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Sample records for holland types parents

  1. The Flip Side of Holland Type Congruence: Incongruence and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Bryan J.; Strife, Samantha Roberts; Hansen, Jo-Ida C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between Holland type (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional; Holland, 1959, 1997) congruence and incongruence (i.e., lack of ft between an occupation's 3-letter Holland code and a person's lowest 3 Holland interest types) and tested whether incongruence predicts unique…

  2. Birth Order Effects on Holland Type, Occupational Interests, and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Paul J.; Leong, Frederick T. L.; Grotti, Shannon D.; Goh, David; Gaylor, Michael

    This investigation examined in two different samples, whether only children differ significantly from firstborn and later-born children in terms of their vocational personality type as described in Holland's RIASEC model, occupational interests, and work values. Literature on family configuration and vocational behavior is reviewed, and current…

  3. Holland Type as a Moderator of Personality-Performance Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Barbara A.; McIntire, Sandra A.; Yost, Amy Powell

    2002-01-01

    Data from 559 undergraduates provided modest evidence that Holland's taxonomy of work environments moderated the relationship between personality and performance. The traits of agreeableness and conscientiousness were better predictors of performance in certain environments. The important relationship between personality and performance may be…

  4. Contradictory Interests: Work, parents, and offspring in early modern Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, M.P.C.

    2004-01-01

    The consistory notes of the Dutch Reformed Church (1573-1700) reveal conflicts over work between parents and children during the early modern period. Two issues that caused particular tension were the labor experience of future sons-in-law and the division of household tasks. Parents' concerns about

  5. La Hollande au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    On 17 October the third industrial exhibition, "Holland at CERN" was officially opened by Dr R.J. van Duinen, President of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). In his opening speech he encouraged scientific organisations such as CERN to take full advantage of industry's ability to design and invent new processes and equipment stressing that the purpose of the "Holland at CERN" exhibition was not simply to sell equipment, but to establish an efficient cross-fertilisation between fundamental science and industry.

  6. Using Holland's Theory in Employment Counseling: Focus on Service Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Denise L.; Levinson, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the basic tenets of Holland's (1997) theory of vocational personalities and work environments and discusses its use by employment counselors in service occupations. The authors describe Holland's 6 personality types and research on the theory, as well as formal and informal assessment and counseling strategies within the…

  7. Evidências de validade convergente-discriminante para a avaliação dos tipos profissionais de Holland (ATPH Evidencias de validez convergente-discriminante para la evaluación de los tipos profesionales de Holland (ATPH Convergent-discriminant validity evidences for the avaliation of Holland's professional types (ATPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Porto Noronha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo buscar evidências de validade convergente-discriminante para o teste Avaliação dos Tipos Profissionais, de Holland (ATPH, com vistas a verificar as relações com a Escala de Aconselhamento Profissional (EAP. A amostra foi composta por 42 estudantes dos ensinos fundamental e médio de escolas públicas e particulares. A idade variou entre 11 e 26 anos, sendo que participaram 43% de alunos do sexo masculino, 50%, do feminino, e 7% que não informaram o gênero. Os resultados sugeriram correlações significativas entre as dimensões do EAP e as tipologias do ATPH, com magnitudes que variavam de baixas a moderadas. A partir dos dados coletados, concluiu-se que o ATPH pode ajudar na identificação dos interesses de estudantes em processos de orientação profissional e que as evidências de validade foram favoráveis.Este estudio tuvo como objetivo buscar evidencias de validez convergente-discriminante para la prueba Evaluación de los Tipos Profesionales, de Holland (ATPH, con vistas de verificar las relaciones con la Escala de Consejería Profesional (EAP. La muestra estuvo compuesta de 42 estudiantes de los ciclos primario y secundario de escuelas públicas y particulares. La edad varió entre 11 y 26 años, y participaron 43% de alumnos del sexo masculino, 50%, del femenino, y 7% que no informaron el género. Los resultados sugirieron correlaciones significativas entre las dimensiones del EAP y las tipologías del ATPH, con magnitudes que variaban de bajas a moderadas. A partir de los datos recolectados, se concluyó que el ATPH puede ayudar en la identificación de los intereses de estudiantes en procesos de orientación profesional y que las evidencias de validez fueron favorables.The present study aimed to search convergent-discriminant validity evidences for Holland's test Avaliação dos Tipos Profissionais (ATPH by verifying its relations with the Escala de Aconselhamento Profissional (EAP. The sample

  8. Vocational Aspirations of Chinese High School Students and Their Parents' Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhi-Jin; Leung, S. Alvin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the vocational aspirations and parental vocational expectations of high school students and their parents (1067 parent-child dyads). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and an Occupations List. The Occupations List consisted of 126 occupational titles evenly distributed across the six Holland types. Parents were…

  9. The Geometric Relationship Between Holland's Personality Typology and the Vocational Preference Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, James A., Jr.; Doughtie, Eugene B.

    1973-01-01

    Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory was administered to 373 undergraduates. The 11 scales of the inventory were intercorrelated and factor analyzed. Six common factors were obtained. The placement of the six personality types in six-dimensional space by factor analysis corresponded closely to Holland's model. (Author)

  10. Vocational Preferences and College Expectations: An Extension of Holland's Principle of Self-Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    Holland's theory of vocational preferences provides a powerful framework for studying students' college experiences. A basic proposition of Holland's theory is that individuals actively seek out and select environments that are congruent with their personality types. Although studies consistently support the self-selection proposition, they have…

  11. Breaking Ground: A Study of Gestalt Therapy Theory and Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Paul J.

    In both Gestalt therapy and Holland's theory of vocational choice, person-environment interaction receives considerable emphasis. Gestalt therapy theory suggests that people make contact (that is, meet needs) through a characteristic style of interacting with the environment. Holland identifies six personality types in his theory and asserts that…

  12. Toekomst intensieve veehouderij in Zuid-Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, I.; Migchels, G.; Vogelzang, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    De intensieve veehouderij in Zuid-Holland is de afgelopen tien jaar gehalveerd. De Provinciale Staten willen de intensieve veehouderij in Zuid- Holland te convergeren naar een diervriendelijke, duurzame en meer extensieve bedrijfsvoering. De provincie kan zich hiervoor richten op veehouderijsystemen

  13. Origins of modern economic system: England or Holland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozinskaya Natalia, A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper, following the approach of the Dutch scholars de Vries and vab der Woude, claims that the Netherlands, rather than England (as it is generally assumed, were the first country, which performed the transition from the traditional society to modern one. Identification of criteria distinguishing traditional and modern societies follows the works of W. Rostow, S. Kuznets and other authors who studied the issue. In order to prove the thesis, author compares urbanization level in Holland and in England, as well as degree of commercialization of those economies, and considers the process of commercial and productive specialization in the United Provinces. Besides that, the formation of modern-type institutional system in Holland is analyzed: the genesis of the markets of factors of production, development of monetary and credit systems and of institutional and technological basis of the industry, strengthening of competitive forces in the economy. Land ownership structure in Holland is considered and its role in genesis of the markets of factors of production. Attention is paid to technological basis of the industry, examined is the impact of immigration. It concludes that the Netherlands were the first country where modern economic growth, as defined by S. Kuznets, started. It was Holland where for the first time the markets of factors of production were formed and, what is particularly important, the industry began to operate on a competitive basis.

  14. Parenting goals: predictors of parent involvement in disease management of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elizabeth M; Iannotti, Ronald J; Schneider, Stefan; Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Sobel, Douglas O

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of diabetes-specific parenting goals for parents of children with type 1 diabetes and to examine whether parenting goals predict a change in parenting involvement in disease management. An independent sample of primary caretakers of 87 children aged 10 to 16 years with type 1 diabetes completed the measure of parenting goals (diabetes-specific and general goals); both parent and child completed measures of parent responsibility for diabetes management at baseline and 6 months. Parents ranked diabetes-specific parenting goals as more important than general parenting goals, and rankings were moderately stable over time. Parenting goals were related to parent responsibility for diabetes management. The relative ranking of diabetes-specific parenting goals predicted changes in parent involvement over 6 months, with baseline ranking of goals predicting more parental involvement at follow-up. Parenting goals may play an important role in family management of type 1 diabetes.

  15. Heinrich Dieter Holland (1927-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turekian, Karl K.

    2012-08-01

    Heinrich Dieter "Dick" Holland, who died on 21 May 2012, was responsible for major advances across several fields of geochemistry. He was born on 27 May 1927 and died just short of his 85th birthday. How Dick became a geochemist is an interesting story in itself. I first met Dick when we shared an office as graduate students at Columbia University in New York. He had attended Princeton University in New Jersey and graduated in 1946 with a chemistry major. He had arrived in the United States with his family from Germany in 1940. The family was of Jewish origin, and although Dick and his relatives were not strict practitioners, their fate in Hitler's Germany, dictated by the family's ancestry, would have been undesirable. Dick and his brother first went to England in 1939 to escape the future horrors that were sure to await them if they had remained in Germany. After their parents escaped to the Dominican Republic, Dick and his brother joined them there. With the help of friends, the family came to the United States from the Dominican Republic in 1940 (it was not unusual for immigrants to first come to a landing spot in the western hemisphere prior to admission to the United States).

  16. Holland bought Slovakian's emission quotas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TREND

    2003-01-01

    It is not a direct trade but more an environmental investment. Dutch government decided to buy over 5 million tons of carbon dioxide emission quotas of Rumania, Hungary and Slovakia. But this is not a direct purchase; it is related to investments into major projects that would decrease emission of greenhouse gases in the mentioned countries. Holland will improve its emission balance set by Kyoto Protocol and 'on the other hand we will offer eastern European countries technologies they are missing,' explained the main objectives of Dutch environmental projects Erik Saat from Senter agency at Dutch Ministry of Economy. The Dutch agency has so far selected one project in Slovakia - absorption of methane gas on waste dumps of eight Slovak towns. This project in value of 5 million Euro will decrease the emission by an equivalent of 500 thousand tons of CO 2 . Slovak Ministry of Environment that has to approve these projects welcomes any activity that would lead to decreasing greenhouse gas pollution. Every three months Senter agency select the best projects submitted in order to fulfil the commitments resulting from Kyoto Protocol. (Author)

  17. The Sugar Tax in Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajjaji, Fadoua

    2016-01-01

    This inquiry supports the theory of a sugar tax has a positive influence on the sugar consumption of Dutch individuals. Once a tax is implemented, the sugar consumption declines. Furthermore, this study supported the hypothesis claiming that children have a positive influence on their parental sugar

  18. Authoritative Parenting, Parenting Stress, and Self-Care in Pre-Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Maureen; Horn, Ivor B.; Alvarez, Vanessa; Cogen, Fran R.; Streisand, Randi

    2012-01-01

    Parent involvement in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) care leads to improved adherence; however, the manner in which parents approach illness management interactions with children must also be considered. It was hypothesized that greater use of an authoritative parenting style and less parenting stress would be associated with greater behavioral adherence and better metabolic control. Ninety-five primary caregivers of preadolescents (ages 8-11) with T1DM completed questionnaires assessing parenting style, pediatric parenting stress, and child behavioral adherence. Caregivers primarily self-identified as using an authoritative parenting style. Greater authoritative parenting was associated with greater behavioral adherence and less difficulty with pediatric parenting stress; no differences in metabolic control were observed. Greater engagement in authoritative parenting behaviors may contribute to increased age-appropriate child behavioral adherence and less pediatric parenting stress. Interventions highlighting diabetes-specific authoritative parenting techniques may enhance health outcomes and improve overall family functioning. PMID:22350495

  19. Authoritative parenting, parenting stress, and self-care in pre-adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Maureen; Horn, Ivor B; Alvarez, Vanessa; Cogen, Fran R; Streisand, Randi

    2012-09-01

    Parent involvement in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) care leads to improved adherence; however, the manner in which parents approach illness management interactions with children must also be considered. It was hypothesized that greater use of an authoritative parenting style and less parenting stress would be associated with greater behavioral adherence and better metabolic control. Ninety-five primary caregivers of preadolescents (ages 8-11) with T1DM completed questionnaires assessing parenting style, pediatric parenting stress, and child behavioral adherence. Caregivers primarily self-identified as using an authoritative parenting style. Greater authoritative parenting was associated with greater behavioral adherence and less difficulty with pediatric parenting stress; no differences in metabolic control were observed. Greater engagement in authoritative parenting behaviors may contribute to increased age-appropriate child behavioral adherence and less pediatric parenting stress. Interventions highlighting diabetes-specific authoritative parenting techniques may enhance health outcomes and improve overall family functioning.

  20. ‘In Holland staat een huis’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris van Heuckelom

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘In Holland there is a house’. The representation of Polish immigrants in recentDutch feature films This article looks into the representation of Polish immigrants in recent Dutch feature films (1997-2012, with a particular focus on the prominent role of domestic settings and familial dysfunctions in the pictures involved. As the analysis reveals, many of the films under discussion bring into view troubled Dutch protagonists (especially men who suffer from degradation in the familial and social sphere. The Polish characters in turn tend to be instrumentalized as (potential agents of change (or rather ‘restoration’, taking up traditional familial and domestic roles that are no longer fulfilled by Dutch characters. While the narrative function granted to Polish immigrants in Dutch film can be closely linked to the widespread perception of Poland (and East Central Europe at large as less ‘modern’ (than the West as well as to the physical, strongly gender-typed labor usually performed by these jobseekers, the Dutch treatment of Polish characters remains largely in line with the screen portrait of expatriate Poles in other European cinemas (i.e., ‘noble’ rather than ‘savage’. In the meanwhile, however, with its particular focus on (declining ‘domesticity’ in Dutch private and public spaces, the corpus of films under discussion points to the contradictory feelings of nostalgia underlying the treatment of migration in Dutch representational practices: while some films expose the longing for the preservation of a monolithic Dutch ‘home’ unaffected by immigrants, other productions instrumentalize the influx of foreigners as a means to reinstall a sense of (female domesticity into the center of the Dutch family.

  1. Authoritative Parenting, Parenting Stress, and Self-Care in Pre-Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Monaghan, Maureen; Horn, Ivor B.; Alvarez, Vanessa; Cogen, Fran R.; Streisand, Randi

    2012-01-01

    Parent involvement in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) care leads to improved adherence; however, the manner in which parents approach illness management interactions with children must also be considered. It was hypothesized that greater use of an authoritative parenting style and less parenting stress would be associated with greater behavioral adherence and better metabolic control. Ninety-five primary caregivers of preadolescents (ages 8-11) with T1DM completed questionnaires assessing parenting st...

  2. 75 FR 9904 - James A. Holland; Denial of Hearing; Final Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... relating to the regulation of a drug product under the act and that the type of conduct underlying the... product under the act and (2) that the type of conduct underlying the conviction undermines the process... Acting Chief Scientist and Deputy Commissionerhas considered Holland's arguments and concludes that they...

  3. Work Activity and Career Goals in Holland's and Schein's Theories of Vocational Personalities and Career Anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvik, Hilmar

    1991-01-01

    Data from 725 Norwegian adults were analyzed using Holland's and Schein's theories. Although some correlation between the type of work preferred and career goal were found, the two types of decisions were not highly related. Persons' career anchors cannot be derived from assessment of their vocational personality and vice versa. (SK)

  4. Holland at CERN – Industrial exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Sponsored by EVD, an agency of the Dutch Ministry of the Economy From 8 to 11 November 2010 Industrial Exhibition Administration Building Bldg. 61 9-00 - 17-30 Twenty seven companies will present their latest technology at the industrial exhibition "Holland at CERN". Dutch industry will exhibit products and technologies which are related to the field of particle physics. Individual interviews will take place directly at the stands in the Main Building. The firms will contact relevant users/technicians but any user wishing to make contact with a particular firm is welcome to use the contact details which are available from each departmental secretariat or at the following URL: http://gs-dep.web.cern.ch/gs-dep/groups/sem/ls/Industrial_Exhibitions.htm#Industrial_exhibitions You will find the list of exhibitors below. LIST OF EXHIBITORS: Schelde Exotech Vernooy BV Triumph Group INCAA Computers DeMaCo Holland bv TNO Science & Industry Janssen Precision Engi...

  5. Relationship between parenting style, family type, personality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    208 females) from single parent, monogamous and polygamous families responded ... It was hypothesized that: there would be significant and positive correlations ... self esteem, need for achievement, locus of control, sense of competence and ... that young people from families where authoritative parenting was practiced ...

  6. College Seniors' Plans for Graduate School: Do Deep Approaches Learning and Holland Academic Environments Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocconi, Louis M.; Ribera, Amy K.; Nelson Laird, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which college seniors' plans for graduate school are related to their tendency to engage in deep approaches to learning (DAL) and their academic environments (majors) as classified by Holland type. Using data from the National Survey of Student Engagement, we analyzed responses from over 116,000 seniors attending…

  7. Self-Monitoring Processes and Holland Vocational Preferences among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael T.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Used Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) and a self-monitoring scale to examine 237 undergraduates' association between self-monitoring and occupational preferences. Regression analyses revealed correlations between gender, self-monitoring propensity, and preferred occupational types (i.e., social, enterprising, or artistic). (TE)

  8. Energiemarkten en energiehandel in Holland in de late middeleeuwen

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelisse, Charles Louis Eduard

    2007-01-01

    This study analyses the economical and commercial development of Holland in the late Middle Ages, focusing on the fuel market and fuel trade. Energy was of vital importance to this society in which industry, trade and export were expanding rapidly. The brisk commercial and industrial development of Holland between the 13th and 16th centuries coincided with demographic growth and increasing urbanisation. Fuel markets in Holland developed in the 15th and 16th century from local to regional and ...

  9. Pathways to Successful Entrepreneurship: Parenting, Personality, Early Entrepreneurial Competence, and Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Personality traits and parenting may relate to entrepreneurial competence (EC) and entrepreneurial interests (EI), which both are central elements of Holland's E-type. Three hundred and twenty 10th grade students and 139 small business founders from East Germany were studied using structural equation modeling. Results showed that an…

  10. Parent-child relationships in Type 1 diabetes: associations among child behavior, parenting behavior, and pediatric parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweenie, Rachel; Mackey, Eleanor R; Streisand, Randi

    2014-03-01

    Interactions between parents and children can influence behavioral and emotional functioning related to Type 1 diabetes (T1D), yet have been relatively unexplored during preadolescence. The present study examined associations among child problem behaviors, critical parenting behaviors, and pediatric parenting stress in a sample of preadolescent youth with T1D. Data are available from 86 preadolescent-parent dyads who participated in the initial baseline assessment of a randomized controlled trial designed to assess the efficacy of an adherence promotion program. Measures included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. After controlling for significant demographic and medical characteristics, parents who reported their child's behavior as more problematic reported more difficulty with pediatric parenting stress, which was also associated with more child-reported critical parenting behaviors. Child problem behaviors and critical parenting behaviors were associated with one another, partially via their association with increased pediatric parenting stress. Potential clinical applications include interventions geared toward helping parents manage difficult child behaviors as well as cope with pediatric parenting stress, with the ultimate goal of improving the parent-child relationship and management of T1D.

  11. Parenting children with diabetes: exploring parenting styles on children living with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherifali, Diana; Ciliska, Donna; O'Mara, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which parenting styles is associated with diabetes control in children (aged 5-12 years) with type 1 diabetes, and on child and parent quality of life. Data were collected from a total of 216 parent and child dyads, from 4 pediatric diabetes clinics in southern Ontario, using a cross-sectional survey methodology. Each parent and child independently completed the questionnaires. The study instruments included the Parenting Dimensions Inventory, Pediatric Quality of Life (diabetes specific), and chart reviews for glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) levels. The results of the study demonstrated that parenting styles were not correlated with diabetes control and were weakly correlated with quality of life. Most parents reported behaviors of authoritative or democratic parenting. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) for children in the study was slightly above optimal target range, at 8.4%. Parental education had a weak negative correlation with diabetes control. Parenting styles are not associated with diabetes control and quality of life in children with type 1 diabetes. However, further research should assess the impact of the determinants of parenting on children with type 1 diabetes and quality of life.

  12. The relationship between parental depressive symptoms, family type and adolescent functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, D.S.; Visser-Meily, J.M.A.; Meijer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    It is evident that parental depressive symptoms negatively influence adolescent behavior and various psychosocial outcomes. Certain family types like families with a chronically ill parent and single parent families are more vulnerable to parental depressive symptoms. However, the relationship

  13. Infant-parent attachment: Definition, types, antecedents, measurement and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Diane

    2004-10-01

    Attachment theory is one of the most popular and empirically grounded theories relating to parenting. The purpose of the present article is to review some pertinent aspects of attachment theory and findings from attachment research. Attachment is one specific aspect of the relationship between a child and a parent with its purpose being to make a child safe, secure and protected. Attachment is distinguished from other aspects of parenting, such as disciplining, entertaining and teaching. Common misconceptions about what attachment is and what it is not are discussed. The distinction between attachment and bonding is provided. The recognized method to assess infant-parent attachment, the Strange Situation procedure, is described. In addition, a description is provided for the four major types of infant-parent attachment, ie, secure, insecure-avoidant, insecure-resistant and insecure-disorganized. The antecedents and consequences of each of the four types of infant-parent attachment are discussed. A special emphasis is placed on the description of disorganized attachment because of its association with significant emotional and behavioural problems, and poor social and emotional outcomes in high-risk groups and in the majority of children who have disorganized attachment with their primary caregiver. Practical applications of attachment theory and research are presented.

  14. Four lessons on Randstad-Holland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Moreno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch delta, at the confluence of the courses of the Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt rivers, is the paradigmatic territory of networks from the earliest stages of the human settlement. In an unsteady landscape, made up of a mosaic of marshes, bogs and sand dunes; irrigated by a maze with rivers, streams and canals; transportation network is the element that strengthens and unites the urban structure for centuries. This article discusses the integration of the Dutch transport network and the urban network from four noted episodes in the history of mobility in the Netherlands: the Trekvaarten [towpaths], the Oude Lijn [Old railway line], the Halsketting [nodal corridor], and finally, the intermodal center Zuidas-Amsterdam. The aim of this article is to show how the development of the Dutch urban network is conditioned by structural changes in the transportation network, and how the evolution of the urban mobility system determines simultaneously both: regional and local spheres. Ultimately, four lessons in mobility and urbanity in the Randstad-Holland that take the case of study further and are a model in the development of an integrated metropolitan system.

  15. Does Personality Matter? Applying Holland's Typology to Analyze Students' Self-Selection into Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. Daniel; Simpson, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized John Holland's personality typology and the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) to examine the factors that may affect students' self-selection into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. Results indicated that gender, race/ethnicity, high school achievement, and personality type were statistically…

  16. Het vennootschapsrecht van Holland. Het vennootschapsrecht van Holland, Zeeland en West-Friesland in de rechtspraak van de Hoge Raad van Holland, Zeeland en West-Friesland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Hendrik Martijn

    2010-01-01

    This book focuses on the observationes tumultuariae of Cornelis van Bijnkershoek and the observationes tumultuariae novae of his son-in-law Willem Pauw. Between 1704 and 1787, therefore during virtually the entire eighteenth century, both these judges and presidents of the Supreme Court of Holland,

  17. Examining the interaction of parental involvement and parenting style in predicting adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Sara E; Friedrich, Elizabeth A; Jawad, Abbas F; Miller, Victoria A

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether aspects of parenting style (specifically, warmth, autonomy support, and coercion) moderated the association between parental involvement and adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes. Children ages 8 to 16 years with type 1 diabetes and a parent completed assessments of parental involvement, parenting style, and adherence. Parent autonomy support and coercion were associated with adherence but warmth was not. Child report of more parental involvement was associated with better adherence. Warmth, autonomy support, and coercion were not moderators. The findings underscore the importance of parental involvement, operationalized as responsibility for diabetes tasks, and parenting style, specifically coercion and autonomy support, for adherence in pediatric chronic illness management. Longitudinal research is needed to better understand how and why dimensions of involvement (e.g., responsibility, monitoring, support) vary over time and whether they impact outcomes differentially. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Role of Parenting Style in Achieving Metabolic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Shorer, Maayan; David, Ravit; Schoenberg-Taz, Michal; Levavi-Lavi, Ifat; Phillip, Moshe; Meyerovitch, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control and treatment adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Parents of 100 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed assessments of their parenting style and sense of helplessness. Parents and patients rated patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Glycemic control was evaluated by HbA1c values. RESULTS An authoritative paternal parenting style predicted better glycemic control and...

  19. The relationship between parental depressive symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Dominik Sebastian; Sieh, Dominik Sebstian; Visser-Meily, Johanna Maria Augusta; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    It is evident that parental depressive symptoms negatively influence adolescent behavior and various psychosocial outcomes. Certain family types like families with a chronically ill parent and single parent families are more vulnerable to parental depressive symptoms. However, the relationship between these symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning remains largely unclear. This study examined relations between self-report of parental depressive symptoms and adolescent functioning in 86 two-parent families including a parent with a chronic medical condition, 94 families with healthy single parents, and 69 families with 2 healthy parents (comparison group). Parents completed the Beck Depression Inventory. Adolescents filled in the Youth Self-Report measuring problem behavior, and other instruments measuring psychosocial outcomes (stress, grade point average, school problems, and self-esteem). Multilevel analyses were used to examine the effects of family type, parental depressive symptoms, adolescents' gender and age, and interaction effects on adolescent functioning. The results indicated that adolescents with chronically ill and single parents had a lower grade point average (pfamily types. Parental depressive symptoms were strongly related to child report of stress (pfamily with 2 parents may have less impact on adolescent problem behavior than growing up in a single parent family. Health practitioners are encouraged to be attentive to the unique and combined influence of family type and parental depressive symptoms on adolescent functioning. Older and female adolescents deserve particular attention.

  20. Minor traumatic brain injuries – what is new? | Hollander ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minor traumatic brain injuries – what is new? D Hollander, J Coventry, M Du Trevou. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  1. Environmental quality in the Dutch province North-Holland 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosma, S.

    2002-08-01

    An overview is given of the environmental quality in the Dutch province Noord-Holland in the year 2002. Special attention is paid to safety, energy, agriculture and the airport Schiphol. The report is available in electronic form in parts, discussing Social developments, the quality of Air, Soil, and Water, Public Health, Nature, Safety, Energy, Agriculture, and Schiphol (airport) [nl

  2. A Factor Analytic Validation of Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scipio, William J.

    1974-01-01

    A principal components analysis was applied to a 135-item pool of the Holland Vocational Preference Inventory, Sixth Revision. The a priori clinical scales were partially upheld with differences attributed to the characteristics of the sample and sociopolitical time context during which the test was administered. (Author)

  3. Energiemarkten en energiehandel in Holland in de late middeleeuwen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelisse, Charles Louis Eduard

    2007-01-01

    This study analyses the economical and commercial development of Holland in the late Middle Ages, focusing on the fuel market and fuel trade. Energy was of vital importance to this society in which industry, trade and export were expanding rapidly. The brisk commercial and industrial development of

  4. Blackjack in Holland Casino's : Basic, optimal and winning strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Genugten, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper considers the cardgame Blackjack according to the rules of Holland Casino's in the Netherlands. Expected gains of strategies are derived with simulation and also with analytic tools. New effiency concepts based on the gains of the basic and the optimal strategy are introduced. A general

  5. Holland Code, Job Satisfaction and Productivity in Clothing Factory Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesacker, Martin; And Others

    Published research on vocational interests and personality has not often assessed the characteristics of workers and the work environment in blue-collar, women-dominated industries. This study administered the Self-Directed Search (Form E) to 318 sewing machine operators in three clothing factories. Holland codes, productivity, job satisfaction,…

  6. The Geometric Relationship Between Holland's Personality Typology and the Vocational Preference Inventory for Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, James A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory was administered to 115 black undergraduate college students. The scales for the black subjects correspond generally to Holland's model but not as well as they do for white subjects. Three weaknesses in the correspondence between the scales of black students and Holland's model were identified. (Author)

  7. Fear of Hypoglycemia, Parenting Stress, and Metabolic Control for Children with Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, Ann-Sofie; Van Daele, Tom; Bleys, Dries; Faust, Kelly; Massa, Guy G

    2017-03-01

    This study sets out to extend current knowledge of parenting stress and fear of hypoglycemia (FoH) in parents of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We examined if the relationship between parental and children's FoH and metabolic control, as reflected by HbA1c, is mediated by parenting stress. A total of 63 parents and children with T1DM were recruited during their routine physician's appointment. Parents completed questionnaires on parenting stress and FoH. Children eight years and older also completed a questionnaire on FoH. HbA1c values were obtained from all children. Mediation analysis revealed an indirect association between parental FoH and HbA1c values through parenting stress (Sobel's z = 2.42, p = .02), but no indirect association between children's FoH and HbA1c. We concluded that parental FOH has an indirect association with the child's metabolic control that is mediated by parenting stress. More simply, fear of hypoglycemia predicts parent stress, which in turn, predicts metabolic control.

  8. The relationship between parental depressive symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Sebastian Sieh

    Full Text Available It is evident that parental depressive symptoms negatively influence adolescent behavior and various psychosocial outcomes. Certain family types like families with a chronically ill parent and single parent families are more vulnerable to parental depressive symptoms. However, the relationship between these symptoms, family type, and adolescent functioning remains largely unclear. This study examined relations between self-report of parental depressive symptoms and adolescent functioning in 86 two-parent families including a parent with a chronic medical condition, 94 families with healthy single parents, and 69 families with 2 healthy parents (comparison group. Parents completed the Beck Depression Inventory. Adolescents filled in the Youth Self-Report measuring problem behavior, and other instruments measuring psychosocial outcomes (stress, grade point average, school problems, and self-esteem. Multilevel analyses were used to examine the effects of family type, parental depressive symptoms, adolescents' gender and age, and interaction effects on adolescent functioning. The results indicated that adolescents with chronically ill and single parents had a lower grade point average (p<.01 than the comparison group. Adolescents of single parents reported more internalizing problems (p<.01 and externalizing problems (p<.05 than children from the other family types. Parental depressive symptoms were strongly related to child report of stress (p<.001. Adolescents of depressed chronically ill parents were particularly vulnerable to internalizing problems (interaction effect, p<.05. Older children and girls, and especially older girls, displayed more internalizing problems and stress. It can be concluded that growing up with a chronically ill parent in a family with 2 parents may have less impact on adolescent problem behavior than growing up in a single parent family. Health practitioners are encouraged to be attentive to the unique and combined

  9. Die verband tussen persoonlikheid, ooreenkomstig die tipologie van Holland en Bestuurspotentiaal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. P. Jacobs

    1984-11-01

    Full Text Available The congruence between the personality types postulated by Holland and managerial traits was investigated. The Vocational Preference Inventory was used to determine the personality types of the subjects selected for the study and a management assessment system to determine their managerial traits. When the degree of personality differentiation was taken into account, meaningful differences were found between realistic and the conventional personality types in respect of initiative and between the artistic and the conventional personality types in respect of analytic, planning and organizing ability. No statistically significant difference between the personality patterns of high and low potential managers could be found, except in respect of the realistic scale. This result indicates that low potential managers possess more realistic characteristics than high potential managers. In general, the findings of this study provide little support for Holland’s formulations of the personality types.

  10. Report from Holland: the economics of North Sea hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellman, M

    1977-09-01

    The article describes how, despite huge revenues from North Sea gas, Holland is currently suffering from unemployment and its long-term prospects are poor. In light of this, Mr. Ellman discusses the implications of North Sea oil for the UK economy. He sites three distinguishable policies that the UK government could adopt in the face of the huge import saving and export creation that North Sea hydrocarbons will soon bring--sound finance, demand management, and structural modernization. (MCW)

  11. The Role of Parents' Educational Level and Centre Type in Parent Satisfaction with Early Childhood Care Centres: A Study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidou, Sofia; Chatzikou, Maria; Tsiamagka, Evmorfia; Koutra, Evangelia; Abakoumkin, Georgios; Tseliou, Eleftheria

    2017-01-01

    This research examines specific facets of parent satisfaction with childcare centres, namely satisfaction with parent-centre communication and the educational services they provide, as well as respective parent beliefs. These were investigated in relation to centre type (private vs public) and parents' education. Parents of different educational…

  12. The relationship of parenting styles and social competency to Type A behavior in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harralson, T L; Lawler, K A

    1992-10-01

    This study examined parenting styles, Type A behavior in parents and children, and social competence in children. Fifty 1st-6th grade children, parents, and their teachers participated. Type A behavior in parents was associated with a controlling style of parenting, but not with pressuring the child to achieve. Parenting styles of achievement pressure and high control were related to impatient and aggressive behaviors in children, as measured by the MYTH, a teacher-scored Type A behavior instrument. In addition, impatience and aggressiveness in the children were negatively correlated with the child's social competency and ability to function in school. Parenting practices, Type A behavior, and social competency in children may play important roles in the origins of detrimental components of Type A behavior, such as impatience and aggression.

  13. Role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorer, Maayan; David, Ravit; Schoenberg-Taz, Michal; Levavi-Lavi, Ifat; Phillip, Moshe; Meyerovitch, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    To examine the role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control and treatment adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Parents of 100 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed assessments of their parenting style and sense of helplessness. Parents and patients rated patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Glycemic control was evaluated by HbA(1c) values. An authoritative paternal parenting style predicted better glycemic control and adherence in the child; a permissive maternal parenting style predicted poor adherence. A higher sense of helplessness in both parents predicted worse glycemic control and lesser adherence to treatment. Parental sense of helplessness was a significant predictor of diabetes control after correcting for other confounders (patient age, sex, and treatment method). An authoritative nonhelpless parenting style is associated with better diabetes control in adolescents. Paternal involvement is important in adolescent diabetes management. These results have implications for psychological interventions.

  14. Mapping "StrengthsQuest" Themes to Holland's Vocational Personality Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Andrew D.; Evans, Karen; Gitin, Elena; Eads, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 1,747 students attending undergraduate classes in legal education at an online university completed the "StrengthsQuest" assessment as part of a larger investigation; of this number, 117 students also completed the "Kuder Career Search". Exploratory factor analysis (principal components followed varimax rotation) of…

  15. Mindfulness and fear of hypoglycaemia in parents of children with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalders, J.; Hartman, E.; Nefs, G.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: To identify the sociodemographic and clinical correlates of fear of hypoglycaemia among parents of children (aged 4-18 years) with Type 1 diabetes and to examine the relationships between parental fear of hypoglycaemia, mindfulness and mindful parenting. Methods: Sociodemographic, self......-reported clinical and psychological data were extracted from the cross-sectional Diabetes MILES Youth - The Netherlands dataset. Questionnaires included the Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey - Parent Worry (parental fear of hypoglycaemia), the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory - Short version (mindfulness......) and the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (mindful parenting). Results: A total of 421 parents (359 mothers) participated. Hierarchical linear regression analyses showed that greater parental fear of hypoglycaemia was related to younger parental age, low educational level, non-Dutch nationality, more...

  16. Een provinciaal meetnet voor de verkeersveiligheid : een verkennende studie in Zuid-Holland. In opdracht van de Commissie Provinciaal Orgaan Verkeersveiligheid Zuid-Holland.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.T.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Road authorities and police corpses in the province of Zuid-Holland gather data in many ways on a variety of traffic activities such as traffic counts, speed measurements, and alcohol controls. The Provincial Road Safety Board of Zuid-Holland would like to monitor the provincial road safety with

  17. Some types of parent number talk count more than others: relations between parents' input and children's cardinal-number knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Elizabeth A; Levine, Susan C

    2011-09-01

    Before they enter preschool, children vary greatly in their numerical and mathematical knowledge, and this knowledge predicts their achievement throughout elementary school (e.g. Duncan et al., 2007; Ginsburg & Russell, 1981). Therefore, it is critical that we look to the home environment for parental inputs that may lead to these early variations. Recent work has shown that the amount of number talk that parents engage in with their children is robustly related to a critical aspect of mathematical development - cardinal-number knowledge (e.g. knowing that the word 'three' refers to sets of three entities; Levine, Suriyakham, Rowe, Huttenlocher & Gunderson, 2010). The present study characterizes the different types of number talk that parents produce and investigates which types are most predictive of children's later cardinal-number knowledge. We find that parents' number talk involving counting or labeling sets of present, visible objects is related to children's later cardinal-number knowledge, whereas other types of parent number talk are not. In addition, number talk that refers to large sets of present objects (i.e. sets of size 4 to 10 that fall outside children's ability to track individual objects) is more robustly predictive of children's later cardinal-number knowledge than talk about smaller sets. The relation between parents' number talk about large sets of present objects and children's cardinal-number knowledge remains significant even when controlling for factors such as parents' socioeconomic status and other measures of parents' number and non-number talk. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Parenting Practices and Child Adjustment in Different Types of Households: A Study of African American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Chen, Yi-Fu; Simons, Ronald L.; Brody, Gene; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    This article uses a sample of 867 African American households to investigate differences in parenting practices and child outcomes by type of household. Results indicate that mothers provide similar levels of parenting regardless of family structure. Secondary caregivers, however, show a great deal of variation in quality of parenting. Fathers and…

  19. Models of Parenting: Implications for Adolescent Well-Being within Different Types of Family Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shucksmith, J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines parenting models and parent-child relationships from early to middle adolescence. Focuses on implications for adolescent functioning, including school integration and psychological well being. Results identify four distinct types of parenting styles characterized by different degrees of acceptance and control of young people's behavior.…

  20. Characterizing diabetes burnout in parents of youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing type 1 diabetes (T1D) is complex and requires round-the-clock attention, much of which falls to parents. Parental stress and family conflict about diabetes are associated with suboptimal youth self-management and glycemic outcomes, yet little research has described parents' experiences with...

  1. When and Why Parents Prompt Their Children to Apologize: The Roles of Transgression Type and Parenting Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jee Young; Rizzo, Michael T.; Harris, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Young children are sensitive to the importance of apologies, yet little is known about when and why parents prompt apologies from children. We examined these issues with parents of 3-10-year-old children (N = 483). Parents judged it to be important for children to apologize following both intentional and accidental morally-relevant transgressions, and they anticipated prompting apologies in both contexts, showing an ‘outcome bias’ (i.e., a concern for the outcomes of children’s transgressions rather than for their underlying intentions). Parents viewed apologies as less important after children’s breaches of social convention; parents recognized differences between social domains in their responses to children’s transgressions. Irrespective of parenting style, parents were influenced in similar fashion by particular combinations of transgressions and victims, though permissive parents were least likely to anticipate prompting apologies. Parents endorsed different reasons for prompting apologies as a function of transgression type, suggesting that they attend to key features of their children’s transgressions when deciding when to prompt apologies. PMID:28405175

  2. When and Why Parents Prompt Their Children to Apologize: The Roles of Transgression Type and Parenting Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E; Noh, Jee Young; Rizzo, Michael T; Harris, Paul L

    2017-01-01

    Young children are sensitive to the importance of apologies, yet little is known about when and why parents prompt apologies from children. We examined these issues with parents of 3-10-year-old children ( N = 483). Parents judged it to be important for children to apologize following both intentional and accidental morally-relevant transgressions, and they anticipated prompting apologies in both contexts, showing an 'outcome bias' (i.e., a concern for the outcomes of children's transgressions rather than for their underlying intentions). Parents viewed apologies as less important after children's breaches of social convention; parents recognized differences between social domains in their responses to children's transgressions. Irrespective of parenting style, parents were influenced in similar fashion by particular combinations of transgressions and victims, though permissive parents were least likely to anticipate prompting apologies. Parents endorsed different reasons for prompting apologies as a function of transgression type, suggesting that they attend to key features of their children's transgressions when deciding when to prompt apologies.

  3. Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  4. Parent-Adolescent Conflicts, Conflict Resolution Types, and Adolescent Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branje, Susan J. T.; van Doorn, Muriel; van der Valk, Inge; Meeus, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the moderating role of conflict resolution on the association between parent-adolescent conflicts and adolescent problematic adjustment. Participants were 1313 Dutch early and middle adolescents who completed measures on conflict frequency, conflict resolution with parents, and internalizing and externalizing adjustment…

  5. The distressed (Type D) personality mediates the relationship between remembered parenting and psychological distress in cardiac patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, N.L.; Versteeg, H.; Helmondt, S.J. van; Jaegere, P.P. de; Geuns, R.J.M. van; Meine, M.M.; Domburg, R.T. van; Pedersen, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Both the distressed (Type D) personality (i.e. the combination of negative affectivity and social inhibition traits) and dysfunctional parenting styles are associated with anxiety and depression. As parenting styles have been related to personality development, dysfunctional parenting

  6. Parent stress and child behaviour among young children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, M E; Monaghan, M; Cogen, F R; Streisand, R

    2011-03-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are responsible for executing a complex daily management regimen and are at risk for elevated levels of stress. Normative misbehaviour during the preschool years can complicate T1D management, and interpretation of behavioural concerns may vary because of child health status and parent stress. Within a paediatric transactional model framework, child characteristics (e.g. behaviour problems, metabolic control) and parent functioning (e.g. parenting stress, anxiety) likely impact one another. Parents of 2- to 6-year-old children with T1D completed self-report measures, including the Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI), and 24-h Recall Interviews. Medical data were obtained by parent report and medical record review. It was hypothesized that greater parent stress and child blood glucose variability would be significantly associated with greater parent-reported child behaviour concerns. Moderate levels of parent stress and child behaviour problems were endorsed; however, parents perceived children's misbehaviour as problematic, particularly with relation to tasks relevant to diabetes management (e.g. bedtimes and mealtimes). Structural equation modelling indicated that greater general anxiety and paediatric parenting stress was associated with parent report of more problematic child behaviour. Blood glucose variability did not significantly contribute to this relationship. The stress experienced by parents of young children with chronic illness appears to relate to their perception of their children's behaviour problems. Parents' experiences with developmentally normative misbehaviour may interfere with disease management and exacerbate parents' stress and the subsequent impact on well-being. Implications for supporting parents and children with T1D are discussed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. A 'financial revolution' reconsidered; public finance in Holland during the Dutch Revolt, 1568-1648

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritschy, W.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of the Dutch state has recurrently been related to a 'financial revolution' dating from the 1540s, which created a market for provincial 'renten' (annuities) funded by provincial excises and eagerly bought by 'rentiers' in the province of Holland. New research into Holland's public

  8. Exploration of Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice in Graduate School Enviroments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Thomas T.; Walsh, E. Pierce

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to refine many of the constructs used in Holland's theory of vocational choice by investigating definitions and relationships that comprise the theory. As well, this study concerned itself with establishing usefulness of applying Holland's theory to students in a graduate school environment. (Author)

  9. Les premières Méditations en Hollande de 1820 à 1880

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, Jakob Heije

    1923-01-01

    Ce fut de 1820 à 1830 que la gloire des Meditations atteguit en Hollande son apogée. Les témoignages d'amiration que contiennent les correspondances, les journeaux intimes, et les revnes de l'époque, puis les éditions qui turent publiées en hollande, et les traductions nombrenses qui y furent

  10. Development and validation of the collaborative parent involvement scale for youths with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansel, Tonja R; Rovner, Alisha J; Haynie, Denise; Iannotti, Ronald J; Simons-Morton, Bruce; Wysocki, Timothy; Anderson, Barbara; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Laffel, Lori

    2009-01-01

    To develop and test a youth-report measure of collaborative parent involvement in type 1 diabetes management. Initial item development and testing were conducted with 81 youths; scale refinement and validation were conducted with 122 youths from four geographic regions. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha, and factor analyses were conducted to select items comprising the scale. Correlations with parenting style and parent diabetes responsibility were examined. Multiple regression analyses examining associations with quality of life, adherence, and glycemic control were conducted to assess concurrent validity. The measure demonstrated strong internal consistency. It was modestly associated with parenting style, but not with parent responsibility for diabetes management. A consistent pattern of associations with quality of life and adherence provide support for the measure's concurrent validity. This brief youth-report measure of parent collaborative involvement assesses a unique dimension of parent involvement in diabetes management associated with important youth outcomes.

  11. Types of arguments in parents-children discussions:: an argumentative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bova, Antonio; Arcidiacono, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to single out the argumentative strategies most frequently used by parents to convince their children to accept their rules and prescriptions at mealtimes. The results of thestudy show that parents mostly put forward arguments based on the quality and quantity of food to persuade their childern to eat. Less frequently, the parents put forward other types of arguments such as the appeal to consistency, the arguments from expert opinion, and the argument from analogy. Whi...

  12. Development and Validation of the Collaborative Parent Involvement Scale for Youths with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nansel, Tonja R.; Rovner, Alisha J.; Haynie, Denise; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Simons-Morton, Bruce; Wysocki, Timothy; Anderson, Barbara; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Laffel, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a youth-report measure of collaborative parent involvement in type 1 diabetes management. Methods Initial item development and testing were conducted with 81 youths; scale refinement and validation were conducted with 122 youths from four geographic regions. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach's α, and factor analyses were conducted to select items comprising the scale. Correlations with parenting style and parent diabetes responsibility were examined. Multiple regr...

  13. PROFIL PROTEIN HIPOFISA SAPI PERAH PERANAKAN FRIES HOLLAND (PFH BETINA FASE FOLIKULER DAN LUTEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Isnaini

    2012-04-01

    hipophisis protein profile of  crossbreed friesh holland dairy cattle follicular and luteal phase by SDS-PAGE method. The result of this research is expected can be used as reference for the examination of a existing certain protein type in hipophisis of crossbreed friesh holland dairy cattle. The material in this research was hipophisis of crossbreed friesh holland dairy cattle follicular phase and luteal phase, taken away from House of Animal Slaughtering Singosari Malang. The method used in this research was observation. Hipophisis sample of crossbreed friesh holland dairy cattle follicular phase and luteal phase was conducted protein isolation and determine weight protein molecule. The data were analysed with descriptive analysis. The result of this research indicate that hipophisis protein profile follicular phase and luteal phase of crossbreed friesh holland dairy cattle have difference. In hipophisis follicular phase have 12 protein bands, there were: 163; 112,3; 101,3; 85,8; 80,6; 71,2; 53,3; 45,2; 39,9; 32,4; 29,8 and 24,8 kDa. In hipophisis luteal phase have 12 protein bands, there were: 163; 112,3; 101,3; 85,8; 71,2; 60,3; 53,3; 45,2; 39,9; 32,4; 29,8 and 24,8 kDa. Weight protein molecule 80,6 kDa just in hipophisis follicular phase, and weight protein molecule 60,3 kDa just in hipophisis luteal phase.The conclusion this research a protein profile hipophisis follicular phase difference with a protein profile hipophisis luteal phase of crossbreed friesh holland dairy cattle. In suggestion  to do an extended research by immunoblothing or westernblothing (WB to make sure a certain protein.   Keywords: Hipophisis, follicular, luteal, weight protein molecule

  14. The Ups and Downs of Parenting Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes: A Crowdsourcing Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jessica S; Aroian, Karen; Caldwell, Cindy; Ross, Judith L; Lee, Joyce M; Schifano, Elizabeth; Novotny, Rebecca; Tamayo, Anthony; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-09-01

    Parenting young children with type 1 diabetes (YC-T1D) entails pervasive challenges; parental coping may influence child and parent outcomes. This study used a qualitative descriptive design to describe these challenges comprehensively to inform the user-centered design of an Internet coping resource for parents. A "Parent Crowd" of 153 parents of children with T1D onset at ≤ 5 years old submitted textual responses online to open-ended questions about parenting YC-T1D. Systematic coding organized responses into domains, themes, and examples. A supplemental focus group of racial/ethnic minority parents enhanced the sample's diversity and validated findings from the Parent Crowd. Similar domains and themes emerged from responses of crowdsourcing and focus group participants. In each domain, parenting YC-T1D was challenging, but there was also substantial evidence of positive coping strategies and adaptability. The study yielded rich data to inform user-centered design of an Internet resource for parents of YC-T1D. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Parental History of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Nonaffective Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Miller, Brian; Bernardo, Miguel; Donner, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We attempted to replicate two previous studies which found an increased risk of diabetes in the relatives of schizophrenia probands. Methods N=34 patients with newly-diagnosed nonaffective psychosis and N=52 non-psychiatric controls were interviewed for parental history of Type 2 diabetes. Results In a logistic regression model that included multiple potential confounders, psychosis was a significant predictor of Type 2 diabetes in either parent (p<0.04). Discussion We found an increased prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the parents of nonaffective psychosis subjects. This association may be due to shared environmental or genetic risk factors, or both. PMID:18031995

  16. Gender-Typed Behavior Over Time in Children with Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Garcia, Randi L.

    2016-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined patterns and predictors of parent-reported gender-typed play behavior in adopted boys and girls in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual two-parent families, across early childhood (Mage = 2.82 to 6.06 years). Specifically, using a sample of 181 couples (56 lesbian couples, 48 gay male couples, and 77 heterosexual couples), we examined parent reports of children’s gender-typed play behavior on the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok & Rust, 1993) at three time points (mean age = 2.82 years at T1, 3.93 years at T2, and 6.06 years at T3). Family structure variables (i.e., parents’ gender and sexual orientation; children’s gender and sibling status) were included as predictors. At T1, according to parent reports, children in lesbian-parent families had less gender-differentiated behavior (boys were less masculine, girls were less feminine) than children in heterosexual- and gay-parent families, whereas the degree of gender differentiation did not differ between heterosexual- versus gay-parent families. Findings from a Common Fate Growth Model (Ledermann & Macho, 2014) revealed that, regardless of family type, the parent-reported gender-typed behavior of boys, but not girls, significantly changed over time (i.e., boys’ behavior became more masculine). Our findings have implications for researchers who study gender development in children and adolescents, particularly those who are being raised by two mothers or two fathers. PMID:27416364

  17. Support Group for Parents Coping with Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Tanja; Rutar, Miha; Battelino, Tadej; Drobnič Radobuljac, Maja; Bratina, Nataša

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood. Active parental involvement, parental support in the diabetes management and family functioning are associated with optimal diabetes management and glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to assess parental satisfaction with participation in the group and their perceptions of the impact of the intervention on living and coping with childrens T1D. A sample of 34 parents of children with T1D participated in this trend study. The participants' experience and satisfaction with support group was measured by a self- evaluation questionnaire, designed for the purpose of the present study. Quantitative data show that parents were overall satisfied with almost all measured items of the evaluation questionnaire (wellbeing in the group, feeling secure, experiencing new things, being able to talk and feeling being heard) during the 4-year period. However, parents from the second and third season, on average, found that the support group has better fulfilled their expectations than the parents from the first season (p = 0,010). The qualitative analysis of the participants' responses to the open-ended questions was underpinned by four themes: support when confronting the diagnosis, transformation of the family dynamics, me as a parent, exchange of experience and good practice and facing the world outside the family. The presented parent support group showed to be a promising supportive, therapeutic and psychoeducative space where parents could strengthen their role in the upbringing of their child with T1D.

  18. Mediating factors of coping process in parents of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouie, Fatemeh; Mehrdad, Neda; Ebrahimi, Hossein

    2013-05-14

    Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition for children and their parents, the management for which imposes a vast responsibility. This study explores the mediating factors that affect Iranian parents' coping processes with their children's type 1 diabetes. Research was conducted using the grounded theory method. Participants were selected purposefully, and we continued with theoretical sampling. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data. The mediating factors of the parental coping process with their child's diabetes consist of the child's cooperation, crises and experiences, economic challenges, and parental participation in care. Findings highlight the necessity of well-informed nurses with insightful understanding of the mediating factors in parental coping with juvenile diabetes in order to meet the particular needs of this group.

  19. Pathogenesis and prevention of type 2 diabetes: parental determinants, breastfeeding, and early childhood nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Sarah; Freemark, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Among the factors predisposing to type 2 diabetes in children, adolescents, and young adults, the health and behavior of both the mother and father are critical. Prevention and treatment of parental nutritional disorders (including obesity and malnutrition), promotion of breastfeeding, and avoidance of overfeeding of young children are essential for childhood health and metabolic function. Focusing research and policy on parental influences on childhood health should reduce the risks of obesity and type 2 diabetes in future generations.

  20. Type D personality mediates the relationship between remembered parenting and perceived health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Broek, Krista C; Smolderen, Kim G; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2014-01-01

    Type D personality (a joint tendency to experience negative emotions and inhibit self-expression) has been associated with adverse outcomes across cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about its association with remembered parenting.......Type D personality (a joint tendency to experience negative emotions and inhibit self-expression) has been associated with adverse outcomes across cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about its association with remembered parenting....

  1. Potential for Drug Abuse: the Predictive Role of Parenting Styles, Stress and Type D Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahin soheili

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was an attempt to predict potential for drug abuse on the basis of three predictors of parenting style, stress and type D personality. Method: In this descriptive-correlational study, 200 students (100 males and 100 females of Islamic Azad University of Karaj were selected by convenience sampling. For data collection, perceived parenting styles questionnaire, perceived stress scale, type D personality scale, and addiction potential scale were used. Results: The results showed that rejecting/neglecting parenting style and emotional warmth were positively and negatively correlated with addiction potential, respectively. Conclusion: The child-parent relationship and also the relationship between stress and type D personality can be considered as predictive factors in addiction potential.

  2. Secrecy From Parents and Type 1 Diabetes Management in Late Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Alexandra; Wiebe, Deborah J; Van Bogart, Karina; Turner, Sara L; Tucker, Christy; Butner, Jonathan E; Berg, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (a) associations of parent-adolescent relationship characteristics and adolescent problem behavior with late adolescents' secrecy from parents about type 1 diabetes management, and (b) whether secrecy was associated with diabetes and psychological outcomes independently of these factors. Adolescents (N = 247, Mage = 17.76 years) completed survey measures of diabetes-related secrecy from parents, disclosure, parental acceptance, parental knowledge, and conduct problems. Mothers and adolescents reported on adolescent adherence to diabetes regimens and adolescents reported their depressive symptoms. Glycemic control was obtained from HbA1c test kits. Adolescent-reported disclosure to parents was uniquely negatively associated with secrecy from parents. Controlling for relationship variables, conduct problems, and sociodemographic and illness-related variables, secrecy from mothers was uniquely associated with poorer glycemic control and secrecy from both parents was associated with lower adherence. Secrecy about type 1 diabetes management is uniquely associated with diabetes outcomes independent of other relationship characteristics and problem behaviors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Clustering of risk factors in parents of patients with type 1 diabetes and nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Lena M; Forsblom, Carol; Fagerudd, Johan; Pettersson-Fernholm, Kim; Kilpikari, Riika; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2007-05-01

    To assess the impact of parental risk factors for diabetic nephropathy. This cross-sectional study included 2,355 type 1 diabetic patients from the FinnDiane (Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy) study. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as macroalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate >200 microg/min or >300 mg/24 h) or end-stage renal disease. Information was available from 4,676 parents. Parental scores were calculated based on the number of various traits in the parents. Patients with diabetic nephropathy, compared with those without diabetic nephropathy, had a higher prevalence of maternal (41 vs. 35%, P = 0.046) and parental (62 vs. 55%, P = 0.044) hypertension, maternal stroke (7.6 vs. 5.1%, P = 0.044), and maternal (1.4 vs. 0.7%, P = 0.058) and parental (4.3 vs. 2.9%, P = 0.030) type 1 diabetes. If both, compared with none, of the parents had hypertension, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for diabetic nephropathy in offspring was 1.56 (95% CI 1.13-2.15). The adjusted OR for diabetic nephropathy was 2.13 (1.36-3.33) for the parental hypertension-diabetes score (3-4 vs. 0 points) and 2.13 (1.37-3.33) for the parental hypertension-cardiovascular disease (CVD)-diabetes score (4-6 vs. 0 points). Fathers of patients with diabetic nephropathy, compared with those without diabetic nephropathy, had reduced overall survival (log-rank P = 0.04) and reduced cardiovascular survival (log-rank P = 0.03). A cluster of parental hypertension, CVD, and diabetes is associated with diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, as is paternal mortality.

  4. Development of an eHealth Program for Parents of Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Robin; Zincavage, Rebekah M; Jaser, Sarah S; Grey, Margaret; Coleman, Julia L; Collett, David; Delvy, Roberta; Basile Ibrahim, Bridget; Marceau, Lisa D

    2018-02-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to understand the experience of parenting an adolescent with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), to develop a prototype of an eHealth program for parents of adolescents with T1DM, and to evaluate the prototype content and acceptability from the perspective of parents and health care providers. Methods A multiphase method was used generating both qualitative and quantitative data at multiple time points. There were 27 parents of adolescents aged 12 to 18 years with T1DM and 16 health care providers who participated in semistructured interviews to identify parental challenges; 53 parents and 27 providers evaluated the prototype. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze interview transcripts, and descriptive statistics were used to summarize survey data. Results Challenges experienced by parents of adolescents with T1DM included understanding the developmental and hormonal changes of adolescence that affect diabetes care, feeling tension between adolescent independence and parent control, communicating without nagging or conflict, transferring diabetes care responsibility safely, dealing with feelings of stress and distress, and perceiving a lack of resources for T1DM care and insufficient personal time for self-care. In the prototype evaluation, both parents and providers found content to be relevant and provided feedback to guide the development of the full program. Conclusions Parents of adolescents with T1DM and providers expressed a need for parents to have more support in transitioning diabetes care from parent to adolescent. eHealth programs offer an ideal way to address these needs and ultimately can be linked to electronic medical records improving quality and efficiency of health care in this population.

  5. Influence of family type and parenting behaviours on teenage sexual behaviour and conceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, C; Allen, E; Strange, V; Oakley, A; Copas, A; Johnson, A; Stephenson, J

    2006-06-01

    Longitudinal data were used to explore relations between teenage pregnancy, sexual behaviour, and family type. The study examined whether students from lone parent and/or teenage mother initiated families more commonly report sex, lack of contraception at first sex, and/or conceptions by age 15/16, and whether such associations can be explained by low parental strictness, difficult parent-child communication, and/or low parental input into sex education. Up to date longitudinal UK research on family influences on conceptions is lacking, as is longitudinal research on family influences on sexual behaviour. No previous studies have comprehensively examined effects of parenting behaviours. Unlike previous research, this study tested theories suggesting that parenting deficits among lone parent and teenage initiated families increase risk of teenage pregnancy among their children. Secondary analysis of data from a trial of sex education. Girls and boys from lone parent families or having mothers who were teenagers when they were born were more likely to report sex but not lack of contraception at first sex by age 15/16. Girls and boys with mothers having them as teenagers, and boys but not girls from lone parent families, were more likely to report being involved in conceptions by age 15/16. Only the association between teenage mother family and girls' conceptions was reduced by adjusting for a parenting behaviour measure. Students from lone parent families or having mothers who were teenagers when they were born are more likely to report early sexual debut and conceptions by age 15/16, but this is not generally explained by parenting style.

  6. Gender-typed behavior over time in children with lesbian, gay, and heterosexual parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Garcia, Randi L

    2016-10-01

    The current longitudinal study examined patterns and predictors of parent-reported gender-typed play behavior in adopted boys and girls in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual 2-parent families, across early childhood (Mage = 2.82 to 6.06 years). Specifically, using a sample of 181 couples (56 lesbian couples, 48 gay male couples, and 77 heterosexual couples), we examined parent reports of children's gender-typed play behavior on the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok & Rust, 1993) at 3 time points (mean age = 2.82 years at T1, 3.93 years at T2, and 6.06 years at T3). Family structure variables (i.e., parents' gender and sexual orientation; children's gender and sibling status) were included as predictors. At T1, according to parent reports, children in lesbian-parent families had less gender-differentiated behavior (boys were less masculine, girls were less feminine) than children in heterosexual- and gay-parent families, whereas the degree of gender differentiation did not differ between heterosexual- versus gay-parent families. Findings from a Common Fate Growth Model (Ledermann & Macho, 2014) revealed that, regardless of family type, the parent-reported gender-typed behavior of boys, but not girls, significantly changed over time (i.e., boys' behavior became more masculine). Our findings have implications for researchers who study gender development in children and adolescents, particularly those who are being raised by 2 mothers or 2 fathers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Assessment of Psychopathology, Quality of Life, and Parental Attitudes in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Nilfer; Öztop, Didem Behice; Yilmaz, Savaş; Altun, Hatice

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify psychopathology, parental attitudes, perceptions of quality of life, and relationships between these factors in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). Fifty adolescents (12-18 years old) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 50 healthy adolescents and their parents were recruited for the study. Clinical interviews with the diabetic adolescents were performed using "Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL)." Both groups completed the "Depression Scale for Children," "State-Trait Anxiety Inventory," and "Health Related Quality of Life Scale for Children," while their parents completed the "Parental Attitude Research Instrument," "The Coping Strategy Indicator," and "Health Related Quality of Life Scale for Children-Parent Form." The psychological disorder ratio in diabetic adolescents was 68%. No significant difference was found regarding perceptions of quality of life between the diabetic group and control group. However, diabetic adolescents with psychological disorder had reduced perception of quality of life than those without psychological disorder. Among parental attitudes, an authoritarian attitude was found to be more common in the diabetic group. It was found that among coping strategies, parents in the diabetic group use avoidance more commonly. In the present study, a high rate of psychopathology was detected among adolescents with type 1 DM. In addition, no clear impairment in quality of life was reported in patients with type 1 DM; however, there was worsening in the perception of quality of life in the presence of psychiatric disorders accompanying diabetes. It was found that parents of diabetic children use inappropriate coping strategies and negative parental attitudes more often than those of healthy controls.

  8. The Comparison of Healthy and Unhealthy Perfectionism and Type A Personality in The Perceived Parenting Styles in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    مریم جهان بخش

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present research is to study healthy and unhealthy perfectionism as well as type A personality based on different parenting styles. With a ex-post-facto method, a sample of undergraduate students at Shahid Beheshti University was selected through random multistage cluster sampling with at least 80 students in every parenting style. This sample consists of 407 students: 235 girls and 172 boys. The subjects completed three questionnaires of perceived parenting style, positive and negative perfectionism scale and type A personality. The collected data was analyzed by statistical tests MANOVA and ANOVA and Scheffe post hoc test. Results indicated that healthy perfectionism in the authoritative parenting style is more and in negligent parenting style is lower than the other parenting styles. The unhealthy perfectionism of the boys was more than girls. The interactive effect of the two variables namely parenting styles and gender upon healthy perfectionism was significant. Healthy­ perfectionism in authoritative parenting style in girls was more than boys and in permissive parenting style healthy perfectionism in boys was more than girls. The general effect of parenting styles and general effect of gender in score of type A personality did not show significant difference; however, the interactive effect of parenting styles and gender upon type A personality was supported. Here in permissive parenting style the type A personality in boys is higher than girls and in authoritarian parenting style the type A personality in girls is higher than boys. Conclusion: Due to the crucial role of parents' parenting styles in creating healthy and unhealthy perfectionism and also due to interactive effect of parenting style and gender on the healthy perfectionism and type A personality, educating parents on parenting styles and also giving instruction to the families for raising healthy persons in the society is a high priority.

  9. Fear of hypoglycaemia in parents of young children with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Katharine; Thomas, Sian; Royle, Pamela; Noyes, Kathryn; Waugh, Norman

    2010-07-15

    Many children with type 1 diabetes have poor glycaemic control. Since the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed that tighter control reduces complication rates, there has been more emphasis on intensified insulin therapy. We know that patients and families are afraid of hypoglycaemia. We hypothesised that fear of hypoglycaemia might take precedence over concern about long-term complications, and that behaviour to avoid hypoglycaemia might be at the cost of poorer control, and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of any interventions designed to prevent that. The objective of this review was to systematically review studies concerning the extent and consequences of fear of hypoglycaemia in parents of children under 12 years of age with type 1 diabetes, and interventions to reduce it. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, meeting abstracts of EASD, ADA and Diabetes UK, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, UK CRN, scrutiny of bibliographies of retrieved papers and contact with experts in the field.Inclusions: Relevant studies of any design of parents of children under 12 years of age with Type 1 diabetes were included. The key outcomes were the extent and impact of fear, hypoglycaemia avoidance behaviour in parents due to parental fear of hypoglycaemia in their children, the effect on diabetes control, and the impact of interventions to reduce this fear and hypoglycaemia avoidance behaviour. Eight articles from six studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross sectional studies and most were of good quality. Parental fear of hypoglycaemia, anxiety and depression were reported to be common. There was a paucity of evidence on behaviour to avoid hypoglycaemia, but there were some suggestions that higher than desirable blood glucose levels might be permitted in order to avoid hypoglycaemia. No studies reporting interventions to reduce parental fear of hypoglycaemia were found. The evidence base was limited. Parents

  10. Fear of hypoglycaemia in parents of young children with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noyes Kathryn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with type 1 diabetes have poor glycaemic control. Since the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT showed that tighter control reduces complication rates, there has been more emphasis on intensified insulin therapy. We know that patients and families are afraid of hypoglycaemia. We hypothesised that fear of hypoglycaemia might take precedence over concern about long-term complications, and that behaviour to avoid hypoglycaemia might be at the cost of poorer control, and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of any interventions designed to prevent that. The objective of this review was to systematically review studies concerning the extent and consequences of fear of hypoglycaemia in parents of children under 12 years of age with type 1 diabetes, and interventions to reduce it. Methods Data Sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, meeting abstracts of EASD, ADA and Diabetes UK, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, UK CRN, scrutiny of bibliographies of retrieved papers and contact with experts in the field. Inclusions: Relevant studies of any design of parents of children under 12 years of age with Type 1 diabetes were included. The key outcomes were the extent and impact of fear, hypoglycaemia avoidance behaviour in parents due to parental fear of hypoglycaemia in their children, the effect on diabetes control, and the impact of interventions to reduce this fear and hypoglycaemia avoidance behaviour. Results Eight articles from six studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross sectional studies and most were of good quality. Parental fear of hypoglycaemia, anxiety and depression were reported to be common. There was a paucity of evidence on behaviour to avoid hypoglycaemia, but there were some suggestions that higher than desirable blood glucose levels might be permitted in order to avoid hypoglycaemia. No studies reporting interventions to reduce parental

  11. Holland piiraks sisserännet EL-i / Ahto Lobjakas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lobjakas, Ahto, 1970-

    2004-01-01

    Hollandi justiitsministri Piet Hein Donneri sõnul otsib EL-i praegune eesistujamaa Holland lahendusi, mis aitaksid põgenikke ja potentsiaalseid asüülitaotlejaid paremini kaitsta nende asukohariikide läheduses

  12. Muusika : Viiulivirtuoos Kanadast. Holland Music Sessionsi stipendiaadid. "Jazzkaar" Georg Otsa jälgedes

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Estonia kontserdisaalis esineb ERSO ees tippviiuldaja Lara St. John. Holland Music Sessions'i meistrikursustele pääses konkursi korras kuus eesti noort muusikut. Vene Draamateatris 17. III toimuvast kontserdist "Georg Otsa jälgedes"

  13. Detection-dependent six-photon Holland-Burnett state interference

    OpenAIRE

    Rui-Bo Jin; Mikio Fujiwara; Ryosuke Shimizu; Robert J. Collins; Gerald S. Buller; Taro Yamashita; Shigehito Miki; Hirotaka Terai; Masahiro Takeoka; Masahide Sasaki

    2016-01-01

    The NOON state, and its experimental approximation the Holland-Burnett state, have important applications in phase sensing measurement with enhanced sensitivity. However, most of the previous Holland-Burnett state interference (HBSI) experiments only investigated the area of the interference pattern in the region immediately around zero optical path length difference, while the full HBSI pattern over a wide range of optical path length differences has not yet been well explored. In this work,...

  14. The relationship between parenting types and older adolescents' personality, academic achievement, adjustment, and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, L H; Schwarz, J C

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine Baumrind's T3 conceptual framework using a multiple informant design and an older adolescent population. With 178 college students and their families as participants, the present study found many of the predicted relations between parents' child-rearing style (Authoritative, Democratic, Nondirective, Nonauthoritarian-Directive, Authoritarian-Directive, and Unengaged) and their adolescent children's behavior in the 4 domains assessed: personality, adjustment, academic achievement, and substance use. The differences between parenting types on the criterion measures were not as large as reported in Baumrind's study, and significant effects were predominantly due to the poor scores from children with Unengaged and Authoritarian-Directive parents. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the Authoritative parenting type, the utility of using a typology, and areas for future research.

  15. Parenting style, parent-youth conflict, and medication adherence in youth with type 2 diabetes participating in an intensive lifestyle change intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletsky, Ronald D; Trief, Paula M; Anderson, Barbara J; Rosenbaum, Paula; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2014-06-01

    Parenting behaviors and family conflict relate to type 1 diabetes outcomes in youth. Our purpose was to understand these relationships in parents and youth with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The TODAY (Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth) trial enrolled youth (10-17 years) with T2DM and parent/guardian. For this ancillary study, we enrolled a sample of youth-parent pairs (N = 137) in 1 study arm (metformin plus lifestyle intervention). They completed questionnaires measuring parenting style related to normative (e.g., completing homework) and diabetes self-care (e.g., testing blood glucose) tasks, and parent-youth verbal conflict (baseline, 6, and 12 months). Parenting style was consistent across normative and diabetes tasks, with gradual increases in autonomy perceived by youth. Conversations were generally calm, with greater conflict regarding normative than diabetes tasks at baseline (youth: p parent: p = .01), 6 months (youth: p = .02, parent: p > .05), and 12 months (youth: p > .05., parent: p = .05). A permissive parenting style toward normative tasks and a less authoritarian style toward diabetes tasks, at baseline, predicted better medication adherence (8-12 months) (normative: adjusted R2 = 0.48, p Parent-youth conflict did not predict medication adherence. Youth with T2DM who perceive more autonomy (less parental control) in day-to-day and diabetes tasks are more likely to adhere to medication regimens. It may be valuable to assess youth perceptions of parenting style and help parents understand youths' needs for autonomy.

  16. Responsive parenting is associated with improved type 1 diabetes-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Harbaum, M; Nansel, T; Haynie, D L; Iannotti, R J; Simons-Morton, B

    2008-09-01

    Improved quality of life is an important treatment goal for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. While previous research supports a relationship between family environment and quality of life, little research has addressed the relationship of parenting style constructs to quality of life in children with chronic disease. The present investigation assesses the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness with diabetes-related quality of life among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Baseline and 12-month follow-up self-report assessments were collected on a sample of 81 children with type 1 diabetes participating in an efficacy trial of a behavioural intervention to enhance adherence. The sample had a mean age of 13.3 years (SD=1.7) and duration of diabetes of 7.7 years (SD=3.7). Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness to diabetes-related quality of life at each time point. After adjusting for demographic and diabetes characteristics, as well as diabetes-specific parent-child behaviours, parent responsiveness was significantly associated with baseline diabetes-related quality of life (beta=0.23; P=0.04). This relationship was sustained at 12-month follow-up (beta=0.22; P=0.04) after adjusting for baseline quality of life and treatment group assignment, suggesting that parent responsiveness is associated with improved quality of life. Findings indicate the importance of a supportive and emotionally warm parenting style in promoting improved quality of life for children with type 1 diabetes. Appropriate parenting skills should be an element of diabetes family management health care.

  17. Driving safety: concerns and experiences of parents of adolescent drivers with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel J; Gonder-Frederick, Linda A; Shepard, Jaclyn A; Campbell, Laura K; Vajda, Karen A

    2012-09-01

    Driving is a dangerous activity for adolescents, perhaps being even more precarious for adolescents with type 1 diabetes due to the possibility of extreme blood glucose (BG). There is no available data on adolescent driving safety concerns and type 1 diabetes. To begin addressing this issue, we surveyed parents regarding their observations and concerns. Seventy-two parents (87.5% mothers) of adolescent drivers aged 16-19 with type 1 diabetes provided analyzable data. Females comprised 36% of their adolescents, with 74% using pump therapy. In the past year, 13 and 84% of parents reported that their adolescent had experienced severe or moderate disruptive hypoglycemia, respectively. Over half (56%) of the parents reported moderate to extreme worry about how diabetes impacted their adolescent's driving, while only 21% of parents thought their adolescents had similar concerns (p = 0.037). Almost one third (31%) of parents thought their adolescent need not treat low BG until it fell below 70 mg/dL, 13% thought their adolescent could safely drive with BG below 65 mg/dL. And, 31 and 14% of parents, respectively, reported their adolescent had been in a collision or stopped by the police in the past year, which they attributed to both hypo- and hyperglycemia. Adolescents reportedly took steps to prevent hypo- and hyperglycemia while driving, but more aggressively avoided hypoglycemia (p < 0.001). While this data is limited, lacking a non-diabetic control group and randomized sample, it does suggest that driving and adolescent type 1 diabetes deserve further attention and investigation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Career Pathing among General Administrative and Support Services Employees Based on Holland?s Typology of Personality Theory and Personal Style Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Catalino N.

    2009-01-01

    The study is about the prevailing differences, commonalities and significant contributions of the career pathing among the general administrative and support services employees based on Holland's Typology of Personality Theory and Personal Style Inventory of selected higher educational institutions in Metro Manila.

  19. Psychosocial effects in parents and children 12 years after newborn genetic screening for type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerruish, Nicola J; Healey, Dione M; Gray, Andrew R

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the psychosocial consequences of testing newborns for genetic susceptibility to multifactorial diseases. This study reports quantitative psychosocial evaluations of parents and children 12 years after screening for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Two parent-child cohorts participated: children at increased genetic risk of T1D and children at low genetic risk. T1D risk status was determined at birth as part of a prospective study investigating potential environmental triggers of autoimmunity. Parent measures included ratings of children's emotional, behavioural and social functioning (Child Behaviour Checklist) and parenting style (Alabama Parenting Questionnaire). Child self-concept was assessed using the self-description questionnaire (SDQ1). Statistical analyses were conducted to test for differences between the groups. Twelve years after testing there was no evidence that knowledge of a child's increased genetic risk of T1D adversely affected parental ratings of their child's emotional, behavioural or social functioning, or impacted upon parenting style. There was no adverse effect upon the child's assessment of their self-concept. This study provides important preliminary data concerning longer-term psychosocial effects of incorporating tests for genetic risk of complex disorders into NBS panels. While it is reassuring that no significant adverse effects have been detected, more data will be required to adequately inform policy. PMID:28120838

  20. Disentangling the roles of parental monitoring and family conflict in adolescents' management of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Holmes, Clarissa S; Chen, Rusan; Maher, Kathryn; Robinson, Elizabeth; Streisand, Randi

    2013-04-01

    Less parental monitoring of adolescents' diabetes self-care and more family conflict are each associated with poorer diabetes outcomes. However, little is known about how these two family factors relate with one another in the context of self-care and glycemic control. Diabetes self-care was evaluated as a mediator of the associations among parental monitoring, family conflict, and glycemic control in early adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Adolescent-parent dyads (n = 257) reported on the frequency of parental monitoring, family conflict, and diabetes self-care. Hemoglobin A1c was abstracted from medical charts. Structural equation modeling was used for mediation analysis. A mediation model linking parental involvement and family conflict with A1c through diabetes self-care fit the data well. Monitoring and conflict were inversely correlated (β = -0.23, p Conflict also was positively associated with higher A1c (β = 0.31, p conflict and less parental monitoring are risk factors for poorer glycemic control, and diabetes self-care is one mediator linking these variables. Interventions to promote parental monitoring of diabetes management during early adolescence may benefit from emphasizing strategies to prevent or reduce family conflict. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  1. A robust TDT-type association test under informative parental missingness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J H; Cheng, K F

    2011-02-10

    Many family-based association tests rely on the random transmission of alleles from parents to offspring. Among them, the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) may be considered to be the most popular statistical test. The TDT statistic and its variations were proposed to evaluate nonrandom transmission of alleles from parents to the diseased children. However, in family studies, parental genotypes may be missing due to parental death, loss, divorce, or other reasons. Under some missingness conditions, nonrandom transmission of alleles may still occur even when the gene and disease are not associated. As a consequence, the usual TDT-type tests would produce excessive false positive conclusions in association studies. In this paper, we propose a novel TDT-type association test which is not only simple in computation but also robust to the joint effect of population stratification and informative parental missingness. Our test is model-free and allows for different mechanisms of parental missingness across subpopulations. We use a simulation study to compare the performance of the new test with TDT and point out the advantage of the new method. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Marek’s disease in the holland white crested chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spalević Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marek’s disease is a viral lymphoproliferative disease of poultry characterized by the creation of lymphoma in muscle, skin, eye or internal organs. Virus maturing into infective forms in follicular epithelium from where enters in the external environment where long time remains infectious. Poultry are infected by dust and remains the holder of the virus throughout their lives. The virus is transmitted vertically. The disease can occur in three forms: nervous, visceral and skin. Affected poultry may have any shape or combination of these. The aim of this study was to determine the cause of the disorder the health status in the flock of holland white crested chickens. Flock had 25 chickens whose ages ranged from 4-16 weeks. Observation, we noticed that the chickens are cachectic, showing signs of sporadic diarrhea and died 3 hens and 2 roosters. Pathoanatomical examination is ascertained changes in certain internal organs. The liver was enlarged with lymphoid proliferate on the surface and in the parenchyma, spleen increased several times and marbled, glandular stomach (proventriculus dilated with petechial hemorrhages on mucose. Changed organs was examination histopathological. In the liver were observed multifocal lymphoid infiltration with subsequent atrophy of the parenchyma, in addition to spleen lymphoid proliferation heterophyllus and histiocytic infiltrates, in proventriculus lymphoblastic infiltration with congestion of capillaries and small haemorrhages. In samples pathologically altered organs PCR method proved the genome of Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 . Based on these results we concluded that the livestock were sick from Marek’s disease, which is expressed in visceral form.

  3. Examination of Bidirectional Relationships between Parent Stress and Two Types of Problem Behavior in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Mirenda, Pat; Duku, Eric; Szatmari, Peter; Georgiades, Stelios; Volden, Joanne; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Bryson, Susan; Smith, Isabel; Fombonne, Eric; Roberts, Wendy; Waddell, Charlotte; Thompson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Path analysis within a structural equation modeling framework was employed to examine the relationships between two types of parent stress and children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors over a 4-year period, in a sample of 184 mothers of young children with autism spectrum disorder. Parent stress was measured with the Parenting Stress…

  4. Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This document contains the fifth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency, examining the impact of parental behavior on the production of delinquent behavior. "Parents: Neglectful and Neglected" (Laurence D. Steinberg) posits…

  5. Effect of Race and Marital Status on Mothers’ Observed Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mackenzie T.; Gruhn, Meredith A.; Grey, Margaret; Delamater, Alan M.; Jaser, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine demographic differences in parenting behaviors and adjustment in youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods Adolescents’ psychosocial adjustment was assessed via self-reports and parent reports, and clinical data were obtained from adolescents’ medical records. Mother–adolescent dyads (N = 93) engaged in a videotaped discussion task, which was coded for observed parenting behaviors. Results Single and non-White mothers exhibited significantly more overinvolved and less collaborative parenting behaviors. Higher levels of overinvolved parenting and lower levels of collaborative parenting were associated with poorer adolescent adjustment (i.e., higher levels of externalizing problems). Observed parenting was not significantly associated with glycemic control. There was an indirect effect of marital status and race/ethnicity on externalizing behaviors through parenting. Conclusions The current study highlights parenting as a potential target for interventions, especially in single and minority mothers, to improve adjustment in this population. PMID:25248850

  6. Parallel vigilance: parents' dual focus following diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus in their young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedel, Selaine; Traynor, Michael; McKee, Martin; Grey, Margaret

    2013-05-01

    There is consensus that enabling patient self-care and expertise leads to better management of chronic illness. Clinicians are being encouraged to manage clinical encounters in ways that promote these outcomes rather than perpetuate hierarchical relationships. This article describes one part of a larger study of 55 outpatient consultations conducted within 14 months of the diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus in young children. Participants were parents and the specialist doctors, nurses, dieticians and social workers who oversee the child's secondary care. Consultations were audio-recorded and transcribed. Our analysis draws on aspects of conversation analysis (CA) to investigate how parents' talk enacts a growing confidence in the management of their child's disease in the face of questioning from professionals. Analysis reveals how this talk distinguishes a duality of focus that combines the normal watchfulness exhibited by all parents as they protect their children, with an additional intense, parallel watchfulness for signs of potentially serious manifestations of diabetes. We term this phenomenon parallel vigilance and illustrate its development using five representative extracts from consultations. The concept of parallel vigilance extends the chronic illness literature and informs our understanding of a process that contributes to parents' developing expertise and provides new and important insights into the way in which parents conceptualize and implement their evolving role in the care of their child. Moreover, parallel vigilance serves as an enabler of parental contributions to the specialist consultation.

  7. Latinos' Use, Desire, and Type of Non-Parental Child Care Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Enilda A.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey of the 2001 National Household Education Surveys Program, this study analyzes the use, desire, and type of non-parental care among Latinos in the United States. These nationally representative data indicate that when controlled for child and household characteristics, Latinos and non-Latino…

  8. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  9. Fear of Hypoglycemia in Parents of Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, Susana R.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Henry, Racquel; Powers, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined fear of hypoglycemia in 81 mothers and 64 fathers of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-Parents of Young Children (HFS-P-YC possible range=26–130).

  10. Young Children's Sibling Relationship Interactional Types: Associations with Family Characteristics, Parenting, and Child Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Wendy C.; Yu, Jeong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examines patterns of sibling relationship qualities or interactional types and their association with family characteristics, parenting, and the characteristics of 1 of those children. Participants were 65 children (34 boys; Time 1 mean age = 51 months), their mothers, fathers, and Head Start teachers. Approximately…

  11. Cortical Serotonin Type-2 Receptor Density in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jeremy; Anderson, George M.; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Hall, Geoffrey B. C.; Nahmias, Claude; Thompson, Ann; Szatmari, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Parents (N = 19) of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and adult controls (N = 17) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) using [[superscript 18]F]setoperone to image cortical serotonin type-2 (5-HT2) receptors. The 5-HT2 binding potentials (BPs) were calculated by ratioing [[superscript 18]F]setoperone intensity in regions of…

  12. Types of parental involvement in CBT with anxious youth: a preliminary meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassis, Katharina; Lee, Trevor Changgun; Bennett, Kathryn; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Mendlowitz, Sandra; Duda, Stephanie; Saini, Michael; Wilansky, Pamela; Baer, Susan; Barrett, Paula; Bodden, Denise; Cobham, Vanessa E; Dadds, Mark R; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Ginsburg, Golda; Heyne, David; Hudson, Jennifer L; Kendall, Philip C; Liber, Juliette; Masia-Warner, Carrie; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Silverman, Wendy; Siqueland, Lynne; Spence, Susan H; Utens, Elisabeth; Wood, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    Meta-analytic studies have not confirmed that involving parents in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for anxious children is therapeutically beneficial. There is also great heterogeneity in the type of parental involvement included. We investigated parental involvement focused on contingency management (CM) and transfer of control (TC) as a potential outcome moderator using a meta-analysis with individual patient data. Investigators of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBT for anxious children, identified systematically, were invited to submit their data. Conditions in each RCT were coded based on type of parental involvement in CBT (i.e., low involvement, active involvement without emphasis on CM or TC, active involvement with emphasis on CM or TC). Treatment outcomes were compared using a 1-stage meta-analysis. All cases involved in active treatment (894 of 1,618) were included for subgroup analyses. Across all CBT groups, means of clinical severity, anxiety, and internalizing symptoms significantly decreased posttreatment and were comparable across groups. The group without emphasis on CM or TC showed a higher proportion with posttreatment anxiety diagnoses than the low-involvement group. Between posttreatment and 1-year follow-up, the proportion with anxiety diagnoses significantly decreased in CBT with active parental involvement with emphasis on CM or TC, whereas treatment gains were merely maintained in the other 2 groups. CBT for anxious children is an effective treatment with or without active parental involvement. However, CBT with active parental involvement emphasizing CM or TC may support long-term maintenance of treatment gains. RESULTS should be replicated as additional RCTs are published.

  13. Investigating and comparing the relationship between parental monitoring types and perceived parenting styles of the Turkish students

    OpenAIRE

    Öğretir Özçelik, Ayse Dilek

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between parental monitoring and parental styles are considered as an important subject for child development field. The aim of this article is to analyze the perceptions of the adolescents about their parents’ parental monitoring and parenting styles in terms of the participants’ gender, family education and family jobs status. The sample size is 252 adolescents with 158 female nd 94 male students. The data were collected by the Parental Monitoring Instrument (PMI) and the Pa...

  14. The distressed (Type D) personality mediates the relationship between remembered parenting and psychological distress in cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damen, Nikki L; Versteeg, Henneke; van Helmondt, Sanne J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Both the distressed (Type D) personality (i.e. the combination of negative affectivity and social inhibition traits) and dysfunctional parenting styles are associated with anxiety and depression. As parenting styles have been related to personality development, dysfunctional parenting...... styles may also be associated with Type D personality. We examined whether remembered parenting was associated with anxiety and depression in cardiac patients and whether Type D personality mediated this relationship. Methods: Our sample comprised 435 patients treated with percutaneous coronary...... intervention (PCI) and 123 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Type D Scale (DS14), and Remembered Relationship with Parents (RRP(10)) scale. Results: Remembered parenting was significantly associated with higher anxiety and depression...

  15. Quality of the parent-child interaction in young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Pouwer, Frans; van Bakel, Hedwig Ja

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) parents have full responsibility for the diabetes-management of their child (e.g. blood glucose monitoring, and administering insulin). Behavioral tasks in childhood, such as developing autonomy, and oppositional behavior (e......). METHODS/DESIGN: First, we will examine which situations are most suitable for observing diabetes-specific interactions. Then, these situations will be video-taped in a pilot study (N = 15). Observed behaviors are described into rating scales, with each scale describing characteristics of parent...

  16. Observational Measures of Parenting in Anxious and Nonanxious Mothers: Does Type of Task Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Grover, Rachel L.; Cord, Jennalee J.; Ialongo, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relation between type of parent–child interaction task and parenting behaviors among a predominantly African American community-based sample. Twenty-five anxious and matched nonanxious (N = 50) mothers were videotaped with their children (Mage = 5.8 years) engaging in both a structured and unstructured task. Blind raters coded 3 parent behaviors hypothesized to play a role in the development of child anxiety: overcontrol, anxious behavior, and criticism. Results indicated that higher levels of overcontrol, anxious behavior, and criticism were found in the structured compared to unstructured task. Levels of criticism, among anxious mothers only, were significantly correlated across tasks. Results suggest that situation specific aspects of parent–child interaction tasks may influence parenting behaviors. These findings help explain variations in observational research in the anxiety literature and highlight the need for careful selection ofparent–child tasks in future research. PMID:16597228

  17. PLASMID PROFILES AND PHAGE TYPES OF SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM ISOLATED FROM SUCCESSIVE FLOCKS OF CHICKENS ON 3 PARENT STOCK FARMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Olsen, J. E.; Bisgaard, M.

    1992-01-01

    Three-hundred-and-eighty-seven strains of Salmonella typhimurium obtained from successive generations of parent stock originating from three different rearing farms were characterized by phage typing and plasmid profiling. Seventy-six strains representing dominant types were selected for restrict......Three-hundred-and-eighty-seven strains of Salmonella typhimurium obtained from successive generations of parent stock originating from three different rearing farms were characterized by phage typing and plasmid profiling. Seventy-six strains representing dominant types were selected...

  18. Fear of Hypoglycemia in Children and Adolescents and Their Parents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Raymond, Jennifer; Naranjo, Diana; Patton, Susana R

    2016-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a frequent occurrence in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. A variety of efforts have been made to standardize the definition of hypoglycemia and to define one of its most significant psychosocial consequences-fear of hypoglycemia (FOH). In addition to documenting the experience of FOH in children and adolescents type 1 diabetes and their parents, studies have investigated the relations between FOH and glycemic control and diabetes technology use. This review provides a summary of the recent FOH literature as it applies to pediatric type 1 diabetes.

  19. Medieval capital markets. Markets for renten between state formation and private investment in Holland (1300-1550)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijderduijn, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The book is structured as follows. Chapter 1 introduces medieval Holland as a significant entity for institutional-economic development by discussing how the state created a county wide societal structure. As a proto-territorial state Holland had a uniform judiciary, a government apparatus that gave

  20. "Hebbende privilege van stede". De verlening van stadsrechtprivileges in Holland en Zeeland (13de - 15de eeuw)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, Joseph Carel Marie

    2011-01-01

    Between 1213 and 1484, numerous towns came into being in the counties of Holland and Zeeland, resulting in the rapid transformation of Holland in particular, into a “landscape of towns” where a large proportion of the county’s population – well above the average for that period - came to live. The

  1. An Evaluation of the Cross-Cultural Validity of Holland's Theory: Career Choices by Workers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Austin, James T.; Sekaran, Uma; Komarraju, Meera

    1998-01-01

    Natives of India (n=172) completed Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory and job satisfaction measures. The inventory did not exhibit high external validity with this population. Congruence, consistency, and differentiation did not predict job or occupational satisfaction, suggesting cross-cultural limits on Holland's theory. (SK)

  2. Parental Characteristics Associated With Outcomes in Youth With Type 2 Diabetes: Results From the TODAY Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Ruth S; Trief, Paula M; El Ghormli, Laure; Goland, Robin; McKay, Siripoom; Milaszewski, Kerry; Preske, Jeff; Willi, Steven; Yasuda, Patrice M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined parental factors associated with outcomes of youth in the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) clinical trial. Of 699 youth with type 2 diabetes in the TODAY cohort, 623 (89.1%) had a parent participate and provide data at baseline, including weight, HbA1c, blood pressure, symptoms of depression, binge eating (BE), and medical history. Youth were followed 2-6.5 years. Data were analyzed using regression models and survival curve methods. Parental diabetes (43.6% of parents) was associated with higher baseline HbA1c (P parent, P = 0.0002). Parental hypertension (40.6% of parents) was associated with hypertension in youth during TODAY (40.4% vs. 27.4% of youth with and without parental hypertension had hypertension, P = 0.0008) and with higher youth baseline BMI z scores (P = 0.0038). Parents had a mean baseline BMI of 33.6 kg/m(2). Parental obesity (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) was associated with higher baseline BMI z scores in the youth (P parents (20.6% of parents) were related to youth depressive symptoms at baseline only (P = 0.0430); subclinical BE in parents was related to the presence of subclinical BE (P = 0.0354) and depressive symptoms (P = 0.0326) in youth throughout the study period. Parental diabetes and hypertension were associated with lack of glycemic control, hypertension, and higher BMI z scores in youth. Further research is needed to better understand and address parental biological and behavioral factors to improve youth health outcomes. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. The relationship between parenting stress and parent-child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0-7 years)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Hartman, Esther E; Aanstoot, Henk-Jan

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent-child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0-7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including...... (like stress and parent-child interactions) are associated with important child outcomes. Therefore, it is important for health-care providers to not only focus on the child with T1DM, but also on the family system....... glucose monitoring and insulin administration). Parent-child interactions were scored with a specifically designed instrument. Questionnaires assessed general and disease-related parenting stress and (diabetes-specific (DS)) QoL. HbA(1c) (glycemic control) was extracted from the medical records. Both...

  4. Understanding the Areas and Correlates of Diabetes-Related Distress in Parents of Teens With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Danielle; Fisher, Lawrence; Polonsky, William; Johnson, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    To identify the unique areas of diabetes-related distress (DD) for parents of teens with type 1 diabetes and parent and teen characteristics associated with DD. Areas of DD were developed from structured interviews and translated into 46 survey items. Items were analyzed with exploratory factor analysis (EFA). An EFA with 332 parents (88% mothers) reduced items to four Parent Diabetes Distress Scale (PDDS) factors (20 items, α = .94): Personal, Teen Management, Parent/Teen Relationship, and Healthcare Team Distress. Parent DD was higher among fathers, younger or single parents, parents of teens with higher hemoglobin A1c or severe low blood glucose levels, authoritarian parenting, depressive symptoms, and low emotional support. 4 areas of parent DD were identified using a newly developed measure, the PDDS. DD was associated with family demographic, teen diabetes status, and parent contextual factors, and can help identify parents who may be more vulnerable to DD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The impact of parental bonding on sexual distress in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiota, Alexandra; Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Mouzas, Odysseas; Melekos, Michael; Tzortzis, Vassilios; Koukoulis, Georgios

    2013-02-01

    Psychosomatic and social issues have been found to be determinants of sexual distress in diabetic and non-diabetic populations. However, the role of parental bonding as a determinant for sexual distress has not been studied in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1). To study the role of parental care and overprotection, in the pathogenesis of sexual distress in women with DM-1. Seventy-seven women with uncomplicated DM-1 and 77 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS), the General Health Questionnaire-28, and the Parental Bonding Instrument were used to evaluate sexual distress, general health and bonding with parents, respectively. To assess the role of parental bonding as risk factor for sexual distress, in women with DM-1. Women with DM-1 had significantly higher FSDS scores compared with controls. Furthermore, women with DM-1 had significantly higher maternal and paternal care, and lower maternal overprotection in comparison with the healthy ones. Paternal overprotection and general health were similar in both groups (P > 0.05). Sexual distress was more frequent in women with DM-1 (31.43% vs. 8.57% of controls, P overprotection and lower paternal overprotection compared to diabetics without sexual distress (P 0.05). Moreover, sexually distressed DM-1 women had worse general health parameters in comparison with the non-sexually distressed diabetics (P overprotection were significant risk factors for sexual distress (P overprotection can lead to sexual distress and, therefore, to Female Sexual Dysfunction in DM-1 women. Evaluation of parental bonding is necessary in DM-1 women with distressing sexual problems. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  6. What's for dinner? Types of food served at family dinner differ across parent and family characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; MacLehose, Rich; Loth, Katie; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Eisenberg, Marla E; Berge, Jerica

    2014-01-01

    To examine the types of food served at family dinner in the homes of adolescents and correlations with parent and family sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors and meal-specific variables. A cross-sectional population-based survey completed by mail or telephone by parents participating in Project F-EAT (Families and Eating and Activity in Teens) in 2009-2010. Homes of families with adolescents in Minneapolis/St. Paul urban area, MN, USA. Participants included 1923 parents/guardians (90·8% female; 68·5% from ethnic/racial minorities) of adolescents who participated in EAT 2010. Less than a third (28%) of parents reported serving a green salad at family dinner on a regular basis, but 70% reported regularly serving vegetables (other than potatoes). About one-fifth (21%) of families had fast food at family dinners two or more times per week. Variables from within the sociodemographic domain (low educational attainment) psychosocial domain (high work-life stress, depressive symptoms, low family functioning) and meal-specific domain (low value of family meals, low enjoyment of cooking, low meal planning, high food purchasing barriers and fewer hours in food preparation) were associated with lower healthfulness of foods served at family dinners, in analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics. There is a need for interventions to improve the healthfulness of food served at family meals. Interventions need to be suitable for parents with low levels of education; take parent and family psychosocial factors into account; promote more positive attitudes toward family meals; and provide skills to make it easier to plan and prepare healthful family meals.

  7. Does the Holland Code Predict Job Satisfaction and Productivity in Clothing Factory Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesacker, Martin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered Self-Directed Search to sewing machine operators to determine Holland code, and assessed work productivity, job satisfaction, absenteeism, and insurance claims. Most workers were of the Social code. Social subjects were the most satisfied, Conventional and Realistic subjects next, and subjects of other codes less so. Productivity of…

  8. Die faktore gemeenskaplik aan die selfondersoekvraelys van Holland en die nuwe Suid-Afrikaanse beroepsbelangstellingsvraelys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Swanevelder

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The factors common to the Self Directed Search of Holland (SDS and the new South African Vocational Interest Inventory (SAVII. The new South African Vocational Interest Inventory was locally developed with the purpose to create a single vocational interest inventory for all population groups in the RSA. In this study the common factors underlying the SDS and the SAVII were determined with the aid of interbattery factor analysis. The results indicate that there are six common factors underlying the two instruments for both the standard nine boys and girls, and that these factors agree with the six factors built into the SDS by Holland. Opsomming Die nuwe Suid-Afrikaanse Beroepsbelangstellingsvraelys (SABBV is plaaslik ontwikkel met die doel om 'n enkele beroepsbelangstellingsvraelys vir alle bevolkingsgroepe binne die RSA, daar te stel. In hierdie studie is daar ondersoek ingestel na die gemeenskaplike faktore onderliggend aan die SABBV en die Selfondersoekvraelys (SOV van Holland met behulp van 'n interbatteryfaktorontleding. Daar is bevind dat daar ses gemeenskaplike faktore onderliggend aan die twee instrumente is vir sowel standerd nege seuns as dogters, en dat hierdie faktore ooreenstem met die ses faktore wat deur Holland in die SOV ingebou is.

  9. Holland in Iceland Revisited: An Emic Approach to Evaluating U.S. Vocational Interest Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Sif; Rounds, James; Su, Rong

    2010-01-01

    An emic approach was used to test the structural validity and applicability of Holland's (1997) RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) model in Iceland. Archival data from the development of the Icelandic Interest Inventory (Einarsdottir & Rounds, 2007) were used in the present investigation. The data…

  10. Examining the Application of Holland's Theory to Vocational Interests and Choices of Chinese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the applicability of Holland's career development theory in cross-cultural settings by examining vocational interests of Chinese college students and the relationship between those interests and their career choices. One hundred sixty five Chinese college students complete a Chinese version of the Self-Directed Search and a…

  11. The Killing Thought in the Eugenic Era and Today: A Commentary on Hollander's Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Wolf

    1989-01-01

    Two responses to Hollander (EC 220 057) and the author's counter-response note similarities between "mercy killing" of people with mental retardation and deliberate abortion of the unborn, misuse of the history of eugenics, and a defense of the author's historical scholarship. (DB)

  12. Examining Holland's Person-Environment Fit, Workplace Aggression, Interpersonal Conflict, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseekos, A. Chantelle; Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Dahlen, Eric R.

    2011-01-01

    The researchers examined the impact of person-environment (P-E) fit, as defined by Holland's (1997) theory, on interpersonal conflict at work (ICAW) and workplace aggression. In addition, previous relationships found in the job satisfaction literature were examined in the present sample of 244 United States employees. Internet-based surveys were…

  13. Arvo Pärt tänavu Holland-Festivali keskmes

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Klassikalise muusika festivalil "Holland-Festival" 1.-26. juun. Amsterdamis on aukülaliseks Arvo Pärt, kelle muusikat esitatakse 7.-10. ja 18. juunil Amsterdami Uues kirikus (Nieuwe Kerk), Muziekgebouw aan het Ij-is ja Concertgebouw's

  14. Pedagogical Approaches Used by Faculty in Holland's Model Environments: The Role of Environmental Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C.; Ethington, Corinna A.; Umbach, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which faculty members in the disparate academic environments of Holland's theory devote different amounts of time in their classes to alternative pedagogical approaches and whether such differences are comparable for those in "consistent" and "inconsistent" environments. The findings show wide variations in the…

  15. Improvement of operation capacity and decreasing of delay of The Hague Holland Spoor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiaojun, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hague Holland Spoor is a representative main station in the Netherlands railvi/ay network, its current form of operation and passenger organisation is being limited by its infrastructure. Also its infrastructure restricts the main network capacity of the Netherlands between Leiden, The Hague and

  16. Medieval market institutions : the organisation of commodity markets in Holland, c. 1200 - c. 1450

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, J.E.C.

    2010-01-01

    According to neo-institutional economics, markets are shaped by man-made rules and practices that determine market efficiency. Departing from this hypothesis, the dissertation examines how the organisation of commodity markets contributed to the rapid commercialisation of the county of Holland in

  17. Public Finance and Economic Growth. The Case of Holland in the Seventeenth Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, O.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/19265473X; Jonker, J.P.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075034638

    2011-01-01

    The debate over the institutions that link economic growth to public finance tends to disregard the need for savings to finance growing public debt. In seventeenth-century Holland the structure, size, and issuing rates of the debt were determined by investors’ preferences, wealth accumulation, and

  18. Public Health Knowledge Utilisation by Policy Actors: An Evaluation Study in Midden-Holland, the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Joyce; Steenkamer, Betty; Treurniet, Henriëtte; Putters, Kim; van Oers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive report has been prepared on the state of public health and healthcare in the Midden-Holland region of the Netherlands. This study describes the development of the report and the mechanisms behind public health knowledge utilisation by three groups of health policy actors: local authorities, public health professionals and regional…

  19. Organisering af lægevagt: Kan vi lære af Holland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huibers, Linda; Olesen, Frede; Moth, Grete

    2013-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver det danske og hollandske sundhedsvæsen kort og fokuserer på lægevagten. Begge landene har lægevagter, men der er interessante forskelle i organisering. Største forskel er i telefon visitation, med sygeplejersker i Holland og læger i Danmark. I artiklen drøfter vi om hvad det...

  20. Holland's SDS Applied to Chinese College Students: A Revisit to Cross-Culture Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jin; Xu, Yonghong Jade; Zhang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, data collected from 875 college freshman and sophomore students enrolled in a 4-year university in central China are used to examine the applicability and validity of a Chinese version of Holland's Self-Directed Search (SDS) that was adapted in the 1990s. The total sample was randomly divided into two groups. Data from the first…

  1. ICI Holland hanteert ISO 9001 ook voor arbozorg: audit is ons toverwoord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenvliet, S.; Pennekamp, E.

    1994-01-01

    In verschillende fabrieken van ICI Holland worden grondstoffen voor polyrethaan, acrylaat, polyesterfilm en grondstoffen voor PET-flessen gemaakt. Werknemers in deze fabrieken krijgen training over de specifieke gevaren. Ook moeten examens afgelegd worden over die gevaren. Dit artikel beschrijft hoe

  2. 'Three centuries of urban and provincial public debt: Amsterdam and Holland'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritschy, W.; M.Boone en C.A. Davids,

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the development of Amsterdam's and Holland's public debt between 1500 and 1800 led to the following conclusion. If public finance is the nerve of any state-system, it is quite adequate to describe the Dutch Republic as a league of seven 'province-republics', much less so, however, to

  3. The relationship between parenting stress and parent-child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0-7 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Hartman, Esther E; Aanstoot, Henk-Jan; van Bakel, Hedwig J A; Emons, Wilco H M; van Mil, Edgar; Pouwer, Frans

    2016-03-01

    To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent-child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0-7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including glucose monitoring and insulin administration). Parent-child interactions were scored with a specifically designed instrument. Questionnaires assessed general and disease-related parenting stress and (diabetes-specific (DS)) QoL. HbA(1c) (glycemic control) was extracted from the medical records. Both general and disease-related parenting stress were associated with a lower (DS)QoL (r ranged from -0.39 to -0.70, p child interaction, emotional involvement of parents (r = 0.23, p child (r = 0.23, p child interaction and (DS)QoL. The results support the notion that diabetes does not only affect the child with T1DM: T1DM is a family disease, as parenting factors (like stress and parent-child interactions) are associated with important child outcomes. Therefore, it is important for health-care providers to not only focus on the child with T1DM, but also on the family system.

  4. The Comparison of Healthy and Unhealthy Perfectionism and Type A Personality in The Perceived Parenting Styles in University Students

    OpenAIRE

    مریم جهان بخش; ابوالقاسم خوش کنش; محمود حیدری

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present research is to study healthy and unhealthy perfectionism as well as type A personality based on different parenting styles. With a ex-post-facto method, a sample of undergraduate students at Shahid Beheshti University was selected through random multistage cluster sampling with at least 80 students in every parenting style. This sample consists of 407 students: 235 girls and 172 boys. The subjects completed three questionnaires of perceived parenting style, positive...

  5. Assessment of psychosocial variables by parents of youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malerbi Fani Eta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the impact of type 1 diabetes (T1D on family functioning and child-rearing practices from parents’ point of view, to assess parents’ health-related quality of life and to explore the relations between psychosocial variables and diabetes care outcomes in youth with diabetes. Methods This research was part of the cross-sectional multicenter Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study, conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics of 20 cities across four Brazilian geographical regions. Psychosocial questions were addressed to 1,079 parents of patients with T1D through an interview (89.3% mothers, 52.5% Caucasians, 38.6 ± 7.6 years old. Overall, 72.5% of the families were from low or very low socioeconomic levels. Parents were also submitted to health-related quality of life instruments (EQ-5D+EQ-VAS. Clinical data from the last medical appointment were collected by a physician using standardized chart review forms. The demographic, educational and socioeconomic profiles were also obtained and HbA1c levels registered. Results Discomfort and anxiety/depression were the main complaints in EQ-5D, and were significantly more frequent in mothers (37.3% and 53.4%, respectively than in fathers (25.7% and 32.7%, respectively. The mother was the only parent involved in diabetes care in 50.5% of the cases. The majority of parents (78.5% mentioned changes in family functioning after the diagnosis, although they neither treated their diabetic children differently from the others (76.3%, nor set prohibitions (69.1% due to diabetes. The majority was worried about diabetes complications (96.4% and felt overwhelmed by diabetes care (62.8%. Parents report of overwhelming was significantly associated with anxiety/depression, as measured by the EQ-5D questionnaire. Less than half of the patients had already slept over, and the permission to do it increased as a function of children’s age. Nearly half of the parents (52

  6. Relations among school/daycare functioning, fear of hypoglycaemia and quality of life in parents of young children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Linda J; Clary, Lauren; Owen, Victoria; Monaghan, Maureen; Alvarez, Vanessa; Streisand, Randi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the type 1 diabetes-related school/daycare experiences of parents of young children and to examine the relationship among child school/daycare functioning, parent fear of hypoglycaemia and parent type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Parents of young children who attend school/daycare must rely on others for daily type 1 diabetes management. Worry about school/daycare type 1 diabetes management may cause parental distress and contribute to diminished parent quality of life. Parental concerns about type 1 diabetes management in young children in the school/daycare setting have not been well described in the literature. Descriptive correlational and cross-sectional parent report of questionnaires design. As part of a randomised controlled trial for parents of young children with type 1 diabetes, 134 parents completed self-report measures at baseline. Data included demographic, school/daycare, and medical information, parent reports of child school/daycare functioning, parent fear of hypoglycaemia and parent type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Parents of younger children, children on a more intensive medical regimen and children who had experienced type 1 diabetes-related unconsciousness or seizures had more school/daycare concerns. Parents who perceived their children had higher school/daycare functioning had less fear about hypoglycaemia and reported better type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. School/daycare functioning and fear of hypoglycaemia were significantly associated with parent type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Parents' concerns about school/daycare functioning and fear of hypoglycaemia play an important role in parents' type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Members of the healthcare team should be aware of concerns related to children attending school/daycare and provide additional support as warranted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Personality types in childhood: relations to latent trajectory classes of problem behavior and overreactive parenting across the transition into adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, A.L.; Deković, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Shiner, R.L.; Prinzie, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated relations among children's personality types, trajectories of internalizing and externalizing problems, and overreactive parenting across 6 years. Latent Class Analysis of the Big 5 personality dimensions (modeled as latent factors, based on mother, father and teacher

  8. Maternal parenting style and adjustment in adolescents with type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jorie M; Skinner, Michelle; Gelfand, Donna; Berg, Cynthia A; Wiebe, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the cross-sectional relationship between maternal parenting style and indicators of well-being among adolescents with diabetes. Seventy-eight adolescents (ages 11.58-17.42 years, M = 14.21) with type 1 diabetes and their mothers separately reported perceptions of maternal parenting style. Adolescents reported their own depressed mood, self-efficacy for managing diabetes, and diabetes regimen adherence. Adolescents' perceptions of maternal psychological control were associated with greater depressed mood regardless of age and gender. Firm control was strongly associated with greater depressed mood and poorer self-efficacy among older adolescents, less strongly among younger adolescents. Adolescents' perceptions of maternal acceptance were associated with less depressed mood, particularly for girls and with better self-efficacy for diabetes management, particularly for older adolescents and girls. Maternal reports of acceptance were associated only with adherence. Maternal parenting style is associated with well-being in adolescents with diabetes, but this association is complex and moderated by age and gender.

  9. Incidentie van baarmoederhalskanker naar geboorteland bij vrouwen in Noord-Holland in 1988-1998 [Incidence of cervical cancer in women in North-Holland by country of birth from 1988-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, O.; Busquet, E.H.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Aaronson, N.K.; Öry, F.G.

    2003-01-01

    Doel. Beschrijven van de incidentie van baarmoederhalskanker bij vrouwen in Noord-Holland naar geboorteland. Opzet. Beschrijvend epidemiologisch onderzoek op basis van kankerregistratiegegevens. Methode. Met behulp van de regionale kankerregistratie van het Integraal Kankercentrum Amsterdam (IKA)

  10. The Sugarsquare study: protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial concerning a web-based patient portal for parents of a child with type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, E.A.; Noordam, C.; Verhaak, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes demands a complicated disease self-management by child and parents. The overwhelming task of combining every day parenting tasks with demands of taking care of a child with diabetes can have a profound impact on parents, often resulting in increased parenting stress.

  11. Examining within- and across-day relationships between transient and chronic stress and parent food-related parenting practices in a racially/ethnically diverse and immigrant population : Stress types and food-related parenting practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Tate, Allan; Trofholz, Amanda; Fertig, Angela; Crow, Scott; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Miner, Michael

    2018-01-16

    Although prior research suggests that stress may play a role in parent's use of food-related parenting practices, it is unclear whether certain types of stress (e.g., transient, chronic) result in different food-related parenting practices. Identifying whether and how transient (i.e., momentary; parent/child conflict) and chronic (i.e., long-term; unemployment >6 months) sources of stress are related to parent food-related parenting practices is important with regard to childhood obesity. This is particularly important within racially/ethnically diverse parents who may be more likely to experience both types of stress and who have higher levels of obesity and related health problems. The current study examined the association between transient and chronic stressors and food-related parenting practices in a racially/ethnically diverse and immigrant sample. The current study is a cross-sectional, mixed-methods study using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Parents (mean age = 35; 95% mothers) of children ages 5-7 years old (n = 61) from six racial/ethnic groups (African American, American Indian, Hispanic, Hmong, Somali, White) participated in this ten-day in-home observation with families. Transient stressors, specifically interpersonal conflicts, had significant within-day effects on engaging in more unhealthful food-related parenting practices the same evening with across-day effects weakening by day three. In contrast, financial transient stressors had stronger across-day effects. Chronic stressors, including stressful life events were not consistently associated with more unhealthful food-related parenting practices. Transient sources of stress were significantly associated with food-related parenting practices in racially/ethnically diverse and immigrant households. Chronic stressors were not consistently associated with food-related parenting practices. Future research and interventions may want to assess for transient sources of stress in

  12. Adolescent and parent diabetes distress in type 1 diabetes: the role of self-efficacy, perceived consequences, family responsibility and adolescent-parent discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, G Urquhart; Walsh, Jennifer; Queralt, Victoria; Nouwen, Arie

    2013-04-01

    To examine the association of adolescent and parent diabetes distress with perceived consequences, dietary self-efficacy, and discrepancies in diabetes family responsibility, in type 1 diabetes (T1D). 203 adolescents with T1D, aged 12-18, and their parents completed self-report questionnaires cross-sectionally. Higher HbA1c, greater perceived negative consequences of diabetes, and reduced self-efficacy predicted adolescent diabetes distress. Higher HbA1c predicted parental diabetes distress, as did diabetes family responsibility disagreements when both family members claimed responsibility, and parents' perception of reduced adolescent self-efficacy. Dietary self-efficacy and perceived negative consequences of diabetes are important factors to consider in assessing and managing adolescent diabetes distress. Perceptions of family responsibility for self-care tasks and parental confidence in adolescents' self-management have implications for parental diabetes distress. Clinical implications support long-held recommendations of taking a family-perspective of T1D care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Parent-Adolescent Discrepancies in Adolescents' Competence and the Balance of Adolescent Autonomy and Adolescent and Parent Well-Being in the Context of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butner, Jonathan; Berg, Cynthia A.; Osborn, Peter; Butler, Jorie M.; Godri, Carine; Fortenberry, Katie T.; Barach, Ilana; Le, Hai; Wiebe, Deborah J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether intrafamily discrepancies in perceptions of the adolescent's competence and independence were associated with autonomy and well-being for adolescents and parents. The ways in which mothers and fathers consistently differed from their adolescent across measures of independence and competence regarding Type 1 diabetes, a…

  14. Detection-dependent six-photon Holland-Burnett state interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rui-Bo; Fujiwara, Mikio; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Collins, Robert J.; Buller, Gerald S.; Yamashita, Taro; Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-11-01

    The NOON state, and its experimental approximation the Holland-Burnett state, have important applications in phase sensing measurement with enhanced sensitivity. However, most of the previous Holland-Burnett state interference (HBSI) experiments only investigated the area of the interference pattern in the region immediately around zero optical path length difference, while the full HBSI pattern over a wide range of optical path length differences has not yet been well explored. In this work, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate up to six-photon HBSI and study the properties of the interference patterns over a wide range of optical path length differences. It was found that the shape, the coherence time and the visibility of the interference patterns were strongly dependent on the detection schemes. This work paves the way for applications which are based on the envelope of the HBSI pattern, such as quantum spectroscopy and quantum metrology.

  15. Assessing fear of hypoglycemia in a population-based study among parents of children with type 1 diabetes - psychometric properties of the hypoglycemia fear survey - parent version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Aarflot, Morten; Rokne, Berit; Graue, Marit

    2015-01-19

    In the treatment of childhood type 1 diabetes, being aware of the parents' fear of hypoglycemia is important, since the parents' fear may influence the management of treatment and the children's blood glucose regulation. The availability of proper instruments to assess the parents' fear of hypoglycemia is essential. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey - Parent version (HFS-P). In a Norwegian population-based sample, 176 parents representing 102 children with type 1 diabetes (6-15 years old) completed the HFS-P, comprising a 15-item worry subscale and a 10-item behavior subscale. We performed exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and further analysis of the scales' construct validity, content validity and reliability. The Norwegian version of the HFS-P had an acceptable factor structure and internal consistency for the worry subscale, whereas the structure and internal consistency of the behavior subscale was more questionable. The HFS-P subscales were significantly correlated (from moderately to weakly) with symptoms of emotional distress, as measured by the Hopkins Symptom Checklist - 25 items. The mothers scored higher than fathers on both HFS-P subscales, but the difference was not statistically significant for the worry subscale. The HFS-P worry subscale seems to be a valid scale for measuring anxiety-provoking aspects of hypoglycemia, and the validity of the HFS-P behavior subscale needs to be investigated further.

  16. [CONTATTI SONORI] Morfologia e poetica della musica di Dave Holland fra gli anni Settanta e Ottanta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sergi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available La musica del contrabbassista inglese Dave Holland ha radici nel jazz ma dialoga con i linguaggi della tradizione colta. Le esigenze compositive si affiancano alla necessità dell'improvvisazione. Holland espone così la propria poetica: «gli uccelli si riuniscono per cantare insieme, ognuno affermando con il canto la propria libertà. Il mio desiderio è condividere il medesimo spirito con i musicisti e comunicarlo alla gente». Questo studio affronta un'analisi di incisioni significative che mettono in luce i risultati musicali di tale pensiero. Il brano Conference of the birds è un manifesto poetico: esso spicca per le scelte sonore, la metrica, l'incrocio delle voci e le giustapposizioni modali. First snow si caratterizza per la correlazione tra il trattamento armonico e la natura modale delle proposte melodiche. Homecoming presenta una peculiare sequenza di episodi musicali e un significativo rapporto fra soluzioni melodiche e armoniche di carattere tonale e modale. L'analisi solleva interrogativi di rilievo: quali strategie compositive e performative vengono adottate nella musica di Dave Holland? Che legame esse intrattengono con il linguaggio del jazz o della musica 'd'arte'? Che tipo di equilibrio si crea fra la dimensione compositiva e l'improvvisazione? Tentando di fornire risposte a tali domande questo studio mette in luce gli elementi rilevanti della musica di uno maggiori compositori e musicisti del jazz strumentale.

  17. Association of parental history of type 2 diabetes with age, lifestyle, anthropometric factors, and clinical severity at type 2 diabetes diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Berencsi, Klara; Sander, Simone

    2016-01-01

    in Type 2 Diabetes cohort. We examined the prevalence ratios (PR) of demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and clinical factors according to parental history, using Poisson regression adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS: Of 2825 T2D patients, 34% (n = 964) had a parental history of T2D. Parental......BACKGROUND: We investigated whether parental history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with age, lifestyle, anthropometric factors, and clinical severity at the time of T2D diagnosis. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study based on the Danish Centre for Strategic Research...... history was associated with younger age at diagnosis [adjusted (a)PR 1.66, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.31) for age

  18. Metabolic control, self-care behaviors, and parenting in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Maia Stoker; Mandleco, Barbara; Roper, Susanne Olsen; Marshall, Elaine S; Dyches, Tina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore relationships among metabolic control, self-care behaviors, and parenting in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Twenty-nine adolescents (mean age, 14.1 years) and their parents participated. Metabolic control was determined by an average of 4 A1C values taken prior to study enrollment; self-care behaviors were measured with a 12-item self-report questionnaire; parenting style was evaluated using the Parenting Practices Report. The mean for A1C values was 8.5%; the mean for overall self-care behaviors was 4.93 (5 = usually). Participants rated themselves highest on the self-care behaviors of giving insulin shots when indicated and adjusting insulin when eating a lot. They ranked themselves lowest on eating a low-fat diet and testing urine for ketones. Parents tended to be more authoritative in their approaches to parenting than either authoritarian or permissive. A significant relationship was found between authoritative mothering and adolescent self-care behaviors and metabolic control. Regression analyses controlling for age and length of time with diabetes confirmed the significance of these relationships. Authoritative fathering positively correlated with the self-care behaviors of monitoring blood glucose, taking insulin, and not skipping meals. A relationship was also noted between permissive parenting by mothers/fathers and poorer metabolic outcomes. However, the permissive parenting correlations did not remain significant when controlling for age and length of time with diabetes. Clinicians may help prevent declining participation in self-care behaviors and metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes by working with parents, particularly mothers, and encouraging authoritative parenting.

  19. Evaluation of Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Parents with a Child Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nakhaey Moghaddam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes type I (DTI is one of the most common endocrine disorders during childhood and adolescents in which has strong impact on physical and emotional development of individuals with family members. We aimed to evaluate of stress, anxiety and depression in parents with DTI child compared with parents with healthy child.Materials and MethodsIn this case – control study, 60 parents of patients with type 1 diabetes, who had referred to the endocrine clinic of Ali Asghar hospital in Zahedan city and the same number of parents with healthy children, who had referred to the hospital for their children's routine checkup, as control group (n=60, were studied. Depression, anxiety and stress was measurement by Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 42 (DASS. Data were analyzed using SPSS-16.ResultsMean age of children was 6.3 ± 3.6 years. In this study, the score and rate of depression in parents of children with diabetes type I was 21.4 ± 13.8 and 75.4%, respectively. The scores of depression, anxiety and stress in parents of children with DTI were 21.4 + 13.8, 18.8 + 11.3 and 27.1 + 11.5 respectively. Also, the scores of depression, anxiety and stress in parents with healthy children were 14.8 ± 11.3, 8.7 ± 6.9 and 15.8 ± 9.3, respectively; and these scores was significantly lower in control group (P0.05.ConclusionDiabetes in children is a stressful event that can affect the public health of parents. Parents of children who diagnosed with DTI, are at risk for experiencing anxiety, depression and stress.

  20. The Association of Mindful Parenting with Glycemic Control and Quality of Life in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serkel-Schrama, Inge J P; de Vries, Jolanda; Nieuwesteeg, Anke M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between the mindful parenting style of parents of adolescents (aged 12-18) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and the glycaemic control and quality of life (QoL) of the adolescents. Chronic health conditions, such as T1DM, that require...... mindful parenting style (IM-P-NL) and the adolescents' glycaemic control. Parents and the adolescents with T1DM (N = 129) both reported on adolescents' generic and diabetes-specific QoL (PedsQL™). The results showed that a more mindful parenting style was associated with more optimal hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c......) values for boys. For girls, a more mindful parenting style was associated with not having been hospitalized for ketoacidosis. For both boys and girls, a more mindful parenting style was associated with better generic and diabetes-specific proxy-reported QoL. In conclusion, mindful parenting style may...

  1. Some Types of Parent Number Talk Count More than Others: Relations between Parents' Input and Children's Cardinal-Number Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Elizabeth A.; Levine, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Before they enter preschool, children vary greatly in their numerical and mathematical knowledge, and this knowledge predicts their achievement throughout elementary school (e.g. Duncan et al., 2007; Ginsburg & Russell, 1981). Therefore, it is critical that we look to the home environment for parental inputs that may lead to these early…

  2. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although childhood obesity prevalence is stabilised in developed countries including Australia, it is continuing to rise among migrants and socially disadvantaged groups in these countries. African migrants and refugees in particular, are at high risk of obesity due to changes in their family dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index. Methods A cross-sectional parent-child dyad study was conducted among 284 African families from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Bilingual workers were trained to collect demographic, anthropometric and questionnaire data on family functioning, parenting, family type and family communication. Results Parents and children reported different levels of family dynamics. Children reported a higher prevalence of poor family functioning (61.5 %, 95 % CI: 55.6, 67.2 versus 56.8 %, 95 % CI: 49.7, 61.6 and protective family type (29 %, 95 % CI: 23.9, 34.5 vs. 13.4 %, 95 % CI: 9.9, 17.9, but a lower prevalence of authoritative parenting style (51.6 %, 95 % CI: 45.7, 57.5 vs. 63 %, 95 % CI: 57.5, 68.8 than parents. There was a positive relationship between poor family functioning and child BMI both before (β = 1.28; 95 % CI: 0.14, 2.41; p < 0.05 and after (β = 1.73; 95 % CI: 0.53, 2.94; p < 0.001 controlling for confounders, and an inverse relationship between consensual family type and child BMI after adjustment (β = −1.92; 95 % CI: −3.59, −0.24; p < 0.05. There was no significant relationship between parental BMI and family functioning, communication, family type or parenting style. Conclusion Children’s perception of poor family functioning was associated with childhood obesity. Family interventions to reduce childhood obesity need

  3. The Role of Authoritative Parenting in Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Zach; Weaver, Patrick; Chen, Rusan; Streisand, Randi; Holmes, Clarissa

    2018-03-01

    Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes are at risk for poorer adherence, lower quality of life (QOL), and poorer glycemic control (HbA1c). Authoritative parenting (AP) along with youth adherence and QOL was hypothesized to relate to better HbA1c. Parent-youth dyads (N = 257) completed baseline measures of adherence and QOL. Youth completed an AP questionnaire, and HbA1c samples were evaluated. Structural equation modeling determined relations among AP, adherence, QOL, and glycemic control. AP indirectly linked to better HbA1c (β = -.15, p = .021) through both better adherence and higher QOL. AP also was associated directly with better adherence (β = .26, p = .001), which in turn was linked to better HbA1c (β = -.35, p = .021). In addition, adherence was associated directly with QOL (β = -.56, p = .001). Together, better youth adherence and higher QOL are two mechanisms by which more AP indirectly relates to better glycemic control during the early adolescent years. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Evaluating Parents' Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Amy E; Patton, Susana R; Van Allen, Jason; Nelson, Michael B; Clements, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    To examine the factor structure and construct validity of the Maternal Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management Scale (MSED) in 135 youth ( Mage  = 13.50  ±  1.83 years), with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The study used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to examine the factor structure and correlations to examine relationships among MSED factors and select parent and child diabetes-related health behaviors and outcomes. EFA identified an 11-item three-factor solution (χ 2 (25, n  = 133)  = 40.22, p  manage their child's diabetes (MSED-M), problem-solve issues surrounding glycemic control (MSED-P), and teach their child about diabetes care (MSED-T). Correlational analyses revealed significant associations between the MSED-M and MSED-T and parent-reported optimism and youth's diabetes-specific self-efficacy. The MSED-T was also associated with glycated hemoglobin and self-monitoring blood glucose. Results provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of a three-factor solution of the MSED. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Holland’s personality types versus preferences in accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Cewińska; Lena Grzesiak; Przemysław Kabalski; Ewa Kusidel

    2017-01-01

    Holland’s personality types versus preferences in accounting The article presents the results of research on the relationship between personality according to the typol-ogy of Holland with preferences in accounting. In his theory, Holland distinguished six personality types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. The authors formulated a general hypothesis that these different personality types have different preferences and views on certain issues in ...

  6. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, S; Halliday, J; Green, J; Renzaho, A M N

    2016-08-03

    Although childhood obesity prevalence is stabilised in developed countries including Australia, it is continuing to rise among migrants and socially disadvantaged groups in these countries. African migrants and refugees in particular, are at high risk of obesity due to changes in their family dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index. A cross-sectional parent-child dyad study was conducted among 284 African families from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Bilingual workers were trained to collect demographic, anthropometric and questionnaire data on family functioning, parenting, family type and family communication. Parents and children reported different levels of family dynamics. Children reported a higher prevalence of poor family functioning (61.5 %, 95 % CI: 55.6, 67.2 versus 56.8 %, 95 % CI: 49.7, 61.6) and protective family type (29 %, 95 % CI: 23.9, 34.5 vs. 13.4 %, 95 % CI: 9.9, 17.9), but a lower prevalence of authoritative parenting style (51.6 %, 95 % CI: 45.7, 57.5 vs. 63 %, 95 % CI: 57.5, 68.8) than parents. There was a positive relationship between poor family functioning and child BMI both before (β = 1.28; 95 % CI: 0.14, 2.41; p parental BMI and family functioning, communication, family type or parenting style. Children's perception of poor family functioning was associated with childhood obesity. Family interventions to reduce childhood obesity need to adopt an intergenerational approach to promote a clear understanding of family dynamics between children and parents. Unless these intergenerational challenges associated with family dynamics are clearly addressed in obesity interventions, current obesity prevention initiatives will continue to widen the childhood obesity gap in Australia.

  7. Child Protection and the Conception of Parental Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mass, M.; Nijnatten, C.H.C.J. van

    2005-01-01

    The legal discourse on child protection that is characterized by the normalization-moralization paradigm focuses more on society's response to parental failure than on the predicament of the child. Findings from texts of legal discourse in Israel and in Holland portray an alliance between the

  8. Characterizing diabetes burnout in parents of youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D)[abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing T1D is complex and requires round-the-clock attention, much of which falls to parents. Parental stress and family conflict about diabetes are associated with suboptimal youth self management and glycemic outcomes, yet little research has described parents' experiences with burnout or tested...

  9. Quality of the parent-child interaction in young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Pouwer, Frans; van Bakel, Hedwig Ja; Emons, Wilco Hm; Aanstoot, Henk-Jan; Odink, Roelof; Hartman, Esther E

    2011-04-14

    In young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) parents have full responsibility for the diabetes-management of their child (e.g. blood glucose monitoring, and administering insulin). Behavioral tasks in childhood, such as developing autonomy, and oppositional behavior (e.g. refusing food) may interfere with the diabetes-management to achieve an optimal blood glucose control. Furthermore, higher blood glucose levels are related to more behavioral problems. So parents might need to negotiate with their child on the diabetes-management to avoid this direct negative effect. This interference, the negotiations, and the parent's responsibility for diabetes may negatively affect the quality of parent-child interaction. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about the quality of interaction between parents and young children with T1DM, and the possible impact this may have on glycemic control and psychosocial functioning of the child. While widely used global parent-child interaction observational methods are available, there is a need for an observational tool specifically tailored to the interaction patterns of parents and children with T1DM. The main aim of this study is to construct a disease-specific observational method to assess diabetes-specific parent-child interaction. Additional aim is to explore whether the quality of parent-child interactions is associated with the glycemic control, and psychosocial functioning (resilience, behavioral problems, and quality of life). First, we will examine which situations are most suitable for observing diabetes-specific interactions. Then, these situations will be video-taped in a pilot study (N = 15). Observed behaviors are described into rating scales, with each scale describing characteristics of parent-child interactional behaviors. Next, we apply the observational tool on a larger scale for further evaluation of the instrument (N = 120). The parents are asked twice (with two years in between) to fill out

  10. Quality of the parent-child interaction in young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aanstoot Henk-Jan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM parents have full responsibility for the diabetes-management of their child (e.g. blood glucose monitoring, and administering insulin. Behavioral tasks in childhood, such as developing autonomy, and oppositional behavior (e.g. refusing food may interfere with the diabetes-management to achieve an optimal blood glucose control. Furthermore, higher blood glucose levels are related to more behavioral problems. So parents might need to negotiate with their child on the diabetes-management to avoid this direct negative effect. This interference, the negotiations, and the parent's responsibility for diabetes may negatively affect the quality of parent-child interaction. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about the quality of interaction between parents and young children with T1DM, and the possible impact this may have on glycemic control and psychosocial functioning of the child. While widely used global parent-child interaction observational methods are available, there is a need for an observational tool specifically tailored to the interaction patterns of parents and children with T1DM. The main aim of this study is to construct a disease-specific observational method to assess diabetes-specific parent-child interaction. Additional aim is to explore whether the quality of parent-child interactions is associated with the glycemic control, and psychosocial functioning (resilience, behavioral problems, and quality of life. Methods/Design First, we will examine which situations are most suitable for observing diabetes-specific interactions. Then, these situations will be video-taped in a pilot study (N = 15. Observed behaviors are described into rating scales, with each scale describing characteristics of parent-child interactional behaviors. Next, we apply the observational tool on a larger scale for further evaluation of the instrument (N = 120. The parents are asked

  11. Hypoglycaemia, fear of hypoglycaemia and quality of life in children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S R; Cooper, M N; Davis, E A; Jones, T W

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the association between fear of hypoglycaemia, episodes of hypoglycaemia and quality of life in children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of 325 children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents. The children were aged 2-18 years. A total of 325 parents of the patients aged 2-18 years and 196 of the patients themselves (aged 8-18 years) completed questionnaires including the PedsQL Diabetes Module, the Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey and Clarke's hypoglycaemia awareness questionnaire. Data were compared with HbA1c results and the history of severe hypoglycaemia episodes. Parents with the highest levels of fear of hypoglycaemia reported that their children had a reduced quality of life (P children with the greatest fear also reported a reduced quality of life (P fear of hypoglycaemia for the parents (P = 0.004) but not the children. Children in the highest fear quartile also had a higher HbA(1c) concentration compared with those in the lowest fear quartile [increase in HbA(1c) 7 mmol/mol (0.6%), P Fear of hypoglycaemia and not episodes of hypoglycaemia per se is associated with increased psychological burden for children with Type 1 diabetes. Interventions to reduce fear of hypoglycaemia in these families may improve their quality of life. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  12. Parental diabetes status reveals association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J1 with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainstein Julio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although mitochondrial dysfunction is consistently manifested in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM, the association of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence variants with T2DM varies among populations. These differences might stem from differing environmental influences among populations. However, other potentially important considerations emanate from the very nature of mitochondrial genetics, namely the notable high degree of partitioning in the distribution of human mtDNA variants among populations, as well as the interaction of mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors working in concert to govern mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that association of mtDNA genetic variants with T2DM could be revealed while controlling for the effect of additional inherited factors, reflected in family history information. Methods To test this hypothesis we set out to investigate whether mtDNA genetic variants will be differentially associated with T2DM depending on the diabetes status of the parents. To this end, association of mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplogroups with T2DM was assessed in 1055 Jewish patients with and without T2DM parents ('DP' and 'HP', respectively. Results Haplogroup J1 was found to be 2.4 fold under-represented in the 'HP' patients (p = 0.0035. These results are consistent with a previous observation made in Finnish T2DM patients. Moreover, assessing the haplogroup distribution in 'DP' versus 'HP' patients having diabetic siblings revealed that haplogroup J1 was virtually absent in the 'HP' group. Conclusion These results imply the involvement of inherited factors, which modulate the susceptibility of haplogroup J1 to T2DM.

  13. Association of the Type of Toy Used During Play With the Quantity and Quality of Parent-Infant Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    The early language environment of a child influences language outcome, which in turn affects reading and academic success. It is unknown which types of everyday activities promote the best language environment for children. To investigate whether the type of toy used during play is associated with the parent-infant communicative interaction. Controlled experiment in a natural environment of parent-infant communication during play with 3 different toy sets. Participant recruitment and data collection were conducted between February 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014. The volunteer sample included 26 parent-infant (aged 10-16 months) dyads. Fifteen-minute in-home parent-infant play sessions with electronic toys, traditional toys, and books. Numbers of adult words, child vocalizations, conversational turns, parent verbal responses to child utterances, and words produced by parents in 3 different semantic categories (content-specific words) per minute during play sessions. Among the 26 parent-infant dyads, toy type was associated with all outcome measures. During play with electronic toys, there were fewer adult words (mean, 39.62; 95% CI, 33.36-45.65), fewer conversational turns (mean, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.12-2.19), fewer parental responses (mean, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.87-1.77), and fewer productions of content-specific words (mean, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.49-2.35) than during play with traditional toys or books. Children vocalized less during play with electronic toys (mean per minute, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.16-3.69) than during play with books (mean per minute, 3.91; 95% CI, 3.09-4.68). Parents produced fewer words during play with traditional toys (mean per minute, 55.56; 95% CI, 46.49-64.17) than during play with books (mean per minute, 66.89; 95% CI, 59.93-74.19) and use of content-specific words was lower during play with traditional toys (mean per minute, 4.09; 95% CI, 3.26-4.99) than during play with books (mean per minute, 6.96; 95% CI, 6.07-7.97). Play with electronic toys is associated with

  14. Information on district initiatives on energy conservation in the Dutch province Noord-Holland. Learning for an effective method and communication strategy; Kennisdocument wijkinitiatieven energiebesparing Noord-Holland. Leerpunten voor een effectieve aanpak en communicatiestrategie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubbelhuis, D. [DWA installatie- en energieadvies, Bodegraven (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    In the Dutch province North Holland several district projects were started in recent years with the purpose to save energy. The Renewable Energy Service Centre analyzed ten such initiatives with the aim to provide municipalities and other initiators with knowledge and information about the experiences [Dutch] In Noord-Holland zijn de afgelopen jaren diverse wijkprojecten opgestart, gericht op energiebesparing. Het Servicepunt Duurzame Energie analyseerde tien van deze initiatieven met het doel om gemeenten en andere initiatiefnemers kennis te laten nemen van de leerervaringen.

  15. Qualitative observation instrument to measure the quality of parent-child interactions in young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwesteeg, A.M.; Hartman, E.E.; Pouwer, F.; Emons, W.H.M.; Aanstoot, H.J.; van Mil, E.; van Bakel, H.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), parents have complete responsibility for the diabetes-management. In toddlers and (pre)schoolers, the tasks needed to achieve optimal blood glucose control may interfere with normal developmental processes and could negatively affect

  16. Challenges of optimizing glycaemic control in children with Type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study of parents' experiences and views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, J; Waugh, N; Barnard, K D; Noyes, K; Harden, J; Stephen, J; McDowell, J; Rankin, D

    2015-08-01

    To explore the difficulties parents encounter in trying to achieve clinically recommended blood glucose levels and how they could be better supported to optimize their child's glycaemic control. In-depth interviews were conducted with 54 parents of children with Type 1 diabetes (≤ 12 years). Data were analysed thematically. Parents described being reluctant and finding it difficult to keep their child's blood glucose levels consistently within clinically recommended ranges. As well as worrying about their child's ability to detect/report hypoglycaemia, parents highlighted a multitude of factors that had an impact on their child's blood glucose levels and over which they could exercise little control. These included: leaving their child with other caregivers who could not be trusted to detect hypoglycaemia; difficulties remotely monitoring and regulating their child's food consumption and activity; and physical and social changes accompanying childhood development. Most parents used two sets of blood glucose targets, with clinically recommended targets employed when their child was in their immediate care and higher targets when in the care of others. Parents described health professionals as lacking understanding of the difficulties they encountered keeping blood glucose within target ranges and needing more empathetic, tailored and realistic advice. It is not parents' fear of hypoglycaemia in isolation that leads to decisions to raise their child's blood glucose but, rather, parental fear in conjunction with other factors and considerations. Hence, to improve diabetes management in children, these factors may need to be addressed; for instance, by training others in diabetes management and using new technologies. Changes to consultations are also recommended. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  17. Predicting holland occupational codes by means of paq job dimension scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Van Der Merwe

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted on how to obtain Holland's codes for South African occupations practically and economically by deducing them from information on the nature of the occupation (as derived by means of the Position Analysis Questionnaire. A discriminant analysis revealed that on the basis of the PAQ information the occupations could be distinguished clearly according to the main orientations of their American codes. Regression equations were also developed to predict the mean Self-Directed Search scores of the occupations on the basis of their PAQ information. Opsomming Ondersoek is ingestel om Holland se kodes vir Suid- Afrikaanse beroepe op 'n praktiese en ekonomiese wyse te bekom deur hulle van inligting oor die aard van die beroep (soos verkry met behulp van die Position Analysis Questionnaire af te lei. 'n Diskriminantontleding het getoon dat die beroepe op grond van die PAQ-inligting duidelik volgens die hoofberoepsgroepe van hulle Amerikaanse kodes onderskei kan word. Verder is regressievergelykings ontwikkel om beroepe se gemiddelde Self-Directed Search-tellings op grond van hulle PAQ-inligting te voorspel.

  18. Alternative Personality Variables and the Relationship to Holland's Personality Types in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Jonathan W.; Fox, Daniel J.; Tunick, Roy H.

    2003-01-01

    The Vocational Preference Inventory, two personality questionnaires, and the Sensation-Seeking Scale were completed by 126 college students. Younger students had undifferentiated vocational profiles. Men tended toward Realistic, Enterprising, and Investigative occupations, women toward Social, Enterprising, and Artistic. Significant convergence…

  19. Toys That Squeak: Toy Type Impacts Quality and Quantity of Parent-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Lossia, Amanda; Suarez-Rivera, Catalina; Gros-Louis, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Given the dependent nature of parent-infant interactions necessary for language development, it is important to understand how context may influence these interactions. This study examines how contextual variables influence communicative, cognitive and social measures of parent-infant interactions. Specifically, how do feedback toys and…

  20. Association between parental history of diabetes and type 2 diabetes genetic risk scores in the PPP-Botnia and Framingham Offspring Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassy, Jason L; Shrader, Peter; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet

    2011-01-01

    Parental history of diabetes and specific gene variants are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but the extent to which these factors are associated is unknown.......Parental history of diabetes and specific gene variants are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but the extent to which these factors are associated is unknown....

  1. Parents' discursive resources: analysis of discourses in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian health care guidelines for children with diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Ase; Borup, Ina; Povlsen, Lene; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of diabetes type 1 in children, the most common metabolic disorder in childhood, increases worldwide, with highest incidence in Scandinavia. Having diabetes means demands in everyday life, and the outcome of the child's treatment highly depends on parents' engagement and involvement. The aim of this study was to explore and describe discourses in health care guidelines for children with diabetes type 1, in Sweden, Norway and Denmark during 2007-2010, with a focus on how parents were positioned. As method a Foucauldian approach to discourse analysis was applied, and a six-stage model was used to perform the analysis. The findings shows a Medical, a Pedagogic and a Public Health discourse embedded in the hegemonic Expert discourse. The Expert discourse positioned parents as dependent on expert knowledge, as recipients of education, as valuable and responsible for their child's health through practicing medical skills. This positioning may place parents on a continuum from being deprived of their own initiatives to being invited to take an active part and could result in feelings of guilt and uncertainty, but also of security and significance. From this study we conclude that guidelines rooted in the Expert discourse may reduce opportunities for parents' voices to be heard and may overlook their knowledge. By broadening the selection of authors of the guidelines to include patients and all professionals in the team, new discourses could emerge and the parents' voice might be more prominent. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Chemical zoning and homogenization of Pasamonte-type pyroxene and their bearing on thermal metamorphism of a howardite parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, M.; Duke, M. B.; Mckay, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Mg-Fe zoning of pyroxenes in Pasamonte and Juvinas eucrites is examined in order to gain a better understanding of the metamorphism in the surface layer of a eucrite/howardite parent body. Three distinct types of Ca-Mg-Fe zoning of Pasamonte pyroxenes are identified. The wide compositional range of the zoned pyroxenes suggests that Pasamonte is less metamorphosed than previously believed. It is also found that a Pasamonte-type pyroxene may yield a Juvinas-type pyroxene by thermal metamorphism. Calculations imply that the homogenization of Juvinas pyroxenes may have occurred during later reheating events rather than during initial cooling.

  3. Early manifestations of type 1 Gaucher disease in presymptomatic children diagnosed after parental carrier screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Amy C; Bier, Louise; Overbey, Jessica R; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica; Desai, Khyati; Desnick, Robert J; Balwani, Manisha

    2017-06-01

    The overall published experience with pediatric type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) has been based on ascertainment through clinical presentation of the disease. We describe the longitudinal follow-up in a presymptomatic pediatric cohort. The cohort includes children diagnosed with GD1, either prenatally or postnatally by molecular genetic testing, and followed for clinical care at our center from 1998 to 2016. All patients' parents were GBA mutation carriers identified through carrier screening programs. Longitudinal clinical, laboratory, and imaging data were obtained through chart review. Thirty-eight patients aged 1-18 years (mean at last visit 6.9 ± 4.1 years) were followed, including 32 p.N409S homozygotes and 6 p.N409S/p.R535H compound heterozygotes. At the last evaluation, a minority had hematological (5%), bone (15%), or linear growth (19%) issues. Only 12% had splenomegaly and 74% had moderate hepatomegaly. Chitotriosidase activity varied widely (6-5,640 nmol/hour/ml) and generally increased with age. Pediatric Gaucher severity scores (GSS) remained stable and within the mild-disease range for most (95%). Treatment for progressive disease during this period was recommended for four children. Most children with the p.N409S/p.N409S and p.N409S/p.R535H GD1 genotypes have minimal disease manifestations and progression during childhood and can be monitored using limited assessments. Those with other mutations may require additional monitoring. These data are valuable for newborn screening and counseling.Genet Med advance online publication 13 October 2016.

  4. The impact of parental history of type 2 diabetes on hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in subjects from central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Negrete, Ana Paula; Porchia, Leonardo M; Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Solis-Cano, Dania G; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2017-12-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance are both associated with the development of Type 2 Diabetes and other pathologies; however, the influence of parental history of Type 2 diabetes (PH-T2D) has yet to be investigated. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of PH-T2D has on the risk of developing hyperinsulinemia and IR. 1092 subjects (703 non-pregnant females and 389 males) were enrolled for a cross-sectional study. Clinical and biochemical parameters were collected. Subjects were allocated according to their PH-T2D: no parents, one parent, or both parents. Insulin resistance was calculated using the HOMA1 equation (HOMA1-IR). Logistic regression was used to determine the association (odds ratio) between PH-T2D and hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance. Increasing degrees of PH-T2D were associated with significant increases in fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and HOMA1-IR (p insulin resistance (odds ratio=1.47, 95%CI: 1.08-2.00 and odds ratio=1.77, 95%CI: 1.09-2.87, respectively), when adjusting for age, sex, BMI, fasting plasma glucose, and triglycerides. The presences of PH-T2D significantly increased the risk of developing hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pediatric irritable bowel syndrome patient and parental characteristics differ by care management type

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates whether certain patient or parental characteristics are associated with gastroenterology (GI) referral versus primary pediatrics care for pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A retrospective clinical trial sample of patients meeting pediatric Rome III IBS criteria was assem...

  6. Outdoor Operational Stability of Indium-Free Flexible Polymer Solar Modules Over 1 Year Studied in India, Holland, and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Sommeling, Paul M.; Gupta, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    We present an outdoor interlaboratory stability study of fully printed and coated indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free polymer solar cell modules in JNCASR Bangalore (India), ECN (Holland), and DTU (Denmark) carried over more than 1 year. The modules comprising a fully printed and coated stack (Ag grid...

  7. Variety of modes of governance of a global value chain: the case of tourism from Holland to Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkuş-Öztürk, H.; Terhorst, P.

    2010-01-01

    Global value chains analysis has become an ever more important approach in economics and economic geography to study the globalization of different sectors. However, it is largely ignored in tourism research. This paper examines the modes of governance of the tourism value chain from Holland to

  8. Factorial Validity of the Vocational Interest Scales of the Holland Vocational Preference Inventory for Australian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasou, James A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The structure of the six vocational interests measured by the Holland Vocational Preference Inventory was identified. Results of two separate analyses showed that a general factor accounted for much of the total variance. Remaining bipolar factors supported previous classifications of interests. (Author/GK)

  9. The Mediating Effects of Student Engagement on the Relationships between Academic Disciplines and Learning Outcomes: An Extension of Holland's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.; Smart, John C.; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the relationships among students' academic majors, levels of engagement, and learning outcomes within the context of Holland's person-environment theory of vocational and educational behavior. The study focused on the role of student engagement as a mediating agent in the relationships between academic majors and student…

  10. Exploring the Effects of Congruence and Holland's Personality Codes on Job Satisfaction: An Application of Hierarchical Linear Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, Terry T.

    2010-01-01

    This study applied hierarchical linear modeling to investigate the effect of congruence on intrinsic and extrinsic aspects of job satisfaction. Particular focus was given to differences in job satisfaction by gender and by Holland's first-letter codes. The study sample included nationally represented 1462 female and 1280 male college graduates who…

  11. Transforming the Dutch Republic into the Kingdom of Holland: the Netherlands between republicanism and monarchy (1795-1815)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, M.

    2010-01-01

    In 1806 more than two centuries of the republican form of government in the Northern Netherlands came to an end. For a long time, historiography had it that the Dutch were indifferent to the end of the Republic and the establishment of the Kingdom of Holland. The transformation was, however, a much

  12. Fear of hypoglycemia in parents of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Colin Patrick; McDarby, Vincent; Cody, Declan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if parental hypoglycaemia fear is associated with worse glycaemic control and increased resource utilisation and to identify risk factors for increased hypoglycaemia fear. Parents of children with diabetes completed a modified Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey. Demographic data, phone contacts and mean glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were also recorded over a 1 year study period. A total of 106 parents participated. Mean patient age was 11.1 years, and duration of diabetes was 4.8 years. Fifty-two per cent were male, and 48% were on insulin pump therapy. Fear of hypoglycaemia was highest among parents of 6- to 11-year-olds. Parents of children with HbA1c less than 7.5% had less hypoglycaemia fear. Previous seizures and increased frequency of phone calls to the diabetes team were not associated with increased fear. Fear of hypoglycaemia is associated with worse glycaemic control. It is highest among parents of 6- to 11-year-olds but is not affected by previous severe hypoglycaemia or associated with increased contact with the diabetes team. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. Vegetation of high-altitude fens and restio marshlands of the Hottentots Holland Mountains, Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. J. Sieben

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Seepages occurring at high altitudes in the Hottentots Holland Mountains (HHM (Western Cape Province. South Africa were subject to a phytosociological survey. Relevé sampling method and classification procedures of the floristic-sociological (Braun-Blanquet approach as well as numerical data analyses (numerical classification and ordination were used to reveal syn- taxonomic patterns and characterize the position of the syntaxa along major environmental gradients. Nine plant communities were recognized, three of which were classified as associations, following formal syntaxonomic and nomenclatural rules of the floristic-sociological approach Most of the studied mire communities were dominated by low-growing clonal restios (Restionaceae. whereas some consisted of other types of graminoids. The most important species determining the structure (and function of the mire communities on sandstones of the HHM include restios Anthochortus crinalis, Chondropetalum deustum.C. mucronatum, Elegia intermedia. E. thyrsifera. Restio subtilis. R. purpurascens. cyperoids Epischoenus villosus. Ficinia argy-ropa, grasses Ehrharta setacea subsp. setacea. Pentameris hirtiglumis as well as shrubs Berzelia squarrosa. Cliffortia tricuspi- data. Erica intenallaris and Grubbia rosmarinifolia. Protea lacticolor and Restio perplexus dominate a rare shale band seep­age community. There are two major groups of communities—the fens (dominated by carpets of Anthochortus crinalis and other low-growing species and the restio marshlands (mosaics of low tussocks of Restio subtilis and tall Chondropetalum mucrona­tum. The degree of soil (and water minerotrophy was found to be the most important differentiating feature between the mire (fen and restio marshland communities studied. The soils in the centre of mires were found to have high contents of peat and showed very little influence from the underlying sandstone. The soils along the mire margins had a greater admixture of

  14. Bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Alexander G.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Carlson, Emily M.

    2016-06-10

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey in Little Holland Tract, a flooded agricultural tract, in the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the “Delta”) during the summer of 2015. The new bathymetric data were combined with existing data to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) at 1-meter resolution. Little Holland Tract (LHT) was historically diked off for agricultural uses and has been tidally inundated since an accidental levee breach in 1983. Shallow tidal regions such as LHT have the potential to improve habitat quality in the Delta. The DEM of LHT was developed to support ongoing studies of habitat quality in the area and to provide a baseline for evaluating future geomorphic change. The new data comprise 138,407 linear meters of real-time-kinematic (RTK) Global Positioning System (GPS) elevation data, including both bathymetric data collected from personal watercraft and topographic elevations collected on foot at low tide. A benchmark (LHT15_b1) was established for geodetic control of the survey. Data quality was evaluated both by comparing results among surveying platforms, which showed systematic offsets of 1.6 centimeters (cm) or less, and by error propagation, which yielded a mean vertical uncertainty of 6.7 cm. Based on the DEM and time-series measurements of water depth, the mean tidal prism of LHT was determined to be 2,826,000 cubic meters. The bathymetric data and DEM are available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RX9954. 

  15. The Association of Mindful Parenting with Glycemic Control and Quality of Life in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES-The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkel-Schrama, Inge J P; de Vries, Jolanda; Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Pouwer, Frans; Nyklíček, Ivan; Speight, Jane; de Bruin, Esther I; Bögels, Susan M; Hartman, Esther E

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between the mindful parenting style of parents of adolescents (aged 12-18) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and the glycaemic control and quality of life (QoL) of the adolescents. Chronic health conditions, such as T1DM, that require demanding treatment regimens, can negatively impact adolescents' quality of life. Therefore, it is important to determine whether mindful parenting may have a positive impact in these adolescents. Age, sex and duration of T1DM were examined as potential moderators. Parents ( N  = 215) reported on their own mindful parenting style (IM-P-NL) and the adolescents' glycaemic control. Parents and the adolescents with T1DM ( N  = 129) both reported on adolescents' generic and diabetes-specific QoL (PedsQL™). The results showed that a more mindful parenting style was associated with more optimal hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) values for boys. For girls, a more mindful parenting style was associated with not having been hospitalized for ketoacidosis. For both boys and girls, a more mindful parenting style was associated with better generic and diabetes-specific proxy-reported QoL. In conclusion, mindful parenting style may be a factor in helping adolescents manage their T1DM. Mindful parenting intervention studies for parents of adolescents with T1DM are needed to examine the effects on adolescents' glycaemic control and their quality of life.

  16. What’s for dinner? Types of food served at family dinner differ across parent and family characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; MacLehose, Rich; Loth, Katie; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Berge, Jerica

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the types of food served at family dinner in the homes of adolescents and correlations with parent and family sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, and meal-specific variables. Design A cross-sectional population-based survey completed by mail or telephone by parents participating in Project F-EAT (Families and Eating and Activity in Teens) in 2009–2010. Setting Homes of families with adolescents in Minneapolis/St Paul urban area. Subjects Participants included 1,923 parents/guardians (90.8% female; 68.5% from ethnic/racial minorities) of adolescents who participated in EAT 2010. Results Less than a third (28%) of parents reported serving a green salad at family dinner on a regular basis, but 70% reported regularly serving vegetables (other than potatoes). About one-fifth (21%) of families had fast food at family dinners two or more times a week. Variables from within the sociodemographic domain (low educational attainment); psychosocial domain (high work-life stress, depressive symptoms, low family functioning); and meal-specific domain (low value of family meals, low enjoyment of cooking, low meal planning, high food purchasing barriers, and fewer hours in food preparation) were associated with lower healthfulness of foods served at family dinners, in analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions There is a need for interventions to improve the healthfulness of food served at family meals. Interventions need to be suitable for parents with low levels of education; take parent and family psychosocial factors into account; promote more positive attitudes toward family meals; and provide skills to make it easier to plan and prepare healthful family meals. PMID:23083836

  17. Brief Report: The Relationship of Parental Support and Conflict to Physical Activity in Preadolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Eleanor Race; Streisand, Randi

    2008-01-01

    Objective To use structural equation modeling to provide a preliminary examination of the relationship between parental support and conflict regarding physical activity behaviors in preadolescents with type 1 diabetes. Method Parent–child dyads (n = 85, M child age = 10.8) completed physical activity items from the Diabetes Family Behavior Scale, Diabetes Related Conflict Scale, and Self-Care Inventory. Children completed physical activity items from the Center for Disease Control's Youth Ris...

  18. Association of Parental History of Diabetes with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Children with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer R; Stafford, Jeanette M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Badaru, Angela; Crume, Tessa L; Dabelea, Dana; Dolan, Lawrence M; Lawrence, Jean M; Pettitt, David J; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Aims Determine if parental diabetes(DM) is associated with unhealthier cardiovascular disease(CVD) risk profiles in youth with type 2 diabetes(T2D), and whether associations differed by race/ethnicity. Methods Family history was available for 382 youth with T2D from 2001 prevalent and 2002–2005 incident SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth cohorts. Parental DM was evaluated two ways two-category— any parent vs. no parent DM (evaluated overall and stratified by race/ethnicity); four-category— both parents, mother only, father only, or no parent DM (evaluated overall only). Associations with hemoglobin A1c(HbA1c), fasting lipids, blood pressure(BP), and urine albumin:creatinine ratio(ACR) were examined using regression models. Results Overall, sample characteristics included: 35.9% male, 19.1% non-Hispanic white(NHW), mean T2D duration 26.6 ± 22.2 months, mean HbA1c 7.9 ± 2.5% (62.6 ± 27.8mmol/mol). Unadjusted two-category comparisons showed youth with parental DM had higher HbA1c, higher DBP, and higher frequency of elevated ACR. Adjusted two-category comparisons showed associations remaining in non-stratified analysis for ACR [OR95%CI)=2.3(1.1, 5.0)] and in NHW youth for HbA1c [6.8% ± 0.4 v. 8.0 ± 0.4 (51.1±4.8mmol/mol v.63.9 ± 4.2), p=.015], DBP (67.7% ± 4.5 v. 76.9 ± 4.4 mmHg, p=.014) and lnTG (4.7±0.3 v. 5.3±0.3, p=.008). There were no significant findings in the adjusted four-category evaluation. Conclusions Parental history of diabetes may be associated with unhealthier CVD risk factors in youth with T2D. PMID:25784087

  19. The association of mindful parenting with glycemic control and quality of life in adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES—The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Serkel-Schrama, I.J.P.; de Vries, J.; Nieuwesteeg, A.M.; Pouwer, F.; Nyklíček, I.; Speight, J.; de Bruin, E.I.; Bögels, S.M.; Hartman, E.E.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between the mindful parenting style of parents of adolescents (aged 12?18) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and the glycaemic control and quality of life (QoL) of the adolescents. Chronic health conditions, such as T1DM, that require demanding treatment regimens, can negatively impact adolescents? quality of life. Therefore, it is important to determine whether mindful parenting may have a positive impact in these adolescents. Age, ...

  20. The Relationship between Parenting Types and Older Adolescents' Personality, Academic Achievement, Adjustment, and Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Laura H.; Schwarz, J. Conrad

    1996-01-01

    Examined the relations between parents' child-rearing style and their older adolescent children's behavior with a sample of 178 college students and their families. Found that students from Nondirective homes had significantly higher SAT scores than students from Authoritarian-Directive and Democratic homes. Students from Unengaged homes had the…

  1. Isolated thoughts and feelings and unsolved concerns: adolescents' and parents' perspectives on living with type 1 diabetes - a qualitative study using visual storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castensøe-Seidenfaden, Pernille; Teilmann, Grete; Kensing, Finn; Hommel, Eva; Olsen, Birthe Susanne; Husted, Gitte Reventlov

    2017-10-01

    To explore and describe the experiences of adolescents and their parents living with type 1 diabetes, to identify their needs for support to improve adolescents' self-management skills in the transition from child- to adulthood. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes often experience deteriorating glycaemic control and distress. Parents are important in adolescents' ability to self-manage type 1 diabetes, but they report anxiety and frustrations. A better understanding of the challenges adolescents and parents face, in relation to the daily self-management of type 1 diabetes, is important to improve clinical practice. A qualitative explorative study using visual storytelling as part of individual interviews. A purposive sample of nine adolescents and their parents (seven mothers, six fathers) took photographs illustrating their experiences living with type 1 diabetes. Subsequently, participants were interviewed individually guided by participants' photographs and a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Four major themes were consistent across adolescents and their parents: (1) striving for safety, (2) striving for normality, (3) striving for independence and (4) worrying about future. Although adolescents and parents had same concerns and challenges living with type 1 diabetes, they were experienced differently. Their thoughts and feelings mostly remained isolated and their concerns and challenges unsolved. The concerns and challenges adolescents and their parents face in the transition from child- to adulthood are still present despite new treatment modalities. Parents are fundamental in supporting the adolescents' self-management-work; however, the parties have unspoken concerns and challenges. Healthcare providers should address the parties' challenges and concerns living with type 1 diabetes to diminish worries about future including fear of hypoglycaemia, the burden of type 1 diabetes and the feeling of being incompetent

  2. The association of mindful parenting with glycemic control and quality of life in adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes : Results from Diabetes MILES—The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serkel-Schrama, Inge; de Vries, J.; Nieuwesteeg, A.M.; Pouwer, F.; Nyklicek, I.; Speight, Jane; de Bruin, Esther; Bogels, Susan; Hartman, E.E.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between the mindful parenting style of parents of adolescents (aged 12–18) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and the glycaemic control and quality of life (QoL) of the adolescents. Chronic health conditions, such as T1DM, that require

  3. Sugarsquare, a Web-Based Patient Portal for Parents of a Child With Type 1 Diabetes: Multicenter Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, E.A.; Maas-van Schaaijk, N.M.; Sas, T.C.; Boers, A.; Smallenbroek, M.; Nuboer, R.; Noordam, C.; Verhaak, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raising a child with type 1 diabetes (T1D) means combining the demands of the disease management with everyday parenting, which is associated with increased levels of distress. A Web-based patient portal, Sugarsquare, was developed to support parents, by providing online

  4. Children's at Home: Pilot Study Assessing Dedicated Social Media for Parents of Adolescents with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akre, Christina; Polvinen, Julie; Ullrich, Nicole J; Rich, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate Children's at Home (C@H), a dedicated social media website for parents of adolescents with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The interventional study included two phases: (1) creating video intervention/prevention assessment (VIA) visual narratives about having an adolescent with NF1 and (2) interacting on C@H, a secure, medically moderated social media website. C@H was evaluated qualitatively at three time points. At enrollment (T0, N = 17), participants reported needing C@H to break their isolation, connect with other families, and receive accurate information, advice, and support from others facing similar challenges. At T1, after creating VIA during 6 months (N = 13, 145 videos), participants mostly valued the opportunity to speak about the challenges they face with NF1 and their journey since diagnosis. At T2, after interacting on C@H for 7 weeks (N = 10, two sign-ins/week/parent), participants reported connecting with other parents of children with NF1 for the first time, valuing the "real faces" and emotions of other parents with shared experiences providing a sense of normalcy. Qualitative analysis suggested that C@H decreased feelings of isolation, provided relief to talk about NF1 without having to explain it, provided new knowledge about NF1 and the opportunity to address non-medical issues of NF1 never discussed in clinic, and helped participants with putting their lives into perspective. C@H allowed parents of adolescents with NF1 to overcome previous isolation and connect for the first time. Innovative applications of social media dedicated to those who care for children with chronic conditions can provide peer-to-peer support, shared experience, and reliable medical information.

  5. Types of social support and parental acceptance among transfemale youth and their impact on mental health, sexual debut, history of sex work and condomless anal intercourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Victory; Arayasirikul, Sean; Chen, Yea-Hung; Jin, Harry; Wilson, Erin C

    2016-01-01

    Transfemale youth (TFY) are an underserved and understudied population at risk for numerous poor physical and mental health outcomes, most notably HIV. Research suggests that parental acceptance and social support may serve as protective factors against HIV and other risks for TFY; however, it is unclear whether TFY receive primary social support from parents with or without parental acceptance of their gender identity. This study examines differences in parental acceptance, mental health and the HIV risk factors of history of sex work, age at sexual debut and engagement in condomless anal intercourse between TFY with two types of primary social support - non-parental primary social support (NPPSS) and parental primary social support (PPSS). Cross-sectional data collected from 301 TFY from 2012 to 2014 in the San Francisco Bay Area were analyzed to determine differences in parental acceptance, mental health and HIV risk factors between youth with and without PPSS. Univariate statistics and chi-squared tests were conducted to determine if parental acceptance and health outcomes were correlated with type of social support. Two-hundred fifty-one participants (83.7%) reported having NPPSS, and 49 (16.3%) reported PPSS. Significantly more youth with PPSS reported affirmative responses on parental acceptance items than their NPPSS counterparts. For example, 87.8% of youth with PPSS reported that their parents believed they could have a happy future as a trans adult, compared with 51.6% of youth with NPPSS (pparental acceptance of their gender identity may be more likely to reach out to their parents as their primary source of social support. Interventions focused on parental acceptance of their child's gender identity may have the most promise for creating parental social support systems in the lives of TFY.

  6. Qualitative observation instrument to measure the quality of parent-child interactions in young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwesteeg, Anke; Hartman, Esther; Pouwer, Frans; Emons, Wilco; Aanstoot, Henk-Jan; Van Mil, Edgar; Van Bakel, Hedwig

    2014-06-10

    In young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), parents have complete responsibility for the diabetes-management. In toddlers and (pre)schoolers, the tasks needed to achieve optimal blood glucose control may interfere with normal developmental processes and could negatively affect the quality of parent-child interaction. Several observational instruments are available to measure the quality of the parent-child interaction. However, no observational instrument for diabetes-specific situations is available. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a qualitative observation instrument, to be able to assess parent-child interaction during diabetes-specific situations. First, in a pilot study (n = 15), the observation instrument was developed in four steps: (a) defining relevant diabetes-specific situations; (b) videotaping these situations; (c) describing all behaviors in a qualitative observation instrument; (d) evaluating usability and reliability. Next, we examined preliminary validity (total n = 77) by testing hypotheses about correlations between the observation instrument for diabetes-specific situations, a generic observation instrument and a behavioral questionnaire. The observation instrument to assess parent-child interaction during diabetes-specific situations, which consists of ten domains: "emotional involvement", "limit setting", "respect for autonomy", "quality of instruction", "negative behavior", "avoidance", "cooperative behavior", "child's response to injection", "emphasis on diabetes", and "mealtime structure", was developed for use during a mealtime situation (including glucose monitoring and insulin administration). The present study showed encouraging indications for the usability and inter-rater reliability (weighted kappa was 0.73) of the qualitative observation instrument. Furthermore, promising indications for the preliminary validity of the observation instrument for diabetes-specific situations were found (r ranged

  7. Parenting characteristics of female caregivers of children affected by chronic endocrine conditions: a comparison between disorders of sex development and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Katherine D; Fedele, David A; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Phillips, Timothy M; Mazur, Tom; Mullins, Larry L; Chernausek, Steven D; Wisniewski, Amy B

    2011-12-01

    Rearing a child with a chronic illness is stressful and can potentially affect parenting style, which may result in poorer outcomes for children. The purpose of this study was to compare parenting characteristics of female caregivers rearing children with a disorder of sex development (DSD) to female caregivers rearing children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Caregivers of both groups were matched according to age and compared on measures of stress and parenting practices. Both groups demonstrated significant levels of stress and negative parenting practices. Children with T1DM and male children with non-life-threatening DSD were perceived as more vulnerable by their caregivers. Better understanding of parenting experiences of female caregivers rearing children with DSD, particularly male children, will facilitate the development of individualized interventions to ameliorate negative parenting practices and stress, with the long-term goal of improved health outcomes for their children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Avoidant coping moderates the relationship between paternal involvement in the child's type 1 diabetes (T1D) care and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Ashley; Limbers, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Fathers may experience greater parenting stress and anxiety when they are more involved in their child's type 1 diabetes (T1D) care. The present study evaluated whether seeking social support and avoidant coping strategies moderate the relationship between paternal involvement in the child's T1D care and parenting stress in an international sample. Two hundred forty-nine fathers of young children with T1D completed the Parenting Stress Index (PSI), Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP), Dads' Active Disease Support scale (DADS), COPE Inventory, Self-Care Inventory (SCI-R), and a demographic questionnaire online. Pearson's product moment correlations were computed, and multiple linear regression analysis was conducted with three separate models in which the PSI Child Domain, PIP Frequency, and PIP Difficulty scores represented different parenting stress outcomes. The interaction between use of denial coping and DADS Involvement was significantly correlated with general parenting stress ( p diabetes treatment regimen ( p management.

  9. Risk Factors for Eating Disturbances in Young People with Type 1 Diabetes and Chronic Asthma: The Role of Parenting Style and Self-Esteem.

    OpenAIRE

    Hatton, J

    2014-01-01

    Background Research indicates that eating disturbances are twice as prevalent among adolescents with type 1 diabetes compared to their healthy peers; comparisons with other chronic illness groups are inconclusive. Adolescent self-esteem and parenting factors have been found to be associated with eating disturbances in type 1 diabetes. However, to date the literature is methodologically limited by a lack of comparison group, and has failed to consider the role of parent care and overprotect...

  10. De Journaux de Hollande en hun functie als forum voor het wetenschappelijk debat tussen de leden van de Republiek der Letteren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Bots

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available De Journeaux de Hollande zijn de Franstalige tijdschriften die tussen 1675 en 1750 in de Republiek verschenen. In dit artikel wordt ingegaan op de vraag in hoeverre deze tijdschriften plaats boden aan het contemporaine wetenschappelijke debat.

  11. Wind-wave, and turbidity time-series data from Little Holland Tract (station HWC), Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Time series data of water surface elevation, wave height, and turbidity were collected in Little Holland Tract (LHT) beginning in December 2015 as part of “Wind-wave...

  12. [Description of Clinical and Neurocognitive Profiles in Offspring of Bipolar-Type-I Parents From a Multimodal Intervention Program: Prisma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio-Ortíz, Juan David; Uribe-Villa, Esteban; Duque-Ríos, Paula; Gutiérrez-Briceño, Paola; Zapata-Henao, Violeta; Peña-Quintero, Cristian Esteban; López-Jaramillo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Offspring of bipolar parents are a high risk population for the develop of mental diseases, their study allow determining the genetic risk, early symptoms, prodromes and psychopathology of bipolar disorder. To describe the psychopathological characteristics and neurocognitives profiles of the offspring of bipolar type I parents. And to identify the presence of sub-syndromal symptoms in all the symptom domains. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 offspring between 6 and 30 years old. Semi-structured diagnostic interviews were performed. The intelectual coeficient was determined and a neuropsychological assessment was performed on 89 offspring. The most prevalent disorder in the offspring was ADHD (27.6%), with major depression (15.5%) and separation anxiety (14.1%) also being prevalent. Seven patients of the sample were diagnosed with bipolar disorder. There was a statistically significant difference between the age groups for ADHD prevalence. The most frequent sub-syndromal symptoms were observed in the disruptive group. Alterations in the cognitive domains: attention, verbal fluency, work memory, and speed of information processing, were observed in the group younger than 18 years. The offspring of bipolar parents have an elevated rate of psychopathology and cognitive alterations. They are a high risk population for the development of mental disease. These subjects also require close longitudinal observation and early and preventive therapeuthic interventions. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. [Incidence of cervical cancer in women in North-Holland by country of birth from 1988-1998].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, O; Busquet, E H; van Leeuwen, F E; Aaronson, N K; Ory, F G

    2003-01-11

    To describe the incidence of cervical cancer in women in North-Holland by country of birth. Descriptive epidemiological study based on data from cancer registries. The number of cases of cervical cancer in North-Holland for the period 1988-1998 was determined using data from the regional cancer registry of the Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Amsterdam. Based on data from the Netherlands Cancer Registry, a comparison was made between the observed (O) and the expected (E) number of cases by area of residence (i.e., Amsterdam versus the rest of North-Holland) and by the woman's country of birth. In the period 1988-1998, the incidence of cervical cancer among women living in North-Holland was significantly higher than that of the nation as a whole (O/E-ratio: 1.2; 95% CI: 1.1-1.2). In particular, the incidence of cervical cancer for women living in Amsterdam (O/E-ratio: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.4-1.6), and for women born in Morocco (O/E-ratio: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.1) or Surinam (O/E-ratio: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.0) was much higher. The country of birth was unknown in 10% of the women. The percentage of patients with extension of the disease outside the uterus (TNM-stages II-IV) did not differ between women born in the Netherlands and those born abroad. The incidence of cervical cancer during the period 1988-1998 was significantly higher for women living in Amsterdam and for women born in Morocco or Surinam than that for the Netherlands as a whole. No significant difference in stage of disease at diagnosis was observed between women born in the Netherlands versus those born abroad.

  14. Psychosexual Outcome Among Iranian Individuals With 5α-Reductase Deficiency Type 2 and Its Relationship With Parental Sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashad, Behzad S; Aghili, Zahra; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Hiradfar, Mehran; Roshan, Ghasem M; Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Khazai, Behnaz; Cohen-Kettenis, P T

    2016-11-01

    Few studies exist on the psychosexual outcome of homogeneous groups of individuals with 5α-reductase deficiency type 2 (5α-RD-2) and the relation between gender changes and parental hostile and benevolent sexism, which are two components of ambivalent sexism that assume a stereotypical approach toward women in an overtly negative way or a chivalrous, seemingly positive way. To report on the psychosexual outcome of individuals with 5α-RD-2 and to investigate its relation to the level of parental sexism in a relatively large sample of Iranians with 5α-RD-2. Twenty participants (mean age = 19.5 years, SD = 6.345) with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of 5α-RD-2 who were assigned the female gender at birth and raised as female were included in the study. Participants and their parents were interviewed and their medical records were assessed. Parents also completed the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI), which includes hostile and benevolent sexism subscales. Psychosexual outcome and parental hostile and benevolent sexism measurements. Twelve of 20 participants (60%) were diagnosed with gender identity disorder not otherwise specified (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision). Ten of these transitioned to the male gender. The other 10 participants (50%), including the two diagnosed with gender identity disorder not otherwise specified, continued living in a female gender role. When comparing the ASI subscale scores between families of participants who changed their gender and those who did not, no significant difference was found for ASI total and hostile sexism scores, but there was a difference for benevolent sexism (P = .049): those whose daughters had changed their gender had higher benevolent sexism scores. The high prevalence of gender change and gender dysphoria reported in the literature was confirmed in this relatively large and homogeneous sample of Iranians with 5-α-RD-2 raised as female. Prenatal exposure

  15. Diabetes miles youth Australia : Methods and sample characteristics of a national survey of the psychological aspects of living with type 1 diabetes in Australian youth and their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagger, V.; Trawley, S.; Hendrieckx, C.; Browne, J.L.; Cameron, F.; Pouwer, F.; Skinner, T.; Speight, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes is a complex and demanding condition, which places a substantial behavioural and psychological burden on young people and their families. Around one-third of adolescents with type 1 diabetes need mental health support. Parents of a child with type 1 diabetes are also at

  16. Copper and lead levels in crops and soils of the Holland Marsh Area-Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czuba, M.; Hutchinson, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the occurrence, distribution, and concentrations of the heavy metals copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) in the soils and crops of the important horticultural area north of Toronto known as the Holland Marsh. The soils are deep organic mucks (> 85% organic matter), derived by the drainage of black marshland soils, which has been carried out over the past 40 years. A comparison is made between the Pb and Cu concentrations in undrained, uncultivated areas of the marsh and in the intensively used horticultural area. Analyses show a marked accumulation of Cu in surface layers of cultivated soils, with a mean surface concentration of 130 ppM, declining to 20 ppM at a 32-cm depth. Undrained (virgin) soils of the same marshes had < 20 ppM at all depths. Lead concentrations also declined through the profile, from concentrations of 22 to 10 ppM. In comparison, undrained areas had elevated Pb levels. Cultivation appeared to have increased Cu, but lowered Pb in the marsh. Copper and lead levels found in the crops were generally higher in the young spring vegetables than in the mature fall ones. Leafy crops, especially lettuce (Lactuca L.) and celery (Apium graveolens), accumulated higher Pb levels in their foliage compared with levels in root crops. Cultivation procedures, including past pesticide applications and fertilizer additions, appeared to be principal sources of Cu. Mobility from the soil and into the plant for these elements in the marsh muck soils is discussed.

  17. Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with increased risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring of parents without diabetes regardless of ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussen, Hozan I; Persson, Martina; Moradi, Tahereh

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes in children is increasing in Sweden, as is the prevalence of maternal overweight/obesity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if maternal overweight/obesity increases the risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring of parents with and without diabetes, and of different ethnicities. The study cohort comprised 1,263,358 children, born in Sweden between 1992 and 2004. Children were followed from birth until diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, emigration, death or end of follow-up in 2009, whichever occurred first. First trimester maternal BMI was calculated (kg/m(2)). Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% CI for type 1 diabetes in the offspring. The risk of type 1 diabetes was increased in offspring of parents with any type of diabetes regardless of parental ethnicity. High first trimester maternal BMI was associated with increased risk of type 1 diabetes only in offspring of parents without diabetes (IRR 1.33 [95% CI 1.20, 1.48]). Increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes in children with non-diabetic parents may partly be explained by increasing prevalence of maternal overweight/obesity.

  18. Heritability, parental transmission and environment correlation of pediatric-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Lora, América L; Vilchis-Gil, Jenny; Molina-Díaz, Mario; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the heritability, parental transmission and environmental contributions to the phenotypic variation in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits in families of Mexican children and adolescents. We performed a cross-sectional study of 184 tri-generational pedigrees with a total of 1160 individuals (99 families with a type 2 diabetes mellitus proband before age 19). The family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus in three generations was obtained by interview. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle information was corroborated in parents and offspring. We obtained correlations for metabolic traits between relative pairs, and variance component methods were used to determine the heritability and environmental components. The heritability of early-onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.50 (p1.0e-7). The heritability was greater than 0.5 for hypertension, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, hypercholesterolemia, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, 2-h insulin, and cholesterol (p1). In contrast, we observed a high environmental correlation (>0.50) for blood pressure, HbA1c and HDL-cholesterol after multivariate adjustment (ptype 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance, were significantly correlated only through the mother and others, such as hypertriglyceridemia, were significantly correlated only through the father. This study demonstrates that type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits are highly heritable among Mexican children and adolescents. Furthermore, several cardiometabolic factors have strong heritability and/or high environmental contributions that highlight the complex architecture of these alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reducing and preventing internalizing and externalizing behavior problems in children with type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrupp, E M; Northam, E; Lee, K J; Scratch, S E; Cameron, F

    2015-11-01

    Children with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of mental health problems, which in turn are associated with poor glycemic control, diabetes-related complications, and long-term psychiatric morbidity. We tested the efficacy of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program in reducing or preventing mental health problems and improving glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes in a randomized controlled trial. Participants were recruited from the Diabetes Clinic, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, and randomized to Triple P or standard diabetes care. The primary outcome was child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems 3 and 12 months postrandomization. Secondary outcomes were glycemic control, parent mental health, parenting skills, and family functioning at 3 and 12 months, and glycemic control at 24 months. A total of 76 participants were randomized (38 to intervention and 38 to control), 60 completed 3-month, and 57 completed 12-month assessments. Benefits of Triple P were evident at 3 months for parent mental health, parenting skills, and family functioning (p externalizing behavior problems indicated greater improvements in child mental health, parent mental health, parenting skills, and diabetes family conflict (p parenting self-efficacy at 3 months. Improvements in parent mental health and parenting competency associated with Triple P were sustained to 12 months for children with pre-existing mental health problems. This study provides some support for the efficacy of Triple P in improving parent and family outcomes, and reducing child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems primarily in children who have pre-existing mental health problems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pathways to diagnosis: a qualitative study of the experiences and emotional reactions of parents of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, David; Harden, Jeni; Waugh, Norman; Noyes, Kathryn; Barnard, Katharine D; Stephen, John; Robertson, Kenneth J; Bath, Louise; Robertson, Linda; Lawton, Julia

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore from parents' perspectives the circumstances and events which led to their child being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The objective was to understand reasons for delays in seeking treatment and parents' emotional reactions to diagnosis so others can be better informed and supported in future. In-depth interviews with 54 parents of children (aged ≤12 yr) with T1D were conducted. Data analysis used an inductive, thematic approach. Parents described a 'prompt' and a 'delayed' pathway to their child being diagnosed. Parents who considered the diagnosis to be 'prompt' reported how they, or other people, had recognized their child had developed symptoms of T1D which resulted in a rapid presentation to health care professionals. In contrast, parents who perceived their child's diagnosis to be 'delayed' did not recognize signs of T1D and attributed their child's deteriorating health to other conditions, being out of routines and/or their stage of development. These parents often only sought medical help when symptoms became extreme. All parents were distressed by their child's diagnosis; however, parents in the 'delayed' pathway expressed unresolved feelings of guilt, particularly when their child was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. Parents' and other people's knowledge about T1D can affect the duration between onset of their child's symptoms and diagnosis. Campaigns to raise awareness should ensure that parents are made aware of symptoms and that T1D can develop during childhood. Health care professionals could discuss with parents the events preceding their child's diagnosis to better determine their emotional support needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Developmental Personality Types from Childhood to Adolescence: Associations with Parenting and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Amaranta D.; Dekovic, Maja; van den Akker, Alithe L.; Stoltz, Sabine E. M. J.; Prinzie, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether changes in children's self-reported Big Five dimensions are represented by (developmental) personality types, using a cohort-sequential design with three measurement occasions across 5 years (four cohorts, 9-12 years at T1; N = 523). Correlates of, and gender differences in, type membership were examined. Latent…

  2. Holland’s personality types versus preferences in accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Cewińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Holland’s personality types versus preferences in accounting The article presents the results of research on the relationship between personality according to the typol-ogy of Holland with preferences in accounting. In his theory, Holland distinguished six personality types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. The authors formulated a general hypothesis that these different personality types have different preferences and views on certain issues in accounting. They also formulated several detailed hypotheses related to two personality types: Conven-tional and Enterprising. In order to verify the hypotheses, the authors carried out quantitative research (a questionnaire survey and focus interviews. Generally speaking, these hypotheses were confirmed.

  3. Gastrointestinal and renal responses to variable water intake in whitebellied sunbirds and New Holland honeyeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, Cromwell; Napier, Kathryn R; Nicolson, Susan W; McWhorter, Todd J; Fleming, Patricia A

    2013-05-01

    Nectarivores face a constant challenge in terms of water balance, experiencing water loading or dehydration when switching between food plants or between feeding and fasting. To understand how whitebellied sunbirds and New Holland honeyeaters meet the challenges of varying preformed water load, we used the elimination of intramuscular-injected [(14)C]-l-glucose and (3)H2O to quantify intestinal and renal water handling on diets varying in sugar concentration. Both sunbirds and honeyeaters showed significant modulation of intestinal water absorption, allowing excess water to be shunted through the intestine when on dilute diets. Despite reducing their fractional water absorption, both species showed linear increases in water flux and fractional body water turnover as water intake increased (both afternoon and morning), suggesting that the modulation of fractional water absorption was not sufficient to completely offset dietary water loads. In both species, glomerular filtration rate was independent of water gain (but was higher for the afternoon), as was renal fractional water reabsorption (measured in the afternoon). During the natural overnight fast, both sunbirds and honeyeaters arrested whole kidney function. Evaporative water loss in sunbirds was variable but correlated with water gain. Both sunbirds and honeyeaters appear to modulate intestinal water absorption as an important component of water regulation to help deal with massive preformed water loads. Shutting down glomerular filtration rate during the overnight fast is another way of saving energy for osmoregulatory function. Birds maintain osmotic balance on diets varying markedly in preformed water load by varying both intestinal water absorption and excretion through the intestine and kidneys.

  4. Fantazmat "Sprawiedliwych" i film "W ciemności" Agnieszki Holland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Żukowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phantasm of the Righteous and Agnieszka Holland’s film "In Darkness" The text analyses Agnieszka Holland’s film In Darkness against the background of the Polish discourse on the Righteous. The devices of this discourse are reconstructed on the basis of two documentary films: The Righteous by Ryszard Gontarz and Janusz Kidawa (1968 and The Story of the Kowalski by Arkadiusz Gołębiowski and Maciej Pawlicki (2009. The basic devices distinguished in the narrative of the Righteous are the following: 1. a symmetry between the Jewish and Polish suffering 2. lack of Jews’ gratefulness and solidarity (“we demonstrated solidarity as far as the sacrifice of life but they…”; 3. treating the Righteous as pars pro toto of the community (they become the proof of the “national character” of Poles; the motif of “the Righteous-anti-Semite”; 4. a conviction about Polish helplessness; 5. marginalisation of the Polish aggression against Jews (a viewpoint that apparently “the scum is everywhere” and the simultaneously expressed accusations that the victims were involved in the Holocaust themselves. Holland is not aware of the discursive mechanisms accumulating around the undertaken subject or the correlated stakes of the common imagination. Therefore, many fragments of In Darkness easily succumb to being captured by the prevailing, and in fact anti-Semitic, clichés of understanding the history. In effect, the phenomenon of unwanted comeback of phantasms occurs in reference to a narrative developed as an antidote for such.

  5. More than teacher directed or child initiated: Preschool curriculum type, parent involvement, and children's outcomes in the child-parent centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Graue

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the contributions of curriculum approach and parent involvement to the short- and long-term effects of preschool participation in the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers. Data came from the complete cohort of 989 low-income children (93% African American in the Chicago Longitudinal Study, who attended preschool in the 20 Child-Parent Centers in 1983-1985 and kindergarten in 1985-1986. We found that implementation of an instructional approach rated high by Head Teachers in teacher-directed and child-initiated activities was most consistently associated with children’s outcomes, including school readiness at kindergarten entry, reading achievement in third and eighth grades, and avoidance of grade retention. Parent involvement in school activities, as rated by teachers and by parents, was independently associated with child outcomes from school readiness at kindergarten entry to eighth grade reading achievement and grade retention above and beyond the influence of curriculum approach. Findings indicate that instructional approaches that blend a teacher-directed focus with child-initiated activities and parental school involvement are origins of the long-term effects of participation in the Child-Parent Centers.

  6. Parenting Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Parenting Conflicts Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print ...

  7. Food and eating behaviors among adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) management involves constant attention to food. In addition to glycemic goals, healthy weight and BMI are important clinical targets, especially in adolescence. Adolescence is a sensitive time for discussions around eating and weight, and risks are elevated for disordered eatin...

  8. Food and eating behaviors among adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents [abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) management involves constant attention to food. In addition to glycemic goals, healthy weight and BMI are important clinical targets, especially in adolescence. Adolescence is a sensitive time for discussions around eating and weight, and risks are elevated for disordered eatin...

  9. Cardiovascular morbidity and early mortality cluster in parents of type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Rossing, P; Nielsen, F S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A familial predisposition was proposed to be a determinant of the increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. The insertion allele of an insertion/deletion polymorphism in the ACE (ACE/ID) gene seems to protect ag...

  10. Coping and caregiving experience of parents of children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess the coping strategies and the relationship of coping with subjective burden and positive caregiving consequences as perceived by the caregivers of children and adolescents with Type-1 diabetes. Design: Cross-sectional assessment. Setting: Outpatient of Endocrinology Department. Participants: Forty-one parents of children and adolescents with Type-1 diabetes Main Outcome Measure: Ways of coping checklist (WCC, involvement evaluation questionnaire (IEQ and scale for assessment of positive aspects of caregiving experience (scale for positive aspects of caregiving experience to study the coping, burden and positive aspects of caregiving respectively. Results: On WCC, the highest score was obtained for seeking social support, followed by planful problem-solving. More frequent use of coping strategies of confrontation and escape-avoidance was associated with significantly higher score on the tension domain of IEQ. Those who more frequently used problem-solving and distancing had significantly higher scores on worrying-urging-I domain of IEQ. supervision domain of IEQ was associated with more frequent use of confrontation, self-control, social support, escape-avoidance and positive reappraisal. More frequent use of distancing and problem-solving were associated with lower caregiving personal gains. More frequent use of problem-solving was associated with higher caregiver satisfaction and lower scores in the domain of self-esteem and social aspects of caring. Conclusion: Caregivers of patients with Type-1 diabetes predominantly use adaptive coping strategies. Higher use of certain coping strategies is associated with negative and positive caregiving consequences.

  11. Balance de potencia del conjunto formado por el tractor New Holland 6610s y la sembradora v-20

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro R. Mayans-Céspedes; José R. Soca-Cabrera; Gilberto López Canteñs

    2009-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se reflejan los resultados de la prueba de tracción y potencia a la toma de fuerza de la sembradora V-204, formando conjunto con el tractor New Holland 6610s4. Para las pruebas se contó con los instrumentos, medios de medición e instalaciones del Centro Nacional de Estandarización de Maquinaria Agrícola, utilizándose la NMX "Método de evaluación de sembradoras y/o fertilizadoras de tracción mecánica con dosificador de disco" y la NC Máquinas agropecuarias y forestales, ...

  12. Playing by the rules. The Hague courts and the Acteonisation du Grand Veneur d’Hollande (1643

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Keblusek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses an unpublished play, Acteonisation du Grand Veneur d’Hollande (1643. Created – and possibly performed – within the immediate circle of the court of Elizabeth of Bohemia in The Hague, its anonymous author satirizes the various personalities in the Orange courts of respectively Frederik Hendrik and Amalia von Solms, and Willem II and Mary Stuart. Focusing on the social ambitions of Johannes Polyander van Kerckhoven, Lord of Heenvliet, and by using the popular myth of Actaeon and Diana, the clash between court and city, between princely aristocrats and republican burghers is played out.

  13. Association between parental history of diabetes and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus differs according to the sex of the parent and offspring's body weight: A finding from a Japanese worksite-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaochen; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Tamakoshi, Koji; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Wada, Keiko; Li, Yuanying; Hilawe, Esayas Haregot; Uemura, Mayu; Chiang, Chifa; Zhang, Yan; Otsuka, Rei; Ota, Atsuhiko; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in the association of parental history of diabetes with the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the offspring according to the sex of the parent and the offspring's body weight. A prospective cohort study of 4446 middle-aged non-diabetic Japanese men and women were followed in Aichi Prefecture, central Japan, from 2002 to 2011. Subjects were categorized by their self-reported parental history of diabetes ("no parental history," "father only," "mother only," and "both"). The association of parental history of diabetes and incidence in the offspring was examined according to overweight status adjusted for age, sex, birth weight, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, total energy intake, body mass index, and number of metabolic syndrome components. During follow-up (median 8.9 years), 277 subjects developed T2DM. Parental history of diabetes was positively associated with T2DM incidence. However, stratified analysis by overweight status revealed that only maternal history was associated with increased T2DM incidence in non-overweight subjects (hazard ratio=2.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.41-3.91). While in overweight subjects, paternal history was significantly associated with higher T2DM incidence (hazard ratio=1.98, 95% confidence interval: 1.19-3.28). Our results suggest that parental history of diabetes mellitus is associated with the incidence of T2DM in offspring differently according to the sex of the affected parent and the offspring's body weight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-perception of psychological functioning and coping ability of adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas-van Schaaijk, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to learn how pediatric psychological care for (Dutch) adolescents and their parents may be optimized. Psychological functioning in adolescents (specifically depression and behavior problems) and their parents (general and diabetes specific parenting stress) is studied while

  15. Supporting parents of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zysberg L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leehu Zysberg,1 Tali Lang21Graduate School, Gordon College of Education, 2Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: This review provides the reader with an integrative view of the literature on the challenges families of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus face, and the interventions proposed in research and practice to facilitate their coping and efficacy in supporting patient care. We present background information regarding the condition and the general challenges it poses, and then focus on younger patients and their families, while reviewing the literature and emerging patterns describing pitfalls and proposed interventions. We present directions for future thought and further research based on what we find (and fail to find in the literature. Keywords: challenges, interventions, patient care, blood sugar, emotional, psychological

  16. Brief Computer-Delivered Intervention to Increase Parental Monitoring in Families of African American Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Deborah A; Idalski Carcone, April; Ondersma, Steven J; Naar-King, Sylvie; Dekelbab, Bassem; Moltz, Kathleen

    2017-06-01

    African American adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at elevated risk for poor diabetes management and metabolic control. Parental supervision and monitoring of adolescent diabetes management have been shown to promote better diabetes management among adolescents, but parents typically decrease their oversight during the transition to independent diabetes care. The purpose of the study was to conduct a randomized clinical trial to test the feasibility and efficacy of a three-session, computer-delivered motivational intervention (The 3Ms) to promote increased parental monitoring among primary caregivers of young African American adolescents with T1D. The intervention was brief and optimized for delivery during routine diabetes clinic visits. Sixty-seven adolescents with T1D aged 11-14 and their primary caregiver were randomly assigned to one of three arms: adolescent and parent motivational intervention (Arm 1), adolescent control and parent motivational intervention (Arm 2), or adolescent and parent control (Arm 3). Intervention effects were assessed 1 month after intervention completion. Parents in Arm 1 and Arm 2 had significant increases in knowledge of the importance of monitoring adolescents' diabetes care. Parents in Arm 2 also had trend to significant increases in direct observation and monitoring of adolescent diabetes care, and adolescents in Arm 2 had significant improvements in glycemic control. Findings from the present study provide preliminary support for the efficacy of a brief, computer-delivered parenting intervention for improving family management practices and adolescent health outcomes among African American adolescents with T1D and their caregivers.

  17. Stressors in Teens with Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: Immediate and Long-Term Implications for Transition to Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersig, Anne L; Tsalikian, Eva; Coffey, Julie; Williams, Janet K

    2016-01-01

    Teens with Type 1 diabetes and their parents experience every day and illness-related stress; however, understanding of how these stressors relate to the transition to adulthood is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify stressors of teens with Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and their parents related to the impending transition to adulthood. This study used open-ended questions to identify every day and illness-related stressors among 15 teens with T1DM and 25 parents seen in one pediatric diabetes clinic. Qualitative descriptive analysis identified themes in interview transcripts. The primary teen stressor related to impending transition centered on ineffective self-management, often when they were taking over responsibility for T1DM management. Parents' concerns included immediate and long-term negative outcomes of teen self-management as well as financial resources and health insurance for the teen. Teens and parents both expressed specific concerns about outcomes and prevention of nocturnal hypoglycemia, and identified uncertainties related to teen health and diabetes-focused health care when no longer living in the parent's home. Teens with Type 1 diabetes and their parents understand that independent teen self-management is a component of transition to adulthood, but worry about teen self-management outcomes. Concerns specific to health care transition included health insurance, T1DM resources, and teens' abilities to handle new situations. Identifying current and future self-management concerns of individuals and families can facilitate targeted education and interventions to support successful transition to adulthood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Short-term impact of a stress management and health promotion program on perceived stress, parental stress, health locus of control, and cortisol levels in parents of children and adolescents with diabetes type 1: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouli, Eleni; Pavlopoulos, Vassilis; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Chrousos, George; Darviri, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Parents of children and adolescents with diabetes type 1 (DT1) usually experience high stress levels, as they have to cope with multiple demands in their everyday life. Different complex interventions have been implemented, which sometimes have led to opposite results. The purpose of this study was to assess stress levels in parents of children and adolescents with DT1 and to evaluate the effectiveness of a stress management program (progressive muscle relaxation combined with diaphragmatic breathing) in reducing perceived and parenting stress, increasing internal locus of control, promoting healthy lifestyle, and normalizing cortisol levels. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 44 parents were randomly assigned to the intervention group (performing relaxation for eight weeks, n = 19) and control group (n = 25). Pre-post measurements included cortisol levels, lifestyle characteristics, perceived stress, perception of health, and parenting stress. A statistically significant decrease in perceived stress (from 27.21 to 19.00, P = .001), as well as in parenting stress (from 85.79 to 73.68, P = .003), was observed in the intervention group. A statistically significant difference was found in perceived stress between the two groups after the intervention (Dmean = 6.64, P = .010). No significant difference was revealed between or within the groups in cortisol levels. Significant improvement was reported by the subjects of the intervention group in various lifestyle parameters. Relaxation techniques seem to have a positive impact on stress and on various lifestyle factors in parents of children and adolescents with DT1. Future research on long-term benefits of an intervention program comprising of various relaxation schemes is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sugarsquare, a Web-Based Patient Portal for Parents of a Child With Type 1 Diabetes: Multicenter Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogerd, Emiel; Maas-Van Schaaijk, Nienke M; Sas, Theo C; Clement-de Boers, Agnes; Smallenbroek, Mischa; Nuboer, Roos; Noordam, Cees; Verhaak, Chris M

    2017-08-22

    Raising a child with type 1 diabetes (T1D) means combining the demands of the disease management with everyday parenting, which is associated with increased levels of distress. A Web-based patient portal, Sugarsquare, was developed to support parents, by providing online parent-professional communication, online peer support and online disease information. The first aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting a multicenter, randomized controlled trial in Dutch parents of a child with T1D. The second aim was to assess the feasibility of implementing Sugarsquare in clinical practice. The parents of 105 children (N=105) with T1D below the age of 13 participated in a 6-month multicenter randomized controlled feasibility trial. They were randomly assigned to an experimental (n=54, usual care and Sugarsquare) or a control group (n=51, usual care). Attrition rates and user statistics were gathered to evaluate feasibility of the trial and implementation. To determine potential efficacy, the parenting stress index (PSI-SF) was assessed at baseline (T0) and after 6 months (T1). Of a potential population of parents of 445 children, 189 were willing to participate (enrollment refusal=57.5%, n=256), 142 filled in the baseline questionnaire (baseline attrition rate=25%, n=47), and 105 also filled in the questionnaire at T1 (post randomization attrition rate during follow-up=26%, n=32). As such, 24% of the potential population participated. Analysis in the experimental group (n=54) revealed a total of 32 (59%) unique users, divided into 12 (38%) frequent users, 9 (28%) incidental users, and 11 (34%) low-frequent users. Of the total of 44 professionals, 34 (77%) logged in, and 32 (73%) logged in repeatedly. Analysis of the user statistics in the experimental group further showed high practicability and integration in all users, moderate acceptability and demand in parents, and high acceptability and demand in health care professionals. Baseline parenting stress

  20. Le voyage au service d’une peinture de la France et des Français : Maxime Du Camp en Hollande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozanne Versendaal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to study the travelogue En Hollande (1859, written by the French author and photographer Maxime Du Camp. This travel document deals with a two weeks journey that Du Camp made in Holland in the winter of 1857. The article particularly examines the way Du Camp has painted the picture of France and the French people, while travelling through different regions of the Netherlands. The article presents in detail some cultural, religious and political aspects of the French identity and culture Du Camp reflects upon in his text.

  1. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices…

  2. The relationship between parenting stress and parent–child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0–7 years)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwesteeg, A.M.; Hartman, E.E.; Aanstoot, H.J.; van Bakel, H.J.A.; Emons, W.H.M.; van Mil, E.; Pouwer, F.

    2016-01-01

    To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent–child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0–7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including glucose monitoring

  3. Parents' Perceived Barriers to Healthful Eating and Physical Activity for Low-Income Adolescents Who Are at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sharon L.; Bell, Toya Wilson; Hasin, Afroza

    2009-01-01

    Healthful eating and regular physical activity are vitally important for low-income adolescents who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). To design a relevant, community-based intervention for these at risk adolescents, parent perceptions of barriers to healthful eating and physical activity should be assessed. Such barriers have been…

  4. Parent-child attitude congruence on type and intensity of physical activity: Testing multiple mediators of sedentary behavior in older children

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined parent–child attitudes on value of specific types and intensities of physical activity, which may explain gender differences in child activity, and evaluated physical activity as a mechanism to reduce time spent in sedentary behaviors. A community sample of 681 parents and 433 ch...

  5. Self-perception of psychological functioning and coping ability of adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents

    OpenAIRE

    Maas-van Schaaijk, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to learn how pediatric psychological care for (Dutch) adolescents and their parents may be optimized. Psychological functioning in adolescents (specifically depression and behavior problems) and their parents (general and diabetes specific parenting stress) is studied while taking into account biological (gender, age, HbA1c) characteristics. How the adolescents internalize their experiences is studied by explicitly asking them to provide their representations about t...

  6. Parenting style and family type, but not child temperament, are associated with television viewing time in children at two years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Anna S; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Lawrence, Julie; Galland, Barbara C; Gray, Andrew R; Taylor, Barry J; Sayers, Rachel; Taylor, Rachael W

    2017-01-01

    Despite the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommending that electronic media be avoided in children under two years of age, screen use is common in infants and toddlers. The aims of this study were to determine how parenting style, infant temperament, and family type are associated with television viewing in two-year-old children. Participants were from the Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI) randomized controlled trial (n = 802) (Dunedin, New Zealand). Demographic information was collected at baseline (late pregnancy), and television and other screen time assessed by questionnaire at 24 months of age. Parenting style (Parenting Practices Questionnaire), infant temperament (Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory), and family type (7 categories) were reported by both parents. Data were available for 487 participants (61% of the original participants). Median television viewing was relatively low at 21 minutes per day, or 30 minutes in those watching television (82%). Children who watched television played with mobile phones (12% of children) or iPads/tablets (22% of children) more frequently than children who did not (6% of children). In terms of parenting style, children of more authoritarian mothers (β = 17, 95% CI: 6-27 minutes), more authoritarian partners (β = 14, 95% CI: 2-26 minutes), or more permissive mothers (β = 10, 95% CI: 3-17 minutes) watched significantly more television. No significant relationships were observed between child temperament and time watching television after adjustment for confounding variables. Children from "active" families (as rated by partners) watched 29 minutes less television each day (P = 0.002). Parenting style and family type were associated with television viewing time in young children, whereas child temperament was not.

  7. Relations between fine motor skill and parental report of attention in young children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casnar, Christy L; Janke, Kelly M; van der Fluit, Faye; Brei, Natalie G; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders presenting in approximately 1 in 3,500 live births. NF1 is a highly variable condition with a large number of complications. A common complication is neuropsychological problems, including developmental delays and learning difficulties that affect as many as 60% of patients. Research has suggested that school-aged children with NF1 often have poorer fine motor skills and are at greater risk for attention difficulties than the general population. Thirty-eight children with NF1 and 23 unaffected children between the ages of 4 and 6 years, who are enrolled in a study of early development in NF1, were included in the present study. Varying levels of fine motor functioning were examined (simple to complex fine motor tasks). For children with NF1, significant difficulties were demonstrated on lab-based mid-level and complex fine motor tasks, even after controlling for nonverbal reasoning abilities, but not on simple fine motor tasks. Parental report also indicated difficulties in everyday adaptive fine motor functioning. No significant correlations were found between complex fine motor ability and attention difficulties. This study provides much needed descriptive data on the early emergence of fine motor difficulties and attention difficulties in young children with NF1.

  8. A qualitative study of perceptions of determinants of disease burden among young patients with type 1 diabetes and their parents in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verloo H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Henk Verloo,1 Mohan Meenakumari,2 Elizabeth Jean Abraham,3 Gnanam Malarvizhi3 1Department Nursing Sciences, University of Applied Nursing Sciences, La Source, Lausanne, Switzerland; 2Kurinji Hospital, 3PSG College of Nursing, PSG Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India Background: Diabetes is a leading threat to public health in India. A huge prevalence of type 1 diabetes among young patients is documented in literature; India is one of the countries with the highest number of new cases per year (10,900, of which 3–4 million face poverty along with diabetes. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of determinants of the disease burden among young patients with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods: In June 2014, perceptions were collected from eleven young patients and five available parents using the critical incident technique. Results: Disease burdens associated with the management of type 1 diabetes can vary significantly according to the different social and economic determinants facing each household. Determinants associated with good practices in the management of childhood type 1 diabetes included socioeconomic status, unawareness of health complications, and beliefs about nutrition. Coping strategies applied via lifestyle changes included monitoring glycemia and regular checkups by diabetologists. A general lack of awareness about type 1 diabetes in Indian society, stigmatization, and limited access and systematic barriers to the delivery of optimal health care were all perceived to be factors hindering the successful management of chronic type 1 diabetes by young patients and their parents. Conclusion: Stigmatization, a lack of therapeutic adherence, and the financial strains placed on families, particularly on poor ones, are critical. More emphasis must be put on the prevention of acute and long-term complications and education. Keywords: adolescents, adherence, critical incidence technique, India

  9. Les discours de François Hollande (2009-2012: la force axiologico-affective du changement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Immacolata Spagna

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – Within the field of argumentative analysis, our purpose is to underline the function and the effectiveness of the axiological-emotional content of the change proposed by François Hollande in his speeches (2009-2012.On the basis of the emotional orientation, given in a dysphoric register towards the previous government and in a euphoric one towards the auspicious future, the argumentation of the change claimed by the “normal” president is based on values. To not change would mean to accept the current situation and therefore all its negative values.Putting the reader in a condition of emotional tension with the aim of energizing him to find a remedy, Hollande’s proposition becomes, thus, a call to action, an implicit request for social, politic and moral engagement, to change the course of history and to realize a better future. Keywords: Argumentation, political discourse, emotion, axiological, change.  Résumé – Dans le cadre de l’analyse argumentative, cet article vise à souligner la fonction et l’efficacité de la charge axiologico-affective du changement proposé par François Hollande dans ses discours (2009-2012.Sur la base de l’orientation émotionnelle, donnée dans un registre dysphorique à l’égard du gouvernement passé et euphorique vers l’avenir prometteur, l’argumentation du changement invoqué par le président “normal” se fonde sur les valeurs. Ne pas changer signifierait accepter la situation actuelle et, par là, toutes ces valeurs négatives.Mettant le lecteur dans une condition de tension émotive pour le motiver à trouver un remède, la proposition de Hollande devient ainsi un appel à agir, une requête implicite d’engagement social, politique et moral pour changer le cours de l’histoire et réaliser un futur meilleur. Mots clés: argumentation, discours politique, émotion, axiologique, changement. 

  10. Strengths-based behavioral intervention for parents of adolescents with type 1 diabetes using an mHealth app (Type 1 Doing Well): Protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supportive parent involvement for adolescents' type 1 diabetes (T1D) self-management promotes optimal diabetes outcomes. However, family conflict is common and can interfere with collaborative family teamwork. Few interventions have used explicitly strengths-based approaches to help reinforce desire...

  11. Life in transition : an osteoarchaeological perspective of the consequences of mediëval socioeconomic developments in Holland and Zeeland (AD 1000-1600)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schats, R.

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the impact of socioeconomic developments on the physical condition of medieval populations in Holland and Zeeland between AD 1000 and 1600 through the analysis of human skeletal remains from three archaeological sites. In a brief period of time, this region went from being

  12. Das Volkslied in Deutschland, Frankreich, Belgien und Holland. Untersuchungen über die Auffassung des Begriffes; Über die traditionellen Zeilen, die Zahlen-, Blumen- und Farbensymbolik

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Cornelis

    1930-01-01

    Wenn man die gewaltige Menge Publikationen über das Volkslied, die im Laufe des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts in Deutschland, Frankreich, Belgien und Holland erschienen sind, vergleicht, springen zwei Punkte sofort ins Auge: 1. der Unterschied zwischen den verschiedenen Auffassungen vom Begriff Volkslied

  13. Relicts of a peat cover in the Westerkoggepolder (West Friesland, North-Holland, The Netherlands): The genesis of an eluvial clay soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, J.; Ligtendag, W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the result of palynological research of peat relicts, found in the Westerkoggepolder (North-Holland, The Netherlands). In general, such relicts of peat in the actual landscape point to an extensive peat cover in the past that disappeared due to land reclamation and agricultural

  14. Acceptance and commitment therapy in youth with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and chronic pain and their parents: A pilot study of feasibility and preliminary efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Staci; Wolters, Pamela L; Toledo-Tamula, Mary Anne; Schmitt, Shawn Nelson; Baldwin, Andrea; Starosta, Amy; Gillespie, Andrea; Widemann, Brigitte

    2016-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 3,500 individuals. Chronic pain is commonly reported among individuals with NF1 and plexiform neurofibroma tumors (PNs). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), an empirically supported method for addressing chronic pain, helps individuals re-focus on valued relationships and activities. This pilot study investigated the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a brief ACT workshop in the NF1 population. Eligible participants included adolescents and young adults (AYA; 12-21 years) with NF1 and chronic pain that interfered with daily functioning and their parents. Patients and parents completed baseline measures of pain interference, pain intensity, functional disability, pain acceptance, depression, and anxiety. Then, AYA and parents participated separately in a 2-day small-group ACT workshop. A telephone booster session occurred 1 month post-intervention. Three-month post-treatment measures were completed by mail. Ten adolescents (4 males; M age = 16.9 years) and seven parents provided baseline and 3-month data. Mean satisfaction with the study was moderate to high (3.9 for patients and 4.6 for parents on a 1-5 scales). Patients and parents reported significant declines in patients' pain interference at 3 months post-treatment. Patient-reported pain intensity significantly declined from baseline to 3 months. Parents reported marginally greater acceptance of their child's pain. No changes emerged in functional ability or mood. Preliminary findings suggest that a brief ACT group intervention is feasible and may help AYA with NF1 and PNs cope with their chronic pain, although larger randomized studies are needed to confirm treatment efficacy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Parents of adolescents with type 1 diabetes--their views on information and communication needs and internet use. A qualitative study.

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    Sam Nordfeldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about parents' views on the use of online resources for information, education and support regarding childhood type 1 diabetes (T1DM. Considering the rapidly evolving new communication practices, parents' perspectives need to be explored. The main purpose of this paper was to explore parents' perceptions of their information-seeking, Internet use, and social networking online. This applied to their everyday life, including the contexts of T1DM and contact with peers. A second aim was to identify implications for future development of Internet use in this respect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-seven parents of 24 young persons aged 10-17 with T1DM participated in eight focus group interviews during their regular visits to a county hospital. Focus group discussions were video/audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Self-reported demographic and medical information was also collected. A main theme was Finding things out, including two sub-themes, Trust and Suitability. The latter were key factors affecting parents' perceptions of online resources. Parents' choice of information source was related to the situation, previous experiences and knowledge about sources and, most importantly, the level of trust in the source. A constantly present background theme was Life situation, including two sub-themes, Roles and functions and Emotions and needs. Parents' information-seeking regarding T1DM varied greatly, and was closely associated with their life situation, the adolescents development phases and the disease trajectory. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Health practitioners and system developers need to focus on creating trust and suitability for users' needs. They should understand the children's diverse needs, which depend on their life situation, on the children's development, and on the disease trajectory. To enhance trust in online health information and support services

  16. Self-report and parent-report of physical and psychosocial well-being in Dutch adolescents with type 1 diabetes in relation to glycemic control

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    Houdijk Mieke C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine physical and psychosocial well-being of adolescents with type 1 diabetes by self-report and parent report and to explore associations with glycemic control and other clinical and socio-demographic characteristics. Methods Demographic, medical and psychosocial data were gathered from 4 participating outpatient pediatric diabetes clinics in the Netherlands. Ninety-one patients completed the Child Health Questionnaire-CF87 (CHQ-CF87, Centre for Epidemiological Studies scale for Depression (CES-D, and the DFCS (Diabetes-specific Family Conflict Scale. Parents completed the CHQ-PF50, CES-D and the DFCS. Results Mean age was 14.9 years (± 1.1, mean HbA1c 8.8% (± 1.7; 6.2–15.0%. Compared to healthy controls, patients scored lower on CHQ subscales role functioning-physical and general health. Parents reported less favorable scores on the behavior subscale than adolescents. Fewer diabetes-specific family conflicts were associated with better psychosocial well-being and less depressive symptoms. Living in a one-parent family, being member of an ethnic minority and reporting lower well-being were all associated with higher HbA1c values. Conclusion Overall, adolescents with type 1 diabetes report optimal well-being and parent report is in accordance with these findings. Poor glycemic control is common, with single-parent families and ethnic minorities particularly at risk. High HbA1c values are related to lower social and family functioning.

  17. Régine Hollander, An Introduction to Financial English, The Basics of Market Finance. Introduction à l’anglais financier

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Régine Hollander, maître de conférences honoraire à l’Université Panthéon-Assas, est spécialiste d’anglais financier et membre du Centre d’études et de recherches sur la vie économique des pays anglo-saxons (CERVEPAS, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3). Elle a participé à la réédition du Vocabulaire économique et financier d’Yves Bernard et Jean-Claude Colli (2003). An Introduction to Financial English est présenté par l’éditeur comme un ouvrage de référence pour la vie professionnelle. ...

  18. The impact of different types of parental support behaviours on child physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time: a cross-sectional study

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    Evelyn Pyper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, 31.5 % of children are overweight or obese, putting them at an increased risk of chronic co-morbidities and premature mortality. Physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time are important behavioural determinants of childhood overweight and obesity that are influenced by the family environment, and particularly parents’ support behaviours. However, there is currently a limited understanding of which types of these support behaviours have the greatest positive impact on healthy child behaviours. This study aims to determine the relative contribution of different types of parental support behaviours for predicting the likelihood that children meet established guidelines for daily physical activity, daily fruit and vegetable consumption, and recreational screen time. Methods A Computer Assisted Telephone Interview survey was used to collect data from a random sample of parents or guardians with at least one child under the age of 18 in Ontario (n = 3,206. Three multivariable logistic regression models were built to predict whether or not parents reported their child was meeting guidelines. Independent variables included parent and child age and gender, multiple indicators of parental support behaviours, and socio-demographic characteristics. Parental support behaviours were categorized post-hoc as motivational, instrumental, regulatory, and conditional based on an adapted framework. Results Controlling for all other factors in the model, several parental support behaviours were found to be significant predictors of children meeting established health guidelines. For example, conditional support behaviours including taking the child to places where they can be active (OR: 2.06; 95 % CI: 1.32-3.21, and eating meals as a family away from the TV (95 % CI: 1.15-2.41 were significant positive predictors of children meeting physical activity and fruit and vegetable guidelines, respectively. Conclusions Health

  19. Reducing stress and supporting positive relations in families of young children with type 1 diabetes: A randomized controlled study for evaluating the effects of the DELFIN parenting program

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    Saßmann Heike

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess initial efficacy and feasibility of a structured behavioural group training (DELFIN for parents of children with diabetes type 1, in order to reduce parenting stress and to improve parenting skills. Methods A randomized controlled study was conducted between July 2008 and September 2010, at a children’s hospital in Hannover with parents of children with type 1 diabetes (2–10 yrs (intervention group n = 37; control group n = 28. Parenting skills, parents’ psychological burden, children’s behavioural difficulties and quality of metabolic control were assessed before, 3 months after and 12 months after participating in the training program. Results In the intervention group parenting behaviour in conflict situations improved significantly after 3 months (Z = −3.28; p ≤ 0.001. It remained stable over 12 months (Z = −2.94; p ≤ 0.01. Depression and anxiety scores of parents decreased (Z = −1.93; p ≤ .05; Z = −2.02; p ≤ .05. Even though the outcome in the intervention group was more positive, the differences between both study arms failed to reach statistical significance. Unexpectedly parenting behaviour in the control group improved also (Z = −2.45; p ≤ .05. Anxiety as well as stress scores decreased in this group (Z = −2.02; p ≤ .05 and Z = −2.11; p ≤ .05. In both groups the initial metabolic control was good and without significant differences (A1c 7.2±0.8% vs. 7.1±0.4%; p > 0.5. It remained stable in the DELFIN group (A1c 7.1±0.8%; p > 0.5, but it increased slightly in controls (A1c 7.3±0.5%; Z = −2.79; p = .005. Conclusions This study has brought first evidence for the efficacy and feasibility of the program. A multicentre study with a larger sample is necessary to confirm these first results.

  20. Parent-child interaction: Does parental language matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menashe, Atara; Atzaba-Poria, Naama

    2016-11-01

    Although parental language and behaviour have been widely investigated, few studies have examined their unique and interactive contribution to the parent-child relationship. The current study explores how parental behaviour (sensitivity and non-intrusiveness) and the use of parental language (exploring and control languages) correlate with parent-child dyadic mutuality. Specifically, we investigated the following questions: (1) 'Is parental language associated with parent-child dyadic mutuality above and beyond parental behaviour?' (2) 'Does parental language moderate the links between parental behaviour and the parent-child dyadic mutuality?' (3) 'Do these differences vary between mothers and fathers?' The sample included 65 children (M age  = 1.97 years, SD = 0.86) and their parents. We observed parental behaviour, parent-child dyadic mutuality, and the type of parental language used during videotaped in-home observations. The results indicated that parental language and behaviours are distinct components of the parent-child interaction. Parents who used higher levels of exploring language showed higher levels of parent-child dyadic mutuality, even when accounting for parental behaviour. Use of controlling language, however, was not found to be related to the parent-child dyadic mutuality. Different moderation models were found for mothers and fathers. These results highlight the need to distinguish parental language and behaviour when assessing their contribution to the parent-child relationship. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Types of Relational Aggression in Girls Are Differentiated by Callous-Unemotional Traits, Peers and Parental Overcontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centifanti, Luna C M; Fanti, Kostas A; Thomson, Nicholas D; Demetriou, Vasiliki; Anastassiou-Hadjicharalambous, Xenia

    2015-11-13

    Adolescent girls often perpetrate aggression by gossiping and spreading rumours about others, by attempting to ruin relationships and by manipulating and excluding others. Further, males and females engage in reactive and proactive relational aggression differently. In this study, we examined the individual, peer and parental contextual factors that best explained the use of reactive and proactive relational aggression in girls. Female participants (n = 614; ages 11-18 years) completed questionnaires on aggression, callous-unemotional (CU) traits, delinquency, peer delinquency, gender composition of their peer group, resistance to peer influence and perceived parental overcontrol. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the effects of individual, peer- and parent-related variables on the likelihood of being classified as a low aggressor, reactive aggressor or proactive/reactive aggressor. Girls in the combined reactive/proactive aggression group were younger, had greater CU traits, a lower proportion of male peers and greater perception of parental control than both the reactive and low aggressive groups. Both highly aggressive groups were more delinquent and had greater peer delinquency than the low aggressive group. This study suggests those girls who show relational aggression for the purpose of gaining status and revenge feel restrained by their parents and may gravitate toward relationships that support their behaviour.

  2. Types of Relational Aggression in Girls Are Differentiated by Callous-Unemotional Traits, Peers and Parental Overcontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna C. M. Centifanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent girls often perpetrate aggression by gossiping and spreading rumours about others, by attempting to ruin relationships and by manipulating and excluding others. Further, males and females engage in reactive and proactive relational aggression differently. In this study, we examined the individual, peer and parental contextual factors that best explained the use of reactive and proactive relational aggression in girls. Female participants (n = 614; ages 11–18 years completed questionnaires on aggression, callous-unemotional (CU traits, delinquency, peer delinquency, gender composition of their peer group, resistance to peer influence and perceived parental overcontrol. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the effects of individual, peer- and parent-related variables on the likelihood of being classified as a low aggressor, reactive aggressor or proactive/reactive aggressor. Girls in the combined reactive/proactive aggression group were younger, had greater CU traits, a lower proportion of male peers and greater perception of parental control than both the reactive and low aggressive groups. Both highly aggressive groups were more delinquent and had greater peer delinquency than the low aggressive group. This study suggests those girls who show relational aggression for the purpose of gaining status and revenge feel restrained by their parents and may gravitate toward relationships that support their behaviour.

  3. The development of postinstitutionalized versus parent-reared Russian children as a function of age at placement and family type.

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    McCall, Robert B; Muhamedrahimov, Rifkat J; Groark, Christina J; Palmov, Oleg I; Nikiforova, Natalia V; Salaway, Jennifer; Julian, Megan M

    2016-02-01

    A total of 149 children, who spent an average of 13.8 months in Russian institutions, were transferred to Russian families of relatives and nonrelatives at an average age of 24.7 months. After residing in these families for at least 1 year (average = 43.2 months), parents reported on their attachment, indiscriminately friendly behavior, social-emotional competencies, problem behaviors, and effortful control when they were 1.5-10.7 years of age. They were compared to a sample of 83 Russian parents of noninstitutionalized children, whom they had reared from birth. Generally, institutionalized children were rated similarly to parent-reared children on most measures, consistent with substantial catch-up growth typically displayed by children after transitioning to families. However, institutionalized children were rated more poorly than parent-reared children on certain competencies in early childhood and some attentional skills. There were relatively few systematic differences associated with age at family placement or whether the families were relatives or nonrelatives. Russian parent-reared children were rated as having more problem behaviors than the US standardization sample, which raises cautions about using standards cross-culturally.

  4. Associations of Youth and Parent Weight Status with Reported versus Predicted Daily Energy Intake and Hemoglobin A1c in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Amanda L. P.; Higgins, Laurie A.; Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Nansel, Tonja R.; Lipsky, Leah M.; Laffel, Lori M. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemic of overweight/obesity affects youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and their families. In youth with T1DM and their parents, we examined weight status with reported and expected energy intake and with youth hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Methods In 243 youth (48% female, 13 ± 3 years) and their parents (84% female, 45 ± 6 years), we assessed body mass index (BMI), prevalence of overweight/obesity, reported energy intake (REI), and youth glycemic control (HbA1c). The REI was compared with predicted daily energy requirements (DER; based on age, weight, sex, and physical activity). Results Youth had diabetes duration of 6.3 ± 3.4 years and HbA1c of 8.5% ± 1.3%; 69% used insulin pump therapy. Overweight and obesity affected 23% and 11% of youth and 30% and 24% of parents, respectively. Youth and parent BMI (r = 0.38; p obese; p obese compared with underweight/normal weight parents (1.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.2 ± 0.5; p = .001) but did not differ among youth by weight status. Both youth and parent BMI were positively correlated with youth HbA1c (r = 0.14, p = .02; r = 0.16, p = .01, respectively). Hemoglobin A1c tended to be higher in obese than in overweight and normal weight youth (mean ± standard deviation [SD] 8.4 ± 1.4, 8.4 ± 1.3, and 8.8 ± 1.0, respectively; p = .06) and was significantly higher in youth whose parents were obese versus overweight or underweight/normal weight (mean ± SD 8.2 ± 1.2, 8.5 ± 1.4, and 8.9 ± 1.5, respectively; p obesity are prevalent among families of youth with T1DM. Weight status appears to influence self-REI in parents and glycemic control in youth with T1DM, suggesting the need for family-based dietary interventions. PMID:23439184

  5. Strengths-Based Behavioral Intervention for Parents of Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes Using an mHealth App (Type 1 Doing Well): Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Eshtehardi, Sahar S; Minard, Charles G; Saber, Rana; Thompson, Debbe; Karaviti, Lefkothea P; Rojas, Yuliana; Anderson, Barbara J

    2018-03-13

    Supportive parent involvement for adolescents' type 1 diabetes (T1D) self-management promotes optimal diabetes outcomes. However, family conflict is common and can interfere with collaborative family teamwork. Few interventions have used explicitly strengths-based approaches to help reinforce desired management behaviors and promote positive family interactions around diabetes care. The aim of this protocol was to describe the development of a new, strengths-based behavioral intervention for parents of adolescents with T1D delivered via a mobile-friendly Web app called Type 1 Doing Well. Ten adolescent-parent dyads and 5 diabetes care providers participated in a series of qualitative interviews to inform the design of the app. The 3- to 4-month pilot intervention will involve 82 parents receiving daily prompts to use the app, in which they will mark the diabetes-related strength behaviors (ie, positive attitudes or behaviors related to living with or managing T1D) their teen engaged in that day. Parents will also receive training on how to observe diabetes strengths and how to offer teen-friendly praise via the app. Each week, the app will generate a summary of the teen's most frequent strengths from the previous week based on parent reports, and parents will be encouraged to praise their teen either in person or from a library of reinforcing text messages (short message service, SMS). The major outcomes of this pilot study will include intervention feasibility and satisfaction data. Clinical and behavioral outcomes will include glycemic control, regimen adherence, family relationships and conflict, diabetes burden, and health-related quality of life. This strengths-based, mobile health (mHealth) intervention aims to help parents increase their awareness of and efforts to support their adolescents' engagement in positive diabetes-related behaviors. If efficacious, this intervention has the potential to reduce the risk of family conflict, enhance collaborative

  6. Consideration of Insulin Pumps or Continuous Glucose Monitors by Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: Stakeholder Engagement in the Design of Web-Based Decision Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tim; Hirschfeld, Fiona; Miller, Louis; Izenberg, Neil; Dowshen, Steven A; Taylor, Alex; Milkes, Amy; Shinseki, Michelle T; Bejarano, Carolina; Kozikowski, Chelsea; Kowal, Karen; Starr-Ashton, Penny; Ross, Judith L; Kummer, Mark; Carakushansky, Mauri; Lyness, D'Arcy; Brinkman, William; Pierce, Jessica; Fiks, Alexander; Christofferson, Jennifer; Rafalko, Jessica; Lawson, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the stakeholder-driven design, development, and testing of web-based, multimedia decision aids for youth with type 1 diabetes who are considering the insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring and their parents. This is the initial phase of work designed to develop and evaluate the efficacy of these decision aids in promoting improved decision-making engagement with use of a selected device. Qualitative interviews of 36 parents and adolescents who had previously faced these decisions and 12 health care providers defined the content, format and structure of the decision aids. Experts in children's health media helped the research team to plan, create, and refine multimedia content and its presentation. A web development firm helped organize the content into a user-friendly interface and enabled tracking of decision aid utilization. Throughout, members of the research team, adolescents, parents, and 3 expert consultants offered perspectives about the website content, structure, and function until the design was complete. With the decision aid websites completed, the next phase of the project is a randomized controlled trial of usual clinical practice alone or augmented by use of the decision aid websites. Stakeholder-driven development of multimedia, web-based decision aids requires meticulous attention to detail but can yield exceptional resources for adolescents and parents contemplating major changes to their diabetes regimens. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. An Analysis of Cultural Diversity and Recurring Themes in Preservice Teachers' Online Discussions of Epstein's Six Types of Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathans, Laura; Revelle, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This study used a qualitative, grounded theoretical framework to examine integration of Joyce Epstein's six typologies of family involvement in responses to discussion questions for an online parent involvement course. Fifty-two undergraduate students' responses were axially coded. Overarching themes were then determined with the constant…

  8. Diagnosed Intellectual and Emotional Impairment among Parents Who Seriously Mistreat Their Children: Prevalence, Type, and Outcome in a Court Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carol G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study examined the court records of 206 seriously abused or neglected children and their families in a large urban area and found that in over half the records a parent had been diagnosed as having an emotional disorder and/or low intelligence, with a majority of these diagnoses indicating significant impairment. (Author/DB)

  9. Rezension von: Barbara Holland-Cunz: Gefährdete Freiheit. Über Hannah Arendt und Simone de Beauvoir. Opladen u.a.: Verlag Barbara Budrich 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Dierkes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Von Barbara Holland-Cunz, die sich mit Simone de Beauvoir und Hannah Arendt bereits einzeln beschäftigt hat, liegt nun ein Band vor, in dem sie sich diesen herausragenden Denkerinnen des 20. Jahrhunderts gemeinsam widmet. In einer beinahe synoptisch anmutenden Herangehensweise fokussiert sie dabei auf den Begriff der Freiheit, der bei beiden von eminenter Bedeutung für das jeweilige Theoriegebäude ist. Holland-Cunz zufolge verstehen beide, bei einigen Unterschieden, Freiheit so, dass sie sich vor allem durch eine in sich eingeschriebene Gefährdung auszeichnet: Diese resultiert aus einem heroisch-emphatischen Gestus, der in paradoxer Weise gepaart wird mit einem abgeklärten Realismus. Über weite Strecken liest sich der Weg zu dieser Deutung, v. a. auch wegen einer teilweise sympathisch unkonventionellen und originellen Herangehensweise, sehr anregend und überzeugend.

  10. "You can't just jump on a bike and go": a qualitative study exploring parents' perceptions of physical activity in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Helen; Blake, Holly; Dee, Beatrice; Glazebrook, Cris

    2014-12-20

    Parents of children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) have an important role in supporting diabetes management behaviours and helping to maintain their child's healthy lifestyle. Physical activity has known benefits for children with T1DM [Diabet Med 31: 1163-1173], but children with chronic health conditions typically have low levels of physical activity. Research is needed to build an understanding of the experience of physical activity for children with T1DM. The purpose of this study was to understand parents' perceptions of what influences physical activity for children with T1DM and to inform the practice of those working with children who have T1DM. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 20 parents (18 mothers, 2 fathers) who had a child aged 7 - 13 years with T1DM in the UK. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and data were analysed using thematic analysis [Qual Res Psychol 3: 77-101, 2006]). Factors believed to influence participation in physical activity are presented as 7 major themes and 15 subthemes. Themes that emerged included the conflict between planning and spontaneous activity, struggles to control blood glucose, recognition of the importance of physical activity, the determination of parents, children relying on their parents to manage physical activity, the importance of a good support system and individual factors about the children that influence physical activity participation. This study highlights that parents serve as gate-keepers for children's physical activity. The findings provide insight into the need for T1DM knowledge and competence in personnel involved in the supervision of children's physical activities. Healthcare providers should collaborate with families to ensure understanding of how to manage physical activity. The findings sensitise professionals to the issues confronted by children with T1DM and their parents, as well as the methods used by children and their families to overcome

  11. A suspected case of intranasal inverted Schneiderian papilloma in an adult male from post-Medieval Holland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, G M A; Waters-Rist, A; Inskip, S A

    2016-03-01

    During the routine assessment of skeletal material unearthed from Middenbeemster, a post-Medieval (AD 17-19th century) cemetery in Northern Holland, an adult male with an unidentified choanal lesion was discovered. The affected individual was analysed macroscopically and via computer tomography. Based on the phenotypic and radiographic characteristics of the lesion, and after a comprehensive review of clinical literature, it was determined that the lesion was likely caused by an inverted Schneiderian papilloma (ISP), a benign but locally aggressive endophytic neoplasm histopathologically characterized by the inversion of the epithelium into the lamina propria (Schneiderian membrane) of the respiratory nasal mucosa. This study presents a detailed description of the pathophysiology and aetiology of ISPs, using both bioarchaeological and biomedical frameworks. Several differential diagnoses are discussed, with emphasis on the reasons for their rejection as the primary pathogenic mechanism(s). To the best of the authors' knowledge, this research is the first reported case of ISP within palaeopathology, which highlights the need to consider ISPs whenever slow-growing sinonasal neoplasms are suspected, as well as in cases that exhibit focal rhinitis. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Facies architecture of heterolithic tidal deposits : The Holocene Holland Tidal Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, M.E.; Geel, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    The size, shape and spatial position of lithofacies types (or facies architecture) in a tidal estuarine basin are complex and therefore difficult to model. The tidal currents in the basin concentrate sand-sized sediment in a branching pattern of tidal channels and fringing tidal flats. Away from the

  13. Appraising Birth Order in Career Assessment: Linkages to Holland's and Super's Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Hartung, Paul J.; Goh, David; Gaylor, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Study 1 (n=159) found significant differences in vocational personality types, interests, and values depending on birth order. Study 2 (n=119) found significant differences in occupational interests by birth order. Both results support Alfred Adler's theory that birth order determines aspects of vocational behavior. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  14. The Relationship between Subjective Well-Being and Vocational Personality Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Elizabeth W.; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between subjective well-being (SWB) and Holland's Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional (RIASEC) model. It was hypothesized that individuals resembling Social and Enterprising vocational personality types would report higher SWB than those resembling other personality types.…

  15. Adolescence, physical inactivity and overweight: analysis based on socio-personal variables of the parents and the type of sport practiced by the children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantallops Ramón, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a larger study carry out in the island of Majorca, which aims to identify the major causes of obesity and overweight in adolescents, as well as to establish different types of analysis in order to understand and to promote interventions to increase physical activity levels in this population, as both a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle are the main causes of overweight. In this case we focus on the following aspects: the relationship between educational level of parents/mothers and their children’s obesity, socioeconomic status of families and its impact on overweight/obesity children and, finally, the relationship between type of sport practiced by the children (competitive sport/ non-competitive sport and overweight/obesity. To this end surveyed 4135 boys and girls from Majorca. The sample was obtained from a multistage sampling. The instrument used was a specifically designed questionnaire. The results show that educational level and socioeconomic status of parents as well as the type of sport practiced by their children are variables that favor the development of overweight and obesity in adolescence

  16. Feeding problems reported by parents of young children with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy and their associations with children's glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susana R; Williams, Laura B; Dolan, Lawrence M; Chen, Ming; Powers, Scott W

    2009-11-01

    Previous research demonstrated high rates of perceived mealtime behavior problems in families of young children with type 1 diabetes who were managed with conventional therapy. Because of new insulin regimens that offer greater flexibility, reexamination of mealtime behaviors is required. We assessed parent-reported mealtime behaviors in a sample of young children using an insulin pump. An additional aim was to evaluate the associations of two measures of parental feeding behavior with children's glycemic control. Primary caregivers of 31 young children (mean age = 5.0 +/- 1.3 yr) completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) and the Behavioral Pediatric Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS). Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was used as a surrogate marker for children's glycemic control. Children had a mean HbA1c of 7.8 +/- 0.64%. Mean CFQ - Restriction and Pressure to Eat scores were 3.1 +/- 0.94 and 2.0 +/- 0.88, respectively (range = 1-5). Mean BPFAS - Parent and Child scores were 16.0 +/- 4.3 (range = 10-50) and 44.9 +/- 9.3 (range = 25-125), respectively. Positive correlations were found between children's HbA1c levels and caregivers' reporting of frequency of child mealtime behavior problems. Caregivers of young children on pump therapy report relatively low rates of mealtime behavior problems. However, correlations with children's HbA1c suggest that parent-child mealtime behaviors continue to relate to children's health outcomes. Research is needed to determine if changing mealtime interactions can improve children's glycemic control; items from the BPFAS and CFQ can offer targets to guide interventions.

  17. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  18. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  19. [Psychiatric patients at the police station in the southern South Holland region: assessment by the District Health Service forensic doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aardoom, H A; Huisman-Wolfs, M M; Nijs, H G T

    2002-09-21

    To describe the epidemiological characteristics of ambulant psychiatric patients who were either brought to the police station or who came by themselves, but who were not kept in a cell, as a basis for the development of a reception protocol. Descriptive. The data from the medical records from 2000 kept by the forensic doctors employed by the district health services for the Southern South Holland region were inventoried. On request by the police, the forensic doctors examined 203 clients. The majority of these were middle-aged men who did have a place of residence. The reason for police involvement was bizarre or confused behaviour in public. Half of the patients had received or were receiving some form of psychiatric treatment from the mental health service. In approximately half of the cases the forensic doctor found a solution together with the police. In the other half of the cases the forensic doctor asked the crisis intervention team at the mental health service for an evaluation. Two thirds of these patients were hospitalised and one third was sent away. Because examination by both the forensic doctor and the mental health service psychiatrist and other procedures were lengthy (up to 6 hours), patients had to spend a long time in a holding cell at the police station that was not designed for stays of this length of time, and often lacked toilet facilities. The forensic doctor treated about half the clients without the need of assistance from the crisis intervention psychiatrist. The temporary accommodation for these confused clients was inadequate.

  20. Preußisch Holland/Paslek - die Wende des Jahres 1945. Die Vertreibung/Aussiedlung der deutschen Bevölkerung 1945-1947.

    OpenAIRE

    Wisniewska, Joanna Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Below mentioned Dissertation depicts one of the most complex issues of polish/german questions of post war history: German nation eviction from the territory handed over to Polish administration as a result of Potsdam pact. This issue applies to the area of present-day Paslek district (former Kreis Preußisch Holland) situated in western part of the previously known Eastern Prussia (now Warmia and Mazury region).Time range indicate on one hand permission of district evacuation (21 Jan 1945) an...

  1. The Reasons of Differences in Dynamics of Economic Grown in Portugal and Holland in the XV-XVII Centuries: an Institutional Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Rozinskaya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to comparative analysis of socio-economic development of Portugal and Holland – two small nations who during certain periods of their history obtained European leadership and played pivotal role in Europe’s transition from Middle Ages to Modernity. Analysis is performed on the basis of the institutional theory. Based to a large extent on theoretical concepts of D. North and D. Acemoglu-J. Robinson, the author notes substantial similarity of the initial conditions in both countries in the Middle Ages – their size in terms of territory and population, geographical location, long coastal lines, early successful development of navigation, fishing and construction of vessels, emergence of strong navy and trade fleet, non-fertile arable land, grain imports, etc. Following that the author then looks for “small disparities” which gradually and having been influenced by external shocks have led to different paths of socio-economic development. These shocks include climatic changes in Holland in XIV century and – in case of Portugal –foreign policy issues (struggle against Kingdom of Castile; and then – the Great Geographical Discoveries. The paper analyses in detail the impact of foreign (especially colonial trade on development of both countries. The process of gradual loss of leading positions in international trade first by Portugal and then by Holland is considered. Author states that as opposed to Portugal, who remained backward agrarian country until XX century, Holland preserved its position of one of the richest and most advanced countries in Europe even after having lost its monopoly position in international trade. In the final part of the paper the author analyses the reasons for divergence of Holland’s and Portugal’s development routes. In relation to it, the following concepts are considered: the concept of the cultural capital by L. Harrison; theory of limited/open access societies by D. North, J

  2. The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is a transmembrane protein present in all cell types of adult Hydra and upregulated at the boundary between bud and parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tischer Susanne

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Notch signalling pathway is conserved in pre-bilaterian animals. In the Cnidarian Hydra it is involved in interstitial stem cell differentiation and in boundary formation during budding. Experimental evidence suggests that in Hydra Notch is activated by presenilin through proteolytic cleavage at the S3 site as in all animals. However, the endogenous ligand for HvNotch has not been described yet. Results We have cloned a cDNA from Hydra, which encodes a bona-fide Notch ligand with a conserved domain structure similar to that of Jagged-like Notch ligands from other animals. Hyjagged mRNA is undetectable in adult Hydra by in situ hybridisation but is strongly upregulated and easily visible at the border between bud and parent shortly before bud detachment. In contrast, HyJagged protein is found in all cell types of an adult hydra, where it localises to membranes and endosomes. Co-localisation experiments showed that it is present in the same cells as HvNotch, however not always in the same membrane structures. Conclusions The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is conserved in Cnidarians. Together with HvNotch it may be involved in the formation of the parent-bud boundary in Hydra. Moreover, protein distribution of both, HvNotch receptor and HyJagged indicate a more widespread function for these two transmembrane proteins in the adult hydra, which may be regulated by additional factors, possibly involving endocytic pathways.

  3. Parenting Perfectionism and Parental Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meghan A.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Kamp Dush, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    The parental role is expected to be one of the most gratifying and rewarding roles in life. As expectations of parenting become ever higher, the implications of parenting perfectionism for parental adjustment warrant investigation. Using longitudinal data from 182 couples, this study examined the associations between societal- and self-oriented parenting perfectionism and new mothers’ and fathers’ parenting self-efficacy, stress, and satisfaction. For mothers, societal-oriented parenting perf...

  4. The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 in infected parental mouse L fibroblasts and mutant gro29 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2003-01-01

    Mutants of cell lines and viruses are important biological tools. The pathway of herpesvirus particle maturation and egress are contentious issues. The mutant gro29 line of mouse L cells is defective for egress of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, and a candidate for studies of virus...

  5. Antropoloogiline Holland / Andres Kõnno

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõnno, Andres

    2004-01-01

    Tallinna VIII Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali filme - Hollandi mängufilmid "Putini ema" ("Poetin's Mama") : režissöör Ineke Smits : 2003 ; "Shouf-Shouf Habibi" : režissöör Albert Ter Heerdt : 2004 ; "Üks ilus päev" ("Het is een schone dag geweest") : režissöör Jos de Putter : 1993 ; "Grimm" : režissöör Alex van Warmerdam : 2003

  6. Parenting stress among parents of children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Francesco; Operto, Francesca Felicia; De Giacomo, Andrea; Margari, Lucia; Frolli, Alessandro; Conson, Massimiliano; Ivagnes, Sara; Monaco, Marianna; Margari, Francesco

    2016-08-30

    In recent years, studies have shown that parents of children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders (NDDs) experience more parenting stress than parents of typically developing children, but the relation between the type of disorders and parenting stress is far from clear. The purpose of this study was to compare the parenting stress experienced by parents of 239 children with Specific Learning Disorders (SpLD), Language Disorders (LD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and typical development (TD). Parents of children with NDDs experience more parenting stress than those of children who have TD. Although, parents of children with ASD or ADHD report the most high scores of parenting stress, also the parents of children with SpLD or LD report higher parental stress compared with parent of children without NDDs. Another interesting finding was that IQ level or emotional and behavioral problems are associated with the higher levels of parenting stress. This study suggest that parent, both mothers and fathers, of children with different type of NDDs should be provided with interventions and resources to empower them with the knowledge and skills to reduce their stress and to enhance their quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Elektron energy-loss spectroscopy on p-type doped high-Tc superconductors and undoped parent compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romberg, H.

    1991-12-01

    In this work the electronic structure of HTSC, mainly La 2-x Sr x CuO 4+y and YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-y , was investigated by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Core-level spectroscopy on the O 1s level yields information on the quantity and character of unoccupied O 2p-states near the Fermi level. In the undoped parent compounds of the HTSC, an admixture of ≥ 10% unoccupied O 2p-states to the conduction band (Cu 3d 10 band or upper Hubbard band) is observed. These O 2p-states are polarized parallel to the CuO 2 -plane (La 2 CuO 4 and Nd 2 CuO 4 ). In La 2 CuO 4 , Nd 2 CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6 , Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 and Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8 , the unoccupied Cu 3d-states are mainly polarized in the CuO 2 plane an admixture of about 10% to 20% of probably Cu 3d 3z 2 -r 2 states. A similar behaviour in the planes and chains in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 is in accordance with the experimental data. The observation of unoccupied states polarized orthogonal to the CuO 2 plane demands consideration of these states in theoretical models. No difference in energetic positions of unoccupied Cu 3d x 2 -y 2 and Cu 3d 3z 2 -r 2 states was observed in disagreement with some X-ray absorption data. Thus, theoretical models which correlate T c -values with this energy difference, are disproved. There is evidence for some admixture of unoccupied Cu 3d 3z 2 -r 2 states but no sign of a separate Cu 3d 3z 2 -r 2 band which was proposed to cross the Fermi level upon doping. Low energy EELS data have provided the dielectric function between 0.5 and 50 eV. (orig./GSCH) [de

  8. "I Don't Want Them to Feel Different": A Mixed Methods Study of Parents' Beliefs and Dietary Management Strategies for Their Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susana R; Clements, Mark A; George, Katie; Goggin, Kathy

    2016-02-01

    Many young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) do not consume a healthful diet; exactly why this occurs despite T1DM education remains poorly understood. This study describes parents' perceptions of healthful eating for T1DM in young children and identifies factors related to parents' dietary management. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods study was performed. Parents completed a questionnaire, 3-day weighed diet record, and a semi-structured interview regarding their perceptions of healthful eating for T1DM and their dietary management practices. Twenty-three families, recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic in the midwestern United States between February 2012 and April 2013, participated. Eligible families had a child with T1DM who was 1 to 6 years old, at least 6 months from diagnosis, and was following an intensive insulin regimen. Mean scores and percentages were calculated from the diet diaries and parent questionnaires, and parents' interviews were coded to identify common themes. Results showed that while parents may believe they know what constitutes a healthful diet for T1DM, they do not always feed their child a healthful diet. Parent-identified barriers to healthful eating included limited time to prepare homemade meals, perceived higher costs of healthier foods, the influence of peers on children's food preferences, and picky eating. Parents also discussed a desire not to limit their child's diet or make their child "feel different," which many parents said often led them to give into their child's requests for less healthful food options. Parents of young children with T1DM identified several barriers to healthful eating that are common for all parents, such as time constraints, expense, and child food preferences. However, unique themes emerged, including parents' desire not to limit their child's diet or make their child "feel different." Nutrition components of T1DM education should include psychological and behavioral strategies to help

  9. Immunotherapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Immunotherapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Immunotherapy What's in this article? ... Types of Immunotherapy Side Effects Outlook Print About Immunotherapy Immunotherapy, also known as targeted therapy or biotherapy, ...

  10. Parenting adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    and the influence of different parenting styles on the adolescents’ adherence to treatment is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to identify the types of parental support that adolescents and young adults with CF want and find helpful in terms of preparing them for adult life. Methods: Sixteen Danish...... was conducted. Results: The adolescents and young adults wanted their parents educated about the adolescent experience. They wanted their parents to learn a pedagogical parenting style, to learn to trust them, and to learn to gradually transfer responsibility for their medical treatment. Additionally......: chronic illness, parenting style, qualitative research, patient preferences, interpretive description...

  11. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Gitte; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2011-01-01

    visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. METHODS: Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus...... are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y)) for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic...

  12. Winning Public Support of a Desegregated School System. Title III ESEA Progress Report, School District 151 (South Holland, Illinois).

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Holland School District 151, IL.

    Thirteen objectives of the program and analyses of each in terms of procedure, evaluation, the status of procedure, and status of the evaluation are listed in this report. The objectives are: the establishment of a community relations program to promote two-way communication between school board, administration, teachers, students, and parents;…

  13. Influences of Contrasting Types of Training on Practitioners' and Parents' Use of Assistive Technology and Adaptations with Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers with Disabilities. Practical Evaluation Reports, Volume 3, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Meter, Diana; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of different types of practices for promoting practitioner and parent adoption of different kinds of assistive technology and adaptations with young children birth to 105 months of age was the focus of a meta-analysis. Six operationally defined adult learning method characteristics and between 2 and 5 practices for each…

  14. Diabetes MILES Youth-Australia: methods and sample characteristics of a national survey of the psychological aspects of living with type 1 diabetes in Australian youth and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Virginia; Trawley, Steven; Hendrieckx, Christel; Browne, Jessica L; Cameron, Fergus; Pouwer, Frans; Skinner, Timothy; Speight, Jane

    2016-08-12

    Type 1 diabetes is a complex and demanding condition, which places a substantial behavioural and psychological burden on young people and their families. Around one-third of adolescents with type 1 diabetes need mental health support. Parents of a child with type 1 diabetes are also at increased risk of psychological distress. A better understanding of the motivators, behaviours and psychological well-being of young people with diabetes and their parents will inform improvement of resources for supporting self-management and reducing the burden of diabetes. The Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Youth-Australia Study is the first large-scale, national survey of the impact of diabetes on the psychosocial outcomes of Australian adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. The survey was web-based to enable a large-scale, national survey to be undertaken. Recruitment involved multiple strategies: postal invitations; articles in consumer magazines; advertising in diabetes clinics; social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter). Recruitment began in August 2014 and the survey was available online for approximately 8 weeks. A total of 781 young people (aged 10-19 years) with type 1 diabetes and 826 parents completed the survey. Both genders, all ages within the relevant range, and all Australian states and territories were represented, although compared to the general Australian population of youth with type 1 diabetes, respondents were from a relatively advantaged socioeconomic background. The online survey format was a successful and economical approach for engaging young people with type 1 diabetes and their parents. This rich quantitative and qualitative dataset focuses not only on diabetes management and healthcare access but also on important psychosocial factors (e.g. social support, general emotional well-being, and diabetes distress). Analysis of the Diabetes MILES Youth-Australia Study data is ongoing, and will provide

  15. Perceptions of Usefulness: Using the Holland Code Theory, Multiple Intelligences Theory, and Role Model Identification to Determine a Career Niche in the Fashion Industry for First-Quarter Fashion Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Crystal D.

    2010-01-01

    This action research study investigated the perceptions that student participants had on the development of a career exploration model and a career exploration project. The Holland code theory was the primary assessment used for this research study, in addition to the Multiple Intelligences theory and the identification of a role model for the…

  16. Om de kwaliteit van het geld. Het toezicht op de muntproductie in de Republiek en de voorziening van kleingeld in Holland en West-Friesland in de achttiende eeuw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Albert Antoine Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The supervision on the coin production in the Republic of the Seven United Provinces and the supply of the smallest denominations (copper duits and silver 1 stuiver) in the province of Holland and West-Friesland in the 18th Century. With information on all the functions involved, illustrated by the

  17. A 3-year prospective study of parent-child communication in early adolescents with type 1 diabetes: relationship to adherence and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Jeannette M; Rohan, Jennifer M; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Drotar, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    To examine changes in parent-child communication patterns and their relation to glycemic control and treatment adherence using observational data in a 3-year prospective multisite study of youth with type 1 diabetes aged 9-11 years at baseline and their families (n = 217). Adolescents and caregivers participated in a diabetes problem-solving discussion. Families were rated on negative and positive communication and interactions using the Interaction Behavior Code. Maternal and paternal negative communication decreased over time, whereas adolescent and maternal positive communication and positive reciprocity increased. Baseline preadolescent youth and maternal positive communication predicted adherence 3 years later. Changes in family communication did not predict changes in glycemic control or adherence. During the transition to adolescence, family communication changed in unexpected and positive ways. Additionally, the relationship of baseline family communication to subsequent adherence suggests the need to assess family communication concerning diabetes-related management during preadolescence. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Beauty and simplicity: the power of fine art and moral teaching on education in seventeenth-century Holland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, J J H

    2009-04-01

    Seventeenth century Dutch genre painting played a major role in the promotion of the pursuit of family and educational virtues. Packing moralistic messages in fine paintings was considered as a very effective moralistic communication policy in a culture in which sending such moralising paintings and drawings on education and domestic virtues, so contributing to the reconciliation of the existing tensions, or, in the words of Simon Schama, embarrassment between beauty and the promoted virtues of frugality and simplicity. A broad middle class created its own private surrounding in which morality and enjoying the beauty of moralising on the family and parenting went together, as is made clear by the analysis of a series of representative images. Dutch parents, moralists, and painters knew the power of beauty in moralising on the family.

  19. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance study in Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2: a 'parent' compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangzhuo; Xu, Chunqiang; Li, Zhanfeng; Feng, Jiajia; Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yufeng; Sun, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Zhixiang

    2017-12-07

    We report a study of angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) with the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current on a Ca 0.73 La 0.27 FeAs 2 single crystal, which is regarded as a 'parent' compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors. A pronounced AMR with twofold symmetry is observed, signifying the highly anisotropic Fermi surface. By further analyzing the AMR data, we find that the Fermi surface above the structural/antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition (T s /T N ) is quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D), as revealed by the 2D scaling behavior of the AMR, Δρ/ρ(0) (H, θ)  =  Δρ/ρ(0) (µ 0 Hcosθ), θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis. While such 2D scaling becomes invalid at temperatures below T s /T N , the three-dimensional (3D) scaling approach by inclusion of the anisotropy of the Fermi surface is efficient, indicating that the appearance of the 3D Fermi surface contributes to anisotropic electronic transport. Compared with other experimental observations, we suspect that the additional 3D hole pocket (generated by the Ca d orbital and As1 p z orbital) around the Γ point in CaFeAs 2 will disappear in the heavily electron doped regime, and moreover, the Fermi surface should be reconstructed across the structural/AFM transition. Besides, a quasi-linear in-plane magnetoresistance with H//ab is observed at low temperatures and its possible origins are also discussed. Our results provide more information to further understand the electronic structure of 112-type IBSs.

  20. DYADIC PARENTING AND CHILDREN’S EXTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Meteyer, Karen B.; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    We explore dyadic parenting styles and their association with first-grade children’s externalizing behavior symptoms in a sample of 85 working-class, dual-earner families. Cluster analysis is used to create a typology of parenting types, reflecting the parental warmth, overreactivity, and laxness of both mothers and fathers in two-parent families. Three distinct groups emerged: Supportive Parents, Mixed-Support Parents and Unsupportive Parents. Results indicate that dyadic parenting styles we...

  1. Adolescents' aggression to parents: longitudinal links with parents' physical aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether parents' previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents' subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents' concurrent physical aggression (CPA) and to investigate whether adolescents' emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1-3 on four types of parents' PPA (mother to adolescent, father to adolescent, mother to father, and father to mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents' emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression and on parents' CPA. Parents' PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15-1.6, p controlling for adolescents' sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents' CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82-17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents' parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0-3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated the effects. Adolescents' parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents' physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as an early signal of aggression into adulthood. Copyright © 2014 Society for

  2. DYADIC PARENTING AND CHILDREN'S EXTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyer, Karen B; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2009-07-01

    We explore dyadic parenting styles and their association with first-grade children's externalizing behavior symptoms in a sample of 85 working-class, dual-earner families. Cluster analysis is used to create a typology of parenting types, reflecting the parental warmth, overreactivity, and laxness of both mothers and fathers in two-parent families. Three distinct groups emerged: Supportive Parents, Mixed-Support Parents and Unsupportive Parents. Results indicate that dyadic parenting styles were related to teacher-reported externalizing symptoms for boys but not for girls.

  3. Psychometric properties and factor structure of the adapted Self-Regulation Questionnaire assessing autonomous and controlled motivation for healthful eating among youth with type 1 diabetes and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, V; Lipsky, L M; Nansel, T R

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the psychometric properties of 2 adapted Self-Regulation Questionnaire (SRQ) measures assessing youth with type 1 diabetes motivation internalization for healthful eating and their parents motivation internalization for providing healthy meals for the family. External validity of the adapted SRQ was evaluated with respect to healthy eating attitudes (healthful eating self-efficacy, barriers, and outcome expectations) assessed by questionnaire, diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2005 [HEI-2005]; Nutrient-Rich Foods Index 9.3 [NRF9.3]; Whole Plant Food Density [WPFD]) assessed by 3-day food records, and body mass index assessed by measured height and weight in youth with type 1 diabetes (N = 136; age 12.3 ± 2.5 years) and their parents. Exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation yielded a 2-factor structure with the expected autonomous and controlled motivation factors for both youth and parents. Internal consistencies of subscales were acceptable (α = .66-.84). Youth autonomous and controlled motivation were positively correlated overall (r = 0.30, p parent: r = 0.36), positive outcome expectations (youth: r = 0.30, parent: r = 0.35), and fewer barriers to healthful eating (youth: r = -0.36, parent: r = -0.32). Controlled motivation was positively correlated with negative outcome expectations for parents (r = 0.29, p expectations for youth. Autonomous motivation was positively associated (p parents (NRF9.3 r = 0.22; WPFD r = 0.24; HEI-2005 r = 0.22) and youth ≥13 years (NRF9.3 r = 0.26) but not youth parents, but not youth, body mass index was associated negatively with autonomous motivation (r = -.33, p < .001) and positively with controlled motivation (r = .27, p < .01). Findings provide initial support for the SRQ in this population and suggest potential developmental differences in the role of motivation on healthful eating among children, adolescents

  4. Dyadic Parenting and Children's Externalizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyer, Karen B.; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    We explore dyadic parenting styles and their association with first-grade children's externalizing behavior symptoms in a sample of 85 working-class, dual-earner families. Cluster analysis is used to create a typology of parenting types, reflecting the parental warmth, overreactivity, and laxness of both mothers and fathers in two-parent families.…

  5. Parental Involvement in Children's Independent Music Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upitis, Rena; Abrami, Philip C.; Brook, Julia; King, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine types of parental involvement associated with independent music lessons. A self-report survey was designed to explore parent characteristics, parental goals, students' musical progress, the teacher-student relationship, the practice environment, and parent behaviours during practice sessions. The extent to…

  6. GENERAL AND SPECIFIC COMBINING ABILITY OF INITIAL PARENTAL FORMS IN TOMATO FOR COMPLEX OF ECONOMICALLY VALUABLE TRAITS TO DEVELOP HYBRIDS F1 OF CHERRY AND COCKTAIL TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Rechets

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of estimation of general and specific combining ability of male and female parental tomato forms were given for complex of traits. The estimation was carried out according to incomplete diallel crosses 15x15. Such varities   as   ‘Trapeza’,  Rosovaya  kapelka’,  ‘Seniorita’, ‘Ocharovanie’,  ‘Tigris’   ‘Vishnya  Zheltaya’  (Gavrish, ‘Denezhnoye Derevo’ (national breeding, and  lines: ‘46/06’,  ‘49/09’,  ‘295/09’,  ‘336/11’,  ‘354/11’,  ‘357/11’, ‘388/09’ (nor, ‘498’ (selection of TARI were used as intial breeding accessions, differing in bush type (determinate and indeterminate, duration of vegetative phase (ultraearly,  early, medium early, middle-ripening, fruit  shape (rounded, oval, fruit color (red, pink, black, orange, tiger and with the gene nor, fruit weight (10 g. and more, brush structure (dense, friable. As a results, ‘Trapeza’, ‘Vishnya Zheltaya’, ‘Ocharovaniye’, ‘Seniorita’, and lines: ‘295/10’, ‘49/09’,  ‘498’,  ‘357/11’,  ‘354/11’,  ‘388/09’  (nor were selected and recommended to be used in breeding program for development of heterotic hybrids with high fruit setting and generative bush type. The promising hybrids F1 with high constants of specific combining ability for a complex of economically valuable traits have been observed. Because of different lines and accessions were used in crossings, these hybrids varied in internode length of cluster type, classical or shorten; rounded or oval fruit shape; fruit  color, red (F1   combinations ‘354/11’ х ‘Seniorita’, ‘Trapeza’ х  ‘L.49/09’,  L.  ‘49/09’  х  L.354/11, pink (F1 combination ‘Rosovaya Kapelka’ х ‘L.354/11’, yellow (F1 combination ‘Ocharovaniye’ х  ‘Vishiya Zheltaya’, deep brown (F1 combination  ‘L.357/11’ х ‘L.354/11’.

  7. Comparative Analysis of WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Genes Revealed Their Parent-of-Origin and Cell Type-Specific Expression Pattern During Early Embryogenesis in Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX gene is a plant-specific clade of homeobox transcription factors. Increasing evidences reveal that WOXs play critical roles in early embryogenesis, which involves zygote development, initiation of zygote division, and apical or basal cell lineage establishment. However, how WOXs regulate these developmental events remains largely unknown, and even detailed expression pattern in gametes and early proembryos is not yet available. Here, 13 WOX family genes were identified in Nicotiana tabacum genome. Comparative analysis of 13 WOX family genes with their homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals relatively conserved expression pattern of WUS and WOX5 in shoot/root apical meristem. Whereas variations were also found, e.g., lacking homolog of WOX8 (a marker for suspensor cell in tobacco genome and the expression of WOX2/WOX9 in both apical cell and basal cell. Transient transcriptional activity analysis revealed that WOXs in WUS clade have repressive activities for their target's transcription, whereas WOXs in ancient and intermediate clade have activation activities, giving a molecular basis for the phylogenetic classification of tobacco WOXs into three major clades. Expression pattern analysis revealed that some WOXs (e.g., WOX 13a expressed in both male and female gametes and some WOXs (e.g., WOX 11 and WOX 13b displayed the characteristics of parent-of-origin genes. Interestingly, some WOXs (e.g., WOX2 and WOX9, which are essential for early embryo patterning, were de novo transcribed in zygote, indicating relevant mechanism for embryo pattern formation is only established in zygote right after fertilization and not carried in by gametes. We also found that most WOXs displayed a stage-specific and cell type-specific expression pattern. Taken together, this work provides a detailed landscape of WOXs in tobacco during fertilization and early embryogenesis, which will facilitate the understanding of their specific roles

  8. The Influence of Parental Education on Timing and Type of Union Formation: Changes Over the Life Course and Over Time in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooyaart, Jarl E; Liefbroer, Aart C

    2016-08-01

    Family background shapes young adults' decisions in their transition to adulthood, and the outcomes of these decisions lay the foundation for their subsequent life course. This study examines the influence of parental education on their children's union formation. We examine the timing of entry into a first union (a married or a cohabiting union), the choice between marriage and cohabitation, and the timing of first marriage. Data from eight nationally representative surveys conducted in the Netherlands are pooled (N = 39,777), with respondents being born between 1930 and 1990, to examine not only the effect of parental education on union formation but also whether this effect changes over birth cohorts, periods, and the life course, and varies by gender. Results from discrete-time hazard analyses show little change in the effect of parental education across cohorts and periods but strong life-course effects. Gender differences in the effect of parental education are relatively small.

  9. Parenting Seminars for Divorcing Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Barry B.

    1995-01-01

    Profiles the parenting seminars and counseling services for divorcing parents offered by the Children of Separation and Divorce Center, a community service agency in Maryland. The seminars are designed to help parents adjust to divorce and understand the needs of their children during and after the divorce process. (MDM)

  10. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance study in Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2: a "parent" compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangzhuo; Xu, Chunqiang; Li, Zhanfeng; Feng, Jiajia; Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yufeng; Sun, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Zhixiang

    2017-11-21

    We report a study of angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) with the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current on a Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2 single crystal, which is regarded as a "parent" compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors. A pronounced AMR with twofold symmetry is observed, signifying the highly anisotropic Fermi surface. By further analyzing the AMR data, we find that the Fermi surface above the structural/antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition (Ts/TN) is quasi-two-dimensional (2D), as revealed by the 2D scaling behavior of the AMR, Δρ/ρ(0) (H, θ)=Δρ/ρ(0) (μ0Hcosθ), θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis. While such a 2D scaling becomes invalid at temperatures below Ts/TN, the three-dimensional (3D) scaling approach by inclusion of the anisotropy of Fermi surface is efficient, indicating that the appearance of 3D Fermi surface contributed to the anisotropic electronic transport. Compared with other experimental observations, we suspect that the additional 3D hole pocket (generated by the Ca d orbital and As1 pz orbital) around the Γ point in CaFeAs2 will disappear in the heavily electron doped regime, and moreover, the Fermi surface should be reconstructed across the structural/AFM transition. Besides, a quasi-linear in-plane magnetoresistance is observed at low temperatures and its possible origins are also discussed. Our results provide more information to further understand the electronic structure of 112-type IBSs. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Parental influences on memories of parents and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Franca; Bonechi, Alice; Peterson, Carole; Smorti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The authors evaluated the role parent-child relationship quality has on two types of memories, those of parents and those of friends. Participants were 198 Italian university students who recalled memories during 4 separate timed memory-fluency tasks about their preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school and university years. Half were instructed to recall memories involving parents and the remainder memories involving friends. Moreover, parent-child relationships were assessed by the Network of Relationships Inventory (NRI; W. Furman & D. Buhrmester, 1985) and Adolescents' Report of Parental Monitoring (D. M. Capaldi & G. R. Patterson, 1989). Results showed that men with positive parent-son relationships had more memories of parents and more affectively positive memories of friends, supporting a consistency model positing similarity between parent-child relationships and memories of friends. Women with positive parental relationship quality had more affectively positive memories of parents but for friends, positive relationship quality only predicted positive memories when young. At older ages, especially middle school-aged children, negative parent-daughter relationships predicted more positive memories of friends, supporting a compensatory model. The gender of parent also mattered, with fathers having a more influential role on affect for memories of friends.

  12. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the Uninsured Medicare Medicaid & CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type ... Diagnosed Treatment & Care Complications Health Insurance For Parents & Kids Know Your Rights We Can Help Enroll in ...

  13. Parent-adolescent dyads: association of parental autonomy support and parent-adolescent shared diabetes care responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, K M; Dashiff, C J; Stump, T E; Weaver, M T

    2013-09-01

    Parent-adolescent shared responsibility for diabetes care is advocated by experts to achieve beneficial diabetes and psychosocial outcomes for adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Parental autonomy support may be a way to facilitate this sharing. In this dyadic study, we examined parental diabetes-specific autonomy support experienced by adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents (n = 89 dyads), and its association with their experience of shared diabetes care responsibility. Path analysis was used to test an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model for parental autonomy support effects on shared responsibility. This was a secondary analysis of data from 89 parent-early/mid-adolescent dyads. Actor effects were identified. Parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parental autonomy support were associated with their respective reports of shared diabetes care responsibility. One partner effect was identified. Adolescents' reports of parental autonomy support were associated with parents' reports of shared responsibility. Parents and adolescents held similar views of autonomy support but discrepant views of shared responsibility. Older adolescents perceived less parental autonomy support. Increasing parental autonomy support may facilitate parent-adolescent sharing of diabetes care responsibility. Adolescent and parent perceptions influence each other and need to be considered when working with them to strengthen parental autonomy support. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Parenting styles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torío López, Susana; Peña Calvo, José Vicente; Inda Caro, Mercedes

    2008-02-01

    Parental educational styles constitute one of the key elements of family socialization. The aim of the present essay is to present the results of a research project carried out in the Principality of Asturias (Spain) among 2,965 families with children of infant and primary-school age (5-8 years old). This research attempts to analyse, among other aspects, parental behaviour tendencies in child upbringing. The analysis of the results obtained allows us to: 1) identify the most common attitudinal and behavioural tendencies of parents in the upbringing of their children; 2) determine how many people have a well defined parental style, and delimit their socio-educational characteristics. Lastly, we consider the need to change some parental behaviour patterns and stress the importance of family education programmes, with the aim of promoting appropriate parenting models and modifying or improving current practices.

  15. Adoptive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotevant, Harold D; Lo, Albert Yh

    2017-06-01

    Challenges in adoptive parenting continue to emerge as adoption policies and practices evolve. We review three areas of research in adoptive parenting that reflect contemporary shifts in adoption. First, we highlight recent findings concerning openness in adoption contact arrangements, or contact between a child's families of birth and rearing. Second, we examine research regarding racial and cultural socialization in transracial and international adoptions. Finally, we review investigations of parenting experiences of lesbian and gay adoptive parents. Overall, parenting processes (e.g., supportive vs. problematic family interaction) are better predictors of child adjustment than are group differences (e.g., open vs. closed adoptions; adoption by heterosexual vs. same-sex parents). The distinctive needs of adopted children call for preparation of adoption-competent mental health, casework, education, and health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbensen Bente

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus a barrier for health care providers (HCPs to overcome in their attempts to involve both adolescents and parents in improvement of glycaemic control. Evidence-based interventions that involve all three parties (i.e., adolescents, parents and HCPs and are integrated into routine outpatient clinic visits are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c > 8.0% and their parents from 2 Danish hospitals and randomise into GSD-Y or control groups. During an 8-12 month period, the GSD-Y group will complete 8 outpatient GSD-Y visits, and the control group will completes an equal number of standard visits. The primary outcome is HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include the following: number of self-monitored blood glucose values and levels of autonomous motivation, involvement and autonomy support from parents, autonomy support from HCPs, perceived competence in managing diabetes, well-being, and diabetes-related problems. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data from baseline, after completion of the visits, and again after a 6-month follow-up. To

  17. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  18. Parent Involvement: Perceptions of Recent Immigrant Parents in a Suburban School District, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Bu-Hyun; Park, Duk-Byeong

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the perceptions of immigrant parents regarding their school's efforts to encourage three types of parent involvement: Parenting, Communicating, and Learning at Home. The sample includes 106 immigrant parents with children who were enrolled in English Language Learners programmes at 10 schools in a suburban school…

  19. Career Choice And College Students: Parental Influence on Career Choice Traditionalism among College Students in Selected Cities in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sella Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the influence of parents on choosing career among college students in selected private colleges situated around Bahirdar City, Ethiopia. Choosing a suitable career is a vital part in every student’s life. Further, it ignites a person’s future life for his/her own job preference and life style. In this context, influence of social members is inevitable; generally the influence of family members and most particularly parents play a major role as an influencer and determiner on choosing a career option. Students in Ethiopia are not exceptional to this phenomenon of selecting right and suitable career. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted and multi stage sampling technique was employed to identify the participants. Totally, 175 participants (Male=99 and (Female =76 responded to Holland Personality Inventory (Holland, 1997 and Career Choice Traditionalism Scale (Hensely, 2003. The collected data were statistically processed using SPSS version 16. Descriptive and inferential statistics was employed to analyze the data. The results revealed that there is a significant influence of parents on career choice among students. Specifically, father’s influence is found to be more significant on career choice decision making among students than their mothers.

  20. Effects of the sanitation of natural gas sources in the Dutch province Noord-Holland, north of the river IJ, on the nutrients and chloride burden of the surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Gaast, J.W.J.; Peerboom, J.M.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    In the Dutch polder 'De Beemster' (part of the province Noord-Holland) the consequences of sanitation of natural gas sources on seepage and the quality of surface waters are studied by means of a model. Material balances are drafted for nitrogen, phosphorus and chlorine. The sealing of all the gas sources in 'De Beemster' appears to have the largest impact on the emission of phosphorus (-40%). The emission of nitrogen and chlorine is reduced by 20%, respectively 25%. Based on the recommendations in this report a follow-up study has been carried out in which the results in this report are translated to other polders in Noord-Holland, north of the river IJ. 24 refs

  1. Attachment Parenting: An Exploration of Demographics and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Katherine E.; Groves, Melissa M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify parenting behaviors practiced by a self-selected group of North American parents who identify themselves as attachment parents. This type of parenting is based on behaviors that are focused on infant needs and demands perhaps more strongly than are traditional mainstream western parenting practices. However,…

  2. Learning a Musical Instrument: The Case for Parental Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this research were to identify the ways in which parents may most constructively support their children's musical development, and to ascertain whether styles of parent-teacher and parent-pupil interaction would influence the extent to which parents engage in different types of supportive behaviours. A model of parent involvement as…

  3. Parental divorce and parental death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Jette; Thuen, Frode; Poul, Bruun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify research on children and adolescents who experience double bereavement, i.e. the experience of loss through parental divorce followed by either parental death or critical illness with imminent death. This knowledge may identify evidence to underpin knowledge......; challenges in both custodial and non-custodial parental death; risk of mental health problems, and the need of support and interventions....

  4. The Influence of Parental Education on Timing and Type of Union Formation : Changes Over the Life Course and Over Time in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooyaart, Jarl E.; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    Family background shapes young adults' decisions in their transition to adulthood, and the outcomes of these decisions lay the foundation for their subsequent life course. This study examines the influence of parental education on their children's union formation. We examine the timing of entry into

  5. Parent Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    and parents say given these assumptions? Which management responsibility is addressed through such training of the difficult conversation?  My conclusions are, briefly, that the difficult conversation is more correctly to be called an impossible conversation. It is an asking for the parent's consent...

  6. Types of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Teens For Parents & Teachers Resolving Family Conflicts The Holidays and Alzheimer's Glossary Virtual Library Online ... Use Map Selector Search Alzheimer’s Association Alzheimer's & Dementia Types of Dementia Types of Dementia Types of Dementia ...

  7. Reunions between adoptees and birth parents: the adoptive parents' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, P R; Campbell, L; Patti, P

    1994-09-01

    This article looks at the reactions of adoptive parents to reunions between their adopted children and the children's birth parents. The focus is on how adoptive parents feel the reunion affects the family's integrity. Three types of family responses are identified: (1) closed, (2) divided, and (3) open. Acceptance of the differences between families created by adoption of children and those created by childbirth was a factor in the families' openness. Closed families saw no difference, and reunion suggested to the adults that they had failed as parents. Parents in open families understood the difference in families, saw the children as separate, and felt no threat to their competence as parents. Families' need for boundaries is examined, and the way the concept of family is constructed is discussed. Implications for the practice of adoption are considered.

  8. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  9. Insulin detemir for the treatment of obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hollander, Priscilla A

    2012-01-01

    Priscilla A Hollander1,21Baylor Endocrine Center, 2Baylor Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USAAbstract: The risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is greater among obese individuals. Following onset of the disease, patients with T2DM become more likely to be afflicted with diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications. Decreasing body weight has been shown to lower glycosylated hemoglobin and improve other metabolic parameters in patients with T2DM. Medications used to lower blood glucose...

  10. Parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress: a cross-illness comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullmann, Stephanie E; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Ryan, Jamie L; Fedele, David A; Rambo, Philip L; Chaney, John M; Mullins, Larry L

    2010-12-01

    The current study sought to investigate differences in parenting capacity variables across four disease groups. Parents (N = 425), the majority of whom were mothers, of children with either cancer, asthma, Type 1 diabetes, or cystic fibrosis, completed measures of parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress. After controlling for significant demographic variables, parents of children with cystic fibrosis and asthma reported higher perceived child vulnerability than parents of children with either diabetes or cancer, while parents of children with asthma and diabetes reported higher parenting stress than parents of children with cancer or cystic fibrosis. No differences between disease groups were found for parental overprotection. The current study provides support for an illness-specific approach to understanding parenting capacity variables in the context of childhood chronic illnesses.

  11. Parental Mediation Regarding Children's Smartphone Use: Role of Protection Motivation and Parenting Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yoori; Choi, Inho; Yum, Jung-Yoon; Jeong, Se-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Parental mediation is a type of behavior that could protect children against the negative uses and effects of smartphones. Based on protection motivation theory, this research (a) predicted parental mediation based on parents' threat and efficacy perceptions and (b) predicted threat and efficacy perceptions based on parenting styles and parents' addiction to smartphone use. An online survey of 448 parents of fourth to sixth graders was conducted. Results showed that both restrictive and active parental mediation were predicted by perceived severity, response efficacy, and self-efficacy. With regard to parenting styles, (a) authoritative parenting was positively related to perceived severity as well as response- and self-efficacy, whereas (b) permissive parenting was negatively related to self-efficacy. In addition, parents' addiction was a negative predictor of perceived severity, but a positive predictor of perceived susceptibility.

  12. Parents and the media. A study of social differentiation in parental media socialization.

    OpenAIRE

    Notten, N.; Kraaykamp, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analysed the effects of parental social background and family composition on various types of parental media socialization. We employed the Family Survey Dutch Population 1998, 2000 and 2003 (N = 2608), and analysed respondents’ reports of socialization practices in their parental home. Respondents from high-status families report more extensive parental media socialization in all highbrow and guidance activities. In contrast, a parental example of popular television viewing ...

  13. A phenomenologic investigation of pediatric residents' experiences being parented and giving parenting advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, A C; Shawler, P M; Blackmon, D L; DeGrace, E W; Wolraich, M L

    2016-09-01

    Factors surrounding pediatricians' parenting advice and training on parenting during residency have not been well studied. The primary purpose of this study was to examine pediatric residents' self-reported experiences giving parenting advice and explore the relationship between parenting advice given and types of parenting residents received as children. Thirteen OUHSC pediatric residents were individually interviewed to examine experiences being parented and giving parenting advice. Phenomenological methods were used to explicate themes and secondary analyses explored relationships of findings based upon Baumrind's parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive). While childhood experiences were not specifically correlated to the parenting advice style of pediatric residents interviewed, virtually all reported relying upon childhood experiences to generate their advice. Those describing authoritative parents reported giving more authoritative advice while others reported more variable advice. Core interview themes related to residents' parenting advice included anxiety about not being a parent, varying advice based on families' needs, and emphasis of positive interactions and consistency. Themes related to how residents were parented included discipline being a learning process for their parents and recalling that their parents always had expectations, yet always loved them. Pediatric residents interviewed reported giving family centered parenting advice with elements of positive interactions and consistency, but interviews highlighted many areas of apprehension residents have around giving parenting advice. Our study suggests that pediatric residents may benefit from more general educational opportunities to develop the content of their parenting advice, including reflecting on any impact from their own upbringing.

  14. Testing specificity among parents' depressive symptoms, parenting, and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Meredith A; Dunbar, Jennifer P; Watson, Kelly H; Reising, Michelle M; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Cole, David A; Compas, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the specificity in relations between observed withdrawn and intrusive parenting behaviors and children's internalizing and externalizing symptoms in an at-risk sample of children (ages 9 to 15 years old) of parents with a history of depression (N = 180). Given past findings that parental depression and parenting behaviors may differentially impact boys and girls, gender was examined as a moderator of the relations between these factors and child adjustment. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for parents of boys and girls and to intrusive parenting for parents of boys only. When controlling for intrusive parenting, preliminary analyses demonstrated that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for parents of boys, and this association approached significance for parents of girls. Specificity analyses yielded that, when controlling for the other type of problem (i.e., internalizing or externalizing), withdrawn parenting specifically predicted externalizing problems but not internalizing problems in girls. No evidence of specificity was found for boys in this sample, suggesting that impaired parenting behaviors are diffusely related to both internalizing and externalizing symptoms for boys. Overall, results highlight the importance of accounting for child gender and suggest that targeting improvement in parenting behaviors and the reduction of depressive symptoms in interventions with parents with a history of depression may have potential to reduce internalizing and externalizing problems in this high-risk population. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Momentary Parental Stress and Food-Related Parenting Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Tate, Allan; Trofholz, Amanda; Fertig, Angela R; Miner, Michael; Crow, Scott; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2017-12-01

    Research suggests that stress and depressed mood are associated with food-related parenting practices (ie, parent feeding practices, types of food served at meals). However, current measures of parental stress, depressed mood, and food-related parenting practices are typically survey-based and assessed as static/unchanging characteristics, failing to account for fluctuations across time and context. Identifying momentary factors that influence parent food-related parenting practices will facilitate the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting healthy food-related parenting practices. In this study, we used ecological momentary assessment to examine the association between momentary factors (eg, stress, depressed mood) occurring early in the day and food-related parenting practices at the evening meal. Children aged 5 to 7 years and their families ( N = 150) from 6 racial and/or ethnic groups ( n = 25 each African American, Hispanic/Latino, Hmong, American Indian, Somali, and white families) were recruited for this mixed-methods study through primary care clinics. Higher stress and depressed mood earlier in the day predicted pressure-to-eat feeding practices and fewer homemade foods served at meals the same night. Effect modification was found for certain racial and/or ethnic groups with regard to engaging in pressure-to-eat feeding practices (ie, America Indian, Somali) or serving fewer homemade meals (ie, African American, Hispanic/Latino) in the face of high stress or depressed mood. Clinicians may want to consider discussing with parents the influence stress and depressed mood can have on everyday food-related parenting practices. Additionally, future researchers should consider using real-time interventions to reduce parental stress and depressed mood to promote healthy parent food-related parenting practices. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Parental involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parent-Teacher Associations and other community groups can play a significant role in helping to establish and run refugee schools; their involvement can also help refugee adults adjust to their changed circumstances.

  17. Demographic and Parenting Correlates of Adolescent Sleep Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata Roblyer, Martha I.; Grzywacz, Joseph. G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of parenting practices for adolescent adjustment, parenting correlates of adolescent sleep functioning remain understudied. This study delineated patterns of sleep functioning in a sample of ethnically diverse, low-income, adolescents and examined associations among three types of parenting practices (parental involvement, parent-child conflict, and parental control) and adolescent sleep functioning (difficulties initiating sleep and maintaining sleep, and sleep duratio...

  18. Families with children with diabetes: implications of parent stress for parent and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Vicki S; Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2012-05-01

    To examine the relation of parent stress to parent mental health and child mental and physical health. We interviewed children with type 1 diabetes (n = 132; mean age 12 years) annually for 5 years and had one parent complete a questionnaire at each assessment. Parents completed measures of general life stress, stress related to caring for a child with diabetes, benefit finding, and mental health. Child outcomes were depressive symptoms, self-care behavior, and glycemic control. Multilevel modeling was used to examine concurrent and longitudinal relations. Greater parent general stress and greater parent diabetes-specific stress were associated with poorer parent mental health. Overall, greater parent general stress was associated with poorer child outcomes, whereas greater parent diabetes-specific stress was associated with better child outcomes. Families with high levels of general life stress should be identified as they are at risk for both poor parent and child health outcomes.

  19. Parental Power and Adolescents' Parental Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acock, Alan C.; Yang, Wen Shan

    1984-01-01

    Combines McDonald's social power of parental identification with sex-linked models of parental identification to account for the identification of daughters (N=199) and sons (N=147) with their parents. Found that because of a halo effect, a gain in identification with one parent is not at the other parent's expense. (JAC)

  20. Current research on parenting styles, dimensions, and beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G

    2017-06-01

    For decades, parenting has been characterized in terms of broad global styles, with authoritative parenting seen as most beneficial for children's development. Concerns with greater sensitivity to cultural and contextual variations have led to greater specificity in defining parenting in terms of different parenting dimensions and greater consideration of the role of parenting beliefs in moderating links between parenting and adjustment. New research includes 'domain-specific' models that describe parents as flexibly deploying different practices depending on their goals, children's needs, and the types of behaviors towards which parenting is directed. These trends are described, and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sexual conflict between parents: offspring desertion and asymmetrical parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Tamás

    2014-09-25

    Parental care is an immensely variable social behavior, and sexual conflict offers a powerful paradigm to understand this diversity. Conflict over care (usually considered as a type of postzygotic sexual conflict) is common, because the evolutionary interests of male and female parents are rarely identical. I investigate how sexual conflict over care may facilitate the emergence and maintenance of diverse parenting strategies and argue that researchers should combine two fundamental concepts in social behavior to understand care patterns: cooperation and conflict. Behavioral evidence of conflict over care is well established, studies have estimated specific fitness implications of conflict for males or females, and experiments have investigated specific components of conflict. However, studies are long overdue to reveal the full implications of conflict for both males and females. Manipulating (or harming) the opposite sex seems less common in postzygotic conflicts than in prezygotic conflicts because by manipulating, coercing, or harming the opposite sex, the reproductive interest of the actor is also reduced. Parental care is a complex trait, although few studies have yet considered the implications of multidimensionality for parental conflict. Future research in parental conflict will benefit from understanding the behavioral interactions between male and female parents (e.g., negotiation, learning, and coercion), the genetic and neurogenomic bases of parental behavior, and the influence of social environment on parental strategies. Empirical studies are needed to put sexual conflict in a population context and reveal feedback between mate choice, pair bonds and parenting strategies, and their demographic consequences for the population such as mortalities and sex ratios. Taken together, sexual conflict offers a fascinating avenue for understanding the causes and consequences of parenting behavior, sex roles, and breeding system evolution. Copyright © 2014 Cold

  2. Parental Engagement: Beyond Parental Involvement in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Kathleen

    This study critically analyzes parents' complex stories of engagement in school and science education. The purpose is not to essentialize parental involvement, but rather to understand the processes of parental involvement and push forward the current discourse on the engagement of low-income minority and immigrant parents in schools and specifically science education. Employing critical grounded theory methods over a four-year span, this study had three areas of focus. First, voices of marginalized parents in the context of various spaces within the school system are examined. Using a qualitative approach, informal, formal, and research spaces were explored along with how minority parents express voice in these various spaces. Findings indicate parents drew on capital to express voice differently in different spaces, essentially authoring new spaces or the type of engagement in existing spaces. Second, the values and beliefs of traditionally marginalized people, the Discourse of mainstream society, and how they can inform a third, more transformative space for parental engagement in science are considered. The voices of low-income, marginalized parents around science and parental engagement (i.e., first space) are contrasted with the tenets of major national science policy documents (i.e., second space). Findings indicate a disparity between the pathways of engagement for low-income parents and policymakers who shape science education. Third, methodological questions of responsibility and assumption in qualitative research are explored. The author's complex struggle to make sense of her positionality, responsibilities, and assumptions as a researcher is chronicled. Findings focused on insider/outsider issues and implications for culturally sensitive research are discussed. Finally, the implications for policy, teaching, and research are discussed.

  3. Turkish Parents' Perceptions of Their Involvement in Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdener, Mehmet Akif

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement has an influence on children's educational engagement during the elementary years. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of rural Turkish parents about their involvement in schooling with elementary school students based on Epstein's (1995) six types of parental involvement (parenting, communicating,…

  4. Parents' Perceptions of Their Involvement in Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdener, Mehmet Akif; Knoeppel, Robert C.

    2018-01-01

    Parent involvement has an influence on children's educational engagement during the elementary years. The objective of this study was to examine the perceptions of rural Turkish parents about their involvement in schooling with elementary school students based on Epstein's (1995) six types of parental involvement (parenting, communicating,…

  5. Parents' qualitative perspectives on child asking for fruit and vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children can influence the foods available at home, but some ways of approaching a parent may be better than others; and the best way may vary by type of parent. This study explored how parents with different parenting styles would best receive their 10 to 14 year old child asking for fruit and vege...

  6. Intergenerational Continuity of Taste: Parental and Adolescent Music Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; van Zalk, Maarten; Christenson, Peter G.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the continuity in music taste from parents to their children is discussed via a multi-actor design. In our models music preferences of 325 adolescents and both their parents were linked, with parental and adolescent educational level as covariates. Parents' preferences for different types of music that had been popular when they…

  7. Development Parenting Model to Increase the Independence of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarty, Kustiah; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2015-01-01

    This study examines parenting and the child's independence model. The research problem is whether there is a relationship between parenting and the child's independence. The purpose of research is to determine: firstly, the type of parenting in an effort to increase the independence of the child; and the relationship between parenting models and…

  8. The Correlation Between Parenting Parents' and Students' Motivation in Learning English on 4rd Semester at the Faculty of Teacher Training and Education (Fkip) University Batanghari Jambi Academic Year 2016/2017

    OpenAIRE

    dewi, kartika

    2017-01-01

    Parenting parents is very important for children to provide encouragement or motivation in learning. With parenting a good influence for children, although many types of parenting applied parents' of children dependent parents' upbringing is applied parents to children.. The purpose in this research want to know whether there is any correlation between Parenting Parents' and Students Motivation in learning English on43rd Semester at the Faculty of Teacher Training and Education (FKIP) Univers...

  9. Holland ja Eesti kohtuvad tantsulaval

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Hollandi trupi Club Guy kontsertetendusest "Myrrh and Cinnamon", mis tuli esmakodselt ettekandele A. Pärdile pühendatud festivalil "Aestonishing music", kontsertetenduses kasutatud eesti heliloojate Pärdi, Tüüri, Sumera, Lille muusikast

  10. Deterrence according to Francois Hollande

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    On the February 19, 2015, the President of the Republic gave a speech on nuclear deterrence. Although it did not contain any major announcements, it reaffirms our nuclear policy while further elaborating upon it - something that the 2013 White Paper did not do - and in this respect provides significant clarifications on French doctrine and posture, and mentions several instances of reorientation. (author)

  11. Adult children's relationships with married parents, divorced parents, and stepparents: biology, marriage or residence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.

    2013-01-01

    The author compared the strength of the relationships that adult children have with different types of parents: biological parents who remained married, stepparents, and biological parents who divorced. He analyzed Dutch life history data containing detailed measures of living arrangements and used

  12. Parent Involvement in Head Start Programs: The Role of Parent, Teacher and Classroom Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, D.C.; Bryant, D.M.; Peisner-Feinberg, E.S.; Skinner, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the extent and types of parent involvement in Head Start programs, and to examine the relations between parent participation and family, teacher and classroom characteristics. Parents (n = 1131) and teachers (n = 59) from four Head Start programs participated. Data were gathered through volunteer logs,…

  13. Parents and the media. A study of social differentiation in parental media socialization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Kraaykamp, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analysed the effects of parental social background and family composition on various types of parental media socialization. We employed the Family Survey Dutch Population 1998, 2000 and 2003 (N = 2608), and analysed respondents’ reports of socialization practices in their parental

  14. Adolescents' Psychological Well-Being and Perceived Parental Involvement: Implications for Parental Involvement in Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps, Kayla; Zyromski, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period of development. Previous research suggests parent involvement in school directly impacts student success. However, different types of parental involvement and the efforts of middle school personnel to educate parents about these effective practices have received scant attention in the literature. The level and type…

  15. Correlates of Parental Differential Treatment: Parental and Contextual Factors during Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzaba-Poria, Naama; Pike, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined whether parental and contextual risk factors contribute to mothers' and fathers' differential treatment (MDT/FDT) when accounting for sibling dyad characteristics. Also explored was whether family type (single mothers vs. 2 parents) moderated the links between the parental and contextual correlates and MDT. One hundred…

  16. Parents and the media: A study of social differentiation in parental media socialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.J.W.R.; Kraaykamp, G.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analysed the effects of parental social background and family composition on various types of parental media socialization. We employed the Family Survey Dutch Population 1998, 2000 and 2003 (N = 2608), and analysed respondents' reports of socialization practices in their parental

  17. Who's doing the talking? Teacher and parent experiences of parent-teacher conferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E M Lemmer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common form of direct communication between parents and teachers in schools worldwide is the parent-teacher conference. Purposeful parent-teacher conferences afford the teacher and the parent the opportunity to address a particular topic related to the child, such as academic progress and behaviour. However, teachers are seldom trained to interact with parents, and both parents and teachers often find such encounters stressful and ineffective. This paper investigates parent and teacher perspectives on the parent-teacher conference through a qualitative inquiry. This is framed by the contributions of ecological theorists to home-school communication and an overview of extant themes in the literature. In the present qualitative inquiry, teacher, parent and learner participants were selected by purposeful and snowball sampling and data were gathered by individual and focus group interviews, school visits and the perusal of written parent-teacher conference reports. The findings indicate that parent-teacher conferences are ritualised school events in all types of schools; parents and teachers' expectations of conferences are limited; teachers are not trained to conduct parent-teacher conferences; and conferencesare overwhelmingly directed at problem solution. Parent-teacher conferences are characterised by a client orientation to parents, rather than a partnership orientation to home-school relations.

  18. Parent's Guide to Understanding Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CTB / McGraw-Hill, Monterey, CA.

    This brief introduction to testing is geared to parents. Types of tests are defined, such as standardized tests, achievement tests, norm referenced tests, criterion referenced tests, and aptitude tests. Various types of scores (grade equivalent, percentile rank, and stanine are also defined, and the uses made of tests by administrators, teachers,…

  19. The Value "Social Responsibility" as a Motivating Factor for Adolescents' Readiness to Participate in Different Types of Political Actions, and Its Socialization in Parent and Peer Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Based on a sample of tetrads (N = 839), including 16 year-old adolescents, their mothers, fathers, and same-sex friends, it was analyzed in which way the value social responsibility is related to adolescents' readiness for different types of political participation. Results showed that social responsibility was positively linked to readiness for…

  20. Parenting Styles and Beliefs about Parental Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that models of parenting style, such as Baumrind's popular model, are insensitive to variations in parenting resulting from characteristics of the different situations in which the parenting is expressed. Argues that considering parenting in context adds greater specificity to the model and enhances the potential for predicting child…

  1. Co-Parenting Quality, Parenting Stress, and Feeding Challenges in Families with a Child Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thullen, Matthew; Bonsall, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    113 parents of children aged 5-13 with ASD completed online surveys assessing co-parenting quality, parenting stress, and child feeding challenges. Results indicated that food selectivity was both the most frequently reported type of challenging feeding behavior and the most often reported as problematic but was also the only type of challenging…

  2. When children affect parents: Children's academic performance and parental investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurk Quadlin, Natasha

    2015-07-01

    Sociologists have extensively documented the ways that parent resources predict children's achievement. However, less is known about whether and how children's academic performance shapes parental investment behaviors. I use data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) and longitudinal fixed effects models to examine how changes in teacher assessments are related to changes in the conferral of various parent resources. Overall, I find that the relationship between achievement and investment varies based on the directionality in children's achievement and the type of resource at hand. Children whose performance improves receive a broad range of enrichment resources, while declines in performance are met with corrective educational resources. Results are largely consistent whether language or math assessments are used to predict investment, and also among children whose achievement does not change over time. I discuss these patterns, along with implications for the use of parent resources in education and family research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Parenting narcissus: what are the links between parenting and narcissism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert S; Bleau, Geoff; Drwecki, Brian

    2006-04-01

    Previous theorizing by clinical psychologists suggests that adolescent narcissism may be related to parenting practices (Kernberg, 1975; Kohut, 1977). Two studies investigated the relations between parenting dimensions (i.e., warmth, monitoring, and psychological control) and narcissism both with and without removing from narcissism variance associated with trait self-esteem. Two hundred and twenty-two college students (Study 1) and 212 high school students (Study 2) completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, a trait self-esteem scale, and standard measures of the three parenting dimensions. Parental warmth was associated positively and monitoring was associated negatively with both types of narcissism. Psychological control was positively associated with narcissism scores from which trait self-esteem variance had been removed. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed, limitations are addressed, and future research directions are suggested.

  4. Impact of parenting practices on parent-child relationships in children with specific learning disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parents of children with specific learning disability (SpLD undergo stress in coping up with their child′s condition. Aims: To document the parenting practices of parents having a child with newly diagnosed SpLD and to analyze their impact on parent-child relationships. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire-based study in our clinic. Materials and Methods: From May 2007 to January 2008, 150 parents (either mother or father of children consecutively diagnosed as having SpLD were enrolled. Parenting practices and parent-child relationships were measured by the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Parent Form (APQ-PF and the Parent Child Relationship Questionnaire (PCRQ, respectively. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson correlation coefficients between subscales of APQ-PF and PCRQ were computed. Multiple regression analysis was carried out for statistical significance of the clinical and demographic variables. Results: Parents who were: (i "involved" in parenting had a good "personal relationship and disciplinary warmth," (ii practicing "positive parenting" had good "warmth, personal relationship and disciplinary warmth," (iii "poorly supervising" their child′s activities lacked "warmth and personal relationship," (iv practicing "inconsistent discipline′ had a higher "power assertion" and (v practicing "corporal punishment" lacked "warmth" and had a higher "power assertion and possessiveness" in their relationships with their child. Parent being poorly educated or currently ill and child having all three types of SpLD present concomitantly or a sibling or a sibling with a chronic disability or being in class standard IX to XI were variables that independently predicted a poor parenting or parent-child relationship subscale score. Conclusions: The present study has identified parenting practices that need to be encouraged or excluded for improving parent-child relationships. Initiating these measures would help in the

  5. Sex Differences in Parenting Behaviors in Single-Mother and Single-Father Households

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufur, Mikaela J.; Howell, Nyssa C.; Downey, Douglas B.; Ainsworth, James W.; Lapray, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    Research on family structure has led some to claim that sex-based parenting differences exist. But if such differences exist in single-parent families, the absence of a second parent rather than specific sex-typed parenting might explain them. We examine differences in mothering and fathering behavior in single-parent households, where number of…

  6. Proactive Parent Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Sharel; Backlund, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Presents examples of teacher-parent interactions designed to help teachers communicate with parents. The scenarios involve a teacher communicating with parents about a struggling student, a teacher communicating with parents about a student's behavior problems, and a teacher attempting to communicate with a confrontational parent. Teacher prompts…

  7. Parenting while Being Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

  8. Nursemaid's Elbow (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... For Parents / Nursemaid's Elbow Print About Nursemaid's Elbow Toddlers and preschoolers are at risk for a common ...

  9. Parenting Styles and Adolescents' Achievement Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunola, Kaisa; Stattin, Hakan; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the extents to which adolescents' achievement strategies are associated with the parenting styles they experience in their families. Respondents (N=354) identified four types of families: those with Authoritative; Authoritarian; Permissive; and Neglectful parenting styles. Results further reveal that adolescents from authoritative…

  10. Parental overprotection revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasgard, M; Metz, W P

    1993-01-01

    Dimensions of parental overprotection are clarified in a critical review of the research and clinical literature. An indulgent style of parenting is distinguished from an overprotective parent-child relationship. Differential antecedents and outcomes are proposed for each of these forms of parent-child interaction. Measures of protection are reviewed. A new conceptual model of parental overprotection is presented which takes into account child, parent, family, socio-cultural, environmental and resiliency factors. Directions for future research are suggested.

  11. Amblyopia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  12. When Parents Argue

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  13. Chlamydia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  14. Oral Thrush (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  15. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  16. Syphilis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  17. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  18. Yersiniosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  19. Amebiasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  20. Infant Botulism (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  1. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  2. Headaches (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  3. Strep Throat (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  4. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  5. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ...

  6. Sinusitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  7. Laryngoscopy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  8. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  9. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  10. Eczema (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  11. Effects of parental monitoring, parent-child communication, and parents' expectation of the child's acculturation on the substance use behaviors of urban, Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Unger, Jennifer B; Wagner, Karla D; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Sussman, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,936 Hispanic adolescents of mean age 14.0 years (standard deviation= 0.4) from seven Los Angeles area schools. The effects of perceived parental monitoring and parent-child communication on the adolescents' self-reported past thirty day cigarette smoking and alcohol and marijuana use behaviors were analyzed. In addition, the relationships between parents' expectations of the child's acculturation and adolescents' drug use behaviors were examined. Parental monitoring and parent-child communication were found to have statistically significant inverse associations with all three drug types when controlling for one another and the demographic variables assessed in the study. Parents' expectation of the child's acculturation to the U.S. was found to be inversely related with alcohol use. Parental monitoring and parent-child communication were not found to mediate the relationship between parents' expectation of the child's acculturation and alcohol use.

  12. Chinese Parenting Reconsideration: Parenting Practices in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-mei; Luster, Tom

    This study examined authoritative and authoritarian parenting and specific parenting practices among Chinese mothers with preschoolers. The final sample consisted of 463 mothers with their 3 to 7 year-olds from 11 preschools, in Taiwan. Mothers completed a Chinese translation of the Parenting Behavior Questionnaire that assessed their parenting…

  13. Parenting educational styles in Slovenia and Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Sevčnikar, Kaja

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life the subject of parenting and child upbringing is often discussed among people who find themselves in the role of parents, babysitters and grandparents striving for best results (Peček Čuk and Lesar, 2009). My thesis focuses on parenting styles of mothers and fathers in Slovenia and in Finland. In the first, theoretical part, I have explained the concepts of socialization and parenting. I have defined the meaning of the term family and different family types. I have also c...

  14. Parental involvement in homework: relations with parent and student achievement-related motivational beliefs and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonida, Eleftheria N; Cortina, Kai S

    2014-09-01

    Parental involvement in homework is a home-based type of involvement in children's education. Research and theory suggest that it is beneficial for learning and achievement under certain conditions and for particular groups of individuals. The study examined whether different types of parents' involvement in homework (autonomy support, control, interference, cognitive engagement) (1) are predicted by their mastery and performance goals for their child and their beliefs of the child's academic efficacy, and (2) predict student achievement goal orientations, efficacy beliefs, and achievement. Grade-level differences were also investigated. The sample consisted of 282 elementary school (5th grade) and junior high school students (8th grade) and one of their parents. Surveys were used for data collection. Structural equation modelling was applied for data analysis. (1) Autonomy support during homework was predicted by parent mastery goal, parents' control and interference by their performance goal and perceptions of child efficacy, and cognitive engagement as supplementary to homework by parent perceptions of child efficacy. (2) Parental autonomy support, control, and interference were differentially associated with student mastery and performance goal orientations, whereas parent cognitive engagement was associated with student efficacy beliefs. (3) The structural model was the same for elementary and junior high school students but the latent means for a number of variables were different. Different types of parental involvement in homework were associated with different outcomes with parent autonomy support to be the most beneficial one. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood ... For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment ...

  16. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicare Medicaid & CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers ...

  17. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicare Medicaid & CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know ... Cure Father of the Year Stop Diabetes at School Tour de Cure Women's Series Do-It-Yourself ...

  18. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Diabetes Diabetes Myths A Day in the Life of Diabetes Famous People Working to Stop Diabetes ... CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday Life Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights ...

  19. Parental distress, parenting practices, and child adaptive outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklewright, Jackie L; King, Tricia Z; O'Toole, Kathleen; Henrich, Chris; Floyd, Frank J

    2012-03-01

    Moderate and severe pediatric traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are associated with significant familial distress and child adaptive sequelae. Our aim was to examine the relationship between parental psychological distress, parenting practices (authoritarian, permissive, authoritative), and child adaptive functioning 12-36 months following TBI or orthopedic injury (OI). Injury type was hypothesized to moderate the relationship between parental distress and child adaptive functioning, demonstrating a significantly stronger relationship in the TBI relative to OI group. Authoritarian parenting practices were hypothesized to mediate relationship between parental distress and child adaptive functioning across groups. Groups (TBI n = 21, OI n = 23) did not differ significantly on age at injury, time since injury, sex, race, or SES. Parents completed the Brief Symptom Inventory, Parenting Practices Questionnaire, and Vineland-II. Moderation and mediation hypotheses were tested using hierarchical multiple regression and a bootstrapping approach, respectively. Results supported moderation and revealed that higher parental psychological distress was associated with lower child adaptive functioning in the TBI group only. Mediation results indicated that higher parental distress was associated with authoritarian parenting practices and lower adaptive functioning across groups. Results suggest that parenting practices are an important area of focus for studies attempting to elucidate the relationship between parent and child functioning following TBI.

  20. Parenting gifted and talented children: what are the key child behaviour and parenting issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew R

    2008-09-01

    The literature on gifted and talented children is limited. Little is known about the types and nature of difficulties experienced by gifted and talented children, and even less known about parenting issues related to parenting a gifted and talented child. The aim of the present study was to describe children's behavioural and emotional adjustment, and the factors that contribute to children's difficulties, as well as to examine the styles of discipline used by parents of gifted and talented children and their level of confidence in managing specific parenting tasks. A survey of parents of gifted and talented children was conducted, with 211 parents meeting criteria for the study. For a community sample, in general gifted and talented children exhibit no more behavioural difficulties than do other children. But children in this sample seemed to show higher levels of emotional symptoms and peer problems. Children's behavioural and emotional difficulties were best predicted by parenting factors, particularly parental confidence. Parents reported that they were less likely to be permissive with their child, but they tended to use a more authoritarian style of parenting characterized by lecturing and a strong reaction to any problems. There are a number of implications for future research, clinical practice, and the development of parenting interventions for this group of parents.

  1. Parenting style and adolescent fruit consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, Stef P J; Brug, Johannes; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2003-08-01

    The importance of the social environment for dietary behaviour has been highlighted in the past decade. A type of environmental influence that has received increasing research attention in recent years is the influence that parents can have on their children's dietary behaviour through food-related parenting practices. Much of the work done so far, however, has reported inconsistent findings and poorly understood mechanisms of influence. The present study aimed to explore the possible environmental influence of general parenting style on adolescent food choice patterns. Data were collected at schools (N=643; mean age 16.5 years), using self-administered questionnaires on parenting style, fruit intake behaviour and fruit-specific cognitions. Consistent and theoretically predictable differences were found between adolescents who described their parents as authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent or neglectful. Fruit consumption and fruit-specific cognitions were most favourable among adolescents who were being raised with an authoritative parenting style. Children of parents with indulgent parenting styles consumed more fruit than adolescents from authoritarian or neglectful homes. Consequences of these results for the interpretation of earlier studies on the influence of parenting practices are discussed, and a research model is proposed for future studies of parental influences on adolescent dietary behaviours.

  2. Children of parents with BED have more eating behavior disturbance than children of parents with obesity or healthy weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydecker, Janet A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2017-06-01

    A limited literature suggests an association between parental eating disorders and child eating-disorder behaviors although this research has focused primarily on restrictive-type eating disorders and very little is known about families with binge-eating disorder (BED). The current study focused on parents (N = 331; 103 fathers and 226 mothers), comparing parents with core features of BED (n = 63) to parents with obesity and no eating disorder (OB; n = 85) and parents with healthy-weight and no eating disorder (HW; n = 183). Parents with BED were significantly more likely than OB and HW parents to report child binge eating, and more likely than HW parents to report child overeating. Parents with BED felt greater responsibility for child feeding than OB parents, and felt more concern about their child's weight than OB and HW parents. Dietary restriction of the child by the parents was related to child binge eating, overeating, and child overweight, and parental group was related to child binge eating (parental BED), overeating (parental BED), and child weight (parental OB). Parents with BED report greater disturbance in their children's eating than OB and HW parents, and OB parents report higher child weight than HW parents. This suggests that it is important to consider both eating-disorder psychopathology and obesity in clinical interventions and research. Our cross-sectional findings, which require experimental and prospective confirmations, provide preliminary evidence suggesting potential factors in families with parental BED and obesity to address in treatment and prevention efforts for pediatric eating disorders and obesity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:648-656). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Parental Authority over Education and the Right to Invite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Bryan R. Warnick explores parents' authority to make educational decisions for their children. In philosophical debates, three types of arguments are typically invoked to justify parents' rights: arguments based on the welfare interests of children, arguments based on the expressive interests of parents, and arguments based on the…

  4. Parental Challenges in Providing Care for Children with Special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority (45, 61.6%) were in the mid and lower social classes (III-V).The most identified parental challenges were economic and medical, indicated by all the parents. Others were social, stress and educational in that order. Type of child's disorder, severity of the disorder and parental social class were indicated by all the ...

  5. A Population-Based Comparison of Female and Male Same-Sex Parent and Different-Sex Parent Households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Henny M W; Kuyper, Lisette; Gartrell, Nanette K

    2018-03-01

    This investigation compared Dutch same-sex parent and different-sex parent households on children's psychological well-being, parenting stress, and support in child rearing. It was also assessed whether associations among children's well-being, parenting stress, and support in child rearing were different in the two household types. Data were based on a nationally representative survey (N = 25,250). Matching was used to enhance similarity in background characteristics between both types of families. Parental and child characteristics were matched for 43 female same-sex parent, 52 male same-sex parent, and 95 different-sex parent households with offspring between 5 and 18 years old. No significant differences were found on children's well-being, problems in the parent-child relationship, being worried about the child, or the use of formal and informal support between mothers in same-sex and different-sex parent households or for fathers in same-sex and different-sex parent households. Regarding perceived confidence in child rearing, fathers in same-sex parent households and mothers in different-sex parent households felt less competent than their counterparts. Neither the associations between children's well-being and the predictors (parenting stress variables) nor those between support and the predictors (parenting stress and children's well-being) differed along household type. In this population-based study, the similarity in child outcomes regardless of household type confirms the results of prior investigations based on convenience samples. These findings are pertinent to family therapists, practitioners, court officials, and policymakers who seek information on parenting experiences and child outcomes in female and male same-sex parent families. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  6. Psychiatric disorders in the parents of individuals with infantile autism: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2007-01-01

    The rates and types of psychiatric disorders were studied in the parents of individuals with infantile autism (IA).......The rates and types of psychiatric disorders were studied in the parents of individuals with infantile autism (IA)....

  7. Gift and sacrifice: parental involvement in Latino adolescents' education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballo, Rosario; Maurizi, Laura K; Suarez, Gloria A; Aretakis, Maria T

    2014-01-01

    Although myriad studies document the benefits of parental involvement in education on various indicators of children's academic performance, less research examines parental involvement among adolescents in low-income Latino families. Incorporating a multidimensional conceptualization of parental involvement, this study examined the relation between parental involvement and academic outcomes in a sample of 223 low-income, Latino adolescents. Results indicated that three types of parental involvement (gift/sacrifice, future discussions/academic socialization, and school involvement) had significant, positive associations with academic outcomes. Moreover, our results suggest that parents' stories about struggles with poverty and immigration are an important component of parental involvement, contributing to adolescents' desire to succeed academically and "give back" to parents. Additionally, our findings indicated that the positive relations between parental involvement and academic outcomes were stronger for immigrant youth and for those with higher endorsements of the Latino cultural value of respeto (respect).

  8. Parenting paradox: parenting after infant loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warland, Jane; O'Leary, Joann; McCutcheon, Helen; Williamson, Victoria

    2011-10-01

    to gain an in-depth understanding of the parenting experiences of bereaved parents in the years following an infant death. an exploratory qualitative study. semi-structured interview in the participants' homes. Data were collected over a five-month period in 2008 and analysed using thematic analysis. a purposive sample of 13 bereaved parents (10 mothers and three fathers) was used. Parents who had accessed the support services offered by two bereavement support agencies were recruited. Participants were asked to describe their experiences of raising their subsequent child. Interviews were conducted when the next born child was at least three years of age. the parents described a 'paradoxical' parenting style where they were trying to parent using two diametrically opposed unsustainable options. For example, they described trying to hold their subsequent child emotionally close but aloof at the same time. the results from this study indicate that the impact of a loss of an infant has far-reaching consequences on subsequent parenting. Support and early intervention at the time of the stillbirth and subsequent pregnancy are likely to be useful. However, further research is required to determine the extent to which early intervention can alter the tendency towards bereaved parents adopting a paradoxical parenting style. The impact of this style on mental health and the emotional health and well-being of the next born child/ren after perinatal loss should also be further examined. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of gender and level of parental involvement among parents in drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C; Grella, Christine E; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2003-05-01

    Most studies of parents in drug treatment have focused exclusively on mothers, and few studies have examined the effects of parents' level of involvement with their children on the parents' drug use and psychological functioning, either before or after treatment. This study examined mothers and fathers (n = 331) who were parents of children under the age of 18; participants were sampled from 19 drug treatment programs across four types of treatment modalities in Los Angeles County. A majority of each group (57% of 214 mothers and 51% of 117 fathers) were classified as being highly involved with their children. At the baseline assessment, higher parental involvement was related to lower levels of addiction severity, psychological severity, and symptoms of psychological distress, and to higher levels of self-esteem and perception of parenting skills. In general, fathers had higher levels of alcohol and drug-use severity than did mothers, but fathers who were more involved with their children showed lower levels of addiction severity than fathers who were less involved. Parental involvement at baseline was unrelated to drug use at the 12-month follow-up, although parents who were less involved with their children reported experiencing more stressors. Given the association of parental involvement with lower levels of addiction severity and psychological distress at baseline, treatment protocols should build upon the positive relationships of parents with their children, and seek to improve those of less-involved parents.

  10. A Parent-to-Parent Program in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kae

    2018-01-01

    Parent-to-parent programs provide emotional and informational support to parents of children with special needs by matching trained and experienced parents with parents needing support. This study examined the implementation and effects of a Parent-to-Parent Program in Taiwan that supported 3 families of youngsters with special needs. Based on the…

  11. Maternal Personality, Parenting Cognitions and Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play) were independently coded. Factor analyses of the personality inventory replicated extraction of the Five-Factor model of personality (Openness, Neuroticism, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness). Controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, the five personality factors qua variables and in patterns qua clusters related differently to diverse parenting cognitions and practices, supporting the multidimensional, modular, and specific nature of parenting. Maternal personality in the normal range, a theoretically important but empirically neglected factor in everyday parenting, has meaning in studies of parenting, child development, and family process. PMID:21443335

  12. Children of Mentally Ill Parents Participating in Preventive Support Groups: Parental Diagnoses and Child Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santvoort, F. van; Hosman, C.M.H.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Janssens, J.M.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill parents. Given the variety of parental diagnoses it might be questionable if offering a standardized program for all these children is the most effective response. While no overall knowledge exists about the type

  13. Parents as passengers during pediatric transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M M; Holditch-Davis, D; Brunssen, S

    1997-01-01

    The transport environment presents a unique setting in which the feasibility, advantages, and disadvantages of passengers accompanying a patient must be assessed carefully. The purpose of this study was to describe the current practice of including parents as passengers during pediatric interfacility transport. One-hundred-eighty-eight critical care transport programs in the United States responded to a voluntary mail survey, providing information about current policies, practices, and crew perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of carrying parents as passengers. Extra seating for passengers was available in 96% of ambulances, 86% of fixed-wing aircraft, and 54% of helicopters used for pediatric transport. Parents traveled as passengers in all types of vehicles; most frequently in ambulances and fixed-wing aircraft. Twenty percent of helicopter programs allowed parent passengers on more than half of their pediatric transports in this vehicle. Advantages of parent passengers included emotional benefit for the parent and child, availability of parents for history and consent, good public relations, and having the parent present if the child dies. Disadvantages included potential parent anxiety, crew distraction, and space limitations. This study reflects the widely diverse policies, practices, and opinions relevant to this topic and confirms a need for further study.

  14. Parenting and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Tamsen; Netsi, Elena; Redinger, Stephanie; Stein, Alan

    2017-06-01

    With the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy and successful prevention of mother-to-child transmission the development of HIV-negative children with HIV-positive parents has become an important focus. There is considerable evidence that children's developmental risk is heightened because a parental HIV-diagnosis is associated with a range of potential problems such as depression, stigma and financial difficulties. Up to a third of children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are cared for by an HIV-positive parent or caregiver. We review the mechanisms by which HIV affects parenting including its negative effects on parental responsiveness in the early years of parenting and parental avoidant coping styles and parenting deficits in the later years. We describe low-cost parenting interventions suited for low resourced HIV endemic settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Worsens the Profile of Cardiometabolic Risk Markers and Decrease Indexes of Beta-Cell Function Independently of Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Women with a Parental History of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sokup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Women with a history of both parental type 2 diabetes (pt2DM and previous gestational diabetes (pGDM represent a group at high risk of cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that pGDM changes cardiometabolic risk markers levels as well as theirs associations with glucose indices in nondiabetic pt2DM women. Methods. Anthropometric parameters, glucose regulation (OGTT, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, beta-cell function, lipid levels, parameters of endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation were evaluated in 55 women with pt2DM, 40 with both pt2DM and pGDM 2–24 months postpartum, and 35 controls. Results. Prediabetes was diagnosed more frequently in women with both pt2DM and pGDM in comparison with women with only pt2DM (10 versus 8, P=0.04. The pGDM group had higher LDL-cholesterol, sICAM-1, tPa Ag, fibrinogen, and lower beta-cell function after adjustment for HOMA-IR, in comparison with pt2DM group. In pt2DM group postchallenge glucose correlated independently with hsCRP and in pGDM group fasting glucose with HOMA-IR. Conclusions. pGDM exerts a combined effect on cardiometabolic risk markers in women with pt2DM. In these women higher LDL-cholesterol, fibrinogen, sICAM-1, tPa Ag levels and decreased beta cell function are associated with pGDM independently of HOMA-IR index value. Fasting glucose is an important cardiometabolic risk marker and is independently associated with HOMA-IR.

  16. Group Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Parents and Children At-Risk for Physical Abuse: An Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, Melissa K.; Deblinger, Esther; Steer, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the relative efficacy of two types of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for treating the traumatized child and at-risk or offending parent in cases of child physical abuse (CPA), 24 parents and their children were treated with Combined Parent-Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CPC-CBT) and 20 parents were treated with Parent-Only CBT.…

  17. Parental authority questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, J R

    1991-08-01

    A questionnaire was developed for the purpose of measuring Baumrind's (1971) permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative parental authority prototypes. It consists of 30 items per parent and yields permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative scores for both the mother and the father; each of these scores is derived from the phenomenological appraisals of the parents' authority by their son or daughter. The results of several studies have supported the Parental Authority Questionnaire as a psychometrically sound and valid measure of Baumrind's parental authority prototypes, and they have suggested that this questionnaire has considerable potential as a valuable tool in the investigation of correlates of parental permissiveness, authoritarianism, and authoritativeness.

  18. Parenting children with down syndrome: An analysis of parenting styles, parenting dimensions, and parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B Allyson; Conners, Frances; Curtner-Smith, Mary Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Effective parenting is vital for a child's development. Although much work has been conducted on parenting typically developing children, little work has examined parenting children with Down syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to compare the parenting styles and dimensions in mothers of children with DS and mothers of TD children. Thirty-five mothers of children with DS and 47 mothers of TD children completed questionnaires about parenting, parental stress, child behavior problems, and child executive function. We found that mothers of children with DS use an authoritative parenting style less and a permissive parenting style more than mothers of TD children. Additionally, we found that mothers of children with DS use reasoning/induction and verbal hostility less and ignoring misbehavior more than mothers of TD children. All of these differences, except for those of reasoning/induction, were at least partially accounted for by the higher levels of parental stress in the DS group. Parenting interventions should be focused on reducing parental stress and training mothers to parent under stress in an effort to improve parenting techniques, which would, in theory, improve long-term child outcomes for children with DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparing the Parenting Role Tasks in Parents of Children with Mental/Physical Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azade Riyahi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The role of parents during childhood is very important. Imbalances in parenting roles may cause severe emotional and physical injuries in children. The current study aimed at comparing parenting role tasks in parents of children who affected to mental/physical disabilities. Materials and Methods In the current cross sectional study, the parenting role tasks questionnaire was completed for 230 married couples with at least one child with disability and the parents were selected by convenience sampling method. The parenting role tasks were compared between mothers and fathers. Independent t-test, chi square and analysis of variances was used to compare the scores between fathers and mothers based on studied variables including demographic variables, types of child disabilities and history of trauma and seizure. Results Among enrolled children, 49 (21.3% had mental and 99 (43% affecting to physical disabilities. A significant difference regarding the parenting role tasks between mothers and fathers; therefore, the mean score of mothers for parenting role tasks was significantly higher than that of fathers regarding different variables such as demographic data, seizure, trauma, and the type of disabilities in the child (P

  20. Maternal Personality, Parenting Cognitions, and Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play)…

  1. Soapbox: Class matters in parenting interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberstein, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Class and income level influence parenting styles and values, yet are rarely discussed in treatment approaches and parenting interventions with families. In this soapbox article, I argue that discrepancies in outcome, retention, and participation could be fruitfully addressed through a fuller understanding of the needs, realities, and parenting goals of families struggling with financial disadvantage. I compare and contrast ethnographic studies of parenting in low socioeconomic environments with the types of strategies and interventions commonly advanced in parent training programs and suggest that clinicians must become more aware of the cultural and socioeconomic overtones of those interventions in determining whether, how, and when to use them with families. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Parent training support for intellectually disabled parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coren, Esther; Hutchfield, Jemeela; Thomae, Manuela; Gustafsson, Carina

    2010-06-16

    Intellectual disability may impact on an individual's capacity to parent a child effectively. Research suggests that the number of intellectually disabled people with children is increasing. Children of parents with intellectual disabilities may be at increased risk of neglectful care which could lead to health, developmental and behavioural problems, or increased risk of intellectual disability.However, there is some indication that some parents with intellectual disabilities are able to provide adequate child care if they are given appropriate training and support to do so. To assess the effectiveness of parent training interventions to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, Sociological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts International, MetaRegister of Controlled Trials, and ZETOC. Randomised controlled trials comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disabilities with usual care or with a control group. Outcomes of interest were: the attainment of parenting skills specific to the intervention, safe home practices and the understanding of child health. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and undertook data extraction. Three trials met the inclusion criteria for this review but no meta-analysis was possible. One study reported improved maternal-child interaction following group parent training compared with the control group. The second study reported some improvements in parents knowledge of life threatening emergencies, ability to recognise dangers and identify precautions and smaller improvements in their ability to implement precautions, use medicines safely and recognise child illness and symptoms. The third study reported improvement in child care and safety skills following the intervention. There is some risk of bias in the

  3. Intergenerational support, satisfaction with parent-child relationship and elderly parents' life satisfaction in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chenhong; Kwok, Chi Leung; Law, Yik Wa; Yip, Paul S F; Cheng, Qijin

    2018-01-22

    This study examines in what exchange patterns that three types of intergenerational support are associated with elderly parents' life satisfaction, and whether elderly parents' evaluation on parent-child relationship plays a mediation role on those associations. Data were drawn from Hong Kong Panel Survey for Poverty Alleviation. Respondents aged 65 and over were included ( N=504). Three types of support, namely, daily-living, financial, and emotional support were examined in four patterns-the over-benefited , under-benefited , reciprocal and no flow of exchange. A multivariable linear regression was applied to investigate the association between pattern of intergenerational exchange and life satisfaction, and mediation analysis was employed to examine the mediating role of satisfaction with parent-child relationship on their associations. Elderly parents were less satisfied with their lives when they had no flow of exchange in daily-living support, and more satisfied when they were under-benefited in financial support, and over-benefited or reciprocal in emotional support. Elderly parents' satisfaction with parent-child relationship mediated the association between exchange of emotional support and life satisfaction; but not the association between daily-living or financial support and life satisfaction. Different types of intergenerational support are associated with elderly parents' life satisfaction in different patterns.

  4. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  5. Parental Involvement in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Tessa

    1979-01-01

    Arguments in favor of increased parental involvement, particularly in nursery education, are presented. Opposition to participation from parents and teachers is discussed and specific areas in which cooperation might be possible are suggested along with different levels of participation. (JMF)

  6. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted.

  7. Naps (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... during a 24-hour period. For example, one toddler may sleep 13 hours at night with only ...

  8. Playground Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... designed for three different age groups: infants and toddlers under 2, 2- to 5-year-olds (preschoolers), ...

  9. Toxocariasis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... with a pet dog or cat (wash a toddler's hands yourself) discourage toddlers from putting dirty hands ...

  10. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Separation Anxiety KidsHealth / For Parents / Separation Anxiety What's in this ... both of you get through it. About Separation Anxiety Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. Parents ...

  11. Parenting and Late Adolescent Emotional Adjustment: Mediating Effects of Discipline and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Cliff; Milone, Mary Catherine; Renk, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that parenting styles are related to the types of discipline parents utilize and that the coupling of parenting styles and discipline techniques are related to child outcomes. Although extant research examines the effects of parenting styles and discipline on child and early adolescent adjustment, less is known about adjustment…

  12. Gene-Environment Correlation Underlying the Association between Parental Negativity and Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Horwitz, Briana N.; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody M.; Spotts, Erica L.; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of adolescent or parent-based twins suggest that gene-environment correlation (rGE) is an important mechanism underlying parent-adolescent relationships. However, information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent "and" child behaviors is needed to distinguish types of rGE. The present…

  13. "Hi Mommy": Parental Preferences of Greetings by Medical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks-Gallo, Lisa; Aron, Chaim Zev; Messina, Catherine R

    2018-04-01

    The therapeutic alliance between pediatricians and parents begins at the initial encounter. The manner in which pediatricians greet family members influences this relationship. This study evaluated whether parents are addressed using generic titles and investigated perceptions of parents regarding how they are addressed by medical staff. Written surveys of 137 parents of pediatric inpatients collected opinions about greetings during medical encounters. Parents were asked if they have been addressed as Mom/Dad/Mommy/Daddy during past medical encounters and which generic titles they would prefer. Using a Likert-type scale, the parents' perceptions of various salutations were assessed and compared. In this sample, 86% of parents were previously called Mom/Dad/Mommy/Daddy. Parents preferred to be addressed as Mom or Dad over other generic titles. Many disliked being addressed as Mommy/Daddy, Ma'am/Sir, or without a name, suggesting that providers should avoid the use of these salutations.

  14. A truth that does not always speak its name: How Hollander and Turowetz's findings confirm and extend the engaged followership analysis of harm-doing in the Milgram paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, S Alexander; Reicher, Stephen D

    2018-04-01

    Hollander and Turowetz (2017, Br. J. Soc. Psychol., 56, 655-674) present important data from post-experimental interviews with participants in Milgram's 'obedience' research. In these, participants responded to various questions about their perceptions of the study and their behaviour by indicating that they trusted the Experimenter not to let them inflict serious harm. Relatively few participants indicated that they acted as they did because they were committed to the Experimenter or to science. We argue, however, that there are two key reasons why this evidence is not inconsistent with claims that harm-doing is a product of engaged followership. The first is that (in contrast to the data obtained from later post-experimental surveys) the conversational logic of the interviews does not topicalize a discussion or valorization of science, but instead requires participants to defend themselves against an accusation of improper behaviour. The second is that participants' accounts of their behaviour nevertheless revolved around expressions of trust in the Experimenter which can themselves be seen as manifestations of shared identity and engaged followership. Nevertheless, we argue that H&T's analysis points to significant ways in which the engaged followership account and its broader implications for understanding perpetrator behaviour can be embellished. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  15. New Parent Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and tactics to help keep children and families healthy, safe and strong. MilParent Power is Help for Parents May 22, 2018 @ 9: ... that’s your job — helping your kids cope in healthy ways to changing circumstances. 6 Tips to Harness Your MilParent Power March 15, 2018 @ 10:42 AM | 4 Min ...

  16. Children of Incarcerated Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charlene Wear

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes what is known about the children of incarcerated parents in California. The report estimates the number of children in California who have parents in the state's criminal justice system (jail, prison, parole, and probation) and summarizes key findings from the research literature on the impact of parental arrest and…

  17. The Parent Loan Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Marian; Supiano, Beckie; Fuller, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    As the cost of college has spiraled ever upward and median family income has fallen, the loan program, called Parent PLUS, has become indispensable for increasing numbers of parents desperate to make their children's college plans work. Last year the government disbursed $10.6-billion in Parent PLUS loans to just under a million families. Even…

  18. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  19. Evaluation of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach by Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra; Ekizoglu, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of parent involvement in children's education, research clearly shows that it is difficult to effectively involve parents. This study aims to capture parents' views of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach (BPIA) designed to secure parent involvement in education by strengthening school-parent communication. Data…

  20. Parenting Beliefs, Parental Stress, and Social Support Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respler-Herman, Melissa; Mowder, Barbara A.; Yasik, Anastasia E.; Shamah, Renee

    2012-01-01

    The present study built on prior research by examining the relationship of parental stress and social support to parenting beliefs and behaviors. A sample of 87 parents provided their views concerning the importance of parenting characteristics as well as their level of parental stress and perceived social support. These parents completed the…

  1. Personality and Parenting Style in Parents of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huver, Rose M. E.; Otten, Roy; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian,…

  2. 5 CFR 1651.7 - Parent or parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parent or parents. 1651.7 Section 1651.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD DEATH BENEFITS § 1651.7 Parent or parents. If the account is to be paid to the participant's parent or parents under § 1651.2(a)(4), the following...

  3. Intergenerational Transmission of Harsh Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Ronald L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined harsh parenting across generations by means of parents' and adolescents' reports. Found that grandparents who had engaged in aggressive parenting produced parents who used similar practices. Harsh discipline of male children was a function of socioeconomic characteristics. (BC)

  4. What are the benefits of parental care? The importance of parental effects on developmental rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Hope; Bonsall, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of parental care is beneficial if it facilitates offspring performance traits that are ultimately tied to offspring fitness. While this may seem self-evident, the benefits of parental care have received relatively little theoretical exploration. Here, we develop a theoretical model that elucidates how parental care can affect offspring performance and which aspects of offspring performance (e.g., survival, development) are likely to be influenced by care. We begin by summarizing four general types of parental care benefits. Care can be beneficial if parents (1) increase offspring survival during the stage in which parents and offspring are associated, (2) improve offspring quality in a way that leads to increased offspring survival and/or reproduction in the future when parents are no longer associated with offspring, and/or (3) directly increase offspring reproductive success when parents and offspring remain associated into adulthood. We additionally suggest that parental control over offspring developmental rate might represent a substantial, yet underappreciated, benefit of care. We hypothesize that parents adjust the amount of time offspring spend in life-history stages in response to expected offspring mortality, which in turn might increase overall offspring survival, and ultimately, fitness of parents and offspring. Using a theoretical evolutionary framework, we show that parental control over offspring developmental rate can represent a significant, or even the sole, benefit of care. Considering this benefit influences our general understanding of the evolution of care, as parental control over offspring developmental rate can increase the range of life-history conditions (e.g., egg and juvenile mortalities) under which care can evolve. PMID:25360271

  5. What are the benefits of parental care? The importance of parental effects on developmental rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Hope; Bonsall, Michael B

    2014-06-01

    The evolution of parental care is beneficial if it facilitates offspring performance traits that are ultimately tied to offspring fitness. While this may seem self-evident, the benefits of parental care have received relatively little theoretical exploration. Here, we develop a theoretical model that elucidates how parental care can affect offspring performance and which aspects of offspring performance (e.g., survival, development) are likely to be influenced by care. We begin by summarizing four general types of parental care benefits. Care can be beneficial if parents (1) increase offspring survival during the stage in which parents and offspring are associated, (2) improve offspring quality in a way that leads to increased offspring survival and/or reproduction in the future when parents are no longer associated with offspring, and/or (3) directly increase offspring reproductive success when parents and offspring remain associated into adulthood. We additionally suggest that parental control over offspring developmental rate might represent a substantial, yet underappreciated, benefit of care. We hypothesize that parents adjust the amount of time offspring spend in life-history stages in response to expected offspring mortality, which in turn might increase overall offspring survival, and ultimately, fitness of parents and offspring. Using a theoretical evolutionary framework, we show that parental control over offspring developmental rate can represent a significant, or even the sole, benefit of care. Considering this benefit influences our general understanding of the evolution of care, as parental control over offspring developmental rate can increase the range of life-history conditions (e.g., egg and juvenile mortalities) under which care can evolve.

  6. Dysfunctional parenting styles increase interpersonal sensitivity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Koichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Shibuya, Naoshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Kamata, Mitsuhiro

    2009-12-01

    The effects of dysfunctional parenting styles on interpersonal sensitivity were studied in 640 Japanese volunteers. Interpersonal sensitivity was assessed by the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM), and perceived parental rearing was evaluated by the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), which is consisted of care and protection factors. Parental rearing was classified into 4 types, i.e., optimal parenting (high care/low protection), affectionate constraint (high care/high protection), neglectful parenting (low care/low protection), and affectionless control (low care/high protection). Males with paternal affectionless control showed higher total IPSM scores than those with paternal optimal parenting (p = 0.022). Females with maternal affectionate constraint (p = 0.001), neglectful parenting (p = 0.022), and affectionless control (p = 0.003) showed higher total IPSM scores than those with maternal optimal parenting. In males and females, dysfunctional parenting styles by the opposite-sex parents did not affected total IPSM scores. The present study suggests that in both males and females interpersonal sensitivity is increased by dysfunctional parenting styles by the same-sex parents.

  7. Parenting Culture Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ellie J.; Faircloth, Charlotte; Macvarish, Jan; Bristow, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    Why do we live at a time when the minutiae of how parents raise their children – how they feed them, talk to them, play with them or discipline them – have become routine sources of public debate and policy making? Why are there now so-called 'parenting experts', and social movements like Attachment Parenting, telling us that 'science says' what parents do is the cause of and solution to social problems? \\ud \\ud Parenting Culture Studies provides in-depth answers to these features of contempo...

  8. Parental Alienation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Torun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children who have been programmed by one parent to be alienated from the other parent are commonly seen in the context of child-custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It is said to result from a combination of a programming (brainwashing parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the targeted parent. Many evaluators use the term parental alienation syndrome to refer to the disorder engendered in such children. However, there is significant controversy going on about the validity of parental alienation syndrome. The purpose of this article has been to describe and help to differentiate parental alienation syndrome and abuse for mental health professionals working in the field, and discuss the arguments about the validity of this syndrome.

  9. The influence of parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication on Bahamian adolescent risk involvement: a three-year longitudinal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Xiaoming; Cottrell, Lesley; Deveaux, Lynette; Kaljee, Linda

    2013-11-01

    The literature suggests that parental monitoring can best be conceptualized and measured through the domains of parental knowledge, youth disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control. Using longitudinal data on 913 grade-six Bahamian students followed over a period of three years, we examined the unique and independent roles of these domains of parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication in relation to adolescent involvement in delinquency, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. The results obtained with mixed-effects models indicate that parental knowledge, youth disclosure, and parental control are negatively associated with both delinquency and substance use. Open parent-adolescent communication was associated with decreased sexual risk behavior, whereas problematic parent-adolescent communication was associated with increased sexual risk behavior. The results obtained with path models indicate that youth disclosure is a significant longitudinal predictor of reduced adolescent delinquency and that parental control during early adolescence predicted reduced substance use in middle adolescence. The findings suggest that parental knowledge, youth disclosure and parental control differ in their impacts on substance use, delinquency and sexual risk behaviors. Problematic parent-adolescent communication is consistently associated with increases in all three types of adolescent risk behaviors. Future parental monitoring interventions should focus on enhancing parents' interpersonal communication skills and emphasize the differences in and importance of the unique components of parental monitoring. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Adoptive gay father families: parent-child relationships and children's psychological adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombok, Susan; Mellish, Laura; Jennings, Sarah; Casey, Polly; Tasker, Fiona; Lamb, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Findings are presented on a U.K. study of 41 gay father families, 40 lesbian mother families, and 49 heterosexual parent families with an adopted child aged 3-9 years. Standardized interview and observational and questionnaire measures of parental well-being, quality of parent-child relationships, child adjustment, and child sex-typed behavior were administered to parents, children, and teachers. The findings indicated more positive parental well-being and parenting in gay father families compared to heterosexual parent families. Child externalizing problems were greater among children in heterosexual families. Family process variables, particularly parenting stress, rather than family type were found to be predictive of child externalizing problems. The findings contribute to theoretical understanding of the role of parental gender and parental sexual orientation in child development. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. Parenting styles and conceptions of parental authority during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, J G

    1995-04-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 110 primarily white, middle-class sixth, eighth, and tenth graders (M = 11.98, 13.84, and 16.18 years of age) and their parents (108 mothers and 92 fathers). Parents judged the legitimacy of parental authority and rated family conflict and rules regarding 24 hypothetical moral, conventional, personal, multifaceted (containing conventional and personal components), prudential, and friendship issues. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Parents' parenting styles differentiated their conceptions of parental authority, but adolescents' perceptions did not. Differences were primarily over the boundaries of adolescents' personal jurisdiction. Furthermore, conceptions of parental authority and parenting styles both contributed significantly to emotional autonomy and adolescent-parent conflict. The implications of the findings for typological models of parenting and distinct domain views of social-cognitive development are discussed.

  12. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting.

  13. Parents of children with enduring epilepsy: predictors of parenting stress and parenting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Meijer, A.M.; Dekovic, M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goals of the work described here were (1) to predict parenting stress and parenting from stressors, resources, and parental coping behaviors in parents of children with epilepsy, and (2) to determine whether parenting stress mediates the effects of these predictors on parenting.

  14. Parents' and children's perception of parent-led Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alison; Dorsey, Crystal S; Swaidan, Victoria R; Storch, Eric A

    2015-02-01

    This study explored parent and child experiences of a parent-led, therapist-assisted treatment during Step One of Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). Seventeen parents/guardians and 16 children who were between the ages of 8 and 12 years were interviewed after Step One and six weeks after the completion of a maintenance phase about their perceptions of the parent-led, therapist-assisted treatment. Participants were asked what they liked and disliked about the treatment as well as what they found to be most and least helpful. Generally, parents and children liked the treatment and found it helpful. In terms of treatment components, children indicated that the relaxation exercises were the most liked/helpful component (62.5%) followed by trauma narrative activities (56.3%). A few children (18.8%) did not like or found least helpful the trauma narrative component as they wanted to avoid talking or thinking about the trauma. Parents indicated that the parent-child meetings were the most liked/helpful (82.4%) followed by the Stepping Together workbook (58.8%) and relaxation exercises (52.9%). Some parents (23.5%) noted that the workbook seemed too repetitive and some parents (17.6%) at times were uncertain if they were leading the parent-child meetings the best way. Parent-led, therapist-assisted TF-CBT may be an acceptable type of service delivery for both parents and children, although more research is needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cross-sectional associations between maternal parenting styles, physical activity and screen sedentary time in children

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Geest, K. E.; Mérelle, S. Y. M.; Rodenburg, G.; Van de Mheen, D.; Renders, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Children’s activity level, including physical activity (PA) and screen sedentary time (SST), is influenced by environmental factors in which parents play a critical role. Different types of parenting styles may influence children’s activity level. Inconsistent results were found on the association between parenting styles and PA, and few studies tested the association between parenting styles and SST. This study examined the association between parenting styles, PA and SST and the ...

  16. Adoptive Gay Father Families: Parent?Child Relationships and Children's Psychological Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Golombok, Susan; Mellish, Laura; Jennings, Sarah; Casey, Polly; Tasker, Fiona; Lamb, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Findings are presented on a U.K. study of 41 gay father families, 40 lesbian mother families, and 49 heterosexual parent families with an adopted child aged 3–9 years. Standardized interview and observational and questionnaire measures of parental well-being, quality of parent–child relationships, child adjustment, and child sex-typed behavior were administered to parents, children, and teachers. The findings indicated more positive parental well-being and parenting in gay father families com...

  17. Testing Specificity Among Parents’ Depressive Symptoms, Parenting, and Child Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Meredith A.; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Watson, Kelly H.; Reising, Michelle M.; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Cole, David A.; Compas, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the specificity in relations between observed withdrawn and intrusive parenting behaviors and children's internalizing and externalizing symptoms in an at risk sample of children (ages 9 to 15-years-old) of parents with a history of depression (N = 180). Given past findings that parental depression and parenting behaviors may differentially impact boys and girls, gender was examined as a moderator of the relations between these factors and child adjustment. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for parents of boys and girls and to intrusive parenting for parents of boys only. When controlling for intrusive parenting, preliminary analyses demonstrated that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for parents of boys, and this association approached significance for parents of girls. Specificity analyses yielded that, when controlling for the other type of problem (i.e., internalizing or externalizing), withdrawn parenting specifically predicted externalizing problems but not internalizing problems in girls. No evidence of specificity was found for boys in this sample, suggesting that impaired parenting behaviors are diffusely related to both internalizing and externalizing symptoms for boys. Overall, results highlight the importance of accounting for child gender and suggest that targeting improvement in parenting behaviors and the reduction of depressive symptoms in interventions with parents with a history of depression may have potential to reduce internalizing and externalizing problems in this high-risk population. PMID:26882467

  18. Parental knowledge is an environmental influence on adolescent externalizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Narusyte, Jurgita; Lichtenstein, Paul; Ganiban, Jody M; Spotts, Erica L; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence both that parental monitoring is an environmental influence serving to diminish adolescent externalizing problems and that this association may be driven by adolescents' characteristics via genetic and/or environmental mechanisms, such that adolescents with fewer problems tell their parents more, and therefore appear to be better monitored. Without information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent and child behaviors, it is impossible to clarify the mechanisms underlying this association. The present study used the Extended Children of Twins model to distinguish types of gene-environment correlation and direct environmental effects underlying associations between parental knowledge and adolescent (age 11-22 years) externalizing behavior with a Swedish sample of 909 twin parents and their adolescent offspring and a US-based sample of 405 White adolescent siblings and their parents. Results suggest that more parental knowledge is associated with less adolescent externalizing via a direct environmental influence independent of any genetic influences. There was no evidence of a child-driven explanation of the association between parental knowledge and adolescent externalizing problems. In this sample of adolescents, parental knowledge exerted an environmental influence on adolescent externalizing after accounting for genetic influences of parents and adolescents. Because the association between parenting and child development originates in the parent, treatment for adolescent externalizing must not only include parents but should also focus on altering their parental style. Thus, findings suggest that teaching parents better knowledge-related monitoring strategies is likely to help reduce externalizing problems in adolescents. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  19. Parent and Adolescent Reports of Parenting When a Parent Has a History of Depression: Associations with Observations of Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Watson, Kelly H.; Reising, Michelle M.; Seehuus, Martin; Compas, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the congruence of parent and adolescent reports of positive and negative parenting with observations of parent-adolescent interactions as the criterion measure. The role of parent and adolescent depressive symptoms in moderating the associations between adolescent or parent report and observations of parenting also was examined. Participants were 180 parents (88.9% female) with a history of clinical depression and one of their 9-to-15 year old children (49.4% female...

  20. Patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Renske; Bos, Annemieke; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the expectations of children and their primary care-givers towards orthodontic treatment and to compare the results with those of a UK sample. A questionnaire survey of children and their primary care-givers attending for their first consultation. The Department of Orthodontics at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), the Netherlands. A total of 168 subjects (84 patients and 84 parents) completed the questionnaire. The children were aged 10 to 14 years. The responses of the children and parents and differences between boys and girls were examined using parametric statistical methods. The data from the Dutch sample were compared with a similar UK sample. Patients and parents shared similar expectations of orthodontic treatment, with the exception of expectations of having a brace fitted at the first appointment, orthodontic treatment involving headgear, any problems with orthodontic treatment, duration of orthodontic treatment and concerning reactions from the public. Among the child participants, boys and girls only differed in their expectations of orthodontic treatment involving jaw surgery. Differences between Dutch and English participants were found regarding the first visit, type of orthodontic treatment, reactions from the public, and pain and problems with orthodontic treatment. Since the expectations of patients and their parents differ on several aspects, effective communication between the orthodontist, patient and parent is considered to be essential. Our hypothesis that Dutch patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment differ from the expectations of English patients and parents was supported.

  1. Parenting style, parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjeong; Walton-Moss, Benita

    2012-07-01

    Parental guidance is critical to the development of children's health-related behaviors. The purpose of this study was to look at the relationship between parenting factors, including parenting style and parenting stress, and children's health-related behaviors. In this descriptive, correlational study, 284 parents of preschool children were interviewed using the Child Rearing Questionnaire and the Korean Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Parent distress, authoritative and permissive parenting styles, family income, and mother's education were significantly associated with children's health-related behaviors. These findings suggest that higher levels of warmth, characteristics of both parenting styles, may be a critical factor in the development of health-related behaviors.

  2. Psychosocial implications of disorders of sex development treatment for parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Amy B

    2017-01-01

    Historically, studies of caregivers of children with disorders of sex development (DSD) have been limited. Recent data reveal that parents of young children with DSD report increased stress, anxiety, depression, and decreased quality of life in ways that are similar to parents of children with other types of chronic illnesses. Also similar to other chronic illnesses of childhood, parents of children with DSD exhibit overprotective parenting and perceive their child as being vulnerable. These emotions and behaviors exhibited by parents are concerning as they may limit an affected child's emotional and social development over time. Perhaps, more unique to the situation of DSD is the perceived, or real, child-focused stigma experienced by parents of children with DSD. Interventions to improve parents' psychosocial adaptation to their child's medical condition, including coaching in how to discuss their child's condition in a manner that makes them feel safe and supported, are needed to optimize outcomes for families.

  3. Reconciling parenting and smoking in the context of child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; Oliffe, John L; Kelly, Mary T; Johnson, Joy L; Chan, Anna

    2013-08-01

    In this article we explore the micro-social context of parental tobacco use in the first years of a child's life and early childhood. We conducted individual interviews with 28 mothers and fathers during the 4 years following the birth of their child. Using grounded theory methods, we identified the predominant explanatory concept in parents' accounts as the need to reconcile being a parent and smoking. Desires to become smoke-free coexisted with five types of parent-child interactions: (a) protecting the defenseless child, (b) concealing smoking and cigarettes from the mimicking child, (c) reinforcing smoking as bad with the communicative child, (d) making guilt-driven promises to the fearful child, and (e) relinquishing personal responsibility to the autonomous child. We examine the agency of the child in influencing parents' smoking practices, the importance of children's observational learning in the early years, and the reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions related to parents' smoking behavior.

  4. Parenting and juvenile delinquency

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeve, M.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile delinquency is a noteworthy problem. This thesis addressed the association between parenting and juvenile delinquency by analyzing the concepts of parenting adopted in family research in relation to criminological concepts and measures of delinquent behavior. Four studies were conducted. The first study addressed a meta-analysis on parenting characteristics and styles in relation to delinquency. In this meta-analysis, previous manuscripts were systematically analyzed, computing mean ...

  5. Personality and parenting style in parents of adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huver, R.M.E.; Otten, R.; Vries, H. de; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived

  6. Parental Involvement in Mathematics: Giving Parents a Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, S.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why parents become involved in their children's education is crucial in strengthening the relationship between parental involvement and academic achievement. The present study focuses on the parental role construction and parental self-efficacy. The resulting trends suggest that parents, regardless of their self-efficacy, may assume…

  7. Parenting Training for Intellectually Disabled Parents: A Cochrane Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coren, Esther; Thomae, Manuela; Hutchfield, Jemeela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a Cochrane/Campbell systematic review of the evidence on the effect of parent training to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities. Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disability with usual care or with a control…

  8. Parenting Styles and Conceptions of Parental Authority during Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1995-01-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 100 mostly white, middle-class, 6th, 8th, and 10th graders and their parents. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Differences were primarily over the…

  9. Parents' Perspectives on Parental Notification of College Students' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Although many colleges and universities use "parental notification" to inform parents of students' alcohol use, the impact of this intervention on student and parent behavior is unclear. Surveys were obtained from 326 parents of university undergraduates, 56 of whom had received a notification. Parent responses to the notification were…

  10. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First ...

  11. What matters most - what parents model or what parents eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Amber E; Martin, Chantel L; Ward, Dianne S

    2018-03-28

    Parents have a strong influence on their children's eating habits; however, researchers struggle to identify which food parenting practices to recommend. This study examined the influence of parents modeling of healthy eating ("parent role modeling") and parents' actual food intake ("parent dietary intake") on child diet quality, and explored whether these practices work together to influence children's diets. Baseline data from a larger intervention trial were used for this analysis. The sample included parents of preschool-age children from households with at least one overweight parent. The Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire was used to assess parent modeling of healthy eating ("healthy modeling"). Three days of dietary recalls were used to collect parents' report of their own intake and their children's intake (excluding food at child care). Associations between parent healthy modeling and parent intake of healthy and unhealthy foods were explored using Pearson correlations. Associations between parent healthy modeling and parent Healthy Eating Index (HEI) score on child HEI score were examined with linear regression. Additionally, the interaction between parent healthy modeling and HEI score on child HEI score was tested. Parent healthy modeling was significantly correlated with parent intake of healthy foodsLinear regression showed a significant association between parent modeling and child HEI score, even after controlling for parent diet (β = 3.08, SE = 0.87, p parents had high parent healthy modeling scores had higher HEI scores (mean = 61.5 ± 10.4) regardless of parent HEI score. We did not find evidence that parent healthy modeling and diet quality interact to influence child diet quality. Parents' healthy modeling is an important practice in influencing children's diet quality, possibly more so than the quality of parents' diets. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Emotional And Behavioral Problems of Single Parent Vs. Two Parent Children: Imam Khomeini Charity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hajebi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this survey is to compare the emotional and behavioral problems of children with only one parent versus those from two-parent families. We analyzed behavioral problems such as aggression, delinquency and socialization issues, as well as emotional problems such as depression, anxiety, and somatic complaints.Methods: Using a multi-stage cluster sampling, 10 of the 20 geographic regions covered by Imam Khomeini Charity were selected. Using systematic random sampling, 460 families with children aged 4-18 years were selected. All children were evaluated using the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL to determine behavioral and emotional problems. Logistic regression tests were conducted to measure the effects variables, including age, gender, number of parents in the family, psychiatric history of each child and history of parental psychiatric treatment, on the internalizing, externalizing and total CBCL scores. A cut-off score of 64 was used to convert raw scores.Results: No differences were observed in CBCL subscales between single-parent children vs. children of two-parent families.Conclusion: Regarding the two-parent families among the study population, the results could not be generalized. As these families have qualified for assistance, the father cannot manage the family because of his disability, such as physical or mental problems. This minimizes the effect of having a father in a two-parent family, rendering them similar to single-parent families. Thus, differences were not observed between the two types of families. Further studies are necessary to compare single-parent families with two-parent families among the community.

  13. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  14. The Parental Bonding Instrument: A psychometric measure to assess parenting practices in the homes in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, A K M Rezaul; Begum, Taslima

    2017-02-01

    There is growing importance of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in clinical practice and research on parenting and parental bonding. Since the development of this diagnostic tool (Parker et al., Brit. J. Med. Psycho.1979; 52:1-10), a number of validation studies have been done in various cultures. The aim of the present study was to translate the measure into Bangla and validate in Bangladeshi culture. A total of 200 adolescents participated in the study. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the data from 191 participants (who provided complete responses) identified a two-factor (Care and Overprotection) structure of the PBI with 17 items. The two factors together explained 44.18% of the total variance. The factors showed moderate to very high internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.863 for Care; 0.622 for Overprotection), and very strong convergent and discriminant validity as evident by their correlations with the measures of cognitive distortions and antisocial behaviors. In line with the original tool we defined four types of parenting style, such as Affectionate constraint, Affectionless control, Optimal parenting, and Neglectful parenting. This study opens the door of future research on parenting practices and parent-child relationships in Bangladesh. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Parental Divorce, Parental Religious Characteristics, and Religious Outcomes in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E; Ellison, Christopher G

    2012-12-01

    Parental divorce has been linked to religious outcomes in adulthood. Previous research has not adequately accounted for parental religious characteristics or subsequent family context, namely whether one's custodial parent remarries. Using pooled data from three waves of the General Social Survey, we examine the relationships among parental divorce, subsequent family structure, and religiosity in adulthood. Growing up in a single-parent family-but not a stepparent family-is positively associated with religious disaffiliation and religious switching and negatively associated with regular religious attendance. Accounting for parental religious characteristics, however, explains sizable proportions of these relationships. Accounting for parental religious affiliation and attendance, growing up with a single parent does not significantly affect religious attendance. Parental religiosity also moderates the relationship between growing up with a single parent and religious attendance: being raised in a single-parent home has a negative effect on religious attendance among adults who had two religiously involved parents.

  16. Demographic and Parenting Correlates of Adolescent Sleep Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata Roblyer, Martha I; Grzywacz, Joseph G

    2015-11-01

    Despite the importance of parenting practices for adolescent adjustment, parenting correlates of adolescent sleep functioning remain understudied. This study delineated patterns of sleep functioning in a sample of ethnically diverse, low-income, adolescents and examined associations among three types of parenting practices (parental involvement, parent-child conflict, and parental control) and adolescent sleep functioning (difficulties initiating sleep and maintaining sleep, and sleep duration). Adolescents ( N = 91, 11-19 years old) self-reported on sleep functioning and parenting practices. Results showed that in the preceding month, 60.5% of adolescents had difficulties initiating sleep and 73.6% had difficulties maintaining sleep. Most adolescents slept 8 or more hours per night, but 30.7% slept less than 8 hours. Latino adolescents slept longer and had fewer difficulties maintaining sleep than non-Latino. High school students had fewer difficulties maintaining sleep than their middle school counterparts; conversely, older adolescents experienced shorter sleep duration than younger ones. Adolescents whose parents had post-secondary education had shorter sleep duration than those whose parents had not graduated from high school. Parental control was correlated with fewer difficulties initiating sleep, whereas parent-child conflict was correlated with more difficulties maintaining sleep. There were no parenting correlates of sleep duration. Latino adolescents had better sleep profiles than non-Latino ones. Regression analyses showed that parental control and parent-child conflict were associated with adolescent sleep functioning across ethnicities. Results suggest that parenting practices, as well as demographic characteristics, are associated with adolescent sleep functioning and should be taken into account in interventions aimed at improving sleep functioning among adolescents.

  17. PARENTING AND SOCIAL ROLES IN TURKISH TRADITIONAL FAMILIES: ISSUES AND CHOICES IN PARENTING FOR TURKISH EXPATRIATE FAMILIES LIVING IN BUCHAREST

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet ECIRLI

    2012-01-01

    This article looks into the issues and challenges of parenting in Turkish families upholding traditional values that live in Bucharest, the capital of Romania. Based on theoretical mainstreams on parenting and the structure of Turkish families, a qualitative research was designed with two aims. The first was to describe the issues and choices in parenting for Turkish expatriate families living in a foreign country. The second was to find out to which of the three ideal-types of families accor...

  18. Influence of Permissive Parenting on Youth Farm Risk Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnah, Hamida A; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2016-01-01

    Farm youth continue to experience high rates of injuries and premature deaths as a result of agricultural activities. Increased parental permissiveness is positively associated with many different types of high-risk behaviors in youth. This study explored whether permissive parenting (fathering and mothering) predicts youth unsafe behaviors on the farm. Data were analyzed for 67 youth and their parents. Families were recruited from a statewide farm publication, through youth organizations (i.e., FFA [Future Farmers of America]), local newspapers, farmer referrals, and through the Cooperative Extension Network. Hierarchical multiple regression was completed. Results revealed that fathers and mothers who practiced lax-inconsistent disciplining were more likely to have youth who indulged in unsafe farm behaviors. Key hypotheses confirmed that permissive parenting (lax-inconsistent disciplining) by parents continued to predict youth unsafe farm behaviors, even after youth age, youth gender, youth personality factor of risk-taking, and father's unsafe behaviors (a measure associated with modeling) were all taken into account. A key implication is that parents may play an important role in influencing youth farm safety behaviors. Parents (especially fathers) need to devote time to discuss farm safety with their youth. Farm safety interventions need to involve parents as well as address and respect the culture and values of families. Interventions need to focus not only on safe farm practices, but also promote positive parenting practices, including increased parent-youth communication about safety, consistent disciplining strategies, and increased monitoring and modeling of safe farm behaviors by parents.

  19. Parents' Qualitative Perspectives on Child Asking for Fruit and Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alicia; O'Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Janice; Nicklas, Theresa A; Baranowski, Tom

    2017-06-05

    Children can influence the foods available at home, but some ways of approaching a parent may be better than others; and the best way may vary by type of parent. This study explored how parents with different parenting styles would best receive their 10 to 14 years old child asking for fruits and vegetables (FV). An online parenting style questionnaire was completed and follow-up qualitative telephone interviews assessed home food rules, child influence on home food availability, parents' preferences for being asked for food, and common barriers and reactions to their child's FV requests. Parents ( n = 73) with a 10 to 14 years old child were grouped into authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or uninvolved parenting style categories based on responses to questionnaires, and interviewed. Almost no differences in responses were detected by parenting style or ethnicity. Parents reported their children had a voice in what foods were purchased and available at home and were receptive to their child's asking for FV. The most important child asking characteristic was politeness, especially among authoritarian parents. Other important factors were asking in person, helping in the grocery store, writing requests on the grocery shopping list, and showing information they saw in the media. The barrier raising the most concern was FV cost, but FV quality and safety outside the home environment were also considerations.

  20. Clinician and Parent Perspectives on Parent and Family Contextual Factors that Impact Community Mental Health Services for Children with Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The present study employed qualitative methods to examine multiple stakeholder perspectives regarding the role of parent and family contextual factors on community child mental health treatment for children with behavior problems. Findings suggest agreement between clinicians and parents on the number, types and importance of parent and family…

  1. Social Support and Parental Stress among Parents of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An International Comparison of United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Parents of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience high parental stress compared to other parents, and social support has been identified in previous research as an effective buffer against stress. However, limited research has evaluated the associations between different types of social support and stress…

  2. A Review of Parent-Based Barriers to Parent-Adolescent Communication about Sex and Sexuality: Implications for Sex and Family Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacane, Mona; Beckmeyer, Jonathon J.

    2016-01-01

    Although adolescents' sexual health is generally better when parents and adolescents communicate about sex and sexuality, researchers have found parents can be reluctant to engage adolescents in conversations about those topics. To better understand why, we reviewed prior literature and identified four types of parent-based barriers to…

  3. Balancing paid work, care and leisure in post-separation households: a comparison of single-parents with co-parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.; Karsten, L.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides insight into the daily lives of separated parents involved in two types of living arrangements: single parents (mainly mothers) living with their children full-time and co-parents living with their children part-time. Earlier studies have stated that the everyday lives of

  4. Building Relationships with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullaj, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Communicating with parents may seem like one more task on top of an overwhelming workload, but creating a positive relationship with parents has many benefits for all involved. The author discusses the steps to creating these relationships and communicating with families.

  5. Handling "Helicopter Parents"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2006-01-01

    Once upon a time, parents would help their children move into dorm rooms and apartments, then wave good-bye for the semester. Not anymore. Baby boomers have arguably been more involved in their children's educations--and their lives in general--than any preceding generation of parents, university observers say. And boomers see no reason why that…

  6. Parenting, Pressures and Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Graham W.

    2000-01-01

    In the 1990s, parenting became a difficult effort to balance work demands with children's needs. However, Canadian and U.S. government policies have not met changing family needs for child care, other services, paid parental leave, and work flexibility. Canada's long-awaited National Children's Agenda has the potential to modernize family policy…

  7. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ...

  8. Parents, Peers and Pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Marsha

    This book looks at the problem of drug abuse, particularly the use of marihuana by children ages 9 to 14, and describes one strategy parents can use to prevent drug use by their children. On the premise that nonmedical drug use is not acceptable for children, parents need to provide guidance and exercise discipline with respect to drug use among…

  9. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  10. Pinterest for Parent Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Brianna; Langworthy, Sara; Jastram, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    As more parents are using the Internet to answer their questions, Extension needs to provide practical, research-based resources in an accessible format. Pinterest is a platform that can be used by Extension educators to provide continued education and make reputable resources more discoverable for parents. Based on Knowles adult learning theory…

  11. Gay and Lesbian Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Gay and Lesbian Parents Page Content Article Body I am gay. Should I worry how this will affect my children? Millions of children have one or more gay and/or lesbian parents. For some children, having ...

  12. Sexism in Parenting Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrain, John D.

    1977-01-01

    Parental roles, as delineated in many of the popular parenting manuals on the market, are reviewed and assessed. It is concluded that the vast majority of authors of child-rearing guides implicity or explicitly endorse the traditional roles of father as the dominant breadwinner and mother as the nurturant caretaker. (Author)

  13. Codependency and Parenting Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Judith L.; Crawford, Duane W.

    1992-01-01

    College students (n=175) reported the parenting style of their mother and father and completed a scale assessing their own level of codependency. Parenting style of the father (uninvolved, permissive, authoritarian, or democratic) was related to offspring codependency. Both sons and daughters of authoritarian fathers had higher levels of…

  14. Parenting: An Ecological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Tom, Ed.; Okagaki, Lynn, Ed.

    This book examines various aspects of parenting and influences on parents, including such key contexts affecting child development as school, neighborhood, and culture. After a forward by Urie Bronfenbrenner and a preface by Tom Luster and Lynn Okagaki, which together help to introduce the topics to be discussed, the book is divided into nine…

  15. Parents on education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lex Herweijer; Ria Vogels

    2004-01-01

    Original title: Ouders over opvoeding en onderwijs. The position of parents with regard to children' education has been changing in recent years: the government believes that they should have a major influence on what happens at their children's school, and also that parents and schools should

  16. Evolution and Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardwick, Judith M.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the theory and research on the physiological or genetic origins of parenting behavior, noting that an ethological or evolutionary analysis of parenting behavior supports the idea that primates, including man, have evolved psychological structures which are particularly adapted to respond to cues from young children. (Author/JM)

  17. Puntos Basicos para Padres: Apoyo Padre a Padre (Basics for Parents: Parent to Parent Support).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, Betsy

    This Spanish language information brief describes the Parent to Parent Program, which provides information and one-to-one emotional support to parents of children with special needs. The program trains experienced parents in the program and matches them with similar parents new to the program. Benefits of the program include: (1) providing parents…

  18. Actividades Para Padres: A Parent Handbook (Activities for Parents: A Parent Handbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca, Benjamin

    Thirty Mora, New Mexico parents attended a 13-session parent involvement workshop (The Mora Adventure) designed to help parents foster successful school experiences through non-school activities with their children. A parent involvement model was used as the basis of the workshop in which the parents developed more effective communication skills;…

  19. Foster Parents' Involvement in Authoritative Parenting and Interest in Future Parenting Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Kraemer, Linda K.; Bernard, Amy L.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed 191 Southwest Ohio foster parents regarding their involvement in authoritative parenting and interest for additional parenting education. Our results showed that most respondents reported using an authoritative parenting style and were interested in receiving future training. Involvement in authoritative parenting differed…

  20. Parental Cognitions, Parental Behavior, and the Child's Understanding of the Parent-Child Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekovic, Maja; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Studied the relationship of parental reasoning complexity to parental behavior during parent-child interactions, and the effect of this relationship on children's social cognitions. Results indicate that parental reasoning complexity is related to parental behaviors of restrictive control, authoritative control, and support, which, in turn, are…