holography can actually be observed in the context of Einstein's gravity and at least a class of generalized gravitational theories, based on a definite holographic principle where neither is the bulk space-time required to be asymptotically AdS nor the boundary to be located at conformal infinity, echoing Wilson's formulation of quantum field theory. After showing the general equilibrium thermodynamics from the corresponding holographic dictionary, in particular, we provide a rather general proof of the equality between the entropy production on the boundary and the increase of black hole entropy in the bulk, which can be regarded as strong support to this holographic principle. The entropy production in the familiar holographic superconductors/superfluids is investigated as an important example, where the role played by the holographic renormalizatio...

  17. Image processing applied to measurement of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Fabio; Lasso, Willian; Torres, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Five different types of aggregates have been analyzed, and the size of particles on samples immersed in distilled water as silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, styrenes and crushed silica particles is made; an attempt at applying the digital image processing (DIP) technique to analyze the particle size, we developed a system of measures microparticles using a microscope, a CCD camera and acquisition software and video processing developed in MATLAB. These studies are combined with laser light using measurements by diffractometry and obtain calibration in the system implemented, in this work we achievement measurement particle size on the order of 4 to 6 micrometers. The study demonstrates that DIP is a fast, convenient, versatile, and accurate technique for particle size analysis; the limitations of implemented setup too will be discussed.

  18. Dual-camera system for high-speed imaging in particle image velocimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, K; Hara, T; Onogi, S; Mouri, H

    2012-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry is an important technique in experimental fluid mechanics, for which it has been essential to use a specialized high-speed camera. However, the high speed is at the expense of other performances of the camera, i.e., sensitivity and image resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the high-speed imaging is also possible with a pair of still cameras.

  19. Optical coherence tomography-based micro-particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Hammer, Daniel X; Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin; Legner, Hartmut

    2013-11-15

    We present a new application of optical coherence tomography (OCT), widely used in biomedical imaging, to flow analysis in near-wall hydrodynamics for marine research. This unique capability, called OCT micro-particle image velocimetry, provides a high-resolution view of microscopic flow phenomena and measurement of flow statistics within the first millimeter of a boundary layer. The technique is demonstrated in a small flow cuvette and in a water tunnel.

  20. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to

  1. Investigation and visualization of internal flow through particle aggregates and microbial flocs using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Lam, Kit Ming; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-05-01

    An advanced particle-tracking and flow-visualization technology, particle image velocimetry (PIV), was utilized to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of large aggregates in water. The laser-based PIV system was used together with a settling column to capture the streamlines around two types of aggregates: latex particle aggregates and activated sludge (AS) flocs. Both types of the aggregates were highly porous and fractal with fractal dimensions of 2.13±0.31 for the latex particle aggregates (1210-2144 μm) and 1.78±0.24 for the AS flocs (1265-3737 μm). The results show that PIV is a powerful flow visualization technique capable of determining flow field details at the micrometer scale around and through settling aggregates and flocs. The PIV streamlines provided direct experimental proof of internal flow through the aggregate interiors. According to the PIV images, fluid collection efficiency ranged from 0.052 to 0.174 for the latex particle aggregates and from 0.008 to 0.126 for AS flocs. AS flocs are apparently less permeable than the particle aggregates, probably due to the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) produced by bacteria clogging the pores within the flocs. The internal permeation of fractal aggregates and bio-flocs would enhance flocculation between particles and material transport into the aggregates.

  2. Fabrication Technique of Holographic Sight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ling; LIU Shou; ZHANG Xiang-su

    2005-01-01

    There are several types of sights used for small arms. All of them have advantages and disadvantages. A new type of sight-holographic sight-is introduced in the paper, with the emphasis on the fabrication technique of the hologram which is the most important part in the sight. A Gaussian dot and a reticle pattern are recorded in the hologram. When illuminated by a laser diode, the virtual images of the dot and the reticle pattern for aiming are observed through the hologram. Compared with other sights, the holographic sight provides quicker, more accurate and covert aiming at moving targets, particularly in close quarter combat situations. It significantly improves the capability of small arms used in close quarter fighting in all weathers.

  3. Magnetic particle imaging: from proof of principle to preclinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, T.; Gdaniec, N.; Möddel, M.

    2017-07-01

    Tomographic imaging has become a mandatory tool for the diagnosis of a majority of diseases in clinical routine. Since each method has its pros and cons, a variety of them is regularly used in clinics to satisfy all application needs. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a relatively new tomographic imaging technique that images magnetic nanoparticles with a high spatiotemporal resolution in a quantitative way, and in turn is highly suited for vascular and targeted imaging. MPI was introduced in 2005 and now enters the preclinical research phase, where medical researchers get access to this new technology and exploit its potential under physiological conditions. Within this paper, we review the development of MPI since its introduction in 2005. Besides an in-depth description of the basic principles, we provide detailed discussions on imaging sequences, reconstruction algorithms, scanner instrumentation and potential medical applications.

  4. Chromatically Corrected Imaging Systems for Charged-Particle Radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Blind, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    In proton radiography, imaging with systems consisting of quadrupole magnets is an established technique for viewing the material distribution and composition of objects, either statically or during fast events such as explosions. With the most favorable magnet configuration, the -I lens, chromatic aberrations generally dominate the image blur. Image resolution can be improved, and largely decoupled from the input-beam parameters, by using a second-order achromatic bend with some additional higher-order aberration correction. The aberration-correction approach is discussed. For a given resolution, such a bend allows use of much lower-energy imaging particles than a -I lens. Each bend design represents a set of equivalent systems; an 800-MeV proton design and its equivalent 40-MeV electron system are presented. The electron system is useful for imaging small objects. Magnet errors in the achromatic bends must be tightly controlled to preserve image quality, but not beyond feasibility of present technology. Sys...

  5. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NOνA”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  6. Systematic Error of Acoustic Particle Image Velocimetry and Its Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickiewicz Witold

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry is getting more and more often the method of choice not only for visualization of turbulent mass flows in fluid mechanics, but also in linear and non-linear acoustics for non-intrusive visualization of acoustic particle velocity. Particle Image Velocimetry with low sampling rate (about 15Hz can be applied to visualize the acoustic field using the acquisition synchronized to the excitation signal. Such phase-locked PIV technique is described and used in experiments presented in the paper. The main goal of research was to propose a model of PIV systematic error due to non-zero time interval between acquisitions of two images of the examined sound field seeded with tracer particles, what affects the measurement of complex acoustic signals. Usefulness of the presented model is confirmed experimentally. The correction procedure, based on the proposed model, applied to measurement data increases the accuracy of acoustic particle velocity field visualization and creates new possibilities in observation of sound fields excited with multi-tonal or band-limited noise signals.

  7. Advances in Time-Resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis details advanced developments in 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) based on the tomographic PIV technique, with an emphasis on time-resolved experiments. Tomographic PIV is a technique introduced in 2006 to measure the flow velocity in a three-dimensional volume. When measurements are

  8. Counter Rotating Open Rotor Animation using Particle Image Velocimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Roosenboom, E W M; Geisler, R; Pallek, D; Agocs, J; Neitzke, K -P

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the two accompanying fluid dynamics videos for the "Counter rotating open rotor flow field investigation using stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry" presented at the 64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics in Baltimore, Maryland, November 20-22, 2011.

  9. Peak-locking reduction for particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Dirk; Neal, Douglas R.; Wieneke, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    A parametric study of the factors contributing to peak-locking, a known bias error source in particle image velocimetry (PIV), is conducted using synthetic data that are processed with a state-of-the-art PIV algorithm. The investigated parameters include: particle image diameter, image interpolation techniques, the effect of asymmetric versus symmetric window deformation, number of passes and the interrogation window size. Some of these parameters are found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of the peak-locking error. The effects for specific PIV cameras are also studied experimentally using a precision turntable to generate a known rotating velocity field. Image time series recorded using this experiment show a linear range of pixel and sub-pixel shifts ranging from 0 to  ±4 pixels. Deviations in the constant vorticity field (ω z ) reveal how peak-locking can be affected systematically both by varying parameters of the detection system such as the focal distance and f-number, and also by varying the settings of the PIV analysis. A new a priori technique for reducing the bias errors associated with peak-locking in PIV is introduced using an optical diffuser to avoid undersampled particle images during the recording of the raw images. This technique is evaluated against other a priori approaches using experimental data and is shown to perform favorably. Finally, a new a posteriori anti peak-locking filter (APLF) is developed and investigated, which shows promising results for both synthetic data and real measurements for very small particle image sizes.

  10. Three-dimensional microscopic light field particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Belden, Jesse; Ni, Rui; Pendlebury, Jonathon; McEwen, Bryce

    2017-03-01

    A microscopic particle image velocimetry (μ {PIV}) technique is developed based on light field microscopy and is applied to flow through a microchannel containing a backward-facing step. The only hardware difference from a conventional μPIV setup is the placement of a microlens array at the intermediate image plane of the microscope. The method combines this optical hardware alteration with post-capture computation to enable 3D reconstruction of particle fields. From these particle fields, we measure three-component velocity fields, but find that accurate velocity measurements are limited to the two in-plane components at discrete depths through the volume (i.e., 2C-3D). Results are compared with a computational fluid dynamics simulation.

  11. Holographic Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G.

    For the last two decades adaptive optics has been used as a technique for correcting imaging applications and directed energy/laser targeting and laser communications systems affected by atmospheric turbulence. Typically these systems are bulky and limited to system with the potential to operate at speeds of MHz. The system utilizes a hologram to perform an all-optical wavefront analysis that removes the need for any computer. Finally, the sensing is made on a modal basis so it is largely insensitive to scintillation and obscuration. We have constructed a prototype device and will present experimental results from our research. The holographic adaptive optics system begins with the creation of a multiplexed hologram. This hologram is created by recording the maximum and minimum response functions of every actuator in the deformable mirror against a unique focused reference beam. When a wavefront of some arbitrary phase is incident on the processed hologram, a number of focal spots are created -- one pair for each actuator in the DM. The absolute phase error at each particular actuator location is simply related to the ratio of the intensity of each pair of spots. In this way we can use an array of photodetectors to give a direct readout of phase error without the need for any calculations. The advantages of holographic adaptive optics are many. To begin with, the measurement of phase error is made all optically, so the wavefront sensor directly controls the actuators in the DM without any computers. Using fast, photon counting photodetectors allows for closed loop correction limited only by the speed of the deformable mirror which in the case of MEMS devices can be 100 kHz or more. All this can be achieved in an extremely compact and lightweight package making it perfectly suited to applications such as UAV surveillance imagery and free space optical communications systems. Lastly, since the correction is made on a modal basis instead of zonal, it is virtually

  12. 3D IMAGING OF INDIVIDUAL PARTICLES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pirard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, impressive progress has been made in digital imaging and in particular in three dimensional visualisation and analysis of objects. This paper reviews the most recent literature on three dimensional imaging with a special attention to particulate systems analysis. After an introduction recalling some important concepts in spatial sampling and digital imaging, the paper reviews a series of techniques with a clear distinction between the surfometric and volumetric principles. The literature review is as broad as possible covering materials science as well as biology while keeping an eye on emerging technologies in optics and physics. The paper should be of interest to any scientist trying to picture particles in 3D with the best possible resolution for accurate size and shape estimation. Though techniques are adequate for nanoscopic and microscopic particles, no special size limit has been considered while compiling the review.

  13. Application of Particle Image Velocimetry Technology in Water Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A display and analysis system for hermetical flow field in water tunnel is developed based on the particle image velocimetry(PIV) technology. It consists of some subsystems, such as lamp-house, imaging, image processing and analyzing, control and particles putting. Taking the flow fields around a sphere and a cylinder model as an example under higher Renolds number 5.8 × 105 in water tunnel, we inquired into the application of the system to water tunnel experiment by cross correlation algorithm. The measure error is less than 2 %. The test results show that the developed system can measure and display the flow field accurately in complex flow field without touching and disturbing. The research work indicates that PIV has lots of potential applications in the underwater flow field measurement.

  14. Holographic non-Fermi-liquid fixed points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Tom; Iqbal, Nabil; Liu, Hong; McGreevy, John; Vegh, David

    2011-04-28

    Techniques arising from string theory can be used to study assemblies of strongly interacting fermions. Via this 'holographic duality', various strongly coupled many-body systems are solved using an auxiliary theory of gravity. Simple holographic realizations of finite density exhibit single-particle spectral functions with sharp Fermi surfaces, of a form distinct from those of the Landau theory. The self-energy is given by a correlation function in an infrared (IR) fixed-point theory that is represented by a two-dimensional anti de Sitter space (AdS(2)) region in the dual gravitational description. Here, we describe in detail the gravity calculation of this IR correlation function.

  15. Sequences for real-time magnetic particle imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI is a new imaging modality with the potential to be a new medical tool for angiographic diagnostics. It is capable of visualizing the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic nanoparticles in high temporal and spatial resolution. Furthermore, the new spatial encoding scheme of a field free line (FFL promises a ten-fold higher sensitivity. So far, all know imaging devices featuring this new technique feature slow data acquisition and thus, are far away from real-time imaging capability. An actual real-time approach requires a complex field generator and an application of currents with very precise amplitude and phase. Here, we present the first implementation and calibration of a dynamic FFL field sequence enabling the acquisition of 50 MPI images per second in a mouse sized scanner.

  16. Holographic scalar mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Nicotri, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    A holographic description of scalar mesons is presented, in which two- and three-point functions are holographically reconstructed. Mass spectrum, decay constants, eigenfunctions and the coupling of the scalar states with two pseu- doscalars are found. A comparison of the results with current phenomenology is discussed.

  17. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Improvements in laser flare removal for particle image velocimetry using fluorescent dye-doped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosky, B. J.; Lowe, K. T.; Danehy, P. M.; Wohl, C. J.; Tiemsin, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    Laser flare, or scattering of laser light from a surface, can often be a major issue in particle image velocimetry (PIV) involving solid boundaries in the flow or a gas-liquid interface. The use of fluorescent light from dye-doped particles has been demonstrated in water applications, but reproducing the technique in an airflow is more difficult due to particle size constraints and safety concerns. The following work presents fluorescent Kiton Red 620 (KR620)-doped polystyrene latex microspheres as a solution to this issue. The particles are small and narrowly distributed, with a mean diameter of 0.87 μ \\text{m} and diameter distribution standard deviation of 0.30 μ \\text{m} . Furthermore, the KR620 dye exhibits much lower toxicity than other common fluorescent dyes, and would be safe to use in large flow facilities. The fluorescent signal from the particles is measured on average to be 320  ±  10 times weaker than the Mie scattering signal from the particles. This reduction in signal is counterbalanced by greatly enhanced contrast via optical rejection of the incident laser wavelength. Fluorescent PIV with these particles is shown to eliminate laser flare near surfaces, allowing for velocity measurements as close as 100 μ \\text{m} to the surface. In one case, fluorescent PIV led to velocity vector validation rates more than 20 times that of the Mie scattering results in the boundary layer region of an angled surface.

  19. Application of particle image velocimetry to dusty plasma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2016-06-01

    > Particle image velocimetry is a fluid measurement technique that has been used for more than 20 years to characterize the particle transport and thermal state of dusty plasma systems. This manuscript provides an overview of this diagnostic technique, highlighting the strengths and limitations that are associated with its use. Additionally, the variations of this technique that have been applied in the study of dusty plasma systems will be discussed, along with a small selection of measurements that can be made with the technique. Potential future directions for this diagnostic tool within the dusty plasma community will also be discussed.

  20. Image segmentation and particles classification using texture analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayar Aly Atteya

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ingredients of oily fish include a large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are important elements in various metabolic processes of humans, and have also been used to prevent diseases. However, in an attempt to reduce cost, recent developments are starting a replace the ingredients of fish oil with products of microalgae, that also produce polyunsaturated fatty acids. To do so, it is important to closely monitor morphological changes in algae cells and monitor their age in order to achieve the best results. This paper aims to describe an advanced vision-based system to automatically detect, classify, and track the organic cells using a recently developed SOPAT-System (Smart On-line Particle Analysis Technology, a photo-optical image acquisition device combined with innovative image analysis software. Methods The proposed method includes image de-noising, binarization and Enhancement, as well as object recognition, localization and classification based on the analysis of particles’ size and texture. Results The methods allowed for correctly computing cell’s size for each particle separately. By computing an area histogram for the input images (1h, 18h, and 42h, the variation could be observed showing a clear increase in cell. Conclusion The proposed method allows for algae particles to be correctly identified with accuracies up to 99% and classified correctly with accuracies up to 100%.

  1. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  2. Symmetric Phase-Only Filtering in Particle-Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemet, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Symmetrical phase-only filtering (SPOF) can be exploited to obtain substantial improvements in the results of data processing in particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In comparison with traditional PIV data processing, SPOF PIV data processing yields narrower and larger amplitude correlation peaks, thereby providing more-accurate velocity estimates. The higher signal-to-noise ratios associated with the higher amplitude correlation peaks afford greater robustness and reliability of processing. SPOF also affords superior performance in the presence of surface flare light and/or background light. SPOF algorithms can readily be incorporated into pre-existing algorithms used to process digitized image data in PIV, without significantly increasing processing times. A summary of PIV and traditional PIV data processing is prerequisite to a meaningful description of SPOF PIV processing. In PIV, a pulsed laser is used to illuminate a substantially planar region of a flowing fluid in which particles are entrained. An electronic camera records digital images of the particles at two instants of time. The components of velocity of the fluid in the illuminated plane can be obtained by determining the displacements of particles between the two illumination pulses. The objective in PIV data processing is to compute the particle displacements from the digital image data. In traditional PIV data processing, to which the present innovation applies, the two images are divided into a grid of subregions and the displacements determined from cross-correlations between the corresponding sub-regions in the first and second images. The cross-correlation process begins with the calculation of the Fourier transforms (or fast Fourier transforms) of the subregion portions of the images. The Fourier transforms from the corresponding subregions are multiplied, and this product is inverse Fourier transformed, yielding the cross-correlation intensity distribution. The average displacement of the

  3. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  4. Design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging (MPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yimeng; Lai, Pui To; Leung, Cheung Hoi; Pong, Philip W T

    2013-09-11

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technique producing quantitative images of the distribution of tracer materials (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) without interference from the anatomical background of the imaging objects (either phantoms or lab animals). Theoretically, the MPI platform can image with relatively high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. In practice, the quality of the MPI images hinges on both the applied magnetic field and the properties of the tracer nanoparticles. Langevin theory can model the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and predict the crucial influence of nanoparticle core size on the MPI signal. In addition, the core size distribution, anisotropy of the magnetic core and surface modification of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles also determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the MPI images. As a result, through rational design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the performance of MPI could be effectively optimized. In this review, the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in MPI is investigated. Rational synthesis and modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and summarized. The potential medical application areas for MPI, including cardiovascular system, oncology, stem cell tracking and immune related imaging are also analyzed and forecasted.

  5. Application of particle filtering algorithm in image reconstruction of EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Xu

    2015-07-01

    To improve the image quality of electromagnetic tomography (EMT), a new image reconstruction method of EMT based on a particle filtering algorithm is presented. Firstly, the principle of image reconstruction of EMT is analyzed. Then the search process for the optimal solution for image reconstruction of EMT is described as a system state estimation process, and the state space model is established. Secondly, to obtain the minimum variance estimation of image reconstruction, the optimal weights of random samples obtained from the state space are calculated from the measured information. Finally, simulation experiments with five different flow regimes are performed. The experimental results have shown that the average image error of reconstruction results obtained by the method mentioned in this paper is 42.61%, and the average correlation coefficient with the original image is 0.8706, which are much better than corresponding indicators obtained by LBP, Landweber and Kalman Filter algorithms. So, this EMT image reconstruction method has high efficiency and accuracy, and provides a new method and means for EMT research.

  6. Research on copying system of dynamic multiplex holographic stereograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huaiping; Yang, Hong; Zheng, Tong

    2003-05-01

    The most important advantage of holographic stereograms over conventional hologram is that they can produce 3D images at any desired scale with movement, holographers in many countries involved in the studies towards it. We began our works in the early 80's and accomplished two research projects automatic system for making synthetic holograms and multiplex synthetic rainbow holograms, Based on these works, a large scale holographic stereogram of an animated goldfish was made by us for practical advertisement. In order to meet the needs of the market, a copying system for making multiplex holographic stereograms, and a special kind of silver halide holographic film developed by us recently. The characteristic of the copying system and the property of the special silver-halide emulsion are introduced in this paper.

  7. Full Color Holographic Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanlou, A.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Mirlis, E.; Crosby, P.; Shore, A.; Henderson, P.; Napier, P.

    2013-02-01

    The ability to produce color holograms from the human tissue represents a major medical advance, specifically in the areas of diagnosis and teaching. This has been achieved at Glyndwr University. In corporation with partners at Gooch & Housego, Moor Instruments, Vivid Components and peninsula medical school, Exeter, UK, for the first time, we have produced full color holograms of human cell samples in which the cell boundary and the nuclei inside the cells could be clearly focused at different depths - something impossible with a two-dimensional photographic image. This was the main objective set by the peninsula medical school at Exeter, UK. Achieving this objective means that clinically useful images essentially indistinguishable from the object human cells could be routinely recorded. This could potentially be done at the tip of a holo-endoscopic probe inside the body. Optimised recording exposure and development processes for the holograms were defined for bulk exposures. This included the optimisation of in-house recording emulsions for coating evaluation onto polymer substrates (rather than glass plates), a key step for large volume commercial exploitation. At Glyndwr University, we also developed a new version of our in-house holographic (world-leading resolution) emulsion.

  8. Relaxation-based viscosity mapping for magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkur, M.; Muslu, Y.; Saritas, E. U.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been shown to provide remarkable contrast for imaging applications such as angiography, stem cell tracking, and cancer imaging. Recently, there is growing interest in the functional imaging capabilities of MPI, where ‘color MPI’ techniques have explored separating different nanoparticles, which could potentially be used to distinguish nanoparticles in different states or environments. Viscosity mapping is a promising functional imaging application for MPI, as increased viscosity levels in vivo have been associated with numerous diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In this work, we propose a viscosity mapping technique for MPI through the estimation of the relaxation time constant of the nanoparticles. Importantly, the proposed time constant estimation scheme does not require any prior information regarding the nanoparticles. We validate this method with extensive experiments in an in-house magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) setup at four different frequencies (between 250 Hz and 10.8 kHz) and at three different field strengths (between 5 mT and 15 mT) for viscosities ranging between 0.89 mPa · s-15.33 mPa · s. Our results demonstrate the viscosity mapping ability of MPI in the biologically relevant viscosity range.

  9. 2D IMAGE BASED SIEVING FOR PARTICLE AGGREGATE GRADATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ken; John Zaniewski; Zhao Pan; Yang Ren'er

    2008-01-01

    Acquiring the size gradation for particle aggregates is a common practice in the granule related industry, and mechanical sieving or screening has been the normal method. Among many drawbacks of this conventional means, the major ones are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and being unable to provide real-time feedback for process control. In this letter, an optical sieving approach is introduced. The two-dimensional images are used to develop methods for inferring particle volume and sieving behavior for gradation purposes. And a combination of deterministic and probabilistic methods is described to predict the sieving behaviors of the particles and to construct the gradation curves for the aggregate sample. Comparison of the optical sieving with standard mechanical sieving shows good correlation.

  10. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  11. Angular multiplexing holograms of four images recorded on photopolymer films with recording-film-thickness-dependent holographic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osabe, Keiichi; Kawai, Kotaro

    2017-03-01

    In this study, angular multiplexing hologram recording photopolymer films were studied experimentally. The films contained acrylamide as a monomer, eosin Y as a sensitizer, and triethanolamine as a promoter in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix. In order to determine the appropriate thickness of the photopolymer films for angular multiplexing, photopolymer films with thicknesses of 29-503 μm were exposed to two intersecting beams of a YVO laser at a wavelength of 532 nm to form a holographic grating with a spatial frequency of 653 line/mm. The diffraction efficiencies as a function of the incident angle of reconstruction were measured. A narrow angular bandwidth and high diffraction efficiency are required for angular multiplexing; hence, we define the Q value, which is the diffraction efficiency divided by half the bandwidth. The Q value of the films depended on the thickness of the films, and was calculated based on the measured diffraction efficiencies. The Q value of a 297-μm-thick film was the highest of the all films. Therefore, the angular multiplexing experiments were conducted using 300-μm-thick films. In the angular multiplexing experiments, the object beam transmitted by a square aperture was focused by a Fourier transform lens and interfered with a reference beam. The maximum order of angular multiplexing was four. The signal intensity that corresponds to the squared-aperture transmission and the noise intensity that corresponds to transmission without the square aperture were measured. The signal intensities decreased as the order of angular multiplexing increased, and the noise intensities were not dependent on the order of angular multiplexing.

  12. Inflation via logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darabi, F.; Felegary, F. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Setare, M.R. [University of Kurdistan, Department of Science, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We study the inflation in terms of the logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy (LECHDE) model with future event horizon, particle horizon, and Hubble horizon cut-offs, and we compare the results with those obtained in the study of inflation by the holographic dark energy HDE model. In comparison, the spectrum of primordial scalar power spectrum in the LECHDE model becomes redder than the spectrum in the HDE model. Moreover, the consistency with the observational data in the LECHDE model of inflation constrains the reheating temperature and Hubble parameter by one parameter of holographic dark energy and two new parameters of logarithmic corrections. (orig.)

  13. Inflation via logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy model

    CERN Document Server

    Darabi, F; Setare, M R

    2016-01-01

    We study the inflation via logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy LECHDE model with future event horizon, particle horizon and Hubble horizon cut-offs, and compare the results with those of obtained in the study of inflation by holographic dark energy HDE model. In comparison, the spectrum of primordial scalar power spectrum in the LECHDE model becomes redder than the spectrum in HDE model. Moreover, the consistency with the observational data in LECHDE model of inflation, constrains the reheating temperature and Hubble parameter by one parameter of holographic dark energy and two new parameters of logarithmic corrections.

  14. Real-time image processing for particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizer, Mark; Ratner, David; Liberzon, Alex

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel high-speed particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) experimental system. Its novelty is due to the FPGA-based, real-time image processing "on camera". Instead of an image, the camera transfers to the computer using a network card, only the relevant information of the identified flow tracers. Therefore, the system is ideal for the remote particle tracking systems in research and industrial applications, while the camera can be controlled and data can be transferred over any high-bandwidth network. We present the hardware and the open source software aspects of the PTV experiments. The tracking results of the new experimental system has been compared to the flow visualization and particle image velocimetry measurements. The canonical flow in the central cross section of a a cubic cavity (1:1:1 aspect ratio) in our lid-driven cavity apparatus is used for validation purposes. The downstream secondary eddy (DSE) is the sensitive portion of this flow and its size was measured with increasing Reynolds number (via increasing belt velocity). The size of DSE estimated from the flow visualization, PIV and compressed PTV is shown to agree within the experimental uncertainty of the methods applied.

  15. Three-dimensional illumination system for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fen; Song, Yang; Qu, Xiangju; Ji, Yunjing; Li, Zhenhua; He, Anzhi

    2016-10-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) is a new developed technique for three-component threedimensional (3C-3D) velocity measurement of the flow field based on the optical tomographic reconstruction method, and has been received extensive attention of the related industries. Three-dimensional light source illuminating the tracer particles of flow field is a critical application for tomographic particle image velocimetry. Three-dimensional light source not only determines the size of measurement volume and the range of the scope of application, but also has a great influence on the image quality. In this work, we propose a rectangular light amplification system using powell lens, prisms and two reflectors. The system can be optimized if given the system parameters based on the theoretical model. The rectangular light amplification system will be verified experimentally by measuring the cross section size of the illuminated light source. A 60mm×25mm cross section of rectangular three-dimensional light source can be obtained by using the rectangular light amplification system. The experiments demonstrate the the feasibility the proposed system.

  16. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  17. Separation method of heavy-ion particle image from gamma-ray mixed images using an imaging plate

    CERN Document Server

    Yamadera, A; Ohuchi, H; Nakamura, T; Fukumura, A

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a separation method of alpha-ray and gamma-ray images using the imaging plate (IP). The IP from which the first image was read out by an image reader was annealed at 50 deg. C for 2 h in a drying oven and the second image was read out by the image reader. It was found out that an annealing ratio, k, which is defined as a ratio of the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) density at the first measurement to that at the second measurement, was different for alpha rays and gamma rays. By subtracting the second image multiplied by a factor of k from the first image, the alpha-ray image was separated from the alpha and gamma-ray mixed images. This method was applied to identify the images of helium, carbon and neon particles of high energies using the heavy-ion medical accelerator, HIMAC. (author)

  18. Holographic Quantum Entanglement Negativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sengupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    We propose a holographic prescription to compute the entanglement negativity for conformal field theories at finite temperatures which exactly reproduces the entanglement negativity for (1+1)- dimensional conformal field theories at finite temperatures dual to (2+1)- dimensional bulk Euclidean BTZ black holes. We observe that the holographic entanglement negativity captures the distillable pure quantum entanglement and is related to the holographic mutual information. The application of our prescription to higher dimensional conformal field theories at finite temperatures within a $AdS_{d+1}/CFT_{d}$ scenario involving dual bulk $AdS$-Schwarzschild black holes is discussed to elucidate the universality of our conjecture.

  19. The fundamentals of imaging from particles to galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Woolfson, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    It is through images that we understand the form and function of material objects, from the fundamental particles that are the constituents of matter to galaxies that are the constituents of the Universe. Imaging must be thought of in a flexible way as varying from just the detection of objects — a blip on a screen representing an aircraft or a vapour trail representing the passage of an exotic particle — to displaying the fine detail in the eye of an insect or the arrangement of atoms within or on the surface of a solid. The range of imaging tools, both in the type of wave phenomena used and in the devices that utilize them, is vast. This book will illustrate this range, with wave phenomena covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum and ultrasound, and devices that vary from those that just detect the presence of objects to those that image objects in exquisite detail. The word ‘fundamentals’ in the title has meaning for this book. There will be no attempt to delve into the fine technical details ...

  20. High-speed particle image velocimetry near surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker

    2013-06-24

    Multi-dimensional and transient flows play a key role in many areas of science, engineering, and health sciences but are often not well understood. The complex nature of these flows may be studied using particle image velocimetry (PIV), a laser-based imaging technique for optically accessible flows. Though many forms of PIV exist that extend the technique beyond the original planar two-component velocity measurement capabilities, the basic PIV system consists of a light source (laser), a camera, tracer particles, and analysis algorithms. The imaging and recording parameters, the light source, and the algorithms are adjusted to optimize the recording for the flow of interest and obtain valid velocity data. Common PIV investigations measure two-component velocities in a plane at a few frames per second. However, recent developments in instrumentation have facilitated high-frame rate (>1 kHz) measurements capable of resolving transient flows with high temporal resolution. Therefore, high-frame rate measurements have enabled investigations on the evolution of the structure and dynamics of highly transient flows. These investigations play a critical role in understanding the fundamental physics of complex flows. A detailed description for performing high-resolution, high-speed planar PIV to study a transient flow near the surface of a flat plate is presented here. Details for adjusting the parameter constraints such as image and recording properties, the laser sheet properties, and processing algorithms to adapt PIV for any flow of interest are included.

  1. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  2. Review of Random Phase Encoding in Volume Holographic Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chia Su

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Random phase encoding is a unique technique for volume hologram which can be applied to various applications such as holographic multiplexing storage, image encryption, and optical sensing. In this review article, we first review and discuss diffraction selectivity of random phase encoding in volume holograms, which is the most important parameter related to multiplexing capacity of volume holographic storage. We then review an image encryption system based on random phase encoding. The alignment of phase key for decryption of the encoded image stored in holographic memory is analyzed and discussed. In the latter part of the review, an all-optical sensing system implemented by random phase encoding and holographic interconnection is presented.

  3. Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotopoulos N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos,1 Robert L Duschka,1 Mandy Ahlborg,2 Gael Bringout,2 Christina Debbeler,2 Matthias Graeser,2 Christian Kaethner,2 Kerstin Lüdtke-Buzug,2 Hanne Medimagh,2 Jan Stelzner,2 Thorsten M Buzug,2 Jörg Barkhausen,1 Florian M Vogt,1 Julian Haegele1 1Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Lübeck, 2Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany Abstract: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI is a novel imaging method that was first proposed by Gleich and Weizenecker in 2005. Applying static and dynamic magnetic fields, MPI exploits the unique characteristics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs. The SPIONs’ response allows a three-dimensional visualization of their distribution in space with a superb contrast, a very high temporal and good spatial resolution. Essentially, it is the SPIONs’ superparamagnetic characteristics, the fact that they are magnetically saturable, and the harmonic composition of the SPIONs’ response that make MPI possible at all. As SPIONs are the essential element of MPI, the development of customized nanoparticles is pursued with the greatest effort by many groups. Their objective is the creation of a SPION or a conglomerate of particles that will feature a much higher MPI performance than nanoparticles currently available commercially. A particle’s MPI performance and suitability is characterized by parameters such as the strength of its MPI signal, its biocompatibility, or its pharmacokinetics. Some of the most important adjuster bolts to tune them are the particles’ iron core and hydrodynamic diameter, their anisotropy, the composition of the particles’ suspension, and their coating. As a three-dimensional, real-time imaging modality that is free of ionizing radiation, MPI appears ideally suited for applications such as vascular imaging and interventions as well as cellular and targeted imaging. A number

  4. Object Detection In Image Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirbhowjap Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Image matching is a key component in almost any image analysis process. Image matching is crucial to a wide range of applications, such as in navigation, guidance, automatic surveillance, robot vision, and in mapping sciences. Any automated system for three-dimensional point positioning must include a potent procedure for image matching. Most biological vision systems have the talent to cope with changing world. Computer vision systems have developed in the same way. For a computer vision system, the ability to cope withmoving and changing objects, changing illumination, and changing viewpoints is essential to perform several tasks. Object detection is necessary for surveillance applications, for guidance of autonomous vehicles, for efficient video compression, for smart tracking of moving objects, for automatic target recognition (ATR systems and for many other applications. Cross-correlation and related techniqueshave dominated the field since the early fifties. Conventional template matching algorithm based on cross-correlation requires complex calculation and large time for object detection, which makes difficult to use them in real time applications. The shortcomings of this class of image matching methods have caused a slow-down in the development of operational automated correlation systems. In the proposed work particle swarm optimization & its variants basedalgorithm is used for detection of object in image. Implementation of this algorithm reduces the time required for object detection than conventional template matching algorithm. Algorithm can detect object in less number of iteration & hence less time & energy than the complexity of conventional template matching. This feature makes the method capable for real time implementation. In this thesis a study of particle Swarm optimization algorithm is done & then formulation of the algorithm for object detection using PSO & its variants is implemented for validating its effectiveness.

  5. Three-dimensional synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Jesse; Truscott, Tadd T.; Axiak, Michael C.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new method for resolving three-dimensional (3D) fluid velocity fields using a technique called synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV). By fusing methods from the imaging community pertaining to light field imaging with concepts that drive experimental fluid mechanics, SAPIV overcomes many of the inherent challenges of 3D particle image velocimetry (3D PIV). This method offers the ability to digitally refocus a 3D flow field at arbitrary focal planes throughout a volume. The viewable out-of-plane dimension (Z) can be on the same order as the viewable in-plane dimensions (X-Y), and these dimensions can be scaled from tens to hundreds of millimeters. Furthermore, the digital refocusing provides the ability to 'see-through' partial occlusions, enabling measurements in densely seeded volumes. The advantages are achieved using a camera array (typically at least five cameras) to image the seeded fluid volume. The theoretical limits on refocused plane spacing and viewable depth are derived and explored as a function of camera optics and spacing of the array. A geometric optics model and simulated PIV images are used to investigate system performance for various camera layouts, measurement volume sizes and seeding density; performance is quantified by the ability to reconstruct the 3D intensity field, and resolve 3D vector fields in densely seeded simulated flows. SAPIV shows the ability to reconstruct fields with high seeding density and large volume size. Finally, results from an experimental implementation of SAPIV using a low cost eight-camera array to study a vortex ring in a 65 × 40 × 32 mm3 volume are presented. The 3D PIV results are compared with 2D PIV data to demonstrate the capability of the 3D SAPIV technique.

  6. Relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Laura R; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality that noninvasively images the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). MPI has demonstrated high contrast and zero attenuation with depth, and MPI promises superior safety compared to current angiography methods, X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging angiography. Nanoparticle relaxation can delay the SPIO magnetization, and in this work we investigate the open problem of the role relaxation plays in MPI scanning and its effect on the image. We begin by amending the x-space theory of MPI to include nanoparticle relaxation effects. We then validate the amended theory with experiments from a Berkeley x-space relaxometer and a Berkeley x-space projection MPI scanner. Our theory and experimental data indicate that relaxation reduces SNR and asymmetrically blurs the image in the scanning direction. While relaxation effects can have deleterious effects on the MPI scan, we show theoretically and experimentally that x-space reconstruction remains robust in the presence of relaxation. Furthermore, the role of relaxation in x-space theory provides guidance as we develop methods to minimize relaxation-induced blurring. This will be an important future area of research for the MPI community.

  7. Holographic c-Function

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, S Shajidul

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple and generic holographic $c$-function that is defined purely from geometry by using the non-affine expansion for null congruences. We examined the proposal for BPS black solutions in $\\mathcal{N}=2$ gauged supergravity that interpolate between two different dimensional AdS spacetimes and also for domain wall solutions. Moreover, we commented on the relation of this geometric proposal with the one from the holographic entanglement entropy.

  8. Cherenkov light imaging in astro-particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik, E-mail: Razmik.Mirzoyan@mpp.mpg.de

    2014-12-01

    Cherenkov light emission plays a key role in contemporary science; it is widely used in high energy, nuclear, and numerous astro-particle physics experiments. Most astro-particle physics experiments are based on the detection of light, and a vast majority of them on the measurement of Cherenkov light. Cherenkov light emission is measured in gases (used in air-Cherenkov technique), in water (for example, neutrino experiments BAIKAL, Super-Kamiokande, NESTOR, ANTARES, future KM3NeT; cosmic and γ-ray experiments Milagro, HAWC, AUGER) and in ice (IceCube). In this report our goal is not limited to simply listing the multitude of experiments that are based on using Cherenkov emission, but we will clarify the reasons making this emission so important and so frequently used. For completeness we will first give a short historical overview on the discovery and evolution of Cherenkov emission and then we will dwell on its main features and numerous applications in astro-particle physics experiments. - Highlights: • We explain why Cherenkov emission is so important and why it is so widely used. • A brief historical excursion is made to the very beginning of Cherenkov emission. • Imaging of the Cherenkov light emission is discussed in a great detail. • The principle of Cherenkov light imaging in diverse experiments is the same.

  9. A simulation study on image reconstruction in magnetic particle imaging with field-free-line encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kenya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present image reconstruction methods for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) with a field-free-line (FFL) encoding scheme and to propose the use of the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm for improving the image quality of MPI. The feasibility of these methods was investigated by computer simulations, in which the projection data were generated by summing up the Fourier harmonics obtained from the MPI signals based on the Langevin function. Images were reconstructed from the generated projection data using the filtered backprojection (FBP) method and the ML-EM algorithm. The effects of the gradient of selection magnetic field (SMF), the strength of drive magnetic field (DMF), the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and the number of projection data on the image quality of the reconstructed images were investigated. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed images became better with increasing gradient of SMF and with increasing diameter of MNPs u...

  10. Particle Identification Using a Ring Imaging Cherenkov Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Justin; Benmokthar, Fatiha

    2016-09-01

    The installation of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter (RICH) on the CLAS12 spectrometer in Hall B of Jefferson Lab will aid in particle identification, specifically with regard to the separation between protons, pions, kaons. The RICH functions by detecting a ring of radiation that is given off by particles moving faster than the speed of light in a medium through the use of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs). Because the size of the ring is dependent on the velocity of the particles, one can separate the incoming charged particles. With 391 MAPMTs being used in the specific design at Jefferson Lab, sophisticated electronic systems are needed to achieve complete data acquisition and ensure the safe operation of RICH. To monitor these electronic systems, the slow control system uses a compilation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) that communicates and, if necessary, changes certain process variables such as the high voltage going to the MAPMTs and the temperature of the system. My actual project focuses on the development of an efficient and reliable slow control system for this detector as well as a java based analyzer for offline data analysis.

  11. New model for holographic storage by simultaneous angular multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, J. C.; Urzua, D.; Olivares-Peréz, A.; Ortiz-Gutierrez, M.

    2006-05-01

    We describe a technique for holographic storage by simultaneous angular multiplexing to obtain a large-scale holographic memory. We recorded 72 objects at the same time in one point on holographic plate PFG-03M from Slavich Co., using a He-Ne laser (λ = 633 nm). Each object is placed on a circular photographic transparency, separate 0.94 degree each one. The technique allows us simultaneous reconstruction of the 72 images without cross-talk. The diffraction efficiency obtained at order one is 6%. Experimental results are shown.

  12. Generation of spatial Bessel beams using holographic metasurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-03-23

    We propose to use backward radiations of leaky waves supported by a holographic metasurface to produce spatial Bessel beams in the microwave frequency regime. The holographic metasurface consists of a grounded dielectric slab and a series of metal patches. By changing the size of metal patches, the surface-impedance distribution of the holographic metasurface can be modulated, and hence the radiation properties of the leaky waves can be designed to realize Bessel beams. Both numerical simulations and experiments verify the features of spatial Bessel beams, which may be useful in imaging applications or wireless power transmissions with the dynamic focal-depth controls.

  13. Rainbow Particle Imaging Velocimetry for Dense 3D Fluid Velocity Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-04-11

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. In this work we tackle this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a “rainbow”), such that each depth corresponds to a specific wavelength of light. A diffractive component in the camera optics ensures that all planes are in focus simultaneously. For reconstruction, we derive an image formation model for recovering stationary 3D particle positions. 3D velocity estimation is achieved with a variant of 3D optical flow that accounts for both physical constraints as well as the rainbow image formation model. We evaluate our method with both simulations and an experimental prototype setup.

  14. Formation of uniform fringe pattern free from diffraction noise at LDA measurement volume using holographic imaging configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have proposed a technique for improving fringe quality at laser Doppler anemometry measurement volume in real time using single hololens imaging configuration over conventional imaging configuration with Gaussian beam optics. In order to remove interference fringe gradients as well as higher order diffraction noise formed at measurement volume in the former approach, a combined hololens imaging system has also been proposed. For qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of fringes formed at measurement volume, atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been performed.

  15. XPIV-Multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, A.; Gurka, R.; Hetsroni, G.

    We introduce the three-dimensional measurement technique (XPIV) based on a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The technique provides three-dimensional and statistically significant velocity data. The main principle of the technique lies in the combination of defocus, stereoscopic and multi-plane illumination concepts. Preliminary results of the turbulent boundary layer in a flume are presented. The quality of the velocity data is evaluated by using the velocity profiles and relative turbulent intensity of the boundary layer. The analysis indicates that the XPIV is a reliable experimental tool for three-dimensional fluid velocity measurements.

  16. XPIV-Multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberzon, A. [Multiphase Flow Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion-IIT, 32000, Haifa (Israel); Institute of Hydromechanics and Water Resources Management, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Gurka, R. [Multiphase Flow Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion-IIT, 32000, Haifa (Israel); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hetsroni, G. [Multiphase Flow Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion-IIT, 32000, Haifa (Israel)

    2004-02-01

    We introduce the three-dimensional measurement technique (XPIV) based on a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The technique provides three-dimensional and statistically significant velocity data. The main principle of the technique lies in the combination of defocus, stereoscopic and multi-plane illumination concepts. Preliminary results of the turbulent boundary layer in a flume are presented. The quality of the velocity data is evaluated by using the velocity profiles and relative turbulent intensity of the boundary layer. The analysis indicates that the XPIV is a reliable experimental tool for three-dimensional fluid velocity measurements. (orig.)

  17. Spatial Spectra of Jet Turbulence Measured by Particle Image Velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wänström, Maja; George, William K.; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2009-01-01

    The unique capabilities of particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been utilized together with two-point similarity theory to measure spatial spectra in a ‘homogenized’ fully-developed turbulence jet at relatively high Reynolds number (20,000). The theory developed by Ewing et al. [1] was found...... to be in excellent agreement with the data, and in fact key to the present application. Despite relatively poor spatial resolution of the scales of motion (up to 15 times the Kolmogorov microscale) and limited dynamic range due to progressive jet velocity decay, it was possible to produce highly accurate spectra...

  18. Brief review of uncertainty quantification for particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, M. H.; Teixeira, R. S.; Koiller, J.; Santos, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Metrological studies for particle image velocimetry (PIV) are recent in literature. An attempt to evaluate the uncertainty quantifications (UQ) of the PIV velocity field are in evidence. Therefore, a short review on main sources of uncertainty in PIV and available methodologies for its quantification are presented. In addition, the potential of some mathematical techniques, coming from the area of geometric mechanics and control, that could interest the fluids UQ community are highlighted as good possibilities. “We must measure what is measurable and make measurable what cannot be measured” (Galileo)

  19. RECENT PROGRESS ON PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An up-to-date review of recent progress on Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) instrumentations was extensively presented in the paper. Around 80 literatures were referenced. Among various aspects of PIV advances, the present concern was mainly placed on progresses of advanced algorithms and microscopic PIV. Attention was specifically directed toward contributions of domestic researchers to these subjects, which were stressed throughout the discussion. In addition, diverse applications of PIV technology in China, e.g., turbulence measurement, hydrodynamics, rotating flows, two-phase flows, were specifically summarized.

  20. Quantum-Holographic Informational Consciousness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Di Biase

    2009-01-01

      The author propose a quantum-informational holographic model of brain-consciousness-universe interactions based in the holonomic neural networks of Karl Pribram, in the holographic quantum theory...

  1. A new non-iterative self-referencing interferometer in optical phase imaging and holographic microscopy, HOLOCAM

    CERN Document Server

    Berz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase retrieval and imaging phase measurements are fields of intense research. It has recently been shown that phase retrieval from self-referencing interferograms (SRI) can be reformulated leading to a stable, linear equation provided the amplitude of the field is known from prior measurement steps (HOLOCAM). Consequently, the numerical solution thereof is straightforward. This is a big achievement since convergence is otherwise not always guaranteed. Applications are expected in X-ray microscopy, general phase retrieval, holography, tomography and optical imaging.

  2. A high temperature seeding technique for particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Hadley, Judith A.

    2016-12-01

    Non-intrusive measurements of gas velocities via particle image velocimetry (PIV) or laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) requires entraining particles into the flow field. There are many techniques and materials available for seeding gas phase flows. However, when the flow temperatures exceed 200 °C, the available options for seed materials becomes limited. In high temperature applications refractory seed materials are required. The established technique for seeding flows with metal oxide powders is via fluidized beds by themselves or in combination with cyclone separators. These systems are fraught with problems which limit their ability to provide consistent, uniform flow seeding. In this work, we describe a technique for reliably introducing metal oxide particles into high temperature flows. The employment of pH stabilization techniques typically used to obtain stable dispersions in ceramic processing can provide a source of seed material for high temperature air flows. By pH stabilizing submicron alumina particles in ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina is used with a moderate size distribution. The technique is not limited to alumina/ethanol and is also demonstrated with an alumina/H2O system. Other ceramic powders in other polar solvents can also be used once their point of zero charge (pHpzc) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. We present an example of the pH stabilized dispersions applied to a very challenging high temperature supersonic flow and a particle dynamics analysis across a shock.

  3. Frontiers in x-ray components for high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging laminar type varied-line-spacing holographic gratings for soft x-ray

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, K

    2003-01-01

    Laminar-type varied-line-spacing gratings have been widely used for soft x-ray monochromator recently because of the features of low stray lights and higher order lights. We have developed and advanced holographic recording and an ion-beam etching methods for the laminar type varied-line spacing gratings. This report describes a short review of the soft x-ray spectrometers using varied-line-spacing gratings, the fabrication process of the laminar-type holographic gratings, and the performance of the flat field spectrographs equipped with the laminar type varied-line spacing gratings comparing with the mechanically ruled replica gratings. It is concluded that, for the sake of the advanced design and fabrication processes and excellent spectroscopic performance, laminar-type holographic gratings will be widely used for soft x-ray spectrometers for various purposes in the near future. (author)

  4. In-lab in-line digital holography for cloud particle measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiqi; Ji, Feng; Li, Liang; Li, Baosheng; Ma, Fei

    2016-10-01

    In terms of climate science, getting the accurate cloud particle sizes, shape and number distributions is necessary for searching the influence of cloud on the environment, radiative transfer, remote sensing measurements and understanding precipitation formation. Many methods and instruments have been developed to measure cloud particles, yet there is still restricted to one-dimensional or two-dimensional projections of particle positions, unable to get the three-dimensional information of the spatial distribution of particles. In-line holography is particularly useful for particles field measurements, because it can directly get the three-dimensional information of the particles and quickly access and storage holographic image. In this paper, the main work is using digital in-line holographic system to measure simulated cloud particles in the laboratory. For digital recording hologram reconstructing, we consider the image intensity in conjunction with the edge sharpness of the particles, to obtain an automatically selected threshold of each particle. Using the threshold, we can get a binary image to identify the particles and separate the particles from background, and then get the information such as the location, shape, particle size of particles. The experimental results show that the in-line digital holography can be used to detect the cloud particles, which can gain many parameters of the simulated cloud particles in the plane perpendicular to the optical axis, and can estimate volume parameters of the simulated cloud particles. This experiment is a basis for the further in situ detection of atmospheric cloud particles.

  5. Numerical investigation of lensless zoomable holographic multiple projections to tilted planes

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayam, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    This paper numerically investigates the feasibility of lensless zoomable holographic multiple projections to tilted planes. We have already developed lensless zoomable holographic single projection using scaled diffraction, which calculates diffraction between parallel planes with different sampling pitches. The structure of this zoomable holographic projection is very simple because it does not need a lens; however, it only projects a single image to a plane parallel to the hologram. The lensless zoomable holographic projection in this paper is capable of projecting multiple images onto tilted planes simultaneously.

  6. Towards single particle imaging of human chromosomes at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Schwenke, Joerg; Yusuf, Mohammed; Estandarte, Ana; Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Clark, Jesse; Song, Changyong; Nam, Daewoong; Joti, Yasumasa; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ratnasari, Gina; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Takata, Hideaki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-12-01

    Single particle imaging (SPI) is one of the front-page opportunities which were used to motivate the construction of the first x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). SPI’s big advantage is that it avoids radiation damage to biological samples because the diffraction takes place in femtosecond single shots before any atomic motion can take place in the sample, hence before the onset of radiation damage. This is the ‘diffract before destruction’ theme, destruction being assured from the high x-ray doses used. This article reports our collaboration’s first attempt at SPI using the SACLA XFEL facility in June 2015. The report is limited to experience with the instrumentation and examples of data because we have not yet had time to invert them to images.

  7. Evaluation of Microflow Digital Imaging Particle Analysis for Sub-Visible Particles Formulated with an Opaque Vaccine Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Grant E; Pochopsky, Alex W T; Clarke, Tessa M; Johnston, Michael J W

    2016-01-01

    Microflow digital imaging (MDI) has become a widely accepted method for assessing sub-visible particles in pharmaceutical formulations however, to date; no data have been presented on the utility of this methodology when formulations include opaque vaccine adjuvants. This study evaluates the ability of MDI to assess sub-visible particles under these conditions. A Fluid Imaging Technologies Inc. FlowCAM® instrument was used to assess a number of sub-visible particle types in solution with increasing concentrations of AddaVax™, a nanoscale squalene-based adjuvant. With the objective (10X) used and the limitations of the sensor resolution, the instrument was incapable of distinguishing between sub-visible particles and AddaVax™ droplets at particle sizes less than 5 μm. The instrument was capable of imaging all particle types assessed (polystyrene beads, borosilicate glass, cellulose, polyethylene protein aggregate mimics, and lysozyme protein aggregates) at sizes greater than 5 μm in concentrations of AddaVax™ up to 50% (vol:vol). Reduced edge gradients and a decrease in measured particle sizes were noted as adjuvant concentrations increased. No significant changes in particle counts were observed for polystyrene particle standards and lysozyme protein aggregates, however significant reductions in particle counts were observed for borosilicate (80% of original) and cellulose (92% of original) particles. This reduction in particle counts may be due to the opaque adjuvant masking translucent particles present in borosilicate and cellulose samples. Although the results suggest that the utility of MDI for assessing sub-visible particles in high concentrations of adjuvant may be highly dependent on particle morphology, we believe that further investigation of this methodology to assess sub-visible particles in challenging formulations is warranted.

  8. Evaluation of Microflow Digital Imaging Particle Analysis for Sub-Visible Particles Formulated with an Opaque Vaccine Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant E Frahm

    Full Text Available Microflow digital imaging (MDI has become a widely accepted method for assessing sub-visible particles in pharmaceutical formulations however, to date; no data have been presented on the utility of this methodology when formulations include opaque vaccine adjuvants. This study evaluates the ability of MDI to assess sub-visible particles under these conditions. A Fluid Imaging Technologies Inc. FlowCAM® instrument was used to assess a number of sub-visible particle types in solution with increasing concentrations of AddaVax™, a nanoscale squalene-based adjuvant. With the objective (10X used and the limitations of the sensor resolution, the instrument was incapable of distinguishing between sub-visible particles and AddaVax™ droplets at particle sizes less than 5 μm. The instrument was capable of imaging all particle types assessed (polystyrene beads, borosilicate glass, cellulose, polyethylene protein aggregate mimics, and lysozyme protein aggregates at sizes greater than 5 μm in concentrations of AddaVax™ up to 50% (vol:vol. Reduced edge gradients and a decrease in measured particle sizes were noted as adjuvant concentrations increased. No significant changes in particle counts were observed for polystyrene particle standards and lysozyme protein aggregates, however significant reductions in particle counts were observed for borosilicate (80% of original and cellulose (92% of original particles. This reduction in particle counts may be due to the opaque adjuvant masking translucent particles present in borosilicate and cellulose samples. Although the results suggest that the utility of MDI for assessing sub-visible particles in high concentrations of adjuvant may be highly dependent on particle morphology, we believe that further investigation of this methodology to assess sub-visible particles in challenging formulations is warranted.

  9. Bragg diffraction from sub-micron particles isolated by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuan, E-mail: ygao0709@anl.gov; Harder, Ross; Southworth, Stephen; Guest, Jeffrey; Ocola, Leonidas; Young, Linda [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Scherer, Norbert; Yan, Zijie [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pelton, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We describe an apparatus using dynamic holographic optical tweezers which is capable of trapping and aligning a single micron scale anisotropic ZnO particle for x-ray Bragg diffraction experiments. The optical tweezers demonstrate enough stability to perform coherent x-ray diffraction imaging.

  10. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  11. Uncertainty quantification in particle image velocimetry and advances in time-resolved image and data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciacchitano, A.

    2014-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a well-established technique for the measurement of the flow velocity in a two or three-dimensional domain. As in any other technique, PIV data is affected by measurement errors, defined as the difference between the measured velocity and its actual value, which i

  12. Drag phenomena from holographic massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Brattan, Daniel K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the motion of point particles in a strongly coupled field theory with broken translation invariance. We obtain the energy and momentum loss rates and drag coefficients for a class of such particles by solving for the motion of classical strings in holographic massive gravity. At low temperatures compared to the graviton mass the behaviour of the string is controlled by the appearance of an exotic ground state with non-zero entropy at zero temperature. Additionally, we find an upper bound on the diffusion constant for a collection of these particles which is saturated when the mass of the graviton goes to zero.

  13. Drag phenomena from holographic massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baggioli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We consider the motion of point particles in a strongly coupled field theory with broken translation invariance. We obtain the energy and momentum loss rates and drag coefficients for a class of such particles by solving for the motion of classical strings in holographic massive gravity. At low temperatures compared to the graviton mass the behaviour of the string is controlled by the appearance of an exotic ground state with non-zero entropy at zero temperature. Additionally we find an upper bound on the diffusion constant for a collection of these particles which is saturated when the mass of the graviton goes to zero.

  14. Fluorescence-Doped Particles for Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Tiemsin, Pacita I.; Wohl, Chrostopher J.; Verkamp, Max; Lowe, T.; Maisto, P.; Byun, G.; Simpson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene latex microspheres (PSLs) have been used for particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements for several decades. With advances in laser technologies, instrumentation, and data processing, the capability to collect more information about fluid flow beyond velocity is possible using new seed materials. To provide additional measurement capability, PSLs were synthesized with temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes incorporated within the particle. These multifunctional PSLs would have the greatest impact if they could be used in large scale facilities with minimal modification to the facilities or the existing instrumentation. Consequently, several potential dyes were identified that were amenable to existing laser systems currently utilized in wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center as well as other wind and fluid (water) tunnels. PSLs incorporated with Rhodamine B, dichlorofluorescein (DCF, also known as fluorescein 548 or fluorescein 27) and other dyes were synthesized and characterized for morphology and spectral properties. The resulting particles were demonstrated to exhibit fluorescent emission, which would enable determination of both fluid velocity and temperature. They also would allow near-wall velocity measurements whereas laser scatter from surfaces currently prevents near-wall measurements using undoped seed materials. Preliminary results in a wind tunnel facility located at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) have verified fluorescent signal detection and temperature sensitivity of fluorophore-doped PSLs.

  15. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.

    2017-06-12

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  16. Holographic Spherically Symmetric Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Michael

    The holographic principle (HP) conjectures, that the maximum number of degrees of freedom of any realistic physical system is proportional to the system's boundary area. The HP has its roots in the study of black holes. It has recently been applied to cosmological solutions. In this article we apply the HP to spherically symmetric static space-times. We find that any regular spherically symmetric object saturating the HP is subject to tight constraints on the (interior) metric, energy-density, temperature and entropy-density. Whenever gravity can be described by a metric theory, gravity is macroscopically scale invariant and the laws of thermodynamics hold locally and globally, the (interior) metric of a regular holographic object is uniquely determined up to a constant factor and the interior matter-state must follow well defined scaling relations. When the metric theory of gravity is general relativity, the interior matter has an overall string equation of state (EOS) and a unique total energy-density. Thus the holographic metric derived in this article can serve as simple interior 4D realization of Mathur's string fuzzball proposal. Some properties of the holographic metric and its possible experimental verification are discussed. The geodesics of the holographic metric describe an isotropically expanding (or contracting) universe with a nearly homogeneous matter-distribution within the local Hubble volume. Due to the overall string EOS the active gravitational mass-density is zero, resulting in a coasting expansion with Ht = 1, which is compatible with the recent GRB-data.

  17. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, P.O. Box 352120, Seattle, Washington 98195-2120 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs’ size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ∼20.1 ± 0.98 to ∼18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  18. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs' size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ∼20.1 ± 0.98 to ∼18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  19. Particle Filter with State Permutations for Solving Image Jigsaw Puzzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingwei; Adluru, Nagesh; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    We deal with an image jigsaw puzzle problem, which is defined as reconstructing an image from a set of square and non-overlapping image patches. It is known that a general instance of this problem is NP-complete, and it is also challenging for humans, since in the considered setting the original image is not given. Recently a graphical model has been proposed to solve this and related problems. The target label probability function is then maximized using loopy belief propagation. We also formulate the problem as maximizing a label probability function and use exactly the same pairwise potentials. Our main contribution is a novel inference approach in the sampling framework of Particle Filter (PF). Usually in the PF framework it is assumed that the observations arrive sequentially, e.g., the observations are naturally ordered by their time stamps in the tracking scenario. Based on this assumption, the posterior density over the corresponding hidden states is estimated. In the jigsaw puzzle problem all observations (puzzle pieces) are given at once without any particular order. Therefore, we relax the assumption of having ordered observations and extend the PF framework to estimate the posterior density by exploring different orders of observations and selecting the most informative permutations of observations. This significantly broadens the scope of applications of the PF inference. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed inference framework significantly outperforms the loopy belief propagation in solving the image jigsaw puzzle problem. In particular, the extended PF inference triples the accuracy of the label assignment compared to that using loopy belief propagation.

  20. Towards 3C-3D digital holographic fluid velocity vector field measurement—tomographic digital holographic PIV (Tomo-HPIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, J.; Atkinson, C.

    2008-07-01

    Most unsteady and/or turbulent flows of geophysical and engineering interest have a highly three-dimensional (3D) complex topology and their experimental investigation is in pressing need of quantitative velocity measurement methods that are robust and can provide instantaneous 3C-3D velocity field data over a significant volumetric domain of the flow. This paper introduces and demonstrates a new method that uses multiple digital CCD array cameras to record in-line digital holograms of the same volume of seed particles from multiple orientations. This technique uses the same basic equipment as Tomo-PIV minus the camera lenses, it overcomes the depth-of-field problem of digital in-line holography and does not require the complex optical calibration of Tomo-PIV. The digital sensors can be oriented in an optimal manner to overcome the depth-of-field limitation of in-line holograms recorded using digital CCD or CMOS array cameras, resulting in a 3D reconstruction of the seed particles within the volume of interest, which can subsequently be analysed using 3D cross-correlation PIV analysis to yield a 3C-3D velocity field. A demonstration experiment of Tomo-HPIV using uniform translation with nominally 11 µm diameter seed particles shows that the 3D displacement derived from 3D cross-correlation Tomo-HPIV analysis can be measured within 5% of the imposed uniform translation, where the imposed uniform translation has an estimated standard uncertainty of 4.3%. So this paper proposes a multi-camera digital holographic imaging 3C-3D PIV method, which is identified as tomographic digital holographic PIV or Tomo-HPIV.

  1. Holographic Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shuang; Li, Miao

    2016-01-01

    We review the paradigm of holographic dark energy (HDE), which arises from a theoretical attempt of applying the holographic principle (HP) to the dark energy (DE) problem. Making use of the HP and the dimensional analysis, we derive the general formula of the energy density of HDE. Then, we describe the properties of HDE model, in which the future event horizon is chosen as the characteristic length scale. We also introduce the theoretical explorations and the observational constraints for this model. Next, in the framework of HDE, we discuss various topics, such as spatial curvature, neutrino, instability of perturbation, time-varying gravitational constant, inflation, black hole and big rip singularity. In addition, from both the theoretical and the observational aspects, we introduce the interacting holographic dark energy scenario, where the interaction between dark matter and HDE is taken into account. Furthermore, we discuss the HDE scenario in various modified gravity (MG) theories, such as Brans-Dick...

  2. Holographic Entanglement Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    We review the developments in the past decade on holographic entanglement entropy, a subject that has garnered much attention owing to its potential to teach us about the emergence of spacetime in holography. We provide an introduction to the concept of entanglement entropy in quantum field theories, review the holographic proposals for computing the same, providing some justification for where these proposals arise from in the first two parts. The final part addresses recent developments linking entanglement and geometry. We provide an overview of the various arguments and technical developments that teach us how to use field theory entanglement to detect geometry. Our discussion is by design eclectic; we have chosen to focus on developments that appear to us most promising for further insights into the holographic map. This is a preliminary draft of a few chapters of a book which will appear sometime in the near future, to be published by Springer. The book in addition contains a discussion of application o...

  3. Phenomenology of Holographic Quenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  4. Photorefractive phase-conjugation digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Ching; Chan, Huang-Tian; Shiu, Min-Tzung; Chew, Yang-Kun

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative method for digital holographic microscopy named as photorefractive phaseconjugation digital holographic microscopy (PPCDHM) technique based on the phase conjugation dynamic holographic process in photorefractive BaTiO3 crystal and the retrieval of phase and amplitude of the object wave were performed by a reflection-type digital holographic method. Both amplitude and phase reconstruction benefit from the prior amplification by self-pumped conjugation (SPPC) as they have an increased SNR. The interest of the PPCDHM is great, because its hologram is created by interfered the amplified phase-conjugate wave field generated from a photorefractive phase conjugator (PPC) correcting the phase aberration of the imaging system and the reference wave onto the digital CCD camera. Therefore, a precise three-dimensional description of the object with high SNR can be obtained digitally with only one hologram acquisition. The method requires the acquisition of a single hologram from which the phase distribution can be obtained simultaneously with distribution of intensity at the surface of the object.

  5. Holographic memories with encryption-selectable function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chia; Lee, Xuan-Hao

    2006-03-01

    Volume holographic storage has received increasing attention owing to its potential high storage capacity and access rate. In the meanwhile, encrypted holographic memory using random phase encoding technique is attractive for an optical community due to growing demand for protection of information. In this paper, encryption-selectable holographic storage algorithms in LiNbO 3 using angular multiplexing are proposed and demonstrated. Encryption-selectable holographic memory is an advance concept of security storage for content protection. It offers more flexibility to encrypt the data or not optionally during the recording processes. In our system design, the function of encryption and non-encryption storage is switched by a random phase pattern and a uniform phase pattern. Based on a 90-degree geometry, the input patterns including the encryption and non-encryption storage are stored via angular multiplexing with reference plane waves at different incident angles. Image is encrypted optionally by sliding the ground glass into one of the recording waves or removing it away in each exposure. The ground glass is a key for encryption. Besides, it is also an important key available for authorized user to decrypt the encrypted information.

  6. PIV measurement at the blowdown pipe outlet. [Particle Image Velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A.; Pyy, L.; Telkkae, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    This report summarizes the findings of the PIV measurement tests carried out in January - February 2013 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility at LUT. The main objective of the tests was to find out the operational limits of the PIV system regarding suitable test conditions and correct values of different adjustable PIV parameters. An additional objective was to gather CFD grade data for verification/validation of numerical models. Both water and steam injection tests were carried out. PIV measurements with cold water injection succeeded well. Raw images were of high quality, averaging over the whole measurement period could be done and flow fields close to the blowdown pipe outlet could be determined. In the warm water injection cases the obtained averaged velocity field images were harder to interpret, especially if the blowdown pipe was also filled with warm water in the beginning of the measurement period. The absolute values of the velocity vectors seemed to be smaller than in the cold water injection cases. With very small steam flow rates the steam/water interface was inside the blowdown pipe and quite stable in nature. The raw images were of good quality but due to some fluctuation in the velocity field averaging of the velocity images over the whole measured period couldn't be done. Condensation of steam in the vicinity of the pipe exit probably caused these fluctuations. A constant outflow was usually followed by a constant inflow towards the pipe exit. Vector field images corresponding to a certain phase of the test could be extracted and averaged but this would require a very careful analysis so that the images could be correctly categorized. With higher steam flow rates rapid condensation of large steam bubbles created small gas bubbles which were in front of the measurement area of the PIV system. They disturbed the measurements by reflecting laser light like seeding particles and therefore the raw images were of poor quality and they couldn

  7. Classical Holographic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Enrico M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce classical holographic codes. These can be understood as concatenated probabilistic codes and can be represented as networks uniformly covering hyperbolic space. In particular, classical holographic codes can be interpreted as maps from bulk degrees of freedom to boundary degrees of freedom. Interestingly, they are shown to exhibit features similar to those expected from the AdS/CFT correspondence. Among these are a version of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula and intriguing properties regarding bulk reconstruction and boundary representations of bulk operations. We discuss the relation of our findings with expectations from AdS/CFT and, in particular, with recent results from quantum error correction.

  8. Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laksmana, F L; Van Vliet, L J; Hartman Kok, P J A; Vromans, H; Frijlink, H W; Van der Voort Maarschalk, K

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to develop a characterization method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational design of coated particles in the pharmaceutical industry. The method applies the MATLAB image processing toolbox to images of coated particles taken w

  9. Holographic Software for Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur; Wozniakowski, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We introduce diagrammatic protocols and holographic software for quantum information. We give a dictionary to translate between diagrammatic protocols and the usual algebraic protocols. In particular we describe the intuitive diagrammatic protocol for teleportation. We introduce the string Fourier transform $\\mathfrak{F}_{s}$ in quantum information, which gives a topological quantum computer. We explain why the string Fourier transform maps the zero particle state to the multiple-qudit resource state, which maximizes the entanglement entropy. We give a protocol to construct this $n$-qudit resource state $|Max \\rangle$, which uses minimal cost. We study Pauli $X,Y,Z$ matrices, and their relation with diagrammatic protocols. This work provides bridges between the new theory of planar para algebras and quantum information, especially in questions involving communication in quantum networks.

  10. Cost-effective and label-free holographic biosensor for detection of herpes simplex virus (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Ho, Ha; Daloglu, Mustafa; Torres, Avee; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Herpes is one of the most widespread sexually transmitted viral diseases. Timely detection of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) can help prevent the rampant spreading of the virus. Current detection techniques such as viral culture, immuno-assays or Polymerase-Chain-Reaction, are time extensive and require expert handling. Here we present a field-portable, easy-to-use, and cost-effective biosensor for the detection of HSV based on holographic imaging. The virus is first captured from a target solution onto specifically developed substrates, prepared by coating glass coverslips with HSV-specific antibodies, and imaged using a lensfree holographic microscope. Several light-emitting-diodes (LEDs), coupled to multi-mode optical-fibers, are used to illuminate the sample containing the viruses. A micro-controller is used to activate the LEDs one at a time and in-line holograms are recorded using a CMOS imager placed immediately above the substrate. These sub-pixel shifted holograms are used to generate a super-resolved hologram, which is reconstructed to obtain the phase and amplitude images of the viruses. The signal of the viruses is enhanced using self-assembled PEG-based nanolenses, formed around the viral particles. Based on the phase information of the reconstructed images we can estimate the size of the viral particles, with an accuracy of +/- 11 nm, as well as quantify the viral load. The limit-of-detection of this system is estimated to be <500 viral copies per 100 μL sample volume that is imaged over 30 mm^2 field-of-view. This holographic microscopy based biosensor is label-free, cost-effective and field-portable, providing results in 2 hours, including sample preparation and imaging time.

  11. 聚四氟乙烯微粉改性激光全息成像树脂的研究%Study of Laser Holographic Imaging Resin Modified with PTFE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑成赋; 朱仕惠; 曾繁涤

    2011-01-01

    将聚四氟乙烯微粉(PTFE)分散于醋酸丁酯中,取配方量的分散液对激光全息成像树脂进行共混改性.通过旋转黏度计、漆膜冲击强度测试仪、模压机研究了PTFE的加入及其加入量对树脂黏度、冲击强度以及模压效果等方面的影响.结果表明:在PTFE加入量为成像树脂质量的1%~1.5%时,激光全息成像树脂的综合性能最好.%Dispersed polytetrafluoroethylene micro-powder into the butyl acetate the formula quantity of dispersed liquid was modified with the laser holographic imaging resin. The influences of the adding of PTFE and its add quantity on the viscosity, the impact strength and moulding behavior of the resin were studied by rotating viscometer, film impact strength tester and moulding machine respectively. The results showed that the laser holographic imaging resin were of the best comprehensive performance when the add quantity of PTFE was 1%~1.5%.

  12. Particle image velocimetry new developments and recent applications

    CERN Document Server

    Willert, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a non-intrusive optical measurement technique which allows capturing several thousand velocity vectors within large flow fields instantaneously. Today, the PIV technique has spread widely and differentiated into many distinct applications, from micro flows over combustion to supersonic flows for both industrial needs and research. Over the past decade the measurement technique and the hard- and software have been improved continuously so that PIV has become a reliable and accurate method for "real life" investigations. Nevertheless there is still an ongoing process of improvements and extensions of the PIV technique towards 3D, time resolution, higher accuracy, measurements under harsh conditions and micro- and macroscales. This book gives a synopsis of the main results achieved during the EC-funded network PivNet 2 as well as a survey of the state-of-the-art of scientific research using PIV techniques in different fields of application.

  13. Stereo particle image velocimetry applied to a vortex pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zherui; Hugo, Ronald J.

    2006-03-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been employed to study a vortex generated via tangential injection of water in a 2.25 inch (57 mm) diameter pipe for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1,118 to 63,367. Methods of decreasing pipe-induced optical distortion and the PIV calibration technique are addressed. The mean velocity field analyses have shown spatial similarity and revealed four distinct flow regions starting from the central axis of rotation to the pipe wall in the vortex flows. Turbulence statistical data and vortex core location data suggest that velocity fluctuations are due to the axis of the in-line vortex distorting in the shape of a spiral.

  14. Characterization of extrusion flow using particle image velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the characterization of polymer flows within an extrusion die using particle image velocimetry (PIV in very constraining conditions (high temperature, pressure and velocity. Measurements were realized on semi-industrial equipments in order to have test conditions close to the industrial ones. Simple flows as well as disrupted ones were studied in order to determine the capabilities and the limits of the method. The analysis of the velocity profiles pointed out significant wall slip, which was confirmed by rheological measurements based on Mooney's method. Numerical simulations were used to connect the two sets of measurements and to simulate complex velocity profiles for comparison to the experimental ones. A good agreement was found between simulations and experiments providing wall slip is taken into account in the simulation.

  15. ENVISION, innovative medical imaging tools for particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. ENVISION aims at developing medical imaging tools to improve the dose delivery to the patient, to ensure a safer and more effective treatment. The animation covers some of these tools, including Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), motion monitoring techniques and simulation. The ENVISION project is co-funded by the European Commission under FP7 Grant Agreement N. 241851. ENVISION serves as a training platform for the Marie Curie Initial Training Programme ENTERVISION, funded by the European Commission under FP7 Grant Agreement N. 264552. Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION

  16. Application of Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry to Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1999-01-01

    Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) is a powerful measurement technique, which can be used as an alternative or complementary approach to Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) in a wide range of research applications. The instantaneous planar velocity measurements obtained with PIV make it an attractive technique for use in the study of the complex flow fields encountered in turbomachinery. Many of the same issues encountered in the application of LDV to rotating machinery apply in the application of PIV. Techniques for optical access, light sheet delivery, CCD camera technology and particulate seeding are discussed. Results from the successful application of the PIV technique to both the blade passage region of a transonic axial compressor and the diffuser region of a high speed centrifugal compressor are presented. Both instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields were obtained. The 95% confidence intervals for the time-averaged velocity estimates were also determined. Results from the use of PIV to study surge in a centrifugal compressor are discussed. In addition, combined correlation/particle tracking results yielding super-resolution velocity measurements are presented.

  17. First in vivo traumatic brain injury imaging via magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendorff, Ryan; Peck, Austin J; Zheng, Bo; Shirazi, Shawn N; Matthew Ferguson, R; Khandhar, Amit P; Kemp, Scott J; Goodwill, Patrick; Krishnan, Kannan M; Brooks, George A; Kaufer, Daniela; Conolly, Steven

    2017-05-07

    Emergency room visits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, but classifying the severity of the injury remains an open challenge. Some subjective methods such as the Glasgow Coma Scale attempt to classify traumatic brain injuries, as well as some imaging based modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, to date it is still difficult to detect and monitor mild to moderate injuries. In this report, we demonstrate that the magnetic particle imaging (MPI) modality can be applied to imaging TBI events with excellent contrast. MPI can monitor injected iron nanoparticles over long time scales without signal loss, allowing researchers and clinicians to monitor the change in blood pools as the wound heals.

  18. First in vivo traumatic brain injury imaging via magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendorff, Ryan; Peck, Austin J.; Zheng, Bo; Shirazi, Shawn N.; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Goodwill, Patrick; Krishnan, Kannan M.; Brooks, George A.; Kaufer, Daniela; Conolly, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Emergency room visits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, but classifying the severity of the injury remains an open challenge. Some subjective methods such as the Glasgow Coma Scale attempt to classify traumatic brain injuries, as well as some imaging based modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, to date it is still difficult to detect and monitor mild to moderate injuries. In this report, we demonstrate that the magnetic particle imaging (MPI) modality can be applied to imaging TBI events with excellent contrast. MPI can monitor injected iron nanoparticles over long time scales without signal loss, allowing researchers and clinicians to monitor the change in blood pools as the wound heals.

  19. Investigation of biophysical mechanisms in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation of cells using a multimodal holographic and fluorescence imaging setup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kalies

    Full Text Available Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy.

  20. Optimization of image capturing method of wear particles for condition diagnosis of machine parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yon-Sang CHO; Heung-Sik PARK

    2009-01-01

    Wear particles are inevitably occurred from moving parts, such as a piston-cylinder made from steel or hybrid materials. And a durability of these parts must be evaluated. The wear particle analysis has been known as a very effective method to foreknow and decide a moving situation and a damage of machine parts by using the digital computer image processing. But it is not laid down to calculate shape parameters of wear particle and wear volume. In order to apply image processing method in a durability evaluation of machine parts, it needs to verify the reliability of the calculated data by the image processing and to lay down the number of images and the amount of wear particles in one image. In this work, the lubricated friction experiment was carried out in order to establish the optimum image capture with the 1045 specimen under experiment condition. The wear particle data were calculated differently according to the number of image and the amount of wear particle in one image. The results show that capturing conditions need to he more than 140 wear particles in one image and over 40 images for the reliable data. Thus, the capturing method of wear particles images was optimized for condition diagnosis of machine moving parts.

  1. Development of an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koki; Oka, Miki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    We developed an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The alpha-particle imaging system consists of an optical lens, an extension tube and a 1 in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) type PSPMT. After a ZnS(Ag) is attached to subject, the scintillation image of ZnS(Ag) is focused on the photocathode of the PSPMT by the use of the optical lens. With this configuration we could image the alpha particle distribution with energy information without contacting to the subject. The spatial resolution and energy resolution were 0.8 mm FWHM and 50% FWHM at 5 mm from the optical lens, respectively. We could successfully image the alpha particle distribution in uranium ore. The developed alpha-particle imaging system will be a new tool for imaging alpha emitters with energy information without contacting the subject.

  2. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation, Imaging, Observations, and Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    This report presents particle formation observations and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Hydrogen was frozen into particles in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. These newly analyzed data are from the test series held on February 28, 2001. Particle sizes from previous testing in 1999 and the testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed: microparticles and delayed particle formation. These experiment image analyses are some of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and they allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  3. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation Energy and Imaging Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents particle formation energy balances and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium during the Phase II testing in 2001. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. The particle formation efficiency is also estimated. Particle sizes from the Phase I testing in 1999 and the Phase II testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles and it allows designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  4. Holographic analysis of photopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amy C.; Alim, Marvin D.; Glugla, David J.; McLeod, Robert R.

    2017-05-01

    Two-beam holographic exposure and subsequent monitoring of the time-dependent first-order Bragg diffraction is a common method for investigating the refractive index response of holographic photopolymers for a range of input writing conditions. The experimental set up is straightforward, and Kogelnik's well-known coupled wave theory (CWT)[1] can be used to separate measurements of the change in index of refraction (Δn) and the thickness of transmission and reflection holograms. However, CWT assumes that the hologram is written and read out with a plane wave and that the hologram is uniform in both the transverse and depth dimensions, assumptions that are rarely valid in practical holographic testing. The effect of deviations from these assumptions on the measured thickness and Δn become more pronounced for over-modulated exposures. As commercial and research polymers reach refractive index modulations on the order of 10-2, even relatively thin (refractive index in a material system. We use this analysis to study a model high Δn two-stage photopolymer holographic material using both transmission and reflection holograms.

  5. Holographic renormalization and supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Cassani, Davide; Martelli, Dario; Sparks, James

    2017-02-01

    Holographic renormalization is a systematic procedure for regulating divergences in observables in asymptotically locally AdS spacetimes. For dual boundary field theories which are supersymmetric it is natural to ask whether this defines a supersymmetric renormalization scheme. Recent results in localization have brought this question into sharp focus: rigid supersymmetry on a curved boundary requires specific geometric structures, and general arguments imply that BPS observables, such as the partition function, are invariant under certain deformations of these structures. One can then ask if the dual holographic observables are similarly invariant. We study this question in minimal N = 2 gauged supergravity in four and five dimensions. In four dimensions we show that holographic renormalization precisely reproduces the expected field theory results. In five dimensions we find that no choice of standard holographic counterterms is compatible with supersymmetry, which leads us to introduce novel finite boundary terms. For a class of solutions satisfying certain topological assumptions we provide some independent tests of these new boundary terms, in particular showing that they reproduce the expected VEVs of conserved charges.

  6. Document watermarking based on digital holographic principle

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chol-Su; Im, Song-Jin

    2013-01-01

    A new method for document watermarking based on the digital Fourier hologram is proposed. It applies the methods of digital image watermarking based on holographic principle presented previously in several papers into printed documents. Experimental results show that the proposed method can not only meet the demand on invisibility, robustness and non-reproducibility of the document watermark, and but also has other advantages compared with the conventional methods for document securities such as embossed hologram, Lippmann photograph and halftone modulation.

  7. Ultrasonic particle image velocimetry for improved flow gradient imaging: algorithms, methodology and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lili; Qian, Ming; Wan, Kun; Yu, Wentao; Jin, Qiaofeng; Ling, Tao; Gao, Shen; Zheng, Hairong

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV) for improving the flow velocity measurement accuracy and efficiency in regions with high velocity gradients. The conventional Echo PIV algorithm has been modified by incorporating a multiple iterative algorithm, sub-pixel method, filter and interpolation method, and spurious vector elimination algorithm. The new algorithms' performance is assessed by analyzing simulated images with known displacements, and ultrasonic B-mode images of in vitro laminar pipe flow, rotational flow and in vivo rat carotid arterial flow. Results of the simulated images show that the new algorithm produces much smaller bias from the known displacements. For laminar flow, the new algorithm results in 1.1% deviation from the analytically derived value, and 8.8% for the conventional algorithm. The vector quality evaluation for the rotational flow imaging shows that the new algorithm produces better velocity vectors. For in vivo rat carotid arterial flow imaging, the results from the new algorithm deviate 6.6% from the Doppler-measured peak velocities averagely compared to 15% of that from the conventional algorithm. The new Echo PIV algorithm is able to effectively improve the measurement accuracy in imaging flow fields with high velocity gradients.

  8. Note on Zero Temperature Holographic Superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Minyong; Niu, Chao; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we have addressed various issues on zero temperature holographic superfluids. First, inspired by our numerical evidence for the equality between the superfluid density and particle density, we provide an elegant analytic proof for this equality by a boost trick. Second, using not only the frequency domain analysis but also the time domain analysis from numerical relativity, we identify the hydrodynamic normal modes and calculate out the sound speed, which is shown to increase with the chemical potential and saturate to the value predicted by the conformal field theory in the large chemical potential limit. Third, the generic non-thermalization is demonstrated by the fully non-linear time evolution from a non-equilibrium state for our zero temperature holographic superfluid. Furthermore, a conserved Noether charge is proposed in support of this behavior.

  9. Note on zero temperature holographic superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minyong; Lan, Shanquan; Niu, Chao; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-06-01

    In this note, we have addressed various issues on zero temperature holographic superfluids. First, inspired by our numerical evidence for the equality between the superfluid density and particle density, we provide an elegant analytic proof for this equality by a boost trick. Second, using not only the frequency domain analysis but also the time domain analysis from numerical relativity, we identify the hydrodynamic normal modes and calculate out the sound speed, which is shown to increase with the chemical potential and saturate to the value predicted by the conformal field theory in the large chemical potential limit. Third, the generic non-thermalization is demonstrated by the fully nonlinear time evolution from a non-equilibrium state for our zero temperature holographic superfluid. Furthermore, a conserved Noether charge is proposed in support of this behavior.

  10. A Simple Holographic Model of Nonlinear Conductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, Gary T; Santos, Jorge E

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple analytic gravitational solution which describes the holographic dual of a 2+1-dimensional conductor which goes beyond the usual linear response. In particular it includes Joule heating. We find that the nonlinear frequency-dependent conductivity is a constant. Surprisingly, the pressure remains isotropic. We also apply an electric field to a holographic insulator and show that there is a maximum electric field below which it can remain an insulator. Above this critical value, we argue that it becomes a conductor due to pair creation of charged particles. Finally, we study 1+1 and 3+1 dimensional conductors at the nonlinear level; here exact solutions are not available and a perturbative analysis shows that the current becomes time dependent, but in a way that is captured by a time-dependent effective temperature.

  11. A New Method of X-Ray Holographic Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢红兰; 陈建文; 高鸿奕; 陆培祥; 徐至展

    2002-01-01

    A new method of x-ray holographic tomography, called pre-amplified x-ray holographic tomography, is proposed to develop an x-ray three-dimensional microscopic imaging technique. In this method, the key component is a micro zone plate taken as an imaging element like an optic lens in x-ray field. Some advantages of the method are shown by a numerical example. The method may make it possible to obtain x-ray microscopic imaging of biological specimens at high resolution in three dimensions.

  12. Application of the holographic interference microscope for investigation of ozone therapy influence on blood erythrocytes of patients in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishko, Tatyana V.; Titar, V. P.; Barchotkina, T. M.; Tishko, D. N.

    2004-09-01

    The holographic methods of phase micro-objects visualization (the holographic phase contrast method and the method of holographic interferometry) are considered. Comparative analysis of classical and holographic methods in microscopy of phase micro-objects is carried out. An arrangement of the holographic interference microscope realizing the holographic methods and experimental results of 3-D imaging of native blood erythrocytes are presented. It is shown that 3-D morphology of blood erythrocytes reflects and determines the state of a human organism and those different physical and chemical factors and internal pathologies influence erythrocytes morphology. The holographic interference microscope was used for investigation of ozone therapy influence on human blood erythrocytes. Blood samples of 60 patients of different age with neurosensoric hardness of hearing before and after ozone therapy were investigated. It was shown that all patients have changed erythrocytes mrophology. Ozone therapy treatment results in normalization of erythrocytes morphology of patients.

  13. Holographic interferometry for security and forensic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambadiyil, Sajan; R. C., Sreelekshmi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Prabhu, Radhakrishna

    2016-10-01

    Security holograms having unique 3D images are one of the tools for enhancing the security for product and personnel authentication and anti-counterfeiting. Apart from the high technology that is required, the uniqueness of a 3D object presents a significant additional threshold for the counterfeiting of such security holograms. But, due to the development of 3D printing technology, the hurdles are disabled and allow the chances of counterfeiting. In order to overcome this, holographic interferometry is effectively utilized and the object is recorded twice before and after the state of random object change. At the time of reconstruction, two signal waves generated simultaneously interfere each other, resulting in a fringe modulation. This fringe modulation in 3D image hologram with respect to the random object change is exploited to generate a rigid and unique anticounterfeit feature. Though holographic interferometry techniques are being widely used for the non-destructive evaluation, the applicability of this technology for the security and forensic activity is less exploited. This paper describes our efforts to introduce holographic interferometry in 3D image holograms for security and forensic applications.

  14. Holographic superconductivity in the presence of dark matter: basic issues

    CERN Document Server

    Rogatko, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The holographic approach to study strongly coupled superconductors in the presence of dark matter is reviewed. We discuss the influence of dark matter on the superconducting transition temperature of both s-wave and p-wave holographic superconductors. The upper critical field, coherence length, penetration depth of holographic superconductors as well as the metal-insulator transitions have also been analysed. Issues related to the validity of AdS/CFT correspondence for the description of superconductors studied in the laboratory and possible experiments directed towards the detection of dark matter are discussed. In doing so we shall compare our assumptions and assertions with those generally accepted in the elementary particle experiments aimed at the detection of dark matter particles.

  15. A Holographic Bound for D3-Brane

    CERN Document Server

    Momeni, Davood; Bahamonde, Sebastian; Myrzakul, Aizhan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will calculate the holographic entanglement entropy, holographic complexity, and fidelity susceptibility for a D3-brane. It will be demonstrated that for a D3-brane the holographic complexity is always greater than or equal to than the fidelity susceptibility. Furthermore, we will also demonstrate that the holographic complexity is related to the holographic entanglement entropy for this system. Thus, we will obtain a holographic bound involving holographic complexity, holographic entanglement entropy and fidelity susceptibility of a D3-brane.

  16. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  17. Neural network method applied to particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ian; Pan, X.

    1993-12-01

    realised. An important class of neural network is the multi-layer perceptron. The neurons are distributed on surfaces and linked by weighted interconnections. In the present paper we demonstrate how this type of net can developed into a competitive, adaptive filter which will identify PIV image pairs in a number of commonly occurring flow types. Previous work by the authors in particle tracking analysis (1, 2) has shown the efficiency of statistical windowing techniques in flows without systematic (in time or space) variations. The effectiveness of the present neural net is illustrated by applying it to digital simulations ofturbulent and rotating flows. Work reported by Cenedese et al (3) has taken a different approach in examining the potential for neural net methods applied to PIV.

  18. Identification and Classification of Adenovirus Particles in Digital Microscopic Images using Active Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha Hiremath

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging is the technique and process used to create images of the human body or medical science. Digital image processing is the use of computer algorithms to perform image processing on digital images. Microscope image processing dates back a half century when it was realized that some of the techniques of image capture and manipulation, first developed for television, could also be applied to images captured through the microscope. This paper presents semi-automated segmentation and identification of adenovirus particles using active contour with multi grid segmentation model. The geometric features are employed to identify the adenovirus particles in digital microscopic image. The min-max, 3 rules are used for recognition of adenovirus particles. The results are compared with manual method obtained by microbiologist.

  19. Characterization of Protein Particles in Therapeutic Formulations Using Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Christine; Zeng, Yuanchun; Zhu, Rong-Rong

    2017-08-01

    Quantitation of particles >10 μm in therapeutic protein formulations is required by pharmacopeia guidelines, and characterization of particles particles; consequently, new methods are needed to measure the sub-10 μm size range. Here, we evaluate imaging flow cytometry (IFC) as a new method for detection of protein aggregates, taking advantage of key enabling attributes including rapid multi-modal high-resolution imaging of individual particles, low sample volume, high sampling efficiency, wide dynamic size and concentration range, and low clog risk. IFC sensitivity was compared with dynamic imaging, a "gold standard" technique for analysis of particles in protein formulations. Both techniques yielded similar results for polystyrene beads ≥2 μm. However, IFC demonstrated greater protein particle detection sensitivity, especially for the sub-10 μm size range. Interestingly, for an aggregated lysozyme sample, IFC detected protein particles using fluorescence images, whereas dynamic imaging failed to detect even large particles >25 μm due to high transparency. The results corroborate implementation of IFC as an advanced technique for protein particle analysis, offering in-depth characterization of particle physical and chemical properties, and enhanced sensitivity for sub-10 μm and transparent particles. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimizing the acquisition and analysis of confocal images for quantitative single-mobile-particle detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friaa, Ouided; Furukawa, Melissa; Shamas-Din, Aisha; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David W; Fradin, Cécile

    2013-08-01

    Quantification of the fluorescence properties of diffusing particles in solution is an invaluable source of information for characterizing the interactions, stoichiometry, or conformation of molecules directly in their native environment. In the case of heterogeneous populations, single-particle detection should be the method of choice and it can, in principle, be achieved by using confocal imaging. However, the detection of single mobile particles in confocal images presents specific challenges. In particular, it requires an adapted set of imaging parameters for capturing the confocal images and an adapted event-detection scheme for analyzing the image. Herein, we report a theoretical framework that allows a prediction of the properties of a homogenous particle population. This model assumes that the particles have linear trajectories with reference to the confocal volume, which holds true for particles with moderate mobility. We compare the predictions of our model to the results as obtained by analyzing the confocal images of solutions of fluorescently labeled liposomes. Based on this comparison, we propose improvements to the simple line-by-line thresholding event-detection scheme, which is commonly used for single-mobile-particle detection. We show that an optimal combination of imaging and analysis parameters allows the reliable detection of fluorescent liposomes for concentrations between 1 and 100 pM. This result confirms the importance of confocal single-particle detection as a complementary technique to ensemble fluorescence-correlation techniques for the studies of mobile particle.

  1. Particle imaging velocimetry experiments and lattice-Boltzmann simulations on a single sphere settling under gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Cate, A.; Nieuwstad, C.H.; Derksen, J.J.; Van den Akker, H.E.A.

    2002-01-01

    A comparison is made between experiments and simulations on a single sphere settling in silicon oil in a box. Cross-correlation particle imaging velocimetry measurements were carried out at particle Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.5 to 31.9. The particle Stokes number varied from 0.2 to 4 and at bot

  2. Particle image velocimetry for quantification of high pressure CO 2 release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A. de; Spruijt, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the current work evaluation of CO2 release velocity profiles is determined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The formation of solid CO2 particles using the rapid expansion of nozzle flow is used as a seeder particle, making the method truly nonintrusive and negates the use of special seeder

  3. The NASA Subsonic Jet Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Many tasks in fluids engineering require prediction of turbulence of jet flows. The present document documents the single-point statistics of velocity, mean and variance, of cold and hot jet flows. The jet velocities ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 times the ambient speed of sound, and temperatures ranged from unheated to static temperature ratio 2.7. Further, the report assesses the accuracies of the data, e.g., establish uncertainties for the data. This paper covers the following five tasks: (1) Document acquisition and processing procedures used to create the particle image velocimetry (PIV) datasets. (2) Compare PIV data with hotwire and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data published in the open literature. (3) Compare different datasets acquired at the same flow conditions in multiple tests to establish uncertainties. (4) Create a consensus dataset for a range of hot jet flows, including uncertainty bands. (5) Analyze this consensus dataset for self-consistency and compare jet characteristics to those of the open literature. The final objective was fulfilled by using the potential core length and the spread rate of the half-velocity radius to collapse of the mean and turbulent velocity fields over the first 20 jet diameters.

  4. An efficient simultaneous reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2009-10-01

    To date, Tomo-PIV has involved the use of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), where the intensity of each 3D voxel is iteratively corrected to satisfy one recorded projection, or pixel intensity, at a time. This results in reconstruction times of multiple hours for each velocity field and requires considerable computer memory in order to store the associated weighting coefficients and intensity values for each point in the volume. In this paper, a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm is presented based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Reconstructions of simulated images are presented for two simultaneous algorithms (SART and SMART) as well as the now standard MART algorithm, which indicate that the same accuracy as MART can be achieved 5.5 times faster or 77 times faster with 15 times less memory if the processing and storage of the weighting matrix is considered. Application of MLOS-SMART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Re θ = 2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1,000 × 1,000 × 160 voxels is discussed. Results indicate improvements in reconstruction speed of 15 times that of MART with precalculated weighting matrix, or 65 times if calculation of the weighting matrix is considered. Furthermore the memory needed to store a large weighting matrix and volume intensity is reduced by almost 40 times in this case.

  5. Particle Image Velocimetry studies of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are a congenital anomaly of the aortic valve with two fused leaflets, affecting about 1-2% of the population. BAV patients have much higher incidence of valve calcification & aortic dilatation, which may be related to altered mechanical forces from BAV hemodynamics. This study aims to characterize BAV hemodynamics using Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). BAV models are constructed from normal explanted porcine aortic valves by suturing two leaflets together. The valves are mounted in an acrylic chamber with two sinuses & tested in a pulsatile flow loop at physiological conditions. 2D PIV is performed to obtain flow fields in three planes downstream of the valve. The stenosed BAV causes an eccentric jet, resulting in a very strong vortex in the normal sinus. The bicuspid sinus vortex appears much weaker, but more unstable. Unsteady oscillatory shear stresses are also observed, which have been associated with adverse biological response; characterization of the hemodynamics of BAVs will provide the first step to understanding these processes better. Results from multiple BAV models of varying levels of stenosis will be presented & higher stenosis corresponded to stronger jets & increased aortic wall shear stresses.

  6. Image Schemas in Verb-Particle Constructions: Evidence from a Behavioral Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive linguists claim that verb-particle constructions are compositional and analyzable, and that the particles contribute to the overall meaning in the form of image schemas. This article examined this claim with a behavioral experiment, in which participants were asked to judge the sensibility of short sentences primed by image-schematic…

  7. QUANTITATIVE FLOW-ANALYSIS AROUND AQUATIC ANIMALS USING LASER SHEET PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STAMHUIS, EJ; VIDELER, JJ

    1995-01-01

    Two alternative particle image velocimetry (PIV) methods have been developed, applying laser light sheet illumination of particle-seeded flows around marine organisms, Successive video images, recorded perpendicular to a light sheet parallel to the main stream, were digitized and processed to map th

  8. Particle Morphology Analysis of Biomass Material Based on Improved Image Processing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaolin; Hu, Xiaojuan; Lu, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Particle morphology, including size and shape, is an important factor that significantly influences the physical and chemical properties of biomass material. Based on image processing technology, a method was developed to process sample images, measure particle dimensions, and analyse the particle size and shape distributions of knife-milled wheat straw, which had been preclassified into five nominal size groups using mechanical sieving approach. Considering the great variation of particle size from micrometer to millimeter, the powders greater than 250 μm were photographed by a flatbed scanner without zoom function, and the others were photographed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with high-image resolution. Actual imaging tests confirmed the excellent effect of backscattered electron (BSE) imaging mode of SEM. Particle aggregation is an important factor that affects the recognition accuracy of the image processing method. In sample preparation, the singulated arrangement and ultrasonic dispersion methods were used to separate powders into particles that were larger and smaller than the nominal size of 250 μm. In addition, an image segmentation algorithm based on particle geometrical information was proposed to recognise the finer clustered powders. Experimental results demonstrated that the improved image processing method was suitable to analyse the particle size and shape distributions of ground biomass materials and solve the size inconsistencies in sieving analysis.

  9. QUANTITATIVE FLOW-ANALYSIS AROUND AQUATIC ANIMALS USING LASER SHEET PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STAMHUIS, EJ; VIDELER, JJ

    Two alternative particle image velocimetry (PIV) methods have been developed, applying laser light sheet illumination of particle-seeded flows around marine organisms, Successive video images, recorded perpendicular to a light sheet parallel to the main stream, were digitized and processed to map

  10. Automatic post-picking improves particle image detection from Cryo-EM micrographs

    CERN Document Server

    Norousi, Ramin; Becker, Thomas; Beckmann, Roland; Schmid, Volker J; Tresch, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) studies using single particle reconstruction is extensively used to reveal structural information of macromolecular complexes. Aiming at the highest achievable resolution, state of the art electron microscopes acquire thousands of high-quality images. Having collected these data, each single particle must be detected and windowed out. Several fully- or semi-automated approaches have been developed for the selection of particle images from digitized micrographs. However they still require laborious manual post processing, which will become the major bottleneck for next generation of electron microscopes. Instead of focusing on improvements in automated particle selection from micrographs, we propose a post-picking step for classifying small windowed images, which are output by common picking software. A supervised strategy for the classification of windowed micrograph images into particles and non-particles reduces the manual workload by orders of magnitude. The method builds...

  11. Parchar – Characterization of Suspended Particles Through Image Processing in Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor Nygaard Markussen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of suspended particles and particle dynamics in aquatic environments increasingly rely on camera systems to characterize the particles. Numerous systems exist and all use different codes and practises to process the images from the systems. Here, a step-by-step guide to an image processing and particle characterization code for Matlab is presented with the aim of bringing the particle community towards standardized image processing techniques. The code uses morphological reconstruction and simple block processing to filter out noise, out-of-focus particles and light source inconsistencies. It has been implemented on a specific camera system but is applicable to numerous systems and on highly variable particle types due to the standardized setup.

  12. High speed versus pulsed images for micro-particle image velocimetry: a direct comparison of red blood cells versus fluorescing tracers as tracking particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Katie L; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    High speed photography in micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) using red blood cells as tracer particles and the use of fluorescing tracer particles (in conjunction with pulsed images) are directly compared by using both methods simultaneously. Measurements are taken on the same blood sample in the same microchip using both methods. This work directly and statistically compares the two methods of μPIV measurement in a controlled in vitro environment for the first time in literature. The pulsed method using fluorescing tracer particles is found to decrease the depth of correlation as expected, and to better represent the shape of the velocity profile. Two methods of velocity characterization are used (single and double parameter) and the pulsed images provide better shape representation in both cases.

  13. VOLUME STUDY WITH HIGH DENSITY OF PARTICLES BASED ON CONTOUR AND CORRELATION IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Yu. Nikolaeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study is the techniques of particle statistics evaluation, in particular, processing methods of particle images obtained by coherent illumination. This paper considers the problem of recognition and statistical accounting for individual images of small scattering particles in an arbitrary section of the volume in case of high concentrations. For automatic recognition of focused particles images, a special algorithm for statistical analysis based on contouring and thresholding was used. By means of the mathematical formalism of the scalar diffraction theory, coherent images of the particles formed by the optical system with high numerical aperture were simulated. Numerical testing of the method proposed for the cases of different concentrations and distributions of particles in the volume was performed. As a result, distributions of density and mass fraction of the particles were obtained, and the efficiency of the method in case of different concentrations of particles was evaluated. At high concentrations, the effect of coherent superposition of the particles from the adjacent planes strengthens, which makes it difficult to recognize images of particles using the algorithm considered in the paper. In this case, we propose to supplement the method with calculating the cross-correlation function of particle images from adjacent segments of the volume, and evaluating the ratio between the height of the correlation peak and the height of the function pedestal in the case of different distribution characters. The method of statistical accounting of particles considered in this paper is of practical importance in the study of volume with particles of different nature, for example, in problems of biology and oceanography. Effective work in the regime of high concentrations expands the limits of applicability of these methods for practically important cases and helps to optimize determination time of the distribution character and

  14. Deriving covariant holographic entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xi; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-11-01

    We provide a gravitational argument in favour of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy proposal. In general time-dependent states, the proposal asserts that the entanglement entropy of a region in the boundary field theory is given by a quarter of the area of a bulk extremal surface in Planck units. The main element of our discussion is an implementation of an appropriate Schwinger-Keldysh contour to obtain the reduced density matrix (and its powers) of a given region, as is relevant for the replica construction. We map this contour into the bulk gravitational theory, and argue that the saddle point solutions of these replica geometries lead to a consistent prescription for computing the field theory Rényi entropies. In the limiting case where the replica index is taken to unity, a local analysis suffices to show that these saddles lead to the extremal surfaces of interest. We also comment on various properties of holographic entanglement that follow from this construction.

  15. Deriving covariant holographic entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Xi; Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    We provide a gravitational argument in favour of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy proposal. In general time-dependent states, the proposal asserts that the entanglement entropy of a region in the boundary field theory is given by a quarter of the area of a bulk extremal surface in Planck units. The main element of our discussion is an implementation of an appropriate Schwinger-Keldysh contour to obtain the reduced density matrix (and its powers) of a given region, as is relevant for the replica construction. We map this contour into the bulk gravitational theory, and argue that the saddle point solutions of these replica geometries lead to a consistent prescription for computing the field theory Renyi entropies. In the limiting case where the replica index is taken to unity, a local analysis suffices to show that these saddles lead to the extremal surfaces of interest. We also comment on various properties of holographic entanglement that follow from this construction.

  16. Vorticity in holographic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Caldarelli, Marco M; Petkou, Anastasios C; Petropoulos, P Marios; Pozzoli, Valentina; Siampos, Konstadinos

    2012-01-01

    In view of the recent interest in reproducing holographically various properties of conformal fluids, we review the issue of vorticity in the context of AdS/CFT. Three-dimensional fluids with vorticity require four-dimensional bulk geometries with either angular momentum or nut charge, whose boundary geometries fall into the Papapetrou--Randers class. The boundary fluids emerge in stationary non-dissipative kinematic configurations, which can be cyclonic or vortex flows, evolving in compact or non-compact supports. A rich network of Einstein's solutions arises, naturally connected with three-dimensional Bianchi spaces. We use Fefferman--Graham expansion to handle holographic data from the bulk and discuss the alternative for reversing the process and reconstruct the exact bulk geometries.

  17. Holographic renormalization as a canonical transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    The gauge/string dualities have drawn attention to a class of variational problems on a boundary at infinity, which are not well defined unless a certain boundary term is added to the classical action. In the context of supergravity in asymptotically AdS spaces these problems are systematically addressed by the method of holographic renormalization. We argue that this class of a priori ill defined variational problems extends far beyond the realm of holographic dualities. As we show, exactly the same issues arise in gravity in non asymptotically AdS spaces, in point particles with certain unbounded from below potentials, and even fundamental strings in flat or AdS backgrounds. We show that the variational problem in all such cases can be made well defined by the following procedure, which is intrinsic to the system in question and does not rely on the existence of a holographically dual theory: (i) The first step is the construction of the space of the most general asymptotic solutions of the classical equati...

  18. Three dimensional tracking of gold nanoparticles using digital holographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Verpillat, Frédéric; Desbiolles, Pierre; Gross, Michel; 10.1117/12.896523

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a digital holographic microscope to track gold colloids in three dimensions. We report observations of 100nm gold particles in motion in water. The expected signal and the chosen method of reconstruction are described. We also discuss about how to implement the numerical calculation to reach real-time 3D tracking.

  19. Macroscopic three-dimensional particle location using stereoscopic imaging and astigmatic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J

    2014-12-15

    This Letter presents a stereoscopic imaging concept for measuring the locations of particles in three-dimensional space. The method is derived from astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV), a powerful technique that is capable of determining 3D particle locations with a single camera. APTV locates particle xy coordinates with high accuracy, while the particle z coordinate has a larger location uncertainty. This is not a problem for 3D2C (i.e., three dimensions, two velocity components) measurements, but for highly three-dimensional flows, it is desirable to measure three velocity components with similar accuracy. The stereoscopic APTV approach discussed in this report has this capability. The technique employs APTV for giving an initial estimate of the particle locations. With this information, corresponding particle images on both sensors of the stereoscopic imaging system are matched. Particle locations are then determined by mapping the two particle image sensor locations to physical space. The measurement error of stereo APTV, determined by acquiring images of 1-μm DEHS particles in a 40 mm×40 mm×20 mm measurement volume in air at Δxyz→0 between two frames, is less than 0.012 mm for xy and 0.025 mm for z. This error analysis proves the excellent suitability of stereo APTV for the measurement of three-dimensional flows in macroscopic domains.

  20. Near-Infrared Super Resolution Imaging with Metallic Nanoshell Particle Chain Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Weijie; Cao, Penfei; Cheng, Lin; Gong, Li; Zhao, Xining; Yang, Lili

    2012-01-01

    We propose a near-infrared super resolution imaging system without a lens or a mirror but with an array of metallic nanoshell particle chain. The imaging array can plasmonically transfer the near-field components of dipole sources in the incoherent and coherent manners and the super resolution images can be reconstructed in the output plane. By tunning the parameters of the metallic nanoshell particle, the plasmon resonance band of the isolate nanoshell particle red-shifts to the near-infrared region. The near-infrared super resolution images are obtained subsequently. We calculate the field intensity distribution at the different planes of imaging process using the finite element method and find that the array has super resolution imaging capability at near-infrared wavelengths. We also show that the image formation highly depends on the coherence of the dipole sources and the image-array distance.

  1. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  2. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C.; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: self­interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex-i.e., amplitude plus phase-hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  3. Gravitation, holographic principle, and extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Caimmi, R

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of Newton's theory of gravitation, restricted to point-like test particles and central bodies, stable circular orbits in ordinary space are related to stable circular paths on a massless, unmovable, undeformable vortex-like surface, under the action of a tidal gravitational field along the symmetry axis. An interpretation is made in the light of a holographic principle, in the sense that motions in ordinary space are connected with motions on a selected surface and vice versa. Then ordinary space is conceived as a 3-hypersurface bounding a $n$-hypervolume where gravitation takes origin, within a $n$-hyperspace. The extension of the holographic principle to extra dimensions implies the existence of a minimum distance where test particles may still be considered as distinct from the central body. Below that threshold, it is inferred test particles lose theirs individuality and "glue" to the central body via unification of the four known interactions and, in addition, (i) particles can no long...

  4. Holographic entanglement entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rangamani, Mukund

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of developments in the field of holographic entanglement entropy. Within the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence, it is shown how quantum entanglement is computed by the area of certain extremal surfaces. The general lessons one can learn from this connection are drawn out for quantum field theories, many-body physics, and quantum gravity. An overview of the necessary background material is provided together with a flavor of the exciting open questions that are currently being discussed. The book is divided into four main parts. In the first part, the concept of entanglement, and methods for computing it, in quantum field theories is reviewed. In the second part, an overview of the AdS/CFT correspondence is given and the holographic entanglement entropy prescription is explained. In the third part, the time-dependence of entanglement entropy in out-of-equilibrium systems, and applications to many body physics are explored using holographic methods. The last part f...

  5. ADAPTIVE LIFTING BASED IMAGE COMPRESSION SCHEME WITH PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat kanvel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive lifting scheme with Particle Swarm Optimization technique for image compression. Particle swarm Optimization technique is used to improve the accuracy of the predictionfunction used in the lifting scheme. This scheme is applied in Image compression and parameters such as PSNR, Compression Ratio and the visual quality of the image is calculated .The proposed scheme iscompared with the existing methods.

  6. Assessment of pressure field calculations from particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charonko, John J.; King, Cameron V.; Smith, Barton L.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the challenges associated with the determination of in-field pressure from DPIV (digital particle image velocimetry)-measured planar velocity fields for time-dependent incompressible flows. Several methods that have been previously explored in the literature are compared, including direct integration of the pressure gradients and solution of different forms of the pressure Poisson equations. Their dependence on grid resolution, sampling rate, velocity measurement error levels and off-axis recording was quantified using artificial data of two ideal sample flow fields—a decaying vortex flow and pulsatile flow between two parallel plates, and real DPIV and pressure data from oscillating flow through a diffuser. The need for special attention to mitigate the velocity error propagation in the pressure estimation is also addressed using a physics-preserving approach based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The results demonstrate that there is no unique or optimum method for estimating the pressure field and the resulting error will depend highly on the type of the flow. However, the virtual boundary, omni-directional pressure integration scheme first proposed by Liu and Katz (2006 Exp. Fluids 41 227-40) performed consistently well in both synthetic and experimental flows. Estimated errors can vary from less than 1% to over 100% with respect to the expected value, though in contrast to more traditional smoothing algorithms, the newly proposed POD-based filtering approach can reduce errors for a given set of conditions by an order of magnitude or more. This analysis offers valuable insight that allows optimizing the choice of methods and parameters based on the flow under consideration.

  7. Holographic predictions for cosmological 3-point functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bzowski, A.; McFadden, P.; Skenderis, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present the holographic predictions for cosmological 3-point correlators, involving both scalar and tensor modes, for a universe which started in a non-geometric holographic phase. Holographic formulae relate the cosmological 3-point functions to stress tensor correlation functions of a holograph

  8. Development of an optoelectronic holographic platform for otolaryngology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Ellery; Dobrev, Ivo; Bapat, Nikhil; Flores, Jorge Mauricio; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John; Cheng, Jeffery Tao; Scarpino, Chris; Ravicz, Michael

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present advances on our development of an optoelectronic holographic computing platform with the ability to quantitatively measure full-field-of-view nanometer-scale movements of the tympanic membrane (TM). These measurements can facilitate otologists' ability to study and diagnose hearing disorders in humans. The holographic platform consists of a laser delivery system and an otoscope. The control software, called LaserView, is written in Visual C++ and handles communication and synchronization between hardware components. It provides a user-friendly interface to allow viewing of holographic images with several tools to automate holography-related tasks and facilitate hardware communication. The software uses a series of concurrent threads to acquire images, control the hardware, and display quantitative holographic data at video rates and in two modes of operation: optoelectronic holography and lensless digital holography. The holographic platform has been used to perform experiments on several live and post-mortem specimens, and is to be deployed in a medical research environment with future developments leading to its eventual clinical use.

  9. Automatic post-picking using MAPPOS improves particle image detection from cryo-EM micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norousi, Ramin; Wickles, Stephan; Leidig, Christoph; Becker, Thomas; Schmid, Volker J; Beckmann, Roland; Tresch, Achim

    2013-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) studies using single particle reconstruction are extensively used to reveal structural information on macromolecular complexes. Aiming at the highest achievable resolution, state of the art electron microscopes automatically acquire thousands of high-quality micrographs. Particles are detected on and boxed out from each micrograph using fully- or semi-automated approaches. However, the obtained particles still require laborious manual post-picking classification, which is one major bottleneck for single particle analysis of large datasets. We introduce MAPPOS, a supervised post-picking strategy for the classification of boxed particle images, as additional strategy adding to the already efficient automated particle picking routines. MAPPOS employs machine learning techniques to train a robust classifier from a small number of characteristic image features. In order to accurately quantify the performance of MAPPOS we used simulated particle and non-particle images. In addition, we verified our method by applying it to an experimental cryo-EM dataset and comparing the results to the manual classification of the same dataset. Comparisons between MAPPOS and manual post-picking classification by several human experts demonstrated that merely a few hundred sample images are sufficient for MAPPOS to classify an entire dataset with a human-like performance. MAPPOS was shown to greatly accelerate the throughput of large datasets by reducing the manual workload by orders of magnitude while maintaining a reliable identification of non-particle images.

  10. Micro-magnetic simulation study on the magnetic particle imaging performance of anisotropic mono-domain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizenecker, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Rahmer, Jürgen; Borgert, Jörn

    2012-11-21

    The performance of magnetic mono-domain particles is of crucial importance in magnetic particle imaging (MPI). So far, the behavior of mono-domain particles has been modeled within the framework of Langevin theory. This theory predicts the dependence of the MPI signal on the particle core size, but cannot account for the influence of the shape, i.e. the anisotropy of the particle core. In this study we present the first micro-magnetic ab initio simulation of spectra of anisotropic particles with different core diameters in an oscillating magnetic field at 25 and 100 kHz. We find that the MPI signal strongly depends on the anisotropy of the magnetic core. Thus, a difference of 3 nm between the principal axes of a prolate ellipsoid with the volume of a 30 nm sphere can result in a complete loss of the MPI signal. Smaller anisotropies, however, can increase the MPI performance of the particle. The simulations show that the effect of the anisotropy on the MPI signal depends on the frequency of the oscillating magnetic field. At 100 kHz, the optimal signal is found at smaller anisotropies than at 25 kHz. Furthermore, the simulations show that experimental spectroscopic results for Resovist® can only be explained quantitatively by particles with a magnetic core size of at least 25 nm.

  11. Semi-automated sorting using holographic optical tweezers remotely controlled by eye/hand tracking camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    We proposed the improved control software for the holographic optical tweezers (HOT) proper for simple semi-automated sorting. The controller receives data from both the human interface sensors and the HOT microscope camera and processes them. As a result, the new positions of active laser traps are calculated, packed into the network format and sent to the remote HOT. Using the photo-polymerization technique, we created a sorting container consisting of two parallel horizontal walls where one wall contains "gates" representing a place where the trapped particle enters into the container. The positions of particles and gates are obtained by image analysis technique which can be exploited to achieve the higher level of automation. Sorting is documented on computer game simulation and the real experiment.

  12. A holographic bound for D3-brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood; Myrzakul, Aizhan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian National University, Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Eurasian National University, Department of General Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Bahamonde, Sebastian [University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, we will regularize the holographic entanglement entropy, holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility for a configuration of D3-branes. We will also study the regularization of the holographic complexity from the action for a configuration of D3-branes. It will be demonstrated that for a spherical shell of D3-branes the regularized holographic complexity is always greater than or equal to the regularized fidelity susceptibility. Furthermore, we will also demonstrate that the regularized holographic complexity is related to the regularized holographic entanglement entropy for this system. Thus, we will obtain a holographic bound involving regularized holographic complexity, regularized holographic entanglement entropy and regularized fidelity susceptibility of a configuration of D3-brane. We will also discuss a bound for regularized holographic complexity from action, for a D3-brane configuration. (orig.)

  13. Chemometric analysis of multi-sensor hyperspectral images of coarse mode aerosol particles for the image-based investigation on aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A.; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Held, Andreas; Lohninger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Multi-sensor hyperspectral imaging is a novel technique, which allows the determination of composition, chemical structure and pure components of laterally resolved samples by chemometric analysis of different hyperspectral datasets. These hyperspectral datasets are obtained by different imaging methods, analysing the same sample spot and superimposing the hyperspectral data to create a single multi-sensor dataset. Within this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images were obtained from size-segregated aerosol particles, sampled above Western Australian salt lakes. The particles were collected on aluminum foils inside a 2350 L Teflon chamber using a Sioutas impactor, sampling aerosol particles of sizes between 250 nm and 10 µm. The complex composition of the coarse-mode particles can be linked to primary emissions of inorganic species as well as to oxidized volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions. The oxidation products of VOC emissions are supposed to form an ultra-fine nucleation mode, which was observed during several field campaigns between 2006 and 2013. The aluminum foils were analysed using chemical imaging and electron microscopy. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the foils at a resolution of about 1 µm. The same area was analysed using a Quanta FEI 200 electron microscope (about 250 nm resolution). In addition to the high-resolution image, the elemental composition could be investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The obtained hyperspectral images were combined into a multi-sensor dataset using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs, www.imagelab.at). After pre-processing of the images, the multi-sensor hyperspectral dataset was analysed using several chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and other multivariate methods. Vertex

  14. Multi-atlas segmentation with particle-based group-wise image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohwi; Lyu, Ilwoo; Styner, Martin

    2014-03-21

    We propose a novel multi-atlas segmentation method that employs a group-wise image registration method for the brain segmentation on rodent magnetic resonance (MR) images. The core element of the proposed segmentation is the use of a particle-guided image registration method that extends the concept of particle correspondence into the volumetric image domain. The registration method performs a group-wise image registration that simultaneously registers a set of images toward the space defined by the average of particles. The particle-guided image registration method is robust with low signal-to-noise ratio images as well as differing sizes and shapes observed in the developing rodent brain. Also, the use of an implicit common reference frame can prevent potential bias induced by the use of a single template in the segmentation process. We show that the use of a particle guided-image registration method can be naturally extended to a novel multi-atlas segmentation method and improves the registration method to explicitly use the provided template labels as an additional constraint. In the experiment, we show that our segmentation algorithm provides more accuracy with multi-atlas label fusion and stability against pair-wise image registration. The comparison with previous group-wise registration method is provided as well.

  15. Drawing Lines with Light in Holographic Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin-Ren; Richardson, Martin

    2013-02-01

    This paper explores the dynamic and expressive possibilities of holographic art through a comparison of art history and technical media such as photography, film and holographic technologies. Examples of modern art and creative expression of time and motions are examined using the early 20th century art movement, Cubism, where subjects are portrayed to be seen simultaneously from different angles. Folding space is represented as subject matter as it can depict space from multiple points of time. The paper also investigates the way holographic art has explored time and space. The lenticular lens-based media reveal a more subjective poetic art in the form of the lyrical images and messages as spectators pass through time, or walk along with the piece of work through an interactive process. It is argued that photographic practice is another example of artistic representation in the form of aesthetic medium of time movement and as such shares a common ground with other dynamic expression that require time based interaction.

  16. Simultaneous steering and imaging of magnetic particles using MRI toward delivery of therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfoul, Ouajdi; Becker, Aaron T.; Fagogenis, Georgios; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance navigation (MRN) offers the potential for real-time steering of drug particles and cells to targets throughout the body. In this technique, the magnetic gradients of an MRI scanner perform image-based steering of magnetically-labelled therapeutics through the vasculature and into tumours. A major challenge of current techniques for MRN is that they alternate between pulse sequences for particle imaging and propulsion. Since no propulsion occurs while imaging the particles, this results in a significant reduction in imaging frequency and propulsive force. We report a new approach in which an imaging sequence is designed to simultaneously image and propel particles. This sequence provides a tradeoff between maximum propulsive force and imaging frequency. In our reported example, the sequence can image at 27 Hz while still generating 95% of the force produced by a purely propulsive pulse sequence. We implemented our pulse sequence on a standard clinical scanner using millimetre-scale particles and demonstrated high-speed (74 mm/s) navigation of a multi-branched vascular network phantom. Our study suggests that the magnetic gradient magnitudes previously demonstrated to be sufficient for pure propulsion of micron-scale therapeutics in magnetic resonance targeting (MRT) could also be sufficient for real-time steering of these particles. PMID:27666666

  17. Millimeter wave, high-resolution, holographic surveillance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, D.L.; Sheen, D.M.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; Smith, R.R.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    Millimeter wave holographic imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing to detect contraband, metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons may provided a practical solution to personnel inspection needs in mass transportation centers. Traditional inspection systems, such as metal detectors and x-ray imaging systems, have limitations for the detection of concealed weapons. metal detectors are limited because they cannot detect plastic weapons and x-ray imaging systems are limited in use due to radiological health considerations. A prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system has been developed and demonstrated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system developed at PNL consists of a sequentially switched 2 {times} 64 element array coupled to a 35 GHz bi-static transceiver. The sequentially switched array of antennas can be used to obtain the holographic data at high speed by electonically sequencing the antennas along one dimension and performing a mechanical scan along the other dimension. A one-dimensional mechanical scan be be performed in about one second. The prototype system scans an aperture of 0.75 by 2.05. This system has been demonstrated and images have been obtained on volunteers at Sea-Tac International airport in Seattle, Washington.

  18. Optimisation of a stirred bioreactor through the use of a novel holographic correlation velocimetry flow measurement technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd-Zulhilmi Ismadi

    Full Text Available We describe a method for measuring three dimensional (3D velocity fields of a fluid at high speed, by combining a correlation-based approach with in-line holography. While this method utilizes tracer particles contained within the flow, our method does not require the holographic reconstruction of 3D images. The direct flow reconstruction approach developed here allows for measurements at seeding densities in excess of the allowable levels for techniques based on image or particle reconstruction, thus making it suited for biological flow measurement, such as the flow in bioreactor. We outline the theory behind our method, which we term Holographic Correlation Velocimetry (HCV, and subsequently apply it to both synthetic and laboratory data. Moreover, because the system is based on in-line holography, it is very efficient with regard to the use of light, as it does not rely on side scattering. This efficiency could be utilized to create a very high quality system at a modest cost. Alternatively, this efficiency makes the system appropriate for high-speed flows and low exposure times, which is essential for imaging dynamic systems.

  19. Direct calculation of the weighting function and depth of correlation in Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (Micro-PIV) from particle images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Michael; Wieneke, Bernhard; Seemann, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Micro-PIV has become the most popular tool to measure flow profiles in microfluidics. When measuring in-plane velocities in a three dimensional flow the measured velocity depends on all particles in the images, even on defocused particles, and is given by a weighted average of the true velocity dx(z) with a weighting function W(z). W(z) depends on the optical setup as well as on the particle diameter and gradients of the flow-profile. The width of W(z) determines the height-extension of the plane in which particles can influence the measurement (Depth of Correlation, DOC). Thus the knowledge of the system dependent W(z) is crucial and can be used to reduce the errors introduced by depth-averaging the velocity field. We determine W(z) and thus the DOC using artificial double images for any given flow profile generated from particle images taken with the same optical setup as used for the PIV measurements. Experimental results for objectives with different numerical apertures (NA), different particle sizes and various out-of-plane gradients will be discussed. The resulting weighting function turns out to be quite asymmetric for air-objectives with high NAs, differing significantly in shape and width (DOC) from existing theoretical predictions.

  20. Holographic display system using combination of exchangeable holograms and intelligent illuminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Sakamoto, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    The authors developed the spatial imaging display using holographic images. A hologram playbacks the virtual 3D images, which are floating in the air. We hope these spatial images have motions and interactive changes. We proposed a prototype imaging unit last year. This tabletop display system consists of the hologram and illumination system. When the user puts a special object like a card, the illumination can change the color of light so as to reconstruct various spatial images. The observers can select and view the spatial image of a hologram using this interactive holographic display. However, this system has the restriction of the reconstructing images. The multiple recording and reconstructing technique playbacks ten images at most. To reconstruct numerous images, we switch the key of an interaction from card objects to holograms. In this paper, we describe an intelligent illumination unit, which can recognize the holographic material attached an RFID tag.

  1. Latest developments of dynamic holographic three-dimensional display%动态全息三维显示研究最新进展∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾超; 高洪跃; 刘吉成; 于瀛洁; 姚秋香; 刘攀; 郑华东; 曾震湘

    2015-01-01

    Holographic three-dimensional (3D) display is a true 3D display technique, which can provide realistic image of a real object or a scene because holography has the ability to reconstruct both the intensity and phase information, i.e., the wave front of the object or scene. Therefore, it could allow the observers to perceive the light as it is scattered by the real object itself without any special eyewear, which is quite different from other 3D display techniques, such as stereoscopic displays and volumetric 3D displays. In this paper, the achievements and developments of the latest new holographic 3D displays are presented. Holographic 3D displays can be divided into static holographic 3D displays and dynamic holographic 3D displays. Here, we briefly introduce the principle of holographic 3D display technique and static holographic 3D displays, and focus on dynamic holographic 3D displays. Large-size, high-resolution and color static holographic 3D displays have already been successfully fabricated and applied in some areas, such as holographic 3D maps and holographic 3D images. However, dynamic holographic 3D displays based on both optical materials and spatial light modulators (SLMs) are still under research, which is a challenge to their applications. Some holographic researchers study the holographic 3D displays based on the SLMs for large-size and large view angle display, but it is difficult to realize them because of limitations of SLMs and there still needs much effort to solve these problems in SLMs. Other holographic researchers work on dynamic holographic materials, such as inorganic crystals, photorefractive polymer, photochromic material etc. The response time and diffraction efficiency are key factors to these materials. Compared with other holographic media, liquid crystals with super-fast response time (about 1 ms) have been reported, which makes it possible to realize video refresh-rate holographic displays. The achievements of dynamic holography

  2. Spatiotemporal multiplexing method for visual field of view extension in holographic displays with naked eye observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, G.; Kujawińska, M.; Kozacki, T.; Zaperty, W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose a method which allows to overcome the basic functional problems in holographic displays with naked eye observation caused by delivering too small images visible in narrow viewing angles. The solution is based on combining the spatiotemporal multiplexing method with a 4f optical system. It enables to increase an aperture of a holographic display and extend the angular visual field of view. The applicability of the modified display is evidenced by Wigner distribution analysis of holographic imaging with spatiotemporal multiplexing method and by the experiments performed at the display demonstrator.

  3. Holographic interference filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Damon W.

    Holographic mirrors have wavelength-selection properties and thus qualify as a class of interference filters. Two theoretical methods for analyzing such structures are developed. The first method uses Hill's matrix method to yield closed-forms solutions in terms of the Floquet-Bloch waves within a periodic structure. A process is developed for implementing this solution method on a computer, using sparse-matrix memory allocation, numerical root-finding algorithms, and inverse-iteration techniques. It is demonstrated that Hill's matrix method is valid for the analysis of finite and multi-periodic problems. The second method of theoretical analysis is a transfer-matrix technique, which is herein termed thin-film decomposition. It is shown that the two methods of solution yield results that differ by, at worst, a fraction of a percent. Using both calculation techniques, a number of example problems are explored. Of key importance is the construction of a set of curves that are useful for the design and characterization of holographic interference filters. In addition to the theoretical development, methods are presented for the fabrication of holographic interference filters using DuPont HRF-800X001 photopolymer. Central to the exposure system is a frequency-stabilized, tunable dye laser. The types of filters fabricated include single-tone reflection filters, two types of multitone reflection filters, and reflection filters for infrared wavelengths. These filters feature index profiles that are not easily attainable through other fabrication methods. As a supplement to the body of the dissertation, the computer algorithms developed to implement Hill's matrix method and thin-film decomposition are also included as an appendix. Further appendices provide more information on Floquet's theorem and Hill's matrix method. A final appendix presents a design for an infrared laser spectrophotometer.

  4. Effect of Recording Parameters Error on Imaging Performance of Type I Holographic Concave Gratings%Ⅰ型全息凹面光栅制作误差对光谱像的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔鹏; 巴音贺希格; 李文昊; 唐玉国; 崔锦江

    2011-01-01

    通过对Ⅰ型全息凹面光栅制作参量误差对光谱像的影响进行数值计算发现:1)两记录臂长的相对误差而不是绝对误差决定光谱像的展宽程度,即使绝对误差较大,只要两记录臂长的误差值相同,像宽也没有明显改变;2)由于Ⅰ型光栅的记录臂一般较长,记录角度误差对像宽的影响不大,但会影响光栅的刻线密度,导致光谱成像位置的偏移;3)曲率半径误差对像宽的影响较大.通过数值模拟明确了Ⅰ型全息凹面光栅制作的误差容许范围,找到了对光谱像宽度影响较大的误差来源,从而为此类光栅的制作提供理论指导,有助于制作出高质量光栅,降低罗兰圆光谱仪的调节难度.%The imaging performance of type I holographic concave gratings would be seriously deteriorated by the recording parameters error during fabrication of the gratings. A numerical simulation was made for analyzing the effect of recording parameters error on imaging performance of the grating. The following conclusions can be obtained from the simulation results. Firstly, the larger the difference between errors of the two recording distances, the worse the imaging performance becomes. Secondly, the recording angle error remains very small because the recording distances for type I gratings are usually very long. The image widths would not change significantly. But the locations of the images would change because the grating constant is different from the desired value. Finally, it is very important to make the curvature radius as close to the namely value as possible, because the radius error would greatly deteriorated the focusing abilities of the gratings. This study can give theoretical guidance to the fabrication for type I holographic concave gratings and reduce the alignment difficulty for the Rowland circle spectrographs.

  5. Direct calculation of depth of correlation and weighting function in μPIV from experimental particle images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, M.; Wieneke, B.; Seemann, R.

    2013-01-01

    Micro-PIV (μPIV) uses volume-illumination and imaging of fluorescent tracer particles through a single microscope objective. Displacement fields measured by image correlation depend on all imaged particles, including defocused particles. The measured in-plane displacement is a weighted average of th

  6. Holographic Magnetisation Density Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically $AdS$ black brane solutions of $D=4$ Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two $U(1)$ gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to $d=3$ CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the $U(1)$'s. Below a critical temperature the system's magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  7. Holographic charge density waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with non-zero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  8. Holographic charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  9. Holographic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martucci, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia “Galileo Galilei' , Università di Padova,and INFN - Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Zaffaroni, Alberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca,and INFN - Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2016-06-28

    We derive the four-dimensional low-energy effective field theory governing the moduli space of strongly coupled superconformal quiver gauge theories associated with D3-branes at Calabi-Yau conical singularities in the holographic regime of validity. We use the dual supergravity description provided by warped resolved conical geometries with mobile D3-branes. Information on the baryonic directions of the moduli space is also obtained by using wrapped Euclidean D3-branes. We illustrate our general results by discussing in detail their application to the Klebanov-Witten model.

  10. Explaining Holographic Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The possible holographic origin of dark energy is investigated. The main existing explanations, namely the UV/IR connection argument of Cohen et al., Thomas’ bulk holography argument, and Ng’s spacetime foam argument, are shown to be not wholly satisfactory. A new explanation is then proposed based on the ideas of Thomas and Ng. It is suggested that dark energy originates from the quantum fluctuations of spacetime limited by the event horizon of the universe. Several potential problems of the explanation are also discussed.

  11. Holographic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordrup, Karl; Negretti, Antonio; Mølmer, Klaus

    2008-07-25

    We propose to use a single mesoscopic ensemble of trapped polar molecules for quantum computing. A "holographic quantum register" with hundreds of qubits is encoded in collective excitations with definite spatial phase variations. Each phase pattern is uniquely addressed by optical Raman processes with classical optical fields, while one- and two-qubit gates and qubit readout are accomplished by transferring the qubit states to a stripline microwave cavity field and a Cooper pair box where controllable two-level unitary dynamics and detection is governed by classical microwave fields.

  12. Holographic twin Higgs model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-15

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at m_{KK}, naturally allowing for m_{KK} beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider.

  13. An Image Enhancement Method Using the Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with an Adaptive Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement techniques are very important to image processing, which are used to improve image quality or extract the fine details in degraded images. In this paper, two novel objective functions based on the normalized incomplete Beta transform function are proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of grayscale image enhancement and color image enhancement, respectively. Using these objective functions, the parameters of transform functions are estimated by the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. We also propose an improved QPSO with an adaptive parameter control strategy. The QPSO and the AQPSO algorithms, along with genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO, are tested on several benchmark grayscale and color images. The results show that the QPSO and AQPSO perform better than GA and PSO for the enhancement of these images, and the AQPSO has some advantages over QPSO due to its adaptive parameter control strategy.

  14. Projection-type see-through holographic three-dimensional display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakunami, Koki; Hsieh, Po-Yuan; Oi, Ryutaro; Senoh, Takanori; Sasaki, Hisayuki; Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Okui, Makoto; Huang, Yi-Pai; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the limited spatio-temporal resolution of display devices, dynamic holographic three-dimensional displays suffer from a critical trade-off between the display size and the visual angle. Here we show a projection-type holographic three-dimensional display, in which a digitally designed holographic optical element and a digital holographic projection technique are combined to increase both factors at the same time. In the experiment, the enlarged holographic image, which is twice as large as the original display device, projected on the screen of the digitally designed holographic optical element was concentrated at the target observation area so as to increase the visual angle, which is six times as large as that for a general holographic display. Because the display size and the visual angle can be designed independently, the proposed system will accelerate the adoption of holographic three-dimensional displays in industrial applications, such as digital signage, in-car head-up displays, smart-glasses and head-mounted displays.

  15. 2-D IMAGE-BASED VOLUMETRIC MODELING FOR PARTICLE OF RANDOM SHAPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ken; Larry E. Banta; Jiang Gangyi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to predicting randomly-shaped particle volume based on its twoDimensional (2-D) digital image is explored. Conversion of gray-scale image of the particles to its binary counterpart is first performed using backlighting technique. The silhouette of particle is thus obtained, and consequently, informative features such as particle area, centroid and shape-related descriptors are collected. Several dimensionless parameters are defined, and used as regressor variables in a multiple linear regression model to predict particle volume. Regressor coefficients are found by fitting to a randomly selected sample of 501 particles ranging in size from 4.75mm to 25mm. The model testing experiment is conducted against a different aggregate sample of the similar statistical properties, the errors of the model-predicted volume of the batch is within ±2%.

  16. Feed particle size evaluation: conventional approach versus digital holography based image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Dell’Orto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of image analysis approach based on digital holography in defining particle size in comparison with the sieve shaker method (sieving method as reference method. For this purpose ground corn meal was analyzed by a sieve shaker Retsch VS 1000 and by image analysis approach based on digital holography. Particle size from digital holography were compared with results obtained by screen (sieving analysis for each of size classes by a cumulative distribution plot. Comparison between particle size values obtained by sieving method and image analysis indicated that values were comparable in term of particle size information, introducing a potential application for digital holography and image analysis in feed industry.

  17. High Dynamic Velocity Range Particle Image Velocimetry Using Multiple Pulse Separation Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg S. O’Donovan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS technique (i records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods.

  18. Holographic interferometry applied to the case of large deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, W

    1989-11-01

    This investigation in holographic interferometry concerns an approach to a systematic quasi-compensation by appropriate optical modifications at the reconstruction in order that the fringes of interference become visible in the case of large unknown object deformations. The relevant relations are established by using the aberration theory for the image formation in combination with elementary intrinsic differential geometry.

  19. Holographic motion picture camera with Doppler shift compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A holographic motion picture camera is reported for producing three dimensional images by employing an elliptical optical system. There is provided in one of the beam paths (the object or reference beam path) a motion compensator which enables the camera to photograph faster moving objects.

  20. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  1. A wideband sensitive holographic photopolymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingju Huang; Sulian Wang; Airong Wang; Qiaoxia Gong; Fuxi Gan

    2005-01-01

    A novel wideband sensitive dry holographic photopolymer sensitized by rose bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB) is fabricated, the holographic storage characteristics of which are investigated under different exposure wavelengths. The result shows that the sensitive spectral band exceeds 200 nm in visible light range, the maximum diffraction efficiency under different exposure wavelengths is more than 40% and decreases with the decrease of exposure wavelength, the exposure sensitivity is not change with the exposure wavelength.This photopolymer is appropriate for wavelength multiplexing or multi-wavelength recording in digital holographic storage.

  2. Introduction to Holographic Superconductor Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Li-Fang; Yang, Run-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    In the last years it has been shown that some properties of strongly coupled superconductors can be potentially described by classical general relativity living in one higher dimension, which is known as holographic superconductors. This paper gives a quick and introductory overview of some holographic superconductor models with s-wave, p-wave and d-wave orders in the literature from point of view of bottom-up, and summarizes some basic properties of these holographic models in various regimes. The competition and coexistence of these superconductivity orders are also studied in these superconductor models.

  3. High resolution isotopic analysis of U-bearing particles via fusion of SIMS and EDS images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Willingham, David

    2016-01-01

    Image fusion of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) images and X-ray elemental maps from energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed to facilitate the isolation and re-analysis of isotopically unique U-bearing particles where the highest precision SIMS measurements are required. Image registration, image fusion and particle micromanipulation were performed on a subset of SIMS images obtained from a large area pre-screen of a particle distribution from a sample containing several certified reference materials (CRM) U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850, as well as a standard reference material (SRM) 8704 (Buffalo River Sediment) to simulate particles collected on swipes during routine inspections of declared uranium enrichment facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In total, fourteen particles, ranging in size from 5 – 15 µm, were isolated and re-analyzed by SIMS in multi-collector mode identifying nine particles of CRM U129A, one of U150, one of U500 and three of U850. These identifications were made within a few percent errors from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) certified atom percent values for 234U, 235U and 238U for the corresponding CRMs. This work represents the first use of image fusion to enhance the accuracy and precision of isotope ratio measurements for isotopically unique U-bearing particles for nuclear safeguards applications. Implementation of image fusion is essential for the identification of particles of interests that fall below the spatial resolution of the SIMS images.

  4. Exploring neural cell dynamics with digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-07-11

    In this review, we summarize how the new concept of digital optics applied to the field of holographic microscopy has allowed the development of a reliable and flexible digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy (DH-QPM) technique at the nanoscale particularly suitable for cell imaging. Particular emphasis is placed on the original biological ormation provided by the quantitative phase signal. We present the most relevant DH-QPM applications in the field of cell biology, including automated cell counts, recognition, classification, three-dimensional tracking, discrimination between physiological and pathophysiological states, and the study of cell membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale. In the last part, original results show how DH-QPM can address two important issues in the field of neurobiology, namely, multiple-site optical recording of neuronal activity and noninvasive visualization of dendritic spine dynamics resulting from a full digital holographic microscopy tomographic approach. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.

  5. Future of photorefractive based holographic 3D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, P.-A.; Bablumian, A.; Voorakaranam, R.; Christenson, C.; Lemieux, D.; Thomas, J.; Norwood, R. A.; Yamamoto, M.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-02-01

    The very first demonstration of our refreshable holographic display based on photorefractive polymer was published in Nature early 20081. Based on the unique properties of a new organic photorefractive material and the holographic stereography technique, this display addressed a gap between large static holograms printed in permanent media (photopolymers) and small real time holographic systems like the MIT holovideo. Applications range from medical imaging to refreshable maps and advertisement. Here we are presenting several technical solutions for improving the performance parameters of the initial display from an optical point of view. Full color holograms can be generated thanks to angular multiplexing, the recording time can be reduced from minutes to seconds with a pulsed laser, and full parallax hologram can be recorded in a reasonable time thanks to parallel writing. We also discuss the future of such a display and the possibility of video rate.

  6. Tomographic particle image velocimetry and its application to turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry is a new experimental method developed to study three-dimensional motion in turbulent flows. The technique is an extension of standard PIV and makes use of several simultaneous views of illuminated tracer particles and their three-dimensional reconstruction as

  7. Effect of feed processing on size of (washed) faeces particles from pigs measured by image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Peder; Kornfelt, Louise Foged; Hansen, Christian Fink

    2005-01-01

    of particles from the sieving fractions were scanned and the length and width of individual particles were identified using image analysis software. The overall mean, mode and median were estimated from a composite function. The dietary physical characteristics significantly affected the proportion of faecal...

  8. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; Van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; CruzTorres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; ElRifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb(-1) of proton-proton collisions collected at root s = 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from

  9. Dual-wavelength digital holography for 3D particle image velocimetry: experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grare, S; Allano, D; Coëtmellec, S; Perret, G; Corbin, F; Brunel, M; Gréhan, G; Lebrun, D

    2016-01-20

    A multi-exposure digital in-line hologram of a particle field is recorded by two successive pulses of different wavelengths. During the reconstruction step, each recording can be independently analyzed by selecting a given wavelength. This procedure enables avoiding the superimposition of particle images that may be close to each other.

  10. Cryogenic holographic distortion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, David G.

    1994-06-01

    Hughes cryogenic holographic test facility allows for the rapid characterization of optical components and mechanical structures at elevated and reduced temperatures. The facility consists of a 1.6 meter diameter thermal vacuum chamber, vibration isolated experiment test platform, and a holographic camera assembly. Temperatures as low as 12 Kelvin and as high as 350 Kelvin have been demonstrated. Complex aspheric mirrors are tested without the need for auxiliary null lenses and may be tested in either the polished or unpolished state. Structural elements such as optical benches, solar array panels, and spacecraft antennas have been tested. Types of materials tested include beryllium, silicon carbide, aluminum, graphite epoxy, silicon/aluminum matrix material and injection molded plastics. Sizes have ranged from 7 cm X 15 cm to 825 cm X 1125 cm and have weighed as little as 0.2 Kg and as much as 130 Kg. Surface figure changes as little as (lambda) /10 peak-to-valley ((lambda) equals .514 micrometers ) are routinely measured.

  11. Fully convolutional neural network for removing background in noisy images of uranium bearing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Butler, Lamar; Foster, Keeyahna; Gumbs, Caleb M.; Howard, Andrea L.; Willingham, David

    2017-01-01

    A fully convolutional neural network (FCN) was developed to supersede automatic or manual thresholding algorithms used for tabulating SIMS particle search data. The FCN was designed to perform a binary classification of pixels in each image belonging to a particle or not, thereby effectively removing background signal without manually or automatically determining an intensity threshold. Using 8,000 images from 28 different particle screening analyses, the FCN was trained to accurately predict pixels belonging to a particle with near 99% accuracy. Background eliminated images were then segmented using a watershed technique in order to determine isotopic ratios of particles. A comparison of the isotopic distributions of an independent data set segmented using the neural network, compared to a commercially available automated particle measurement (APM) program developed by CAMECA, highlighted the necessity for effective background removal to ensure that resulting particle identification is not only accurate, but preserves valuable signal that could be lost due to improper segmentation. The FCN approach improves the robustness of current state-of-the-art particle searching algorithms by reducing user input biases, resulting in an improved absolute signal per particle and decreased uncertainty of the determined isotope ratios.

  12. Particle size distribution of brown and white rice during gastric digestion measured by image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Kostlan, Kevin; Singh, R Paul

    2013-09-01

    The particle size distribution of foods during gastric digestion indicates the amount of physical breakdown that occurred due to the peristaltic movement of the stomach walls in addition to the breakdown that initially occurred during oral processing. The objective of this study was to present an image analysis technique that was rapid, simple, and could distinguish between food components (that is, rice kernel and bran layer in brown rice). The technique was used to quantify particle breakdown of brown and white rice during gastric digestion in growing pigs (used as a model for an adult human) over 480 min of digestion. The particle area distributions were fit to a Rosin-Rammler distribution function. Brown and white rice exhibited considerable breakdown as the number of particles per image decreased over time. The median particle area (x(50)) increased during digestion, suggesting a gastric sieving phenomenon, where small particles were emptied and larger particles were retained for additional breakdown. Brown rice breakdown was further quantified by an examination of the bran layer fragments and rice grain pieces. The percentage of total particle area composed of bran layer fragments was greater in the distal stomach than the proximal stomach in the first 120 min of digestion. The results of this study showed that image analysis may be used to quantify particle breakdown of a soft food product during gastric digestion, discriminate between different food components, and help to clarify the role of food structure and processing in food breakdown during gastric digestion.

  13. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  14. Setting up of holographic optical tweezer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Tata, B. V. R.; Ravindran, T. R.

    2017-05-01

    Optical tweezers use tightly focused laser beams to hold and move microscopic objects in a solvent. However, many applications require simultaneous control over multitude of particles, positioning them in 3D space at desired locations with desired symmetry, which is made possible by the use of holographic optical tweezers using the technique of beam shaping and holography. We have designed and developed a holographic optical tweezer set-up using a phase only liquid crystal, reflective spatial light modulator. We employ the technique of phase modulation to modulate the phase of the beam by generating holograms using Random Superposition (RS) and weighted Gerchberg Saxton algorithm (WGS) algorithm for generating desired patterns of light at the trapping plane. A 4×4 array of beams with square symmetry was generated using WGS algorithm and trapped polystyrene particles of size 1.2 micron in a 4×4 two dimensional array. There were uniformity issues among the trap intensities, as we move away from the zeroth order spot. This was corrected by taking into account diffraction effects due to the pixelated nature of SLM modulating the intensity of the trap spots and the ghost order suppression by spatial disorder.

  15. Adventures in Holographic Dimer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Karch, Andreas; /Washington U., Seattle; Yaida, Sho; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. Firstly, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Secondly, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.

  16. Code properties from holographic geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Pastawski, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Almheiri, Dong, and Harlow [hep-th/1411.7041] proposed a highly illuminating connection between the AdS/CFT holographic correspondence and operator algebra quantum error correction (OAQEC). Here we explore this connection further. We derive some general results about OAQEC, as well as results that apply specifically to quantum codes which admit a holographic interpretation. We introduce a new quantity called `price', which characterizes the support of a protected logical system, and find constraints on the price and the distance for logical subalgebras of quantum codes. We show that holographic codes defined on bulk manifolds with asymptotically negative curvature exhibit `uberholography', meaning that a bulk logical algebra can be supported on a boundary region with a fractal structure. We argue that, for holographic codes defined on bulk manifolds with asymptotically flat or positive curvature, the boundary physics must be highly nonlocal, an observation with potential implications for black holes and for q...

  17. Multi-pass light amplification for tomographic particle image velocimetry applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaemi, S.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    The light source budget is a critical issue for tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) systems due to its requirement for large illuminated volume and imaging at small apertures. In this work, a light amplification system based on the multi-pass concept is investigated for Tomo-PIV applic

  18. Micro-particle image velocimetry for velocity profile measurements of micro blood flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Katie L; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-04-25

    Micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) is used to visualize paired images of micro particles seeded in blood flows. The images are cross-correlated to give an accurate velocity profile. A protocol is presented for μPIV measurements of blood flows in microchannels. At the scale of the microcirculation, blood cannot be considered a homogeneous fluid, as it is a suspension of flexible particles suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. Shear rate, maximum velocity, velocity profile shape, and flow rate can be derived from these measurements. Several key parameters such as focal depth, particle concentration, and system compliance, are presented in order to ensure accurate, useful data along with examples and representative results for various hematocrits and flow conditions.

  19. Particle detection and classification using commercial off the shelf CMOS image sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Martín [Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche, 8400 (Argentina); Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Lipovetzky, Jose, E-mail: lipo@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche, 8400 (Argentina); Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Sofo Haro, Miguel; Sidelnik, Iván; Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Alcalde Bessia, Fabricio; Berisso, Mariano Gómez [Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche, 8400 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper we analyse the response of two different Commercial Off The shelf CMOS image sensors as particle detectors. Sensors were irradiated using X-ray photons, gamma photons, beta particles and alpha particles from diverse sources. The amount of charge produced by different particles, and the size of the spot registered on the sensor are compared, and analysed by an algorithm to classify them. For a known incident energy spectrum, the employed sensors provide a dose resolution lower than microGray, showing their potentials in radioprotection, area monitoring, or medical applications.

  20. Segmented holographic spectrum splitting concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Silvana P.; Vorndran, Shelby; Wu, Yuechen; Chrysler, Benjamin; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a segmented parabolic concentrator employing holographic spectral filters that provide focusing and spectral bandwidth separation capability to the system. Strips of low band gap silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells are formed into a parabolic surface as shown by Holman et. al. [1]. The surface of the PV segments is covered with holographic elements formed in dichromated gelatin. The holographic elements are designed to transmit longer wavelengths to silicon cells, and to reflect short wavelength light towards a secondary collector where high-bandgap PV cells are mounted. The system can be optimized for different combinations of diffuse and direct solar illumination conditions for particular geographical locations by controlling the concentration ratio and filtering properties of the holographic elements. In addition, the reflectivity of the back contact of the silicon cells is used to increase the optical path length and light trapping. This potentially allows the use of thin film silicon for the low bandgap PV cell material. The optical design combines the focusing properties of the parabolic concentrator and the holographic element to control the concentration ratio and uniformity of the spectral distribution at the high bandgap cell location. The presentation concludes with a comparison of different spectrum splitting holographic filter materials for this application.

  1. Improved cuckoo search with particle swarm optimization for classification of compressed images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vamsidhar Enireddy; Reddi Kiran Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The need for a general purpose Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) system for huge image databases has attracted information-technology researchers and institutions for CBIR techniques development. These techniques include image feature extraction, segmentation, feature mapping, representation, semantics, indexing and storage, image similarity-distance measurement and retrieval making CBIR system development a challenge. Since medical images are large in size running to megabits of data they are compressed to reduce their size for storage and transmission. This paper investigates medical image retrieval problem for compressed images. An improved image classification algorithm for CBIR is proposed. In the proposed method, RAW images are compressed using Haar wavelet. Features are extracted using Gabor filter and Sobel edge detector. The extracted features are classified using Partial Recurrent Neural Network (PRNN). Since training parameters in Neural Network are NP hard, a hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) – Cuckoo Search algorithm (CS) is proposed to optimize the learning rate of the neural network.

  2. Cherenkov light imaging in astro-particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2014-12-01

    Cherenkov light emission plays a key role in contemporary science; it is widely used in high energy, nuclear, and numerous astro-particle physics experiments. Most astro-particle physics experiments are based on the detection of light, and a vast majority of them on the measurement of Cherenkov light. Cherenkov light emission is measured in gases (used in air-Cherenkov technique), in water (for example, neutrino experiments BAIKAL, Super-Kamiokande, NESTOR, ANTARES, future KM3NeT; cosmic and γ-ray experiments Milagro, HAWC, AUGER) and in ice (IceCube). In this report our goal is not limited to simply listing the multitude of experiments that are based on using Cherenkov emission, but we will clarify the reasons making this emission so important and so frequently used. For completeness we will first give a short historical overview on the discovery and evolution of Cherenkov emission and then we will dwell on its main features and numerous applications in astro-particle physics experiments.

  3. Cosmic AntiParticle Ring Imaging Cerenkov Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE2A \\\\ \\\\ %title \\\\ \\\\The CAPRICE experiment studies antimatter and light nuclei in the cosmic rays as well as muons in the atmosphere. The experiment is performed with the spectrometer shown in the figure which is lifted by a balloon to an altitude of 35-40 km. At this altitude less than half a percent of the atmosphere is above the 2 ton spectrometer which makes it possible to study the cosmic ray flux without too much background from atmospherically produced particles. The spectrometer includes time-of-flight scintillators, a gaseous RICH counter, a drift chamber tracker and a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter. The important feature of the spectrometer is to discriminate between different particles.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at measuring the flux of the antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) above about 5 GeV and relate the fluxes to models including exotic production of antiparticles like dark matter supersymmetric particles. The flux of muons is measured during descent of the balloon through the at...

  4. The holographic F theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The F theorem states that, for a unitary three dimensional quantum field theory, the F quantity defined in terms of the partition function on a three sphere is positive, stationary at fixed point and decreases monotonically along a renormalization group flow. We construct holographic renormalization group flows corresponding to relevant deformations of three-dimensional conformal field theories on spheres, working to quadratic order in the source. For these renormalization group flows, the F quantity at the IR fixed point is always less than F at the UV fixed point, but F increases along the RG flow for deformations by operators of dimension $3/2 < \\Delta < 5/2$. Therefore the strongest version of the F theorem is in general violated.

  5. Losing Forward Momentum Holographically

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanian, Koushik

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving Einstein's Equations in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and an event horizon with planar topology. Our scheme allows for the introduction of a particular metric source at the conformal boundary. Such a spacetime has a dual holographic description in terms of a strongly interacting quantum field theory at nonzero temperature. By introducing a sinusoidal static metric source that breaks translation invariance, we study momentum relaxation in the field theory. In the long wavelength limit, our results are consistent with the fluid-gravity correspondence and relativistic hydrodynamics. In the small amplitude limit, our results are consistent with the memory function prediction for the momentum relaxation rate. Our numerical scheme allows us to study momentum relaxation outside these two limits as well.

  6. Holographic Glueball Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Brünner, Frederic; Rebhan, Anton

    2014-01-01

    We announce new results on glueball decay rates in the Sakai-Sugimoto model, a realization of holographic QCD from first principles that has only one coupling constant and an overall mass scale as free parameters. We extend a previous investigation by Hashimoto, Tan, and Terashima who have considered the lowest scalar glueball which arises from a somewhat exotic polarization of supergravity modes and whose mass is uncomfortably small in comparison with lattice results. On the other hand, the scalar glueball dual to the dilaton turns out to have a mass of about twice the mass of the rho meson (1487 MeV), very close to the scalar meson $f_0(1500)$ that is frequently interpreted as predominantly glue. Calculating the decay rate into two pions we find a surprisingly good agreement with experimental data for the $f_0(1500)$. We have also obtained decay widths for tensor and excited scalar glueballs, indicating universal narrowness.

  7. Engineering holographic phase diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Dai, Shou-Huang; Maity, Debaprasad; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2016-10-01

    By introducing interacting scalar fields, we tried to engineer physically motivated holographic phase diagrams which may be interesting in the context of various known condensed matter systems. We introduce an additional scalar field in the bulk which provides a tunable parameter in the boundary theory. By exploiting the way the tuning parameter changes the effective masses of the bulk interacting scalar fields, desired phase diagrams can be engineered for the boundary order parameters dual to those scalar fields. We give a few examples of generating phase diagrams with phase boundaries which are strikingly similar to the known quantum phases at low temperature such as the superconducting phases. However, the important difference is that all the phases we have discussed are characterized by neutral order parameters. At the end, we discuss if there exists any emerging scaling symmetry associated with a quantum critical point hidden under the dome in this phase diagram.

  8. Holographic Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Wise, Derek K

    2013-01-01

    We reinterpret special relativity, or more precisely its de Sitter deformation, in terms of 3d conformal geometry, as opposed to (3+1)d spacetime geometry. An inertial observer, usually described by a geodesic in spacetime, becomes instead a choice of ways to reverse the conformal compactification of a Euclidean vector space up to scale. The observer's "current time," usually given by a point along the geodesic, corresponds to the choice of scale in the decompactification. We also show how arbitrary conformal 3-geometries give rise to "observer space geometries," as defined in recent work, from which spacetime can be reconstructed under certain integrability conditions. We conjecture a relationship between this kind of "holographic relativity" and the "shape dynamics" proposal of Barbour and collaborators, in which conformal space takes the place of spacetime in general relativity. We also briefly survey related pictures of observer space, including the AdS analog and a representation related to twistor theor...

  9. Comments on Holographic Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Dean; Rath, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    We study two recent conjectures for holographic complexity: the complexity=action conjecture and the complexity=volume conjecture. In particular, we examine the structure of the UV divergences appearing in these quantities, and show that the coefficients can be written as local integrals of geometric quantities in the boundary. We also consider extending these conjectures to evaluate the complexity of the mixed state produced by reducing the pure global state to a specific subregion of the boundary time slice. The UV divergences in this subregion complexity have a similar geometric structure, but there are also new divergences associated with the geometry of the surface enclosing the boundary region of interest. We discuss possible implications arising from the geometric nature of these UV divergences.

  10. Covariant holographic entanglement negativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sengupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    We conjecture a holographic prescription for the covariant entanglement negativity of $d$-dimensional conformal field theories dual to non static bulk $AdS_{d+1}$ gravitational configurations in the framework of the $AdS/CFT$ correspondence. Application of our conjecture to a $AdS_3/CFT_2$ scenario involving bulk rotating BTZ black holes exactly reproduces the entanglement negativity of the corresponding $(1+1)$ dimensional conformal field theories and precisely captures the distillable quantum entanglement. Interestingly our conjecture for the scenario involving dual bulk extremal rotating BTZ black holes also accurately leads to the entanglement negativity for the chiral half of the corresponding $(1+1)$ dimensional conformal field theory at zero temperature.

  11. Holographic Heat Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Clifford V

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that in theories of gravity where the cosmological constant is considered a thermodynamic variable, it is natural to use black holes as heat engines. Two examples are presented in detail using AdS charged black holes as the working substance. We notice that for static black holes, the maximally efficient traditional Carnot engine is also a Stirling engine. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. We first propose a precise picture of how the traditional thermodynamic dictionary of holography is extended when the cosmological constant is dynamical and then conjecture that the engine cycles can be performed by using renormalization group flow. We speculate about the existence of a natural dual field theory counterpart to the gravitational thermodynamic volume.

  12. Dissecting holographic conductivities

    CERN Document Server

    Davison, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    The DC thermoelectric conductivities of holographic systems in which translational symmetry is broken can be efficiently computed in terms of the near-horizon data of the dual black hole. By calculating the frequency dependent conductivities to the first subleading order in the momentum relaxation rate, we give a physical explanation for these conductivities in the simplest such example, in the limit of slow momentum relaxation. Specifically, we decompose each conductivity into the sum of a coherent contribution due to momentum relaxation and an incoherent contribution, due to intrinsic current relaxation. This decomposition is different from those previously proposed, and is consistent with the known hydrodynamic properties in the translationally invariant limit. This is the first step towards constructing a consistent theory of charged hydrodynamics with slow momentum relaxation.

  13. Holographic sliding stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Niko; Järvinen, Matti; Lippert, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Holographic models provide unique laboratories to investigate nonlinear physics of transport in inhomogeneous systems. We provide a detailed account of both dc and ac conductivities in a defect conformal field theory with spontaneous stripe order. The spatial symmetry is broken at large chemical potential, and the resulting ground state is a combination of a spin and charge density wave. An infinitesimal applied electric field across the stripes will cause the stripes to slide over the underlying density of smeared impurities, a phenomenon which can be associated with the Goldstone mode for the spontaneously broken translation symmetry. We show that the presence of a spatially modulated background magnetization current thwarts the expression of some dc conductivities in terms of horizon data.

  14. In vivo liver visualizations with magnetic particle imaging based on the calibration measurement approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckhoff, J.; Kaul, M. G.; Mummert, T.; Jung, C.; Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Knopp, T.; Ludwig, F.; Balceris, C.; Ittrich, H.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) facilitates the rapid determination of 3D in vivo magnetic nanoparticle distributions. In this work, liver MPI following intravenous injections of ferucarbotran (Resovist®) was studied. The image reconstruction was based on a calibration measurement, the so called system function. The application of an enhanced system function sample reflecting the particle mobility and aggregation status of ferucarbotran resulted in significantly improved image reconstructions. The finding was supported by characterizations of different ferucarbotran compositions with the magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy technique. For instance, similar results were obtained between ferucarbotran embedded in freeze-dried mannitol sugar and liver tissue harvested after a ferucarbotran injection. In addition, the combination of multiple shifted measurement patches for a joint reconstruction of the MPI data enlarged the field of view and increased the covering of liver MPI on magnetic resonance images noticeably.

  15. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera Gontard, Lionel, E-mail: lionelcg@gmail.com [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ozkaya, Dogan [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blount' s Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-01-15

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of an uneven background. The approach is based on adaptive thresholding, making use of local threshold values that change with spatial coordinate. The algorithm allows particles to be detected and characterized with greater accuracy than using more conventional methods, in which a global threshold is used. Its application to images of heterogeneous catalysts is presented. -- Research Highlights: {yields}The paper describes a novel algorithm for segmenting TEM images of nanoparticles which is simple but robust. {yields}A Graphical User Interface allows interactivity during the processing of images. This allows maximise the success of local thresholding. {yields}The method described can be used to provide more accurate measurements of particle size distributions.

  16. First Steps Toward Incorporating Image Based Diagnostics Into Particle Accelerator Control Systems Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Edelen, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    At present, a variety of image-based diagnostics are used in particle accelerator systems. Often times, these are viewed by a human operator who then makes appropriate adjustments to the machine. Given recent advances in using convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for image processing, it should be possible to use image diagnostics directly in control routines (NN-based or otherwise). This is especially appealing for non-intercepting diagnostics that could run continuously during beam operatio...

  17. Speckle-free digital holographic recording of a diffusely reflecting object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You Seok; Kim, Taegeun; Woo, Sung Soo; Kang, Hoonjong; Poon, Ting-Chung; Zhou, Changhe

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate holographic recording without speckle noise using the digital holographic technique called optical scanning holography (OSH). First, we record a complex hologram of a diffusely reflecting (DR) object using OSH. The incoherent mode of OSH makes it possible to record the complex hologram without speckle noise. Second, we convert the complex hologram to an off-axis real hologram digitally and finally we reconstruct the real hologram using an amplitude-only spatial light modulator (SLM) without twin-image noise and speckle noise. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time demonstrating digital holographic recording of a DR object without speckle noise.

  18. Particle image velocimetry - Principles and first results; La velocimetrie par images de particules. Principes et premiers resultats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, A.; Marechal, J.P. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a measurement technique elaborated towards the end of the 1970`s, but which has developed considerably in recent years. The general principle of PIV is very simple and enables access to instantaneous velocity fields. It consists in recording images of tracer-particles injected into the flow and determining the distance covered by these particles. Since we know the time lapse between successive images of the same particle, we can derive the local fluid velocity. Among the many existing image acquisition and processing methods, the image inter-correlation analysis techniques, used with a pulsed laser source, is the most effective. Since we know the influence of different parameters (number of particles, beam power, time lapse between two successive images, size of query zones, etc.) on the quality of the final result, we can optimize practical adjustment of the PIV measurement scheme. The PIV was tested on the LAVITA hydraulic mockup (simulating the operation of a tangential fan). First results are, all in all, highly satisfactory. These have enabled the rapid drafting of instantaneous mean velocity field maps (20 images acquired in less than 90 seconds, with a post-processing time of about 10 minutes). Observation of the instantaneous fields has evidenced the presence of low frequency non-stationary phenomena which are not revealed by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Quantitative comparison between LDV and PIV, concerning average fields, showed close results, with, however, local divergences which could be relatively marked. It must nevertheless be noted that the PIV measurements performed on LAVITA have not been optimized with a view to obtaining a consistently good accuracy level. Priority in the present case was given to the scope of the field explored, with a view to observing the large non-stationary structures within a flow. The PIV measurement technique is thus operational for prompt flow characterization. However

  19. Holographic three-dimensional display and hologram calculation based on liquid crystal on silicon device [invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junchang; Tu, Han-Yen; Yeh, Wei-Chieh; Gui, Jinbin; Cheng, Chau-Jern

    2014-09-20

    Based on scalar diffraction theory and the geometric structure of liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS), we study the impulse responses and image depth of focus in a holographic three-dimensional (3D) display system. Theoretical expressions of the impulse response and the depth of focus of reconstructed 3D images are obtained, and experimental verifications of the imaging properties are performed. The results indicated that the images formed by holographic display based on the LCoS device were periodic image fields surrounding optical axes. The widths of the image fields were directly proportional to the wavelength and diffraction distance, and inversely proportional to the pixel size of the LCoS device. Based on the features of holographic 3D imaging and focal depth, we enhance currently popular hologram calculation methods of 3D objects to improve the computing speed of hologram calculation.

  20. 多参考光合成孔径DMIPH术的细胞相位重构%Reconstruction of cell phase by multi-reference light synthetic aperture digital microsopic image plane holographic technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巩文迪; 卢兆林; 刘佳毅

    2012-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) extracts the phase information directly instead of traditional optical microscopy, and records high frequency and low frequency information of an object more accurately. Based on DHM, cell phase was reconstructed by means of angular spectrum algorithm and least-squares unwrapping algorithm. Quantitative observation and effective measurement were earned out for living biological sample cells. The experiment results indicates that multi-reference light synthetic aperture digital microscopic image plane holography can be effectively applied to the amplitude and phase reconstruction of the microstructures of three-dimension objects, it can improve synthetic degree of system significantly in recording the object' s high frequency and low frequency information, and the diffraction limit resolution 12. 81p/mm can be obtained. The results show that super resolution imaging of digital holographic can be effectively implemented based on this system, and three-dimension topography information and accurate phase distribution of the microstructure cells can be obtained.%为了克服传统光学显微术无法直接提取相位信息的不足而能更准确记录物体高频和低频信息的合成,采用多参考光合成孔径数字显微像面全息系统,并结合角谱算法和最小二乘解包裹算法实现了细胞的相位重构.选取活体细胞组织等相位型生物进行作为实验样本,对其进行定量观察和有效测量.结果表明,多参考光合成孔径数字显微像面全息系统可以有效地应用于3维物体显微结构的振幅和相位重构,能显著地提高记录系统的高频和低频信息在全息图上的合成度,并实现超出系统的衍射极限12.81p/mm的分辨率.该系统可以有效地实现数字全息系统的超分辨率成像,从而获得细胞显微结构的3维形貌信息和准确的相位分布.

  1. Accumulative difference image protocol for particle tracking in fluorescence microscopy tested in mouse lymphonodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Carlo E; Caccia, Michele; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Rivolta, Ilaria; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Gorletta, Tatiana; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-08-17

    The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done.

  2. Accumulative difference image protocol for particle tracking in fluorescence microscopy tested in mouse lymphonodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo E Villa

    Full Text Available The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done.

  3. Microballoon pressure sensors for particle imaging manometry in liquid and gaseous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N; Mastrangelo, C H

    2016-02-21

    We present the fabrication and testing of engineered microballoon particles that expand and contract under external pressure changes hence serving as microscopic pressure sensors. The particles consist of 12 μm hollow flexible 0.4 μm-thick parylene-C shells with and without a coating of ultrathin Al2O3 diffusion barriers, and the changes in the particle radius are measured from the particle spectral reflectivity. The microballoons display radial pressure sensitivities of 0.64 nm psi(-1) and 0.44 nm psi(-1), respectively in agreement with theoretical estimates. The microballoon devices were used for mapping the internal pressure drop within microfluidic chips. These devices experience nearly spherical symmetry which could make them potential flow-through sensors for the augmentation of particle-based flow characterization methodologies extending today's capabilities of particle imaging velocimetry.

  4. Holographic Waveguided See-Through Display Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for lightweight, space suit-mounted displays, Luminit proposes a novel Holographic Waveguided See-Through Display. Our proposed Holographic...

  5. Assessing Plankton and Particles with an Autonomous Imaging LOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Artemia , provided by the Hubbs Research Institute, were introduced. Images of these zooplankton, acquired in April 2008 in the SIO pier flume, are shown...long), and an Artemia (~ 0.8 mm long).] 3 Laser Optical Plankton Counter The final operational software was

  6. Digital Holographic Interferometry for Airborne Particle Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-19

    solar light collector, Journal of Renewable ans Sustainable Energy (01 2014) Matthew J. Berg, Christopher M. Sorensen. Internal fields of soot fractal ...Riviere. Spectral and angular light-scattering from silica fractal aggregates, Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer (11 2012) Nava

  7. Improved layer-based method for rapid hologram generation and real-time interactive holographic display applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-S; Chu, D P

    2015-07-13

    Layer-based method has been proposed as an efficient approach to calculate holograms for holographic image display. This paper further improves its calculation speed and depth cues quality by introducing three different techniques, an improved coding scheme, a multilayer depth- fused 3D method and a fraction method. As a result the total computation time is reduced more than 4 times, and holographic images with accommodation cue are calculated in real time to interactions with the displayed image in a proof-of-concept setting of head-mounted holographic displays.

  8. Sparsity metrics for autofocus in digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin; Healy, John J.; Guanshen, Yan; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is an optic-electronic technique that enables the numerical reconstruction of the complex wave-field reflected from, or transmitted through, a target. Together with phase unwrapping, this method permits a height profile, a thickness profile, and/or a refractive index profile, to be extracted, in addition to the reconstruction of the image intensity. Digital holographic microscopy is unlike classical imaging systems in that one can obtain the focused image without situating the camera in the focal plane; indeed, it is possible to recover the complex wave-field at any distance from the camera plane. In order to reconstruct the image, the captured interference pattern is first processed to remove the virtual image and DC component, and then back-propagated using a numerical implementation of the Fresnel transform. A necessary input parameter to this algorithm is the distance from the camera to the image plane, which may be measured independently, estimated by eye following reconstruction at multiple distances, or estimated automatically using a focus metric. Autofocus algorithms are commonly used in microscopy in order to estimate the depth at which the image comes into focus by manually adjusting the microscope stage; in digital holographic microscopy the hologram can be reconstructed at multiple depths, and the autofocus metric can be evaluated for each reconstructed image intensity. In this paper, fifteen sparsity metrics are investigated as potential focus metrics for digital holographic microscopy, whereby the metrics are applied to a series of reconstructed intensities. These metrics are tested on the hologram of a biological cell. The results demonstrate that many of the metrics produce similar profiles, and groupings of the metrics are proposed.

  9. The place for performance in the digital holographic space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Richardson, Martin; Sandford-Richardson, Elizabeth; Bernardo, Luis Miguel; Crespo, Helder

    2014-02-01

    In this series of digital art holograms and lenticulars, we are examining different kinds of movement inside the digital holographic space explored by Elizabeth Sandford-Richardson, a visual performance artist. During the process of capturing the image, we used the HoloCam Portable Light System, equipped with Canon and Nikon cameras positioned at different heights and angles, in order to improve the rendering of the holographic space. Based on the "Performativity of Performance Documentation" a notion introduced by Philip Auslanderi we revisit some authors that have been working in the "theatrical" practise, mainly in photography, adding the possibility of movement in 3D space. We must realise that the movement of the viewer in front of a digital holographic image creates the performance that he/she is looking at. We should consider the physical space, outside the hologram, and this kind of "performance acts", also part of the work. In summary, we propose a reflection on the digital holographic space, time, movement and its place in contemporary art.

  10. Powder dispersion mechanisms within a dry powder inhaler using microscale particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiang; Wereley, Steven T; Heng, Paul W S; Chan, Lai Wah; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2016-12-05

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the ability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to visually assess dry powder dispersion within an inhaler. Herein, the study reports particle movement characterization of entrained low-micron particles within an inhaler to further scheme of potential mechanisms. Carrier based DPI formulations were prepared and placed in a transparent model Rotahaler(®) chamber for the aerosolization experiments. Then using the PIV, a high-speed camera, the dried powder dispersion was directly observed and analyzed for all, neat, binary and ternary systems. Powder dispersion mechanisms proposed include drag force, impact with obstacle and particle-particle collision; these different mechanisms depended on the powder flow properties. A revised ratio of aerodynamic response time (τA) to the mean time between collisions (τC) was found to be 6.8 indicating that particle collisions were of strong influence to particle dispersion. With image analysis techniques, visualization of particle flow pattern and collision regions was possible; suggesting that the various mechanisms proposed did govern the powder dispersion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Charged particle velocity map image reconstruction with one-dimensional projections of spherical functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Thomas; Liu Yuzhu; Knopp, Gregor; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Radi, Peter; Sych, Yaroslav [Molecular Dynamics Group, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Velocity map imaging (VMI) is used in mass spectrometry and in angle resolved photo-electron spectroscopy to determine the lateral momentum distributions of charged particles accelerated towards a detector. VM-images are composed of projected Newton spheres with a common centre. The 2D images are usually evaluated by a decomposition into base vectors each representing the 2D projection of a set of particles starting from a centre with a specific velocity distribution. We propose to evaluate 1D projections of VM-images in terms of 1D projections of spherical functions, instead. The proposed evaluation algorithm shows that all distribution information can be retrieved from an adequately chosen set of 1D projections, alleviating the numerical effort for the interpretation of VM-images considerably. The obtained results produce directly the coefficients of the involved spherical functions, making the reconstruction of sliced Newton spheres obsolete.

  12. Rf-synchronized imaging for particle and photon beam characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    The usefulness of imaging electro-optics for rf-driven accelerators can be enhanced by synchronizing the instruments to the system fundamental frequency or an appropriate subharmonic. This step allows one to obtain micropulse bunch length and phase during a series of linac bunches or storage ring passes. Several examples now exist of the use of synchroscan and dual-sweep streak cameras and/or image dissector tubes to access micropulse scale phenomena (10 to 30 ps) during linac and storage ring operations in the US, Japan, and Europe. As space permits, selections will be presented from the list of phase stability phenomena on photoelectric injectors, micropulse length during a macropulse, micropulse elongation effects, transverse Wakefield effects within a micropulse, and submicropulse phenomena on a stored beam. Potential applications to the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be briefly addressed.

  13. Digital image processing of nanometer-size metal particles on amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, F.; Artal, P.; Bescos, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The task of differentiating very small metal aggregates supported on amorphous films from the phase contrast image features inherently stemming from the support is extremely difficult in the nanometer particle size range. Digital image processing was employed to overcome some of the ambiguities in evaluating such micrographs. It was demonstrated that such processing allowed positive particle detection and a limited degree of statistical size analysis even for micrographs where by bare eye examination the distribution between particles and erroneous substrate features would seem highly ambiguous. The smallest size class detected for Pd/C samples peaks at 0.8 nm. This size class was found in various samples prepared under different evaporation conditions and it is concluded that these particles consist of 'a magic number' of 13 atoms and have cubooctahedral or icosahedral crystal structure.

  14. An Analytical Approach for Fast Recovery of the LSI Properties in Magnetic Particle Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Jabbari Asl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linearity and shift invariance (LSI characteristics of magnetic particle imaging (MPI are important properties for quantitative medical diagnosis applications. The MPI image equations have been theoretically shown to exhibit LSI; however, in practice, the necessary filtering action removes the first harmonic information, which destroys the LSI characteristics. This lost information can be constant in the x-space reconstruction method. Available recovery algorithms, which are based on signal matching of multiple partial field of views (pFOVs, require much processing time and a priori information at the start of imaging. In this paper, a fast analytical recovery algorithm is proposed to restore the LSI properties of the x-space MPI images, representable as an image of discrete concentrations of magnetic material. The method utilizes the one-dimensional (1D x-space imaging kernel and properties of the image and lost image equations. The approach does not require overlapping of pFOVs, and its complexity depends only on a small-sized system of linear equations; therefore, it can reduce the processing time. Moreover, the algorithm only needs a priori information which can be obtained at one imaging process. Considering different particle distributions, several simulations are conducted, and results of 1D and 2D imaging demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles by SEM stereoscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Orkun

    2010-05-01

    Surface area of volcanic ash particles is of great importance to research including plume dynamics, particle chemical and water reactions in the plume, modelling (i.e. plume shape, particle interactions , dispersion etc.), remote sensing of transport and SO2, HCl, H2O, CO2 levels, forecasting plume location, and transportation and deposition of ash particles. The implemented method presented in this study offer new insights for surface characterization of volcanic ash particles on macro-pore regions. Surface area and volumes of volcanic ash particles were measured using digital elevation models (DEM) reconstructed from stereoscopic images acquired from different angles by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The method was tested using glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) micro-spheres which exhibit low spherical imperfections. The differences between measured and geometrically calculated surface areas were introduced for both micro-spheres and volcanic ash particles in order to highlight the probable errors in modelling on volcanic ash behaviour. The specific surface areas of volcanic ash particles using this method are reduced by half (from mean values of 0.045 m2/g to 0.021 m2/g) for the size increment 63 μm to 125 μm. Ash particles mostly have higher specific surface area values than the geometric forms irrespective of particle size. The specific surface area trends of spheres and ash particles resemble for finer particles (63 μm). Approximation to sphere and ellipsoid have similar margin of error for coarser particles (125 μm) but both seem to be inadequate for representation of real ash surfaces.

  16. Universal Charge Diffusion and the Butterfly Effect in Holographic Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Mike

    2016-08-01

    We study charge diffusion in holographic scaling theories with a particle-hole symmetry. We show that these theories have a universal regime in which the diffusion constant is given by Dc=C vB2/(2 π T ), where vB is the velocity of the butterfly effect. The constant of proportionality C depends only on the scaling exponents of the infrared theory. Our results suggest an unexpected connection between transport at strong coupling and quantum chaos.

  17. Classification of biological and non-biological fluvial particles using image processing and artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bim Prasad; Shrestha, Nabin Kumar; Poudel, Laxman

    2009-04-01

    Particles flowing along with water largely affect safe drinking water, irrigation, aquatic life preservation and hydropower generation. This research describes activities that lead to development of fluvial particle characterization that includes detection of biological and non-biological particles and shape characterization using Image Processing and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Fluvial particles are characterized based on multi spectral images processing using ANN. Images of wavelength of 630nm and 670nm are taken as most distinctive characterizing properties of biological and non-biological particles found in Bagmati River of Nepal. The samples were collected at pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Random samples were selected and multi spectral images are processed using MATLAB 6.5. Thirty matrices were built from each sample. The obtained data of 42 rows and 60columns were taken as input training with an output matrix of 42 rows and 2 columns. Neural Network of Perceptron model was created using a transfer function. The system was first validated and later on tested at 18 different strategic locations of Bagmati River of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. This network classified biological and non biological particles. Development of new non-destructive technique to characterize biological and non-biological particles from fluvial sample in a real time has a significance breakthrough. This applied research method and outcome is an attractive model for real time monitoring of particles and has many applications that can throw a significant outlet to many researches and for effective utilization of water resources. It opened a new horizon of opportunities for basic and applied research at Kathmandu University in Nepal.

  18. Fourier holographic display for augmented reality using holographic optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lee, Dukho; Jeong, Youngmo; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-03-01

    A method for realizing a three-dimensional see-through augmented reality in Fourier holographic display is proposed. A holographic optical element (HOE) with the function of Fourier lens is adopted in the system. The Fourier hologram configuration causes the real scene located behind the lens to be distorted. In the proposed method, since the HOE is transparent and it functions as the lens just for Bragg matched condition, there is not any distortion when people observe the real scene through the lens HOE (LHOE). Furthermore, two optical characteristics of the recording material are measured for confirming the feasibility of using LHOE in the proposed see-through augmented reality holographic display. The results are verified experimentally.

  19. Loop Quantum Gravity, Exact Holographic Mapping, and Holographic Entanglement Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Muxin

    2016-01-01

    The relation between Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) and tensor network is explored from the perspectives of bulk-boundary duality and holographic entanglement entropy. We find that the LQG spin-network states in a space $\\Sigma$ with boundary $\\partial\\Sigma$ is an exact holographic mapping similar to the proposal in arXiv:1309.6282. The tensor network, understood as the boundary quantum state, is the output of the exact holographic mapping emerging from a coarse graining procedure of spin-networks. Furthermore, when a region $A$ and its complement $\\bar{A}$ are specified on the boundary $\\partial\\Sigma$, we show that the boundary entanglement entropy $S(A)$ of the emergent tensor network satisfies the Ryu-Takayanagi formula in the semiclassical regime, i.e. $S(A)$ is proportional to the minimal area of the bulk surface attached to the boundary of $A$ in $\\partial\\Sigma$.

  20. 数字全息显微像平面相位畸变的自动补偿研究%Automatic phase aberration compensation of image plane in digital holographic microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳; 周皓; 赵宏波; 顾济华

    2013-01-01

    The automatic phase aberration compensation of off-axis digital holographic microscopy is studied theoreticaly and experimentaly.Firstly,the average gradient auto-focus function is used to achieve the optimal reconstruction distance of the digital hologram recorded by CCD.After numerical apodization and spatial frequency filtering,the numerical reconstruction is performed by the product of the hologram with modified digital reference wave.Finally,with the automatic phase aberration compensation of image plane,the accurate phase distribution is achieved.This method uses only one single digital hologram and can retrieve automatically and rapidly the real phase distribution of the object.%对离轴数字全息显微相位畸变的自动补偿进行了理论和实验研究.首先对由CCD记录的数字全息图采用平均梯度自聚焦方法确定最佳再现距离,然后将修正的虚拟参考光作用于切趾滤波后的全息图进行数字再现,经像平面相位自动补偿后得到无畸变的物体相位分布.该方法仅需记录一幅离轴数字全息图就可以自动快速地重建物体的真实相位信息.

  1. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to

  2. An Image Filter Based on Shearlet Transformation and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image is always polluted by noise and made data postprocessing difficult. To remove noise and preserve detail of image as much as possible, this paper proposed image filter algorithm which combined the merits of Shearlet transformation and particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. Firstly, we use classical Shearlet transform to decompose noised image into many subwavelets under multiscale and multiorientation. Secondly, we gave weighted factor to those subwavelets obtained. Then, using classical Shearlet inverse transform, we obtained a composite image which is composed of those weighted subwavelets. After that, we designed fast and rough evaluation method to evaluate noise level of the new image; by using this method as fitness, we adopted PSO to find the optimal weighted factor we added; after lots of iterations, by the optimal factors and Shearlet inverse transform, we got the best denoised image. Experimental results have shown that proposed algorithm eliminates noise effectively and yields good peak signal noise ratio (PSNR.

  3. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  4. On-line non-intrusive particle size measurement of pulverised fuel through digital imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles of particle size measurement and latest industrial results recorded using an innovative optical instrumentation system designed to measure the size distribution of particles in a pneumatic suspension. The system is non-intrusive and cost-effective. A low-cost CCD camera is used to capture images of the particulate flow field, which is illuminated by a low-cost pulsed laser sheet generator. The particle size distribution is then determined by processing the particle images through the use of novel processing algorithms. Experimental results obtained in the past on a small scale particle flow test rig have demonstrated that the system is capable of measuring the size distribution of pneumatically conveyed particles with an accuracy of a few percent. For the present paper results obtained when testing the system at a 4 MW industrial test facility are presented. Comparisons are made with both off-line reference data achieved through sieving and on-line laser diffraction data recorded using an intrusive, extractive, Malvern Instruments system. In general there is good agreement between results when considering the characteristics and limitations of the individual methodologies. The novel imaging system shows itself to be rugged, practical and useful under genuine industrial conditions.

  5. Nanoscale imaging of alteration layers of corroded international simple glass particles using ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiandong; Neeway, James J.; Zhang, Yanyan; Ryan, Joseph V.; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Tieshan; Zhu, Zihua

    2017-08-01

    Glass particles with dimensions typically ranging from tens to hundreds of microns are often used in glass corrosion research in order to accelerate testing. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanoscale imaging techniques are badly needed to characterize the alteration layers at the surfaces of these corroded glass particles. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can provide a lateral resolution as low as ~100 nm, and, compared to other imaging techniques, is sensitive to elements lighter than carbon. In this work, we used ToF-SIMS to characterize the alteration layers of corroded international simple glass (ISG) particles. At most particle surfaces, inhomogeneous or no alteration layers were observed, indicating that the thickness of the alterations layers may be too thin to be observable by ToF-SIMS imaging. Relatively thick (e.g., 1-10 microns) alteration layers were inhomogeneously distributed at a small portion of surfaces. More interestingly, some large-size (tens of microns) glass particles were fully altered. Above observations suggest that weak attachment and the defects on ISG particle surfaces play an important role in ISG glass corrosion.

  6. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  7. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helas, G.; Andreae, M. O.

    2008-10-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  8. Observing Electrokinetic Janus Particle-Channel Wall Interaction Using Microparticle Image Velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boymelgreen, Alicia; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional/two-component microparticle image velocimetry is used to examine the hydrodynamic flow patterns around metallodielectric Janus particles 15 μm in diameter adjacent to insulating and conducting walls. Far from the walls, the observed flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with previous experimental and analytical models. However, close to the conducting wall, strong electrohydrodynamic flows are observed at low frequencies, which result in fluid being injected toward the particle. The proximity of the metallic hemisphere to the conducting wall is also shown to produce a localized field gradient, which results in dielectrophoretic trapping of 300 nm polystyrene particles across a broad range of frequencies.

  9. Multiple-plane particle image velocimetry using a light-field camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupsch, Christoph; Brücker, Christoph

    2013-01-28

    Planar velocity fields in flows are determined simultaneously on parallel measurement planes by means of an in-house manufactured light-field camera. The planes are defined by illuminating light sheets with constant spacing. Particle positions are reconstructed from a single 2D recording taken by a CMOS-camera equipped with a high-quality doublet lens array. The fast refocusing algorithm is based on synthetic-aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV). The reconstruction quality is tested via ray-tracing of synthetically generated particle fields. The introduced single-camera SAPIV is applied to a convective flow within a measurement volume of 30 x 30 x 50 mm³.

  10. Single Particle Analysis by Combined Chemical Imaging to Study Episodic Air Pollution Events in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Brenner, Florian; Hutter, Herbert; Schauer, Gerhard; Kistler, Magdalena; Greilinger, Marion; Lohninger, Hans; Lendl, Bernhard; Kasper-Giebl, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The aerosol composition of a city like Vienna is characterized by a complex interaction of local emissions and atmospheric input on a regional and continental scale. The identification of major aerosol constituents for basic source appointment and air quality issues needs a high analytical effort. Exceptional episodic air pollution events strongly change the typical aerosol composition of a city like Vienna on a time-scale of few hours to several days. Analyzing the chemistry of particulate matter from these events is often hampered by the sampling time and related sample amount necessary to apply the full range of bulk analytical methods needed for chemical characterization. Additionally, morphological and single particle features are hardly accessible. Chemical Imaging evolved to a powerful tool for image-based chemical analysis of complex samples. As a complementary technique to bulk analytical methods, chemical imaging can address a new access to study air pollution events by obtaining major aerosol constituents with single particle features at high temporal resolutions and small sample volumes. The analysis of the chemical imaging datasets is assisted by multivariate statistics with the benefit of image-based chemical structure determination for direct aerosol source appointment. A novel approach in chemical imaging is combined chemical imaging or so-called multisensor hyperspectral imaging, involving elemental imaging (electron microscopy-based energy dispersive X-ray imaging), vibrational imaging (Raman micro-spectroscopy) and mass spectrometric imaging (Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) with subsequent combined multivariate analytics. Combined chemical imaging of precipitated aerosol particles will be demonstrated by the following examples of air pollution events in Vienna: Exceptional episodic events like the transformation of Saharan dust by the impact of the city of Vienna will be discussed and compared to samples obtained at a high alpine

  11. An investigation on dissolution kinetics of single sodium carbonate particle with image analysis method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changdong Li; Carlos Amador; Yulong Ding

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of sodium carbonate is investigated with the image analysis method at the approach of single particle. The dissolution experiments are carried out in an aqueous solution under a series of controlled temper-ature and pH. The selected sodium carbonate particles are al spherical with the same mass and diameter. The dissolution process is quantified with the measurement of particle diameter from dissolution images. The concentration of dissolved sodium carbonate in solvent is calculated with the measured diameter of particle. Both surface reaction model and mass transport model are implemented to determine the dissolution mecha-nism and quantify the dissolution rate constant at each experimental condition. According to the fitting results with both two models, it is clarified that the dissolution process at the increasing temperature is controlled by the mass transport of dissolved sodium carbonate travelling from particle surface into solvent. The dissolution process at the increasing pH is control ed by the chemical reaction on particle surface. Furthermore, the dissolution rate constant for each single spherical sodium carbonate particle is quantified and the results show that the disso-lution rate constant of single spherical sodium carbonate increases significantly with the rising of temperature, but decreases with the increasing of pH conversely.

  12. Application of imaging based tools for the characterisation of hollow spray dried amorphous dispersion particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Ferreira, Ana P; Tobyn, Mike; DiMemmo, Lynn; Martin, Kyle; Mathias, Neil; Schild, Richard; Vig, Balvinder; Baumann, John M; Parks, Stacy; Ashton, Mike

    2014-04-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate novel approaches to determine spray dried dispersion (SDD) specific particle characteristics through the use of imaging based technologies. The work demonstrates approaches that can be applied in order to access quantitative approximations for powder characteristics for hollow particles, such as SDD. Cryo-SEM has been used to measure the solid volume fraction and/or particle density of SDD particles. Application of this data to understand the impact of spray drying process conditions on SDD powder properties, and their impact on processability and final dosage form quality were investigated. The use of data from a Morphologi G3 image based particle characterisation system was also examined in order to explain both the propensity and extent of attrition within a series of SDD samples, and also demonstrate the use of light transmission data to assess the relative wall thickness of SDD particles. Such approaches demonstrate a means to access potentially useful information that can be linked to important particle characteristics for SDD materials which, in addition to the standard bulk powder measurements such as bulk density, may enable a better understanding of such materials and their impact on downstream processability and final dosage form acceptability.

  13. Fluorescent Nanodiamond-Gold Hybrid Particles for Multimodal Optical and Electron Microscopy Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weina; Naydenov, Boris; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Wuensch, Bettina; Hübner, Kristina; Ritz, Sandra; Cölfen, Helmut; Barth, Holger; Koynov, Kaloian; Qi, Haoyuan; Leiter, Robert; Reuter, Rolf; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Boldt, Felix; Scheuer, Jonas; Kaiser, Ute; Sison, Miguel; Lasser, Theo; Tinnefeld, Philip; Jelezko, Fedor; Walther, Paul; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2016-10-12

    There is a continuous demand for imaging probes offering excellent performance in various microscopy techniques for comprehensive investigations of cellular processes by more than one technique. Fluorescent nanodiamond-gold nanoparticles (FND-Au) constitute a new class of "all-in-one" hybrid particles providing unique features for multimodal cellular imaging including optical imaging, electron microscopy, and, and potentially even quantum sensing. Confocal and optical coherence microscopy of the FND-Au allow fast investigations inside living cells via emission, scattering, and photothermal imaging techniques because the FND emission is not quenched by AuNPs. In electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis of FND-Au reveals greatly enhanced contrast due to the gold particles as well as an extraordinary flickering behavior in three-dimensional cellular environments originating from the nanodiamonds. The unique multimodal imaging characteristics of FND-Au enable detailed studies inside cells ranging from statistical distributions at the entire cellular level (micrometers) down to the tracking of individual particles in subcellular organelles (nanometers). Herein, the processes of endosomal membrane uptake and release of FNDs were elucidated for the first time by the imaging of individual FND-Au hybrid nanoparticles with single-particle resolution. Their convenient preparation, the availability of various surface groups, their flexible detection modalities, and their single-particle contrast in combination with the capability for endosomal penetration and low cytotoxicity make FND-Au unique candidates for multimodal optical-electronic imaging applications with great potential for emerging techniques, such as quantum sensing inside living cells.

  14. Classification of volcanic ash particles from Sakurajima volcano using CCD camera image and cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, T.; Shimano, T.; Nishimura, T.

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and speedy characterization of volcanic ash particle is needed to conduct a petrologic monitoring of ongoing eruption. We develop a new simple system using CCD camera images for quantitatively characterizing ash properties, and apply it to volcanic ash collected at Sakurajima. Our method characterizes volcanic ash particles by 1) apparent luminance through RGB filters and 2) a quasi-fractal dimension of the shape of particles. Using a monochromatic CCD camera (Starshoot by Orion Co. LTD.) attached to a stereoscopic microscope, we capture digital images of ash particles that are set on a glass plate under which white colored paper or polarizing plate is set. The images of 1390 x 1080 pixels are taken through three kinds of color filters (Red, Green and Blue) under incident-light and transmitted-light through polarizing plate. Brightness of the light sources is set to be constant, and luminance is calibrated by white and black colored papers. About fifteen ash particles are set on the plate at the same time, and their images are saved with a bit map format. We first extract the outlines of particles from the image taken under transmitted-light through polarizing plate. Then, luminances for each color are represented by 256 tones at each pixel in the particles, and the average and its standard deviation are calculated for each ash particle. We also measure the quasi-fractal dimension (qfd) of ash particles. We perform box counting that counts the number of boxes which consist of 1×1 and 128×128 pixels that catch the area of the ash particle. The qfd is estimated by taking the ratio of the former number to the latter one. These parameters are calculated by using software R. We characterize volcanic ash from Showa crater of Sakurajima collected in two days (Feb 09, 2009, and Jan 13, 2010), and apply cluster analyses. Dendrograms are formed from the qfd and following four parameters calculated from the luminance: Rf=R/(R+G+B), G=G/(R+G+B), B=B/(R+G+B), and

  15. Holographic Duality in Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaanen, Jan; Liu, Yan; Sun, Ya-Wen; Schalm, Koenraad

    2015-11-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Condensed matter: the charted territory; 3. Condensed matter: the challenges; 4. Large N field theories for holography and condensed matter; 5. The AdS/CFT correspondence as computational device: the dictionary; 6. Finite temperature magic: black holes and holographic thermodynamics; 7. Holographic hydrodynamics; 8. Finite density: the Reissner-Nordström black hole and strange metals; 9. Holographic photoemission and the RN metal: the fermions as probes; 10. Holographic superconductivity; 11. Holographic Fermi liquids; 12. Breaking translational invariance; 13. AdS/CMT from the top down; 14. Outlook: holography and quantum matter; References; Index.

  16. An adaptive image enhancement technique by combining cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper.

  17. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements Inside the Human Nasal Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James; Hopkins, Lisa; Sreenivas, K. R.; Wexler, Anthony; Prasad, Ajay

    1998-11-01

    In some applications (such as biological flows) the flow passage exhibits a highly complex geometry. A method is described by which such a flow passage is rendered as a three-dimensional model. A computer model of an adult human nasal cavity was generated from digitized computed tomography (CT) scan images, using the I-DEAS modeling package, and was converted to a stereolithographic file for rapid prototyping. Rapid prototyping yielded a water soluble negative of the airway. Silicone elastomer was poured over the negative, which was washed out after the silicone hardened. This technique can be used to obtain an accurate, transparent, silicone, replicate model of any arbitrary geometry. If the working fluid is refractive-index matched to the silicone, it is possible to obtain PIV measurements in any cross-section. We demonstrate the technique by creating a double-scale model of the human nasal passage, and obtaining PIV measurements.

  18. Flow field analysis in expanding healthy and emphysematous alveolar models using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Jessica M; Day, Steven; Weinstein, Steven J; Robinson, Risa J

    2010-02-01

    Particulates that deposit in the acinus region of the lung have the potential to migrate through the alveolar wall and into the blood stream. However, the fluid mechanics governing particle transport to the alveolar wall are not well understood. Many physiological conditions are suspected to influence particle deposition including morphometry of the acinus, expansion and contraction of the alveolar walls, lung heterogeneities, and breathing patterns. Some studies suggest that the recirculation zones trap aerosol particles and enhance particle deposition by increasing their residence time in the region. However, particle trapping could also hinder aerosol particle deposition by moving the aerosol particle further from the wall. Studies that suggest such flow behavior have not been completed on realistic, nonsymmetric, three-dimensional, expanding alveolated geometry using realistic breathing curves. Furthermore, little attention has been paid to emphysemic geometries and how pathophysiological alterations effect deposition. In this study, fluid flow was examined in three-dimensional, expanding, healthy, and emphysemic alveolar sac model geometries using particle image velocimetry under realistic breathing conditions. Penetration depth of the tidal air was determined from the experimental fluid pathlines. Aerosol particle deposition was estimated by simple superposition of Brownian diffusion and sedimentation on the convected particle displacement for particles diameters of 100-750 nm. This study (1) confirmed that recirculation does not exist in the most distal alveolar regions of the lung under normal breathing conditions, (2) concluded that air entering the alveolar sac is convected closer to the alveolar wall in healthy compared with emphysematous lungs, and (3) demonstrated that particle deposition is smaller in emphysematous compared with healthy lungs.

  19. Cell shape identification using digital holographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    We present a cost-effective, simple and fast digital holographic microscopy method based upon Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation for identification of the geometrical shape of a cell. The method was tested using synthetic hologram images generated by ray-tracing software and from experimental images of semi-transparent spherical beads and living red blood cells. Our results show that by only using the real part of the back-reconstructed amplitude the proposed method can provide information of the geometrical shape of the object and at the same time accurately determine the axial position of the object under study. The proposed method can be used in flow chamber assays for pathophysiological studies where fast morphological changes of cells are studied in high numbers and at different heights.

  20. Optical cryptography topology based on a three-dimensional particle-like distribution and diffractive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, coherent diffractive imaging has been considered as a promising alternative for information retrieval instead of conventional interference methods. Coherent diffractive imaging using the X-ray light source has opened up a new research perspective for the measurement of non-crystalline and biological specimens, and can achieve unprecedentedly high resolutions. In this paper, we show how a three-dimensional (3D) particle-like distribution and coherent diffractive imaging can be applied for a study of optical cryptography. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding approach is used, and the plaintext is considered as a series of particles distributed in a 3D space. A topology concept is also introduced into the proposed optical cryptosystem. During image decryption, a retrieval algorithm is developed to extract the plaintext from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed optical cryptography topology are also analyzed.