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Sample records for holmium 172

  1. Magnetic structure of holmium-yttrium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehan, D.A.; McMorrow, D.F.; Cowley, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the chemical and magnetic structures of a series of holmium-yttrium superlattices and a 5000 angstrom film of holmium, all grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. By combining the results of high-resolution x-ray diffraction with detailed modeling, we show...... that the superlattices have high crystallographic integrity: the structural coherence length parallel to the growth direction is typically almost-equal-to 2000 angstrom, while the interfaces between the two elements are well defined and extend over approximately four lattice planes. The magnetic structures were...... determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The moments on the Ho3+ ions in the superlattices form a basal-plane helix. From an analysis of the superlattice structure factors of the primary magnetic satellites, we are able to determine separately the contributions made by the holmium and yttrium...

  2. Metrological traceability of holmium oxide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, D. E. F.; Gomes, J. F. S.; Alvarenga, A. P. D.; Borges, P. P.; Araujo, T. O.

    2018-03-01

    Holmium oxide solution was prepared as a candidate of certified reference material for spectrophotometer wavelength scale calibration. Here is presented the necessary steps for evaluation of the uncertainty and the establishment of metrological traceability for the production of this material. Preliminary results from the first produced batch are shown.

  3. Magnetodielectric coupling in multiferroic holmium iron garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malar Selvi, M.; Chakraborty, Deepannita; Venkateswaran, C.

    2017-01-01

    Single phase magneto-electric multiferroics require a large magnetic or electric field for producing magneto-electric (ME) and magnetodielectric (MD) effects. For utilizing these effects in devices investigations on the room temperature and low field MD studies are necessary. Recently, efforts have been largely devoted to the investigation of rare earth iron garnets. In the physical method, the preparation of rare earth iron garnet requires high sintering temperature and processing time. To solve these problems, ball milling assisted microwave sintering technique is used to prepare nanocrystalline holmium iron garnets (Ho_3Fe_5O_1_2). Magnetic and dielectric properties of the prepared sample are investigated. These properties get enhanced in nanocrystalline form when compared to the bulk. The MD coupling of the prepared sample is evident from the anomaly in the temperature dependent dielectric constant plot and the ME coupling susceptibility is derived from the room temperature MD measurements. - Highlights: • Formation of single phase Holmium iron garnet reported. • Ball milling assisted microwave sintering reduces the sintering temperature and time. • Holmium iron garnet shows enhanced magnetic and dielectric properties. • Pyromagnetic and pyroelectric measurements confirm the magnetoelectric coupling. • Room temperature magnetodielectric measurements show the nonlinear behaviour.

  4. Stone retropulsion during holmium:YAG lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Ryan, R Tres; Teichman, Joel M H; Kim, Jeehyun; Choi, Bernard; Arakeri, Navanit V; Welch, A J

    2003-03-01

    We modeled retropulsion during holmium:YAG lithotripsy on the conservation of momentum, whereby the force of ejected fragment debris off of the calculous surface should equal the force of retropulsion displacing the stone. We tested the hypothesis that retropulsion occurs as a result of ejected stone debris. Uniform calculous phantoms were irradiated with holmium:YAG energy in air and in water. Optical fiber diameter and pulse energy were varied. Motion of the phantom was monitored with high speed video imaging. Laser induced crater volume and geometry were characterized by optical coherence tomography. To determine the direction of plume laser burn paper was irradiated at various incident angles. Retropulsion was greater for phantoms irradiated in air versus water. Retropulsion increased as fiber diameter increased and as pulse energy increased (p <0.001). Crater volumes increased as pulse energy increased (p <0.05) and generally increased as fiber diameter increased. Crater geometry was wide and shallow for larger fibers, and narrow and deeper for smaller fibers. The ejected plume propagated in the direction normal to the burn paper surface regardless of the laser incident angle. Retropulsion increases as pulse energy and optical fiber diameter increase. Vector analysis of the ejected plume and crater geometry explains increased retropulsion using larger optical fibers. Holmium:YAG lithotripsy should be performed with small optical fibers to limit retropulsion.

  5. Ethanolamine derivatives of dysprosium and holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharia, K.S.; Singh, M.; Mathur, S.; Sankhla, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation and properties of dysprosium and holmium derivatives of mono-, di- and tri-ethanolamine derivatives are described. Compounds of general formulae: Ln(OPrsup(i)) 2 (mea), Ln(OPrsup(i))(mea) 2 , Ln(mea) 3 , Ln(OPrsup(i))(dea), Ln 2 (dea) 3 , Ln(dea)(deaH) and Ln(tea) (where Ln = Dy or Ho and mea, dea and tea are the anions of respective ethanolamine) were obtained and characterized by elemental analysis and IR spectra. (author)

  6. A cladding-pumped, tunable holmium doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-11-18

    We present a tunable, high power cladding-pumped holmium doped fiber laser. The laser generated >15 W CW average power across a wavelength range of 2.043 - 2.171 μm, with a maximum output power of 29.7 W at 2.120 μm. The laser also produced 18.2 W when operating at 2.171 µm. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest power operation of a holmium doped laser at a wavelength >2.15 µm. We discuss the significance of background losses and fiber design for achieving efficient operation in holmium doped fibers.

  7. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate hyperplasia: technical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP was first described by doctor P.J. Gilling et al. from New Zealand in 1996. The operation involves anatomical dissection of the prostatic tissue off the surgical capsule using a high-powered holmium laser followed by intravesical morsellation. The objective of this article is to explain the techniques for HoLEP.

  8. Crystal structure and phase composition of aluminium thin films with holmium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koleshko, V.M.; Belitskij, V.F.; Obukhov, V.E.; Rumak, N.V.; Urban, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of holmium additions on the crystal structure and phase composition of thin aluminium films has been studied. A regularity in grain size changes in aluminium thin films versus the holmium content in them is established. The holmium introduction is shown to result in the appearance of axial texture in the aluminium films, the texture axis being determined by the quantity of the addition. During heat treatment of the aluminium films, containing holmium additions, in the range of low ( approximately 100-200 deg C) annealing temperatures holmium monohydroxide is formed, and at annealing temperatures 300 deg C 0 3 is formed

  9. ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF HOLMIUM TO CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF SUPPURATIVE -INFLAMMATORY COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poddubnaya H. N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Article denotes to determination of antibacterial action of polyoxometalate holmium to causative agents of suppurative-inflammatory process in wounds of patients, which were suffered from trauma. Method of serial dilutions was used for determination of minimal inhibiting concentration (MIC of holmium to staphylococci, enterococci and E. coli. Registration of holmium action shows the strong antibacterial influence to staphylococci and enterococci (MIC of holmium action to staphylococcal and enterococcal strains same 1 10 M, to strains of E.coli – 2,5 10 M. Solutions of holmium don’t have antibacterial action to strains of E.coli.

  10. Use of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Stefano

    1997-12-01

    The Holmium-YAG is a versatile laser with multiple soft- tissue applications including tissue incision and vaporization, and pulsed-laser applications such as lithotripsy. At 2140 nanometers, the wavelength is highly absorbed by tissue water. Further, like CO2 laser, the Holmium produces immediate tissue vaporization while minimizing deep thermal damage to surrounding tissues. It is an excellent instrument for endopyelotomy, internal urethrotomy, bladder neck incisions and it can be used to resect the prostate. The Holmium creates an acute TUR defect which gives immediate results like the TURP. More than 50 patients were treated from Jan. 1996 to Jan. 1997 for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, bladder neck stricture, urethral stenosis, and superficial bladder tumors.

  11. Holmium:YAG laser stapedotomy: preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubig, Ingrid M.; Reder, Paul A.; Facer, G. W.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    This study investigated the use of a pulsed Holmium:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) laser- fiber microsurgical system for laser stapedotomy. This system ablates human stapes bones effectively with minimal thermal damage. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of the Ho:YAG laser (Schwartz Electro Optics, Inc., Orlando, FL) for stapedotomy and to evaluate temperature changes within the cochlea during the ablation process. Human cadaveric temporal bones were obtained and the stapes portion of the ossicular chain was removed. A 200 micrometers diameter low OH quartz fiber was used to irradiate these stapes bones in an air environment. The laser was pulsed at 2 Hz, 250 microsecond(s) ec pulse width and an irradiance range of 100 - 240 J/cm2 was used to ablate holes in the stapes footplate. The resultant stapedotomies created had smooth 300 micrometers diameter holes with a minimum of circumferential charring. Animal studies in-vivo were carried out in chinchillas to determine the caloric spread within the cochlea. A 0.075 mm Type T thermocouple was placed in the round window. Average temperature change during irradiation of the stapes footplate recorded in the round window was 3.6 degree(s)C. The data suggest that stapedotomy using the Ho:YAG laser can result in a controlled ablation of the stapes footplate with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding stapes. Optical coupling using fiberoptic silica fibers is an ideal method for delivering laser energy to the stapes during stapedotomy.

  12. Magnetoresistance in terbium and holmium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.L.; Jericho, M.H.; Geldart, D.J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The longitudinal magnetoresistance of single crystals of terbium and holmium metals in their low-temperature ferromagnetic phase has been investigated in magnetic fields up to 80 kOe. Typical magnetoresistance isotherms exhibit a minimum which increases in depth and moves to higher fields as the temperature increases. The magnetoresistance around 1 0 K, where inelastic scattering is negligible, has been interpreted as the sum of a negative contribution due to changes in the domain structure and a positive contribution due to normal magnetoresistance. At higher temperatures, a phenomenological approach has been developed to extract the inelastic phonon and spin-wave components from the total measured magnetoresistance. In the temperature range 4--20 0 K (approximately), the phonon resistivity varies as T 3 . 7 for all samples. Approximate upper and lower bounds have been placed on the spin-wave resistivity which is also found to be described by a simple power law in this temperature range. The implications of this result for theoretical treatments of spin-wave resistivity due to s-f exchange interactions are considered. It is concluded that the role played by the magnon energy gap is far less transparent than previously suggested

  13. Thermal property of holmium doped lithium lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, V. L.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-04-01

    The new glass system of holmium doped lithium lead borate glasses were prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. The thermal stability of the different compositions of Ho3+ ions doped lithium lead borate glasses were studied by using TG-DTA. The Tg values are ranging from 439 to 444 °C with respect to the holmium concentration. Physical parameters like polaron radius(rp), inter-nuclear distance (ri), field strength (F) and polarizability (αm) of oxide ions were calculated using appropriate formulae.

  14. Assiut Experience in the Application of Holmium Laser in Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assiut Experience in the Application of Holmium Laser in Treatment of Ureteral Calculi in Adults. A.M. Abdel Lateef, A.E. Abdel Moniem, M.I. Taha, M.A. Shalaby. Abstract. Internal Optical Urethrotomy at the National Medical Center of Sanou Souro in Bobo-Dioulasso: Feasibility, Safety and Short-Term Results Objective To ...

  15. Microspheres with Ultrahigh Holmium Content for Radioablation of Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, W.; Seevinck, P.R.; Krijger, G.C.; Visser, T.; Kroon-Batenburg, L.M.J.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Hennink, W.E.; van het Schip, A.D.; Nijsen, J.F.W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop microspheres with an ultra high holmium content which can be neutron activated for radioablation of malignancies. These microspheres are proposed to be delivered selectively through either intratumoral injections into solid tumors or administered via an

  16. Microspheres with ultrahigh holmium content for radioablation of malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, W; Seevinck, P R; Krijger, G C; Visser, T; Kroon-Batenburg, L M J; Bakker, C J G; Hennink, W E; van het Schip, A D; Nijsen, J F W

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop microspheres with an ultra high holmium content which can be neutron activated for radioablation of malignancies. These microspheres are proposed to be delivered selectively through either intratumoral injections into solid tumors or administered via an

  17. Microspheres with Ultrahigh Holmium Content for Radioablation of Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, W.; Seevinck, P.R.; Krijger, G.C.; Visser, T.; Kroon-Batenburg, L.M.J.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Hennink, W.E.; Van het Schip, A.D.; Nijsen, J.F.W.

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop microspheres with an ultra high holmium content which can be neutron activated for radioablation of malignancies. These microspheres are proposed to be delivered selectively through either intratumoral injections into solid tumors or administered via an

  18. Compact high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet with holmium poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Walstrom, P.L. (Grumman Space Systems, Los Alamos, NM (United States))

    1992-03-15

    A compact high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built with poles made of the rare-earth metal holmium. The magnet is intended for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linear accelerators where compact high-field quadrupoles are needed, but where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out because of trapped-flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm, outside diameter of 11 cm, length of 11 cm, and pole tip length of 6 cm. The effect of using holmium, a material with a higher saturation field than iron, was investigated by replacing poles made of iron with identical poles made of holmium. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and reached a peak quadrupole field gradient of 355 T/m, a 10% increase over the same magnet with iron poles. This increase in performance is consistent with calculations based on B-H curves that were measured for holmium at 4.2 K. (orig.).

  19. Drug metabolism: Comparison of biodistribution profile of holmium in three different compositions in healthy Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Vidal, Lluis Pascual; Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotope holmium is a candidate to be used in cancer treatment and diagnosis. There are different holmium salts and they present distinct solubility and consequently different biodistribution profiles. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the biodistribution profiles of two holmium salts (chloride and sulfate) and holmium nanoparticles (oxide) through an in vivo biodistribution assay using animal model. Samples were labeled with technetium-99m and administered in Wistar rats by retro-orbital route. Holmium chloride is highly soluble in water and it was quickly filtered by the kidneys while holmium sulfate that presents lower solubility in water was mainly found in the liver and the spleen. However, both the salts showed a similar biodistribution profile. On the other hand, holmium oxide showed a very different biodistribution profile since it seemed to interact with all organs. Due to its particle size range (approximately 100 nm) it was not intensively filtered by the kidneys being found in high quantities in many organs, for this reason its use as a nanoradiopharmaceutical could be promising in the oncology field. - Highlights: • This article brings the biodistribution of holmium in 3 different compositions. • The results, as a technical note may help other researchers around the world to elucidate the mechanism (biological behavior) and the best strategy to use holmium as radiopharmaceutical.

  20. Acupoint Massage in Relieving Pain after Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Wei-qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of acupoint massage in relieving pain after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Methods: Ninety-two patients undergone ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy were enrolled and randomized into a treatment group and a control group, 46 in each group. Patients in the control group were given regular nursing care, while patients in the treatment group were intervened by acupoint massage in addition to the regular nursing care. The pain was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) at 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h after operation, and compared between the two groups. Results:There was no significant difference in comparing the VAS score at 6 h after operation between the two groups (P>0.05). The VAS scores in the treatment group at 12 h and 24 h after operation were significantly lower than those in the control group (both P Conclusion: Acupoint massage can effectively relieve the pain after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy, reduce the use of analgesics, and promote the recovery.

  1. Synthesis and ultrasonic characterisation of vitreous holmium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senin Hassan; Sidek Hj, Abdul Aziz; Abdul Halim Shaari

    1996-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of holmium metaphosphate glasses (Ho sub 2 O sub 3) sub x (P sub 2 O sub 5) sub 1-x, with the mole fraction of x of holmium oxide equal to 0.208, 0.22 and 0.231 respectively, have been determined from measurements of the effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure on ultrasonic wave velocities. At temperature below about 100K, the ultrasonic wave velocity of this type of rare earth phosphate glasses become anomalously dependent upon temperature; a behaviour associated with the interaction between acoustic phonons and two level systems. The hydrostatic pressure derivatives (∂ C sup S sub IJ / ∂ P) sub p=0 of the elastic stiffnesses C sub IJ and also (∂ C sup S sub IJ / ∂ P) sub p=0 of the bulk modulus B sup S of these glasses are anomalously negative. Both longitudinal γ sub L and shear γ sub S acoustic mode Gruneisen parameters are small and negative : the application of pressure softens the long-wavelength acoustic phonon mode frequencies. The results confirmed that the holmium phosphate glasses show an extraordinary elastic behaviour under high pressures

  2. Dysprosium (holmium) determination in the presence of erbium and dysprosium (holmium, erbium) determination in the presence of cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolubara, A.I.; Kochubej, A.I.; Usatenko, Yu.I.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of salicylic acid upon complex formation in the systems REE - boronsulfoalizarinate, REE - oxine and REE - boronsulfoalizarinate - oxine is investigated. Comparison of optical characteristics of the above systems in the absence and in the presence of salicylic acid is carried out. It is established that in all the cases the effect of salicylic acid depends both on the nature of REE and the ratio of all the components of the system. Under certain conditions the given dependence is observed only for erbium complexes. Extraction-photometric methods of dysprosium and holmium determination in the presence of equal erbium amounts, as well as holmium and erbium determination in the presence of cerium equal amounts is developed

  3. Dysprosium (holmium) determination in the presence of erbium and dysprosium (holmium, erbium) determination in the presence of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolubara, A I; Kochubei, A I; Usatenko, Yu I

    1978-01-01

    Effect of salicylic acid upon complex formation in the systems REE - boronsulfoalizarinate, REE - oxine and REE - boronsulfoalizarinate - oxine is investigated. Comparison of optical characteristics of the above systems in the absence and in the presence of salicylic acid is carried out. It is established that in all the cases the effect of salicylic acid depends both on the nature of REE and the ratio of all the components of the system. Under certain conditions the given dependence is observed only for erbium complexes. Extraction-photometric methods of dysprosium and holmium determination in the presence of equal erbium amounts, as well as holmium and erbium determination in the presence of cerium equal amounts is developed.

  4. Microspheres with an ultra high holmium content for brachytherapy of malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, Raphael A.; Myamoto, Douglas M.; Souza, Jaime R.; Nascimento, Nanci; Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de; Osso Junior, Joao A.; Martinelli, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to develop biodegradable microspheres intended for internal radiation therapy which provides an improved treatment for hepatic carcinomas. The most studied brachytherapy system employing microspheres made of holmium-biopolymer system is composed by poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc). The importance of the holmium high content in the microspheres can be interpreted as follow from a therapeutic standpoint, to achieve an effective use of microspheres loaded with HoAcAc, a high content of holmium is required to yield enough radioactivity with a relatively low amount of microspheres.The usual amounts of holmium that are incorporated in the microspheres composed by poly(L-lactic acid) and HoAcAc are 17.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) of holmium, which corresponds to a loading of about 50% of HoAcAc. Different approaches have been investigated to increase that value. One updated approach towards this direction is the production of microspheres with ultrahigh holmium as matrix using HoAcAc crystals as the sole starting material without the use of biopolymer. Likewise, in the search of microspheres with increased holmium content , it has been demonstrated that by changing the HoAcAc crystal structure by its recrystallization from crystal phase to the amorphous there is lost of acetylacetonate and water molecules causing the increasing of the holmium content. Microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation, using holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc) crystals as the sole ingredient. Microspheres were characterized by using light and scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-rays diffraction, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. (author)

  5. Microspheres with an ultra high holmium content for brachytherapy of malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Raphael A.; Myamoto, Douglas M.; Souza, Jaime R.; Nascimento, Nanci; Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Osso Junior, Joao A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia; Martinelli, Jose R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    The overall objective of this work is to develop biodegradable microspheres intended for internal radiation therapy which provides an improved treatment for hepatic carcinomas. The most studied brachytherapy system employing microspheres made of holmium-biopolymer system is composed by poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc). The importance of the holmium high content in the microspheres can be interpreted as follow from a therapeutic standpoint, to achieve an effective use of microspheres loaded with HoAcAc, a high content of holmium is required to yield enough radioactivity with a relatively low amount of microspheres.The usual amounts of holmium that are incorporated in the microspheres composed by poly(L-lactic acid) and HoAcAc are 17.0 {+-} 0.5% (w/w) of holmium, which corresponds to a loading of about 50% of HoAcAc. Different approaches have been investigated to increase that value. One updated approach towards this direction is the production of microspheres with ultrahigh holmium as matrix using HoAcAc crystals as the sole starting material without the use of biopolymer. Likewise, in the search of microspheres with increased holmium content , it has been demonstrated that by changing the HoAcAc crystal structure by its recrystallization from crystal phase to the amorphous there is lost of acetylacetonate and water molecules causing the increasing of the holmium content. Microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation, using holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc) crystals as the sole ingredient. Microspheres were characterized by using light and scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-rays diffraction, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. (author)

  6. Ocular brachytherapy with a holmium-166 irradiator device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, Arnaldo P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnoloica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Engenharia Hospitalar], e-mail: aprata@des.cefetmg.br; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares], e-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The ocular brachytherapy is a method that allows controlling ocular tumors. However, the irradiation of the ocular area in high doses can bring damages mainly to the surrounding healthy tissue, such as lens, retina and bone tissue of the orbital area in growth phase. Brachytherapy in comparison to teletherapy allows a large reduction of the absorbed doses in the adjacent tissues avoiding deleterious effects. Various types of radionuclides can be applied to ocular brachytherapy. Those radionuclides shall be encapsulated and placed juxtaposed to the sclera, back to the tumor. Herein, a new device was developed to encapsulate the radioactive material. It can easily place back of the eyeball. A computational model of the ocular area was developed in order to simulate the spatial dose distribution promoted by the holmium-166 nuclide distributed inside the irradiator device. The simulations addressed a device placed on the surface of the sclera, rotated 90 deg taken at the normal axis forward to the lens. The simulation was carried on the code Monte Carlo MCNP5. The computational simulation generates the spatial dose distribution in the treated volume. All continuous beta and the discrete gamma and X-ray spectra emitted by the holmium-166 were incorporated on simulations. The results allow comparing the space dose distribution to other types of sources used for the same end. The sclera absorbed dose, the maximum apical tumor dose, as well as on the tumor base were investigated. Indeed, the tumor thickness defines the conditions of irradiation. The holmium-166 dose distribution provides a tool to propose a better and optimized protocol for ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  7. Ocular brachytherapy with a holmium-166 irradiator device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Arnaldo P.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2009-01-01

    The ocular brachytherapy is a method that allows controlling ocular tumors. However, the irradiation of the ocular area in high doses can bring damages mainly to the surrounding healthy tissue, such as lens, retina and bone tissue of the orbital area in growth phase. Brachytherapy in comparison to teletherapy allows a large reduction of the absorbed doses in the adjacent tissues avoiding deleterious effects. Various types of radionuclides can be applied to ocular brachytherapy. Those radionuclides shall be encapsulated and placed juxtaposed to the sclera, back to the tumor. Herein, a new device was developed to encapsulate the radioactive material. It can easily place back of the eyeball. A computational model of the ocular area was developed in order to simulate the spatial dose distribution promoted by the holmium-166 nuclide distributed inside the irradiator device. The simulations addressed a device placed on the surface of the sclera, rotated 90 deg taken at the normal axis forward to the lens. The simulation was carried on the code Monte Carlo MCNP5. The computational simulation generates the spatial dose distribution in the treated volume. All continuous beta and the discrete gamma and X-ray spectra emitted by the holmium-166 were incorporated on simulations. The results allow comparing the space dose distribution to other types of sources used for the same end. The sclera absorbed dose, the maximum apical tumor dose, as well as on the tumor base were investigated. Indeed, the tumor thickness defines the conditions of irradiation. The holmium-166 dose distribution provides a tool to propose a better and optimized protocol for ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  8. Structural and optical properties of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, influence by holmium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathevula, L. E.; Noto, L. L.; Mothudi, B. M.; Dhlamini, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    α-Fe2O3 and α-Fe2O3 doped with different concentration of holmium ions were synthesized by a simple sol-gel method. The XRD data confirmed the hexagonal structure of α-Fe2O3 for un-doped and holmium doped samples. The crystallite size was found to be decreasing with increasing holmium concentration. The amount of holmium was quantified using an EDS, which shows an increase in holmium quantity as concentration increases. The UV-Vis measurement shows an absorption edge around 570 nm. The band gap was estimated using the Kubelka-Munk relation and it was found to be fluctuating between 1.94 eV and 2.04 eV. The PL spectra confirmed the effect of holmium ions on luminescence properties of α-Fe2O3 which showed a maximum intensity at 0.1 mol% Holmium, and quenching as the concentration is increased from 0.3 mol% to 0.9 mol%.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Diffusivity of Holmium and Praseodymium Zirconates

    OpenAIRE

    Stopyra M.; Niemiec D.; Moskal G.

    2016-01-01

    A2B2O7 oxides with pyrochlore or defected fluorite structure are among the most promising candidates for insulation layer material in thermal barrier coatings. The present paper presents the procedure of synthesis of holmium zirconate Ho2Zr2O7 and praseodymium zirconate Pr2Zr2O7 via Polymerized-Complex Method (PCM). Thermal analysis of precursor revealed that after calcination at relatively low temperature (700°C) fine-crystalline, single-phase material is obtained. Thermal diffusivity was me...

  10. Thermal Response to High-Power Holmium Laser Lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoukhi, Ali H; Ghani, Khurshid R; Hall, Timothy L; Roberts, William W

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate "caliceal" fluid temperature changes during holmium laser activation/lithotripsy using settings up to 40 W power output with different irrigation flow rates. The experimental system consisted of a glass test tube (diameter 10 mm/length 75 mm) filled with deionized water, to mimic a calix. Real-time temperature was recorded using a thermocouple (Physitemp, NJ) positioned 5 mm from the bottom of the tube. A 200 μm laser fiber (Flexiva; Boston Scientific, MA) was introduced through the working channel of a disposable ureteroscope (LithoVue; Boston Scientific) and the laser fiber tip was positioned 15 mm above the bottom of the test tube. Deionized water irrigation (room temperature) through the working channel of the ureteroscope was delivered at flow rates of 0, 7-8, 14-15, and 38-40 mL/minute. A 120-W holmium laser (pulse 120; Lumenis, CA) was used. The following settings were explored: 0.5 J × 10 Hz, 1.0 J × 10 Hz, 0.5 J × 20 Hz, 1.0 J × 20 Hz, 0.5 J × 40 Hz, 1.0 J × 40 Hz, and 0.5 J × 80 Hz. During each experiment, the laser was activated continuously for 60 seconds. Temperature increased with increasing laser power output and decreasing irrigation flow rate. The highest temperature, 70.3°C (standard deviation 2.7), occurred with laser setting of 1.0 J × 40 Hz and no irrigation after 60 seconds of continuous laser firing. None of the tested laser settings and irrigation parameters produced temperature exceeding 51°C when activated for only 10 seconds of continuous laser firing. High-power holmium settings fired in long bursts with low irrigation flow rates can generate high fluid temperatures in a laboratory "caliceal" model. Awareness of this risk allows urologist to implement a variety of techniques (higher irrigation flow rates, intermittent laser activation, and potentially cooled irrigation fluid) to control and mitigate thermal

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Holmium-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Bloemen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rare earth atoms exhibit several interesting properties, for example, large magnetic moments and luminescence. Introducing these atoms into a different matrix can lead to a material that shows multiple interesting effects. Holmium atoms were incorporated into an iron oxide nanoparticle and the concentration of the dopant atom was changed in order to determine its influence on the host crystal. Its magnetic and magneto-optical properties were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry and Faraday rotation measurements. The luminescent characteristics of the material, in solution and incorporated in a polymer thin film, were probed by fluorescence experiments.

  12. Dynamics of pulsed holmium:YAG laser photocoagulation of albumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfefer, T.J.; Welch, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The pulsed holmium:YAG laser (λ = 2.12 μm, τ p = 250 μs) has been investigated as a method for inducing localized coagulation for medical procedures, yet the dynamics of this process are not well understood. In this study, photocoagulation of albumen (egg white) was analysed experimentally and results compared with optical-thermal simulations to investigate a rate process approach to thermal damage and the role of heat conduction and dynamic changes in absorption. The coagulation threshold was determined using probit analysis, and coagulum dynamics were documented with fast flash photography. The nonlinear computational model, which included a Beer's law optical component, a finite difference heat transfer component and an Arrhenius equation-based damage calculation, was verified against data from the literature. Moderate discrepancies between simulation results and our experimental data probably resulted from the use of a laser beam with an irregular spatial profile. This profile produced a lower than expected coagulation threshold and an irregular damage distribution within a millisecond after laser onset. After 1 ms, heat conduction led to smoothing of the coagulum. Simulations indicated that dynamic changes in absorption led to a reduction in surface temperatures. The Arrhenius equation was shown to be effective for simulating transient albumen coagulation during pulsed holmium:YAG laser irradiation. Greater understanding of pulsed laser-tissue interactions may lead to improved treatment outcome and optimization of laser parameters for a variety of medical procedures. (author)

  13. Holmium laser enucleation versus laparoscopic simple prostatectomy for large adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaneda, R; Thanigasalam, R; Rizk, J; Perrot, E; Theveniaud, P E; Baumert, H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate with another minimally invasive technique, the laparoscopic simple prostatectomy. We compared outcomes of a series of 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic simple prostatectomy (n=20) with laser enucleation of the prostate (n=20) for large adenomas (>100 grams) at our institution. Study variables included operative time and catheterization time, hospital stay, pre- and post-operative International Prostate Symptom Score and maximum urinary flow rate, complications and economic evaluation. Statistical analyses were performed using the Student t test and Fisher test. There were no significant differences in patient age, preoperative prostatic size, operating time or specimen weight between the 2 groups. Duration of catheterization (P=.0008) and hospital stay (P.99). Holmium enucleation of the prostate has similar short term functional results and complication rates compared to laparoscopic simple prostatectomy performed in large glands with the advantage of less catheterization time, lower economic costs and a reduced hospital stay. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Dielectric and conducting behaviour of polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Want, Basharat; Zahoor Ahmad, Bhat; Hamid Bhat, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate spherulites have been obtained by using gel diffusion technique and characterized by different physio-chemical techniques. The surfaces of these spherulites are composed of nano-rod with an average diameter of about 80 nm. At room temperature the initial crystal structure is triclinic, space group P1. Thermal studies suggested a phase transition occurring in holmium octa-molybdate crystals at about 793 K. The electrical properties of the system have been studied as a function of frequency and temperature in the ranges of 20 Hz–3 MHz and 290–570 K, respectively. A giant dielectric constant and two loss peaks have been observed in the permittivity formalism. The conducting behaviour of the material is also discussed. The conductivity was found to be 1572 μ Ω −1 m −1 at room temperature and 3 MHz frequency. The conductivity of the polycrystalline material was attributed to the fact that it arises due to the migration of defects on the oxygen sub-lattice. Impedance studies were also performed in the frequency domain to infer the bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall electric response of the material. The electrical responses have been attributed to the grain, grain-boundary, and interfacial effects. (paper)

  15. Holmium laser use in the treatment of selected dry eye syndrome complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial results of treatment selected complications of dry eye syndrome with holmium laser. The lacrimal puncta obliteration and coagulation of the corneal ulcer surface were done.

  16. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CORROSIVE label. 172.442 Section 172.442... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label must... CORROSIVE label must be white in the top half and black in the lower half. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66259, Dec...

  17. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OXIDIZER label. 172.426 Section 172.426... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be... OXIDIZER label must be yellow. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66257, Dec. 20, 1991] ...

  18. 49 CFR 172.554 - POISON placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON placard. 172.554 Section 172.554... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.554 POISON placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON placard must be as follows: EC02MR91.057 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.519, the background on the POISON...

  19. HOLMIUM LASER ENUCLEATION OF THE PROSTATE, FEATURES OF THE INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Hublarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP is a minimally invasive procedure used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The method is as reliable performance with long-term monitoring, and high safety compared to conventional methods of surgical treatment of prostatic hyperplasia – suprapubic simple prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate. Despite the complexity and duration of training for mastering HoLEP currently has a definite Frortage of references detailing the technical aspects of the method. The proposed article is detailed recommendations skilled mastering HoLEP. The material is based on a review of existing literature and my own experience and clinical material Latgale Urology Center in the development and conduct of HoLEP. 

  20. 49 CFR 172.400 - General labeling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 172.411 1.6 EXPLOSIVES 1.6 172.411 2.1 FLAMMABLE GAS 172.417 2.2 NONFLAMMABLE GAS 172.415 2.3 POISON GAS 172.416 3 (flammable liquid) Combustible liquid FLAMMABLE LIQUID (none) 172.419 4.1 FLAMMABLE... B) POISON 172.430 6.2 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE 1 172.432 7 (see § 172.403) RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I 172.436 7...

  1. Holmium laser enucleation for prostate adenoma greater than 100 gm.: comparison to open prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J A; Lingeman, J E

    2001-02-01

    Options for treatment of large (greater than 100 gm.) prostatic adenomas have until now been limited to open surgery or transurethral resection by skilled resectionists. Considerable blood loss, morbidity, extended hospital stay and prolonged recovery occur with open surgery for large prostatic adenomas. Endoscopic surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia has evolved during the last decade to offer the patient and surgeon significant advantages of transurethral removal of prostatic adenomas. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate with transurethral tissue morcellation provides significant reductions in morbidity, bleeding and hospital stay for patients with large prostate adenomas. A retrospective review of data on 10 cases of holmium laser enucleation and 10 open prostatectomies for greater than 100 gm. prostatic adenomas was performed from 1998 to 1999 at our institution. Patient demographics, indication for surgery, preoperative and postoperative American Urological Association (AUA) symptom scores, operating time, serum hemoglobin, resected prostatic weight, pathological diagnosis, length of stay and complications were compared. Patient age, indications for surgery (retention, failed medical therapy, high post-void residual, bladder calculi, bladder diverticula and azotemia) and preoperative AUA symptom scores were similar in both groups. Postoperative AUA symptom scores were significantly decreased (p gm., p = 0.0003). Resected weight was greater in the holmium laser enucleation group (151 versus 106 gm., p = 0.07). Length of stay was significantly shorter in the holmium laser enucleation group (2.1 versus 6.1 days, p <0.001). Complications in the holmium laser enucleation group included stress urinary incontinence in 4 cases, prostatic perforation in 1 and urinary retention in 1. No patient treated with holmium laser enucleation was discharged home with an indwelling catheter. Complications in the open prostatectomy group included bladder neck contractures

  2. Conduction and stability of holmium titanium oxide thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castán, H., E-mail: helena@ele.uva.es [Department of Electronic, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); García, H.; Dueñas, S.; Bailón, L. [Department of Electronic, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Miranda, E. [Departament d' Enginyería Electrònica, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Kukli, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, EE-50411,Tartu (Estonia); Kemell, M.; Ritala, M.; Leskelä, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-30

    Holmium titanium oxide (HoTiO{sub x}) thin films of variable chemical composition grown by atomic layer deposition are studied in order to assess their suitability as dielectric materials in metal–insulator–metal electronic devices. The correlation between thermal and electrical stabilities as well as the potential usefulness of HoTiO{sub x} as a resistive switching oxide are also explored. It is shown that the layer thickness and the relative holmium content play important roles in the switching behavior of the devices. Cycled current–voltage measurements showed that the resistive switching is bipolar with a resistance window of up to five orders of magnitude. In addition, it is demonstrated that the post-breakdown current–voltage characteristics in HoTiO{sub x} are well described by a power-law model in a wide voltage and current range which extends from the soft to the hard breakdown regimes. - Highlights: • Gate and memory suitabilities of atomic layer deposited holmium titanium oxide. • Holmium titanium oxide exhibits resistive switching. • Layer thickness and holmium content influence the resistive switching. • Low and high resistance regimes follow a power-law model. • The power-law model can be extended to the hard breakdown regime.

  3. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label must...

  4. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fatty acids. 172.860 Section 172.860 Food and Drugs... Multipurpose Additives § 172.860 Fatty acids. The food additive fatty acids may be safely used in food and in... and their associated fatty acids manufactured from fats and oils derived from edible sources: Capric...

  5. 7 CFR 1427.172 - Settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Settlement. 1427.172 Section 1427.172 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.172 Settlement. (a...

  6. 21 CFR 172.814 - Hydroxylated lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxylated lecithin. 172.814 Section 172.814 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.814 Hydroxylated lecithin. The food additive hydroxylated lecithin may be safely... obtained by the treatment of lecithin in one of the following ways, under controlled conditions whereby the...

  7. 40 CFR 172.11 - Publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publication. 172.11 Section 172.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXPERIMENTAL USE PERMITS Federal Issuance of Experimental Use Permits § 172.11 Publication. (a) Notice of receipt of an...

  8. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  9. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing...

  10. 40 CFR 172.43 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 172.43 Section 172.43... PERMITS Notification for Certain Genetically Modified Microbial Pesticides § 172.43 Definitions. Terms... material of an isolate and any descendants derived under axenic culture conditions from that isolate. Small...

  11. 21 CFR 172.876 - Castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Castor oil. 172.876 Section 172.876 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Multipurpose Additives § 172.876 Castor oil. The food additive castor oil may be safely used in accordance with...

  12. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color...

  13. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone peroxides. 172.802 Section 172.802 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.802 Acetone peroxides. The food additive acetone peroxides may be safely used in... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide...

  14. 49 CFR 172.450 - EMPTY label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EMPTY label. 172.450 Section 172.450... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.450 EMPTY label. (a) Each EMPTY label, except for size, must be as follows....) in height. (2) The label must be white with black printing. (b) [Reserved] ...

  15. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FISSILE label. 172.441 Section 172.441... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be... FISSILE label must be white. [69 FR 3669, Jan. 26, 2004] ...

  16. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl cellulose may be safely used in food, except standardized foods that do not provide for such use, in...

  17. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  18. Effect of silver nanoparticles on the dielectric properties of holmium doped silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejikumar, P.R.; Jyothy, P.V.; Mathew, Siby; Thomas, Vinoy; Unnikrishnan, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of silver nanoparticle co-doping on the dielectric properties of holmium doped silica glasses was studied. Silver nanoparticles of size between 20 and 22 nm were produced by the sol-gel technique. One of the samples showed an icosahedral morphology of the nanocrystal formed, along with spherical morphology. It was found that the tuning of the dielectric constant values could be accomplished by co-doping. The sample, with 1 wt% of Ho, had low dielectric constant values within the range 100 Hz-3 MHz due to the formation of quasi-molecular structures of holmium. This effect was evaded to some extent with silver co-doping as a result of the interdispersion of holmium complexes. Also it was found that the co-doping produced a higher dielectric loss which was calculated from the tan δ-log f graph. The Cole-Cole parameters and the Jonscher power law parameters were also calculated and are presented.

  19. Chitosan microspheres loaded with holmium-165 produced by spray dryer for liver cancer therapy: preliminary experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Douglas Massao; Pires, Geovanna; Lira, Raphael A. de; Melo, Vitor H.S.; Nascimento, Nanci; Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer of 2-deoxy-2-amino-D-glucose that is obtained by deacetylation of chitin. It's biocompatible, biodegradable, non toxic and has antitumor activity. Chitosan has many applications, such as their microparticles that can be used to treat prostate cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and for liver tumor brachytherapy treatment. Our group is developing different biodegradable polymer-based microspheres loaded with holmium-165 for this purpose. The Chitosan microspheres were produced loaded with holmium (III) chloride, and not loaded with it, by Mini Spray Dryer procedure. The microspheres were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), confocal laser scanning microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, particle size, and X-ray diffraction. The EDS analysis confirmed the holmium chloride presence into the prepared chitosan microparticles. (author)

  20. Chitosan microspheres loaded with holmium-165 produced by spray dryer for liver cancer therapy: preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Douglas Massao; Pires, Geovanna; Lira, Raphael A. de; Melo, Vitor H.S.; Nascimento, Nanci; Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de, E-mail: douglas.miyamoto@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Osso Junior, Joao Alberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia

    2011-07-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer of 2-deoxy-2-amino-D-glucose that is obtained by deacetylation of chitin. It's biocompatible, biodegradable, non toxic and has antitumor activity. Chitosan has many applications, such as their microparticles that can be used to treat prostate cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and for liver tumor brachytherapy treatment. Our group is developing different biodegradable polymer-based microspheres loaded with holmium-165 for this purpose. The Chitosan microspheres were produced loaded with holmium (III) chloride, and not loaded with it, by Mini Spray Dryer procedure. The microspheres were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), confocal laser scanning microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, particle size, and X-ray diffraction. The EDS analysis confirmed the holmium chloride presence into the prepared chitosan microparticles. (author)

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals of DTPA, DMSA and EDTA labeled with holmium-166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.; Matsouka, H.; Takami, S.; Terunuma, K.

    2001-01-01

    DTPA, DMSA and EDTA were labelled with 166 Ho of low specific activity, 250-275mCi/mg of Ho, produced from holmium oxide by the 165 Ho(n, g) 166 Ho reaction at a neutron flux of about 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 . Three pH ranges were selected in the study, viz. 2-3, 3-3.5 and 5-6. The labelling reactions were studied as chloride and nitrate solutions in aqueous and saline media at 30 min and 20-24 h of reaction. DTPA was labelled over 99, DMSA at about 90 and EDTA at 100.0% with 166 Ho. The complexes were found stable at all times of investigation. A beta chromatogram scanner was used to study by TLC the labelling reactions of DTPA and DMSA with the nuclide and by PC those of EDTA. A biodistribution study in three rats injected intravenous with a saline solution of 166 HoCl 3 [DTPA] at pH5.1 showed an initial uptake in blood, kidney and lung after 30 minutes. After four hours the complex was found to have cleared from blood and lung, and localized 100% in kidney. It was stable in vivo in the kidney after 24 hours. The g spectrum analysis did not show the formation of any impurity except the four characteristic g energies of 166 Ho. (author)

  2. Holmium-166-chico intracavitary radiation therapy for cystic brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, C. H.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, E. H.; Choi, C. W.; Hong, S. W.; Lim, S. M. [Korea Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Holmium-166-chitosan complex (Ho-166-chico) is injected into the unresectable seven cystic brain tumors (2 cases of metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer, 1 case of recurrent trigeminal neurinoma, 3 cases of recurrent low grade cystic astrocytomas, and 1 case of craniopharyngioma). The Ommaya reservoir was installed stereotactically. The cyst volume and wall thickness were measured by MRI before Ho-166-chico injection. The thickness of the cyst wall is up to 4 mm. Ho-166-chico (555-740 MBq) injected into the cyst to result in 25 Gy of dose to a cyst wall at a depth of 4 mm. Dose to the cyst wall was estimated by Monte Carlo simulation using the EGS4 code. All Ho-166-chico injected was assumed to be uniformly distributed in the spherical cyst. After Ho-166-chico injection, the distribution of isotopes was monitored by gamma camera. Two injections were administrated in two cases, and one injection in all the others. The response was evaluated with MRI. Four of 7 cases were shrunk in size with thinning of the cyst wall, 2 of 7 cases showed growth arrest, and one case showed progression. Estimated surface dose of cyst wall was between 78 and 2566 Gy. No one showed systemic absorption of Ho-166-chico, and specific complication associated with isotope injection. Ho-166-chico intracavitary radiation therapy for cystic brain tumor may be safe, and reliable method and deserves further evaluation.

  3. Optical and electrical doping of silicon with holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyver, J.F.; Kik, P.G.; Kimura, T.; Polman, A.; Franzo, G.; Coffa, S.

    1999-01-01

    2 MeV holmium ions were implanted into Czochralski grown Si at a fluence of 5.5x10 14 Ho/cm 2 . Some samples were co-implanted with oxygen to a concentration of (7±1)x10 19 cm -3 . After recrystallization, strong Ho segregation to the surface is observed, which is fully suppressed by co-doping with O. After recrystallization, photoluminescence peaks are observed at 1.197, 1.96 and 2.06 μm, characteristic for the 5 I 6 → 5 I 8 and 5 I 7 → 5 I 8 transitions of Ho 3+ . The Ho 3+ luminescence lifetime at 1.197 μm is 14 ms at 12 K. The luminescence intensity shows temperature quenching with an activation energy of 11 meV, both with and without O co-doping. The observed PL quenching cannot be explained by free carrier Auger quenching, but instead must be due to energy backtransfer or electron hole pair dissociation. Spreading resistance measurements indicate that Ho exhibits donor behavior, and that in the presence of O the free carrier concentration is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude. In the O co-doped sample 20% of the Ho 3+ was electrically active at room temperature

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Diffusivity of Holmium and Praseodymium Zirconates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stopyra M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A2B2O7 oxides with pyrochlore or defected fluorite structure are among the most promising candidates for insulation layer material in thermal barrier coatings. The present paper presents the procedure of synthesis of holmium zirconate Ho2Zr2O7 and praseodymium zirconate Pr2Zr2O7 via Polymerized-Complex Method (PCM. Thermal analysis of precursor revealed that after calcination at relatively low temperature (700°C fine-crystalline, single-phase material is obtained. Thermal diffusivity was measured in temperature range 25-200°C, Ho2Zr2O7 exhibits lower thermal diffusivity than Pr2Zr2O7. Additionally, PrHoZr2O7 was synthesized. The powder in as-calcined condition is single-phase, but during the sintering decomposition of solid solution took place and Ho-rich phase precipitated. This material exhibited the best insulating properties among the tested ones.

  5. Ureteroscopic holmium laser cutting for inadvertently sutured drainage tube (report of five cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu; Lu, Xin; Ren, Shancheng; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a simple solution for inadvertently sutured drainage tube after urological surgery and discuss the different managements according to different types of this embarrassing complication. From September 2001 to January 2007, five inadvertently sutured drainage tubes were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser cutting for the suture. All drainage tubes were removed after the operation without other complications. Holmium laser cutting via ureteroscope is a simple solution for the embarrassing problem of inadvertently sutured drainage tube. It can save the patient from undergoing another open surgery.

  6. Holmium laser lithotripsy (HoLL) of ureteral calculi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Rainer M.; Lehrich, Karin; Fayad, Amr

    2001-05-01

    The effectiveness and side effects of ureteroscopic HoLL of ureteral stones should be evaluated. In 63 patients (17 female, 46 males) a total of 75 stones of 3-20 mm diameter were treated with ureteroscopic HoLL. 18.7 percent of stones were located in the proximal third, 24.0 percent in the middle third and 57.3 percent in the distal third of the ureter. HoLL was performed with small diameter semirigid and flexible ureteroscopes, 220 or 365 nm flexible laser fibers and a holmium:YAG laser at a power of 5-15 W (0.5-1.0 J, 10- 15 Hz). 47 of 63 patients (74.6 percent) were immediately free of stones, and 8 others (12.6 percent) lost their residual fragments spontaneously within two weeks. Another 2 patients received additional chmolitholysis for uric acid stone fragments, i.e. 90.5 percent of patients were stone free by one sitting of ureterscopic HoLL. Of the remaining 6 patients (9.5 percent) who still had residual calculi 4 weeks after HoLL, 2 asymptomatic patients refused any additional treatment, 2 patients preferred treatment with ESWL, and 2 patients had a successful second HoLL, thereby raising the success rate of ureteroscopic HoLL to 93.7 percent. 2 patients showed contrast medium extravasation on retrograde ureterograms, due to guide wire perforation. No ureteral stricture occurred. In conclusion, transurethral ureteroscopic HoLL proved to be a safe and successful minimal invasive treatment of ureteral calculi.

  7. Successful Treatment of Stent Knot in the Proximal Ureter Using Ureteroscopy and Holmium Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masters M. Richards

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knotted ureteral stent is rare yet tedious complication that might represent a treatment challenge to the endourologist. Only twelve cases of knotted stent have been reported. Different management options have been reported, including simple traction, ureteroscopy, percutaneous removal, and open surgery. In this paper, we present the successful untying of the knot using ureteroscopy with holmium laser.

  8. [Comparison of validity and safety between holmium: YAG laser and traditional surgery in partial nephrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Xia, Ming

    2015-08-11

    To compare the validity and safety between holmium: YAG laser and traditional surgery in partial nephrectomy. A total of 28 patients were divided into two groups (holmium: YAG laser group without renal artery clamping and traditional surgery group with renal artery clamping). The intraoperative blood loss, total operative time, renal artery clamping time, postoperative hospital stay, separated renal function, postoperative complications and depth of tissue injury were recorded. The intraoperative blood loss, total operative time, renal artery clamping time, postoperative hospital stay, separated renal function, postoperative complications and depth of tissue injury were 80 ml, 77 min, 0 min, 7.4 days, 35 ml/min, 0, 0.9 cm, respectively, in holmium: YAG laser group. And in traditional surgery group were 69 ml, 111 min, 25.5 min, 7.3 days, 34 ml/min, 0, 2.0 cm, respectively. The differences of total operative time, renal artery clamping time and depth of tissue injury between two groups were statistically significant. The others were not statistically significant. Holmium: YAG laser is effective and safe in partial nephrectomy. It can decrease the total operative time, minimize the warm ischemia time and enlarge the extent of surgical excision.

  9. Comparison of ESWL and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in management of ureteral stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yon; Cao, Wenzhou; Shen, Hua; Xie, Jianjun; Adams, Tamara S; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Shao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    There are many options for urologists to treat ureteral stones that range from 8 mm to 15 mm, including ESWL and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. While both ESWL and ureteroscopy are effective and minimally invasive procedures, there is still controversy over which one is more suitable for ureteral stones. To perform a retrospective study to compare the efficiency, safety and complications using ESWL vs. ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in management of ureteral stones. Between October 2010 and October 2012, 160 patients who underwent ESWL or ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy at Suzhou municipal hospital for a single radiopaque ureteral stone (the size 8-15 mm) were evaluated. All patients were followed up with ultrasonography for six months. Stone clearance rate, costs and complications were compared. Similarity in stone clearance rate and treatment time between the two procedures; overall procedural time, analgesia requirement and total cost were significantly different. Renal colic and gross hematuria were more frequent with ESWL while voiding symptoms were more frequent with ureteroscopy. Both procedures used for ureteral stones ranging from 8 to 15 mm were safe and minimally invasive. ESWL remains first line therapy for proximal ureteral stones while ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy costs more. To determining which one is preferable depends on not only stone characteristics but also patient acceptance and cost-effectiveness ratio.

  10. Comparison of ESWL and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in management of ureteral stones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yon Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are many options for urologists to treat ureteral stones that range from 8 mm to 15 mm, including ESWL and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. While both ESWL and ureteroscopy are effective and minimally invasive procedures, there is still controversy over which one is more suitable for ureteral stones. OBJECTIVE: To perform a retrospective study to compare the efficiency, safety and complications using ESWL vs. ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in management of ureteral stones. METHODS: Between October 2010 and October 2012, 160 patients who underwent ESWL or ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy at Suzhou municipal hospital for a single radiopaque ureteral stone (the size 8-15 mm were evaluated. All patients were followed up with ultrasonography for six months. Stone clearance rate, costs and complications were compared. RESULTS: Similarity in stone clearance rate and treatment time between the two procedures; overall procedural time, analgesia requirement and total cost were significantly different. Renal colic and gross hematuria were more frequent with ESWL while voiding symptoms were more frequent with ureteroscopy. Both procedures used for ureteral stones ranging from 8 to 15 mm were safe and minimally invasive. CONCLUSION: ESWL remains first line therapy for proximal ureteral stones while ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy costs more. To determining which one is preferable depends on not only stone characteristics but also patient acceptance and cost-effectiveness ratio.

  11. Wound repair in rat urinary bladder following electrocautery or holmium laser incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzi, Giordano; Schmidlin, Franz R.; Gabbiani, Giulio; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Pittet, Brigitte; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Iselin, Christoph E.

    1999-06-01

    Woundhealing is a complex phenomenon which varies according the type of tissue but is also depending from the type of tissue injury. Electrocautery mainly induces coagulation necrosis while thermal damages induced by the Holmium laser primarily lead to tissue vaporization which may induce less tissue injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process of the Holmium laser induced lesions compared to electrocautery induced lesions in urothelial tissue by assessing the inflammatory response and myofibroblast behavior in sequential healing phases. A surgical wound was created in the urinary rat bladder of 32 rats either by electrocautery or by laser (N=16). The inflammatory response, the total lesion depth and the myofibroblast activity during woundhealing was then analyzed on a qualitative basis on days 0/2/4/8. The overall inflammatory response was comparable in both groups up to days two and four. However, at day eight less cellular inflammatory reaction and less myofibroblast activity was found in the specimen of lesions created by the Holmium laser. These results suggest that wound repair may be a less invasive process after Holmium laser than electrocautery.

  12. 46 CFR 172.085 - Hull type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hull type. 172.085 Section 172.085 Shipping COAST GUARD... of This Chapter § 172.085 Hull type. If a cargo listed in Table 151.05 of part 151 of this chapter is to be carried, the tank barge must be at least the hull type specified in Table 151.05 of this...

  13. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aspartame. 172.804 Section 172.804 Food and Drugs... Multipurpose Additives § 172.804 Aspartame. The food additive aspartame may be safely used in food in... conditions: (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). (b) The...

  14. Performance and safety of holmium: YAG laser optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Bodo E; Glickman, Randolph D; Stallman, Kenneth J; Maswadi, Saher; Chew, Ben H; Beiko, Darren T; Denstedt, John D; Teichman, Joel M H

    2005-11-01

    Lower-pole ureteronephroscopy requires transmission of holmium:YAG energy along a deflected fiber. Current ureteroscopes are capable of high degrees of deflection, which may stress laser fibers beyond safe limits during lower-pole use. We hypothesized that optical fiber and safety measures differ among manufacturers. Small (200-273-microm) and medium-diameter (300-400-microm) Ho:YAG fibers were tested in a straight and 180 degrees bent configuration. Energy transmission was measured by an energy detector. Fiber durability was assessed by firing the laser in sequentially tighter bending diameters. The fibers were bent to 180 degrees with a diameter of 6 cm and run at 200- to 4000-mJ pulse energy to determine the minimum energy required to fracture the fiber. The bending diameter was decreased by 1-cm increments and testing repeated until a bending diameter of 1 cm was reached. The maximum deflection of the ACMI DUR-8E ureteroscope with each fiber in the working channel was recorded. The flow rate through the working channel of the DUR-8E was measured for each fiber. The mean energy transmission differed among fibers (P < 0.001). The Lumenis SL 200 and the InnovaQuartz 400 were the best small and medium-diameter fibers, respectively, in resisting thermal breakdown (P < 0.01). The Dornier Lightguide Super 200 fractured repeatedly at a bend diameter of 2 cm and with the lowest energy (200 mJ). The other small fibers fractured only at a bend diameter of 1 cm. The Sharplan 200 and InnovaQuartz Sureflex 273T were the most flexible fibers, the Lumenis SL 365 the least. The flow rate was inversely proportional to four times the power of the diameter of the fiber. Optical performance and safety differ among fibers. Fibers transmit various amounts of energy to their cladding when bent. During lower-pole nephroscopy with the fiber deflected, there is a risk of fiber fracture from thermal breakdown and laser-energy transmission to the endoscope. Some available laser fibers

  15. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... alcohol in tableted foods for special dietary use, in an amount not greater than that required to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  16. 21 CFR 172.135 - Disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., other than black-eyed peas) 165 Promote color retention. Mayonnaise 75 Preservative. Ready-to-eat cereal... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Disodium EDTA. 172.135 Section 172.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  17. 40 CFR 172.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 172.1 Section 172.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXPERIMENTAL USE... efficacious action on a pest. [73 FR 75599, Dec. 12, 2008] ...

  18. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effect of changes in accounting principles, and the effect of changes in accounting estimates; (2) May... intangible assets defined as intangible in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; and (5... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education...

  19. 21 CFR 172.655 - Furcelleran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (red seaweed). (b) The food additive conforms to the following: (1) It is a sulfated polysaccharide the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Furcelleran. 172.655 Section 172.655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  20. 48 CFR 207.172 - Human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Human research. 207.172... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plans 207.172 Human research. Any DoD component sponsoring research involving human subjects— (a) Is responsible for oversight of...

  1. 20 CFR 702.172 - Certification; definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification; definitions. 702.172 Section 702.172 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LONGSHOREMEN'S... engaged in commerce but does not include military vessels or Coast Guard vessels. (b) “Federal Maritime...

  2. 12 CFR 563.172 - Financial derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... underlying assets, indices, or reference rates. The most common types of financial derivatives are futures, forward commitments, options, and swaps. A mortgage derivative security, such as a collateralized mortgage... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial derivatives. 563.172 Section 563.172...

  3. Fine- and hyperfine structure investigations of the even-parity configuration system of the atomic holmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, D.; Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.; Furmann, B.

    2018-04-01

    In this work new experimental results concerning the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even-parity level system of the holmium atom (Ho I) were obtained; additionally, hfs data obtained recently as a by-product in investigations of the odd-parity level system were summarized. In the present work the values of the magnetic dipole and the electric quadrupole hfs constants A and B were determined for 24 even-parity levels, for 14 of them for the first time. On the basis of these results, as well as on available literature data, a parametric study of the fine structure and the hyperfine structure for the even-parity configurations of atomic holmium was performed. A multi-configuration fit of 7 configurations was carried out, taking into account second-order of the perturbation theory. For unknown electronic levels predicted values of the level energies and hfs constants are given, which can facilitate further experimental investigations.

  4. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade do Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dalmazio, Ilza; Valente, Eduardo S., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: valente@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP-{sup 166}Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  5. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP- 166 Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  6. Safety of holmium laser prostatectomy in patients with cardiac pacemaker implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The use of the standard monopolar electrocautery is associated with significant risks of implant malfunction in patients on a cardiac pacemaker. It is also associated with a risk of adverse cardiac events due to blood loss and fluid absorption. The properties of the holmium laser prevent the occurrence of these adverse events. We report the successful use of this technology in resecting the gland in patients on a permanent cardiac pacemaker implant. MATERIALS AND Methods: Six patients with permanent cardiac pacemaker implant were treated with holmium laser resection of prostate over a period of two years. Treated patients had bothersome prostatic symptoms and failed to respond to medical therapy. All patients were operated under spinal anesthesia using a high power VersaPulse ® PowerSuiteTM Holmium laser source. Normal saline was used as irrigant. Intravesical tissue morcellator was also used to remove the larger fragments in two of the patients. Results : Median patient age was 60 years (range 56-73 and median prostate volume was 40cc (range 20-48cc. None of the patient required blood transfusion or had significant hyponatremia or Transurethral resection syndrome. No patients had any pacemaker malfunction or hemodynamic instability during the procedure or in immediate postoperative period. Improvement in maximum urine flow rate was observed from an average of 7 ml/sec in preoperative period to 22 ml/sec postoperatively at 3 month followup. Conclusions: Holmium laser prostatectomy offers the ideal modality of surgery in patients on a cardiac pacemaker. It helps to avoid additional preparation and minimizes the risk of device malfunction and adverse post operative events.

  7. A holmium(III)-based single-molecule magnet with pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajiwara, Takashi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University (Japan)

    2017-09-11

    The right environment: The remarkable properties of a recently reported holmium(III)-based single-ion magnet have been ascribed to the hyperfine interactions with the half-integer nuclear spin in combination with the pentagonal-bipyramidal coordination environment. These results provide insight into the complicated magnetic properties of nanosized magnetic materials. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Material science as basis for nuclear medicine: Holmium irradiation for radioisotopes production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Ahmed Rufai; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Otuka, Naohiko

    2018-05-01

    Material Science, being an interdisciplinary field, plays important roles in nuclear science. These applications are seen in weaponry, armoured vehicles, accelerator structure and development, semiconductor detectors, nuclear medicine and many more. Present study presents the applications of some metals in nuclear medicine (radioisotope production). The charged-particle-induced nuclear reactions by using cyclotrons or accelerators have become a very vital feature of the modern nuclear medicine. Realising the importance of excitation functions for the efficient production of medical radionuclides, some very high purity holmium metals are generally prepared or purchased for bombardment in nuclear accelerators. In the present work, various methods to obtain pure holmium for radioisotope production have been discussed while also presenting details of our present studies. From the experimental work of the present studies, some very high purity holmium foils have been used in the work for a comprehensive study of residual radionuclides production cross-sections. The study was performed using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with γ-ray spectrometry. The stack was bombarded with 50.4 MeV alpha particle beam from AVF cyclotron of RI Beam Factory, Nishina Centre for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Japan. The work produced thulium radionuclides useful in nuclear medicine.

  9. Holmium:YAG laser effects on articular cartilage metabolism: in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Lane; Montgomery, L.; Fanton, G.; Dillingham, M.; Schurman, D. J.

    1994-09-01

    We report effects of applying variable doses of Holmium:YAG laser energy to bovine articular cartilage in vitro. The response of the cartilage to the Holmium:YAG laser energy was determined by quantification of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan synthesis. This study demonstrates that articular cartilage cell metabolism was maintained at a normal level following treatment of cartilage at a dose of 0.6 joules/pulse. The laser energy was applied at 10 Hz for 10 seconds at 1 mm distance from the cartilage. Under these conditions and at a dose of 0.6 joules/pulse, the total energy density was calculated to be 240 joules/cm2, assuming minimal loss of energy due to water absorption. Energy levels grater than 0.8 joules/pulse corresponding to calculated energy densities greater than 320 joules/cm2 proved harmful to cartilage. Our data demonstrate that low levels of Holmium:YAG laser energy can be applied to articular cartilage under conditions that maintain and/or stimulate cell metabolism.

  10. 21 CFR 172.867 - Olestra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prepackaged ready-to-eat savory (i.e., salty or piquant but not sweet) snacks and prepackaged, unpopped popcorn kernels that are ready-to-heat. In such foods, the additive may be used in place of fats and oils... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Olestra. 172.867 Section 172.867 Food and Drugs...

  11. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters of fatty acids... prepared from lactic acid and fatty acids meeting the requirements of § 172.860(b) and/or oleic acid...

  12. Hyperfine structure investigations for the odd-parity configuration system in atomic holmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, D.; Furmann, B.

    2018-02-01

    In this work new experimental results of the hyperfine structure (hfs) in the holmium atom are reported, concerning the odd-parity level system. Investigations were performed by the method of laser induced fluorescence in a hollow cathode discharge lamp on 97 spectral lines in the visible part of the spectrum. Hyperfine structure constants: magnetic dipole - A and electric quadrupole - B for 40 levels were determined for the first time; for another 21 levels the hfs constants available in the literature were remeasured. Results for the A constants can be viewed as fully reliable; for B constants further possibilities of improving the accuracy are considered.

  13. Magnetic x-ray scattering studies of holmium using synchro- tron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, D.; Moncton, D.E.; D'Amico, K.L.; Bohr, J.; Grier, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    We present the results of magnetic x-ray scattering experiments on the rare-earth metal holmium using synchrotron radiation. Direct high-resolution measurements of the nominally incommensurate magnetic satellite reflections reveal new lock-in behavior which we explain within a simple spin-discommensuration model. As a result of magnetoelastic coupling, the spin-discommensuration array produces additional x-ray diffraction satellites. Their observation further substantiates the model and demonstrates additional advantages of synchrotron radiation for magnetic-structure studies

  14. Diode-Pumped Thulium (Tm)/Holmium (Ho) Composite Fiber 2.1-Micrometers Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Schematic of the 800-nm diode pumped Tm/Ho composite fiber laser 8 Under quasi-continuous wave (Q- CW ) pumping conditions of 1-ms duration and a...Fig. 9 (Top) Schematic of the 800-nm diode -pumped Tm/Ho composite fiber laser with outcoupler. (Left) Q- CW laser performance of the Tm/Ho composite...ARL-TR-7452 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Diode -Pumped Thulium (Tm)/Holmium (Ho) Composite Fiber 2.1-μm Laser by G

  15. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate and Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Treated by Superselective Arterial Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios D. Asimakopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic pelvic pseudoaneurysm with concomitant arteriovenous fistula has been described as a rare and challenging complication, which may occur during transurethral resection of the prostate. We provide the first report of this complication after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The attempt to control the bleeding by conversion to open surgery and placement of haemostatic stitches into the prostatic fossa failed. Angiography with superselective arterial embolization proved to be a modern, quick, safe, and efficient treatment of this uncommon complication.

  16. Evaluation of samarium-153 and holmium-166-EDTMP in the normal baboon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louw, W.K.A.; Dormehl, I.C.; Rensburg, A.J. van; Hugo, N.; Alberts, A.S.; Forsyth, O.E.; Beverley, G.; Sweetlove, M.A.; Marais, J.; Loetter, M.G.; Aswegen, A. van

    1996-11-01

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals such as ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) complexes of samarium-153 and holmium-166 are receiving considerable attention for therapeutic treatment of bone metastases. In this study, using the baboon experimental model, multicompartmental analysis revealed that with regard to pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and skeletal localisation, {sup 166}Ho-EDTMP was significantly inferior to {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP. A more suitable {sup 166}Ho-bone-seeking agent should thus be sought for closer similarity to {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP to exploit fully the therapeutic potential of its shorter half-life and more energetic beta radiation.

  17. Lumbar endoscopic percutaneous discolisis, with Holmium YAG laser - four years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez L, Jorge Felipe; Rugeles O, Jose G

    2001-01-01

    we have designed a prospective study over 220 patients with lumbar hernia. our purpose is to show the results that we have obtained with endoscopic percutaneous holmium YAG laser lumbar disc decompression. In all cases, ambulatory surgery was performed using local anesthesia, follow up based on Mac Nab criteria was made with excellent and good results in 75% of patients this is a useful safety outpatient procedure with good results, fewer complications, reduced costs and with the same or better results than traditional procedures

  18. Specific heat of holmium and YNi2B2C. Criticalbehaviour and superconducting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekkali, Abdelhakim

    2010-01-01

    Object of the thesis is the study of the specific heat of holmium and YNi 2 B 2 C in the temperature ranges from 50 to 200 KI respectively from 380 mK to 20 K in magnetic fields up to 9 T. In the present thesis the criticalbehaviour of YNi 2 B 2 C and properties of the superconducting state of tne non-magnetic rare-earth nickel borocarbide YNi 2 B 2 C are studied by means of a self-developed measurement apparatur of the specific heat using the quasi-adiabatic heating-pulse method as well as of holmium by means of the relaxation method. In this thesis reliable statements about the critical exponents on monocrystalline holmium could be made. The study on holmium proves that the critical behaviour of the specific heats cannot be described in the framework of the predictions of the chiral universality classes. By means of measurements of the specific heat in this thesis could be confirmed that YNi 2 B 2 C is a multiband superconductor. The positive curvature of the boundary line below T c in the phase diagram yields a first hint to the many-band character of YNI 2 B 2 C. In the zero-field the electronic specific heat in the superconducting state c es (T) can be not explained in the framework of the pure BCS theory. At low temperatures a residual contribution by normally conducting electrons could be detected, which hints to a not completely opened energy gap. A possible explanation would be that a band (or several bands) with low charge-carrier concentration not contribute to the superconductivity. This result agrees with de Haas-van Alphen measurements on isostructural superconducting LuNi 2 B 2 C monocrystals, which suggest the many-band character of the superconductivity as well as a vanishing energy gap in one band. The fluctuation behaviour of the specific heat of YNi 2 B 2 C in the neighbourhood of the superconducting-normally conducting transition agrees well with that of the 3D-XY model. [de

  19. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Botelho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction.

  20. Evidence for a devil's staircase in holmium produced by an applied magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, R.A.; Jehan, D.A.; McMorrow, D.F.; McIntyre, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic structure of holmium has been studied using neutron diffraction when a magnetic field is applied along the c axis. The field has the effect of suppressing the onset of the commensurate cone phase found at low temperatures in zero field, and instead produces a series of spin-slip structures. In contrast to the zero-field diffraction experiments, where a continuous variation of the magnetic wave vector q was observed, we find that below ∼15 K the wave vector q is always commensurate and forms a devil's staircase with increasing field

  1. 21 CFR 172.260 - Oxidized polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to 19. (b) The additive is used or intended for use as a protective coating or component of protective coatings for fresh avocados, bananas, beets, coconuts, eggplant, garlic, grapefruit, lemons, limes... Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.260 Oxidized polyethylene. Oxidized polyethylene may be safely...

  2. 32 CFR 172.3 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SALES OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY § 172.3 Policy. (a) Cash or cash equivalents in the prescribed amounts shall accompany bid deposits for a bid to be considered responsive. Similarly, cash or cash...-level costs incurred in operation of the recyclable program. (2) After reimbursement of the cost...

  3. 21 CFR 172.830 - Succinylated monoglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.830 Succinylated monoglycerides. The food additive succinylated... a level not to exceed 3 percent by weight of the shortening. (2) As a dough conditioner in bread...

  4. 21 CFR 172.365 - Kelp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.365 Kelp. Kelp may be safely added to a food as a source of the...

  5. 21 CFR 172.395 - Xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.395 Xylitol. Xylitol may be safely used in foods for special...

  6. 21 CFR 172.715 - Calcium lignosulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.715 Calcium lignosulfonate. Calcium lignosulfonate may be...

  7. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used...

  8. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely...

  9. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be...

  10. 49 CFR 172.200 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... transportation shall describe the hazardous material on the shipping paper in the manner required by this subpart... marine pollutant, that is— (1) Identified by the letter “A” in column 1 of the § 172.101 table, except...

  11. 10 CFR 431.172 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... boiler, hot water supply boiler, commercial warm air furnace, instantaneous water heater, storage water heater, or unfired hot water storage tank. Flue loss means the sum of the sensible heat and latent heat... Provisions for Commercial HVAC & Water Heating Products § 431.172 Definitions. The following definitions...

  12. Evaluation of holmium laser versus cold knife in optical internal urethrotomy for the management of short segment urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Kaza, Ram Chandra Murthy; Singh, Bipin Kumar

    2014-10-01

    SACHSE COLD KNIFE IS CONVENTIONALLY USED FOR OPTICAL INTERNAL URETHROTOMY INTENDED TO MANAGE URETHRAL STRICTURES AND HO: YAG laser is an alternative to it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urethral stricture treatment outcomes, efficacy, and complications using cold knife and Ho: YAG (Holmium laser) for optical internal urethrotomy. In this prospective study included, 90 male patients age >18 years, with diagnosis of urethral stricture admitted for internal optical urethrotomy during April 2010 to March 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups containing 45 patients each using computer generated random number. In group A (Holmium group), internal urethrotomy was done with Holmium laser and in group B (Cold knife group) Sachse cold knife was used. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery in Out Patient Department on 15, 30 and 180 post-operative days. At each follow up visit physical examination, and uroflowmetry was performed along with noting complaints, if any. The peak flow rates (PFR) were compared between the two groups on each follow up. At 180 days (6 month interval) the difference between mean of PFR for Holmium and Cold knife group was statistically highly significant (P knife urethrotomy.

  13. Use of the Moses Technology to Improve Holmium Laser Lithotripsy Outcomes: A Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhilali, Mostafa M; Badaan, Shadie; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Andonian, Sero

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of Moses technology in Holmium laser and to compare it with the Regular mode in terms of lithotripsy efficiency and laser-tissue interactions. The Lumenis ® Pulse™ P120H holmium laser system together with Moses D/F/L fibers were used to compare the Regular mode with the Moses modes in stone retropulsion by using a high-speed camera, and stone ablation efficiency. In addition, a porcine ureteroscopy model was used to assess stone fragmentation and dusting as well as laser-tissue interaction with the ureteral wall. After a laser pulse, in vitro stone displacement experiments showed a significant reduction in retropulsion when using the Moses mode. The stone movement was reduced by 50 times at 0.8 J and 10 Hz (p technology resulted in more efficient laser lithotripsy, in addition to significantly reduced stone retropulsion, and displayed a margin of safety that may result in a shorter procedural time and safer lithotripsy.

  14. Laparoscopy-assisted micropercutaneous choledocholithotripsy with holmium laser in a cholecystectomized patient: an initial report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçen, Kaan; Atabey, Mustafa; Gökçen, Pınar; Gökçe, Gökhan

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel minimally invasive technique, laparoscopy-assisted micropercutaneous choledocholithotripsy, for choledocholithiasis that cannot be treated with other endoscopic techniques. This technique includes standard laparoscopic exploration of the common bile duct, combined with an all-seeing needle and holmium laser lithotripsy. As is known, an all-seeing needle is used in micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy for middle-sized renal stones. In this technique, an all-seeing needle was inserted into the dilatated common bile duct under laparoscopic vision and then a lithotripsy procedure was performed with a holmium laser behind the biliary stent. A cholecystectomized female patient with a 21-mm stone in the common bile duct who previously underwent an unsuccessful endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure was operated on in our service with laparoscopy-assisted micropercutaneous choledocholithotomy without a T-tube. This novel procedure was completed uneventfully and the patient was discharged without any complications. In the future, this procedure will hopefully be a treatment modality in choledocholithiasis that cannot be treated by other minimally invasive techniques.

  15. 21 CFR 172.863 - Salts of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Salts of fatty acids. 172.863 Section 172.863 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.863 Salts of fatty acids. The food additive salts of fatty acids may be safely..., magnesium, potassium, and sodium salts of the fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid...

  16. Dicty_cDB: CHK172 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH (Link to library) CHK172 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11104-1 - (Link to Or...iginal site) CHK172F 626 - - - - - - Show CHK172 Library CH (Link to library) Clone ID CHK172 (Link to dicty...Base) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U11104-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.b...HEECKTQGNNYFKQSQYMDAIRCYTQAIELSNGTIA AYYGNRAAAYLAICTKSSLQDSIKDSLKAIELERSFIKGYTRASKAYIHLAQYDQAASII VRGLVFDPRN...KMDHEECKTQGNNYFKQSQYMDAIRCYTQAIELSNGTIA AYYGNRAAAYLAICTKSSLQDSIKDSLKAIELERSFIKGYT

  17. 7 CFR 457.172 - Coverage Enhancement Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage Enhancement Option. 457.172 Section 457.172..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.172 Coverage Enhancement Option. The Coverage Enhancement Option for the 2009 and succeeding crop years are as follows: FCIC policies: United...

  18. 49 CFR 172.446 - CLASS 9 label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the six white spaces between them. The lower half of the label must be white with the class number “9... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CLASS 9 label. 172.446 Section 172.446... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.446 CLASS 9 label. (a) Except for size and color, the “CLASS 9...

  19. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Hull Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this...

  20. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and..., Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.615 Chewing gum base. The food additive chewing gum base... substances listed in paragraph (a) of this section, chewing gum base may also include substances generally...

  1. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet extract flavor base may be safely used in food in accordance with the provisions of this section. (a...

  2. 21 CFR 172.822 - Sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium lauryl sulfate. 172.822 Section 172.822 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.822 Sodium lauryl sulfate. The food additive sodium lauryl sulfate may be safely... specifications: (1) It is a mixture of sodium alkyl sulfates consisting chiefly of sodium lauryl sulfate [CH2(CH2...

  3. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... benchmarking. 141.172 Section 141.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.172 Disinfection profiling and benchmarking. (a... sanitary surveys conducted by the State. (c) Disinfection benchmarking. (1) Any system required to develop...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 172 - Trefoil Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trefoil Symbol B Appendix B to Part 172... SECURITY PLANS Pt. 172, App. B Appendix B to Part 172—Trefoil Symbol 1. Except as provided in paragraph 2 of this appendix, the trefoil symbol required for RADIOACTIVE labels and placards and required to be...

  5. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived from...

  6. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized, and...

  7. 21 CFR 172.340 - Fish protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.340 Fish protein isolate. (a) The food additive fish... accordance with recognized good manufacturing practice for fish to be used as human food. (4) The additive... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fish protein isolate. 172.340 Section 172.340 Food...

  8. 7 CFR 1150.172 - Books and records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Books and records. 1150.172 Section 1150.172... Order Reports, Books and Records § 1150.172 Books and records. Each person who is subject to this... employees of the Board and the Secretary such books and records as are necessary to carry out the provisions...

  9. 49 CFR 172.701 - Federal-State relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal-State relationship. 172.701 Section 172... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Training § 172.701 Federal-State relationship. This subpart and the parts...

  10. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and L-alanine...

  11. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Vegetables § 155.172 Canned dry...

  12. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  13. 26 CFR 1.172-13 - Product liability losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 3. Y, a professional medical association, is sued by B, a patient, in an action based on the malpractice of one of its doctors. B recovers $25,000. Because the suit was based on the services of B, the... 172(j)(3) not to have section 172(b)(1)(I) apply. (4) Relationship with section 172(b)(3)(C) election...

  14. 49 CFR 172.416 - POISON GAS label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON GAS label. 172.416 Section 172.416... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.416 POISON GAS label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS label... POISON GAS label and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black and the...

  15. 21 CFR 172.770 - Ethylene oxide polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene oxide polymer. 172.770 Section 172.770... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.770 Ethylene oxide polymer. The polymer of ethylene oxide may... conditions. (a) It is the polymer of ethylene oxide having a minimum viscosity of 1,500 centipoises in a 1...

  16. 21 CFR 172.888 - Synthetic petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic petroleum wax. 172.888 Section 172.888... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.888 Synthetic petroleum wax. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in or on foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Synthetic petroleum wax is a...

  17. 49 CFR 172.540 - POISON GAS placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON GAS placard. 172.540 Section 172.540... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.540 POISON GAS placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS... the POISON GAS placard and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black...

  18. Alternative Treatment of Osteoma Using an Endoscopic Holmium-YAG Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ba Leun Han

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoma is one of the most common tumors of the cranial vault and the facial skeleton. For osteoma in the facial region, endoscopic resection is widely used to prevent surgical scarring. Tumors in a total of 14 patients were resected using an endoscopic holmium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Ho:YAG laser with a long flexible fiber. Aside from having the advantage of not leaving a scar due to the use of endoscopy, this procedure allowed resection at any position, was minimally invasive, and caused less postoperative pain. This method yielded excellent cosmetic results, so the endoscopic Ho:YAG laser is expected to emerge as a good treatment option for osteoma.

  19. Lande gJ factors for even-parity electronic levels in the holmium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, D.; Werbowy, S.; Krzykowski, A.; Furmann, B.

    2018-05-01

    In this work the hyperfine structure of the Zeeman splitting for 18 even-parity levels in the holmium atom was investigated. The experimental method applied was laser induced fluorescence in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. 20 spectral lines were investigated involving odd-parity levels from the ground multiplet, for which Lande gJ factors are known with high precision, as the lower levels; this greatly facilitated the evaluation of gJ factors for the upper levels. The gJ values for the even-parity levels considered are reported for the first time. They proved to compare fairly well with the values obtained recently in a semi-empirical analysis for the even-parity level system of Ho I.

  20. Development of phosphate glass microspheres containing holmium for selective internal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, Eraldo Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    The selective internal radiotherapy is an alternative for some kinds of cancer as the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or primary liver cancer treatment. In this treatment, glass or polymer microspheres containing radionuclides inside their structure are introduced in the liver through hepatic artery and trapped at the arterioles that feed the tumor. In this work, the development of phosphate glasses containing holmium for production of microspheres and their application in Brazil are proposed. The developed glasses presented suitable chemical durability, density of 2,7(3) g/cm 3 , high thermal stability and the impurities contained therein do not preclude the treatment. The microspheres were produced by the flame method and the gravitational fall method, and were characterized by means of several techniques to evaluate shape, average particle size, activity and biocompatibility suitable for selective internal radiotherapy. Based in the main results, the submission to in vivo tests is proposed. (author)

  1. High power operation of cladding pumped holmium-doped silica fibre lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Alexander; Bennetts, Shayne; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-02-25

    We report the highest power operation of a resonantly cladding-pumped, holmium-doped silica fibre laser. The cladding pumped all-glass fibre utilises a fluorine doped glass layer to provide low loss cladding guidance of the 1.95 µm pump radiation. The operation of both single mode and large-mode area fibre lasers was demonstrated, with up to 140 W of output power achieved. A slope efficiency of 59% versus launched pump power was demonstrated. The free running emission was measured to be 2.12-2.15 µm demonstrating the potential of this architecture to address the long wavelength operation of silica based fibre lasers with high efficiency.

  2. Influence of crystallite size and temperature on the antiferromagnetic helices of terbium and holmium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Jens-Peter; Michels, Andreas [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Ferdinand, Adrian; Birringer, Rainer [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Baller, Joerg; Sanctuary, Roland [University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Philippi, Stefan [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Lott, Dieter [GKSS Research Center, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Balog, Sandor [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rotenberg, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California 94720 (United States); Kaindl, Guenter [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Doebrich, Kristian M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We report on the results of grain-size and temperature-dependent magnetization, specific-heat, neutron-scattering, and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments on the heavy rare-earth metals terbium and holmium, with particular emphasis on the temperature regions where the helical antiferromagnetic phases exist. In contrast to Ho, we find that the helical structure in Tb is relative strongly affected by microstructural disorder, specifically, it can no longer be detected for the smallest studied grain size of D=18 nm. Moreover, in coarse-grained Tb a helical structure persists even in the ferromagnetic regime, down to about T=215 K, in agreement with the ARPES data, which reveal a nesting feature of the Fermi surface at the L point of the Brillouin zone at T=210 K.

  3. Holmium-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fibers for 2.1 μm lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chuanfei; He, Chunfeng; Jia, Zhixu; Wang, Shunbin; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2015-10-15

    Holmium (Ho3+)-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fibers based on TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3 glasses are fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method. By using a 1.992 μm fiber laser as the pump source, lasing at 2.077 μm is obtained from a 27 cm long Ho3+-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fiber. The maximum unsaturated power is about 161 mW and the corresponding slope efficiency is up to 67.4%. The influence of fiber length on lasing at 2.1 μm is also investigated. Our results show that Ho3+-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fibers are promising gain media for 2.1 μm laser applications.

  4. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  5. Bouveret's syndrome complicated by distal gallstone ileus after laser lithotropsy using Holmium: YAG laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers John B

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bouveret's syndrome is an unusual presentation of duodenal obstruction caused by the passage of a large gallstone through a cholecystoduodenal fistula. Endoscopic therapy has been used as first-line treatment, especially in patients with high surgical risk. Case presentation We report a 67-year-old woman who underwent an endoscopic attempt to fragment and retrieve a duodenal stone using a Holmium: Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet Laser (Ho:YAG which resulted in small bowel obstruction. The patient successfully underwent enterolithotomy without cholecystectomy or closure of the fistula. Conclusion We conclude that, distal gallstone obstruction, due to migration of partially fragmented stones, can occur as a possible complication of laser lithotripsy treatment of Bouveret's syndrome and might require urgent enterolithotomy.

  6. Synthesis and optical properties of antimony oxide glasses doped with holmium trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunatha, S.; Eraiah, B., E-mail: eraiah@rediffmail.com [Department of physics, Bangalore University, Bengaluru – 560 056. India (India)

    2016-05-06

    Holmium doped lithium-antimony-lead borate glasses having 1 mol% AgNO{sub 3} with composition 50B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20PbO-25Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-5Li{sub 2}O have been prepared using single step melt quenching technique. The XRD spectrum confirms amorphous nature of glasses. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses. The optical direct band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.10 eV to 3.31 eV and indirect band gap energies were found to be in the range of 2.28 eV to 3.00 eV. The refractive indexes have been calculated by using Lorentz-Lorenz formula and the calculated values in the range of 2.31 to 2.37.

  7. Study of intraarticular application of 166-Holmium IHPP in healthy hares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szentesi, M.; Koernyei, J.; Antalffi, M.; Toerkoe, J.; Toth, G.Y.; Janoki, G.Y.; Balogh, L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthesis non invasive therapy in rheumatoid arthritis is an alternative of surgical synovectomy. This method was applied first by Fellinger in 1952, and since then it has been practiced all over the world. The leakage of traditionally applied isotopes is cca. 4-10%, and the whole body dose is 10 rads. The objective of our work is to produce a nuclear medication with a minimum radioactive load, of short half-life and ideal molecule size for the treatment of radiosynoviorthesis / 166- Holmium IHPP / and the study of its effect on healthy hares. The first results have been already reported on previously. 166-Holmium IHPP has the features of: half-life of 26.9 hr, the maximum soft-tissue penetration of a beta particle 1.84 MeV, emitted from 166-Ho 8.4 mm. With an average of 3.3 mm. Methods applied: Biodistribution analysis, gamma camera analysis, biochemical and histological tests with photo- and electro microscope were carried out on healthy New Zealand hares 6, 24, 72, 168 hours after radiosynoviorthesis. Results: All the testing methods applied showed that 97 /96,1-98,2/ % remained on the spot of the injection and the 2/3 of the small percentage released leakage: is excreted by the liver and the other 1/3 of it with the urine.The hematological and biochemical parameters did not show differences. During histological examination moderate level acute radioarthritis in the knee joint treated was observed (6-24 hours after the injection), then moderate level subacute radioarthritis with slight degeneration in the synovial membrane and in the synovial fluid. It was only the electro microscopic examination that did show a minimal degeneration in the cartilage and in the menisci, but it got regenerated in 168 hours. Conclusion: The examination carried out has proved that 166-Ho -IHPP can be effectively applied in radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical testing has started

  8. Microspheres of poly(ε-caprolactone) loaded Holmium-165: morphology and thermal degradation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Miyamoto, Douglas Massao; Lira, Raphael Arivar de; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto; Nascimento, Nanci; Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de

    2011-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL), being one of the most important biocompatible and biodegradable aliphatic polyester, provides many potential biomedical. The preparation of biodegradable materials, polymer-based microspheres, is being developed by our group and the goal is to prepare and label with Ho-165 different polymer-based microspheres. The use of radionuclide-loaded microspheres is a promising treatment of liver malignancies. PCL microspheres can be loaded with holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc). PCL and PCL/HoAcAc microspheres were prepared by an emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation technique. The PCL/ HoAcAc microspheres were irradiated in a nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP to radionuclide activation. Gamma irradiation was performed at 25 and 50 kGy doses. The microspheres were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and con focal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In the CLSM images were observed emission in 488 nm characteristic of holmium. The SEM surface image of PCL/HoAcAc microspheres showed more roughness than PCL microspheres. TG of PCL/HoAcAc microspheres showed a substantial weight loss above 200 degree C, indicating decomposition of HoAcAc. The residual weight indicates the presence of Ho 2 O 3 . Gamma irradiation at 25 and 50 kGy doses had no effect on the PCL/HoAcAc microspheres, which indicates that the chemical composition of the microspheres had not change. (author)

  9. Microspheres of poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) loaded Holmium-165: morphology and thermal degradation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Miyamoto, Douglas Massao; Lira, Raphael Arivar de; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto; Nascimento, Nanci; Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL), being one of the most important biocompatible and biodegradable aliphatic polyester, provides many potential biomedical. The preparation of biodegradable materials, polymer-based microspheres, is being developed by our group and the goal is to prepare and label with Ho-165 different polymer-based microspheres. The use of radionuclide-loaded microspheres is a promising treatment of liver malignancies. PCL microspheres can be loaded with holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc). PCL and PCL/HoAcAc microspheres were prepared by an emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation technique. The PCL/ HoAcAc microspheres were irradiated in a nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP to radionuclide activation. Gamma irradiation was performed at 25 and 50 kGy doses. The microspheres were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and con focal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In the CLSM images were observed emission in 488 nm characteristic of holmium. The SEM surface image of PCL/HoAcAc microspheres showed more roughness than PCL microspheres. TG of PCL/HoAcAc microspheres showed a substantial weight loss above 200 degree C, indicating decomposition of HoAcAc. The residual weight indicates the presence of Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Gamma irradiation at 25 and 50 kGy doses had no effect on the PCL/HoAcAc microspheres, which indicates that the chemical composition of the microspheres had not change. (author)

  10. Holmium laser assisted ′anatomical′ enucleation of adenoma of benign hyperplasia of prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivadeo S Bapat

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To present our technique of Holmium Laser assisted "ANATOMICAL" enucleation of the benign prostatic adenoma (HoLEP in 219 patients. Procedure is based on the principle of digital enucleation of the adenoma from its surgical capsule, but performed entirely by perurethral endoscopic technique assisted by Holmium Laser. Materials and Methods: From March 2001 to November 2004, 219 patients under went HoLEP. After the initial cuts from bladder neck to verumontanum at 5 and 7 o′clock position, capsule is identified. The beak of the resectoscope sheath was inserted in the plane between the capsule and the adenoma and the adenoma was physically pushed away towards the urethra from the capsule. Laser was used to coagulate the bleeders, to cut the mucosal attachments and tough stromal tissue. Procedure was repeated for median and two lateral lobes. There was minimal bleeding and fluid absorption. Complications were few. Results: In 206 cases successful enucleation of the adenoma was carried out. First 13 cases formed part of the learning curve and were completed by standard transurethral resection of prostate (TURP. IPSS score dropped from average of 23 to 8 and peak flow improved from 20. No patient had postoperative urinary incontinence or stricture. Conclusions: HoLEP is an effective alternative to TURP. Ultimate end results replicate the end results of open enucleation of BPH without its morbidity and have all the advantages of endoscopic surgery. It offers distinct advantages over standard TURP as the incidence of blood transfusion and fluid absorption are greatly minimized.

  11. Separation of holmium (III) from aqueous chloride medium by Amberlite IRC748

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Anitha, M.; Singh, D.K.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    High purity holmium finds applications in nuclear reactors as control rod, rare earth based magnetic alloys, lasers, medical applications, etc. Holmium belongs to the heavier group of rare earths and its content is very less (<0.5%) in Monazite mineral, hence its recovery from various potential sources becomes essential. Ion exchange technique is a well known method for effective separation, purification, recovery, and concentration of metal ions from lean aqueous solutions. It has also been widely used for separation and purification of rare earths. In the present investigation application of Amberlite IRC748, a chelating type of resin containing iminodiacetic acid functional group for separation of Ho(III) was explored. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, weight of resin, initial metal concentration and temperature on the adsorption characteristics of Ho(III) were investigated in detail. The loading of Ho(III) ion onto resin increased with increasing the initial concentration. The adsorption was strongly dependent on pH of the medium with enhanced adsorption as the pH turned from 1 to 4. In the batch system, the Amberlite IRC748 resin exhibited the highest Ho(III) ion uptake as 180 mg/g at 298 K, at an initial pH value of 4. The adsorption data gave good fit with Langmuir isotherm which was better than the Freundlich curve. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH, ΔS and ΔG were evaluated from the temperature variation data. Negative value of ΔH (-11.5 kJ/mole), indicated that the adsorption of Ho(III) ion onto Amberlite resin was exothermic in nature. ΔS was found to be 5.52 J/mole/K. Kinetic study indicated that the adsorption data fitted the pseudo second order kinetic equation. (author)

  12. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-μm holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive “balloon push” (n = 4) and “rendezvous” (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  13. Magneto-optical study of holmium iron garnet Ho3Fe5O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pavlov, V. V.; Kimel, A. V.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.; Pisarev, R. V.

    2012-09-01

    Bulk holmium iron garnet Ho3Fe5O12 is a cubic ferrimagnet with Curie temperature TC = 567 K and magnetization compensation point in the range 130-140 K. The magneto-optical data are presented for a holmium iron garnet Ho3Fe5O12 film, ˜10 μm thick, epitaxially grown on a (111)-type gadolinium-gallium garnet Gd3Ga5O12 substrate. A specific feature of this structure is that the parameters of the bulk material, from which the film was grown, closely match the substrate ones. The temperature and field dependences of Faraday rotation as well as the temperature dependence of the domain structure in zero field were investigated. The compensation point of the structure was found to be Tcomp = 127 K. It was shown that the temperature dependence of the characteristic size of domain structure diverges at this point. Based on the obtained results we established that the magnetic anisotropy of the material is determined by both uniaxial and cubic contributions, each characterized by different temperature dependence. A complex shape of hysteresis loops and sharp changes of the domain pattern with temperature indicate the presence of collinear-noncollinear phase transitions. Study of the optical second harmonic generation was carried out using 100 fs laser pulses with central photon energy E = 1.55 eV. The electric dipole contribution (both crystallographic and magnetic) to the second harmonic generation was observed with high reliability despite a small mismatch of the film and substrate parameters.

  14. Simultaneous determination of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in high purity rare earth oxides by second order derivative spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbu, M.; Prasada Rao, T.; Iyer, C. S. P.; Damodaran, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    High purity individual rare earth oxides are increasingly used as major components in lasers (Y 2 O 3 ), phosphors (YVO 3 , Eu 2 O 3 ), magnetic bubble memory films (Gd 2 O 3 ) and refractive-index lenses and fibre optics (La 2 O 3 ). The determination of individual lanthanides in high purity rare earth oxides is a more important and difficult task. This paper reports the utilization of higher order derivative spectrophotometry for the simultaneous determination of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in high purity rare earth oxides. The developed procedure is simple, reliable and allows the determination of 0.001 to 0.2% of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in several rare earth. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Holmium laser vs. conventional (cold knife) direct visual internal urethrotomy for short-segment bulbar urethral stricture: Outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhanwar, Ankur; Kumar, Manoj; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Prakash, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to analyze the outcome between holmium laser and cold knife direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) for short-segment bulbar urethral stricture. We conducted a prospective study comprised of 112 male patients seen from June 2013 to December 2014. Inclusion criterion was short-segment bulbar urethral stricture (≤1.5cm). Exclusion criteria were prior intervention/urethroplasty, pan-anterior urethral strictures, posterior stenosis, urinary tract infection, and those who lost to followup. Patients were divided into two groups; Group A (n=58) included cold knife DVIU and group B (n=54) included holmium laser endourethrotomy patients. Patient followup included uroflowmetry at postoperative Day 3, as well as at three months and six months. Baseline demographics were comparable in both groups. A total of 107 patients met the inclusion criteria and five patients were excluded due to inadequate followup. Mean stricture length was 1.31 ± 0.252 cm (p=0.53) and 1.34 ± 0.251 cm in Groups A and B, respectively. Mean operating time in Group A was 16.3 ± 1.78 min and in Group B was 20.96 ± 2.23 min (p=0.0001). Five patients in Group A had bleeding after the procedure that was managed conservatively by applying perineal compression. Three patients in Group B had fluid extravasation postoperatively. Qmax (ml/s) was found to be statistically insignificant between the two groups at all followups. Both holmium laser and cold knife urethrotomy are safe and equally effective in treating short-segment bulbar urethral strictures in terms of outcome and complication rate. However, holmium laser requires more expertise and is a costly alternative.

  16. Feasibility of Endovascular Radiation Therapy Using Holmium-166 Filled Balloon Catheter in a Swine Hemodialysis Fistula Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Jung [Dept. of Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To describe how to make a swine hemodialysis fistula model and report our initial experience to test the feasibility of endovascular radiation therapy with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. The surgical formation of arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was performed by end-to-side anastomosis of the bilateral jugular vein and carotid artery of 6 pigs. After 4 weeks, angiograms were taken and endovascular radiation was delivered to the venous side of AVF with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. Pigs were sacrificed 4 weeks after the radiation and AVFs were harvested for histological examination. All animals survived without any morbidity during the experimental periods. The formation of fistula on the sides of necks was successful in 11 of the 12 pigs (92%). One AVF failed from the small jugular vein. On angiograms, 4 of the 11 AVFs showed total occlusion or significant stenosis and therefore, endovascular radiation could not be performed. Of 7 eligible AVFs, five underwent successful endovascular radiation and two AVFs did not undergo radiation for the control. Upon histologic analysis, one non-radiated AVF showed total occlusion and others showed intimal thickening from the neointimal hyperplasia. Formation of the swine carotid artery-jugular vein hemodialysis fistula model was successful. Endovascular radiation using a Holmium-166 filled balloon catheter was safe and feasible.

  17. 21 CFR 172.379 - Vitamin D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin D2. 172.379 Section 172.379 Food and Drugs... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.379 Vitamin D2. Vitamin D2 may be used safely in foods as a... prescribed conditions: (a) Vitamin D2, also known as ergocalciferol, is the chemical 9,10-seco(5Z,7E,22E)-5,7...

  18. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.872 Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the number...

  19. The evaluation of tissue mass loss in the incision line of prostate with benign hyperplasia performed using holmium laser and cutting electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Mariusz; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Lipiński, Marek Ireneusz; Lipinski, Piotr; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the changes in the incision line of prostatic adenoma using a monopolar cutting electrode and holmium laser, as well as the assessment of associated tissue mass and volume loss of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The material used in this study consisted of 74 preparations of prostatic adenoma obtained via open retropubic adenomectomy, with an average volume of 120.7 ml. The material obtained cut in vitro before fixation in formaldehyde. One lobe was cut using holmium laser, the other using a monopolar cutting electrode. After the incision was made, tissue mass and volume loss were evaluated. Thermocoagulation changes in the incision line were examinedunder light microscope. In the case of the holmium laser incision, the average tissue mass loss was 1.73 g, tissue volume loss 3.57 ml and the depth of thermocoagulation was 1.17 mm. When the monopolar cutting electrode was used average tissue mass loss was 0.807 g, tissue volume loss 2.48 ml and the depth of thermocoagulation was 0.19 mm. Where holmium laser was used, it was observed that the layer of tissue with thermocoagulation changes was deeper than in the case of the monopolar cutting electrode. Moreover, it was noticed that holmium laser caused bigger tissue mass and volume loss than the cutting electrode.

  20. Our first clinical experience with radiosynoviorthesis by means of (166)Ho-holmium-boro-macroaggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Otakar; Kasparek, R; Ullmann, V; Melichar, F; Kropacek, M; Mirzajevov, M

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the therapeutic and adverse effects of the application of 166-holmium-boro-macroaggregates (HMBA) in radiosynovectomy (RSO) of the knees. We assessed the efficacy and safety of (166)Ho-HBMA in a prospective clinical trial in patients suffering from chronic synovitis. An effective component of radiopharmaceutical (166)Ho-boro-macroaggregates is radionuclide (166)Ho which has both beta-emission and gamma-emission. The physical half-life time of 166 Ho is 26.8 hours. After application of the radiopharmaceutical into a joint cavity, the effect of beta-emission causes radiation necrosis of pathologically changed (inflamed) synovial membrane. From 15th April 2005, we have started RSO of knees by means of new radiopharmaceutical (166)Ho-boro-macroaggregates in patients with gonarthrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic synovitis, psoriatic arthritis, gout arthropathy. Seventeen intra-articular injections were performed in fifteen patients receiving a mean activity of 972 MBq (range: 904-1,057 MBq) (166)Ho-HMBA. The patients were hospitalized for three days. Side effects were evaluated during hospital stay and after 6-8 weeks. Static scintigraphy of knee joints and measurements of blood radioactivity were performed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated after 6-8 weeks. In 2 hours and 2 days after application, we proved, by means of knee and inguinal scintigraphy, only insignificant radiopharmaceutical leakage from the joint cavity to the inguinal lymph nodes in four patients. In treated patients, no serious adverse effects occurred. Nine patients were without complaints; 4 patients had slight knee exsudation and 2 patients had great exsudation. Therapeutic effects after 6-8 weeks were as follows: 2 patients were without pain, 9 with lower pain, 3 with the same pain and 1 patient with increased pain. Joint motion was improved in 7 patients, remained the same in 7 patients and was impaired in 1 patient. Analgesics consumption was lower in 5 patients

  1. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including the decaglycerol esters, may be safely used in food in...

  2. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... application to meat and poultry products that comply with the ready-to-eat definition in 9 CFR 430.1. Current... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172.785 Section 172.785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  3. 21 CFR 172.878 - White mineral oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... yeast contamination during fermentation In an amount not to exceed good manufacturing practice. 4. As a... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true White mineral oil. 172.878 Section 172.878 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  4. 40 CFR 172.3 - Scope of requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of requirement. 172.3 Section 172.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... test does not expect to receive any benefit in pest control from the pesticide's use. (c) For purposes...

  5. 40 CFR 172.25 - Administration of State programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of State programs. 172.25 Section 172.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... upon the nature of the pest problem and the requirements of the testing program submitted. The...

  6. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 172.710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The...

  7. 21 CFR 172.315 - Nicotinamide-ascorbic acid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 172.315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.315 Nicotinamide-ascorbic acid complex...

  8. 19 CFR 172.32 - Authority to accept offers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority to accept offers. 172.32 Section 172.32 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE....32 Authority to accept offers. The authority to accept offers in compromise, subject to the...

  9. 21 CFR 172.275 - Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.275 Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives identified in this section may be safely...

  10. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition to...

  11. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to complying...

  12. Bone dissemination of prostate cancer after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, Dai; Nishi, Morihiro; Satoh, Takefumi; Shitara, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Fujita, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of dissemination of prostate cancer after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate in an 80-year-old patient. The patient presented at hospital because of nocturia. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy was carried out because of high serum prostate-specific antigen (3.55 ng/mL), but it showed no malignancies. Benign prostate hyperplasia was diagnosed, and he was started on an α1-blocker. Although the urinary symptom improved with silodosin, acute urinary retention occurred 3 years after therapy began. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for relief of bladder outlet obstruction enabled discharge of urine. Pathological examination of the resected tissue found adenocarcinoma with a high Gleason score, 4 + 5. Serum alkaline phosphatase increased rapidly after holmium laser enucleation, and bone scintigraphy confirmed multiple bone metastases. Prostate cancer, T1bN0M1b, was diagnosed. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser of a large exogenous prostatic calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masanori; Ohara, Rei; Kanao, Kent; Nakajima, Yosuke

    2011-04-01

    Prostatic calculi are classified into two types, endogenous and exogenous calculi, based on their origin. Endogenous calculi are commonly observed in elderly men; however, exogenous prostatic calculi are extremely rare. We report here the case of a 51-year-old man who suffered incontinence and pollakiuria with a giant exogenous prostatic calculus almost completely replacing the prostatic tissue. X-rays and computed tomography demonstrated a large calculus of 65 × 58 mm in the small pelvic cavity. The patient underwent a transurethral lithotripsy with a holmium-YAG laser and a total of 85 g of disintegrated stones was retrieved and chemical stone analysis revealed the presence of magnesium ammonium phosphate. The incontinence improved and the voiding volume increased dramatically, and no stone recurrence in the prostatic fossa occurred at the 2 years follow-up. The etiology of this stone formation seemed to be based on some exogenous pathways combined with urinary stasis and chronic urinary infection due to compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of the neutral and ionic components of the holmium trichloride vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Kudin, L.S.; Pogrebnoj, A.M.; Butman, M.F.; Burdukovskaya, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    The composition of saturated vapor above holmium trichloride in the temperature range of 887 - 1051 K is studied by the method of high-temperature mass spectrometry. Neutral components are presented by molecules of Ho n Cl 3n , n = 1 - 4 charged ones - by Cl - , HoCl 4 - , Ho 2 Cl 7 - ions. Sublimation enthalpies and formation enthalpies of gaseous molecules and ions (298 K): Δ s H Deg (HoCl 3 ) = 284 ±6, Δ s H Deg (Ho 2 Cl 6 ) = 352 ± 20; ΔH Deg (HoCl 3 ) = -722 ± 6; Δ f H Deg (Ho 2 Cl 6 ) = -1661 ± 20; Δ f H Deg (HoCl 4 - ) ≤ - 1191 ± 20, Δ f H Deg (Ho-2Cl 7 - ) ≤ -2127 ± 30 kJ/mol are determined. The value of electron affinity for HoCl 4 radical (A 0 ≥ 3.6 eV) is estimated [ru

  15. Laboratory investigation of the efficacy of holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sailer, Hermann F.; Hering, Peter; Prettl, Wilhelm

    1997-05-01

    Current endodontic therapy involves debridement and disinfection of the root canal by means of mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation. However, several studies have shown that these techniques fail to achieve complete cleansing. Recently, lasers have been suggested for use within root canals. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of Holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris and smear layer. Root canal surfaces of freshly-extracted human teeth were exposed to pulsed Ho:YAG laser radiation. Subsequently, laser induced structural changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Temperature measurements during irradiation were performed by means of thermocouples. The result of this survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment modalities. However, limitations exist with regard to circumscribed and well-quantified irradiation of root canal surfaces, due to the lack of perpendicular delivery of the laser beam. Additional studies will be required to develop suitable optical transmission systems, in order to achieve complete cleansing and to avoid damage to the periradicular tissues, respectively.

  16. Microspheres of polyester loaded with Holmium-165: effect of gamma irradiation on the polymeric structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Mariangela de Burgos M. de; Pires, Geovanna; Lira, Rafael A. de; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Nascimento, Nanci; Melo, Vitor Hugo Soares de; Kodama, Yasko

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers containing radioactive isotopes have potential applications as delivery vehicles of beta radiation to the cancer tumors by brachytherapy. 166-Ho is an example of such radioisotope emitting high-energy beta particles, and also its gamma rays allow nuclear imaging in everywhere is applied. Among the biodegradable polymers, different types of poly(lactide) have been investigated in our laboratory, and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) was used as substrate to prepare microparticles loaded with holmium acetylacetonate HoAcAc (PLLA-HoAcAc-MP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of these microparticles to gamma radiation. The PLLA-HoAcAc-MP were irradiated in a nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP, and their stability studied out with gamma radiation of 25, 50 and 100 kGy doses. MP were characterized before and after irradiation by differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and con focal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Preliminary results showed that gamma radiation did not damage morphologically the prepared PLLA-HoAcAc-MP in the dose range studied, and this procedure may be an important tool for knowing the stabilities of the polymers studied as MP for possible application in brachytherapy. (author)

  17. Development and evaluation of holmium doped phosphate glass microspheres for selective internal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, Eraldo C.; Martinelli, Jose Roberto; Squair, Peterson L; Osso Junior, Joao A.; Sene, Frank Ferrer

    2013-01-01

    Selective Internal Radiotherapy is used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma. In this treatment 90 Y -doped aluminosilicate glass microspheres are introduced in the hepatic artery and they migrate to the liver near to the tumor where they are trapped in the arterioles. The radiation β- emitted by the decay of 90 Y annihilates the cancer cells. A macroaggregate of albumin containing technetium is previously used to monitor the lung shunt and to prevent the spreading of 90 Y during the treatment. In the present work, 165 Ho- doped phosphate glass microspheres were developed aiming that application. 165 Ho has high cross section for neutron capture (64 bars) and 166 Ho decays emitting β- radiation with appropriate energy for killing cancer cells, and gamma rays with low energy which can be used to obtain images of the microspheres location and to check possible occurrence of lung shunt. Holmium also is highly paramagnetic and can be used to obtain images whereby NMR. The glass matrix consists of (P 2 O 5 ) tetrahedrons and can be produced by a relatively lower melting temperature of chemical compounds. The 31 P decays by emitting β- radiation and contributes to the absorbed dose, helping to annihilate the cancer cells. The microspheres were produced by using two methods: the flame and the gravitation falling methods to obtain microspheres with appropriate properties. (author)

  18. Clinical effects of transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization with holmium-166 poly(l-lactic acid) microspheres in healthy pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vente, M.A.D.; Nijsen, J.F.W.; Wit, T.C. de; Schip, A.D. van het [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, J.H.; Seevinck, P.R. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Krijger, G.C. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Huisman, A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Haematology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zonnenberg, B.A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Internal Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ingh, T.S.G.A.M. van den [TCCI Consultancy B.V., P.O. Box 85032, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of holmium-166 poly(l-lactic acid) microspheres administered into the hepatic artery in pigs. Healthy pigs (20-30 kg) were injected into the hepatic artery with holmium-165-loaded microspheres ({sup 165}HoMS; n = 5) or with holmium-166-loaded microspheres ({sup 166}HoMS; n = 13). The microspheres' biodistribution was assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography and/or MRI. The animals were monitored clinically, biochemically, and ({sup 166}HoMS group only) hematologically over a period of 1 month ({sup 165}HoMS group) or over 1 or 2 months ({sup 166}HoMS group). Finally, a pathological examination was undertaken. After microsphere administration, some animals exhibited a slightly diminished level of consciousness and a dip in appetite, both of which were transient. Four lethal adverse events occurred in the {sup 166}HoMS group due either to incorrect administration or comorbidity: inadvertent delivery of microspheres into the gastric wall (n = 2), preexisting gastric ulceration (n = 1), and endocarditis (n = 1). AST levels were transitorily elevated post-{sup 166}HoMS administration. In the other blood parameters, no abnormalities were observed. Nuclear scans were acquired from all animals from the {sup 166}HoMS group, and MRI scans were performed if available. In pigs from the {sup 166}HoMS group, atrophy of one or more liver lobes was frequently observed. The actual radioactivity distribution was assessed through ex vivo {sup 166m}Ho measurements. It can be concluded that the toxicity profile of HoMS is low. In pigs, hepatic arterial embolization with {sup 166}HoMS in amounts corresponding with liver-absorbed doses of over 100 Gy, if correctly administered, is not associated with clinically relevant side effects. This result offers a good perspective for upcoming patient trials. (orig.)

  19. Our first clinical experience with radiosynoviorthesis by means of 166Ho-holmium-boro-macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, O.; Ullmann, V.; Kasparek, R.; Melichar, F.; Kropacek, M.; Mirzajevova, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the therapeutic and adverse effects of the application of 166- holmium-boro-macroaggregates (HMBA) in radiosynovectomy (RSO) of the knees. We assessed the efficacy and safety of 166H o-HBMA in a prospective clinical trial in patients suffering from chronic synovitis. An effective component of radiopharmaceutical 166H o-boro-macroaggregates is radionuclide 166H o which has both b-emission and g-emission. The physical half-life time of 166H o is 26.8 hours. After application of the radiopharmaceutical into a joint cavity, the effect of b-emission causes radiation necrosis of pathologically changed (inflamed) synovial membrane. From 15 april 2005, we have started RSO of knees by means of new radiopharmaceutical 166H o-boro-macroaggregates in patients with gonarthrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic synovitis, psoriatic arthritis, gout arthropathy. Seventeen intra-articular injections were performed in fifteen patients receiving a mean activity of 972 MBq (range: 904.1057 MBq) 166H o-HMBA. The patients were hospitalized for three days. Side effects were evaluated during hospital stay and after 6.8 weeks. Static scintigraphy of knee joints and measurements of blood radioactivity were performed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated after 6.8 weeks. In 2 hours and 2 days after application, we proved, by means of knee and inguinal scintigraphy, only insignificant radiopharmaceutical leakage from the joint cavity to the inguinal lymph nodes in four patients. In treated patients, no serious adverse effects occurred. Nine patients were without complaints; 4 patients had slight knee exudation and 2 patients had great exudation. Therapeutic effects after 6.8 weeks were as follows: 2 patients were without pain, 9 with lower pain, 3 with the same pain and 1 patient with increased pain. Joint motion was improved in 7 patients, remained the same in 7 patients and was impaired in 1 patient. Analgesics consumption was lower in 5 patients, the same in 9

  20. Specific heat of holmium and YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. Criticalbehaviour and superconducting properties; Spezifische Waerme von Holmium und YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. Kritisches Verhalten und supraleitende Eigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkali, Abdelhakim

    2010-01-04

    Object of the thesis is the study of the specific heat of holmium and YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C in the temperature ranges from 50 to 200 KI respectively from 380 mK to 20 K in magnetic fields up to 9 T. In the present thesis the criticalbehaviour of YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and properties of the superconducting state of tne non-magnetic rare-earth nickel borocarbide YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C are studied by means of a self-developed measurement apparatur of the specific heat using the quasi-adiabatic heating-pulse method as well as of holmium by means of the relaxation method. In this thesis reliable statements about the critical exponents on monocrystalline holmium could be made. The study on holmium proves that the critical behaviour of the specific heats cannot be described in the framework of the predictions of the chiral universality classes. By means of measurements of the specific heat in this thesis could be confirmed that YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C is a multiband superconductor. The positive curvature of the boundary line below T{sub c} in the phase diagram yields a first hint to the many-band character of YNI{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. In the zero-field the electronic specific heat in the superconducting state c{sub es}(T) can be not explained in the framework of the pure BCS theory. At low temperatures a residual contribution by normally conducting electrons could be detected, which hints to a not completely opened energy gap. A possible explanation would be that a band (or several bands) with low charge-carrier concentration not contribute to the superconductivity. This result agrees with de Haas-van Alphen measurements on isostructural superconducting LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C monocrystals, which suggest the many-band character of the superconductivity as well as a vanishing energy gap in one band. The fluctuation behaviour of the specific heat of YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C in the neighbourhood of the superconducting-normally conducting transition agrees well with that of the 3D-XY model. [German

  1. Surface alloy formation by adsorption of holmium on Ag/Mo(112) bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkiewicz, Jan; Oleksy, Czesław

    2018-03-01

    Work function change measurements, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density functional theory (DFT) are used to determine the structures formed on Ag/Mo(112) bimetallic surfaces upon deposition of 0.5 monolayer (ML) of holmium. As the bimetallic surfaces, we have chosen the Mo(112) substrate covered with 1 or 2 ML of Ag. Such surfaces have the same symmetry as the Mo(112) face but different electronic properties. LEED experiment indicates that the c(2 × 2) structure is formed on (1 ML Ag)/Mo(112) bimetallic surface upon deposition of 0.5 ML of Ho. DFT calculations show that a type of Ag-Ho surface alloy is formed, with Ho atoms 0.6 Å below the distorted layer of Ag. This is neither a substitutional nor a subsurface alloy. It is found that the adsorption structure formed on the (2 ML Ag)/Mo(112) bimetallic surface depends on the annealing temperature. After deposition of 0.5 ML of Ho at 300 K, the LEED pattern of p(2 × 2) symmetry is observed. Annealing of the overlayer at 640 K irreversibly changes the p(2 × 2) pattern into a pattern of c(2 × 2) type. The results of DFT computations show that the c(2 × 2) structure of the Ag-Ho surface alloy is energetically most favorable. In this structure, 0.5 ML of Ho is between the two monolayers of Ag, and the symmetry of the topmost layer is changed. The work function change calculated for the c(2 × 2) structure is in a good agreement with the measured value (0.22 eV). The results show that adsorption of Ho on the Ag/Mo(112) bimetallic surfaces is substantially different than on the clean Mo(112).

  2. Studies on therapeutic method of liver cancer(hapatocellular carcinome)by Holmium-166 radionuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, H. S.; Kim, M. J.; Han, K. H.; Park, C. I. [Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    As the study of radioactive nuclide, Holmium-166 in the treatment of liver cancer(hepatocellular carcinoma), this study was performed under the base of animal experimental. Using dog liver, percutaneous injection of Ho-166 MAA or chitosan with premade dose was done under the ultrasound guidance. Continuously the same procedure as previous one was performed in the skin hapatoma, which was developed by the injection of hepatocellular carcinoma cell in the nude mouse, In case of injected normal liver of dog, imaging study including ultrasound, CT and MRI was done in order to evaluate effect of Ho-166 and pathologic reaction. The result showed well defined nectosis of normal liver as well as skin hepatoma. The area of nectosis is dependent on the dose of injected Ho-166. Generally, pathologic reaction is tissue coagulation nectosis, Ho-166 particles, fibrosis and hemorrhage. In the clinical study, 50 patients with hapatoma was selected for this study under the agreement of patient. Under ultrasound guidance percutaneous injection of Ho-166 Maa or chitosan to tumor was performed and follow-up study was extended from 6 to 12 month. The result showed that 64% of patient were completely treated. Overall, the effect of treatment could be obtained in 41 patient (82%) among 50 hepatoma patient. Conclusively Ho-166 is thought to be a compromising agent in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and one of therapeutic modality, if it is established internally and world-wide. In the future, the popular percutaneous ethanol injection method will be replaced to this method. 19 refs., 1 tabs., 14 figs. (author)

  3. Factors affecting de novo urinary retention after Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Han Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patients can experience urinary retention (UR after Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP that requires bladder distension during the procedure. The aim of this retrospective study is to identify factors affecting the UR after HoLEP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 336 patients, which underwent HoLEP for a symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia between July 2008 and March 2012, were included in this study. Urethral catheters were routinely removed one or two days after surgery. UR was defined as the need for an indwelling catheter placement following a failure to void after catheter removal. Demographic and clinical parameters were compared between the UR (n = 37 and the non-urinary retention (non-UR; n = 299 groups. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 68.3 (±6.5 years and the mean operative time was 75.3 (±37.4 min. Thirty seven patients (11.0% experienced a postoperative UR. UR patients voided catheter free an average of 1.9 (±1.7 days after UR. With regard to the causes of UR, 24 (7.1% and 13 (3.9% patients experienced a blood clot-related UR and a non-clot related UR respectively. Using multivariate analysis (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: De novo UR after HoLEP was found to be self-limited and it was not related to learning curve, patient age, diabetes, or operative time. Efficient morcellation and careful control of bleeding, which reduces clot formation, decrease the risk of UR after HoLEP.

  4. Holmium laser urethrotomy for treatment of traumatic stricture urethra: a review of 78 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Manzoor; Lal, Murli; Askari, Syed Hasan; Hashmi, Altaf; Rizvi, Syed Adibul Hasan

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and long-term results of laser urethrotomy as minimally invasive treatment for traumatic stricture urethra. Between January 2006 and June 2008, 78 male patients were treated with Holmium Laser urethrotomy. 16 Fr urethroscope was used through which 600um laser fiber was introduced through side channel. Stricture was visualized and incised at 12 o'clock position with energy set at 1500-2000 MJ at pulse rate of 10-12. Two other incisions were given at 2 and 10 o'clock positions. Further ablation was done till 16Fr Foley's catheter was passed. Patients were followed in a stricture clinic. Patients age ranged from 15-73 years. All strictures were due to trauma, Road traffic accident in 40 (52%) post catheter trauma 4 (5%), fall as ride 27 (35%) and failed urethroplasty 7 (8%). Site of stricture was bulbar 57 (73%), bulbomembranous 16 (20%) and membranoprostatic 5 (2.5%). Length of stricture ranged from 0.8-2.5 cms. At 3 months follow-up, 60 (77%) patients remained catheter and symptoms free while 18 (23%) developed recurrence of stricture but at the end of 36 months follow-up success rate decreased to 47 (60%). Among those who developed re-strictures, 6 ( 7.6%) had 2nd sitting laser while 4 (5.1%) had urethroplasty, and others were on intermittent dilatation. Immediate complications were sepsis 10 (13%), extravasation 2 (4%), failed urethrotomy 2 (4%) and mild haematuria 3 (5.8%). Hospital stay ranged from day care to 3 days. Laser urethrotomy is minimally invasive and an effective treatment for short strictures in bulbarurethra. The recurrence rate is 40% in the long-term follow-up and is more commonly seen in completely obliterated strictures.

  5. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate and retropubic prostatic adenomectomy: morbidity analysis and anesthesia considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Mesa, D; Amorín-Díaz, M; Pérez-Arviza, L; Fernández-Pello Montes, S; Martín-Huéscar, A

    2015-11-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an alternative to prostatic adenomectomy for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy. We analyzed our learning curve for this technique, and we compared it in a secondary manner with prostatic adenomectomy. A retrospective comparative study was conducted that included the first 100 cases of HoLEP performed in our center and the latest 50 cases of retropubic adenomectomy. We collected data on the patients, the surgery, the anesthesia, the perioperative variables, the anesthesia complications and the postoperative variables, with a 6-month follow-up. We analyzed the learning curve without mentors for HoLEP and compared the characteristics of HoLEP in 2 separate phases (learning and stabilization phases) with the latest retropubic prostatic adenomectomies performed. Intradural anesthesia was the most common technique. The transfusion needs, length of stay (P<.01) and postoperative morbidity were lower for HoLEP than for adenomectomy. However, the retropubic adenomectomy group had larger initial prostate volumes (P<.001) and shorter surgical times (P<.001). Better surgical performance (P<.001) and a lower incidence of complications were observed in the HoLEP-B group (once the learning curve had been overcome) compared with the HoLEP-A group. In our center, HoLEP was introduced as a valid alternative to open retropubic adenomectomy, with excellent results in terms of morbidity and reduced hospital stay. In terms of the learning curve, we consider that approximately 50 patients (without mentor) is an appropriate cutoff. Local anesthesia is a good choice for the anesthesia technique. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Holmium laser urethrotomy for treatment of traumatic stricture urethra: A review of 78 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.; Lal, M.; Askari, S.H.; Hashmi, A.; Rizvi, S.A.H.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and long-term results of laser urethrotomy as minimally invasive treatment for traumatic stricture urethra. Methods: Between January 2006 and June 2008, 78 male patients were treated with Holmium Laser urethrotomy. 16 Fr urethroscope was used through which 600um laser fiber was introduced through side channel. Stricture was visualized and incised at 12 o'clock position with energy set at 1500-2000 MJ at pulse rate of 10-12. Two other incisions were given at 2 and 10 o'clock positions. Further ablation was done till 16 Fr Foley's catheter was passed. Patients were followed in a stricture clinic. Results: Patients age ranged from 15-73 years. All strictures were due to trauma, Road traffic accident in 40(52%) post catheter trauma 4(5%), fall as ride 27(35%) and failed urethroplasty 7(8%). Site of stricture was bulbar 57(73%), bulbomembranous 16(20%) and membranoprostatic 5(2.5%). Length of stricture ranged from 0.8-2.5 cms. At 3 months follow-up, 60(77%) patients remained catheter and symptoms free while 18(23%) developed recurrence of stricture but at the end of 36 months follow-up success rate decreased to 47 (60%). Among those who developed re-strictures, 6(7.6%) had second sitting laser while 4(5.1%) had urethroplasty, and others were on intermittent dilatation. Immediate complications were sepsis 10(13%), extravasation 2(4%), failed urethrotomy 2(4%) and mild haematuria 3(5.8%). Hospital stay ranged from day care to 3 days. Conclusion: Laser urethrotomy is minimally invasive and an effective treatment for short strictures in bulbar urethra. The recurrence rate is 40% in the long-term follow-up and is more commonly seen in completely obliterated strictures. (author)

  7. Effects of Intraluminal Irradiation with Holmium-166 for TIPS Stenosis: Experimental Study in a Swine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Seon; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Kim, Deog Yoon; Park, Yong Koo; Kim, Soo Joong [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Joon [Kang Dong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal irradiation with Holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) for reducing the pseudointimal hyperplasia (PIH) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) tract in a swine model. TIPS was performed in 12 domestic pigs, after the creation of portal hypertension by intraportal injection of a mixture of N-butyl-2- cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and lipiodol. Five pigs first underwent intraluminal irradiation (30 Gy) in the parenchymal tract with using a {sup 166}Ho solution-filled balloon catheter, and this was followed by the placement of a nitinol stent in the TIPS tract. For the seven control pigs, the balloon was filled with saline and contrast media mixture. Two weeks later, follow-up portography and histological analysis were performed. TIPS was successfully performed in all twelve pigs with achieving artificially induced portal hypertension. Portography performed two weeks after TIPS showed the patent tracts in the TIPS tracts that were irradiated with {sup 166}Ho (5/5, 100%), whereas either completely (5/6, 83.3%) or partially (1/6, 16.7%) occluded TIPS were seen in the seven pigs of the nonirradiated control group, except in one pig that experienced periprocedural death due to bleeding. Histological analysis showed a statistically significant difference for the maximal PIH (irradiated: 32.8%, nonirradiated: 76.0%, p < 0.001) between the two groups. Intraluminal irradiation with 30 Gy of {sup 166}Ho for TIPS significantly improved the TIPS patency in a swine model of portal hypertension during a 2- week period of follow-up.

  8. Gamma spectrometry and chemical characterization of bioactive glass seeds with Holmium-166 for oncological implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, Eduardo S.

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive glass seeds synthesized by the sol-gel technique with Si:Ho:Ca composition with natural holmium incorporated were irradiated in the TRIGA type nuclear reactor IPR-R1 at 100kW, in the central thimble where the thermal neutron flux is 2.8x10 12 n/cm 2 .s and the epithermal neutron flux is 2.6 X 10 11 n/cm 2 .s . After an 8 hour irradiation time, with an induced activity close to 110MBq/seed, a set of seeds was submitted to Gamma Spectrometry Analysis in a counting system with an HPGe detector, ORTEC electronic instrumentation and a Camberra Multichannel Analyser, to determine all radionuclides present on the sample as well as its individual activities. Special attention was paid on the discrimination of Si, 40 Ca, 44 Ca, C and Ho as the other expected elements like 48 Ca, 2 H and 18 O were present in traces or have very short half-lives. The second sample was submitted to Plasma spectrometry to determine the 166 Ho concentration in weight. The third sample was submitted to an X-ray spectrometry in a JEOL-JXA-8900RL equipment to determine its qualitative chemical composition, in order to evaluate impurities and nominal composition. It was determined that most of the activity, after decaying of short half-life elements, was due to 166 Ho present on the sample, with a well characterized β and gamma spectra. The homogeneity of the seeds was tested on the X-ray spectrometry, and verified that there is no discrepancy in composition from distinct seeds or in a same seed. The results are relevant on the investigation of the viability of producing 166 Ho radioactive seeds for oncological implants. (author)

  9. 21 CFR 172.210 - Coatings on fresh citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a 2:1 ratio. Sodium lauryl sulfate Complying with § 172.822. As a film former. Wood rosin Color of K... adjuvant. Potassium persulfate Do. Propylene glycol alginate Do. Sodium decylbenzenesulfonate Do. (4) In...

  10. Wideband thulium–holmium-doped fiber source with combined forward and backward amplified spontaneous emission at 1600–2300 nm spectral band

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honzátko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2014), s. 3650-3653 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1840 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Bandwidth * Spontaneous emission * Holmium Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2014

  11. 2.05 µm holmium-doped all-fiber laser diode-pumped at 1.125 µm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kir'yanov, A. V.; Barmenkov, Y. O.; Villegas Garcia, I.

    2017-08-01

    We report a holmium-doped all-fiber laser oscillating at ~2.05 µm in continuous wave at direct in-core pumping by a 1.125 µm laser diode. Two types of home-made holmium-doped alumino-germano-silicate fiber (HDF), differentiated in the Ho3+ doping level, were fabricated to implement the laser, for revealing the effect of Ho3+ concentration upon the laser output. Firstly, the fibers were characterized thoroughly from the material and optical viewpoints. Then, laser action with both HDFs was assessed using the simplest Fabry-Perot cavity, assembled by a couple of spectrally adjusted fiber Bragg gratings, also made-in-house. In the best case, when using the lower-doped HDF of proper length (1.4 m), low threshold (~370 mW) and moderate slope efficiency (~13%) of ~2.05 µm lasing were obtained at 1.125 µm diode pumping. Long-term stability, high brightness, low noise, and purely CW operation are shown to be the laser’s attractive features. Yet, when utilizing the heavier-doped HDF, laser output is revealed to be overall worse, with a possible reason being the deteriorating Ho3+ concentration-related effects.

  12. Safety analysis of holmium-166 microsphere scout dose imaging during radioembolisation work-up. A cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braat, Arthur J.A.T.; Prince, Jip F.; Rooij, Rob van; Bruijnen, Rutger C.G.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Lam, Marnix G.E.H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2018-03-15

    Radioembolisation is generally preceded by a scout dose of technetium-99m-macroaggregated albumin to estimate extrahepatic shunting of activity. Holmium-166 microspheres can be used as a scout dose (±250 MBq) and as a therapeutic dose. The general toxicity of a holmium-166 scout dose ({sup 166}Ho-SD) and safety concerns of an accidental extrahepatic deposition of {sup 166}Ho-SD were investigated. All patients who received a {sup 166}Ho-SD in our institute were reviewed for general toxicity and extrahepatic depositions. The absorbed dose in extrahepatic tissue was calculated on SPECT/CT and correlated to clinical toxicities. In total, 82 patients were included. No relevant clinical toxicity occurred. Six patients had an extrahepatic deposition of {sup 166}Ho-SD (median administered activity 270 MBq). The extrahepatic depositions (median activity 3.7 MBq) were located in the duodenum (3x), gastric fundus, falciform ligament and the lesser curvature of the stomach, and were deposited in a median volume of 15.3 ml, which resulted in an estimated median absorbed dose of 3.6 Gy (range 0.3-13.8 Gy). No adverse events related to the extrahepatic deposition of the {sup 166}Ho-SD occurred after a median follow-up of 4 months (range 1-12 months). These results support the safety of 250 MBq {sup 166}Ho-SD in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  13. The application of x-ray spectrometry to isotopic-source activation analysis of dysprosium and holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, A.E.; Mboweni, R.C.M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel aspect of activation analysis is described for the determination of dysprosium and holmium at low concentrations. The method involves the measurement of K x-rays from radionuclides produced by thermal neutron activation using a 1 mg 252 Cf source. The basis for elemental selection depends largely on the demand for analysis and on the existence of favourable nuclear properties for the production of a practicable x-ray yield. A full appraisal of the analytical potential of the method is presented with particular emphasis on its application to geological matrices. The sensitivity was optimised by employing a detector that was particularly effective at photon energies below 150 keV. Analytical conditions are demonstrated for the elements of interest over a wide range of concentrations in small powdered samples. The investigation formed the basis of a feasibility study to establish if the application could be developed for the routine off-line determination of dysprosium and holmium using an isotopic-neutron source. (author)

  14. Therapeutic application of new holmium-166 chitosan complex in malignant and benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K.B.; Kim, Y.M.; Shin, B.C.; Kim, J.R.; Ryu, J.M.; Lim, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The new holmium-166 chitosan complex ( 166 Ho-CHICO, DW- 166 HC) was prepared by reacting the aqueous acidic solution of chitosan with 166 Ho(NO 3 ) 3 at room temperature with quantitative labelling yield. The progress of the reaction and labelling yield were determined by instant this layer chromatography using silicic acid impregnated glass fiber (ITLC-SA) and developing solvent of MeOH:H 2 O:HAC (49:49:2). The high labelling yield of more than 99% was obtained by reacting chitosan solution (35 mg/4 ml) with 166 Ho(NO 3 ) 3 in which 7 mg of 165 Ho+ 166 Ho were contained as a maximum content. The labelling yield was highly dependent on the pH of the chitosan solution. The optimal labelling could be obtained at pH 2.5∼3.5 The characteristics of 166 Ho-CHICO were similar to those of chitosan, which is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, soluble and viscous in acidic condition but geltatinuous at pH 6.0 and precipitating in alkaline conditions. 166 Ho-CHICO can be easily prepared by reconstituting freeze-dried chitosan (kit A) with 166 Ho(NO 3 ) 3 solution (kit B) just prior to use. After intrahepatic administration of 166 Ho-CHICO to male rats, the radioactivity concentrations in blood were low and the cumulative urinary and fecal excretion over a period of 0 to 72 hours were 0.53% and 0.54%, respectively. the radioactivity concentration in tissues and the whole-body autoradiography images showed that most of the administered radioactivity was localized at the administered site, and only slight radioactivity was detected from the liver, spleen, lungs, and bones. An autoradiograph after intratumoral administration of 166 Ho-CHICO showed that radioactivity was localized at the administered site of the lesion without distribution to other organs and tissues. A biodistribution study in normal rabbits with 166 Ho-CHICO showed that most of the radioactivities were retained in the knee joint with negligible extra leakage at 72 hours after intra

  15. Determinants of holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser time and energy during ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Wilson R; Marchini, Giovanni S; Pompeo, Alexandre; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J; Monga, Manoj

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the association of preoperative noncontrast computed tomography stone characteristics, laser settings, and stone composition with cumulative holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser time/energy. We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent semirigid/flexible ureteroscopy and Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy (200 or 365 μm laser fiber; 0.8-1.0 J energy; and 8-10 Hz rate) at 2 tertiary care centers (April 2010-May 2012). Studied parameters were as follows: patient's characteristics; stone characteristics (location, burden, hardness, and composition); total laser time and energy; and surgical outcomes. One hundred patients met our inclusion criteria. Mean stone size was 1.01 ± 0.42 cm and volume 0.33 ± 0.04 cm(3). Mean stone radiodensity was 990 ± 296 HU, and Hounsfield units density 13.8 ± 6.0 HU/mm. All patients were considered stone free. Stone size and volume had a significant positive correlation with laser energy (R = 0.516, P R = 0.621, P R = 0.477, P R = 0.567, P stone size, only the correlation between HU and laser time was significant (R = 0.262, P = .011). In the multivariate analysis, with exception of stone composition (P = .103), all parameters significantly increased laser energy (R(2) = 0.524). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive significant association of laser time with stone volume (P R(2) = 0.512). In multivariate analysis for laser energy, only calcium phosphate stones required less energy to fragment compared with uric acid stones. No significant differences were found in the multivariate laser time model. Ho:YAG laser cumulative energy and total time are significantly affected by stone dimensions, hardness location, fiber size, and power. Kidney location, laser fiber size, and laser power have more influence on the final laser energy than on the total laser time. Calcium phosphate stones require less laser energy to fragment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiosynoviorthesis of knees by means of 166Ho-holmium-boro-macroaggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Otakar; Kaspárek, Richard; Ullmann, Vojtech; Melichar, Frantisek; Kropácek, Martin; Mirzajevova, Marcela

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse and therapeutic effects of applicated holmium-boro-macroaggregates (HBMAs) in the radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) of knees in patients suffering from chronic synovitis. We started RSO of the knees by means of a new radiopharmaceutical (RF) HBMA in patients with gonarthrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic synovitis, psoriatic arthritis, and gout arthropathy. Seventeen (17) intra-articular injections were performed in 15 patients who were receiving a mean activity of 972 MBq (range, 904-1057) of 166Ho-HBMA. Patient inclusion to the study followed a series of inclusion and exclusion criterions. The patients were hospitalized for 3 days. Side-effects were evaluated during their hospital stay and again after 6-8 weeks. Static scintigraphy of knee joints and measurements of blood radioactivity were performed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated after 6-8 weeks and at 6 months. In 2 hours and 2 days following the application, we proved, by means of knee and inguinal scintigraphy, only insignificant radiopharmaceutical leakage from the joint cavity to the inguinal lymph nodes in 4 patients. In the treated patients, no serious adverse effects occurred. Nine (9) patients were without complaints, 4 patients had slight knee exudation, and 2 patients had great exudation. Therapeutic effects were as follows: 2 patients were without pain, 9 were with lower pain, 3 were with the same pain, and 1 patient was with increased pain. Joint motion was improved in 7 patients, remained the same in 7 patients, and was impaired in 1 patient. Analgesics consumption was lower in 5 patients, the same in 9 patients, and greater in 1 patient. Knee exudation was absent in 2 patients, lower in 4 patients, the same in 6 patients, and greater in 3 patients. In 3 patients it was necessary to do surgical RSO. This RF can extend the range of clinically used radiopharmaceuticals for RSO and to supplement space between 90Y with high energy and 186Re with 169Er with

  17. In vitro study of morphological and chemical modification threshold of bovine dental enamel irradiated by the holmium laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eduardo, Patricia Lerro de Paula

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Ho:YLF laser effects on the dental enamel surface with regards to its morphology, thermal variations during its irradiation in the pulp chamber and its increased resistance to demineralization through quantitative analysis of calcium and phosphorous atoms reactive concentrations in samples. Twenty samples of bovine enamel were used and divided in four groups: control - acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application followed by demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (100 J/cm 2 ) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (350 J/cm 2 ) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid: and irradiation with Ho:YLF laser ( 450 J/cm 2 ) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid. Ali samples were quantified according to their calcium and phosphorous atoms relative concentrations before and after the treatments above. X-Ray fluorescence spectrochemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. It was observed an increase on the calcium and phosphorous atoms concentration ratio and therefore the enamel demineralization reduction as a result of the lactic acid treatment in the samples irradiated with the holmium laser followed by the APF application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this study for clinical purposes, morphological changes caused by the holmium laser irradiation were analyzed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified regions of the enamel with consequent changes on its permeability and solubility. Temperature changes of ten human pre-molars teeth irradiated with 350 J/cm 2 and 450 J/cm 2 were also monitored in the pulp chamber in real time. Temperature increases over 4,20 C did not occur. The results obtained from this study along with the results from previous researches developed at

  18. Hyperfine-Interaction-Driven Suppression of Quantum Tunneling at Zero Field in a Holmium(III) Single-Ion Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Liu, Dan; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2017-04-24

    An extremely rare non-Kramers holmium(III) single-ion magnet (SIM) is reported to be stabilized in the pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry by a phosphine oxide with a high energy barrier of 237(4) cm -1 . The suppression of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field and the hyperfine structures originating from field-induced QTMs can be observed even from the field-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility in addition to single-crystal hysteresis loops. These dramatic dynamics were attributed to the combination of the favorable crystal-field environment and the hyperfine interactions arising from 165 Ho (I=7/2) with a natural abundance of 100 %. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hyperfine-interaction-driven suppression of quantum tunneling at zero field in a holmium(III) single-ion magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang [Key Lab. of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China); Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fournier, Grenoble (France); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Liu, Dan; Chibotaru, Liviu F. [Theory of Nanomaterials Group and INPAC-Institute of Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-04-24

    An extremely rare non-Kramers holmium(III) single-ion magnet (SIM) is reported to be stabilized in the pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry by a phosphine oxide with a high energy barrier of 237(4) cm{sup -1}. The suppression of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field and the hyperfine structures originating from field-induced QTMs can be observed even from the field-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility in addition to single-crystal hysteresis loops. These dramatic dynamics were attributed to the combination of the favorable crystal-field environment and the hyperfine interactions arising from {sup 165}Ho (I=7/2) with a natural abundance of 100 %. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. 21 CFR 172.712 - 1,3-Butylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.712 1,3-Butylene glycol. The food additive 1,3-butylene glycol (CAS...

  1. 21 CFR 172.345 - Folic acid (folacin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.345 Folic acid (folacin). Folic acid (CAS Reg. No. 59-30-3...

  2. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.372 N-Acetyl-L-methionine. The food additive N-acetyl-L...

  3. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be...

  4. 21 CFR 172.335 - D-Pantothenamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.335 D-Pantothenamide. The food additive D-pantothenamide as a...

  5. 21 CFR 172.380 - Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.380 Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 may be used safely in foods as a...

  6. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline...

  7. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine...

  8. 21 CFR 172.385 - Whole fish protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.385 Whole fish protein concentrate. The food additive whole fish protein concentrate may be safely used as a food supplement in accordance with the... fish that are used in other forms for human food. (b) The additive consists essentially of a dried fish...

  9. 40 CFR 172.48 - Data requirements for a notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS EXPERIMENTAL USE PERMITS Notification for Certain Genetically Modified Microbial Pesticides § 172... methods used to genetically modify the microbial pesticide. (h) The identity and location of the gene... organisms. (d) Information on survival and the ability of the microbial pesticide to increase in numbers...

  10. 21 CFR 172.846 - Sodium stearoyl lactylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.846 Sodium stearoyl lactylate. The food additive sodium stearoyl... emulsifier, stabilizer, or texturizer in snack dips, at a level not to exceed 0.2 percent by weight of the...

  11. Hyperfine structure investigation of the first excited state 4Isub(13/2) (5,418-1) in Holmium-165 by the atomic beam resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldenhoven, R.

    1976-01-01

    By the method of atomic beam resonance the hyperfine structure of the first excited state 4 Isub(13/2) (5418 cm -1 ) of 165 Holmium was studied for the first time. Using a suitable ΔF = 0 transition, the gsub(J)-factor was measured. After a determination of estimates for the hyperfine constants A and B from two suitably chosen ΔF = 0 transitions, the hyperfine splittings have been measured. (orig./WL) [de

  12. The effect and influence of lumen holmium laser lithotripsy on serum oxidative stress proteins and inflammatory factors of ureteral calculi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect and influence of lumen holmium laser lithotripsy on treating serum oxidative stress proteins and inflammatory factors of patients with ureteral calculi. Methods: A total of 120 cases of patients with ureteral calculi treated in our hospital from May 2010 to Nov 2014 were enrolled in this research for an analysis study. The effect and influence on serum oxidative stress proteins and inflammatory factors of lumen holmium laser lithotripsy on ureteral calculi patients were assayed. Then 120 cases of healthy subjects in our hospital at the same period were taken as control. Results: Among the 120 cases of ureteral calculi patients, 113 cases of patients showed successful operation, with a success rate of 94.2%. The average calculi-discharged time was (28.4 ± 11.2 d and the average operation time was (58.9 ± 10.7 min, while the postoperative hospital stay is (3.8 ± 1.2 d. The results also showed that the levels of NOX1. NOX3, NOX4 and NOX5, and levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α of patients with ureteral calculi were significantly higher, compared with the control group, and these parameters were normalized greatly after operation with that the levels of them were significantly different from those before operation. Conclusion: Lumen holmium laser lithotripsy exerts a significant effect on ureteral calculi patients and the oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory factor were normalized greatly.

  13. Outcome analysis of holmium laser and pneumatic lithotripsy in the endoscopic management of lower ureteric calculus in pediatric patients: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Jhanwar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyse outcomes of holmium laser and pneumatic lithotripsy in treatment of lower ureteric calculus in pediatric patients. Materials and methods: Prospective study conducted between August 2013 and July 2015. Inclusion criteria were lower ureteric calculus with stone size ≤1.5cms. Exclusion criteria were other than lower ureteric calculus, stone size ≥1.5cms, congenital renal anomalies, previous ureteral stone surgery. Patients were divided into two groups. Group A underwent pneumatic and group B underwent laser lithotripsy procedure. Patient's baseline demographic and peri-operative data were recorded and analysed. Post operatively X-ray/ultrasound KUB (Kidney, ureter and bladder was performed to assess stone free status. Results: A total of 76 patients who met the inclusion criteria to ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy were included. Group A and B included 38 patients in each. Mean age was 12.5±2.49 in Group A and 11.97±2.74 years in Group B respectively (p=0.38. Overall success rate was 94.73% in Group A and 100% in Group B, respectively (p=0.87. Conclusion: Holmium Laser lithotripsy is as efficacious as pneumatic lithotripsy and can be used safely for the endoscopic management of lower ureteric calculus in pediatric patients. However, holmium laser requires more expertise and it is a costly alternative.

  14. Evaluation of erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser radiation and dental hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, David Cameron

    Lasers have become increasingly established in medicine as effective alternatives or adjuncts to conventional techniques. In dentistry, several clinical laser systems have been developed and marketed, but their applications have been limited to soft tissue surgery. To date, no laser has been capable of effectively cutting or modifying the highly mineralised dental tissues of enamel and dentine. The aim of this study was to evaluate two new laser systems for use in dentistry through a series of in vitro experiments. Both generic erbium and holmium lasers have theoretically superior operating characteristics over currently established lasers for applications with dental hard tissues. The two lasers investigated in this study were pulsed Er:YAG (lambda=2.94) a.m. and Cr-Tm-Ho:YAG (lambda=2.1mu.m). Both operated with a macropulse duration of approximately 200lambdas, at pulse repetition rates of 2-8Hz and mean pulse energies up to 230mJ. Radiation was focused using CaF[2] lenses (f=50-120mm). The lasers could be operated with or without the addition of a surface water film at the interaction site. Tissue removal efficiency was expressed as a latent heat of ablation (LHA, kJ/cm[3]) using a modification of the technique described by Charlton et al. (1990). The mean LHA's for the Er:YAG laser were 6.24kJ/cm[3] and 22.99kJ/cm[3] with dentine and enamel respectively without water, and 10.07kJ/cm[3] and 18.73kJ/cm[3] for dentine and enamel with water. The Cr-Tm-Ho:YAG laser was unable to effectively remove enamel at the fluences and pulse energies available; the mean LHA's for the Cr-Tm- Ho:YAG laser with dentine were 82.79kJ/cm3 and 57.57kJ/cm3 with and without water respectively. The Cr-Tm-Ho;YAG was approximately 8-9 times less efficient for tissue removal than the Er:YAG system. Er:YAG tissue removal with water was characterised by clean "surgical" cuts, comparable in histological appearance to those obtained using conventional instrumentation. Some thermal disruption

  15. 21 CFR 172.856 - Propylene glycol mono- and diesters of fats and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fatty acids. 172.856 Section 172.856 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... diesters of fats and fatty acids. Propylene glycol mono- and diesters of fats and fatty acids may be safely... and/or fatty acids in compliance with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids in...

  16. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians. (a...

  17. 49 CFR 172.202 - Description of hazardous material on shipping papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... papers. 172.202 Section 172.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers § 172.202 Description of hazardous material on shipping papers. (a) The shipping description of a hazardous material on the shipping paper...

  18. 21 CFR 172.894 - Modified cottonseed products intended for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumption. 172.894 Section 172.894 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.894 Modified cottonseed products...

  19. 13 CFR 120.172 - Flood-plain and wetlands management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flood-plain and wetlands management. 120.172 Section 120.172 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Policies Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.172...

  20. 19 CFR 172.12 - Petitions acted on at Customs Headquarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Petitions acted on at Customs Headquarters. 172.12 Section 172.12 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Petitions § 172.12 Petitions acted on at Customs Headquarters. Upon receipt of a petition for relief filed...

  1. 26 CFR 1.172-4 - Net operating loss carrybacks and net operating loss carryovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... years. (iv) Loss attributable to foreign expropriation. If the provisions of section 172(b)(3)(A) and § 1.172-9 are satisfied, the portion of a net operating loss attributable to a foreign expropriation... attributable to a foreign expropriation loss (as defined in section 172(h)) and if an election under paragraph...

  2. Predictive risk factors of postoperative urinary incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate during the initial learning period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the predictive factors for postoperative urinary incontinence (UI following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP during the initial learning period. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 127 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent HoLEP between January 2011 and December 2013. We recorded clinical variables, including blood loss, serum prostate-specific antigen levels, and the presence or absence of UI. Blood loss was estimated as a decline in postoperative hemoglobin levels. The predictive factors for postoperative UI were determined using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: Postoperative UI occurred in 31 patients (24.4%, but it cured in 29 patients (93.5% after a mean duration of 12 weeks. Enucleation time >100 min (p=0.043 and blood loss >2.5g/dL (p=0.032 were identified as significant and independent risk factors for postoperative UI. Conclusions: Longer enucleation time and increased blood loss were independent predictors of postoperative UI in patients who underwent HoLEP during the initial learning period. Surgeons in training should take care to perform speedy enucleation maneuver with hemostasis.

  3. Line Identification of Atomic and Ionic Spectra of Holmium in the Near-UV. Part I. Spectrum of Ho i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Labady, N.; Özdalgiç, B. [Graduate School of Engineering and Sciences, Istanbul University, TR-34452 Beyazıt, Istanbul (Turkey); Er, A.; Güzelçimen, F.; Öztürk, I. K.; Başar, Gö. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Istanbul University, TR-34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Kröger, S. [Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin, Wilhelminenhofstr. 75A, D-12459 Berlin (Germany); Kruzins, A.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R., E-mail: ikanat@istanbul.edu.tr [Laser Centre, The University of Latvia, Rainis Boulevard 19, LV-1586 Riga (Latvia)

    2017-02-01

    The Fourier Transform spectra of a Holmium hollow cathode discharge lamp have been investigated in the UV spectral range from 25,000 up to 31,530 cm{sup −1} (317 to 400 nm). Two Ho spectra have been measured with neon and argon as buffer gases. Based on the intensity ratios from these two spectra, a distinction was made between atomic and ionic lines (ionic lines are discussed in an accompanying paper). Using the known Ho i energy levels, 71 lines could be classified as transitions of atomic Ho, 34 of which have not been published previously. Another 32 lines, which could not be classified, are listed in the literature and assigned as atomic Ho. An additional 370 spectral lines have been assigned to atomic Ho based on the signal-to-noise ratio in the two spectra measured under different discharge conditions, namely with buffer gases argon and neon, respectively. These 370 lines have not been previously listed in the literature.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of the energy transfer processes important to obtain holmium laser action in the Er:Tm:Ho:YLF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarelho, Luiz Vicente Gomes

    1995-01-01

    There are several processes of energy transfer between Er, Tm and Ho ions in YLF crystal that could be evaluated using the Foerster-Dexter method. Energy transfer processes, important to understand Holmium laser action, were studied, specially involving the energy transfer between the first excited states of Er and Tm donors and Ho acceptor. The back-transfer processes were evaluated too in order to minimize the system losses. Another important process to understand Ho laser action in the host is the energy diffusion mechanism between donor ions due to excitation migration processes which take place before the energy transfer to Ho. The proposed model of energy transfer was developed to include the diffusion mechanism between donors in the absence and presence of the acceptors. The energy transfer probability was evaluated including the back-transfer processes besides the diffusion assistance. A laser medium model based on the fundamental spectroscopic parameters was used in order to determine the ideal donor acceptor concentrations in order to maximize the laser action of Ho at 2,1 μm. (author)

  5. Influence of Pelvicaliceal Anatomy on Stone Clearance After Flexible Ureteroscopy and Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Large Renal Stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takaaki; Murota, Takashi; Okada, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Muguruma, Kouei; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of pelvicaliceal anatomy on stone clearance in patients with remnant fragments in the lower pole after flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy (fURSL) for renal stones >15 mm. This retrospective study included 67 patients with radiopaque residual fragments (>2 mm) in the lower pole after fURSL for large renal stones (>15 mm). The preoperative infundibular length (IL), infundibular width (IW), infundibulopelvic angle (IPA), and caliceal pelvic height (CPH) were measured using intravenous urography. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine whether any of these measurements affected stone clearance. Of the 67 patients, 55 (82.1%) were stone free (SF) 3 months after fURSL. The anatomic factors significantly favorable for an SF status were a short IL, broad IW, wide IPA, and low CPH. On multivariate analysis, the IPA had a significant influence on an SF status after fURSL (p=0.010). An IPA renal stones according to our multivariate analysis. Additional studies are required to further evaluate the characteristics of the pelvicaliceal anatomy influencing stone clearance.

  6. Brachytherapy using holmium-166 liquid balloon system for in-stent restenosis: 6 months clinical and angiographic follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. H.; Kim, S. K.; Cha, K. S.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, H. S.; Kang, D. Y. [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    In western country, 3 systems of brachytherapy using commercial radioactive source has been established. However, brachytherapy using holmium-166 liquid balloon system (HLBS) for the patient with stent restenosis has not been studied enough. 30 patients (male 23, mean age 58.9 7.7) were enrolled. Target dose was 15 Gy at 1 mm distance from the intimal surface. Clinical diagnoses of the study patients included stable angina 10 and unstable angina 20 patients. Target lesion included LAD 19, LCx 5 and RCA 6 arteries. Pre-brachytherapy treatment included cutting balloon angioplasty in 25, rotational atherectomy in 5 patients. Fractionation and stepping was done in 6 patients each. Follow-up angiography was done in 19 patients. Of them, 4 cases developed angiographic restenosis (21%) including 3 cases of total occlusion. 6 month MACE (major adverse cardiac event) occurred in 5 patients including one sudden cardiac death in a patient with 80 year-old, triple-vessel diseased patient. Vascular brachytherapy using HLBS is a safe and effective treatment modality for in-stent restenosis showing acceptable angiographic and clinical result.

  7. Rebuttal of the existence of solid rare earth bicarbonates and the crystal structure of holmium nitrate pentahydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincke, Christine; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2017-03-16

    The synthesis routes of Gd(HCO{sub 3}){sub 3}.5H{sub 2}O and Ho(HCO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O, which are the only known bicarbonates of rare earth metals, were refuted and the published crystal structures were discussed. Because of the structural relationship of Ho(HCO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O to rare earth nitrate hexahydrates,[] the synthesis of holmium nitrate hydrate was considered and the crystal structure of Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.5H{sub 2}O was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.5H{sub 2}O was determined to crystallize in the triclinic space group P1 (no. 2) with a = 6.5680(14) Aa, b = 9.503(2) Aa, c = 10.462(2) Aa, α = 63.739(14) , β = 94.042(2) and γ = 76.000(16) . The crystal structure consists of isolated [Ho(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}] polyhedra and non-coordinating water molecules. It is isotypic to other rare earth nitrate pentahydrates. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Saito

    Full Text Available In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53-88 underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS, uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2. The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6-35 to 3 (0-22 (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test, as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2-20 to 3 (1-8 (p < 0.001. Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57 ± 0.83 ml/sec to 17.60 ± 1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms.

  9. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Hisamitsu; Aoki, Hiroaki; Muto, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Raizo; Tsujimura, Akira; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53–88) underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan) laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2). The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6–35) to 3 (0–22) (p<0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test), as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2–20) to 3 (1–8) (p<0.001). Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57±0.83 ml/sec to 17.60±1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms. PMID:26090819

  10. Comparison of cold-knife optical internal urethrotomy and holmium:YAG laser internal urethrotomy in bulbar urethral strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenice, Mustafa Gurkan; Sam, Emre; Colakoglu, Yunus; Atar, Feyzi Arda; Sahin, Selcuk; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Tugcu, Volkan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To compare the results of cold-knife optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and Holmium:YAG laser internal urethrotomy (HIU) in primary bulbar urethral strictures. Material and methods A total of 63 patients diagnosed with primary bulbar urethral stricture between August 2014 and September 2015 were assigned to the OIU (n = 29) and HIU (n = 34) groups. The demographic variables, biochemistry panels, and preoperative and postoperative uroflowmetry results including the maximum flow rate (Qmax) and mean flow rate (Qmean) values, retrograde urethrography, and diagnostic flexible urethroscopy findings were recorded prospectively. Demographic features and preoperative values were not statistically different between groups (p >0.05). Mean surgical times were 18.4 ±2.3 min for OIU and 21.9 ±3.8 min for HIU groups, which was statistically significant (p 0.05). There was no recurrence in the first 3 months in either group. The urethral stricture recurrence rate up to month 12 was not statistically significant for the OIU group (n = 6, 20.7%) as compared to the HIU group (n = 11, 32.4%; p = 0.299). At follow-up, the SFR and IFR was 96% and 88% at 3-months, and 82% and 71% at 12-months, respectively (p method to OIU, and it has similar success rates in the treatment of short segment bulbar urethral strictures. PMID:29732217

  11. Targeting of liver tumour in rats by selective delivery of holmium-166 loaded microspheres: a biodistribution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijsen, F.; Rook, D.; Zonnenberg, B.; Klerk, J. de; Rijk, P. van; Schip, F. van het [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brandt, C. [Animal Inst., Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Meijer, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dullens, H. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hennink, W. [Dept. of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    2001-06-01

    Intra-arterial administration of beta-emitting particles that become trapped in the vascular bed of a tumour and remain there while delivering high doses, represents a unique approach in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumours. Studies on selective internal radiation therapy of colorectal liver metastases using yttrium-90 glass microspheres have shown encouraging results. This study describes the biodistribution of 40-{mu}m poly lactic acid microspheres loaded with radioactive holmium-166, after intra-arterial administration into the hepatic artery of rats with implanted liver tumours. Radioactivity measurements showed >95% retention of injected activity in the liver and its resident tumour. The average activity detected in other tissues was {<=}0.1%ID/g, with incidental exceptions in the lungs and stomach. Very little {sup 166}Ho activity was detected in kidneys (<0.1%ID/g), thereby indicating the stability of the microspheres in vivo. Tumour targeting was very effective, with a mean tumour to liver ratio of 6.1{+-}2.9 for rats with tumour (n=15) versus 0.7{+-}0.5 for control rats (n=6; P<0.001). These ratios were not significantly affected by the use of adrenaline. Histological analysis showed that five times as many large (>10) and medium-sized (4-9) clusters of microspheres were present within tumour and peritumoural tissue, compared with normal liver. Single microspheres were equally dispersed throughout the tumour, as well as normal liver parenchyma. (orig.)

  12. Prenatal Diagnoses with Cordocentesis: Evaluation of 172 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Erdemoğlu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of 172 cordosentesis cases for chromosomal analysis in high risk pregnant patients which were performed in our clinic during 2001 and 2004. Cordosentesis procedure were performed mainly for, fetal anomaly, positive triplescreening test. Fetal chromosomal anomaly ratio was 7.5%. Trisomi 21,18,13 were found in fetal anomaly group. The invasive procedure success rate was %98.8. Cordosentes is a safe and easily performed prenatal diagnosis and treatment method in modern perinatology.

  13. Combined retrograde flexible ureteroscopic lithotripsy with holmium YAG laser for renal calculi associated with ipsilateral ureteral stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Colombo, Jose R; Ganpule, Arvind; Turna, Burak; Cocuzza, Antonio; Dhawan, Divyar; Santos, Bruno; Mazzucchi, Eduardo; Srougi, Miguel; Desai, Mahesh; Desai, Mihir

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined ureteroscopic holmium YAG lithotripsy for renal calculi associated with ipsilateral ureteral stones. Between August 2002 and March 2007, retrograde flexible ureteroscopic stone treatment was attempted in 351 cases. Indication for treatment was concurrent symptomatic ureteral stones in 63 patients (group I). Additional operative time and perioperative complication rates were compared to a group of 39 patients submitted to ureteroscopic treatment for ureteral calculi exclusively (group II). Mean ureteral stone size was 8.0 +/- 2.6 mm and 8.1 +/- 3.4 mm for groups I and II, respectively. Mean operative time for group I was 67.9 +/- 29.5 minutes and for group 2 was 49.3 +/- 13.2 minutes (p stone size was 10.7 +/- 6.4 mm, overall stone free rate in group I was 81%. However, considering only patients with renal stones smaller than 15 mm, the stone free rate was 88%. Successful treatment occurred in 81% of patients presenting lower pole stones, but only 76% of patients with multiple renal stones became stone free. As expected, stone free rate showed a significant negative correlation with renal stone size (p = 0.03; r = -0.36). Logistic regression model indicated an independent association of renal stones smaller than 15 mm and stone free rate (OR = 13.5; p = 0.01). Combined ureteroscopic treatment for ureteral and ipsilateral renal calculi is a safe and attractive option for patients presenting for symptomatic ureteral stone and ipsilateral renal calculi smaller than 15 mm.

  14. Initial Clinical Experience with a Modulated Holmium Laser Pulse—Moses Technology: Does It Enhance Laser Lithotripsy Efficacy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mullerad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The Lumenis® High-power Holmium Laser (120H has a unique modulated pulse mode, Moses™ technology. Moses technology modulates the laser pulse to separate the water (vapor bubble, then deliver the remaining energy through the bubble. Proprietary laser fibers were designed for the Moses technology. Our aim was to compare stone lithotripsy with and without the Moses technology. Methods We designed a questionnaire for the urologist to fill immediately after each ureteroscopy in which the Lumenis 120H was used. We compared procedures with (n=23 and without (n=11 the use of Moses technology. Surgeons ranked the Moses technology in 23 procedures, in comparison to regular lithotripsy (worse, equivalent, better, much better. Laser working time and energy use were collected from the Lumenis 120H log. Results During 4 months, five urologists used the Lumenis 120H in 34 ureteroscopy procedures (19 kidney stones, 15 ureteral stones; 22 procedures with a flexible ureteroscope, and 12 with a semi-rigid ureteroscope. Three urologists ranked Moses technology as much better or better in 17 procedures. In 2 cases, it was ranked equivalent, and in 4 cases ranking was not done. Overall, laser lithotripsy with Moses technology utilized laser energy in less time to achieve a satisfying stone fragmentation rate of 95.8 mm3/min versus 58.1 mm3/min, P=0.19. However, this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion The new Moses laser technology demonstrated good stone fragmentation capabilities when used in everyday clinical practice.

  15. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Holmium Laser Enucleation and Transurethral Resection of the Prostate in Patients With Detrusor Underactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Jin Woo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Currently, holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP are the standard surgical procedures used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the surgical management of BPH in patients with detrusor underactivity (DU can effectively improve voiding symptoms, but comparative data on the efficacy of HoLEP and TURP are insufficient. Therefore, we compared the short-term surgical outcomes of HoLEP and TURP in patients with DU. Methods From January 2010 to May 2015, 352 patients underwent HoLEP or TURP in procedures performed by a single surgeon. Of these patients, 56 patients with both BPH and DU were enrolled in this study (HoLEP, n=24; TURP, n=32. Surgical outcomes were retrospectively compared between the 2 groups. DU was defined as a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate of <40 cm H2O as measured by a pressure flow study. Results The preoperative characteristics of patients and the presence of comorbidities were comparable between the 2 groups. The TURP group showed a significantly shorter operative time than the HoLEP group (P=0.033. The weight of the resected prostate was greater in the HoLEP group, and postoperative voiding parameters, including peak flow rate and postvoid residual urine volume were significantly better in the HoLEP group than in the TURP group. Conclusions HoLEP can be effectively and safely performed in patients with DU and can be expected to have better surgical outcomes than TURP in terms of the improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms.

  16. Serial Changes in Sexual Function Following Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate: A Short-term Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Su; Ha, Seung Beom; Lee, Chang Ju; Cho, Min Chul; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the serial changes in sexual function in the short-term period after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and to investigate whether a change in each domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) is associated with improvement of micturition. Thirty-eight potent men who underwent HoLEP and in whom complete 12-month follow-up data on the IIEF were available were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent a baseline evaluation for BPH. The surgical outcome was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively by use of the International Prostate Symptom Score, IIEF, and uroflowmetry. The mean age and body mass index of the patients was 64.5±6.2 years and 24.2±2.6 kg/m(2), respectively. Mean total prostate volume and transitional zone volume were 48.8±18.8 ml and 24.2±16.1 ml, respectively. Most IIEF domain scores showed a slight decrease at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery but recovered to the baseline or showed a marginal but nonsignificant increase at 12 months postoperatively compared with baseline. Orgasmic function and the overall sexual satisfaction domain score remained slightly reduced up to 12 months postoperatively. There was no significant correlation between improvement of micturition and change in sexual function throughout the follow-up period after surgery. Although HoLEP achieves significant improvements in micturition, overall sexual function decreases slightly in the early postoperative period, but recovers to the baseline at 12 months postoperatively. Our data suggest that changes in sexual function after HoLEP are not associated with improvement of micturition.

  17. Expanding rare-earth oxidation state chemistry to molecular complexes of holmium(II) and erbium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew R; Bates, Jefferson E; Fieser, Megan E; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Evans, William J

    2012-05-23

    The first molecular complexes of holmium and erbium in the +2 oxidation state have been generated by reducing Cp'(3)Ln [Cp' = C(5)H(4)SiMe(3); Ln = Ho (1), Er (2)] with KC(8) in the presence of 18-crown-6 in Et(2)O at -35 °C under argon. Purification and crystallization below -35 °C gave isomorphous [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Ln] [Ln = Ho (3), Er (4)]. The three Cp' ring centroids define a trigonal-planar geometry around each metal ion that is not perturbed by the location of the potassium crown cation near one ring with K-C(Cp') distances of 3.053(8)-3.078(2) Å. The metrical parameters of the three rings are indistinguishable within the error limits. In contrast to Ln(2+) complexes of Eu, Yb, Sm, Tm, Dy, and Nd, 3 and 4 have average Ln-(Cp' ring centroid) distances only 0.029 and 0.021 Å longer than those of the Ln(3+) analogues 1 and 2, a result similar to that previously reported for the 4d(1) Y(2+) complex [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Y] (5) and the 5d(1) La(2+) complex [K(18-crown-6)(Et(2)O)][Cp″(3)La] [Cp″ = 1,3-(Me(3)Si)(2)C(5)H(3)]. Surprisingly, the UV-vis spectra of 3 and 4 are also very similar to that of 5 with two broad absorptions in the visible region, suggesting that 3-5 have similar electron configurations. Density functional theory calculations on the Ho(2+) and Er(2+) species yielded HOMOs that are largely 5d(z(2)) in character and supportive of 4f(10)5d(1) and 4f(11)5d(1) ground-state configurations, respectively.

  18. Enucleation ratio efficacy might be a better predictor to assess learning curve of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Wook Jeong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To appraise the evaluation methods for learning curve and to analyze the non-mentor-aided learning curve and early complications following the holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. MATERIALS AND METHODS:One-hundred and forty (n=140 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP from July 2008 to July 2010 by a single surgeon (SJO were enrolled. Perioperative clinical variables, including enucleation time, morcellation time, enucleation ratio (enucleation weight/transitional zone volume, enucleation efficacy (enucleated weight/enucleation time, enucleation ratio efficacy (enucleation ratio/enucleation time, and early complication rate were analyzed. RESULTS: Mean prostate volume was 62.7 mL (range 21-162 and preoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS was 19.0 (4-35. Mean enucleation time and morcellation time were 49.9±23.8 (S.D. min and 11.0±9.7 min, respectively. Median duration of postoperative indwelling catheter was 1 (1-7 day and median hospital stay was 1 (1-6 day. There were a total of 31 surgery-related complications in 27 patients (19.3%, and all were manageable. There was an increasing trend of enucleation efficacy in the first 50 cases. However, enucleation efficacy was linearly correlated with the prostate size (correlation coefficients, R=0.701, p<0.001. But, enucleation ratio efficacy could eliminate the confounding effect of the prostate size (R=-0.101, p=0.233. The plateau of enucleation ratio efficacy was reached around the twenty-fifth case. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that the operative learning curve plateau is reached after about 25 cases. We propose that a more appropriate parameter for estimating the operative learning curve is enucleation ratio efficacy, rather than enucleation efficacy.

  19. Activity coefficients in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) from T=(278.15 to 328.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Rabindra N.; Roy, Lakshmi N.; Tabor, Bennett J.; Richards, Sarah J.; Cummins, Mason P.; Himes, Curtis A.; Gibbs, Stephanie N.; Christiansen, Edward B.

    2005-01-01

    Activity coefficients of HCl in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) have been calculated from the observed e.m.f.s using the Nernst equation. The temperatures ranged from (278.15 to 328.15) K at 5 K intervals and at constant total ionic strengths of (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) mol.kg -1 . Electromotive-force measurements were made on the cell without liquid junction of the type:Pt vertical bar H 2 (g,p=101.325kPa) vertical bar HCl(m A ),HoCl 3 (m B ) vertical bar AgCl(s), vertical bar Ag(s) The results of the activity coefficients of HCl for this mixed electrolyte mixture have been interpreted in terms of the simpler Harned's equations and the ion-interaction model of Pitzer. Results show that the quadratic term is sufficient for the full range of Y B (the ionic strength fraction of the salt) to 0.9 at all the ionic strengths studied. The Pitzer's mixing parameters S θH,Ho and Ψ H,Ho,Cl (including higher order electrostatic effects) and θ H,Ho and Ψ H,Ho,Cl (excluding higher order electrostatic effects) have been determined. These values at T=298.15 K are: S θH , Ho =0.115, Ψ H,Ho,Cl =-.071; and θ H,Ho =-.663, Ψ H,Ho,Cl =0.165. The parameters obtained in this study reproduce the activity coefficients of HCl in the mixtures within 0.015 over the entire range of ionic strengths and within 0.009 for I>=0.05 mol.kg -1 over the entire temperature range

  20. Pulsed liquid jet dissector using holmium: YAG laser - a novel neurosurgical device for brain incision without imparing vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Jokura, H.; Shirane, R.; Uenohara, H.; Ohyama, H.; Takayama, K.

    2003-01-01

    Neurosurgery has long required a method for dissecting brain tissue without damaging principal vessels and adjacent tissue, so as to prevent neurological complications after operation. In this study we constructed a prototype of such a device and used it in an attempt to resect beagle brain cortex. The prototype device consisted of an optical fiber, a Y adapter, and a nozzle whose internal exit diameter was 100 μm. Cold physiological saline (4 o C) was supplied to it at a rate of 40 ml/h. Pulsed liquid jets were ejected from the nozzle by a pulsed Holmium:YAG) (Ho:YAG) laser at an irradiation energy of 300 mJ/pulse. The profile of the liquid jet was observed with a high-speed camera while changing the distance between the optical fiber end and nozzle exit (equivalent to the Standoff distance). With this device (3 Hz operation), brain dissection of anesthetized beagles was attempted while measuring the local temperature of the target. A histological study of the incised parts was also performed. When the Standoff distance was 24 mm, the liquid jet was emitted straight from the nozzle at a maximum initial velocity of 50 m/s. The brain parenchyma was cut with this device while preserving vessels larger than 200 μm in diameter and keeping the operative field clear. The local temperature rose to no more than 41 o C, below the functional heat damage threshold of brain tissue. Histological findings showed no signs of thermal tissue damage around the dissected margin. The Ho:YAG laser-induced liquid jet dissector can be applied to neurosurgery after incorporating some minor improvements. (author)

  1. Pair truncation for rotational nuclei: j=17/2 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halse, P.; Jaqua, L.; Barrett, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The suitability of the pair condensate approach for rotational states is studied in a single j=17/2 shell of identical nucleons interacting through a quadrupole-quadrupole Hamiltonian. The ground band and a K=2 excited band are both studied in detail. A direct comparison of the exact states with those constituting the SD and SDG subspaces is used to identify the important degrees of freedom for these levels. The range of pairs necessary for a good description is found to be highly state dependent; S and D pairs are the major constituents of the low-spin ground-band levels, while G pairs are needed for those in the γ band. Energy spectra are obtained for each truncated subspace. SDG pairs allow accurate reproduction of the binding energy and K=2 excitation energy, but still give a moment of inertia which is about 30% too small even for the lowest levels

  2. 49 CFR 172.404 - Labels for mixed and consolidated packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Labels for mixed and consolidated packaging. 172..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.404 Labels for mixed and consolidated packaging. (a) Mixed packaging. When hazardous materials having different hazard classes are packed within the...

  3. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids. 172.852... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.852 Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids. Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid esters of mono- and diglycerides) may be safely used in food in...

  4. 21 CFR 172.866 - Synthetic glycerin produced by the hydrogenolysis of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of carbohydrates. 172.866 Section 172.866 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... produced by the hydrogenolysis of carbohydrates. Synthetic glycerin produced by the hydrogenolysis of carbohydrates may be safely used in food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a) It shall contain not in...

  5. 21 CFR 172.5 - General provisions for direct food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true General provisions for direct food additives. 172.5... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION General Provisions § 172.5 General provisions for direct food additives. (a...

  6. 49 CFR 172.201 - Preparation and retention of shipping papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation and retention of shipping papers. 172..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers § 172.201 Preparation and retention of shipping papers. (a) Contents. When a description of hazardous material is required to be included on a shipping...

  7. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tanks containing a mixture of anhydrous hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine (M86 fuel) and designed...

  8. 49 CFR 172.317 - KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark. 172.317 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.317 KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark. (a) General. For... of Division 5.2 must be marked with the KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark specified in this section...

  9. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  10. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and as...

  11. 21 CFR 172.816 - Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester. 172.816 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.816 Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester. Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) It is the...

  12. 21 CFR 172.350 - Fumaric acid and salts of fumaric acid.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fumaric acid and salts of fumaric acid. 172.350... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.350 Fumaric acid and salts of fumaric acid. Fumaric acid and its calcium, ferrous, magnesium, potassium, and sodium salts may be safely used...

  13. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors. 172.510 Section 172.510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....510 Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors. Natural...

  14. Low-power holmium:YAG laser urethrotomy for treatment of urethral strictures: functional outcome and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Stefan; Knoll, Thomas; Osman, Mahmoud M; Köhrmann, Kai Uwe; Michel, Maurice S; Alken, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of endourethrotomy with the holmium:YAG laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. Between January 2002 and January 2004, 32 male patients with symptomatic urethral strictures (8 bulbar, 9 penile, 9 combined) were treated with Ho:YAG-laser urethrotomy in our department. The stricture was iatrogenic in 60% (N = 18), inflammatory in 16.6% (N = 5), traumatic in 13.3% (N = 4), and idiopathic in 7% (N = 3). The stricture was incised under vision at the 12 o'clock location or the site of maximum scar tissue or narrowing in asymmetric strictures. Laser energy was set on 1200 to 1400 mJ with a frequency of 10 to 13 Hz. Postoperatively, drainage of the bladder was performed for 4 days using a 18F silicone catheter. Triamcinolone was instilled intraurethrally after removal of the catheter in all patients. Patients were followed up by mailed questionnaire, including International Prostate Symptom Score and quality of life. Retrograde endoscopic Ho:YAG laser urethrotomy could be performed in all 32 patients. Most patients (22; 68.7%) did not need any reintervention. Ten patients developed recurrent strictures that were treated by another laser urethrotomy in 4 patients (12.5%), while 6 patients (18.7%) needed open urethroplasty with buccal mucosa. Including 2 patients treated with repeat laser urethrotomy, 24 patients (75%) were considered successful after a mean follow-up of 27 months (range 13-38 months). No intraoperative complications were encountered, although in 5% of patients, a urinary-tract infection was diagnosed postoperatively. No gross hematuria occurred. The Ho:YAG laser urethrotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral stricture with results comparable to those of conventional urethrotomy. Further data from long-time follow-up are necessary to compare the success rate with that of conventional urethrotomy and urethroplasty. Nevertheless, the Ho:YAG laser urethrotomy might at

  15. Efficacy of holmium. Yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Ho: YAG) laser therapy for arthroscopic synovectomy of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasuo; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kanbe, Katsuaki

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the efficacy of holmium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Ho: YAG) laser therapy for arthroscopic synovectomy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we treated 13 shoulders of 11 RA patients of whom 1 was stage I, 7 stage II, 2 stage III, and 1 stage IV. The duration of RA is 4.6 years on average and the follow-up period is an average of 14 months. The Ho: YAG laser was set at 10 Watt (W) to treat the bone erosion areas so as to reach the deep zones of the pannus in order to resect the synovium. We compared C-reactive protein (CRP), Disease activity score (DAS) 28 and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings before and after surgery. We cultured primary synovial cells to assay cytokine production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Morphological examination was performed after treatment with the Ho: YAG laser at 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 W. We found villous synovium proliferation with vascularity in the rotator interval and supra spinatus tendon in the shoulder joints. In the subacromial bursa, yellow fat tissue and white fibrous soft tissue were detected in almost all shoulders. After synovectomy using the Ho: YAG laser, CRP decreased from an average of 3.6 to 0.8 and DAS28 also decreased from an average of 5.4 to 3.7 at 14 months after surgery. MRI showed decreased panni with synovium and did not precede joint destruction after 14 months in 10 shoulders out of 13 (77%). At 20 W of the Ho: YAG laser treatment, the synovial cells shrank as in apoptosis and the number of cells also decreased. Laser treatment also resulted in the following significant changes: TNF-α production increased at 1, 10, 15 and 20 W (compared with 0 W) but not dose dependently; IL-1β and IL-6 increased up to 10 W (compared with 0 W) but decreased at 15 and 20 W (compared with 10 W). In morphological examination, after treatment with the Ho: YAG laser at 15 W, the synovial cells expanded and the number of cells decreased. Therefore, Ho: YAG laser therapy is effective

  16. Activity coefficients in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) from T=(278.15 to 328.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Rabindra N. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States)]. E-mail: rroy@drury.edu; Roy, Lakshmi N. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Tabor, Bennett J. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Richards, Sarah J. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Cummins, Mason P. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Himes, Curtis A. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Gibbs, Stephanie N. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Christiansen, Edward B. [Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States)

    2005-07-15

    Activity coefficients of HCl in (hydrogen chloride+holmium chloride) (aq) have been calculated from the observed e.m.f.s using the Nernst equation. The temperatures ranged from (278.15 to 328.15) K at 5 K intervals and at constant total ionic strengths of (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) mol.kg{sup -1}. Electromotive-force measurements were made on the cell without liquid junction of the type:Pt vertical bar H{sub 2}(g,p=101.325kPa) vertical bar HCl(m{sub A}),HoCl{sub 3}(m{sub B}) vertical bar AgCl(s), vertical bar Ag(s) The results of the activity coefficients of HCl for this mixed electrolyte mixture have been interpreted in terms of the simpler Harned's equations and the ion-interaction model of Pitzer. Results show that the quadratic term is sufficient for the full range of Y{sub B} (the ionic strength fraction of the salt) to 0.9 at all the ionic strengths studied. The Pitzer's mixing parameters S{sub {theta}}{sub H,Ho} and {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl} (including higher order electrostatic effects) and {theta}{sub H,Ho} and {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl} (excluding higher order electrostatic effects) have been determined. These values at T=298.15 K are: S{sub {theta}}{sub H},{sub Ho}=0.115, {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl}=-.071; and {theta}{sub H,Ho}=-.663, {psi}{sub H,Ho,Cl}=0.165. The parameters obtained in this study reproduce the activity coefficients of HCl in the mixtures within 0.015 over the entire range of ionic strengths and within 0.009 for I>=0.05 mol.kg{sup -1} over the entire temperature range.

  17. Comparative evaluation of two methods for 172Tm production in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, I.M.; Hayes, Alejandro; Melcer, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of two methods for the production of 172 Tm in nuclear reactors is carried out. They are respectively based on two chains of double neutron capture reactions, 170 Er(n,γ) 171 Er(n,γ) 172 Er(β - ) 172 Tm and 170 Er(n,γ) 171 Er(β - ) 171 Tm(n,γ) 172 Tm, and a chain of triple neutron capture: 169 Tm(n,γ) 170 Tm(n,γ) 71 Tm(n,γ) 172 Tm. Theoretical considerations with respect to both ways of production are formulated and the mathematical equation are solved. Experiments of irradiation of Er 2 O 3 and Tm 2 O 3 were performed. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods are discussed. (author)

  18. Validation of the 172 group ENDFB7GX library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Suhail Ahmad; Raj, Devesh; Karthikeyan, R.; Jagannathan, V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Five 172 group libraries, viz., IAEAGX, ENDFB6GX, JENDL3GX, JEFF31GX, and LWRPSGX were obtained as a part of the IAEA WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP). The first four libraries have data available for 173 nuclides up to 244 Cm. The LWRPSGX library based on JEFF3.1 point dataset is an extended library up to 252 Cf. Data for 12 more actinides and the related burnup chain were added. The five libraries were validated against known experiments in an earlier work. In general the LWRPSGX was found to be giving better results. Recently another version of 172 group library 'ENDFB7GX' has been released. In the present work we provide the results of validation of the ENDFB7GX library against the same set of experimental data and a comparison with results of other libraries. The experimental configuration data include a variety of uniform lattices with enriched UO 2 , U- metal, mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuels with H 2 O and D 2 O moderators for a wide range of enrichment, fuel diameter and ratio of moderator to fuel volume (V m /V f ). The calculations have been done using the code LATTEST which solves the single pin lattice cell problem by 1-D multi-group transport theory after cylindricalising the square or hexagonal cell boundary. The LATTEST code is an improved version of the MURLI code and is capable of providing a ready testing of any new cross section library against a set of experimental benchmark lattices collected from various sources. The calculated k eff values and certain spectral indices, where available, have been compared for all the libraries for more than hundred critical lattices. There is a general under prediction of k eff values by all libraries. The maximum under prediction is for ENDFB6GX library and the least is for JENDL3GX library. The ENDFB7GX library, in general, is found to over predict in comparison to the k eff values obtained using LWRPSGX library. While scrutinizing the basic nuclear data it was noted that the slowing down cross

  19. Long-Term Outcomes of Laser Prostatectomy for Storage Symptoms: Comparison of Serial 5-Year Followup Data between High Performance System Photoselective Vaporization and Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Chul; Song, Won Hoon; Park, Juhyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Jeong, Hyeon; Oh, Seung-June; Paick, Jae-Seung; Son, Hwancheol

    2018-01-09

    We compared long-term storage symptom outcomes between photoselective laser vaporization of the prostate with a 120 W high performance system and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. We also determined factors influencing postoperative improvement of storage symptoms in the long term. Included in our study were 266 men, including 165 treated with prostate photoselective laser vaporization using a 120 W high performance system and 101 treated with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate, on whom 60-month followup data were available. Outcomes were assessed serially 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months postoperatively using the International Prostate Symptom Score, uroflowmetry and the serum prostate specific antigen level. Postoperative improvement in storage symptoms was defined as a 50% or greater reduction in the subtotal storage symptom score at each followup visit after surgery compared to baseline. Improvements in frequency, urgency, nocturia, subtotal storage symptom scores and the quality of life index were maintained up to 60 months after photoselective laser vaporization or holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. There was no difference in the degree of improvement in storage symptoms or the percent of patients with postoperative improvement in storage symptoms between the 2 groups throughout the long-term followup. However, the holmium laser group showed greater improvement in voiding symptoms and quality of life than the laser vaporization group. On logistic regression analysis a higher baseline subtotal storage symptom score and a higher BOOI (Bladder Outlet Obstruction Index) were the factors influencing the improvement in storage symptoms 5 years after prostate photoselective laser vaporization or holmium laser enucleation. Our serial followup data suggest that storage symptom improvement was maintained throughout the long-term postoperative period for prostate photoselective laser vaporization with a 120 W high performance system and holmium

  20. Robotic Assisted Simple Prostatectomy versus Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Patients with Large Volume Prostate: A Comparative Analysis from a High Volume Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, Paolo; Fossati, Nicola; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Pokorny, Morgan; De Groote, Ruben; Geurts, Nicolas; Goossens, Marijn; Schatterman, Peter; De Naeyer, Geert; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    We report a comparative analysis of robotic assisted simple prostatectomy vs holmium laser enucleation of the prostate in patients who had benign prostatic hyperplasia with a large volume prostate (greater than 100 ml). A total of 81 patients underwent robotic assisted simple prostatectomy and 45 underwent holmium laser enucleation of the prostate in a 7-year period. Patients were preoperatively assessed with transrectal ultrasound and uroflowmetry. Functional parameters were assessed postoperatively during followup. Perioperative outcomes included operative time, postoperative hemoglobin, catheterization time and hospitalization. Complications were reported according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Compared to the holmium laser enucleation group, patients treated with prostatectomy were significantly younger (median age 69 vs 74 years, p = 0.032) and less healthy (Charlson comorbidity index 2 or greater in 62% vs 29%, p = 0.0003), and had a lower rate of suprapubic catheterization (23% vs 42%, p = 0.028) and a higher preoperative I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) (25 vs 21, p = 0.049). Both groups showed an improvement in the maximum flow rate (15 vs 11 ml per second, p = 0.7), and a significant reduction in post-void residual urine (-73 vs -100 ml, p = 0.4) and I-PSS (-20 vs -18, p = 0.8). Median operative time (105 vs 105 minutes, p = 0.9) and postoperative hemoglobin (13.2 vs 13.8 gm/dl, p = 0.08) were similar for robotic assisted prostatectomy and holmium laser enucleation, respectively. Median catheterization time (3 vs 2 days, p = 0.005) and median hospitalization (4 vs 2 days, p = 0.0001) were slightly shorter in the holmium laser group. Complication rates were similar with no Clavien grade greater than 3 in either group. Our results from a single center suggest comparable outcomes for robotic assisted simple prostatectomy and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate in patients with a large volume prostate. These findings require

  1. A primary exploration to quasi-two-dimensional rare-earth ferromagnetic particles: holmium-doped MoS2 sheet as room-temperature magnetic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Lin, Zheng-Zhe

    2018-05-01

    Recently, two-dimensional materials and nanoparticles with robust ferromagnetism are even of great interest to explore basic physics in nanoscale spintronics. More importantly, room-temperature magnetic semiconducting materials with high Curie temperature is essential for developing next-generation spintronic and quantum computing devices. Here, we develop a theoretical model on the basis of density functional theory calculations and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida theory to predict the thermal stability of two-dimensional magnetic materials. Compared with other rare-earth (dysprosium (Dy) and erbium (Er)) and 3 d (copper (Cu)) impurities, holmium-doped (Ho-doped) single-layer 1H-MoS2 is proposed as promising semiconductor with robust magnetism. The calculations at the level of hybrid HSE06 functional predict a Curie temperature much higher than room temperature. Ho-doped MoS2 sheet possesses fully spin-polarized valence and conduction bands, which is a prerequisite for flexible spintronic applications.

  2. Development of phosphate glass microspheres containing holmium for selective internal radiotherapy; Desenvolvimento de microesferas de vidro fosfato contendo holmio para uso em radioterapia interna seletiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros Filho, Eraldo Cordeiro

    2016-11-01

    The selective internal radiotherapy is an alternative for some kinds of cancer as the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or primary liver cancer treatment. In this treatment, glass or polymer microspheres containing radionuclides inside their structure are introduced in the liver through hepatic artery and trapped at the arterioles that feed the tumor. In this work, the development of phosphate glasses containing holmium for production of microspheres and their application in Brazil are proposed. The developed glasses presented suitable chemical durability, density of 2,7(3) g/cm{sup 3}, high thermal stability and the impurities contained therein do not preclude the treatment. The microspheres were produced by the flame method and the gravitational fall method, and were characterized by means of several techniques to evaluate shape, average particle size, activity and biocompatibility suitable for selective internal radiotherapy. Based in the main results, the submission to in vivo tests is proposed. (author)

  3. Flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) with holmium laser versus extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for treatment of renal stone <2 cm: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Ren, Kewei; Pan, Haiyan; Zhu, Lijie; Wu, Sheng; You, Xiaoming; Shao, Hongbao; Dai, Feng; Peng, Tao; Qin, Feng; Wang, Jian; Huang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to systematically review the efficacy and safety of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) with holmium laser versus extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for the treatment of renal stone ESWL (WMD = 2.13, 95 % CI 1.13-4.00, P = 0.02). F-URS is associated with higher SFR, lower APR and RR than ESWL. F-URS is a safe and effective procedure. It can successfully treat patients with stones for 1-2 cm, especially for lower pole stone, without increasing complications, operative time and hospital stay. F-URS can be used as an alternative treatment to ESWL in selected cases with larger renal stones. However, further randomized trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Use of the Stone Cone for prevention of calculus retropulsion during holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Brian H; Dretler, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Stone retropulsion during ureteroscopic lithotripsy leads to additional procedures for residual calculi. The Stone Cone (Boston Scientific, Natick, Mass., USA) is a device designed to prevent stone migration. To determine the incidence of calculus retropulsion and additional procedures after ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy while using the Stone Cone. A retrospective review of patients with obstructing ureteral calculi who underwent ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy using the Stone Cone as a backstop over a 3-year period at an academic medical center was performed. 133 patients underwent ureteroscopy with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy using the Stone Cone to prevent calculus retroplusion. Success was defined as no residual fragments >2 mm in size, no changes from semirigid to flexible ureteroscope, and no additional procedures. Post-operative imaging was abdominal plain radiography or computed tomography. A MEDLINE search was performed to indentify all English clinical studies of the Stone Cone. Of the 133 uses of the Stone Cone, there were 2 (1.5%) residual retropulsed fragments >2 mm which required an additional procedure. There were no changes to flexible ureteroscope secondary to stone retropulsion in 105 cases of semirigid ureteroscopy. There was no instance of ureteral obstruction from residual 2-mm fragments. There were no ureteral strictures or hydronephrosis among 91 patients with long-term follow-up imaging. A review of the literature was performed which yielded 4 clinical publications and 90 reported cases using the Stone Cone with 100% success. Two of these studies showed statistically significant improvement when compared with control patients. The Stone Cone minimized stone retropulsion during ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy. The Stone Cone offers the urologist greater certainty during ureteroscopy and may decrease the number of clinically significant residual calculi. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. 经皮肾穿刺钬激光碎石术后疼痛的护理干预%Nursing intervention of postoperative pain after percutaneous nephrolithotomy holmium laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白玫; 乔够梅; 杏玲芝; 陆皓

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨护理干预对减轻经皮肾穿刺钬激光碎石术后疼痛的效果.方法:随机将264例经皮肾穿刺钬激光碎石术患者分成干预组和对照组各132例.对照组患者给予经皮肾穿刺钬激光碎石术后常规护理,干预组在对照组的基础上进行一系列的护理干预.结果:干预组术后疼痛明显低于对照组(P<0.05).结论:护理干预在经皮肾穿刺钬激光碎石术后应用能明显减轻患者疼痛,加速患者术后康复,有利于护理质量的提高.%Objective:To study the nursing intervention on reducing percutaneous holmium laser effect of postoperative pain. Methods:264 patients randomized to percutaneous nephrolithotomy with holmium laser lithotripsy were divided into intervention group and control group of 132 cases at radom. The control group conventional percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy postoperative care, intervention group were based on a series of nursing intervention. Results postoperative pain of intervention group was significantly lower than control group ( P <0.05 ). Conclusion: Nursing intervention in percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy in patients with significantly reduced postoperative pain,accelerated postoperative recovery, is conducive to improving quality of care.

  6. [Review of 1,172 clinical cases with human communication disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Díaz, M R; de Pustilnik, N F; Tortolero, Y

    1976-01-01

    The study comprised 1,172 clinical cases that were classified according to sex, age and speech disorders. A review is made on the most common alterations that they present, the selective treatment in each type and their rehabilitation.

  7. POWERDRESS and diversified expression of the MIR172 gene family bolster the floral stem cell network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rae Eden Yumul

    Full Text Available Termination of the stem cells in the floral meristem (also known as floral determinacy is critical for the reproductive success of plants, and the molecular activities regulating floral determinacy are precisely orchestrated during the course of floral development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, regulators of floral determinacy include several transcription factor genes, such as APETALA2 (AP2, AGAMOUS (AG, SUPERMAN (SUP, and CRABSCLAW (CRC, as well as a microRNA (miRNA, miR172, which targets AP2. How the transcription factor and miRNA genes are coordinately regulated to achieve floral determinacy is unknown. A mutation in POWERDRESS (PWR, a previously uncharacterized gene encoding a SANT-domain-containing protein, was isolated in this study as an enhancer of the weakly indeterminate ag-10 allele. PWR was found to promote the transcription of CRC, MIR172a, b, and c and/or enhance Pol II occupancy at their promoters, without affecting MIR172d or e. A mutation in mature miR172d was additionally found to enhance the determinacy defects of ag-10 in an AP2-dependent manner, providing direct evidence that miR172d is functional in repressing AP2 and thereby contributes to floral determinacy. Thus, while PWR promotes floral determinacy by enhancing the expression of three of the five MIR172 members as well as CRC, MIR172d, whose expression is PWR-independent, also functions in floral stem cell termination. Taken together, these findings demonstrate how transcriptional diversification and functional redundancy of a miRNA family along with PWR-mediated co-regulation of miRNA and transcription factor genes contribute to the robustness of the floral determinacy network.

  8. Non-yrast states and shape co-existence in 172Os

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Kibedi, T.; Byrne, A.P.; Anderssen, S.S.; Baxter, A.M.; Fabricius, B.; Lane, G.J.; Stuchbery, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of 172 Os noted an anomaly in the behaviour of the moment of inertia of the yrast band at low spin. A phenomenological model of shape coexistence based on interacting rotational bands was proposed to explain this anomaly and this model predicted low-lying non-yrast states. In order to test these predictions, the β-decay of 172 Ir has been used to populate 172 Os. Excited states have been observed and classified into positive-parity ''quasi-β'' and ''quasi-γ'' bands and a negative-parity band. The energies of the quasi-β band states are seen to be in general agreement with the predictions of the phenomenological model and the model is refined to take into account the new data. The bands involved are determined to have significantly different moments of inertia. (orig.)

  9. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF GX17+2: CONFIRMATION OF A PERIODIC SYNCHROTRON SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, Jillian; Gelino, Dawn M.; Wachter, Stefanie; Rupen, Michael P.; Gelino, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is also a member of a small family of LMXBs known as 'Z-sources' that are believed to have persistent X-ray luminosities that are very close to the Eddington limit. GX17+2 is highly variable at both radio and X-ray frequencies, a feature common to Z-sources. What sets GX17+2 apart is its dramatic variability in the near-infrared, where it changes by ΔK ∼ 3 mag. Previous investigations have shown that these brightenings are periodic, recurring every 3.01 days. Given its high extinction (A V ≥ 9 mag), it has not been possible to ascertain the nature of these events with ground-based observations. We report mid-infrared Spitzer observations of GX17+2 which indicate a synchrotron spectrum for the infrared brightenings. In addition, GX17+2 is highly variable in the mid-infrared during these events. The combination of the large-scale outbursts, the presence of a synchrotron spectrum, and the dramatic variability in the mid-infrared suggest that the infrared brightening events are due to the periodic transit of a synchrotron jet across our line of sight. An analysis of both new, and archival, infrared observations has led us to revise the period for these events to 3.0367 days. We also present new Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data for GX17+2 obtained during two predicted infrared brightening events. Analysis of these new data, and data from the RXTE archive, indicates that there is no correlation between the X-ray behavior of this source and the observed infrared brightenings. We examine various scenarios that might produce periodic jet emission.

  10. Lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}Hf and {sup 174}Hf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerst, Rosa-Belle; Stegemann, Simon; Jolie, Jan; Regis, Jean-Marc; Rudigier, Matthias; Saed-Samii, Nima; Zell, Karl Oskar [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Using the {sup 170}Yb(α,2n) and {sup 172}Yb(α,2n) reactions the lifetimes of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}Hf and {sup 174}Hf have been measured in fast-timing experiments using the Cologne Orange-Spectrometer and 6 LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-Detectors. The lifetimes were obtained analyzing e{sup -}-γ-coincidence time-spectra with the slope method. The new and more precise lifetimes correct existing, outdated lifetimes in nuclear databases. Additionally, the systematics of the B(E2,2{sub 1}{sup +}→0{sub 1}{sup +}) is studied.

  11. X-ray bursts from GX 17+2: a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztajno, M.; Langmeier, A.; Truemper, J.; Pietsch, W.; Paradijs, J. van; Lewin, W.H.G.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1986-01-01

    The detection of two X-ray bursts from GX 17+2 is reported; a short one (lasting about 10s), and a long one (which lasted about 5 min). These bursts reached a maximum intensity of only about 40 per cent above the persistent flux level. Like previous long bursts observed from GX 17+2 the long burst showed little softening during its decay, and it is difficult at first glance to classify it as either a type 1 or a type 2 burst. Following the recent results of two of the authors a time-dependent spectral analysis of these bursts has been made. (author)

  12. Details management in the application of percutaneous nephroscope holmium laser lithotripsy%细节管理在经皮肾镜钬激光碎石术中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王地萍; 张红芹

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察细节管理在经皮肾镜钬激光碎石术中的应用效果。方法:通过对56例患者进行经皮肾镜钬激光碎石的手术配合和对其围手术期的护理,总结出手术各个环节的护理要点。结果:56例手术患者中,一例中转切开取石,其余55例均碎石成功,效果非常满意,无并发症发生。结论:经皮肾镜钬激光碎石术具有出血少,创伤小,痛苦少,住院时间短、病人恢复快等优点,做好护理细节管理是保证手术顺利完成的重要条件。%Objective:To observe the details of the management in the application of percutaneous nephroscope holmium laser lithotripsy. Methods:By means of 56 patients with percutaneous nephroscope holmium laser lithotrip-sy procedure and the perioperative nursing, sums up the operation nursing key points of each part. Results:56 pa-tients with surgery, in case of transit the stones cut, the remaining 55 cases of gravel, effect is very satisfactory, no complications occurred. Conclusion: Percutaneous nephroscope holmium laser lithotripsy with less bleeding, small trauma, less pain, shorter hospitalization time and patients recover fast, do a good job in nursing detail management is vital to ensure that operation is completed.

  13. miR172 down-regulates the translation of cleistogamy 1 in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floret opening in barley is induced by the swelling of the lodicule, a trait under the control of the cleistogamy1 (cly1) gene. The product of cly1 is a member of the APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor family, which inhibits lodicule development. A sequence polymorphism at the miR172 target site wi...

  14. 12 CFR 560.172 - Re-evaluation of real estate owned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Re-evaluation of real estate owned. 560.172... of real estate owned. A savings association shall appraise each parcel of real estate owned at the... under the particular circumstances. The foregoing requirement shall not apply to any parcel of real...

  15. 26 CFR 1.172-10 - Net operating losses of real estate investment trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating losses of real estate investment... (continued) § 1.172-10 Net operating losses of real estate investment trusts. (a) Taxable years to which a loss may be carried. (1) A net operating loss sustained by a qualified real estate investment trust (as...

  16. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  17. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution... intended to be filtered through a silver-containing water filter. (g) Bottled water must meet the quality...

  18. 21 CFR 172.520 - Cocoa with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.520 Cocoa with dioctyl... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cocoa with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate for...

  19. 21 CFR 172.810 - Dioctyl sodium sulfo-suc-cinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.810 Dioctyl sodium sulfo-suc-cinate. The food additive... gums or hydrophilic colloids. (d) As an emulsifying agent for cocoa fat in noncarbonated beverages...

  20. Extremely Energetic 4B/X17.2 Flare and Associated Phenomena ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak,. Nainital 263 129 ... In this paper, we present the preliminary analysis of X17.2 flare, observed on. 28 October 2003. ... The Hα movie shows large scale .... we calculate the thermal energy (Eth) content of the flare applying the following formula:.

  1. 76 FR 13240 - National Endowment for the Arts; National Council on the Arts 172nd Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts; National Council on the Arts 172nd Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), as amended, notice is hereby given that a meeting of the National Council on the Arts...

  2. Water, Sanitation and Children’s Health : Evidence from 172 DHS Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Gunther, Isabel; Fink, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    This paper combines 172 Demography and Health Survey data sets from 70 countries to estimate the effect of water and sanitation on child mortality and morbidity. The results show a robust association between access to water and sanitation technologies and both child morbidity and child mortality. The point estimates imply, depending on the technology level and the sub-region chosen, that w...

  3. Spectral shapes and a beta-gamma directional correlation in the beta decay of 172Tm (Jpi = 2-)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers Hansen, P.; Loft Nielsen, H.; Wilsky, K.

    1966-01-01

    The isotope 172Tm populates the 0+, 2+ and 4+ states of the 172Yb ground-state rotational band directly in beta decay. The shapes and intensities of the three beta groups have been measured by means of a six-gap magnetic spectrometer operated in coincidence with a Nal(Tl) crystal. The experimenta...

  4. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... from edible fats and oils. 172.225 Section 172.225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to the...

  5. 42 CFR 137.172 - Should the audit report be sent anywhere else to ensure receipt by the Secretary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Should the audit report be sent anywhere else to ensure receipt by the Secretary? 137.172 Section 137.172 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Audits...

  6. 40 CFR 429.172 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... technology (BCT). [Reserved] 429.172 Section 429.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Wood Furniture and Fixture Production With Water Wash Spray Booth(s) or With Laundry Facilities... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). [Reserved] ...

  7. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... kernel oil, or both oils. 172.861 Section 172.861 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils, may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  8. 26 CFR 1.172-9 - Election with respect to portion of net operating loss attributable to foreign expropriation loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operating loss attributable to foreign expropriation loss. 1.172-9 Section 1.172-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... operating loss attributable to foreign expropriation loss. (a) In general. If a taxpayer has a net operating loss for a taxable year ending after December 31, 1958, and if the foreign expropriation loss for such...

  9. Efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in men with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jong Hyun; Kang, Sung Gu; Kang, Seok Ho; Cheon, Jun; Kim, Je Jong; Lee, Jeong Gu

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to compare the short-term outcomes of men who had urodynamic evidence of detrusor underactivity (DU) or detrusor overactivity (DO) of a non-neurogenic etiology as well as bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and who underwent Holmium Laser Enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). A database of 322 patients who underwent HoLEP between 2010 and 2014 was analyzed. Patients were classified into three groups according to the results of a preoperative urodynamic study. Preoperative parameters such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Quality of Life (QoL) index, IPSS grade, uroflowmetry were compared with postoperative parameters measured at 6 months. There were 138 patients with BOO-only and 89 patients with BOO and detrusor dysfunction including 56 with DO and 33 with DU. The degree of improvement in IPSS-total (BOO: 10.7, DO: 8.3, DU: 7.0; p = 0.023) was greater in the BOO-only group than in the DU group. There were more patients whose IPSS grade improved in the BOO-only group (71%) than in the detrusor dysfunction group (DO: 53.6% and DU: 45.5%). Postoperative IPSS-voiding (4.5 vs 7.0), and Qmax (18 vs 13.7) in the BOO-only group were significantly better than those in the DU group. Additionally, postoperative IPSS-storage (4.7 vs 6.7), and IPSS-total (9.1 vs 12.3) in the BOO-only group were significantly better than in the DO group (all p < 0.05). In conclusion, early surgical management for men with severe LUTS and associated BPH before secondary degeneration occurs may be beneficial for preserving detrusor function and yield better treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Nonspecific genitourinary pain improves after prostatectomy using holmium laser enucleation of prostate in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Han Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in nonspecific genitourinary discomfort or pain (GUDP before and after holmium laser enucleation of prostate (HoLEP. GUDP associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS is a common complaint among benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH patients, but very little is known about this clinical entity. METHODS: From February 2010 to August 2011, 100 HoLEP patients with complete clinical data at a single institution were enrolled in the study to analyze the degree of GUDP with a visual analog scale (VAS from 0 to 10 points at baseline and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, and to investigate any relationships between GUDP and urodynamics, uroflowmetry, and scores from the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS questionnaire. RESULTS: Fifty-six patients had LUTS only, while the remaining 44 had both LUTS and GUDP. Pain was located in the suprapubic (42.0%, perineal/penile (33.0%, back (17.0%, and perianal (8.0% regions. During the post-operative period, at six months, the VAS, IPSS, peak flow rate and post-void residual volume had improved significantly in 44 GUDP patients (p<0.010. GUDP had completely resolved in 40 (90.9% patients and had decreased in four (9.1% patients, while seven (12.5% patients developed GUDP with voiding in the urethral and perineal areas by the third month postoperatively. When compared to patients with complete resolution, those with persistent GUDP were found to have a significantly higher preoperative presence of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO as an independent risk factor (OR 6.173, 95% CI 1.132-1.323. CONCLUSION: Both GUDP and LUTS improved significantly after HoLEP. Patients with significant preoperative BOO tended to have persistent GUDP after surgery.

  11. Do We Really Need to Wear Proper Eye Protection When Using Holmium:YAG Laser During Endourologic Procedures? Results from an Ex Vivo Animal Model on Pig Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Luca; Cloutier, Jonathan; Compérat, Eva; Kronemberg, Peter; Charlotte, Frederic; Berthe, Laurent; Rouchausse, Yann; Salonia, Andrea; Montorsi, Francesco; Traxer, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser exposure on ex vivo pig eyes and to test the protective action of different glasses in preventing eye lesions in case of accident. We pointed the tip of a Ho:YAG laser fiber from different distances (0, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 20 cm, respectively) toward the center of the pupil of the pig eye. The Ho:YAG laser was activated for 1 or 5 seconds at three different settings (0.5 J-20 Hz, 1 J-10 Hz, and 2 J-10 Hz, respectively). The experiment was repeated using laser safety glasses and eyeglasses. A total of 78 pig eyes were used. The effects of the Ho:YAG laser on pig eyes were assessed by histopathology. Comparable laser emission experiments were performed on thermal paper at different distances using different pulse energies. Ho:YAG laser-induced corneal lesions were observed in unprotected eyes, ranging from superficial burning lesions to full-thickness necrotic areas, and were directly related to pulse energy and time of exposure and inversely related to the distance from the eye. When the laser was placed 5 cm or more, no corneal damage was observed regardless of the laser setting and the time of exposure. Similar distance/energy level relationships were observed on thermal paper. No damage was observed to the lens or the retina in any of the Ho-YAG laser-treated eyes or in any of the eyes protected by laser safety and eyeglasses. Ho:YAG lasers can cause damage when set to high energy, but only to the cornea, from close distances (0-5 cm) and in the absence of eye protection. Eyeglasses are equally effective in preventing laser damage as laser safety glasses.

  12. Comparison of Predictive Factors for Postoperative Incontinence of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate by the Surgeons' Experience During Learning Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Chiba, Koji; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-03-01

    To detect predictive factors for postoperative incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) according to surgeon experience (beginner or experienced) and preoperative clinical data. Of 224 patients, a total of 203 with available data on incontinence were investigated. The potential predictive factors for post-HoLEP incontinence included clinical factors, such as patient age, and preoperative urodynamic study results, including detrusor overactivity (DO). We also classified the surgeons performing the procedure according to their HoLEP experience: beginner (predictive factor at the super-short period (the next day of catheter removal: odds ratio [OR], 3.375; P=0.000). Additionally, patient age, surgeon mentorship (inverse correlation), and prostate volume were significant predictive factors at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 1.072; P=0.004; OR, 0.251; P=0.002; and OR, 1.008; P=0.049, respectively). With regards to surgeon experience, DO and preoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (inverse) at the super-short period, and patient age and mentorship (inverse correlation) at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 3.952; P=0.002; OR, 1.084; P=0.015; and OR,1.084; P=0.015; OR, 0.358; P=0.003, respectively) were significant predictive factors for beginners, and first desire to void (FDV) at 1 month after HoLEP (OR, 1.009; P=0.012) was a significant predictive factor for experienced surgeons in multivariate analysis. Preoperative DO, IPSS, patient age, and surgeon mentorship were significant predictive factors of postoperative patient incontinence for beginner surgeons, while FDV was a significant predictive factors for experienced surgeons. These findings should be taken into account by surgeons performing HoLEP to maximize the patient's quality of life with regards to urinary continence.

  13. Holmium:YAG Laser Ablation for the Management of Lower Urinary Tract Foreign Bodies Following Incontinence Surgery: A Case Series and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Garson; Mamut, Adiel; Martin, Paul; Welk, Blayne

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with the endoscopic removal of foreign bodies (such as mesh or permanent suture) in the lower urinary tract after female stress incontinence surgery with the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser, and to systematically review the literature on this topic. A retrospective chart review of 18 consecutive women found to have mesh or suture exposure was performed. All patients underwent Ho:YAG laser ablation. A systematic review was performed to identify literature addressing the endoscopic management of mesh/suture exposure after stress incontinence surgery. Between November 2011 and February 2016, 18 women underwent Ho:YAG laser ablation of exposed mesh or suture. Presenting symptoms included lower urinary tract symptoms, pelvic pain, incontinence, or recurrent urinary tract infections. Thirteen women had a previous synthetic midurethral sling and five had a prior retropubic suspension. The median age was 58 years (interquartile range [IQR] 50-60) and median follow-up was 2 years (IQR 1-2). Four patients (22%) had residual mesh after the first procedure, requiring a repeat endoscopic procedure. Only one patient had a small amount of asymptomatic residual mesh on cystoscopy after the final procedure. Only minor postoperative complications were observed. Eight patients had stress incontinence and four underwent operative treatment for this. In our systematic review, we identified 16 case series, which described a total of 158 patients. Women most commonly presented with voiding symptoms or incontinence. Based on the synthesis of these data, repeat procedures were necessary in 16% and vesicovaginal fistula occurred in 2%. Recurrent/persistent stress incontinence was present in 20%, and of these patients, 3/4 underwent a new stress incontinence procedure. Both our case series and the systematic review of the literature demonstrated that endoscopic treatment of lower urinary tract foreign bodies after stress

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Semirigid Ureteroscopy Combined with Holmium: YAG Laser in the Treatment of Upper Urinary Tract Calculi: Is it a Good Alternative Treatment Option of Flexible Ureteroscopy for Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Siddiqui, T. R.; Ahmed, W.; Alam, S. E.; Shah, S. A.; Soomro, I. A.; Qureshi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the success rates of endoscopic management of upper ureteral stones using semirigid ureterorenoscopy and holmium: YAG laser lithotripters. Method: A total of 74 patients with an established diagnosis of upper ureteric stone and scheduled for endoscopic ureteral stone treatment were retrospectively evaluated. Failure was defined as the inability to contact or fragment the stone, migration of the stone into the renal pelvis and difficulty in visualizing the stone for the second time. Success rates and influencing factors as for stone-free state were investigated. Results: Mean age of our patients was 45.99±15.00 (range: 24-82) years. In 14 of 74 patients procedural failure was observed. Double J stents were implanted in 65 percent of the patients and ureteral catheterization was performed on 20 percent of them. The total success rate was 81.1 percent. Major complication rate was 1.1 percent. Factors effecting the success rate as gender, age, body mass index, grade of hydronephrosis and stone size were evaluated and only age was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: Despite some potential risks, semirigid ureterorenoscopic stone extraction and holmium: YAG laser lithotripters are still safe and effective treatment alternatives for management of upper ureteral stones. (author)

  15. High spin states in 63Cu. 17/2+ isomeric yrast state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsan Ung Chan; Bruandet, J.F.; Dauchy, A.; Giorni, A.; Glasser, F.; Morand, C.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.

    1979-01-01

    The 63 Cu nucleus has been studied via the reaction 61 Ni(α, pnγ), using different in beam γ spectroscopy techniques. An isomeric high-spin Yrast state 17/2 + (tau = 6.1 +- 0.6ns) is located at 4498 keV. The gsub(9/2) shell must be involved to explain positive high-spin states established in this work [fr

  16. Measurement of triple gauge-boson couplings at 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The triple gauge-boson couplings, Awp, Aw and Abp, have been measured using 34 semileptonically and 54 hadronically decaying WW candidate events. The events were selected in the data recorded during 1996 with the ALEPH detector at 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb^-1. The triple gauge-boson couplings have been measured using optimal observables constructed from kinematic information of WW events. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  17. Page | 172

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    University Malaysia; Lecturer, Department of Law, College of Humanities, ... the opinion that dictatorships 'are methods other than competitive elections used for ..... for Enjoyment and Enforcement of Human Rights and General Law and.

  18. Visual internal urethrotomy for management of urethral strictures in boys: a comparison of short-term outcome of holmium laser versus cold knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulela, Waseem; ElSheemy, Mohammed S; Shoukry, Mahmoud; Shouman, Ahmed M; Shoukry, Ahmed I; Ghoneima, Waleed; El Ghoneimy, Mohamed; Morsi, Hany A; Mohsen, Mostafa Abdel; Badawy, Hesham

    2018-04-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) using holmium laser (Ho:YAG) (group A) versus cold knife (group B) in children with urethral strictures. It may be the first comparative study on this issue in children. This study compared Ho:YAG group, which was evaluated prospectively from January 2014 till January 2016, versus cold knife group, which was a historical control performed from March 2008 till February 2010. Children ≤ 13 years old with urethral strictures ≤ 1.5 cm were included successively. Recurrent cases, congenital obstructions and cases with complete arrest of dye in voiding cystourethrography were excluded. Scar tissue was incised at twelve o'clock. Outcome was compared using Student's t, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square or Fisher exact tests as appropriate. Each group included 21 patients. Mean age was 6.27 ± 3.23 (2-13) years old. Mean stricture length was 1.02 versus 1 cm in group A versus B, respectively (p = 0.862). Ten cases of penile/bulbous strictures and another 11 cases of membranous strictures were found in each group. There was no significant difference between both groups in preoperative data. Success rate for initial VIU was 66.7% in group A versus 38% in group B (p = 0.064). This was associated with significantly higher Q max in group A (mean 16.52 vs 12.09 ml/s; p = 0.03). Success rate after two trials of VIU was 76.2% for group A and 47.61% for group B (p = 0.057). No complications were reported in both groups. Laser VIU has a higher success rate than cold knife VIU for urethral strictures ≤ 1.5 cm in children with significantly higher Q max . Both are easy to perform, low invasive and safe.

  19. In Vitro Comparison of Holmium Lasers: Evidence for Shorter Fragmentation Time and Decreased Retropulsion Using a Modern Variable-pulse Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John Roger; Penniston, Kristina L; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-09-01

    To compare the performance of variable- and fixed-pulse lasers on stone phantoms in vitro. Seven-millimeter stone phantoms were made to simulate calcium oxalate monohydrate stones using BegoStone plus. The in vitro setting was created with a clear polyvinyl chloride tube. For each trial, a stone phantom was placed at the open end of the tubing. The Cook Rhapsody H-30 variable-pulse laser was tested on both long- and short-pulse settings and was compared to the Dornier H-20 fixed-pulse laser; 5 trials were conducted for each trial arm. Fragmentation was accomplished with the use of a flexible ureteroscope and a 273-micron holmium laser fiber using settings of 1 J × 12 Hz. The treatment time (in minute) for complete fragmentation was recorded as was the total retropulsion distance (in centimeter) during treatment. Laser fibers were standardized for all repetitions. The treatment time was significantly shorter with the H-30 vs the H-20 laser (14.3 ± 2.5 vs 33.1 ± 8.9 minutes, P = .008). There was no difference between the treatment times using the long vs short pulse widths of the H-30 laser (14.4 ± 3.4 vs 14.3 ± 1.7 minutes, P = .93). Retropulsion differed by laser type and pulse width, H-30 long pulse (15.8 ± 5.7 cm), H-30 short pulse (54.8 ± 7.1 cm), and H-20 (33.2 ± 12.5 cm) (P laser fragmented stone phantoms in half the time of the H-20 laser regardless of the pulse width. Retropulsion effects differed between the lasers, with the H-30 causing the least retropulsion. Longer pulse widths result in less stone retropulsion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Predictive Factors for Postoperative Incontinence of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate by the Surgeons’ Experience During Learning Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Shigemura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To detect predictive factors for postoperative incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP according to surgeon experience (beginner or experienced and preoperative clinical data. Methods: Of 224 patients, a total of 203 with available data on incontinence were investigated. The potential predictive factors for post-HoLEP incontinence included clinical factors, such as patient age, and preoperative urodynamic study results, including detrusor overactivity (DO. We also classified the surgeons performing the procedure according to their HoLEP experience: beginner (<21 cases and experienced (≥21 cases. Results: Our statistical data showed DO was a significant predictive factor at the super-short period (the next day of catheter removal: odds ratio [OR], 3.375; P=0.000. Additionally, patient age, surgeon mentorship (inverse correlation, and prostate volume were significant predictive factors at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 1.072; P=0.004; OR, 0.251; P=0.002; and OR, 1.008; P=0.049, respectively. With regards to surgeon experience, DO and preoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (inverse at the super-short period, and patient age and mentorship (inverse correlation at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 3.952; P=0.002; OR, 1.084; P=0.015; and OR,1.084; P=0.015; OR, 0.358; P=0.003, respectively were significant predictive factors for beginners, and first desire to void (FDV at 1 month after HoLEP (OR, 1.009; P=0.012 was a significant predictive factor for experienced surgeons in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Preoperative DO, IPSS, patient age, and surgeon mentorship were significant predictive factors of postoperative patient incontinence for beginner surgeons, while FDV was a significant predictive factors for experienced surgeons. These findings should be taken into account by surgeons performing HoLEP to maximize the patient’s quality of life with regards to urinary continence.

  1. Holmium laser enucleation versus transurethral resection in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia: an updated systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Holmium laser enucleation (HoLEP in surgical treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH potentially offers advantages over transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP. METHODS: Published randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and the Cochrane Library up to October 10, 2013 (updated on February 5, 2014. After methodological quality assessment and data extraction, meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 and Trial Sequential Analysis (TSA 0.9 software. RESULTS: Fifteen studies including 8 RCTs involving 855 patients met the criteria. The results of meta-analysis showed that: a efficacy indicators: there was no significant difference in quality of life between the two groups (P>0.05, but compared with the TURP group, Qmax was better at 3 months and 12 months, PVR was less at 6, 12 months, and IPSS was lower at 12 months in the HoLEP, b safety indicators: compared with the TURP, HoLEP had less blood transfusion (RR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.47, but there was no significant difference in early and late postoperative complications (P>0.05, and c perioperative indicators: HoLEP was associated with longer operation time (WMD 14.19 min, 95% CI 6.30 to 22.08 min, shorter catheterization time (WMD -19.97 h, 95% CI -24.24 to -15.70 h and hospital stay (WMD -25.25 h, 95% CI -29.81 to -20.68 h. CONCLUSIONS: In conventional meta-analyses, there is no clinically relevant difference in early and late postoperative complications between the two techniques, but HoLEP is preferable due to advantage in the curative effect, less blood transfusion rate, shorter catheterization duration time and hospital stay. However, trial sequential analysis does not allow us to draw any solid conclusion in overall clinical benefit comparison between the two approaches. Further large, well-designed, multicentre/international RCTs with long-term data and the comparison between the two approaches remain open.

  2. In vitro study of morphological and chemical modification threshold of bovine dental enamel irradiated by the holmium laser; Estudo in vitro das alteracoes morfologicas e quimicas do esmalte dental bovino irradiado pelo laser de holmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo, Patricia Lerro de Paula

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Ho:YLF laser effects on the dental enamel surface with regards to its morphology, thermal variations during its irradiation in the pulp chamber and its increased resistance to demineralization through quantitative analysis of calcium and phosphorous atoms reactive concentrations in samples. Twenty samples of bovine enamel were used and divided in four groups: control - acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application followed by demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (100 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (350 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid: and irradiation with Ho:YLF laser ( 450 J/cm{sup 2}) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid. Ali samples were quantified according to their calcium and phosphorous atoms relative concentrations before and after the treatments above. X-Ray fluorescence spectrochemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. It was observed an increase on the calcium and phosphorous atoms concentration ratio and therefore the enamel demineralization reduction as a result of the lactic acid treatment in the samples irradiated with the holmium laser followed by the APF application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this study for clinical purposes, morphological changes caused by the holmium laser irradiation were analyzed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified regions of the enamel with consequent changes on its permeability and solubility. Temperature changes of ten human pre-molars teeth irradiated with 350 J/cm{sup 2} and 450 J/cm{sup 2} were also monitored in the pulp chamber in real time. Temperature increases over 4,20 C did not occur. The results obtained from this study along with the results from previous

  3. Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Enhances Viral Replication in CD172a+ Monocytic Cells upon Adhesion to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Poelaert, Katrien C K; Van Cleemput, Jolien; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a main cause of respiratory disease, abortion, and encephalomyelopathy in horses. Monocytic cells (CD172a(+)) are the main carrier cells of EHV-1 during primary infection and are proposed to serve as a "Trojan horse" to facilitate the dissemination of EHV-1 to target organs. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 is transferred from CD172a(+) cells to endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate EHV-1 transmission between these two cell types. We hypothesized that EHV-1 employs specific strategies to promote the adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC to facilitate EHV-1 spread. Here, we demonstrated that EHV-1 infection of CD172a(+) cells resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increase in adhesion to EC. Antibody blocking experiments indicated that α4β1, αLβ2, and αVβ3 integrins mediated adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC. We showed that integrin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were involved in EHV-1-induced CD172a(+) cell adhesion at early times of infection. EHV-1 replication was enhanced in adherent CD172a(+) cells, which correlates with the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In the presence of neutralizing antibodies, approximately 20% of infected CD172a(+) cells transferred cytoplasmic material to uninfected EC and 0.01% of infected CD172a(+) cells transmitted infectious virus to neighboring cells. Our results demonstrated that EHV-1 infection induces adhesion of CD172a(+) cells to EC, which enhances viral replication, but that transfer of viral material from CD172a(+) cells to EC is a very specific and rare event. These findings give new insights into the complex pathogenesis of EHV-1. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen worldwide, causing frequent outbreaks of abortion and myeloencephalopathy, even in vaccinated horses. After primary replication in the respiratory tract, EHV-1 disseminates

  4. LOFT CIS analysis penetration S-7A 8'' WW - 172-AB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, W.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The 8'' WW - 172 - AB line from the containment penetration S-7A was analyzed to ASME Code, Subsection NC (Class 2) criteria. This section of piping is part of the LOFT Containment Isolation System. The model considered the line from the penetration S-7A outward through two horizontal-plane elbows and then through three valves to a wall penetration. Results of the analysis show that the system will meet Class 2 requirements if additional support/restraint is installed at three locations besides the existing restraints. The locations and loads for these supports/restraints are included in the body of the report

  5. Measurement of triple gauge-boson couplings at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Ward, J. J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-03-01

    The triple gauge-boson couplings, αWΦ, αW and αBΦ, have been measured using 34 semileptonically and 54 hadronically decaying W+W- candidate events. The events were selected in the data recorded during 1996 with the ALEPH detector at 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. The triple gauge-boson couplings have been measured using optimal observables constructed from kinematic information of W+W- events. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  6. Fine physical and genetic mapping of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 originating from wild emmer (Triticum dicoccoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Ouyang

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important wheat diseases in the world. In this study, a single dominant powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 was identified in the IW172 wild emmer accession and mapped to the distal region of chromosome arm 7AL (bin7AL-16-0.86-0.90 via molecular marker analysis. MlIW172 was closely linked with the RFLP probe Xpsr680-derived STS marker Xmag2185 and the EST markers BE405531 and BE637476. This suggested that MlIW172 might be allelic to the Pm1 locus or a new locus closely linked to Pm1. By screening genomic BAC library of durum wheat cv. Langdon and 7AL-specific BAC library of hexaploid wheat cv. Chinese Spring, and after analyzing genome scaffolds of Triticum urartu containing the marker sequences, additional markers were developed to construct a fine genetic linkage map on the MlIW172 locus region and to delineate the resistance gene within a 0.48 cM interval. Comparative genetics analyses using ESTs and RFLP probe sequences flanking the MlIW172 region against other grass species revealed a general co-linearity in this region with the orthologous genomic regions of rice chromosome 6, Brachypodium chromosome 1, and sorghum chromosome 10. However, orthologous resistance gene-like RGA sequences were only present in wheat and Brachypodium. The BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds that we have developed provide a framework for the physical mapping and map-based cloning of MlIW172.

  7. Prevaccination with SRL172 (heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae) inhibits experimental periodontal disease in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, T; Rook, G A W

    2000-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a bacterial dental plaque-induced destructive inflammatory condition of the tooth-supporting tissues, which is thought to be mediated by T lymphocytes secreting T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines, resulting in recruitment of high numbers of antibody-producing B lymphocytes/plasma cells as well as polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) secreting tissue-destructive components, such at matrix metalloproteinases and reactive oxygen metabolites into the gingival connective tissues. One treatment strategy may be to down-regulate the Th2 response to those dental plaque microorganisms which induce the destructive inflammatory response. In this study we have examined the effects of a potent down-regulator of Th2 responses on ligature-induced periodontal disease in an experimental rat model. A single s.c. injection into Wistar rats of 0·1 or 1 mg of SRL172, a preparation of heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae (NCTC 11659), 13 days before application of the ligature, significantly reduced the subsequent destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, as measured by loss of periodontal attachment fibres (P < 0·001) and bone (P < 0·002). This protective effect occurred not only on the experimental (ligatured) side but also on the control unligatured side. SRL172 has undergone extensive toxicological studies and safety assessments in humans, and it is suggested that it may provide a safe and novel therapeutic approach to periodontal disease. PMID:10844524

  8. Optimization of Acid Black 172 decolorization by electrocoagulation using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper utilizes a statistical approach, the response surface optimization methodology, to determine the optimum conditions for the Acid Black 172 dye removal efficiency from aqueous solution by electrocoagulation. The experimental parameters investigated were initial pH: 4–10; initial dye concentration: 0–600 mg/L; applied current: 0.5-3.5 A and reaction time: 3–15 min. These parameters were changed at five levels according to the central composite design to evaluate their effects on decolorization through analysis of variance. High R2 value of 94.48% shows a high correlation between the experimental and predicted values and expresses that the second-order regression model is acceptable for Acid Black 172 dye removal efficiency. It was also found that some interactions and squares influenced the electrocoagulation performance as well as the selected parameters. Optimum dye removal efficiency of 90.4% was observed experimentally at initial pH of 7, initial dye concentration of 300 mg/L, applied current of 2 A and reaction time of 9.16 min, which is close to model predicted (90%) result. PMID:23369574

  9. A mechanistic study of Toxoplasma gondii ROP18 inhibiting differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital infection of Toxoplasma gondii is an important factor causing birth defects. The neural stem cells (NSCs are found to be one of the target cells for the parasite during development of the brain. As a key virulence factor of the parasite that hijacks host cellular functions, ROP18 has been demonstrated to mediate the inhibition of host innate and adaptive immune responses through specific binding different host immunity related molecules. However, its pathogenic actions in NSCs remain elusive. Results In the present study, ROP18 recombinant adenovirus (Ad-ROP18 was constructed and used to infect C17.2 NSCs. After 3d- or 5d–culture in differentiation medium, the differentiation of C17.2 NSCs and the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were detected. The results showed that the protein level of βIII-tubulin, a marker of neurons, in the Ad-ROP18-transfected C17.2 NSCs was significantly decreased, indicating that the differentiation of C17.2 NSCs was inhibited by the ROP18. The β-catenin level in the Ad-ROP18-transfected C17.2 NSCs was found to be lower than that in the Ad group. Also, neurogenin1 (Ngn1 and neurogenin2 (Ngn2 were downregulated significantly (P < 0.05 in the Ad-ROP18-transfected C17.2 NSCs compared to the Ad group. Accordingly, the TOP flash/FOP flash dual-luciferase report system showed that the transfection of Ad-ROP18 decreased the Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in the C17.2 NSCs. Conclusions The inhibition effect of the ROP18 from T. gondii (TgROP18 on the neuronal differentiation of C17.2 NSCs was at least partly mediated through inhibiting the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, eventually resulting in the downregulation of Ngn1 and Ngn2. The findings help to better understand potential mechanisms of brain pathology induced by TgROP18.

  10. 172 nm excimer VUV-triggered photodegradation and micropatterning of aminosilane films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, Christian; Naumov, Sergej; Zajadacz, Joachim; Buchmeiser, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Emission from Xe 2 * excimers exhibiting photon energies between 7 and 10 eV can be used to induce strong surface modification effects on polymeric materials in the top 100 nm layer. In order to identify suitable monomers for this VUV-based process, the photodegradation mechanism of different organosilanes of the general structure R-CH 2 -Si(OCH 3 ) 3 was elucidated by quantum chemical calculations. Herein, the photodegradation of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane films by the use of a 172 nm excimer lamp under different irradiation conditions is described and completed by micropatterning experiments. The presence of 1000-5000 ppm oxygen was found to promote the transformation process to an inorganic-like surface. The films obtained were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and fluorescence microscopy after covalent attachment of a fluorescent dye to the remaining amino groups. Complementary, silver staining was used to visualize photopatterning.

  11. Lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}W and {sup 178}W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudigier, M., E-mail: rudigier@ikp.uni-koeln.d [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Regis, J.-M.; Jolie, J.; Zell, K.O.; Fransen, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2010-12-01

    The lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}W and {sup 178}W has been measured in fast timing experiments using the Cologne Double Orange Spectrometer for conversion electron spectroscopy. The B(E2,2{sub 1}{sup +{yields}}0{sub 1}{sup +}) values of the isotopes {sup 170-178}W are compared to calculations in the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) employing the consistent Q formalism. An analysis of the B(E2) value systematics in the rare earth nuclei around mass A=170 using the N{sub p}N{sub n}-scheme shows signatures of a structural change in the tungsten isotopes which is not reflected in the energy systematics.

  12. QCD studies with $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation data at 172-189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied hadronic events from e+e- annihilation data at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt{s}=172, 183 and 189 GeV. The total integrated luminosity of the three samples, measured with the OPAL detector, corresponds to 250 pb^-1. We present distributions of event shape variables, charged particle multiplicity and momentum, measured separately in the three data samples. From these we extract measurements of the strong coupling alpha_s, the mean charged particle multiplicity and the peak position xi_0 in the xi_p=ln(1/x_p) distribution. In general the data are described well by analytic QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models. Our measured values of alpha_s, and xi_0 are consistent with previous determinations at sqrt{s}=MZ.

  13. Hard-photon production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the process $e^+e^-{\\rightarrow}\\rm n {\\gamma}$ $(\\rm n{\\ge}2)$ at centre-of-mass energies of 161.3 GeV and 172.1 GeV. The analysis is based on a sample of events collected by the L3 detector in 1996 corresponding to total integrated luminosities of 10.7 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ and 10.1 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ respectively. The observed rates of events with two and more photons and the characteristic distributions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. This is used to set lower limits on contact interaction energy scale parameters, on the QED cut-off parameters and on the mass of excited electrons.

  14. First step in developing SWNT nano-sensor for C17.2 neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Pirbhai, Massooma; Chandrasekar, Swetha; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina

    Nanomaterials are widely used for biomedical applications and diagnostics, including as drug and gene delivery agents, imaging objects, and biosensors. As single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess a size similar to intracellular components, including fibrillar proteins and some organelles, the potential for use in a wide variety of intracellular applications is significant. However, implementation of an SWNT based nano-sensor is difficult due to lack of understanding of SWNT-cell interaction on both the cellular and molecular level. In this study, C17.2 neural stem cells have been tested after uptake of SWNTs wrapped with ssDNA over a wide variety of time periods, allowing for broad localization of SWNTs inside of the cells over long time periods. The localization data is being used to develop a predictive model of how, upon uptake of SWNT, the cytoskeleton and other cellular structures of the adherent cells is perturbed.

  15. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Polyhydroxyalkanoates Production by Comamonas sp. EB172 Using Central Composite Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Azman Mohd Johar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Statistical approach, central composite design (CCD was used to investigate the complex interaction among temperature (25-37 °C, initial medium pH (5-9, inoculum size (4-10 % (v/v, concentration of (NH42SO4 (0-1 g/L and concentration of mixed organic acids (5-10 g/L in the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Comamonas sp. EB172.Methodology and Results: Mixed organic acids derived from anaerobically treated palm oil mill effluent (POME containing acetic:propionic:butyric (ratio of 3:1:1 were used as carbon source in the batch culture of Comamonas sp. EB172 to produce polyhydoxyalkanoates (PHAs. The analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that all five factors were significantly important in the batch fermentation by shake flask with a P value of less than 0.001. The optimal temperature, initial medium pH, inoculum size, concentration of (NH42SO4 and concentration of mixed organic acids were 30 °C, 7.04, 4.0 % (v/v, 0.01 g/L and 5.05 g/L respectively.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Optimization of the production medium containing mixed organic acids has improved the PHA production for more than 2 folds. Under optimal condition in the shake flask fermentation, the predicted growth is 2.98 g/L of dry cell weight (DCW with 47.07 wt % of PHA content. The highest yield of PHA was 0.28 g of PHA per g mixed organic acids.

  16. The Micro-RNA172c-APETALA2-1 Node as a Key Regulator of the Common Bean-Rhizobium etli Nitrogen Fixation Symbiosis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I.; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. PMID:25739700

  17. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search is described to detect charged Higgs bosons via the process e^+e^- -> H^+H^-, using data collected by the OPAL detector at center-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 25 pb^-1. The decay channels are assumed to be H^+ -> qq'(bar) and H^+ -> \\tau^+ \

  18. 30 CFR 206.172 - How do I value gas produced from leases in an index zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gas production that is not sold under an arm's-length dedicated contract is the index-based value... safety net prices calculated at § 206.172(e)(4)(i) exceeds the index-based value that applies to the gas... contract is the higher of the index-based value under paragraph (d) of this section or the value of that...

  19. Effects of IGFBP-2 on proliferation and differentiation in neural stem cell line C17.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Y

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Yujia Deng,1 Lei Wang,1,2 Lite Ge,1,3 Da Duan,1 Yi Zhuo,1 Ting Yuan,1 Weiping Yan,1 Peiqi Huang,1 Xiaohua Teng,1 Ming Lu1,3 1Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Hunan Normal University (163 Hospital of the People’s Liberation Army, Changsha, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Xiangya School of Central South University, Haikou, 3Key Laboratory of Protein Chemistry and Developmental Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Objective: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2, a member of a highly conserved family of six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs, can regulate several cellular processes through IGF-dependent or IGF-independent pathway. Recent studies have provided solid evidence for the importance to delineate that olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC-conditioned medium (OCM can not only facilitate the differentiation of neural stem cell line (C17.2 into neurons, but also promote the survival and proliferation. We have previously reported that IGFBP-2 was detected in OCM. This study is designed to investigate the roles of IGFBP-2 for the regulation of C17.2 differentiation and proliferation.Methods and results: IGFBP-2 was identified and upregulated in OCM to compare with astrocytes-conditioned medium by shotgun proteomics and semiquantitative proteomic analysis. In order to investigate whether exogenous IGFBP-2 could stimulate proliferation in C17.2 cells and differentiate it into glia or neuron, we used various concentrations of IGFBP-2 to induce C17.2 cells which were cultured in DMEM/F12. The results showed that exogenous IGFBP-2 can promote proliferation in C17.2 cells, but had little effect on differentiation. Interestingly, we also found that IGFBP-2 could induce C17.2 cells to differentiate into astrocytes, while inhibiting their differentiation into neurons in a dose

  20. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  1. Survey of the effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract of white Morus alba leaf on apoptosis induction in a-172 GBM cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabili, Sheyda; Fallah, Soudabeh; Aein, Mojdeh; Vatannejad, Akram; Panahi, Ghodratollah; Fadaei, Reza; Moradi, Nariman; Shojaii, Asie

    2018-02-20

    In this study, the effect of doxorubicin, flavonoid extract of white Morus alba leaf (MFE) and a combination of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on Bax and Bcl2 levels and caspase 3 activity of cancer A-172 GBM cell line was investigated. Bax/Bcl2 levels of treated A-172 GBM cell line with flavonoid extract of white mulberry leaf were estimated by ELISA methods. Caspase 3 activity of treated A-172 GBM cells was determined by calorimetric assay. The flow cytometry assessment was used to estimate the apoptosis percent of treated A-172 GBM cells. Treatment of A-172 GBM cells with MFE, doxorubicin and a combination of MFE and doxorubicin caused a significant decrease in Bcl2 level and an increase in Bax level. The apoptosis percent of treated cells were also elevated significantly. Present results suggest that concomitant use of herbal medicine and chemotherapy may be an effective alternative method for the treatment of cancers.

  2. Crash Testing and Simulation of a Cessna 172 Aircraft: Hard Landing Onto Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of a Cessna 172 aircraft was conducted at the Landing and Impact Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2015. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the performance of Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) that were mounted at various locations in the aircraft and to generate impact test data for model validation. A finite element model of the aircraft was developed for execution in LSDYNA to simulate the test. Measured impact conditions were 722.4-in/s forward velocity and 276-in/s vertical velocity with a 1.5deg pitch (nose up) attitude. These conditions were intended to represent a survivable hard landing. The impact surface was concrete. During the test, the nose gear tire impacted the concrete, followed closely by impact of the main gear tires. The main landing gear spread outward, as the nose gear stroked vertically. The only fuselage contact with the impact surface was a slight impact of the rearmost portion of the lower tail. Thus, capturing the behavior of the nose and main landing gear was essential to accurately predict the response. This paper describes the model development and presents test-analysis comparisons in three categories: inertial properties, time sequence of events, and acceleration and velocity time-histories.

  3. Probing the diffusion of vacuum ultraviolet ({lambda} = 172 nm) induced oxidants by nanoparticles immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatri, Om P.; Hatanaka, Takeshi; Murase, Kuniaki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sugimura, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki.sugimura@materials.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-09-30

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, {lambda} = 172 nm) patterning of alkyl monolayer on silicon surface has been demonstrated with emphasis on the diffusion of VUV induced oxygen-derived active species, which are accountable for the pattern broadening. The VUV photons photo-dissociates the atmospheric oxygen and water molecules into the oxygen-derived active species (oxidants). These oxidants photo-oxidize the hexadecyl (HD) monolayer in VUV irradiated regions (Khatri et al., Langmuir. 24 (2008) 12077), as well as the little concentration of oxidants diffuses towards the masked areas. In this study, we performed VUV patterning at a vacuum pressure of 10 Pa to track the diffusion pathways for the oxidants with help of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs; {phi} = 10 nm) immobilization. At VUV irradiated sites AuNPs are found as uniformly distributed, but adjacent to the pattern boundary we observed quasi-linear arrays of AuNPs, which are determined by diffusion pathways of the oxidants. The diffusion of oxidants plays vital role in pattern broadening. The site selective anchoring of AuNPs demonstrates the utility of VUV photons for the construction of functional materials with microstructural architecture.

  4. Basal Cell Epithelioma (A Clinico-pathological Study of 172 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R L Solanki

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a clinico-pathological analysis of 172 cases of basal cell epithelioma representing 28% of the total skin cancer case. 1.44% of the total malignant tumours, 1% of the total tumours and 0.24% of the hospital admissions. M:F ratio was 1.26:1. The mean age was 54.06 years with the maximum number of cases in the fifth decade., Most (94% of the lesions were seen on the head and neck region. Histopathologically it showed solid (60.5%, adenoid cystic (15,7%, keratotic (9.3%, pigmented (6.4%, basi-squamous (3.5% and morphoea patterns (2.3%. Perineural lymphatic invasion was seen in 52% of the adenoid cystic basal call epithelioma. Amyloid (12.8% and amyloid like deposits (29.65% were seen in 42% of the case. Amyloid deposits were seen as lichen amyloidosis in 10.46% cases and in or around the tumour cell masses in 16.8% cases. It appeared as structureless homogeneous eosinophilic material and showed congophilia with apple green birefringence on polarising microscopy. It was found to be KMN04 sensitive (AA type protein- secondary amyloidosis. Amyloid like deposits appeared as less homogeneous,, basophilic, fractured material which showed non-specific congophilia with apple- green birefringence and stained with acid orcein stain indicating degenerated collagen (elastoid-degeneration.

  5. Search for a massive diphoton resonance at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    A search for the resonant production of high mass photon pairs associated with a leptonic or hadronic system has been performed using a total data sample of 25.7 pb^-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies between 130 GeV and 172 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The observed number of events is consistent with the expected number from Standard Model processes. The observed candidates are combined with search results from sqrt{s} ~ M_Z to place limits on Br(H^0 -> gamma gamma) within the Standard Model for Higgs boson masses up to 77 GeV, and on the production cross section of any scalar resonance decaying into di-photons. Upper limits on Br(H^0 -> gamma gamma) x sigma(e^+e^- -> H^0 Z^0) of 290 - 830 fb are obtained over 40 < M_H < 160 GeV. Type-I two-Higgs-doublet scalars which couple only to gauge bosons are ruled out up to a mass of 76.5 GeV at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Penanganan Teror Bom Thamrin Ditinjau Berdasarkan Skep Kapolri Nomor: 172 Tahun 2014 tentang Penanganan Tempat Kejadian Perkara (PTKP Bom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Tabrani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Fenomena ISIS pasca Al-Qaeda telah memberikan harapan baru dan semangat baru kelompok radikal Islam di Indonesia. Salah satu aksi terorisme yang dilakukan oleh anggota ISIS di Indonesia adalah terror Bom Thamrin pada 14 Januari 2016 dengan pola dan modus berupa bom dan penembakan. Polri sebagai leading sector penanganan terorisme, telah merumuskan beberapa peraturan mengenai penanganan terorisme, misalnya, Keputusan Kepala Kepolisian Negara Republik Indonesia Nomor: 172 Tahun 2014 tentang Penanganan Tempat Kejadian Perkara Bom (PTKP. Keputusan tersebut menjadi landasan kepolisian dalam penanganan kasus teror di lapangan. Untuk itu, penelitian ini akan mengungkap sejauh mana penanganan terror bom Thamrin ditinjau berdasarkan Skep Kapolri Nomor: 172 Tahun 2014 Tentang Penanganan Tempat Kejadian Perkara Bom (PTKP. Kata kunci: terorisme, Teror Thamrin, ISIS, Polri   ISIS phenomena after Al-Qaeda have given new hope and spirit of Islamic radicalism groups in Indonesia. One of terrorism action by ISIS members was Thamrin bombing terror on January 14, 2016 with pattern and modus of bombings and shootings. Indonesian National Police as a leading sector in handling terrorism has formulated rules regarding terrorism handling, such as the Decree of the Indonesian National Police Chief (Perkap No. 172, 2014 on the Handling of the Crime Scene (PTKP of bomb. This decree becomes the base of police on handling terror scene. Therefore, this research can reveal how far the handling of Thamrin terror bombing based on Skep No. 173, 2014. Keywords: Terrorism, Terror of Thamrin, ISIS, Indonesian National Police

  7. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical characterization of 172 cutaneous round cell tumours in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Rios Araújo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a panel of antibodies (CD117, CD3, CD79a, CD45, cytokeratin, vimentin and E-cadherin on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of canine cutaneous round cell tumours. Neoplastic tumours were diagnosed by histology and histochemical stains and included 107 mast cell tumours, 31 cutaneous histiocytomas, two localized histiocytic sarcomas, 21 cutaneous lymphomas, three plasma cell tumours, one transmissible venereal tumour and seven unclassified round cell tumours. The histologic diagnosis was modified in 39.5% of the total 172 neoplasms. The staining for CD45 and Ecadherin were variable, and therefore, the final diagnoses of cutaneous histiocytoma and localized histiocytic sarcoma were made based on histology in association with negative results for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin. The cellular origin of unclassified round cell tumours was defined in all cases. Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and plasma cell tumours were CD79a-positive and could be distinguished from each other by the morphological characteristics. Mast cell tumours and T cell lymphoma were CD117 and CD3 positive, respectively. The positive staining for vimentin and the negative staining for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin favoured the diagnosis of transmissible venereal tumours. Thus, the final diagnosis of cutaneous round cell tumours should be based on the interpretation of immunohistochemical results together with the cellular morphology observed by histology. Therefore, more studies to optimize the specific markers in formalin-fixed, paraffinembedded tissues (especially for histiocytes are required for definitive diagnosis of round cell tumours in dogs.

  8. Carbon ion beam is more effective to induce cell death in sphere-type A172 human glioblastoma cells compared with X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Momoko; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Yajima, Hirohiko; Izumi-Nakajima, Nakako; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2014-12-01

    To obtain human glioblastoma cells A172 expressing stem cell-related protein and comparison of radiosensitivity in these cells with X-rays and carbon beam. Human monolayer-type A172 glioblastoma cells were maintained in normal medium with 10% bovine serum. In order to obtain sphere-type A172 cells the medium was replaced with serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors. Both types of A172 cells were irradiated with either X-rays or carbon ion beams and their radiosensitivity was evaluated. Serum-free medium induced expression of stem cell-related proteins in A172 cells along with the neurosphere-like appearance. These sphere-type cells were found resistant to both X-rays and carbon ion beams. Phosphorylation of histone H2A family member X persisted for a longer period in the cells exposed to carbon ion beams than in those exposed to X-rays and it disappeared quicker in the sphere type than in the monolayer type. Relative radioresistance of the sphere type cells was smaller for carbon ion beams than for X-rays. We demonstrated that glioblastoma A172 cells with induced stem cell-related proteins turned resistant to irradiation. Accelerated heavy ion particles may have advantage over X-rays in overcoming the tumor resistance due to cell stemness.

  9. Low-Cost Biodegradation and Detoxification of Textile Azo Dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 by Providencia rettgeri Strain HSL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study focuses on exploitation of agricultural waste wheat bran (WB as growth medium for degradation of textile azo dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 (RB 172 using a single bacterium P. rettgeri strain HSL1 (GenBank accession number JX853768.1. The bacterium was found to completely decolorize 50 mg L−1 of dye RB 172 within 20 h at 30 ± 0.2°C under microaerophilic incubation conditions. Additionally, significant reduction in COD (85% and TOC (52% contents of dye decolorized medium was observed which suggested its mineralization. Induction in the activities of azoreductase (159% and NADH-DCIP reductase (88% provided an evidence for reductive cleavage of dye RB 172. The HPLC, FTIR, and GC-MS analysis of decolorized products confirmed the degradation of dye into various metabolites. The proposed metabolic pathway for biodegradation of RB 172 has been elucidated which showed the formation of 2 intermediate metabolites, namely, 4-(ethenylsulfonyl aniline and 1-amino-1-(4-aminophenyl propan-2-one. The acute and phytotoxicity evaluation of degraded metabolites suggests that bacterial strain favors the detoxification of dye RB 172. Thus, WB could be utilized as a low-cost growth medium for the enrichment of bacteria and their further use for biodegradation of azo dyes and its derivatives containing wastes into nontoxic form.

  10. A suggested periodic table up to Z≤ 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkö, Pekka

    2011-01-07

    Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements.

  11. Measurement of the W mass by direct reconstruction in e+e-collisions at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J. P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M. N.; Nief, J. Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J. F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Ward, J. J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; G. Hansper, N.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-03-01

    The mass of the W boson is obtained from reconstructed invariant mass distributions in W-pair events. The sample of W pairs is selected from 10.65 pb-1 collected with the ALEPH detector at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 172.09 GeV. The invariant mass distribution of simulated events are fitted to the experimental distributions and the following W masses are obtained:The statistical errors are the expected errors for Monte Carlo samples of the same integrated luminosity as the data. The combination of these three measurements gives:

  12. Measurement of the W mass by direct reconstruction in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is obtained from reconstructed invariant mass distributions in W-pair events. The sample of W pairs is selected from 10.65~pb$^{-1}$ collected with the ALEPH detector at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 172.09 \\GEV. The invariant mass distribution of simulated events are fitted to the experimental distributions and the following W masses are obtained: $WW \\to q\\overline{q}q\\overline{q } m_W = 81.30 +- 0.47(stat.) +- 0.11(syst.) GeV/c^2$, $WW \\to l\

  13. Direct traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: angiographic classification and treatment strategies. Study of 172 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Cuong Tran; Nguyen, Dang; Duc, Vo Tan; Chau, Huynh Hong; Son, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience in treatment of traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) via endovascular intervention. We hereof recommend an additional classification system for type A CCF and suggest respective treatment strategies. Only type A CCF patients (Barrow's classification) would be recruited for the study. Based on the angiographic characteristics of the CCF, we classified type A CCF into three subtypes including small size, medium size and large size fistula depending on whether there was presence of the anterior carotid artery (ACA) and/or middle carotid artery (MCA). Angiograms with opacification of both ACA and MCA were categorized as small size fistula. Angiograms with opacification of either ACA or MCA were categorized as medium size fistula and those without opacification of neither ACA nor MCA were classified as large size fiatula. After the confirm angiogram, endovascular embolization would be performed impromptu using detachable balloon, coils or both. All cases were followed up for complication and effect after the embolization. A total of 172 direct traumatic CCF patients were enrolled. The small size fistula was accountant for 12.8% (22 cases), medium size 35.5% (61 cases) and large size fistula accountant for 51.7% (89 cases). The successful rate of fistula occlusion under endovascular embolization was 94% with preservation of the carotid artery in 70%. For the treatment of each subtype, a total of 21/22 cases of the small size fistulas were successfully treated using coils alone. The other single case of small fistula was defaulted. Most of the medium and large size fistulas were cured using detachable balloons. When the fistula sealing could not be obtained using detachable balloon, coils were added to affirm the embolization of the cavernous sinus via venous access. There were about 2.9% of patient experienced direct carotid artery puncture and 0.6% puncture after carotid artery cut-down exposure. About 30% of cases experienced

  14. Different effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors nicotinamide and trichostatin A (TSA) in C17.2 neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Hua; Wang, Kai; Wen, Tieqiao

    2012-11-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are involved in proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, mRNA transcription, and protein expression in various cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying such functions is still not fully clear. In this study, we used C17.2 neural stem cell (NSC) line as a model to evaluate the effects of nicotinamide and trichostatin A (TSA) on cell characteristics. Results show that nicotinamide and TSA greatly inhibit cell growth, lead to cell morphology changes, and effectively induce cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analyses confirmed that nicotinamide significantly decreases the expression of bcl-2 and p38. Further insight into the molecular mechanisms shows the suppression of phosphorylation in eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) by nicotinamide, whereas, an increased expression of bcl-2 and p38 and phosphorylation of 4EBP1 by TSA. However, both nicotinamide and TSA significantly increase the expression of cytochrome c (cyt c). These results strongly suggest that bcl-2, p38, cyt c, and p-4EBP1 could suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis of C17.2 NSCs mediated by histone deacetylase inhibitors, nicotinamide and TSA, involving different molecular mechanisms.

  15. A case of functional growth hormone deficiency and early growth retardation in a child with IFT172 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Herald, Angela K; Kinning, Esther; Iida, Aritoshi; Wang, Zheng; Miyake, Noriko; Ikegawa, Shiro; McNeilly, Jane; Ahmed, S Faisal

    2015-04-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of rare conditions that present through a wide range of manifestations. Given the relative common occurrence of defects of the GH/IGF-I axis in children with short stature and growth retardation, the association between ciliopathies and these defects needs further attention. Our patient is a boy who was born at term and noted to have early growth retardation and weight gain within the first 18 months of life. Biochemical tests demonstrated low IGF-I but a normal peak GH on stimulation and an adequate increase in IGF-I on administration of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed pituitary hypoplasia and an ectopic posterior pituitary. His growth responded well to rhGH therapy. Subsequently he also developed a retinopathy of his rods and cones, metaphyseal dysplasia, and hypertension with renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Whole-exome sequencing demonstrated compound heterozygous mutations of IFT172, thus consistent with a ciliopathy. This is the first reported case of a child with a mutation in IFT172 who presented with growth retardation in early childhood and was initially managed as a case of functional GH deficiency that responded to rhGH therapy. This case highlights the importance of ciliary function in pituitary development and the link between early onset growth failure and ciliopathies.

  16. A 172 $\\mu$W Compressively Sampled Photoplethysmographic (PPG) Readout ASIC With Heart Rate Estimation Directly From Compressively Sampled Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamula, Venkata Rajesh; Valero-Sarmiento, Jose Manuel; Yan, Long; Bozkurt, Alper; Hoof, Chris Van; Helleputte, Nick Van; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat; Verhelst, Marian

    2017-06-01

    A compressive sampling (CS) photoplethysmographic (PPG) readout with embedded feature extraction to estimate heart rate (HR) directly from compressively sampled data is presented. It integrates a low-power analog front end together with a digital back end to perform feature extraction to estimate the average HR over a 4 s interval directly from compressively sampled PPG data. The application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) supports uniform sampling mode (1x compression) as well as CS modes with compression ratios of 8x, 10x, and 30x. CS is performed through nonuniformly subsampling the PPG signal, while feature extraction is performed using least square spectral fitting through Lomb-Scargle periodogram. The ASIC consumes 172  μ W of power from a 1.2 V supply while reducing the relative LED driver power consumption by up to 30 times without significant loss of relevant information for accurate HR estimation.

  17. Multi-photon final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb^{-1} taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The measured cross-sections agree well with the expectation from QED. In a combined fit using data from all centre-of-mass energies, the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits on the cut-off parameters: Lambda_+ > 195 GeV and Lambda_- > 210 GeV (95% CL). In addition, limits on non-standard e^+e^-gamma couplings and contact interactions, as well as a 95% CL mass limit for an excited electron, M_{e^*} > 194 GeV for an e^+e^-gamma coupling kappa = 1, are determined.

  18. CtBP1/BARS Gly172 → Glu mutant structure: Impairing NAD(H)-binding and dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardini, Marco; Valente, Carmen; Ricagno, Stefano; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2009-01-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are multi-functional proteins involved in nuclear transcriptional co-repression, Golgi membrane fission, and synaptic ribbon formation. Binding of NAD(H) to CtBPs promotes dimerization. CtBP dimers act as a scaffold for multimeric protein complex formation, thus bridging transcriptional repressors and their targets in the nucleus. Based on size-exclusion chromatography experiments and on the crystal structure of the NAD(H)-free G172E CtBP mutant, we show here that absence of NAD(H) induces flexibility/backbone conformational changes at the dimerization interface and at the CtBP interdomain region. The results presented shed first light on the correlation between NAD(H)-binding and functional CtBP dimerization.

  19. Measurement of the W-pair cross section in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Ward, J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The e+e- --> W+W- cross section is measured in a data sample collected by ALEPH at a mean centre--of--mass energy of 172.09 GEV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. Cross sections are given for the three topologies, fully leptonic, semi-leptonic and hadronic of a W-pair decay. Under the assumption that no other decay modes are present, the W-pair cross section is measured to be 11.7 +- 1.2 (stat.) +- 0.3 (syst.) pb. The existence of the triple gauge boson vertex of the Standard Model is clearly preferred by the data. The decay branching ratio of the W boson into hadrons is measured to be B(W --> hadrons) = 67.7 +- 3.1 (stat.) +- 0.7 (syst.)%, allowing a determination of the CKM matrix element |Vcs|= 0.98 +- 0.14 (stat.) +- 0.03 (syst.).

  20. characterization and weldability of plasma nitrided P/M martensitic stainless steel X 20 Cr Ni 172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Karim, R.A.; El-demellawy, M.A; Waheed, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    stainless steels are widely used in nuclear applications, as a construction material. in these applications stainless steels suffer from corrosion degradation due severe environment and operating conditions. improving the engineering properties of such material prolong the service life time.in the present study, powder metallurgy technique namely plasma rotating electrode process (PREP) was used to produce martensitic steel DIN X 20 Cr Ni 172 with 0.5 % N. this step was followed by hot isostatic pressing process (HIP) . the effect of N on the weldability of this steel has been investigated . this included microstructure characterization, hardness evaluation and ferrite content measurements. the results showed that the presence of high nitrogen content in this steel resulted in a pore free structure with improved the hardness across the welding area. A single phase with few precipitates was detected on the grain boundaries in the heat affected zone. the results were supplemented by x-ray diffraction patterns and EDAX analysis

  1. Measurement of the W-pair cross section in e+e- collisions at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Ward, J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-12-01

    The e+e--->W+W- cross section is measured in a data sample collected by ALEPH at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 172.09 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. Cross sections are given for the three topologies, fully leptonic, semi-leptonic and hadronic of a W-pair decay. Under the assumption that no other decay modes are present, the W-pair cross section is measured to be 11.7+/-1.2(stat.)+/-0.3(syst.) pb. The existence of the triple gauge boson vertex of the Standard Model is clearly preferred by the data. The decay branching ratio of the W boson into hadrons is measured to be B(W-->hadrons)=67.7+/-3.1(stat.)+/-0.7(syst.) %, allowing a determination of the CKM matrix element Vcs=0.98+/-0.14(stat.)+/-0.03(syst.).

  2. Altering F-Actin Structure of C17.2 Cells using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Jay; Gillette, Nathan L. D.; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Pirbhai, Massooma; Lehigh Univesity Collaboration; Susquehanna University Collaboration

    Advancements in nanotechnology have become fundamental to the delivery of drugs to treat various diseases. One such advancement is that of carbon nanotubes and their possible implications on drug delivery. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential in the biomedical field as a means to deliver materials such as drugs and genes into the human body due to their size and chemistry. However, the effects of the nanotubes on cells they interact with are still unknown. Previous studies have shown that a low dosage of SWCNTs can affect differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In this experiment, we investigate how the tubes affect the structure of the cells. Specifically, we determined the impact on the cell by examining the actin filament length, protrusions along the edge of the cells, and actin distribution. Presenter/Author 1.

  3. Search for anomalous four-jet events in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A study of hadronic events with high jet-multiplicity is performed using the data sample collected by the L3 experiment at LEP at $\\sqrt{s}=130-172$ GeV. The observed event rates agree with the Standard Model predictions and upper limits are set on the production cross section of pairs of heavy particles that decay hadronically.

  4. Single and multi-photon events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for single and multi-photon events with missing energy is performed using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161 GeV and 172 GeV for a total of 20.9 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The results obtained are used to derive the value for the $\

  5. Biosorption of the metal-complex dye Acid Black 172 by live and heat-treated biomass of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1: Kinetics and sorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Bing [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Li, Gang [Department of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Wenzhou Vocational College of Science and Technology, 325006 Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang, Sheng [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Crowley, David E., E-mail: crowley@ucr.edu [Department of Environmental Science, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhao, Yu-Hua, E-mail: yhzhao225@zju.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-02-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum amount of Acid Black 172 sorption was about 2.98 mmol/g biomass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amine groups played a major role in the biosorption of Acid Black 172. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reasons of increased dye sorption by heat-treated biomass were proposed. - Abstract: The ability of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 to adsorb Acid Black 172 was studied to determine the kinetics and mechanisms involved in biosorption of the dye. Kinetic data for adsorption fit a pseudo-second-order model. Increased initial dye concentration could significantly enhance the amount of dye adsorbed by heat-treated biomass in which the maximum amount of dye adsorbed was as high as 2.98 mmol/g biomass, whereas it had no significant influence on dye sorption by live biomass. As treated temperature increased, the biomass showed gradual increase of dye sorption ability. Experiments using potentiometric titration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that amine groups (NH{sub 2}) played a prominent role in biosorption of Acid Black 172. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that heat treatment of the biomass increased the permeability of the cell walls and denatured the intracellular proteins. The results of biosorption experiments by different cell components confirmed that intracellular proteins contributed to the increased biosorption of Acid Black 172 by heat-treated biomass. The data suggest that biomass produced by this strain may have application for removal of metal-complex dyes from wastewater streams generated from the dye products industry.

  6. Functional regulation of Q by microRNA172 and transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS in controlling bread wheat spikelet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pan; Liu, Jie; Dong, Huixue; Sun, Jiaqiang

    2018-02-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) spike architecture is an important agronomic trait. The Q gene plays a key role in the domestication of bread wheat spike architecture. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Q expression and transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this study, we show that overexpression of bread wheat tae-miR172 caused a speltoid-like spike phenotype, reminiscent of that in wheat plants with the q gene. The reduction in Q transcript levels in the tae-miR172 overexpression transgenic bread wheat lines suggests that the Q expression can be suppressed by tae-miR172 in bread wheat. Indeed, our RACE analyses confirmed that the Q mRNA is targeted by tae-miR172 for cleavage. According to our analyses, the Q protein is localized in nucleus and confers transcriptional repression activity. Meanwhile, the Q protein could physically interact with the bread wheat transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS (TaTPL). Specifically, the N-terminal ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) (LDLNVE) motif but not the C-terminal EAR (LDLDLR) motif of Q protein mediates its interaction with the CTLH motif of TaTPL. Moreover, we show that the N-terminal EAR motif of Q protein is also essentially required for the transcriptional repression activity of Q protein. Taken together, we reveal the functional regulation of Q protein by tae-miR172 and transcriptional co-repressor TaTPL in controlling the bread wheat spike architecture. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Positive transcriptional regulation of the human micro opioid receptor gene by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and increase of its DNA binding affinity based on polymorphism of G-172 -> T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takeshi; Kaneda, Toshio; Muto, Akihiro; Yoshida, Tadashi

    2009-07-24

    Micro opioid receptor (MOR) agonists such as morphine are applied widely in clinical practice as pain therapy. The effects of morphine through MOR, such as analgesia and development of tolerance and dependence, are influenced by individual specificity. Recently, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms on the human MOR gene to investigate the factors that contribute to individual specificity. In process of single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis, we found that specific nuclear proteins bound to G(-172) --> T region in exon 1 in MOR gene, and its affinity to DNA was increased by base substitution from G(-172) to T(-172). The isolated protein was identified by mass spectrometry and was confirmed by Western blotting to be poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). The overexpressed PARP-1 bound to G(-172) --> T and enhanced the transcription of reporter vectors containing G(-172) and T(-172). Furthermore, PARP-1 inhibitor (benzamide) decreased PARP-1 binding to G(-172) --> T without affecting mRNA or protein expression level of PARP-1 and down-regulated the subsequent MOR gene expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, we found that tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhanced MOR gene expression as well as increased PARP-1 binding to the G(-172) --> T region and G(-172) --> T-dependent transcription in SH-SY5Y cells. These effects were also inhibited by benzamide. In this study, our data suggest that PARP-1 positively regulates MOR gene transcription via G(-172) --> T, which might influence individual specificity in therapeutic opioid effects.

  8. Bose-Einstein Correlations in $e^{+} e^{-} \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ at 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Hoch, M; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations between like-charge pions are studied in hadronic final states produced by e+e- annihilations at center-of-mass energies of 172 and 183 GeV. Three event samples are studied, each dominated by one of the processes W+W- to qqlnu, W+W- to qqqq, or (Z/g)* to qq. After demonstrating the existence of Bose-Einstein correlations in W decays, an attempt is made to determine Bose-Einstein correlations for pions originating from the same W boson and from different W bosons, as well as for pions from (Z/g)* to qq events. The following results are obtained for the individual chaoticity parameters lambda assuming a common source radius R: lambda_same = 0.63 +- 0.19 +- 0.14, lambda_diff = 0.22 +- 0.53 +- 0.14, lambda_Z = 0.47 +- 0.11 +- 0.08, R = 0.92 +- 0.09 +- 0.09. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. At the current level of statistical precision it is not established whether Bose-Einstein correlations, between pions from different W bosons exist or not.

  9. Di-Jet Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet production is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons radiated by the LEP beams at e+e- centre-of-mass energies 161 and 172 GeV. The jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm. The angular distributions of direct and double-resolved processes are measured and compared to the predictions of leading order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD. The jet energy profiles are also studied. The inclusive two-jet cross-section is measured as a function of transverse energy and rapidity and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The inclusive two-jet cross-section as a function of rapidity is compared to the prediction of the leading order Monte Carlo generators PYTHIA and PHOJET. The Monte Carlo predictions are calculated with different parametrisations of the parton distributions of the photon. The influence of the `underlying event' has been studied to reduce the model dependence of the predicted jet cross-sections from the Monte Carlo generators.

  10. Search for chargino and neutralino production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 170 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search for charginos and neutralinos, predicted by supersymmetric theories, has been performed using a data sample of 10.3 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 170 and 172 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for these particles has been found. The results are combined with those from previous OPAL chargino and neutralino searches at lower energies to obtain limits. Exclusion regions at 95% C.L. of parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are determined. Within this framework, for tan(beta) >= 1.0, lower mass limits are placed on the lightest chargino and the three lightest neutralinos. The 95% C.L. lower mass limit on the lightest chargino, assuming that it is heavier than the lightest neutralino by more than 10 GeV, is 84.5 GeV for the case of a large universal scalar mass (m_0 > ~1 TeV) and 65.7 GeV for the smallest m_0 compatible with current limits on the sneutrino and slepton masses. The lower limit on the lightest neutralino mass at 95% C.L. for tan(beta) >= 1.0 is 2...

  11. Measurement of triple gauge boson couplings from $W^+ W^-$ production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    We present measurements of triple gauge boson coupling parameters using data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP2 at a centre-of-mass energy of 172 GeV. A total of 120 W-pair candidates has been selected in the q q(bar) q q(bar), q q(bar) l nu(bar)_l, and l nu(bar)_l l(bar)' nu_l' decay channels, for an integrated luminosity of 10.4 pb^-1. We use these data to determine several different anomalous coupling parameters using the measured cross-section and the distributions of kinematic variables. We measure alpha_B-phi = 0.35 + 1.29 - 1.07 +/- 0.38, alpha_W-phi = 0.00 + 0.30 - 0.28 +/- 0.11, alpha_W = 0.18 + 0.49 - 0.47 +/- 0.23, Delta(g_1^z) = -0.03 + 0.40 -0.37 +/- 0.14, Delta(kappa_gamma^(HISZ)) = 0.03 + 0.55 - 0.51 +/- 0.20, and Delta(kappa) = 0.03 + 0.49 - 0.46 +/- 0.21. Combining the alpha_W-phi result with our previous result obtained from the 161 GeV data sample we measure alpha_W-phi = -0.08 + 0.28 - 0.25 +/- 0.10. All of these measurements are consistent with the Standard Model.

  12. Searches for charginos and neutralinos in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170, and 172 GeV are analysed for signals of chargino and neutralino production. No evidence of a signal is found, although candidate events consistent with the expectations from Standard Model processes are observed. Limits at 95% C.L. on the production cross sections are derived and bounds on the parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are set. The lower limit on the mass of the lightest chargino is 85.5 GeV/c^2 for gaugino-like charginos (mu = -500 GeV/c^2), and 85.0 GeV/c^2 for Higgsino-like charginos (M_2 = 500 GeV/c^2), for heavy sneutrinos (M(snu) > 200 GeV/c^2) and tanb = sqrt(2). The effect of light sleptons on chargino and neutralino limits is investigated. The assumptions of a universal slepton mass and a universal gaugino mass are relaxed, allowing less model-dependent limits to be obtained.

  13. Correction of senile entropion using holmium laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecik, Mariusz; Kecik, Dariusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Brodecka, Malgorzata

    2003-10-01

    Ninety-eight patients were included in clinical trials. They were divided into 3 groups, depending on the severity of lower lid inversion. Eighteen patients were included in the group with mild lid inversion; 59 patients had moderate lid inversion and in 21 patients the inversion was severe. Additionally, the patients were subdivided into two groups, according to their age - up to and above the age of 69 years. In both age groups, patients with moderate entropion predominated. All patients underwent photocoagulation of the lower lid. Post-operative wound healing took about 14 days. The effect was described as good when the position of the lid returned to normal with the lashes at an angle of about 45° to the free edge of the eyelid. When the position of the eyelid was normal with the lashes at an angle of about 60° or more to the edge of the lid and not rubbing against the globe, the effect was considered satisfactory. When the inversion of the lid was not corrected, the effect was unsatisfactory. Good effects were seen in 61% of patients, 21% of the patients demonstrated satisfactory effects and in 18% the outcome was unsatisfactory. The best results were observed in patients with mild entropion, aged 69 years and younger.

  14. Holmium hafnate: An emerging electronic device material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavunny, Shojan P.; Sharma, Yogesh; Kooriyattil, Sudheendran; Dugu, Sita; Katiyar, Rajesh K.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Scott, James F.

    2015-01-01

    We report structural, optical, charge transport, and temperature properties as well as the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of Ho 2 Hf 2 O 7 (HHO) which make this material desirable as an alternative high-k dielectric for future silicon technology devices. A high dielectric constant of ∼20 and very low dielectric loss of ∼0.1% are temperature and voltage independent at 100 kHz near ambient conditions. The Pt/HHO/Pt capacitor exhibits exceptionally low Schottky emission-based leakage currents. In combination with the large observed bandgap E g of 5.6 eV, determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, our results reveal fundamental physics and materials science of the HHO metal oxide and its potential application as a high-k dielectric for the next generation of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

  15. Holmium hafnate: An emerging electronic device material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavunny, Shojan P.; Sharma, Yogesh; Kooriyattil, Sudheendran; Dugu, Sita; Katiyar, Rajesh K.; Scott, James F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-03-01

    We report structural, optical, charge transport, and temperature properties as well as the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of Ho2Hf2O7 (HHO) which make this material desirable as an alternative high-k dielectric for future silicon technology devices. A high dielectric constant of ˜20 and very low dielectric loss of ˜0.1% are temperature and voltage independent at 100 kHz near ambient conditions. The Pt/HHO/Pt capacitor exhibits exceptionally low Schottky emission-based leakage currents. In combination with the large observed bandgap Eg of 5.6 eV, determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, our results reveal fundamental physics and materials science of the HHO metal oxide and its potential application as a high-k dielectric for the next generation of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  16. Holmium hafnate: An emerging electronic device material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavunny, Shojan P., E-mail: shojanpp@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Sharma, Yogesh; Kooriyattil, Sudheendran; Dugu, Sita; Katiyar, Rajesh K.; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: shojanpp@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 70377, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States); Scott, James F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 70377, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States); Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-16

    We report structural, optical, charge transport, and temperature properties as well as the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of Ho{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (HHO) which make this material desirable as an alternative high-k dielectric for future silicon technology devices. A high dielectric constant of ∼20 and very low dielectric loss of ∼0.1% are temperature and voltage independent at 100 kHz near ambient conditions. The Pt/HHO/Pt capacitor exhibits exceptionally low Schottky emission-based leakage currents. In combination with the large observed bandgap E{sub g} of 5.6 eV, determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, our results reveal fundamental physics and materials science of the HHO metal oxide and its potential application as a high-k dielectric for the next generation of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  17. Ureteroscopic Holmium Lasertripsy for Treatment of Impacted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    line therapy for chronically impacted ureteral stones, which are frequently associated with chronic infl ammation, polyps and strictures. It is quite safe and it avoids the futile repetition of ESWL and problems caused by a prolonged passage of ...

  18. Search for anomalous production of dilepton events with missing transverse momentum in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Events containing a pair of charged leptons and significant missing transverse momentum are selected from a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.6 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV. The observed number of events, four at 161 GeV and nine at 172 GeV, is consistent with the number expected from Standard Model processes, predominantly arising from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is observed and limits on the production of scalar charged lepton pairs and other new particles are presented.

  19. Search for sleptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and gammagamma-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  20. Search for sleptons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Sau, Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and yy-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  1. Characterization of a lactose-responsive promoter of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus 05-172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhu; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2017-09-01

    A novel lactose-responsive promoter of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene Lba1680 of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain 05-172 isolated from a traditionally fermented dairy product koumiss was characterized. In L. acidophilus 05-172, expression of Lba1680 was induced by lactose, with lactose-induced transcription of Lba1680 being 6.1-fold higher than that induced by glucose. This is in contrast to L. acidophilus NCFM, a strain isolated from human feces, in which expression of Lba1680 and Lba1679 is induced by glucose. Both gene expression and enzyme activity assays in L. paracasei transformed with a vector containing the inducible Lba1680 promoter (PLba1680) of strain 05-172 and a heme-dependent catalase gene as reporter confirmed that PLba1680 is specifically induced by lactose. Its regulatory expression could not be repressed by glucose, and was independent of cAMP receptor protein. This lactose-responsive promoter might be used in the expression of functional genes in L. paracasei incorporated into a lactose-rich environment, such as dairy products. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ferromagnetic ordering in ThSi{sub 2} type CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, C. Peter, E-mail: s-peter@northwestern.ed [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 N. Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States); Kanatzidis, Mercouri G., E-mail: m-kanatzidis@northwestern.ed [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 N. Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The compound CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72} crystallizes in the ThSi{sub 2} structure type in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/amd with lattice parameters a=b=4.2415(6) A c=14.640(3) A. CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72} is a polar intermetallic compound having a three-dimensional Ge/Au polyanion sub-network filled with Ce atoms. The magnetic susceptibility data show Curie-Weiss law behavior above 50 K. The compound orders ferromagnetically at {approx}8 K with estimated magnetic moment of 2.48 mu{sub B}/Ce. The ferromagnetic ordering is confirmed by the heat capacity data which show a rise at {approx}8 K. The electronic specific heat coefficient (gamma) value obtained from the paramagnetic temperature range 15-25 K is {approx}124(5) mJ/ mol K{sup 2}. The entropy change due to the ferromagnetic transition is {approx}4.2 J/mol K which is appreciably reduced compared to the value of R ln(2) expected for a crystal-field-split doublet ground state and/or Kondo exchange interactions. - Graphical abstract: CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72} crystallizes in the ThSi{sub 2} structure type in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/amd and orders ferromagnetically at {approx}8 K.

  3. Increased oxidative stress and anaerobic energy release, but blunted Thr172-AMPKα phosphorylation, in response to sprint exercise in severe acute hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Alamo, David; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Rodríguez-García, Lorena; Santana, Alfredo; Cusso, Maria Roser; Guerrero, Mario; Guerra, Borja; Dorado, Cecilia; Calbet, José A L

    2012-09-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major mediator of the exercise response and a molecular target to improve insulin sensitivity. To determine if the anaerobic component of the exercise response, which is exaggerated when sprint is performed in severe acute hypoxia, influences sprint exercise-elicited Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation, 10 volunteers performed a single 30-s sprint (Wingate test) in normoxia and in severe acute hypoxia (inspired Po(2): 75 mmHg). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and immediately after 30 and 120 min postsprint. Mean power output and O(2) consumption were 6% and 37%, respectively, lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. O(2) deficit and muscle lactate accumulation were greater in hypoxia than in normoxia. Carbonylated skeletal muscle and plasma proteins were increased after the sprint in hypoxia. Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation was increased by 3.1-fold 30 min after the sprint in normoxia. This effect was prevented by hypoxia. The NAD(+)-to-NADH.H(+) ratio was reduced (by 24-fold) after the sprints, with a greater reduction in hypoxia than in normoxia (P exercise in human skeletal muscle is altered in severe acute hypoxia, which abrogated Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation, likely due to lower LKB1 activation by SIRT1.

  4. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable ‘UU172 element’ from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. PMID:21255110

  6. The effect of sugar and processed food imports on the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 172 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tracy Kuo; Teymourian, Yasmin; Tursini, Maitri Shila

    2018-04-14

    Studies find that economic, political, and social globalization - as well as trade liberalization specifically - influence the prevalence of overweight and obesity in countries through increasing the availability and affordability of unhealthful food. However, what are the mechanisms that connect globalization, trade liberalization, and rising average body mass index (BMI)? We suggest that the various sub-components of globalization interact, leading individuals in countries that experience higher levels of globalization to prefer, import, and consume more imported sugar and processed food products than individuals in countries that experience lower levels of globalization. This study codes the amount of sugar and processed food imports in 172 countries from 1995 to 2010 using the United Nations Comtrade dataset. We employ country-specific fixed effects (FE) models, with robust standard errors, to examine the relationship between sugar and processed foods imports, globalization, and average BMI. To highlight further the relationship between the sugar and processed food import and average BMI, we employ a synthetic control method to calculate a counterfactual average BMI in Fiji. We find that sugar and processed food imports are part of the explanation to increasing average BMI in countries; after controlling for globalization and general imports and exports, sugar and processed food imports have a statistically and substantively significant effect in increasing average BMI. In the case of Fiji, the increased prevalence of obesity is associated with trade agreements and increased imports of sugar and processed food. The counterfactual estimates suggest that sugar and processed food imports are associated with a 0.5 increase in average BMI in Fiji.

  7. Measured performance of a 1.72 kW rooftop grid connected photovoltaic system in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayompe, L.M.; Duffy, A.; McCormack, S.J.; Conlon, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained from monitoring a 1.72 kW p photovoltaic system installed on a flat roof of a 12 m high building in Dublin, Ireland (latitude 53.4 o N and longitude 6.3 o E). The system was monitored between November 2008 and October 2009 and all the electricity generated was fed into the low voltage supply to the building. Monthly average daily and annual performance parameters of the PV system evaluated include: final yield, reference yield, array yield, system losses, array capture losses, cell temperature losses, PV module efficiency, system efficiency, inverter efficiency, performance ratio and capacity factor. The maximum solar radiation, ambient temperature and PV module temperature recorded were 1241 W/m 2 in March, 29.5 o C and 46.9 o C in June respectively. The annual total energy generated was 885.1 kW h/kW p while the annual average daily final yield, reference yield and array yield were 2.41 kW h/kW p /day, 2.85 kW h/kW p /day and 2.62 kW h/kW p /day respectively. The annual average daily PV module efficiency, system efficiency and inverter efficiency were 14.9%, 12.6% and 89.2% respectively while the annual average daily performance ratio and capacity factor were 81.5% and 10.1% respectively. The annual average daily system losses, capture losses and cell temperature losses were 0.23 h/day, 0.22 h/day and 0.00 h/day respectively. Comparison of this system with other systems in different locations showed that the system had the highest annual average daily PV module efficiency, system efficiency and performance ratio of 14.9%, 12.6% and 81.5% respectively. The PV system's annual average daily final yield of 2.4 kW h/kW p /day is higher than those reported in Germany, Poland and Northern Ireland. It is comparable to results from some parts of Spain but it is lower than the reported yields in most parts of Italy and Spain. Despite low insolation levels, high average wind speeds and low ambient temperature improve Ireland

  8. $\\pi \\pi$ phase-shift analysis from an experiment $\\pi^{-}p \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} n$ at 17.2 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Grayer, G; Dietl, H; Hyams, Bernard David; Jones, C; Koch, W; Lorenz, E; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Meissburger, J; Ochs, W; Schlein, P E; Stierlin, U; Weilhammer, P

    1972-01-01

    The pi pi phase-shifts have been determined by a Chew-Low extrapolation in the pi pi mass region from 500 to 1500 MeV using data of a spark chamber experiment on pi /sup -/p to pi /sup -/ pi /sup +/n at 17.2 GeV/c, which yielded 318000 events. The authors find an I=0 s- wave phase shift which increases slowly, passing through 90 degrees near 900 MeV, and then rises very rapidly. The old 'up' solution is eliminated on the basis of fits in the mass region from 900-1000 MeV. (13 refs).

  9. Evaluation of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator on 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Shuji; Imajo, Yoshinari; Hamada, Fumio; Miyaji, Chihiro

    1982-01-01

    The clinical effect of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator OK-432 and/or PSK was studied about 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV). In 91 cases in stage III, fifty percent survival period was found to be 11.5 months for 63 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 7.5 months for 28 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. In 81 cases in stage IV, fifty percent survival period was found to be 6.7 months for 45 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 3.3 months for 36 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. (author)

  10. Search for anomalous production of photonic events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rembser, C; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    Photonic events with large missing energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130, 136, 161 and 172 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented based on search topologies designed to select events with a single photon and missing transverse energy or events with a pair of acoplanar photons. In both search topologies, cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection. These results are compared with the expectations from the Standard Model processes e+e- -> nu nu(bar) gamma (gamma) (single-photon) and e+e- -> \

  11. Observation of the scalar meson at 1260 MeV in the reaction Π-p→Π+Π-n at 17.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, K.; Sakrejda, I.; Turnau, J.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the reaction Π - p↑→Π + Π - n at 17.2 GeV/c for |t|>0.2 GeV 2 yields relatively narrow scalar resonance well fitted by the Breit-Wigner formula. A fit to low and high |t| S-wave needs a new object which we call G (1260) with a width of (160+-10) MeV in addition to a broader Σ(1300) resonance. Unusual production properties of the former are tentatively explained in terms of a hybrid meson trajectory. An importance of the polarized target information is also discussed. (author)

  12. Neutral-Current Four-Fermion Production in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at 130 GeV $\\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq$ 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A study of neutral-current four-fermion processes is performed, using data collected by the L3 detector at LEP during high-energy runs at centre-of-mass energies 130 - 136, 161 and 170 - 172 GeV, with integrated luminosities of 4.9, 10.7 and 10.1 pb$^{-1}$, respectively. The total cross sections for the final states $ \\ell\\ell \\ell^\\prime \\ell^\\prime $ and $\\rm \\ell\\ell qq $ ($\\ell$,~$\\ell^\\prime $ = e, $\\mu$ or $\\tau$) are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction.

  13. Measurement of hadron and lepton pair production at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on measurements of $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation into hadrons and lepton pairs. The data have been taken with the L3 detector at LEP at centre--of--mass energies between 161~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$ and 172~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$. In a data sample corresponding to 21.2~pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity 2728 hadronic and 868 lepton--pair events are selected. The measured cross sections and leptonic forward--backward asymmetries agree well with the Standard Model predictions. \\end{abstract}

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $161 \\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq 172$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed with the L3 detector at LEP. The data sample was collected at three centre-of-mass energies, 161.3, 170.3 and 172.3 GeV with integrated luminosities of 10.8, 1.0 and 9.2 $pb^-1$, respectively. No Higgs signal is observed. In combination with previous data taken at the Z resonance, a lower Higgs mass limit, $M_H > 69.5$ GeV, is obtained at 95\\% confidence level.

  15. Long-lived K isomer and enhanced γ vibration in the neutron-rich nucleus 172Dy: Collectivity beyond double midshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Watanabe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The level structure of 172Dy has been investigated for the first time by means of decay spectroscopy following in-flight fission of a 238U beam. A long-lived isomeric state with T1/2=0.71(5 s and Kπ=8− has been identified at 1278 keV, which decays to the ground-state and γ-vibrational bands through hindered electromagnetic transitions, as well as to the daughter nucleus 172Ho via allowed β decays. The robust nature of the Kπ=8− isomer and the ground-state rotational band reveals an axially-symmetric structure for this nucleus. Meanwhile, the γ-vibrational levels have been identified at unusually low excitation energy compared to the neighboring well-deformed nuclei, indicating the significance of the microscopic effect on the non-axial collectivity in this doubly mid-shell region. The underlying mechanism of enhanced γ vibration is discussed in comparison with the deformed Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation based on a Skyrme energy-density functional.

  16. Orbitally-driven evolution of Lake Turkana (Turkana Depression, Kenya, EARS) between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma: A sequence stratigraphy perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu; Boës, Xavier; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2017-01-01

    Lakes act as major archives for continental paleoenvironments, particularly when the evolution of lake levels over time serves as a guide for understanding regional paleohydrology and paleoclimate. In this paper, two sections from the Nachukui Formation (Turkana Depression, East African Rift System) provide a complete record of lake level variability and then paleohydrology for Lake Turkana between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma. This period corresponds to a key time during which important human evolutionary and technological innovations have occurred in East Africa and in the Turkana area. Based on sedimentary facies and sequence analyses on coastal deposits, one long-term regressive-transgressive cycle is identified between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma. Superimposed on this trend, five higher-frequency cycles of lake level change are identified between 1.87 and 1.76 Ma. Origins of these periodicities are attributed to orbital forcings. The extents of bathymetry change and shoreline migration during these periods are explored, suggesting that the period between 1.87 and 1.76 Ma was relatively dry and that climate experienced a relatively low variability. This finding differs strongly from most of the previous paleoenvironmental investigations in the region that argue high climate variability during a relatively wet period. This work emphasizes the importance of using sequence stratigraphy for analyzing lacustrine deposits.

  17. Search for Acoplanar Lepton Pair Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161, 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 77.0 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV, 172 GeV and 183 GeV. The observed numbers of events: four at 161 GeV, nine at 172 GeV, and 78 at 183 GeV, are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is an experimental signature also for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for various new physics processes are presented. Assuming a 100% branching ratio for the decay of a right-handed charged slepton to a charged lepton and the lightest neutr...

  18. Determination of Psub(K) values to the 172, 103 and 97 keV levels and the fluorescence yield. omega. sub(K) of Eu after electron capture by /sup 153/Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K; Grewal, B S; Sahota, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1985-03-01

    From an analysis of K x-ray-..gamma..-ray sum peaks observed with an intrinsic Ge detector the K-capture probabilities (Psub(K)) to the 172, 103 and 97 keV levels in the decay of /sup 153/Gd have been determined; these yield an electron-capture energy Qsub(EC)=245 +- 2. The K-capture probability to the 172 keV level differs significantly from that found in the literature. With these results the K-shell fluorescence yield of Eu is ..omega..sub(K)=0.935 +- 0.019.

  19. Search for Unstable Heavy and Excited Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 170-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    We have searched for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons, N and L^+/-, and for excited states of neutral and charged leptons, nu*, e*, mu* and tau*, in e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 170 and 172 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. From the analysis of charged-current decays of pair-produced unstable heavy leptons, and of charged-current and photonic decays of pair-produced excited leptons, lower limits on their masses are derived. From the analysis of charged-current and photonic decays of singly-produced excited leptons, upper limits on the ratio of the coupling to the compositeness scale, f/Lambda, are determined for masses up to the kinematic limit.

  20. Search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ from 130 to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The process e+e- --> h A is used to search for the Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the bbbb and tautaubb final states. The search is performed in the data collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 172 GeV and with a total luminosity of 27.2 pb-1. No candidate events are found in either of the final states, in agreement with the expected background of 0.91 events from all Standard Model processes. Combined with searches for e+e- --> hZ, this results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the masses of both h and A of 62.5 GeV/c2, for tan(beta) > 1.

  1. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161, 170 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1 1.1pb-1 and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95%C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV

  2. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  3. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 172 GeV by ALEPH at LEP, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 27.5 pb-1, are analysed in a search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons H+-. Three analyses are employed to select the tau nu tau nu, tau nu c s and c s c s final states. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass limits are set as a function of the branching fraction BR for H+- -> tau nu. Charged Higgs bosons with masses below 52 GeV are excluded at 95% C.L. independently of BR, thus significantly improving on existing mass limits from LEP1 searches.

  4. Missing mass spectra in hadronic events from $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161-172 GeV and limits on invisible Higgs decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; Alessandro, R D; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Events characterised by large hadronic energy and transverse momentum are selected from the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 161 and 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 21 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. The visible mass and the missing mass distributions of the selected events are consistent with those expected from Standard Model processes. This result is combined with that from data taken at the Z resonance to set an upper limit on the production rate and decay into invisible final states of a non-minimal Higgs boson, as a function of the Higgs mass. Assuming the non-minimal Higgs production cross section to be the same as for the Standard Model Higgs boson and the decay branching fraction into invisible final states to be 100\\%, a Higgs mass lower limit of 69.6 GeV is derived at 95\\% confidence level.

  5. QCD Studies and Determination of $\\alpha_s$ in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the structure of hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at LEP at the center of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 21.25 pb-1 collected during the high energy runs of 1996. The distributions of event shape variables and the energy dependence of their mean values are well reproduced by QCD models. From a comparison of the data with resummed second order QCD calculations, we determine the strong coupling constant at the two energies. Combining with our earlier measurements we find that the strong coupling constant decreases with increasing energy as expected in QCD.

  6. Search for charged Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Marumi, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    The data collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 172 GeV by ALEPH at LEP, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 27.5 pb-1, are analysed in a search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons H+/-. Three analyses are employed to select the τ+νττ- ν¯τ, cs¯τ-ν¯τ and cs¯sc¯ final states. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass limits are set as a function of the branching fraction ℬ(τν) for H+/--->τν. Charged Higgs bosons with masses below 52 GeV/c2 are excluded at 95% C.L. independently of ℬ(τν), thus significantly improving on existing limits. © 1998

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)=161, 170 and 172GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The reaction e+e--->HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1, 1.1pb-1, and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV/c2. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV/c2.

  8. Search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s) from 130 to 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The process e+e--->hA is used to search for the Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the bboverlinebboverline and τ+τ-bboverline final states. The search is performed in the data collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 172 GeV and with a total luminosity of 27.2 pb-1. No candidate events are found in either of the final states, in agreement with the expected background of 0.91 events from all Standard Model processes. Combined with searches for e+e--->hZ, this results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the masses of both h and A of 62.5 GeV/c2, for tan β>1.

  9. Vortex phase diagram for extremely underdoped Bi2.2Sr1.72La0.08CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuij; Oka, Kunihiko; Mumtaz, Arif; Bando, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Vortex phase diagram for H parallel c of extremely underdoped Bi 2.2 Sr 1.72 La 0.08 CaCu 2 O 8+δ superconductor was determined from a magnetization measurement. In the magnetization curve, a second peak in the low temperature region and a sharp change in the high temperature region were observed. The second-peak field and the sharp-change field are explained based on the three-to-two dimensional crossover and the decoupling transition of the vortex lattice, respectively. For the most underdoped sample, which has the transition temperature T c =60.2 K, the anisotropy constant γ and the ab plane penetration length λ 0 have been deduced to be γ=320 and λ 0 ∼340 nm, respectively

  10. Elastic scattering of 120, 145 and 172.5 MeV α-particles by 12C, 24Mg and 27Al and optical model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiktor, S.; Mayer-Boericke, C.; Kiss, A.; Rogge, M; Turek, P.

    1980-12-01

    The 120,145 and 172.5 MeV α-particle beams from JULIC were used to measure differential cross sections for elastic scattering on 12 C, 24 Mg and 27 Al in the angular range from about 5deg to 70deg (c.m. system). The angular distributions were analysed extensively in terms of the optical model using a variety of potential forms. Apart from the parametrized forms of potential, as Wood-Saxon (WS) or rather (WS)sup(ν) also a model independent representation of potential spline potential was employed. The analysis based on the parametrized forms of the potential made it possible to find the best fit parameter sets, which were than examined on their uniqueness and energy dependence. Emphasis was given to gaining information on the radial shape of the potential. (author)

  11. Maintenance and neuronal cell differentiation of neural stem cells C17.2 correlated to medium availability sets design criteria in microfluidic systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural stem cells (NSCs play an important role in developing potential cell-based therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease. Microfluidics has proven a powerful tool in mechanistic studies of NSC differentiation. However, NSCs are prone to differentiate when the nutrients are limited, which occurs unfavorable by fast medium consumption in miniaturized culture environment. For mechanistic studies of NSCs in microfluidics, it is vital that neuronal cell differentiation is triggered by controlled factors only. Thus, we studied the correlation between available cell medium and spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation of C17.2 NSCs in standard culture medium, and proposed the necessary microfluidic design criteria to prevent undesirable cell phenotype changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A series of microchannels with specific geometric parameters were designed to provide different amount of medium to the cells over time. A medium factor (MF, defined as the volume of stem cell culture medium divided by total number of cells at seeding and number of hours between medium replacement successfully correlated the amount of medium available to each cell averaged over time to neuronal cell differentiation. MF smaller than 8.3×10(4 µm3/cell⋅hour produced significant neuronal cell differentiation marked by cell morphological change and significantly more cells with positive β-tubulin-III and MAP2 staining than the control. When MF was equal or greater than 8.3×10(4 µm3/cell⋅hour, minimal spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation happened relative to the control. MF had minimal relation with the average neurite length. SIGNIFICANCE: MFs can be controlled easily to maintain the stem cell status of C17.2 NSCs or to induce spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation in standard stem cell culture medium. This finding is useful in designing microfluidic culture platforms for controllable NSC maintenance and differentiation. This study also

  12. Alogliptin alleviates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by promoting CPT1a expression via Thr172 phosphorylation of AMPKα in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Hiroshi; Sato, Shuichi; Yazaki, Tomotaka; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ishimura, Norihisa; Ishihara, Shunnji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-05-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO) has been reported to be effective for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alogliptin (ALO) may have efficacy against NAFLD progression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study examined the effectiveness of ALO in a rodent model of NAFLD and diabetes mellitus. KK‑Ay mice were used to produce an NAFLD model via administration of a choline‑deficient (CD) diet. To examine the effects of alogliptin, KK‑Ay mice were provided with a CD diet with 0.03% ALO and/or 0.02% PIO orally for 8 weeks. Biochemical parameters, pathological alterations and hepatic mRNA levels associated with fatty acid metabolism were assessed. Severe hepatic steatosis was observed in KK‑Ay mice fed with a CD diet, which was alleviated by the administration of ALO and/or PIO. ALO administration increased the hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) mRNA expression level and enhanced the Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP‑activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) in the liver. PIO administration tended to decrease the hepatic fatty acid synthase mRNA expression level and increase the serum adiponectin level. Homeostasis model of assessment‑insulin resistance values tended to improve with ALO and PIO administration. ALO and PIO alleviated hepatic steatosis in KK‑Ay mice fed with a CD diet. ALO increased hepatic mRNA expression levels associated with fatty acid oxidation. In addition, the results of the present study suggested that ALO promotes CPT1a expression via Thr172 phosphorylation of AMPKα.

  13. Tg(Th-Cre)FI172Gsat (Th-Cre) defines neurons that are required for full hypercapnic and hypoxic reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jenny J; Ray, Russell S

    2017-08-15

    The catecholaminergic (CA) system has been implicated in many facets of breathing control and offers an important target to better comprehend the underlying etiologies of both developmental and adult respiratory pathophysiologies. Here, we used a noninvasive DREADD-based pharmacogenetic approach to acutely perturb Tg(Th-Cre)FI172Gsat ( Th-Cre )-defined neurons in awake and unrestrained mice in an attempt to characterize CA function in breathing. We report that clozapine-N-oxide (CNO)-DREADD-mediated inhibition of Th-Cre -defined neurons results in blunted ventilatory responses under respiratory challenge. Under a hypercapnic challenge (5% CO 2 /21% O 2 /74% N 2 ), perturbation of Th-Cre neurons results in reduced f R , [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] Under a hypoxic challenge (10% O 2 /90% N 2 ), we saw reduced f R , [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], in addition to instability in both interbreath interval and tidal volume, resulting in a Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern. These findings demonstrate the necessity of Th-Cre -defined neurons for the hypercapnic and hypoxic ventilatory responses and breathing stability during hypoxia. However, given the expanded non-CA expression domains of the Tg(Th-Cre)FI172Gsat mouse line found in the brainstem, full phenotypic effect cannot be assigned solely to CA neurons. Nonetheless, this work identifies a key respiratory population that may lead to further insights into the circuitry that maintains respiratory stability in the face of homeostatic challenges. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Measurement of the W-pair cross-section and of the W mass in e+ e- interactions at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abreu, P.; et al.

    From a data sample of 9.98 pb-1 integrated luminosity, collected by DELPHI at a centre-of-mass energy of 172 GeV, 118 events were selected as W-pair candidates. From these, the branching fraction Br(W ->q ) was measured to be 0.660+0.036-0.037 ( {stat.}) +/- 0.009 ( {syst.}) and the cross-section for the doubly resonant process hrm e+ e- -> W+ W- to be 11.58+1.44-1.35 ( {stat.}) +/- 0.32 ( {syst.}) pb. The mass of the W boson, obtained from direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of the fermion pairs in the decays { WW -> lν q {q}} and { WW -> q {q}q {q}}, was determined to be mW = \\: 80.22 \\: +/- \\: 0.41 ( {stat.}) \\: +/- 0.04 ( {syst.}) \\: m 0.05 ( {int.}) \\: +/- 0.03 ( {LEP})\\: {GeV}/c2, where ``int.'' denotes the uncertainty from interconnection effects like colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein interference. Combined with the W mass obtained from the cross-sections measured by DELPHI at threshold, a value of mW = \\: 80.33 \\: +/- \\: 0.30 ( {stat.}) \\: +/- 0.05 ({syst.}) \\: +/- \\: 0.03 ( {int.}) \\: +/- \\: 0.03 ( {LEP}) \\: {GeV}/c2 was found.

  15. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores facilitates the influx of extracellular calcium in platelet derived growth factor stimulated A172 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereb, G; Szöllösi, J; Mátyus, L; Balázs, M; Hyun, W C; Feuerstein, B G

    1996-05-01

    Calcium signaling in non-excitable cells is the consequence of calcium release from intracellular stores, at times followed by entry of extracellular calcium through the plasma membrane. To study whether entry of calcium depends upon the level of saturation of intracellular stores, we measured calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane of single confluent A172 glioblastoma cells stimulated with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and/or bradykinin (BK). We monitored the entry of extracellular calcium by measuring manganese quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence. PDGF raised intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after a dose-dependent delay (tdel) and then opened calcium channels after a dose-independent delay (tch). At higher doses (> 3 nM), BK increased [Ca2+]i after a tdel approximately 0 s, and tch decreased inversely with both dose and peak [Ca2+]i. Experiments with thapsigargin (TG), BK, and PDGF indicated that BK and PDGF share intracellular Ca2+ pools that are sensitive to TG. When these stores were depleted by treatment with BK and intracellular BAPTA, tdel did not change, but tch fell to almost 0 s in PDGF stimulated cells, indicating that depletion of calcium stores affects calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane. Our data support the capacitative model for calcium channel opening and the steady-state model describing quantal Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  16. Theoretical study of hyperfine interactions and optically detected magnetic resonance spectra by simulation of the C291[NV]-H172 diamond cluster hosting nitrogen-vacancy center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizovtsev, A P; Ya Kilin, S; Pushkarchuk, A L; Pushkarchuk, V A; Jelezko, F

    2014-01-01

    Single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond coupled to neighboring nuclear spins are promising candidates for room-temperature applications in quantum information processing, quantum sensing and metrology. Here we report on a systematic density functional theory simulation of hyperfine coupling of the electronic spin of the NV center to individual 13 C nuclear spins arbitrarily disposed in the H-terminated C 291 [NV] - H 172 cluster hosting the NV center. For the ‘families’ of equivalent positions of the 13 C atom in diamond lattices around the NV center we calculated hyperfine characteristics. For the first time the data are given for a system where the 13 C atom is located on the NV center symmetry axis. Electron paramagnetic resonance transitions in the coupled electron–nuclear spin system 14 NV- 13 C are analyzed as a function of the external magnetic field. Previously reported experimental data from Dréau et al (2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 134107) are described using simulated hyperfine coupling parameters. (paper)

  17. Measurement of the w boson mass and $w^{+} w^{-}$ production and decay properties in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at s**(1/2) = 172-GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of the W boson mass, M_W, and decay width, Gamma_W, from the direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of its decay products in W pair events collected at a mean centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s} = 172.12 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. Measurements of the W pair production cross-section, the W decay branching fractions and properties of the W decay final states are also described. A total of 120 candidate W^+W^- events has been selected for an integrated luminosity of 10.36 pb^-1. The W^+W^- production cross-section is measured to be sigma_WW = 12.3 +/- 1.3(stat.) +/- 0.3(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model expectation. The W^+W^- -> qq(bar) l nu and W^+W^- -> qq(bar)qq(bar) final states are used to obtain a direct measurement of Gamma_W = 1.30^{+0.62}_{-0.55}(stat.) +/- 0.18(syst.) GeV. Assuming the Standard Model relation between M_W and Gamma_W, the W boson mass is measured to be M_W = 80.32 +/- 0.30(stat.) +/- 0.09(syst.) GeV. The event properties of the...

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e^+e^- collisions collected at center-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172 GeV by the OPAL detector at LEP. The data collected at these energies correspond to integrated luminosities of 10.0, 1.0 and 9.4 pb^-1, respectively. The search is sensitive to the main final states from the process in which the Higgs boson is produced in association with a fermion anti-fermion pair, namely four jets, two jets with missing energy, and two jets produced together with a pair of electron, muon or tau leptons. One candidate event is observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation. In combination with previous OPAL searches at center-of-mass energies close to the Z^0 resonance and the revised previous OPAL searches at 161 GeV, we derive a lower limit of 69.4 GeV for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level.

  19. Tests of the Standard Model and Constraints on New Physics from Measurements of Fermion-pair Production at 130-172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Production of events with hadronic and leptonic final states has been measured in e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV, using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-sections and leptonic forward-backward asymmetries are presented, both including and excluding the dominant production of radiative Z \\gamma events, and compared to Standard Model expectations. The ratio R_b of the cross-section for bb(bar) production to the hadronic cross-section has been measured. In a model-independent fit to the Z lineshape, the data have been used to obtain an improved precision on the measurement of \\gamma-Z interference. The energy dependence of \\alpha_em has been investigated. The measurements have also been used to obtain limits on extensions of the Standard Model described by effective four-fermion contact interactions, to search for t-channel contributions from new massive particles and to place limits on chargino pair production with subsequent decay of the chargino into a light gluino and a quark pair.

  20. Measurement of W-pair cross sections in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV and W decay branching fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on the measurement of W-boson pair-production with the L3 detector at LEP at an average centre-of-mass energy of 172.13~GeV. In a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 10.25~pb$^{-1}$ we select 110 four-fermion events with pairs of hadronic jets or leptons with high invariant masses. Branching fractions of W decays into different fermion-antifermion pairs are determined with and without the assumption of charged-current lepton universality. The branching fraction for hadronic W decays is measured to be: $ B(\\mathrm{W\\rightarrow hadrons}) = 64.2^{+3.7}_{-3.8}~(stat.) \\pm 0.5~(syst.)~\\%$. Combining all final states the total cross section for W-pair production is measured to be: $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{WW}} = 12.27^{+1.41}_{-1.32}~(stat.)\\pm0.23~(syst.)$~pb. The results are in good agreement with the Standard Model.

  1. Search for heavy neutral and charged leptons in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable neutral leptons of Dirac (Majorana) type for masses below 78.0 (66.7), 78.0 (66.7) and 72.2 (58.2) GeV, if the heavy neutrino couples to the electron, muon or tau family, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 81.0 GeV for a wide mass range of the associated neutral heavy lepton. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with a mass less than 84.2 GeV is also excluded. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays via mixing into a massless neutrino, we exclude masses below 78.7 GeV.

  2. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  3. Search for Stable Heavy Charged Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A search for stable or long-lived heavy charged particles in $e^+e^-$ interactions at energies of 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV has been performed using the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The search is based on particle identification provided by the Time Projection Chamber and the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Upper limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived on the cross-section for heavy long-lived pair-produced charge $\\pm e$ and $\\pm 2/3e$ particles in the range of 0.4-2.3 pb for masses from 45 to 84 GeV/$c^2$. Within supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, long-lived charginos with masses from 45 to 84 (80)~GeV/$c^2$ for high (low) sneutrino masses can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level. %Mass limits for long-lived sleptons are obtained. %For selectrons no general mass limits can be given. Left-handed (right-handed) long-lived or stable smuons and staus with masses between 45 and 68 (65)~GeV/$c^2$ can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level.

  4. Efeito do Hólmio YAG laser (Ho: YAG sobre o tendão patelar de ratos após 12 e 24 semanas de seguimento The effects of Holmium YAG laser (Ho:YAG on the patellar tendon of rats after 12 and 24 weeks of follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Lino Júnior

    2005-01-01

    , com neoformação vascular evidente. No grupo de 24 semanas as fibras de colágeno se apresentavam com disposição regular e paralela ao longo eixo do tendão.The authors have studied the effects of the Holmium: Yttrium Aluminum Grenade (Ho:YAG laser on tendon sizes (proximal and distal length and width and on the cellularity and arrangement of collagen fibers in 20 Wistar variety, male, white, adult rats (Rattus Novergicus. The animals have been divided in two groups, according to the follow-up time (12 and 24 weeks and pursuant to the for form of laser application (continuous or two-point. A Holmium laser (pulsed, solid state, 2.1 micron waves, 40 watts, OmniTip 30º tip apparatus was used. After the animals were sacrificed, the proximal and distal length and width of the operated size of such rats were compared to those of the non-operated size be means of non-parametric testing (considering p=0,05. The length in the operated size was significantly bigger for both follow-up groups, when compared to the length of the non-operated size, however there was no significant difference in such measures in function of the type of laser application. In the same manner, the width, both in the proximal and distal regions, was significantly bigger in the operated size in both follow-up groups, without showing any significant difference whatsoever in function of the type of application. When the measures in both follow-up groups were compared, distal length and width showed a trend to become bigger after 24 weeks, while width in the proximal region was significantly bigger in this group. As for the subjective microscopic evaluation, both in longitudinal and cross sections, it was possible to observe and increase in the number of fibroblasts, mainly in the 12-week group. The average fibroblast concentration in the tendon with 24-week follow-up was group deemed to be intermediate between the 12-week group and non-operated tendon. The conjunctive tissue was exuberant in the region

  5. Evolution of E 2 transition strength in deformed hafnium isotopes from new measurements on 172Hf,174Hf, and 176Hf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudigier, M.; Nomura, K.; Dannhoff, M.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Saed-Samii, N.; Stegemann, S.; Régis, J.-M.; Robledo, L. M.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, Ch.; Warr, N.; Zell, K. O.

    2015-04-01

    Background: The available data for E 2 transition strengths in the region between neutron-deficient hafnium and platinum isotopes are far from complete. More and precise data are needed to enhance the picture of structure evolution in this region and to test state-of-the-art nuclear models. In a simple model, the maximum collectivity is expected at the middle of the major shell. However, for actual nuclei, particularly in heavy-mass regions, which should be highly complex, this picture may no longer be the case, and one should use a more realistic nuclear-structure model. We address this point by studying the spectroscopy of Hf as a representative case. Purpose: We remeasure the 21+ half-lives of 172,174,176Hf, for which there is some disagreement in the literature. The main goal is to measure, for the first time, the half-lives of higher-lying states of the rotational band. The new results are compared to a theoretical calculation for absolute transition strengths. Method: The half-lives were measured using γ -γ and conversion-electron-γ delayed coincidences with the fast timing method. For the determination of half-lives in the picosecond region, the generalized centroid difference method was applied. For the theoretical calculation of the spectroscopic properties, the interacting boson model is employed, whose Hamiltonian is determined based on microscopic energy-density functional calculations. Results: The measured 21+ half-lives disagree with results from earlier γ -γ fast timing measurements, but are in agreement with data from Coulomb excitation experiments and other methods. Half-lives of the 41+ and 61+ states were measured, as well as a lower limit for the 81+ states. Conclusions: This work shows the importance of a mass-dependent effective boson charge in the interacting boson model for the description of E 2 transition rates in chains of nuclei. It encourages further studies of the microscopic origin of this mass dependence. New experimental

  6. Magnetic structures of holmium-lutetium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swaddling, P.P.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.

    1996-01-01

    Alloys and superlattices of Ho and Lu have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their magnetic structures determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The 4f moments in the alloys form a helix at all compositions with the moments aligned in the basal plane perpendicular to the wave vector...... of the helix remaining coherent through the nonmagnetic Lu blocks. The neutron scattering from the superlattices is consistent with a model in which there are different phase advances of the helix turn angle through the Ho and Lu blocks, but with a localized moment on the Ho sites only. A comparison...... of Ho and Lu. At low temperatures, for superlattices with fewer than approximately twenty atomic planes of Ho, the Ho moments within a block undergo a phase transition from helical to ferromagnetic order, with the coupling between successive blocks dependent on the thickness of the Lu spacer....

  7. The systems terbium (holmium) nitrate-piperidine nitrate-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khisaeva, D.A.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Semenova, Eh.B.

    1982-01-01

    Using the method of cross sections at 25 and 50 deg C solubility in the systems Tb(NO 3 ) 2 -C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 -H 2 O and Ho(NO 3 ) 3 -C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 -H 2 O has been studied. The systems are characterized by chemical interaction of components. Solubility isotherms have crystallization fields of solid phases of the composition Tb(NO 3 ) 3 x3[C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 ]x3H 2 O and Ho(NO 3 ) 3 x2[C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 ]. The compounds detected are singled out preparatively, their IR spectra are studied, their thermogravimetric analysis is carried out. Investigation results are compared with similar systems formed by nitrates of other representatives of rare earth group

  8. Automated production of no carrier added holmium-166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.; Dadchova, E.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An automated system has been developed to produce no carrier added 166 Ho from the decay of 166 Dy produced by neutron activation of 164 Dy 2 O 3 . Targets consisting of 5-10 mg of 164 Dy 2 O 3 are irradiated in HIFAR at 5 x 10 13 n.s -1 .cm -2 for 12h then allowed to cool for 2 days. The irradiation can is then transferred to the automated system located in a 'hot' cell in the radiopharmaceutical research building. A two dimension robotic arm encompassing a grab and motorized screwdriver is used to open the irradiation can. A second arm carrying a teflon tube introduces 9M HCI into the can to dissolve the target. A second tube carries the dissolved target via a peristaltic pump to a heated vial where it is evaporated to dryness under a flow of N 2 . A Peltier cooled trap is used to prevent release of HCl fumes into the cell. A motorized syringe pump dispenses 1 mL of 0.1 M HNO 3 to redissolve the digest which is then transferred by peristaltic pump via a hollow fibre filter and auto injector into an Aminex- A5 HPLC column. 166 Dy is eluted from the column in 0.132 M α-HIBA into a heated cyclone flask and evaporated to dryness under a stream of N 2 heated to about 50 deg C. After two days the evaporated Dy/ 166 Ho digest is dissolved in another 1 mL of 0.1 M HNO 3 and injected onto the HPLC column. 166 Ho is collected in 20-25 mL of α-HIBA and evaporated to dryness as before at about 400 C to ensure complete decomposition of the α-HIBA. The product is finally dissolved in about I mL of 0.1 M HCI and pumped through a 0.22 μM filter to a product vial

  9. Magnetic character of holmium atom adsorbed on platinum surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shick, Alexander; Shapiro, D.S.; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, A.I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 2751. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-05872J Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015042 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : rare-earth adatoms * density-functional theory * single-atom magnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  10. Experience with endoscopic holmium laser in the pediatric population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merguerian, Paul A.; Reddy, Pramod P.; Barrieras, Diego; Bagli, Darius J.; McLorie, Gordon A.; Khoury, Antoine E.

    1999-06-01

    Introduction: Due to the unavailability of suitable endoscopic instruments, pediatric patients have not benefited fully from the technological advances in the endoscopic management of the upper urinary tract. This limitation may be overcome with the Holmuim:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet(Ho:YAG) laser delivered via small instruments. To date, there is no published report on the use of this modality in children. Purpose: We evaluated the indications, efficacy, and complications of endourological Ho:YAG laser surgery in the treatment of pediatric urolithiasis, posterior urethral valves, ureterocele and ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Methods: The patient population included 10 children with renal, ureteral and bladder calculi, 2 children with posterior urethral valves, 2 children with obstructing ureteroceles, 2 children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction and 1 child with a urethral stricture. Access to the lesions was either antegrade via a percutaneous nephrostomy tract or retrograde via the urethra. A solid state Ho:YAG laser with maximum output of 30 watts (New Star lasers, Auburn, CA) was utilized as the energy source. Results: A total of 10 patients underwent laser lithotripsy. The means age of the patients was 9 yrs (5-13 yrs). The average surface area of the calculi as 425.2 mm2 (92-1645 mm2). 8 of the patients required one procedure to render them stone free, one patient had a staghorn calculus filling every calyx of a solitary kidney requiring multiple treatments and one other patient with a staghorn calculus required 2 treatments. There were no complications related to the laser lithotripsy. Two newborn underwent successful ablation of po sterious urethral valves. Two infants underwent incision of obstructing ureteroceles with decompression of the ureterocele on postoperative ultrasound. Two children underwent endypyelotomy for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. One was successful an done required an open procedure to correct the obstruction. One child underwent successful direct visual urethrotomy for a urethral sticture. Conclusions: The Ho:YAGs ability to pulverize urinary calculi make it an obvious choice for lithotripsy in children. The advantages of this technology are the ability to precisely apply the laser using small fibers, and the laser's ability to pulverize calculi with minimal trauma to surrounding tissue. The Ho-YAG laser is also superior to other modalities in the treatment of secondary ureteropelvic junction obstruction. We do not feel the Ho:YAG laser is superior to the curren treatment methods for the treatment of posterior urethral valves and obstructed ureteroceles.

  11. Self-swept holmium fiber laser near 2100 nm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Jan; Peterka, Pavel; Koška, Pavel; Podrazký, Ondřej; Todorov, Filip; Honzátko, Pavel; Kašík, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 4120-4125 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13306S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fiber lasers * Fourier transform infrared spectrometer * Laser wavelength Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics ) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  12. Coherent magnetic structures in terbium/holmium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    to 230 K, two samples retain this magnetic structure while the third undergoes a transition first to a mixed phase of helically and ferromagnetically ordered Tb moments, then to a phase with only helically ordered To moments. Ln all cases, the magnetic ordering is found to be long ranged, with coherence...

  13. MicroRNA profiling of tomato leaf curl new delhi virus (tolcndv infected tomato leaves indicates that deregulation of mir159/319 and mir172 might be linked with leaf curl disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Qazi MR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV, a constituent of the genus Begomovirus, infects tomato and other plants with a hallmark disease symptom of upward leaf curling. Since microRNAs (miRs are known to control plants developmental processes, we evaluated the roles of miRNAs in Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV induced leaf curling. Results Microarray analyses of miRNAs, isolated from the leaves of both healthy and ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv Pusa Ruby, revealed that ToLCNDV infection significantly deregulated various miRNAs representing ~13 different conserved families (e.g., miR319, miR172, etc.. The precursors of these miRNAs showed similar deregulated patterns, indicating that the transcription regulation of respective miRNA genes was perhaps the cause of deregulation. The expression levels of the miRNA-targeted genes were antagonistic with respect to the amount of corresponding miRNA. Such deregulation was tissue-specific in nature as no analogous misexpression was found in flowers. The accumulation of miR159/319 and miR172 was observed to increase with the days post inoculation (dpi of ToLCNDV agroinfection in tomato cv Pusa Ruby. Similarly, these miRs were also induced in ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv JK Asha and chilli plants, both exhibiting leaf curl symptoms. Our results indicate that miR159/319 and miR172 might be associated with leaf curl symptoms. This report raises the possibility of using miRNA(s as potential signature molecules for ToLCNDV infection. Conclusions The expression of several host miRNAs is affected in response to viral infection. The levels of the corresponding pre-miRs and the predicted targets were also deregulated. This change in miRNA expression levels was specific to leaf tissues and observed to be associated with disease progression. Thus, certain host miRs are likely indicator of viral infection and could be potentially employed to develop viral resistance strategies.

  14. The Extracellular Environment's Effect on Cellular Processes: An In Vitro Study of Mechanical and Chemical Cues on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and C17.2 Neural Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Meghan E.

    Stem cells are widely used in the area of tissue engineering. The ability of cells to interact with materials on the nano- and micro- level is important in the success of the biomaterial. It is well-known that cells respond to their micro- and nano-environments through a process termed chemo-mechanotransduction. It is important to establish standard protocols for cellular experiments, as chemical modifications to maintenance environments can alter long-term research results. In this work, the effects of different media compositions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) throughout normal in vitro maintenance are investigated. Changes in RNA regulation, protein expression and proliferation are studied via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), immunocytochemistry (ICC) and cell counts, respectively. Morphological differences are also observed throughout the experiment. Results of this study illustrate the dynamic response of hMSC maintenance to differences in growth medium and passage number. These experiments highlight the effect growth medium has on in vitro experiments and the need of consistent protocols in hMSC research. A substantial opportunity exists in neuronal research to develop a material platform that allows for both the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells into neurons and the ability to quantify the secretome of neuronal cells. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are fabricated in a two-step anodization procedure where voltage is varied to control the pore size and morphology of the membranes. C17.2 neural stem cells are differentiated on the membranes via serum-withdrawal. Cellular growth is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ICC and qPCR. ImageJ software is used to obtain phenotypic cell counts and neurite outgrowth lengths. Results indicate a highly tunable correlation between AAO nanopore sizes and differentiated cell populations. By selecting AAO membranes with specific pore size ranges, control of neuronal

  15. Search for Supersymmetry with a dominant R-Parity violating $LQ\\overline{D}$ Coupling in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Perrodo, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, A.N.; Williams, M.I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Chambers, J.T.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A.; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    A search for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a dominant LQDbar coupling has been performed using the data collected by ALEPH at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This result is translated into lower limits on the masses of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, sneutrinos and squarks. For instance, for m_0=500 GeV/c^2 and tan(beta)=sqrt(2) charginos with masses smaller than 81 GeV/c^2 and neutralinos with masses smaller than 29 GeV/c^2 are excluded at the 95% confidence level for any generation structure of the LQDbar coupling.

  16. Search for supersymmetry with a dominant R-parity violating $LL\\overline{E}$ coupling in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miguel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Leahraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buek, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Coles, J.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    A search for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a dominant LLE coupling has been performed using the data collected by ALEPH at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This is translated into lower limits on the mass of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, sneutrinos and squarks. For instance, charginos with masses less than 73 GeV and neutralinos with masses less than 23 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for any generation structure of the LLE coupling, and for neutralino, slepton or sneutrino LSPs.

  17. Low-dose/dose-rate γ radiation depresses neural differentiation and alters protein expression profiles in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and C17.2 neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Lindegren, Heléne; Johansson, Lotta; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Forsby, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on cellular development in the nervous system are presently unclear. The focus of the present study was to examine low-dose γ-radiation-induced effects on the differentiation of neuronal cells and on the development of neural stem cells to glial cells. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to (137)Cs γ rays at different stages of retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation, and neurite formation was determined 6 days after exposure. When SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to low-dose-rate γ rays at the onset of differentiation, the number of neurites formed per cell was significantly less after exposure to either 10, 30 or 100 mGy compared to control cells. Exposure to 10 and 30 mGy attenuated differentiation of immature C17.2 mouse-derived neural stem cells to glial cells, as verified by the diminished expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Proteomic analysis of the neuroblastoma cells by 2D-PAGE after 30 mGy irradiation showed that proteins involved in neuronal development were downregulated. Proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation were altered in both cell lines after exposure to 30 mGy; however, the rate of cell proliferation was not affected in the low-dose range. The radiation-induced attenuation of differentiation and the persistent changes in protein expression is indicative of an epigenetic rather than a cytotoxic mechanism.

  18. Cloning, expression and characterisation of P450-Hal1 (CYP116B62) from Halomonas sp. NCIMB 172: A self-sufficient P450 with high expression and diverse substrate scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joanne L; Sabatini, Selina; Manning, Jack; Tavanti, Michele; Galman, James L; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2018-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are able to catalyse a range of synthetically challenging reactions ranging from hydroxylation and demethylation to sulfoxidation and epoxidation. As such they have great potential for biocatalytic applications but are underutilised due to often-poor expression, stability and solubility in recombinant bacterial hosts. The use of self-sufficient P450 s with fused haem and reductase domains has already contributed heavily to improving catalytic efficiency and simplifying an otherwise more complex multi-component system of P450 and redox partners. Herein, we present a new addition to the class VII family with the cloning, sequencing and characterisation of the self-sufficient CYP116B62 Hal1 from Halomonas sp. NCIMB 172, the genome of which has not yet been sequenced. Hal1 exhibits high levels of expression in a recombinant E. coli host and can be utilised from cell lysate or used in purified form. Hal1 favours NADPH as electron donor and displays a diverse range of activities including hydroxylation, demethylation and sulfoxidation. These properties make Hal1 suitable for future biocatalytic applications or as a template for optimisation through engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 21 CFR 172.250 - Petroleum naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... naphtha is used or intended for use as a solvent in protective coatings on fresh citrus fruit in... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings...-oxidation, the entire procedure is to be carried out under subdued light. apparatus Separatory funnels. 250...

  20. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... petroleum gas (LPG) that is unodorized as authorized in § 173.315(b)(1) unless it is legibly marked NON... the portable tank are not visible. (d) NON-ODORIZED marking on portable tanks containing LPG. After...

  1. Search Results | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Public Report on Basic Education (1996), a study that is widely known as the ... Community Based Governance of Wetlands in the Sand River Catchment Area ... province in Indonesia and the eastern and southern coasts of Sri Lanka.

  2. 49 CFR 172.102 - Special provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... may be made from polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) or other polymeric material. 33Ammonium... hazard criteria level may be transported in Large Packagings. 43The membrane filters, including paper..., subsection 33.2.1 (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter), nitrocellulose membrane filters in the form in which...

  3. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center...

  4. 21 CFR 172.140 - Ethoxyquin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used as an antioxidant for preservation of color in the production of chili powder, paprika, and ground... or on the uncooked fat of meat from animals except poultry. 3 parts per million in or on the uncooked liver and fat of poultry. 0.5 part per million in or on the uncooked muscle meat of animals. 0.5 part...

  5. 21 CFR 172.809 - Curdlan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) produced by pure culture fermentation from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Alcaligenes... Curdlan,” by Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., 12-10 Nihonbashi, 2-Chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 103, Japan, 1996...

  6. 23 CFR 172.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrative Services Act of 1949 (Public Law 92-582, 86 Stat. 1278 (1972)); (2) Equivalent State... law prior to the enactment of Public Law 105-178 (TEA-21) on June 9, 1998. Consultant means the... project subject to 23 U.S.C. 112(a). One-year applicable accounting period means the annual accounting...

  7. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... crystallization accelerator in cocoa products, in imitation chocolate, and in compound coatings Not to exceed 1... product that complies with the limitations prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section. [53 FR 21632, June...

  8. Vegetation - San Felipe Valley [ds172

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This Vegetation Map of the San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area in San Diego County, California is based on vegetation samples collected in the field in 2002 and 2005 and...

  9. 25 CFR 172.1 - Acreage designated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operation and maintenance and betterment assessments by the United States to the District, and section 24 of... as follows: Lands with recognized water rights not subject to operation and maintenance or betterment...

  10. 21 CFR 172.610 - Arabinogalactan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums... water from Western larch wood, having galactose units and arabinose units in the approximate ratio of...

  11. 21 CFR 172.535 - Disodium inosinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... of water of crystallization. (b) The food additive is used as a flavoring adjuvant in food. ...

  12. 40 CFR 172.4 - Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... rates, and situation of application on or in which the pesticide is to be used; the States in which the... will be accomplished; (iv) The name, street address, telephone number, and qualifications of all... change participants; (v) The name and street address of all cooperators, if available at the time an...

  13. 49 CFR 172.204 - Shipper's certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the certification the words “herein-named” may be substituted for the words “above-named”. (2) “I... respects in proper condition for transport according to applicable international and national governmental... national governmental regulations. Note to paragraph (c)(1): In the certification, the word “packed” may be...

  14. 172-IJBCS-Article-Dr Wellington Oyibo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    Trypanosomal genetic polymorphisms, Immune response polymorphisms. INTRODUCTION ... causes the West African sleeping sickness. The parasites invade the ..... of cell activation. Highly purified trypanosome DNA have been shown.

  15. 46 CFR 172.245 - Survival conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... seals to cargo hopper gates; or (ii) Guillotine doors in bulkheads in way of the conveyor belt. ... inches (50 mm) when the vessel is in the equilibrium position. (e) Progressive flooding. In the design...

  16. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is a high... and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call... container shall bear, in addition to other information required by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act...

  17. 21 CFR 172.886 - Petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register... it is very hygroscopic and will react with some metal containers in the presence of air. Phosphoric... high enough to keep the wax melted. (Note: In preheating the sulfoxide-acid mixture, remove the stopper...

  18. 28 CFR 17.2 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... entrusted with classified national security information originated within or in the custody of the Department. This part does not affect the operation of the Department's participation in the National... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED...

  19. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of meat and meat products (including poultry and wild game), with directions for use which limit the amount of sodium nitrite to not more than 200 parts per million in the finished meat product, and the amount of...

  20. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... finished product. (2) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of meat and meat products (including poultry and wild game), with directions... finished meat product and the amount of sodium nitrite to not more than 200 parts per million in the...

  1. 21 CFR 172.110 - BHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... shreds 50 Active dry yeast 1 1,000 Beverages and desserts prepared from dry mixes 1 2 Dry breakfast cereals 50 Dry diced glazed fruit 1 32 Dry mixes for beverages and desserts 1 90 Emulsion stabilizers for... beverages and desserts shall bear adequate directions for use to provide that beverages and desserts...

  2. 40 CFR 82.172 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... behavioral disorders; dermatoxicity; pharmacological effects; mammalian absorption, distribution, metabolism..., critical life stage tests, behavioral tests, algal growth tests, seed germination tests, microbial function..., whether existing or new, intended for use as a replacement for a class I or II compound. Test marketing...

  3. 23 CFR 172.7 - Audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with the requirements of the cost principles contained in 48 CFR part 31. Other procedures may be used... audit for the cost principles contained in 48 CFR part 31 for the consultant, if such rates are not... administrative or de facto ceilings. The consultant's indirect cost rates for its one-year applicable accounting...

  4. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Record the sample as “negative” for xanthan gum if no gel forms or if a soft or brittle gel forms both... more than 1.5 percent of pyruvic acid and “negative” for xanthan gum if the sample contains less than 1... preclude such use. (f) To assure safe use of the additive: (1) The label of its container shall bear, in...

  5. 32 CFR 172.5 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., the installation finance and accounting officer or the activity providing accounting support shall... required information. (2) The Military Department's finance and accounting office receiving the sales... TFO cycle. (3) The Military Department's finance and accounting office shall: (i) Report weekly...

  6. 49 CFR 172.407 - Label specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Design. (1) Except for size and color, the printing, inner border, and symbol on each label must be as... withstand, without deterioration or a substantial change in color, a 30-day exposure to conditions incident... shown in the appropriate section of this subpart. (d) Color. (1) The background color on each label must...

  7. 21 CFR 172.836 - Polysorbate 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... monostearate, in the minimum quantity required to accomplish the intended effect, in formulations of white... exceed 0.5 percent on a dry-weight basis. (14) As an emulsifier in chocolate flavored syrups, whereby the...

  8. 49 CFR 172.704 - Training requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... recurrent training after March 25, 2003, and in no case later than March 24, 2006, each hazmat employee must... by each employee in the event of a security breach. (b) OSHA, EPA, and other training. Training...

  9. Publications | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Rapid change in wetland cover has been hastened by increasing annual population ... during the establishment and management of four participatory plant nurseries. ... Huge postharvest (PH) losses are a threat to food security, incomes and ...

  10. 21 CFR 172.806 - Azodicarbonamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... an aging and bleaching ingredient in cereal flour in an amount not to exceed 2.05 grams per 100...

  11. 21 CFR 172.115 - BHT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food... BHA and BHT) parts per million Dehydrated potato shreds 50 Dry breakfast cereals 50 Emulsion...

  12. 21 CFR 172.133 - Dimethyl dicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... treatment, filtration, or other technologies prior to the use of dimethyl dicarbonate: (1) In wine, dealcoholized wine, and low alcohol wine in an amount not to exceed 200 parts per million. (2) In ready-to-drink...

  13. Sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis in LSL-KrasG12D-LSL-Trp53R172H-Pdx-1-Cre mice via suppressing aldo-keto reductase family 1B10 (AKR1B10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haonan; Yang, Allison L; Chung, Yeon Tae; Zhang, Wanying; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2013-09-01

    Sulindac has been identified as a competitive inhibitor of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10), an enzyme that plays a key role in carcinogenesis. AKR1B10 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and exhibits lipid substrate specificity, especially for farnesyl and geranylgeranyl. There have been no studies though showing that the inhibition of PDAC by sulindac is via inhibition of AKR1B10, particularly the metabolism of farnesyl/geranylgeranyl and Kras protein prenylation. To determine the chemopreventive effects of sulindac on pancreatic carcinogenesis, 5-week-old LSL-Kras(G12D)-LSL-Trp53(R172H)-Pdx-1-Cre mice (Pan(kras/p53) mice) were fed an AIN93M diet with or without 200 p.p.m. sulindac (n = 20/group). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that average animal survival in Pan(kras/p53) mice was 143.7 ± 8.8 days, and average survival with sulindac was increased to 168.0 ± 8.8 days (P < 0.005). Histopathological analyses revealed that 90% of mice developed PDAC, 10% with metastasis to the liver and lymph nodes. With sulindac, the incidence of PDAC was reduced to 56% (P < 0.01) and only one mouse had lymph node metastasis. Immunochemical analysis showed that sulindac significantly decreased Ki-67-labeled cell proliferation and markedly reduced the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Raf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2. In in vitro experiments with PDAC cells from Pan(kras/p53) mice, sulindac exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of AKR1B10 activity. By silencing AKR1B10 expression through small interfering RNA or by sulindac treatment, these in vitro models showed a reduction in Kras and human DNA-J homolog 2 protein prenylation, and downregulation of phosphorylated C-raf, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 expression. Our results demonstrate that sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis by the inhibition of Kras protein prenylation by targeting AKR1B10.

  14. A mathematical model for the study of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. I. Lipid accumulation during growth of Mucor circinelloides CBS 172-27 on a vegetable oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggelis, G.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available    The accumulation of lipids In microorganisms cultivated In growth media having as sole carbon and energy source vegetable or animal fat has been an object of research and industrial interest for many years. Interestingly, the accumulated fat often has a composition and structure much different from that of the fat present In the substrate.
       The present work describes a mathematical approach to the accumulation of fat by oleaginous microorganisms growing on medium containing vegetable oil as carbon source. A mathematical model, correlating the accumulation of reserve fat with the growth of microbial population and the available quantity of exocellular fat, is proposed. This model is verified by experimental data taken by cultivation of Mucor circinelloides CBS 172-27 on sunflower oil.
       The proposed model is described by the equation: XL = XLo + Lo(1-e-k2.t– (lnx-lnxo/k1    where XL(mg/l the concentration of reserve lipids at time t(h, XLo(mg/l the concentration of lipid reserves at time t=o, Lo(mg/l the initial concentration of exocellular fat (a t=o, X(mg/l the concentration of fat-free biomass at a given time t and Xo the concentration of fat-free biomass at time t=o; k1 and k2 constants.

       Durante muchos años la acumulación de lípidos en microorganismos desarrollados en medio de cultivo, tomando como única fuente de carbono y energía grasas vegetales o animales, ha sido objeto de investigación e Interés industrial.    Interesadamente, la grasa acumulada tiene a menudo una composición y estructura muy diferente de la que tiene la grasa presente en el sustrato.    El presente trabajo describe una aproximación matemática a la acumulaci

  15. Retracted: Addition of a single methyl group to a small molecule sodium channel inhibitor introduces a new mode of gating modulation, by L Wang, SG Zellmer, DM Printzenhoff and NA Castle. British Journal of Pharmacology, volume 172(20): 4905-4918, published in October 2015; DOI 10.1111/bph.13259.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-07-01

    The above article, published by the British Journal of Pharmacology in October 2015 (https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bph.13259), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief and John Wiley & Sons Limited. The retraction has been agreed owing to the discovery of errors in the chemical structure of the synthetic compounds generated. The corrected structure is now available in the article PF-06526290 can both enhance and inhibit conduction through voltage gated sodium channels by L Wang, SG Zellmer, DM Printzenhoff and NA Castle, 2018, https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bph.14338. Reference Wang L, Zellmer SG, Printzenhoff DM, Castle NA (2015). Addition of a single methyl group to a small molecule sodium channel inhibitor introduces a new mode of gating modulation. Br J Pharmacol 172: 4905-4918. https://doi.org/10.1111/bph.13259. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. 5.7  W cw single-frequency laser at 671  nm by single-pass second harmonic generation of a 17.2  W injection-locked 1342  nm Nd : YVO4 ring laser using periodically poled MgO : LiNbO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Peter; Ruebel, Felix; Bartschke, Juergen; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate a continuous wave single-frequency laser at 671.1 nm based on a high-power 888 nm pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser at 1342.2 nm. Unidirectional operation of the fundamental ring laser is achieved with the injection-locking technique. A Nd:YVO4 microchip laser serves as the injecting seed source, providing a tunable single-frequency power of up to 40 mW. The ring laser emits a single-frequency power of 17.2 W with a Gaussian beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2lasers. This work opens possibilities in cold atoms experiments with lithium, allowing the use of larger ensembles in magneto-optical traps or higher diffraction orders in atomic beam interferometers.

  17. Magnetic structures in ultra-thin Holmium films: Influence of external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, L.J. [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59600-900, RN (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoró 59625-620, RN (Brazil); Mello, V.D. [Departamento de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoró 59625-620, RN (Brazil); Anselmo, D.H.A.L. [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59600-900, RN (Brazil); Vasconcelos, M.S., E-mail: mvasconcelos@ect.ufrn.br [Escola de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    We address the magnetic phases in very thin Ho films at the temperature interval between 20 K and 132 K. We show that slab size, surface effects and magnetic field due to spin ordering impact significantly the magnetic phase diagram. Also we report that there is a relevant reduction of the external field strength required to saturate the magnetization and for ultra-thin films the helical state does not form. We explore the specific heat and the susceptibility as auxiliary tools to discuss the nature of the phase transitions, when in the presence of an external magnetic field and temperature effects. The presence of an external field gives rise to the magnetic phase Fan and the spin-slip structures. - Highlights: • We analyze the magnetic phases of very thin Ho films in the temperature interval 20–132 K. • We show that slab size, etc. due to spin ordering may impact the magnetic phase diagram. • All magnetic phase transitions, for strong magnetic fields, are marked by the specific heat. • The presence of an external field gives rise to the magnetic phase Fan and the spin-slip one.

  18. Holmium-166m: multi-gamma standard to determine the activity of radionuclides in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, Estela Maria de Oliveira

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency and calibration curves as function of gamma-ray energy for a germanium detector are usually established by using many standard gamma ray sources of radionuclides decaying with few gamma rays or radionuclides having complex decay scheme, as 152 Eu or 133 Ba. But these radionuclides cannot be used alone, because they have a few gamma lines with high intensity and these lines have a irregular distribution in the energy spectrum. 166m Ho is found to be a convenient single source for such calibration, because it decays by β - with subsequent emission of about 40 strong and well distributed gamma lines between 80 and 1500 keV. Moreover, its long half - life (1200 years) and X-rays characteristics between 40 and 50 keV makes it a good standard for calibration of germanium detectors. However, it is necessary to know with accuracy and precision the gamma ray intensities of their main lines, due to the fact that literature has showed discrepant values. Then, a methodology to determine the emission probability of its main lines is proposed by means of combined use of gamma spectrometry and coincidence 4πβ -γ techniques. The experimental results show consistence to the others authors, with lower or compatible uncertainties. (author)

  19. White line structure in the x-ray Lsub(III) absorption edge of holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, B.K.; Agarwal, B.R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The white line at the Ho Lsub(III) absorption edge has been recorded in Ho metal, Ho 2 O 3 and HoCl 3 . The white line structure in Ho 2 O 3 has been analysed by regarding it as due to the transition into bound states of the Lsub(III) excited ion. The extended fine structure has been used to obtain information on the bond lengths in the compounds. (author)

  20. Photoluminescence studies on holmium (III) and praseodymium (III) doped calcium borophosphate (CBP) phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Prasad, V.; Damodaraiah, S.; Devara, S. N.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2018-05-01

    Using solid state reaction method, Ho3+ and Pr3+ doped calcium borophosphate (CBP) phosphors were prepared. These phosphors were characterized using XRD, SEM, FT-IR, 31P solid state NMR, photoluminescence (PL) and decay profiles. Structural details were discussed from XRD and FT-IR spectra. From 31P NMR spectra of these phosphors, mono-phosphate complexes Q0-(PO43-) were observed. Photoluminescence spectra were measured for both Ho3+ and Pr3+ doped calcium borophosphate phosphors and the spectra were studied for different concentrations. Decay curves were obtained for the excited level, 5F4+5S2 of Ho3+ and 1D2 level of Pr3+ in these calcium borophosphate phosphors and lifetimes were measured. CIE color chromaticity diagrams are drawn for these two rare earth ions in calcium borophosphate phosphors. Results show that Ho3+ and Pr3+ doped CBP phosphors might be served as green and red luminescence materials.

  1. Radiosynoviorthesis of Knees by Means of 166Ho-Holmium-Boro-Macroaggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraft, O.; Kašpárek, R.; Ullmann, V.; Melichar, František; Kropáček, Martin; Mirzajevová, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2007), s. 296-302 ISSN 1084-9785 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS100480501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiosynoviorthesis * radionuclide synovectomy * 166Ho Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2007

  2. Synthesis and optical property of holmium doped Lithium lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, V. L.; Eraiah, B.

    2017-05-01

    The new glass system 60B2O3-30PbO-(10-x)Li2O-xHo2O3 (where x =0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 mol%) were prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The XRD spectrum confirms the amorphous nature of the sample. The density of these glasses is measured by using Archimedes principle, the values range from 4.23 g/cm-3 to 4.34 g/cm-3 and the corresponding molar volumes are calculated. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses in the wavelength range of 200nm to 1100nm. The measured optical direct band gap energies were in the range of 3.072eV to 3.259eV and the optical indirect band gap energies in the range of 2.658eV to 2.846eV. The refractive indices of these glasses were measured by using Abbe refractometer and the corresponding polarizabilities of oxide ions are calculated by using Lorentz-Lorentz relations.

  3. Spectrophotometric study of holmium complexation in KOH solutions at 25 Deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanchikova, S.A.; Bitejkina, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    Complexation of Ho 3+ in solutions of HoCl 3 and KOH at 25 Deg C is studied by indicator spectrophotometric method. Within the range of pH 9.25-10.10 and μ≤4 x 10 -4 stability constants of Ho 3+ hydroxocomplexes are measured and are extrapolated on zero ion strength [ru

  4. Retrograde ureteroscopic holmium laser endopyelotomy in a selected population of patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stilling, Nicolaj; Jung, Helene; Nørby, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    follow-up 110 weeks). Success criteria were defined as symptom relief and improved or preserved renal function. Results. Twenty-nine patients (66%) experienced complete symptom resolution and 10 patients (23%) had significant symptom improvement (i.e. no need for pain-killing medication). Five patients...

  5. InP layers with low density of defects: effect of holmium and erbium admixture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Olga; Novotný, Jan; Zavadil, Jiří; Kohout, Jindřich; Žďánský, Karel

    Roč. 48, 9 Special Issue (1997), s. 66-69 ISSN 0013-578X. [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education - DMS-RE 1997 /7./. Kočovce, 09.06.1997-11.06.1997] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/96/1238 Keywords : semiconductors * epitaxial growth * rare earth compounds * crystal defects Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  6. Cation exchange resins labeled with holmium-166 for treatment of liver malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Renata F.; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing interest in new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals is prompting investigators to utilize isotopes with more focused capabilities for treating various tumors, reducing the negative effects on neighboring healthy cells. Local radionuclide therapy using radioactive microspheres is a promising therapy for non-operable group of patients suffering from liver malignancies. Many publications have shown the success of this technique. The emphasis in the present work is the resin-based microspheres labeled with 166 Ho. The production of 166 Ho is feasible in the IEA-R1 Reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP, because it does not need high power and high neutron fluxes. Samples of Ho 2 O 3 were irradiated in selected positions of the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP. The neutron flux was 1.0 x10 13 n.s -1 .cm -2 for 1 hour. The dissolution of Ho 2 O 3 was studied with different volumes of 0.1M HCl and also varying the heating temperature. The AG50W-X8 200-400 mesh and CM Sephadex C-25 cation exchange resins were labeled with 166 Ho. The retention of 166 Ho in the resins was studied and also its stability. The results of the dissolution experiments of Ho 2 O 3 showed that there is a direct relation between the increasing volumes needed to dissolve higher masses, and also the positive effect of raising the temperature. The results show very good retention of 166 Ho in both columns, even when high volumes of 0.1M HCl are passed through the column containing the resins and its good stability towards saline solution, PBS solution and glucose.Although the resins employed in this work did not have the right particle size (20-50μm), the chemical behavior showed the very good labeling of the resins with 166 Ho, and its stability. (author)

  7. Radioactive holmium poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres for treatment of liver malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsen, J.F.W.

    2001-01-01

    Liver metastases frequently occur during the progression of various solid tumours, especially colorectal cancers, and are the cause of 25-50% of all cancer deaths [1-3]. In particular in patients with colorectal cancer the liver is the main metastatic site. Median survival of patients with liver

  8. Investigation of different-ligand complexes of holmium and erbium with NTA and carbonate ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, N.A.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Found out have been the optimum conditions for the formation of the lantanides (Ln) multiligand complexes with the nitriletriacetic acid (NTA) and the carbonate-ion. It has been established that the components correlation in complex compounds is equal to 1:1:1. Computed have been the values of the oscillator forces of the absorption bands, that conform to the ''supersensitive'' migration of the multiligand complexes, It is shown that the increment in the oscillator forces, the induced entering of one carbonate-ion into the Ln-NTA complex molecule conforms to about 1/4 of the oscillator forces increment during the migration from the aquo ion to the [Ln(CO 3 ) 4 ] 5- complex carbonaceous ion

  9. Excitation functions for some Ne induced reactions with Holmium: incomplete fusion vs complete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, Munish; Sharma, Anjali; Rizvi, I.A.; Ahamad, Tauseef; Ghugre, S.S.; Sinha, A.K.; Chaubey, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Reactions induced by 20 Ne are expected to be considerably more complex than those of 12 C, and 16 O. As a part of the ongoing program to understand CF and ICF reaction mechanisms, it is of great interest to see whether the same experimental technique yield similarly valuable information for 20 Ne induced reactions. In this present work an attempt has been made to measure the excitation functions for fifteen evaporation residues (ERs) identified in the interaction of 20 Ne + 165 Ho system in the energy range 4 -7 MeV/A

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of holmium-scandium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho-Sc alloys and superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy have been investigated using x-ray and neutron-diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal that the alloy samples have different a lattice parameters for the Sc-seed layer and the Ho:Sc alloy grown on top...... of the seed layer; while the superlattices have different a lattice parameters for the Sc seed, and for both the Ho and Sc in the superlattice layers. The structural characteristics are related to the large lattice mismatches (of the order 7%) between the constituent elements. The magnetic moments...

  11. Influence of rare earth holmium on the properties of lead iodide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matuchová, Marie; Procházková, Olga; Maixner, J.; Žďánský, Karel; Zavadil, Jiří

    Vol. 2, No 4 (2005), s. 1275-1279 ISSN 1610-1634. [EXMATEC 2004 - International Workshop on Expert Evaluation & Control of Compounds Semiconductor Materials & Technologies /7./. Montpellier, 01.06.2004-04.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/0379; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/04/0959 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : rare earth compounds * detector circuits * semiconductor technology Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Calorimetric measurements of $^{163}$ holmium decay as tools to determine the electron neutrino mass

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    1982-01-01

    Computes the spectrum of 'calorimetric' energy in the electron capture decay of /sup 163/Ho. A calorimetric experiment would yield an excellent determination of (/sup 163/Ho, /sup 163/Dy) mass difference. The proximity of the spectral endpoint to an atomic resonance makes the fraction of events that are sensitive to a non-zero neutrino mass superior in /sup 163/Ho decay than in tritium decay.

  13. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R.; Smits, Maarten L.; Hennink, Wim E.; Bakker, Chris J G; Van Den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J. Frank W

    2015-01-01

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they

  14. Dicty_cDB: SLE172 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d/ 1126 0.0 VHJ195 (VHJ195Q) /CSM/VH/VHJ1-D/VHJ195Q.Seq.d/ 1102 0.0 SLD492 (SLD492Q) /CSM/SL/SLD4-D/SLD492... 0.0 1 ( AU052538 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLD492. 817 0.0 1 ( C83939 ) Dictyostelium dis

  15. 48 CFR 217.172 - Multiyear contracts for supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... law. For additional policies that apply only to multiyear contracts for weapon systems, see 217.173... requirements of law are met and there are no other statutory restrictions on using a multiyear contract for the... provisions in the contract do not include consideration of recurring manufacturing costs of the contractor...

  16. 21 CFR 172.882 - Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... coating on shell eggs Do. 5. As a float on fermentation fluids in the manufacture of vinegar and wine and... with wild organisms during fermentation Do. [42 FR 14491, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 47 FR 11838, Mar...

  17. 21 CFR 172.884 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter. As a float on fermentation fluids in the manufacture of vinegar and wine to prevent or retard access of air, evaporation, and wild yeast contamination during fermentation In an amount not to exceed...

  18. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... syringe. 1-milliliter capacity, with 3-inch, 22-gauge needle. Volumetric flask. 5-milliliter capacity.... Pipet 100 milliliters of 1,2-dichloroethane into a 1-liter glass-stoppered volumetric flask and adjust... into a 1-liter glass-stoppered volumetric flask and adjust to volume with hexane, with mixing. n...

  19. What we do | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC supports research in developing countries to create real and lasting change. ... Far East Asia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Central Asia, South Asia ... it was reported that mangrove wetlands and other thick coastal vegetation served to reduce ...

  20. Final report Hanford environmental compliance project 89-D-172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project is unique in that it consisted of 14 subprojects which varied in project scope and were funded from more that one program. This report describes the HEC Project from inception to completion and the scope, schedule, and cost of the individual subprojects. Also provided are the individual subproject Cost closing statements and Project completion reports accompanied by construction photographs and illustrations

  1. 49 CFR 172.402 - Additional labeling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 30, 2001, such as, a label without the hazard class or division number displayed in the lower corner... this section); and (2)For other than Class 1 or Class 2 materials (for subsidiary labeling requirements for Class 1 or Class 2 materials see paragraph (e) or paragraphs (f) and (g), respectively, of this...

  2. 172 Networks, Micro Small Enterprises (MSE'S) and Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    It is no doubt that the role of entrepreneurship in the emerging economies such like Kenya ... understand networking and small business performance as there is no single general ... solution for small firm development (Borg 1991, Donckels and Lambrecht. 1995 ..... Scandinavian Journal of Management , 31 (3/4), 83-99.

  3. What we do | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Launched in 2001, the Regional Network on HIV/AIDS, Rural Livelihoods and Food Security (RENEWAL) is a growing network of networks made up of national food ... In Pratapura Industrial Area (Tikamgarh district, Bundelkhand region, Madhya Pradesh), stone quarrying and crushing is carried out by labor-intensive units ...

  4. 49 CFR 172.310 - Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... industrial, Type A, Type B(U), or Type B(M) package must be legibly and durably marked on the outside of the... package which conforms to an IP-1, IP-2, IP-3 or a Type A package design must be legibly and durably... origin of the design. The international vehicle registration code for packages designed by a United...

  5. 21 CFR 172.826 - Sodium stearyl fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nonyeast-leavened bakery products in an amount not to exceed 1 percent by weight of the flour used. (4) As... maleate. (b) The additive is used or intended for use: (1) As a dough conditioner in yeast-leavened bakery products in an amount not to exceed 0.5 percent by weight of the flour used. (2) As a conditioning agent in...

  6. 49 CFR 172.802 - Components of a security plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... from origin to destination, including shipments stored incidental to movement. (b) The security plan must also include the following: (1) Identification by job title of the senior management official... business and must make the security plan available upon request, at a reasonable time and location, to an...

  7. 172 ANALYSIS OF URBAN DECAY FROM LOW RESOLUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    temporal pattern of urban decay in different parts of a traditional organic city through ... c. Twenty percent or more of the residential structures were in need of major ... the body of the city which must be removed through surgical blades of urban ... Figure 1. Pay-off matrix of urban blight development. (Adapted from Sule 1980).

  8. 21 CFR 172.270 - Sulfated butyl oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... edible vegetable oil using 1-butanol. Following sulfation, the reaction mixture is washed with water and...

  9. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...). Copies may be examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, Food and Drug... ingredient is used as a thickener, emulsifier, or stabilizer in alcoholic beverages at a use level not to exceed 20 percent in the final beverage. [70 FR 8034, Feb. 17, 2005] ...

  10. All projects related to | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Data on sexual violence against women and men, both during and after conflicts, shows alarming levels of abuse across the globe. Start Date: April 1, 2013. End Date: December 22, 2015. Topic: SOCIAL PROBLEMS, VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN, SEXUAL ABUSE, INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, CONFLICT ...

  11. 21 CFR 172.230 - Microcapsules for flavoring substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Glutaraldehyde—As cross-linking agent for insolubilizing a coacervate of gum arabic and gelatin. n-Octyl alcohol... only for encapsulating lemon oil, distilled lime oil, orange oil, peppermint oil, and spearmint oil for...

  12. 21 CFR 172.120 - Calcium disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... malt beverages 25 Antigushing agent. French dressing 75 Preservative. Legumes (all cooked canned, other... Promote color and flavor retention. Spreads, artificially colored and lemon-flavored or orange-flavored...

  13. 12 CFR 308.172 - Eligibility of applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for remuneration for the applicant, under its direction and control, on the date the adversary... indirectly owns or controls a majority of the voting shares. The Board of Directors may, however, on the... addition, the Board of Directors may determine that financial relationships of the applicant other than...

  14. 21 CFR 172.892 - Food starch-modified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment with the following enzymes: Enzyme Limitations Alpha-amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.1) The enzyme must be... 3 percent, followed by treatment with a beta-amylase enzyme that is either an approved food additive... nutritive saccharide polymer has a dextrose equivalent of less than 20. Beta-amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.2...

  15. 21 CFR 172.560 - Modified hop extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., ethyl alcohol, or isopropyl alcohol acidified with hydrochloric or sulfuric acid; oxidation with peracetic acid; isomerization by calcium chloride or magnesium chloride treatment in ethylene dichloride...

  16. What we do | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Economic Reform, Firm Survival and Competitiveness (Middle East and North Africa). During the 1980s, it was thought that liberalizing trade and exposing industries to competition would result in the loss of some firms but a more productive and competitive industrial sector as a whole. Middle East, North Of Sahara, South Of ...

  17. 32 CFR 172.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... scrap or discarded as waste, but are capable of being reused after undergoing some type of physical or... recognition of the types of materials being processed and the applicable regulation governing the handling and... been routinely sold with the proceeds being used to offset customer costs. (iv) Bones, fats, and meat...

  18. 42 CFR 413.172 - Principles of prospective payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End... methodology used to establish payment rates and the changes specified in § 413.196(b) in the Federal Register...

  19. 40 CFR 97.172 - Out of control periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and... appendix E to, part 75 of this chapter. (b) Audit decertification. Whenever both an audit of a monitoring... the time of the audit, the Administrator will issue a notice of disapproval of the certification...

  20. 49 CFR 172.800 - Purpose and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... packaging such as a cargo tank motor vehicle, portable tank, tank car, or other bulk container. (1) Any... emulsions, suspensions, or gels; (11) Any quantity of organic peroxide, Type B, liquid or solid, temperature...