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Sample records for hole universe model

  1. Black Hole Universe Model and Dark Energy

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2011-01-01

    Considering black hole as spacetime and slightly modifying the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach principle and Einsteinian general relativity and self consistently explains various observations of the universe without difficulties. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole and gradually grew through a supermassive black hole to the present universe by accreting ambient material and merging with other black holes. The entire space is infinitely and hierarchically layered and evolves iteratively. The innermost three layers are the universe that we lives, the outside space called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer has an infinite radius and zero limits for both the mass density and absolute temperature. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics, the Einstein general relativity with the Robertson-Walker metric of spacetime, and tend to expand outward physically. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside black holes. The origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published in peer-review journals. This study will show how this new model explains the acceleration of the universe and why dark energy is not required. We will also compare the black hole universe model with the big bang cosmology.

  2. A New Cosmological Model: Black Hole Universe

    Zhang T. X.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new cosmological model called black hole universe is proposed. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient mate- rials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we are living, the outside called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer is infinite in radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. The relationships among all layers or universes can be connected by the universe family tree. Mathematically, the entire space can be represented as a set of all universes. A black hole universe is a subset of the en- tire space or a subspace. The child universes are null sets or empty spaces. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics - the Einstein general theory of relativity with the Robertson-walker metric of spacetime - and tend to expand outward physically. The evolution of the space structure is iterative. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside. The entire life of a universe begins from the birth as a hot star-like or supermassive black hole, passes through the growth and cools down, and expands to the death with infinite large and zero mass density and absolute temperature. The black hole universe model is consistent with the Mach principle, the observations of the universe, and the Einstein general theory of relativity. Its various aspects can be understood with the well-developed physics without any difficulty. The dark energy is not required for the universe to accelerate its expansion. The inflation is not necessary because the black hole universe

  3. Acceleration of black hole universe

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  4. Black Hole Universe Model for Explaining GRBs, X-Ray Flares, and Quasars as Emissions of Dynamic Star-like, Massive, and Supermassive Black Holes

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-01-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach’s principle, governed by Einstein’s general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, and acceleration of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates the emissions of dynamic black holes according to the black hole universe model and provides a self-consistent explanation for the observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flares, and quasars as emissions of dynamic star-like, massive, and supermassive black holes. It is shown that a black hole, when it accretes its ambient matter or merges with other black holes, becomes dynamic. Since the event horizon of a dynamic black hole is broken, the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation leaks out. The leakage of the inside hot blackbody radiation leads to a GRB if it is a star-like black hole, an X-ray flare if it is a massive black hole like the one at the center of the Milky Way, or a quasar if it is a supermassive black hole like an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The energy spectra and amount of emissions produced by the dynamic star-like, massive, and supermassive black holes can be consistent with the measurements of GRBs, X-ray flares, and quasars.

  5. Will black holes eventually engulf the Universe?

    Martin-Moruno, Prado; Jimenez Madrid, Jose A.; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.

    2006-01-01

    The Babichev-Dokuchaev-Eroshenko model for the accretion of dark energy onto black holes has been extended to deal with black holes with non-static metrics. The possibility that for an asymptotic observer a black hole with large mass will rapidly increase and eventually engulf the Universe at a finite time in the future has been studied by using reasonable values for astronomical parameters. It is concluded that such a phenomenon is forbidden for all black holes in quintessential cosmological models

  6. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  7. Black holes in the universe

    Camenzind, M.

    2005-01-01

    While physicists have been grappling with the theory of black holes (BH), as shown by the many contributions to the Einstein year, astronomers have been successfully searching for real black holes in the Universe. Black hole astrophysics began in the 1960s with the discovery of quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGN) in distant galaxies. Already in the 1960s it became clear that the most natural explanation for the quasar activity is the release of gravitational energy through accretion of gas onto supermassive black holes. The remnants of this activity have now been found in the centers of about 50 nearby galaxies. BH astrophysics received a new twist in the 1970s with the discovery of the X-ray binary (XRB) Cygnus X-1. The X-ray emitting compact object was too massive to be explained by a neutron star. Today, about 20 excellent BH candidates are known in XRBs. On the extragalactic scale, more than 100.000 quasars have been found in large galaxy surveys. At the redshift of the most distant ones, the Universe was younger than one billion year. The most enigmatic black hole candidates identified in the last years are the compact objects behind the Gamma-Ray Bursters. The formation of all these types of black holes is accompanied by extensive emission of gravitational waves. The detection of these strong gravity events is one of the biggest challenges for physicists in the near future. (author)

  8. Black hole formation in a contracting universe

    Quintin, Jerome; Brandenberger, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a contracting universe. We aim to determine under which conditions density perturbations grow to form large inhomogeneities and collapse into black holes. Our method consists in solving the cosmological perturbation equations in complete generality for a hydrodynamical fluid. We then describe the evolution of the fluctuations over the different length scales of interest and as a function of the equation of state for the fluid, and we explore two different types of initial conditions: quantum vacuum and thermal fluctuations. We also derive a general requirement for black hole collapse on sub-Hubble scales, and we use the Press-Schechter formalism to describe the black hole formation probability. For a fluid with a small sound speed (e.g., dust), we find that both quantum and thermal initial fluctuations grow in a contracting universe, and the largest inhomogeneities that first collapse into black holes are of Hubble size and the collapse occurs well before reaching the Planck scale. For a radiation-dominated fluid, we find that no black hole can form before reaching the Planck scale. In the context of matter bounce cosmology, it thus appears that only models in which a radiation-dominated era begins early in the cosmological evolution are robust against the formation of black holes. Yet, the formation of black holes might be an interesting feature for other models. We comment on a number of possible alternative early universe scenarios that could take advantage of this feature.

  9. Black hole formation in a contracting universe

    Quintin, Jerome; Brandenberger, Robert H., E-mail: jquintin@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 Canada (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    We study the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a contracting universe. We aim to determine under which conditions density perturbations grow to form large inhomogeneities and collapse into black holes. Our method consists in solving the cosmological perturbation equations in complete generality for a hydrodynamical fluid. We then describe the evolution of the fluctuations over the different length scales of interest and as a function of the equation of state for the fluid, and we explore two different types of initial conditions: quantum vacuum and thermal fluctuations. We also derive a general requirement for black hole collapse on sub-Hubble scales, and we use the Press-Schechter formalism to describe the black hole formation probability. For a fluid with a small sound speed (e.g., dust), we find that both quantum and thermal initial fluctuations grow in a contracting universe, and the largest inhomogeneities that first collapse into black holes are of Hubble size and the collapse occurs well before reaching the Planck scale. For a radiation-dominated fluid, we find that no black hole can form before reaching the Planck scale. In the context of matter bounce cosmology, it thus appears that only models in which a radiation-dominated era begins early in the cosmological evolution are robust against the formation of black holes. Yet, the formation of black holes might be an interesting feature for other models. We comment on a number of possible alternative early universe scenarios that could take advantage of this feature.

  10. Black Holes in Our Universe

    are humanity's high-technology windows onto the universe. For reasons that will ... instrument ever built; and it was the first direct ... gravity will drive it to collapse into a black hole. Indeed, in 2007, ... Given their large X-ray power, it has been ...

  11. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe

    Table of contents. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe · What is black hole? Accretion Disk and Jet · What is black hole's spin? Accretion Disk · Black Hole's Potential · Light Curves: Photon Count Rate Vs Time · Quasi-Periodic Oscillation · Slide 9 · Model · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Summary.

  12. Cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-11-01

    Modifying slightly the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe. This new cosmological model is consistent with the Mach principle, Einsteinian general theory of relativity, and observations of the universe. The origin, structure, evolution, and expansion of the black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published recently in a scientific journal: Progress in Physics. This paper explains the observed 2.725 K cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present universe with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses. According to the black hole universe model, the observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe, which can be considered as an ideal black body. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient materials and merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. A governing equation that expresses the possible thermal history of the black hole universe is derived from the Planck law of black body radiation and radiation energy conservation. The result obtained by solving the governing equation indicates that the radiation temperature of the present universe can be ˜2.725 K if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and is therefore consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. A smaller or younger black hole universe usually cools down faster. The characteristics of the original star-like or supermassive black hole are not critical to the physical properties of the black hole universe at present, because matter and radiation are mainly from the outside space, i.e., the mother universe.

  13. Black-hole universe: time evolution.

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Okawa, Hirotada; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2013-10-18

    Time evolution of a black hole lattice toy model universe is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations in a cubic box with a black hole at the origin are numerically solved with periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of faces opposite to each other. Defining effective scale factors by using the area of a surface and the length of an edge of the cubic box, we compare them with that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. It is found that the behavior of the effective scale factors is well approximated by that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. In our model, if the box size is sufficiently larger than the horizon radius, local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the Universe even though the inhomogeneity is extremely nonlinear.

  14. Sizes of Black Holes Throughout the Universe

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-05-01

    What is the distribution of sizes of black holes in our universe? Can black holes of any mass exist, or are there gaps in their possible sizes? The shape of this black-hole mass function has been debated for decades and the dawn of gravitational-wave astronomy has only spurred further questions.Mind the GapsThe starting point for the black-hole mass function lies in the initial mass function (IMF) for stellar black holes the beginning size distribution of black holes after they are born from stars. Instead of allowing for the formation of stellar black holes of any mass, theoretical models propose two gaps in the black-hole IMF:An upper mass gap at 50130 solar masses, due to the fact that stellar progenitors of black holes in this mass range are destroyed by pair-instability supernovae.A lower mass gap below 5 solar masses, which is argued to arise naturally from the mechanics of supernova explosions.Missing black-hole (BH) formation channels due to the existence of the lower gap (LG) and the upper gap (UG) in the initial mass function. a) The number of BHs at all scales are lowered because no BH can merge with BHs in the LG to form a larger BH. b) The missing channel responsible for the break at 10 solar masses, resulting from the LG. c) The missing channel responsible for the break at 60 solar masses, due to the interaction between the LG and the UG. [Christian et al. 2018]We can estimate the IMF for black holes by scaling a typical IMF for stars and then adding in these theorized gaps. But is this initial distribution of black-hole masses the same as the distribution that we observe in the universe today?The Influence of MergersBased on recent events, the answer appears to be no! Since the first detections of gravitational waves in September 2015, we now know that black holes can merge to form bigger black holes. An initial distribution of black-hole masses must therefore evolve over time, as mergers cause the depletion of low-mass black holes and an increase in

  15. Universality of black hole quantum computing

    Dvali, Gia [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Gomez, Cesar [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC; Luest, Dieter [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Omar, Yasser [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico; Richter, Benedikt [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico

    2017-01-15

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy efficiency. Furthermore, we establish a fundamental bound on the complexity of quantum circuits encoded on these systems, and characterize the unitary operations that are implementable. It becomes apparent that the computational power is very limited due to the fact that the black hole life-time is of the same order of the gate operation time. As a consequence, it is impossible to retrieve its information, within the life-time of a black hole, by externally coupling to the black hole qubits. However, we show that, in principle, coupling to some of the internal degrees of freedom allows acquiring knowledge about the micro-state. Still, due to the trivial complexity of operations that can be performed, there is no time advantage over the collection of Hawking radiation and subsequent decoding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Quasar Formation and Energy Emission in Black Hole Universe

    Zhang T. X.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Formation and energy emission of quasars are investigated in accord with the black hole universe, a new cosmological model recently developed by Zhang. According to this new cosmological model, the universe originated from a star-like black hole and grew through a supermassive black hole to the present universe by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. The origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe have been fully ex- plained in Paper I and II. This study as Paper III explains how a quasar forms, ignites and releases energy as an amount of that emitted by dozens of galaxies. A main sequence star, after its fuel supply runs out, will, in terms of its mass, form a dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole. A normal galaxy, after its most stars have run out of their fuels and formed dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes, will eventually shrink its size and collapse towards the center by gravity to form a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses. This collapse leads to that extremely hot stellar black holes merge each other and further into the massive black hole at the center and meantime release a huge amount of radiation energy that can be as great as that of a quasar. Therefore, when the stellar black holes of a galaxy collapse and merge into a supermassive black hole, the galaxy is activated and a quasar is born. In the black hole universe, the observed dis- tant quasars powered by supermassive black holes can be understood as donuts from the mother universe. They were actually formed in the mother universe and then swallowed into our universe. The nearby galaxies are still very young and thus quiet at the present time. They will be activated and further evolve into quasars after billions of years. At that time, they will enter the universe formed by the currently observed distant quasars as similar to the distant quasars entered our universe

  17. Scalar-Tensor Black Holes Embedded in an Expanding Universe

    Tretyakova, Daria; Latosh, Boris

    2018-02-01

    In this review we focus our attention on scalar-tensor gravity models and their empirical verification in terms of black hole and wormhole physics. We focus on a black hole, embedded in an expanding universe, describing both cosmological and astrophysical scales. We show that in scalar-tensor gravity it is quite common that the local geometry is isolated from the cosmological expansion, so that it does not backreact on the black hole metric. We try to extract common features of scalar-tensor black holes in an expanding universe and point out the gaps that must be filled.

  18. Scalar-Tensor Black Holes Embedded in an Expanding Universe

    Daria Tretyakova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus our attention on scalar-tensor gravity models and their empirical verification in terms of black hole and wormhole physics. We focus on black holes, embedded in an expanding universe, describing both cosmological and astrophysical scales. We show that in scalar-tensor gravity it is quite common that the local geometry is isolated from the cosmological expansion, so that it does not backreact on the black hole metric. We try to extract common features of scalar-tensor black holes in an expanding universe and point out the issues that are not fully investigated.

  19. Modeling black hole evaporation

    Fabbri, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this book is two-fold: the first part gives a fully detailed and pedagogical presentation of the Hawking effect and its physical implications, and the second discusses the backreaction problem, especially in connection with exactly solvable semiclassical models that describe analytically the black hole evaporation process. The book aims to establish a link between the general relativistic viewpoint on black hole evaporation and the new CFT-type approaches to the subject. The detailed discussion on backreaction effects is also extremely valuable.

  20. Black hole entropy, universality, and horizon constraints

    Carlip, Steven

    2006-01-01

    To ask a question about a black hole in quantum gravity, one must restrict initial or boundary data to ensure that a black hole is actually present. For two-dimensional dilaton gravity, and probably a much wider class of theories, I show that the imposition of a 'stretched horizon' constraint modifies the algebra of symmetries at the horizon, allowing the use of conformal field theory techniques to determine the asymptotic density of states. The result reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy without any need for detailed assumptions about the microscopic theory. Horizon symmetries may thus offer an answer to the problem of universality of black hole entropy

  1. Black hole entropy, universality, and horizon constraints

    Carlip, Steven [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-03-01

    To ask a question about a black hole in quantum gravity, one must restrict initial or boundary data to ensure that a black hole is actually present. For two-dimensional dilaton gravity, and probably a much wider class of theories, I show that the imposition of a 'stretched horizon' constraint modifies the algebra of symmetries at the horizon, allowing the use of conformal field theory techniques to determine the asymptotic density of states. The result reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy without any need for detailed assumptions about the microscopic theory. Horizon symmetries may thus offer an answer to the problem of universality of black hole entropy.

  2. Black holes in an expanding universe.

    Gibbons, Gary W; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2010-04-02

    An exact solution representing black holes in an expanding universe is found. The black holes are maximally charged and the universe is expanding with arbitrary equation of state (P = w rho with -1 < or = for all w < or = 1). It is an exact solution of the Einstein-scalar-Maxwell system, in which we have two Maxwell-type U(1) fields coupled to the scalar field. The potential of the scalar field is an exponential. We find a regular horizon, which depends on one parameter [the ratio of the energy density of U(1) fields to that of the scalar field]. The horizon is static because of the balance on the horizon between gravitational attractive force and U(1) repulsive force acting on the scalar field. We also calculate the black hole temperature.

  3. Fate of Yang-Mills black hole in early Universe

    Nakonieczny, Lukasz; Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics Maria Curie-Sklodowska University 20-031 Lublin, pl. Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej 1 (Poland)

    2013-02-21

    According to the Big Bang Theory as we go back in time the Universe becomes progressively hotter and denser. This leads us to believe that the early Universe was filled with hot plasma of elementary particles. Among many questions concerning this phase of history of the Universe there are questions of existence and fate of magnetic monopoles and primordial black holes. Static solution of Einstein-Yang-Mills system may be used as a toy model for such a black hole. Using methods of field theory we will show that its existence and regularity depend crucially on the presence of fermions around it.

  4. Thermodynamical universality of the Lovelock black holes

    Dadhich, Naresh; Pons, Josep M.; Prabhu, Kartik

    2011-01-01

    The necessary and sufficient condition for the thermodynamical universality of the static spherically symmetric Lovelock black hole is that it is the pure Lovelock {\\Lambda}-vacuum solution. By universality we mean the thermodynamical parameters: temperature and entropy always bear the same relationship to the horizon radius irrespective of the Lovelock order and the spacetime dimension. For instance, the entropy always goes in terms of the horizon radius as rh and r^2 respectively for h odd ...

  5. Black holes in the early Universe.

    Volonteri, Marta; Bellovary, Jillian

    2012-12-01

    The existence of massive black holes (MBHs) was postulated in the 1960s, when the first quasars were discovered. In the late 1990s their reality was proven beyond doubt in the Milky way and a handful nearby galaxies. Since then, enormous theoretical and observational efforts have been made to understand the astrophysics of MBHs. We have discovered that some of the most massive black holes known, weighing billions of solar masses, powered luminous quasars within the first billion years of the Universe. The first MBHs must therefore have formed around the time the first stars and galaxies formed. Dynamical evidence also indicates that black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses ordinarily dwell in the centers of today's galaxies. MBHs populate galaxy centers today, and shone as quasars in the past; the quiescent black holes that we detect now in nearby bulges are the dormant remnants of this fiery past. In this review we report on basic, but critical, questions regarding the cosmological significance of MBHs. What physical mechanisms led to the formation of the first MBHs? How massive were the initial MBH seeds? When and where did they form? How is the growth of black holes linked to that of their host galaxy? The answers to most of these questions are works in progress, in the spirit of these reports on progress in physics.

  6. Black holes in the early Universe

    Volonteri, Marta; Bellovary, Jillian

    2012-01-01

    The existence of massive black holes (MBHs) was postulated in the 1960s, when the first quasars were discovered. In the late 1990s their reality was proven beyond doubt in the Milky way and a handful nearby galaxies. Since then, enormous theoretical and observational efforts have been made to understand the astrophysics of MBHs. We have discovered that some of the most massive black holes known, weighing billions of solar masses, powered luminous quasars within the first billion years of the Universe. The first MBHs must therefore have formed around the time the first stars and galaxies formed. Dynamical evidence also indicates that black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses ordinarily dwell in the centers of today's galaxies. MBHs populate galaxy centers today, and shone as quasars in the past; the quiescent black holes that we detect now in nearby bulges are the dormant remnants of this fiery past. In this review we report on basic, but critical, questions regarding the cosmological significance of MBHs. What physical mechanisms led to the formation of the first MBHs? How massive were the initial MBH seeds? When and where did they form? How is the growth of black holes linked to that of their host galaxy? The answers to most of these questions are works in progress, in the spirit of these reports on progress in physics. (review article)

  7. Can superconducting cosmic strings piercing seed black holes generate supermassive black holes in the early universe?

    Lake, Matthew J. [The Institute for Fundamental Study, ' ' The Tah Poe Academia Institute' ' , Naresuan University, Phitsanulok (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Ministry of Education, Bangkok (Thailand); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Department of Mathematics, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes (SMBH) at redshifts z > 6, when the Universe was only 900 million years old, raises the question of how such massive compact objects could form in a cosmologically short time interval. Each of the standard scenarios proposed, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short-time formation of supermassive objects. In this work we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of SMBH in the early Universe, in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings piercing small seed black holes is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. As a toy model, the accretion rate of a seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings carrying constant current is considered. Using an effective action approach, which phenomenologically incorporates a large class of superconducting string models, we estimate the minimum current required to form SMBH with masses of order M = 2 x 10{sup 9} M {sub CircleDot} by z = 7.085. This corresponds to the mass of the central black hole powering the quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 and is taken as a test case scenario for early-epoch SMBH formation. For GUT scale strings, the required fractional increase in the string energy density, due to the presence of the current, is of order 10{sup -7}, so that their existence remains consistent with current observational bounds on the string tension. In addition, we consider an ''exotic'' scenario, in which an SMBH is generated when a small seed black hole is pierced by a higher-dimensional F-string, predicted by string theory. We find that both topological defect strings and fundamental strings are able to carry currents large enough to generate early-epoch SMBH via our proposed mechanism. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Phantom energy accretion onto black holes in a cyclic universe

    Sun Chengyi

    2008-01-01

    Black holes pose a serious problem in cyclic or oscillating cosmology. It is speculated that, in the cyclic universe with phantom turnarounds, black holes will be torn apart by phantom energy prior to turnaround before they can create any problems. In this paper, using the mechanism of phantom accretion onto black holes, we find that black holes do not disappear before phantom turnaround. But the remanent black holes will not cause any problems due to Hawking evaporation.

  9. Black holes - a way out of the universe

    Hartvigsen, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Following a general discussion of the phenomenon of gravitational collapse and the formation of dwarf stars, neutron stars and black holes, the characteristics of black holes are discussed in more detail. The nature of a black hole in the space-time continuum of the general relativity theory is described and the 'Einstein-Rosen bridge', or 'snake-pit', is presented. The concept that matter drawn into a black hole in our universe may be emitted from a 'white hole' on the 'other side' is also presented. Evidence for the existence of black holes in the universe is discussed and the X-ray source in Cygnus X-1 is cited as a possible example. Finally the interesting possibility is mentioned that our universe itself may be a black hole, having its origin in a white hole, which mathematically could represent the 'big bang' theory. (JIW)

  10. Black holes - a way out of the universe

    Hartvigsen, Y [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Institutt for Teoretisk Fysikk

    1975-01-01

    Following a general discussion of the phenomenon of gravitational collapse and the formation of dwarf stars, neutron stars and black holes, the characteristics of black holes are discussed in more detail. The nature of a black hole in the space-time continuum of the general relativity theory is described and the 'Einstein-Rosen bridge', or 'snake-pit', is presented. The concept that matter drawn into a black hole in our universe may be emitted from a 'white hole' on the 'other side' is also presented. Evidence for the existence of black holes in the universe is discussed and the X-ray source in Cygnus X-1 is cited as a possible example. Finally the interesting possibility is mentioned that our universe itself may be a black hole, having its origin in a white hole, which mathematically could represent the 'big bang' theory.

  11. Supermassive black holes in the distant universe

    2004-01-01

    This book provides a unique overview of recent developments in studies of AGN and the evolution of supermassive black holes, with particular emphasis on the revolutionary results from the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories Each chapter is a comprehensive analysis and review by an expert in the field that should provide easy access to the subject The chapters progressively follow a single theme---the mapping of the accretion history of the universe---from both theoretical and observational points of view The chapters are written at a level that should be accessible to graduate students and non-specialists, yet the depth and innovation of the analyses will also make it highly informative to the specialist The topical nature of the subject matter means that the material presented in this book is not well covered in the present literature Moreover, the depth and interconnectedness of the chapters ensures that the coverage is much more comprehensive and informative than a conference proceeding would be The...

  12. Black holes and structure in an oscillating universe

    Saslaw, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    If black holes exist in the contracting phase of a closed universe, they will give rise to a pressure and entropy catastrophe. First, the black holes absorb all the radiation; then their apparent horizons merge, and coalesce with the cosmological apparent horizon. All external observers become internal observers. It is possible that the internal metric of some of the merging black holes will be contracting, and others expanding. I suggest here that the resulting violent inhomogeneities can lead to a re-expansion in a significant portion of the universe. Global re-expansion, prompted by the merging of black holes, may thus begin in a semi-classical rather than fully quantum gravitational era, at densities greater than those at which nucleosynthesis occurs. Surviving black holes and inhomogeneities could initiate the formation of structures such as galaxies in the 'new' universe. The behaviour of such an oscillating universe would differ in detail from cycle to cycle. (author)

  13. Primordial Black Holes from Supersymmetry in the Early Universe.

    Cotner, Eric; Kusenko, Alexander

    2017-07-21

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model generically predict that in the early Universe a scalar condensate can form and fragment into Q balls before decaying. If the Q balls dominate the energy density for some period of time, the relatively large fluctuations in their number density can lead to formation of primordial black holes (PBH). Other scalar fields, unrelated to supersymmetry, can play a similar role. For a general charged scalar field, this robust mechanism can generate black holes over the entire mass range allowed by observational constraints, with a sufficient abundance to account for all dark matter in some parameter ranges. In the case of supersymmetry the mass range is limited from above by 10^{23}  g. We also comment on the role that topological defects can play for PBH formation in a similar fashion.

  14. Black Holes, the Brightest Objects in the Universe

    McKinney, Jonathan (Stanford University)

    2009-04-28

    Black holes are everywhere in the Universe. They form when massive stars end their life in a simultaneous violent collapse and energetic explosion. Galaxies end up littered with small black holes, each roughly the mass of ten Suns. Nearly every galaxy center ends up with a single huge black hole, with the mass of a million to a billion Suns. During their lifetimes, black holes chew up their surroundings and spew out ultra-energetic beams of radiation and matter that are visible from across the Universe. In this lecture, I will discuss how black holes form, outline how we detect them, and show movies that illustrate how they work according to Einstein and state-of-the-art computer simulations. We will see that these blackest of all objects in the Universe actually shine the brightest.

  15. Black holes in a cubic Galileon universe

    Babichev, E.; Charmousis, C.; Lehébel, A.; Moskalets, T., E-mail: eugeny.babichev@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: christos.charmousis@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: antoine.lehebel@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: tetiana.moskalets@th.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-09-01

    We find and study the properties of black hole solutions for a subclass of Horndeski theory including the cubic Galileon term. The theory under study has shift symmetry but not reflection symmetry for the scalar field. The Galileon is assumed to have linear time dependence characterized by a velocity parameter. We give analytic 3-dimensional solutions that are akin to the BTZ solutions but with a non-trivial scalar field that modifies the effective cosmological constant. We then study the 4-dimensional asymptotically flat and de Sitter solutions. The latter present three different branches according to their effective cosmological constant. For two of these branches, we find families of black hole solutions, parametrized by the velocity of the scalar field. These spherically symmetric solutions, obtained numerically, are different from GR solutions close to the black hole event horizon, while they have the same de-Sitter asymptotic behavior. The velocity parameter represents black hole primary hair.

  16. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe. Department of Physics Indian Institute of Science Bangalore. Notes: 74th Annual Meeting of Indian Academy of Science.

  17. Dynamical 3-Space: Black Holes in an Expanding Universe

    Rothall D. P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Black holes are usually studied without including effects of the expanding universe. However in some recent studies black holes have been embedded in an expanding universe, in order to determine the interplay, if any, of these two dynamical processes. Dynamical 3-space theory contains time independent solutions for black holes, which are spatial in-flows, and separately the time dependent Hubble expansion. This theory has explained numerous puzzles in observational astrophysics and contains 3 constants; G, - which from experimental data turns out to be the fine structure constant, and - which is a small but nonzero distance, possibly a Planck-type length. The Hubble expansion in the dynamical 3-space theory cannot be “switched o”, forcing the study, first, of isolated black holes coexisting with the expanding universe. It is shown that a time dependent black hole and expanding universe solution exists. The nature and implications of these solutions are discussed as they evolve over time. A dynamical network of black holes and induced linking cosmic filaments forming bubble structures is discussed, as a consequence of dynamical 3-space undergoing a dynamical breakdown of homogeneity and isotropy, even in the absence of baryonic matter.

  18. Were all white holes in the early Universe converted into black holes?

    Dey, T.K.; Banerji, S.

    1991-01-01

    It has been claimed that in the early Universe any white hole must have been converted to a black hole. But taking the simple case of an expanding homogeneous dust sphere colliding with a homogeneous spherical shell of dust which are mutually noninteracting, we find that the mean motion of the combined system will be expanding or contracting to a distant observer according as the combined radius at the instant of collision is less than or greater than the Schwarzschild radius

  19. Black holes, information, and the universal coefficient theorem

    Patrascu, Andrei T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    General relativity is based on the diffeomorphism covariant formulation of the laws of physics while quantum mechanics is based on the principle of unitary evolution. In this article, I provide a possible answer to the black hole information paradox by means of homological algebra and pairings generated by the universal coefficient theorem. The unitarity of processes involving black holes is restored by the demanding invariance of the laws of physics to the change of coefficient structures in cohomology.

  20. Exploring the invisible universe from black holes to superstrings

    Baaquie, Belal E

    2015-01-01

    "Why"? Why is the world, the Universe the way it is? Is space infinitely large? How small is small? What happens when one continues to divide matter into ever smaller pieces? Indeed, what is matter? Is there anything else besides what can be seen? Pursuing the questions employing the leading notions of physics, one soon finds that the tangible and visible world dissolves — rather unexpectedly — into invisible things and domains that are beyond direct perception. A remarkable feature of our Universe is that most of its constituents turn out to be invisible, and this fact is brought out with great force by this book. Exploring the Invisible Universe covers the gamut of topics in advanced modern physics and provides extensive and well substantiated answers to these questions and many more. Discussed in a non-technical, yet also non-trivial manner, are topics dominated by invisible things — such as Black Holes and Superstrings as well as Fields, Gravitation, the Standard Model, Cosmology, Relativity, the O...

  1. Physics of Rotating and Expanding Black Hole Universe

    Seshavatharam U. V. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its journey universe follows strong gravity. By unifying general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics a simple derivation is given for rotating black hole's temperature. It is shown that when the rotation speed approaches light speed temperature approaches Hawking's black hole temperature. Applying this idea to the cosmic black hole it is noticed that there is "no cosmic temperature" if there is "no cosmic rotation". Starting from the Planck scale it is assumed that universe is a rotating and expanding black hole. Another key assumption is that at any time cosmic black hole rotates with light speed. For this cosmic sphere as a whole while in light speed rotation "rate of decrease" in temperature or "rate of increase" in cosmic red shift is a measure of "rate of cosmic expansion". Since 1992, measured CMBR data indicates that, present CMB is same in all directions equal to $2.726^circ$ K, smooth to 1 part in 100,000 and there is no continuous decrease! This directly indicates that, at present rate of decrease in temperature is practically zero and rate of expansion is practically zero. Universe is isotropic and hence static and is rotating as a rigid sphere with light speed. At present galaxies are revolving with speeds proportional to their distances from the cosmic axis of rotation. If present CMBR temperature is $2.726^circ$ K, present value of obtained angular velocity is $2.17 imes 10^{-18}$ rad/sec $cong$ 67 Km/sec$imes$Mpc. Present cosmic mass density and cosmic time are fitted with a $ln (volume ratio$ parameter. Finally it can be suggested that dark matter and dark energy are ad-hoc and misleading concepts.

  2. String model of black hole microstates

    Larsen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of black holes arbitrarily far from extremality is modeled by a gas of weakly interacting strings. As an effective low-energy description of black holes the string model provides several highly nontrivial consistency checks and predictions. Speculations on a fundamental origin of the model suggest surprising simplifications in nonperturbative string theory, even in the absence of supersymmetry. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Holographic shell model: Stack data structure inside black holes?

    Davidson, Aharon

    2014-03-01

    Rather than tiling the black hole horizon by Planck area patches, we suggest that bits of information inhabit, universally and holographically, the entire black core interior, a bit per a light sheet unit interval of order Planck area difference. The number of distinguishable (tagged by a binary code) configurations, counted within the context of a discrete holographic shell model, is given by the Catalan series. The area entropy formula is recovered, including Cardy's universal logarithmic correction, and the equipartition of mass per degree of freedom is proven. The black hole information storage resembles, in the count procedure, the so-called stack data structure.

  4. Black holes in an expanding universe and supersymmetry

    Dietmar Klemm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the supersymmetric solutions to five and six-dimensional minimal (ungauged supergravities for which the bilinear Killing vector constructed from the Killing spinor is null. We focus on the spacetimes which admit an additional SO(1,1 boost symmetry. Upon the toroidal dimensional reduction along the Killing vector corresponding to the boost, we show that the solution in the ungauged case describes a charged, nonextremal black hole in a Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker (FLRW universe with an expansion driven by a massless scalar field. For the gauged case, the solution corresponds to a charged, nonextremal black hole embedded conformally into a Kantowski–Sachs universe. It turns out that these dimensional reductions break supersymmetry since the bilinear Killing vector and the Killing vector corresponding to the boost fail to commute. This represents a new mechanism of supersymmetry breaking that has not been considered in the literature before.

  5. FRW cosmological model inside an isolated Schwarzschild black hole

    Ortiz, C.; Rosales, J. J.; Socorro, J.; Tkach, V. I.

    2004-01-01

    Using the canonical quantum theory of spherically symmetric pure gravitational systems, we present a direct correspondence between the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model in the interior of a Schwarzschild black hole and the nth energy eigenstate of a linear harmonic oscillator. Such type of universe has a quantized mass of the order of the Planck mass and harmonic oscillator wave functions

  6. Can a primordial black hole or wormhole grow as fast as the universe?

    Carr, B J; Harada, Tomohiro; Maeda, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of whether there are physically realistic self-similar solutions in which a primordial black hole is attached to an exact or asymptotically Friedmann model for an equation of state of the form p = (γ - 1)ρc 2 . In the positive-pressure case (1 < γ < 2), there is no solution in which the black hole is attached to an exact Friedmann background via a sonic point. However, there is a one-parameter family of black hole solutions which are everywhere supersonic and asymptotically quasi-Friedmann, in the sense that they contain a solid angle deficit at large distances. Such solutions exist providing the ratio of the black hole size to the cosmological horizon size is above some critical value and they include 'universal' black holes with an apparent horizon but no event horizon. In the stiff case (γ = 2), there is no self-similar solution in an exact background unless the matter turns into null dust before entering the event horizon; otherwise the only black hole solutions are probably asymptotically quasi-Friedmann universal ones. For a dark-energy-dominated universe (0 < γ < 2/3), there is a one-parameter family of black hole solutions which are properly asymptotically Friedmann (i.e. with no angle deficit) and the ratio of the black hole size to the cosmological horizon size is below some critical value. Above this value, one finds a self-similar cosmological wormhole solution which connects two asymptotic regions: one exactly Friedmann and the other asymptotically quasi-Friedmann. We also consider the possibility of self-similar black hole solutions in a universe dominated by a scalar field. This is like the stiff fluid case if the field is massless, but the situation is less clear if the scalar field is rolling down a potential and therefore massive, as in the quintessence scenario. Although no explicit asymptotically Friedmann black hole solutions of this kind are known, they may exist if the black hole is not too large. (brief

  7. Can a primordial black hole or wormhole grow as fast as the universe?

    Carr, B J [Astronomy Unit, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Harada, Tomohiro [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Maeda, Hideki, E-mail: B.J.Carr@qmul.ac.u, E-mail: harada@rikkyo.ac.j, E-mail: hideki@cecs.c [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile)

    2010-09-21

    This review addresses the issue of whether there are physically realistic self-similar solutions in which a primordial black hole is attached to an exact or asymptotically Friedmann model for an equation of state of the form p = ({gamma} - 1){rho}c{sup 2}. In the positive-pressure case (1 < {gamma} < 2), there is no solution in which the black hole is attached to an exact Friedmann background via a sonic point. However, there is a one-parameter family of black hole solutions which are everywhere supersonic and asymptotically quasi-Friedmann, in the sense that they contain a solid angle deficit at large distances. Such solutions exist providing the ratio of the black hole size to the cosmological horizon size is above some critical value and they include 'universal' black holes with an apparent horizon but no event horizon. In the stiff case ({gamma} = 2), there is no self-similar solution in an exact background unless the matter turns into null dust before entering the event horizon; otherwise the only black hole solutions are probably asymptotically quasi-Friedmann universal ones. For a dark-energy-dominated universe (0 < {gamma} < 2/3), there is a one-parameter family of black hole solutions which are properly asymptotically Friedmann (i.e. with no angle deficit) and the ratio of the black hole size to the cosmological horizon size is below some critical value. Above this value, one finds a self-similar cosmological wormhole solution which connects two asymptotic regions: one exactly Friedmann and the other asymptotically quasi-Friedmann. We also consider the possibility of self-similar black hole solutions in a universe dominated by a scalar field. This is like the stiff fluid case if the field is massless, but the situation is less clear if the scalar field is rolling down a potential and therefore massive, as in the quintessence scenario. Although no explicit asymptotically Friedmann black hole solutions of this kind are known, they may exist if the

  8. Backreaction and continuum limit in a closed universe filled with black holes

    Korzyński, Mikołaj

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the continuum limit of the initial data for a vacuum, closed cosmological model with black holes as the only sources of the gravitational field. The model we consider is an exact solution of the constraint equations and represents a vacuum universe with a number of black holes placed on a spatial slice of S 3 topology considered at the moment of its largest expansion when the black holes are momentary at rest. We explain how and under what conditions the Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker (FLRW) metric arises as the continuum limit when the number of black holes contained in the model goes to infinity. We also discuss the relation between the effective cosmological parameters of the model, inferred from the large scale geometry of the spacetime, and the masses of individual black holes. In particular, we prove an estimate for the difference between the total effective mass of the system and the sum of the masses of all black holes, thus quantifying the effects of the inhomogeneities in the matter distribution or the cosmological backreaction. (paper)

  9. Physics of Rotating and Expanding Black Hole Universe

    Seshavatharam U. V. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its journey universe follows strong gravity. By unifying general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics a simple derivation is given for rotating black hole’s temperature. It is shown that when the rotation speed approaches light speed temperature approaches Hawking’s black hole temperature. Applying this idea to the cosmic black hole it is noticed that there is “no cosmic temperature” if there is “no cosmic rotation”. Starting from the Planck scale it is assumed that- universe is a rotating and expanding black hole. Another key assumption is that at any time cosmic black hole rotates with light speed. For this cosmic sphere as a whole while in light speed rotation “rate of decrease” in temperature or “rate of increase” in cosmic red shift is a measure of “rate of cosmic expansion”. Since 1992, measured CMBR data indicates that, present CMB is same in all directions equal to 2 : 726 K ; smooth to 1 part in 100,000 and there is no continuous decrease! This directly indicates that, at present rate of decrease in temperature is practically zero and rate of expansion is practically zero. Universe is isotropic and hence static and is rotating as a rigid sphere with light speed. At present galaxies are revolving with speeds proportional to their distances from the cosmic axis of rotation. If present CMBR temperature is 2 : 726 K, present value of obtained angular velocity is 2 : 17 10 Present cosmic mass density and cosmic time are fitted with a ln ( volume ratio parameter. Finally it can be suggested that dark matter and dark energy are ad-hoc and misleading concepts.

  10. UNIVERSE IN A BLACK HOLE IN EINSTEIN–CARTAN GRAVITY

    Popławski, Nikodem, E-mail: NPoplawski@newhaven.edu [Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of New Haven, 300 Boston Post Road, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The conservation law for the angular momentum in curved spacetime, consistent with relativistic quantum mechanics, requires that the antisymmetric part of the affine connection (torsion tensor) is a variable in the principle of least action. The coupling between the spin of elementary particles and torsion in the Einstein–Cartan theory of gravity generates gravitational repulsion at extremely high densities in fermionic matter, approximated as a spin fluid, and thus avoids the formation of singularities in black holes. The collapsing matter in a black hole should therefore bounce at a finite density and then expand into a new region of space on the other side of the event horizon, which may be regarded as a nonsingular, closed universe. We show that quantum particle production caused by an extremely high curvature near a bounce can create enormous amounts of matter, produce entropy, and generate a finite period of exponential expansion (inflation) of this universe. This scenario can thus explain inflation without a scalar field and reheating. We show that, depending on the particle production rate, such a universe may undergo several nonsingular bounces until it has enough matter to reach a size at which the cosmological constant starts cosmic acceleration. The last bounce can be regarded as the big bang of this universe.

  11. Universe in a Black Hole in Einstein-Cartan Gravity

    Popławski, Nikodem

    2016-12-01

    The conservation law for the angular momentum in curved spacetime, consistent with relativistic quantum mechanics, requires that the antisymmetric part of the affine connection (torsion tensor) is a variable in the principle of least action. The coupling between the spin of elementary particles and torsion in the Einstein-Cartan theory of gravity generates gravitational repulsion at extremely high densities in fermionic matter, approximated as a spin fluid, and thus avoids the formation of singularities in black holes. The collapsing matter in a black hole should therefore bounce at a finite density and then expand into a new region of space on the other side of the event horizon, which may be regarded as a nonsingular, closed universe. We show that quantum particle production caused by an extremely high curvature near a bounce can create enormous amounts of matter, produce entropy, and generate a finite period of exponential expansion (inflation) of this universe. This scenario can thus explain inflation without a scalar field and reheating. We show that, depending on the particle production rate, such a universe may undergo several nonsingular bounces until it has enough matter to reach a size at which the cosmological constant starts cosmic acceleration. The last bounce can be regarded as the big bang of this universe.

  12. Black hole entropy and the problem of universality

    Carlip, Steven

    2007-01-01

    A key test of any quantum theory of gravity is its ability to reproduce the known thermodynamic properties of black holes. A statistical mechanical description of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy once seemed remote, but today we suffer an embarrassment of riches: many different approaches to quantum gravity yield the same entropy, despite counting very different states. This 'universality' suggests that some underlying feature of the classical theory may control the quantum density of states. I discuss the possibility that this feature is an approximate two-dimensional conformal symmetry near the horizon

  13. Black hole entropy and the problem of universality

    Carlip, Steven [Physics Department, 1 Shields Ave., University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    A key test of any quantum theory of gravity is its ability to reproduce the known thermodynamic properties of black holes. A statistical mechanical description of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy once seemed remote, but today we suffer an embarrassment of riches: many different approaches to quantum gravity yield the same entropy, despite counting very different states. This 'universality' suggests that some underlying feature of the classical theory may control the quantum density of states. I discuss the possibility that this feature is an approximate two-dimensional conformal symmetry near the horizon.

  14. Retrograde versus Prograde Models of Accreting Black Holes

    David Garofalo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus that magnetic fields, accretion disks, and rotating black holes are instrumental in the generation of the most powerful sources of energy in the known universe. Nonetheless, because magnetized accretion onto rotating black holes involves both the complications of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics that currently cannot fully be treated numerically, and uncertainties about the origin of magnetic fields that at present are part of the input, the space of possible solutions remains less constrained. Consequently, the literature still bears witness to the proliferation of rather different black hole engine models. But the accumulated wealth of observational data is now sufficient to meaningfully distinguish between them. It is in this light that this critical paper compares the recent retrograde framework with standard “spin paradigm” prograde models.

  15. Superspace WZW models and black holes

    Rocek, M.

    1991-10-01

    We show how to write an off-shell action for the SU(2) x U(1) supersymmetric WZW model in terms of N = 2 chiral and twisted chiral multiplets. We discuss the N = 4 supersymmetry of this model and exhibit the N = 4 superconformal current algebra. Finally, we show that the off-shell formulation makes it possible to perform a duality transformation, which leads to a supersymmetric sigma model on a manifold with a black hole type singularity. 23 refs

  16. On Geometric Variational Models for Inpainting Surface Holes (PREPRINT)

    2006-01-01

    email: haro@ima.umn.edu Phone: (612) 626-1501 Fax: (612) 626-7370 Affiliations: 1 Dept. de Tecnologia , University of Pompeu-Fabra, Passeig de...regions where the 3D model is incomplete. The main cause of holes are occlusions, but these can also be due to low reflectance, constraints in the...major areas where range scanners are used. With the increasing popularity of range scanners as 3D shape acquisition devices, with applications in

  17. Fatal youth of the Universe: black hole threat for the electroweak vacuum during preheating

    Gorbunov, Dmitry; Levkov, Dmitry; Panin, Alexander, E-mail: gorby@ms2.inr.ac.ru, E-mail: levkov@ms2.inr.ac.ru, E-mail: panin@ms2.inr.ac.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-01

    Small evaporating black holes were proposed to be dangerous inducing fast decay of the electroweak false vacuum. We observe that the flat-spectrum matter perturbations growing at the post-inflationary matter dominated stage can produce such black holes in a tiny amount which may nevertheless be sufficient to destroy the vacuum in the visible part of the Universe via the induced process. If the decay probability in the vicinity of Planck-mass black holes was of order one as suggested in literature, the absence of such objects in the early Universe would put severe constraints on inflation and subsequent stages thus excluding many well-motivated models (e.g. the R {sup 2}-inflation) and supporting the need of new physics in the Higgs sector. We give a qualitative argument, however, that exponential suppression of the probability should persist in the limit of small black hole masses. This suppression relaxes our cosmological constraints, and, if sufficiently strong, may cancel them.

  18. Coalescing black hole solution in the De-Sitter universe

    Ahmed, Mainuddin

    2005-01-01

    A new coalescing black hole solution of Einstein-Maxwell equation in general relativity is given. The new solution is also found to support the 'Nerst Theorem' of thermodynamics in the case of black hole. Thus this solution poses to solve an outstanding problem of thermodynamics and black hole physics. (author)

  19. Black holes in the Universe: Generalized Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solutions

    Gao Changjun; Chen Xuelei; Shen Yougen; Faraoni, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    We present new exact solutions which presumably describe black holes in the background of a spatially flat, pressureless dark-matter- or dark matter plus dark energy (DM+DE)- or quintom-dominated Universe. These solutions generalize Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metrics. For a dark-matter- or (DM+DE)-dominated universe, the area of the black hole apparent horizon (AH) decreases with the expansion of the Universe while that of the cosmic AH increases. However, for a quintom-dominated universe, the black hole AH first shrinks and then expands, while the cosmic AH first expands and then shrinks. A (DM+DE)-dominated universe containing a black hole will evolve to the Schwarzschild-de Sitter solution with both AHs approaching constant size. In a quintom-dominated universe, the black hole and cosmic AHs will coincide at a certain time, after which the singularity becomes naked, violating cosmic censorship.

  20. Modelling binary black-hole coalescence

    Baker, John

    2003-01-01

    The final burst of radiation from the coalescence of two supermassive black holes produces extraordinary gravitational wave luminosity making these events visible to LISA even out to large redshift. Interpreting such observations will require detailed theoretical models, based on general relativity. The effort to construct these models is just beginning to produce results. I describe the Lazarus approach to modelling these radiation bursts, and present recent results which indicate that the system loses, in the last few wave cycles, about 3% of its mass-energy as strongly polarized gravitational radiation

  1. Black holes from large N singlet models

    Amado, Irene; Sundborg, Bo; Thorlacius, Larus; Wintergerst, Nico

    2018-03-01

    The emergent nature of spacetime geometry and black holes can be directly probed in simple holographic duals of higher spin gravity and tensionless string theory. To this end, we study time dependent thermal correlation functions of gauge invariant observables in suitably chosen free large N gauge theories. At low temperature and on short time scales the correlation functions encode propagation through an approximate AdS spacetime while interesting departures emerge at high temperature and on longer time scales. This includes the existence of evanescent modes and the exponential decay of time dependent boundary correlations, both of which are well known indicators of bulk black holes in AdS/CFT. In addition, a new time scale emerges after which the correlation functions return to a bulk thermal AdS form up to an overall temperature dependent normalization. A corresponding length scale was seen in equal time correlation functions in the same models in our earlier work.

  2. Rotating universe models

    Tozini, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review is made of some properties of the rotating Universe models. Godel's model is identified as a generalized filted model. Some properties of new solutions of the Einstein's equations, which are rotating non-stationary Universe models, are presented and analyzed. These models have the Godel's model as a particular case. Non-stationary cosmological models are found which are a generalization of the Godel's metrics in an analogous way in which Friedmann is to the Einstein's model. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Could the dynamics of the Universe be influenced by what is going on inside black holes?

    Avelino, P.P., E-mail: pedro.avelino@astro.up.pt [Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, Universidade do Porto, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, PT4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the potential impact of mass inflation inside black holes on the dynamics of the Universe, considering a recent reformulation of general relativity, proposed in [1], which prevents the vacuum energy from acting as a gravitational source. The interior dynamics of accreting black holes is studied, at the classical level, using the homogeneous approximation and taking charge as a surrogate for angular momentum. We show that, depending on the accreting fluid properties, mass inflation inside black holes could influence the value of the cosmological constant and thus the dynamics of the Universe. A full assessment of the cosmological role played by black holes will require a deeper understanding of the extremely energetic regimes expected inside real astrophysical black holes, including their relation with the physics of the very early Universe, and may eventually lead to an entirely new paradigm for the origin and evolution of the Universe.

  4. A quasi-static approach to structure formation in black hole universes

    Durk, Jessie; Clifton, Timothy, E-mail: j.durk@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: t.clifton@qmul.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the existence of hierarchies of structure in the Universe, we present four new families of exact initial data for inhomogeneous cosmological models at their maximum of expansion. These data generalise existing black hole lattice models to situations that contain clusters of masses, and hence allow the consequences of cosmological structures to be considered in a well-defined and non-perturbative fashion. The degree of clustering is controlled by a parameter λ, in such a way that for λ ∼ 0 or 1 we have very tightly clustered masses, whilst for λ ∼ 0.5 all masses are separated by cosmological distance scales. We study the consequences of structure formation on the total net mass in each of our clusters, as well as calculating the cosmological consequences of the interaction energies both within and between clusters. The locations of the shared horizons that appear around groups of black holes, when they are brought sufficiently close together, are also identified and studied. We find that clustering can have surprisingly large effects on the scale of the cosmology, with models that contain thousands of black holes sometimes being as little as 30% of the size of comparable Friedmann models with the same total proper mass. This deficit is comparable to what might be expected to occur from neglecting gravitational interaction energies in Friedmann cosmology, and suggests that these quantities may have a significant influence on the properties of the large-scale cosmology.

  5. A quasi-static approach to structure formation in black hole universes

    Durk, Jessie; Clifton, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of hierarchies of structure in the Universe, we present four new families of exact initial data for inhomogeneous cosmological models at their maximum of expansion. These data generalise existing black hole lattice models to situations that contain clusters of masses, and hence allow the consequences of cosmological structures to be considered in a well-defined and non-perturbative fashion. The degree of clustering is controlled by a parameter λ, in such a way that for λ ∼ 0 or 1 we have very tightly clustered masses, whilst for λ ∼ 0.5 all masses are separated by cosmological distance scales. We study the consequences of structure formation on the total net mass in each of our clusters, as well as calculating the cosmological consequences of the interaction energies both within and between clusters. The locations of the shared horizons that appear around groups of black holes, when they are brought sufficiently close together, are also identified and studied. We find that clustering can have surprisingly large effects on the scale of the cosmology, with models that contain thousands of black holes sometimes being as little as 30% of the size of comparable Friedmann models with the same total proper mass. This deficit is comparable to what might be expected to occur from neglecting gravitational interaction energies in Friedmann cosmology, and suggests that these quantities may have a significant influence on the properties of the large-scale cosmology.

  6. A quasi-static approach to structure formation in black hole universes

    Durk, Jessie; Clifton, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the existence of hierarchies of structure in the Universe, we present four new families of exact initial data for inhomogeneous cosmological models at their maximum of expansion. These data generalise existing black hole lattice models to situations that contain clusters of masses, and hence allow the consequences of cosmological structures to be considered in a well-defined and non-perturbative fashion. The degree of clustering is controlled by a parameter λ, in such a way that for λ ~ 0 or 1 we have very tightly clustered masses, whilst for λ ~ 0.5 all masses are separated by cosmological distance scales. We study the consequences of structure formation on the total net mass in each of our clusters, as well as calculating the cosmological consequences of the interaction energies both within and between clusters. The locations of the shared horizons that appear around groups of black holes, when they are brought sufficiently close together, are also identified and studied. We find that clustering can have surprisingly large effects on the scale of the cosmology, with models that contain thousands of black holes sometimes being as little as 30% of the size of comparable Friedmann models with the same total proper mass. This deficit is comparable to what might be expected to occur from neglecting gravitational interaction energies in Friedmann cosmology, and suggests that these quantities may have a significant influence on the properties of the large-scale cosmology.

  7. Dark Candles of the Universe: Black Hole Observations

    Aykutalp, Aycin

    2016-03-01

    In 1916, when Karl Schwarzschild solved the Einstein field equations of general relativity for a spherically symmetric, non-rotating mass no one anticipated the impact black holes would have on astrophysics. I will review the main formation channels for black hole seeds and their evolution through cosmic time. In this, emphasis will be placed on the observational diagnostics of astrophysical black holes and their role on the assembly of galaxy formation and evolution. I then review how these observations put constrain on the seed black hole formation theories. Finally, I present an outlook for how future observations can shed light on our understanding of black holes. This work is supported by NSF Grant AST-1333360.

  8. On the origin of Hawking mini black-holes and the cold early universe

    Canuto, V.

    1978-01-01

    A simple argument is outlined leading to the result that the mass of mini black holes exploding today is 10 to the 15th power g. A mathematical model is discussed which indicates that the equation of state is greatly softened in the high-density regime and a phase transition may exist, such that any length (particularly very small sizes) will grow with time irrespective of its relation to the size of the particle horizon. It is shown that the effect of spin-2 mesons with respect to the equation of state is to soften the pressure and make it negative. An analytical expression is given for the probability that any particular region in a hot early universe will evolve into a black hole.

  9. Models of black hole production at LHC

    Klippert, R.; Salinas, C. J. Solano

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss about the different models for black hole production at the future Large Hadron Collider. In traditional scenarios the Planck scale is fundamental, and the weak scale is derived from it via some dynamical mechanism. Recently, several authors are exploring an alternative viewpoint where the weak scale is the fundamental scale of nature and the 4-dimensional Planck scale is to be derived from that. These scenarios include large or warped extra dimensions, propagation of matter and gauge degrees of freedom on brane worlds, and a fundamental Planck scale of O(TeV). If the scale of quantum gravity is near TeV we will have a copious production of mini black holes at the Large Hadron Collider and Cosmic rays interactions in the atmosphere. We discussed as well other line of semi-classical models from analog gravity in nonlinear electrodynamics that can be tested as well at LHC. The possible consequences of these models for high energy experimental physics are discussed

  10. Microstates of black holes in expanding universe from interacting branes

    Shiba, Shotaro [Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK),1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Thermodynamics of the near extremal black p-branes can be described by collective motions of gravitationally interacting branes. This proposal is called the p-soup model. In this paper, we check this proposal in the case of black brane system which is asymptotically Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe in an infinite distance. As a result, we can show that the gravitationally interacting branes explain free energy, entropy, temperature and other physical quantities in these systems. This implies that the microstates of this kind of brane system can be also understood in the p-soup model.

  11. A holographic model for black hole complementarity

    Lowe, David A. [Physics Department, Brown University,Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Thorlacius, Larus [University of Iceland, Science Institute,Dunhaga 3, IS-107, Reykjavik (Iceland); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics,Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova University Centre, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-12-07

    We explore a version of black hole complementarity, where an approximate semiclassical effective field theory for interior infalling degrees of freedom emerges holographically from an exact evolution of exterior degrees of freedom. The infalling degrees of freedom have a complementary description in terms of outgoing Hawking radiation and must eventually decohere with respect to the exterior Hamiltonian, leading to a breakdown of the semiclassical description for an infaller. Trace distance is used to quantify the difference between the complementary time evolutions, and to define a decoherence time. We propose a dictionary where the evolution with respect to the bulk effective Hamiltonian corresponds to mean field evolution in the holographic theory. In a particular model for the holographic theory, which exhibits fast scrambling, the decoherence time coincides with the scrambling time. The results support the hypothesis that decoherence of the infalling holographic state and disruptive bulk effects near the curvature singularity are complementary descriptions of the same physics, which is an important step toward resolving the black hole information paradox.

  12. Universality of the quasinormal spectrum of near-extremal Kerr-Newman black holes

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Our current knowledge about the quasinormal resonance spectrum of charged and rotating Kerr-Newman black holes is quite poor. This unsatisfactory situation is a direct consequence of the fact that all attempts to decouple the gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of generic Kerr-Newman black holes have failed thus far. Recently, Zilhao et al. (Phys Rev D 90:12, 124088, 2014. arXiv:1410.0694) have studied the nonlinear stability of Kerr-Newman black holes. We show here that their numerical results for the time evolutions of the spacetime deformations of near-extremal Kerr-Newman black holes are described extremely well by a simple and universal analytical formula for the quasinormal resonances of the black holes. This formula is expressed in terms of the black-hole physical parameters: the horizon angular velocity Ω{sub H} and the Bekenstein-Hawking temperature T{sub BH}. (orig.)

  13. Gravitational black-holes-hedgehogs and two degenerate vacua of the Universe

    Sidharth, B. G.; Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Nielsen, H. B.

    In the present paper, assuming the Multiple Point Principle (MPP) as a new law of Nature, we considered the existence of the two degenerate vacua of the Universe: the first Electroweak (EW) vacuum at v1 ≈ 246GeV — “true vacuum”, and the second Planck scale “false vacuum” at v2 ˜ 1018 GeV. In these vacua, we investigated different topological defects. The main aim of this paper is an investigation of the black-hole-hedgehogs configurations as defects of the false vacuum. In the framework of the f(R) gravity, described by the Gravi-Weak unification model, we considered a black-hole solution, which corresponds to a “hedgehog” — global monopole, that has been “swallowed” by the black-hole with mass core MBH ˜ 1018GeV and radius δ ˜ 10‑21GeV‑1. Considering the results of the hedgehog lattice theory in the framework of the SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge-invariant theory with hedgehogs in the Wilson loops, we have used the critical value of temperature for the hedgehogs confinement phase (Tc ˜ 1018GeV). This result gave us the possibility to conclude that the SM shows a new physics with contributions of the SU(2)-triplet Higgs bosons at the scale ˜10TeV. Theory predicts the stability of the EW-vacuum and the accuracy of the MPP.

  14. From Quarks to Black Holes Interviewing the Universe

    Hammond, Richard T

    2001-01-01

    This book presents a series of delightful interviews in which natural objects such as an electron, a black hole, a galaxy, and even the vacuum itself, reveal their innermost secrets - not only what they are but also how they feel. A hydrogen atom tells us about quantum mechanics and why we live in a non-deterministic world; a black hole explains curved space and naked singularities; and a uranium atom talks of its life on a meteor, its tremendous collision with Earth, and properties of radioactivity - all while grappling with its own mortality. A neutron star gives a personal account of its cr

  15. A New Model of Black Hole Formation

    Thayer G. D.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a black hole and its event horizon are described. Conclusions, which are the result of a thought experiment, show that Schwarzschild [1] was correct: A singularity develops at the event horizon of a newly-formed black hole. The intense gravitational field that forms near the event horizon results in the mass-energy of the black hole accumulating in a layer just inside the event horizon, rather than collapsing into a central singularity.

  16. Canonical Ensemble Model for Black Hole Horizon of Schwarzschild ...

    Abstract. In this paper, we use the canonical ensemble model to discuss the radiation of a Schwarzschild–de Sitter black hole on the black hole horizon. Using this model, we calculate the probability distribution from function of the emission shell. And the statistical meaning which compare with the distribution function is ...

  17. From black holes to baby universes: Exploring the possibility of creating a cosmos in the laboratory

    Ansoldi, S.; Merali, Z.; Guendelman, E.I.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the essential features of baby-universe production, starting from a description of black holes and wormholes, in terms of the causal structure of spacetime, and following a qualitative review of the connection between vacuum decay and inflation in early universe cosmology. Related open questions are also addressed, especially in connection with the possibility that baby universes could be formed within our present universe — either in a future particle accelerator, or spontaneously.

  18. Modeling Supermassive Black Holes in Cosmological Simulations

    Tremmel, Michael

    My thesis work has focused on improving the implementation of supermassive black hole (SMBH) physics in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. SMBHs are ubiquitous in mas- sive galaxies, as well as bulge-less galaxies and dwarfs, and are thought to be a critical component to massive galaxy evolution. Still, much is unknown about how SMBHs form, grow, and affect their host galaxies. Cosmological simulations are an invaluable tool for un- derstanding the formation of galaxies, self-consistently tracking their evolution with realistic merger and gas accretion histories. SMBHs are often modeled in these simulations (generally as a necessity to produce realistic massive galaxies), but their implementations are commonly simplified in ways that can limit what can be learned. Current and future observations are opening new windows into the lifecycle of SMBHs and their host galaxies, but require more detailed, physically motivated simulations. Within the novel framework I have developed, SMBHs 1) are seeded at early times without a priori assumptions of galaxy occupation, 2) grow in a way that accounts for the angular momentum of gas, and 3) experience realistic orbital evolution. I show how this model, properly tuned with a novel parameter optimiza- tion technique, results in realistic galaxies and SMBHs. Utilizing the unique ability of these simulations to capture the dynamical evolution of SMBHs, I present the first self-consistent prediction for the formation timescales of close SMBH pairs, precursors to SMBH binaries and merger events potentially detected by future gravitational wave experiments.

  19. Schwarzschild black hole in the background of the Einstein universe: some physical effects

    Ramachandra, B S; Vishveshwara, C V

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of an asymptotically non-flat black hole spacetime is that of a Schwarzschild black hole in the background of the Einstein universe, which is a special case of the representation of a black hole in a cosmological background given by Vaidya. Recently, this spacetime has been studied in detail by Nayak et al. They constructed a composite spacetime called the Vaidya-Einstein-Schwarzschild (VES) spacetime. We investigate some of the physical effects inherent to this spacetime. We carry out a background-black hole decomposition of the spacetime in order to separate out the effects due to the background spacetime and the black hole. The physical effects we study include the classical tests - the gravitational redshift, perihelion precession and light bending - and circular geodesics. A detailed classification of geodesics, in general, is also given

  20. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe.

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-29

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole-a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. Looking for the invisible universe - Black matter, black energy, black holes

    Elbaz, David

    2016-01-01

    As the discovery of the expansion of the universe and of black holes put the study of cosmology into question again because it now refers to invisible things such as black holes, black energy and black matter, the author proposes an other view on the universe within such a context. He first discusses these three enigmas of black matter, black energy and black holes. In a second part, he addresses, discusses and comments five illusions: the Uranian illusion (questions of the existence of an anti-world, of black matter temperature), the Mercurian illusion (quantum gravity, the string theory), the Martian illusion (a patchwork universe, the illusion of the infinite), the cosmic Maya (the John Wheeler's cup, the holographic universe), and the narcissistic illusion

  2. Black hole growth in the early Universe is self-regulated and largely hidden from view.

    Treister, Ezequiel; Schawinski, Kevin; Volonteri, Marta; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Gawiser, Eric

    2011-06-15

    The formation of the first massive objects in the infant Universe remains impossible to observe directly and yet it sets the stage for the subsequent evolution of galaxies. Although some black holes with masses more than 10(9) times that of the Sun have been detected in luminous quasars less than one billion years after the Big Bang, these individual extreme objects have limited utility in constraining the channels of formation of the earliest black holes; this is because the initial conditions of black hole seed properties are quickly erased during the growth process. Here we report a measurement of the amount of black hole growth in galaxies at redshift z = 6-8 (0.95-0.7 billion years after the Big Bang), based on optimally stacked, archival X-ray observations. Our results imply that black holes grow in tandem with their host galaxies throughout cosmic history, starting from the earliest times. We find that most copiously accreting black holes at these epochs are buried in significant amounts of gas and dust that absorb most radiation except for the highest-energy X-rays. This suggests that black holes grew significantly more during these early bursts than was previously thought, but because of the obscuration of their ultraviolet emission they did not contribute to the re-ionization of the Universe.

  3. Models of the universe

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Most models of the universe are dependent on the assumption of a uniform distribution of matter, and thus are rather crude, due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's field equations. Here, a model is proposed which avoids this smoothing-out process. A metric is obtained which is consistent with the assumption that the matter of the universe is concentrated mainly in stars, moving with the velocity of recession implied by Hubble's law. The solution obtained gives results comparable to those obtainable by Schwarzchild metric, suitably adjusted to agree with the Einstein-DeSitter model at large distances

  4. Universal instability of hairy black holes in Lovelock-Galileon theories in D dimensions

    Takahashi, Kazufumi; Suyama, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    We analyze spherically symmetric black hole solutions with time-dependent scalar hair in a class of Lovelock-Galileon theories, which are the scalar-tensor theories with second-order field equations in arbitrary dimensions. We first show that known black hole solutions in five dimensions are always plagued by the ghost/gradient instability in the vicinity of the horizon. We then generalize such black hole solutions to higher dimensions and show that the same instability found in five dimensions appears universally in any number of dimensions.

  5. Baby universe metric equivalent to an interior black-hole metric

    Gonzalez-Diaz, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the maximally extended metric corresponding to a large wormhole is the unique possible wormhole metric whose baby universe sector is conformally equivalent ot the maximal inextendible Kruskal metric corresponding to the interior region of a Schwarzschild black hole whose gravitational radius is half the wormhole neck radius. The physical implications of this result in the black hole evaporation process are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Quantum Black Hole Model and HAWKING’S Radiation

    Berezin, Victor

    The black hole model with a self-gravitating charged spherical symmetric dust thin shell as a source is considered. The Schroedinger-type equation for such a model is derived. This equation appeared to be a finite differences equation. A theory of such an equation is developed and general solution is found and investigated in details. The discrete spectrum of the bound state energy levels is obtained. All the eigenvalues appeared to be infinitely degenerate. The ground state wave functions are evaluated explicitly. The quantum black hole states are selected and investigated. It is shown that the obtained black hole mass spectrum is compatible with the existence of Hawking’s radiation in the limit of low temperatures both for large and nearly extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. The above mentioned infinite degeneracy of the mass (energy) eigenvalues may appeared helpful in resolving the well known information paradox in the black hole physics.

  7. Chaotic universe model.

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2018-01-15

    In this study, we consider nonlinear interactions between components such as dark energy, dark matter, matter and radiation in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker space-time and propose a simple interaction model based on the time evolution of the densities of these components. By using this model we show that these interactions can be given by Lotka-Volterra type equations. We numerically solve these coupling equations and show that interaction dynamics between dark energy-dark matter-matter or dark energy-dark matter-matter-radiation has a strange attractor for 0 > w de  >-1, w dm  ≥ 0, w m  ≥ 0 and w r  ≥ 0 values. These strange attractors with the positive Lyapunov exponent clearly show that chaotic dynamics appears in the time evolution of the densities. These results provide that the time evolution of the universe is chaotic. The present model may have potential to solve some of the cosmological problems such as the singularity, cosmic coincidence, big crunch, big rip, horizon, oscillation, the emergence of the galaxies, matter distribution and large-scale organization of the universe. The model also connects between dynamics of the competing species in biological systems and dynamics of the time evolution of the universe and offers a new perspective and a new different scenario for the universe evolution.

  8. The Formation and Growth of Black Holes in the Universe: New cosmological clues

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years a change of paradigm occurred in the field of black hole research. We now believe, that stellar mass black holes are created in powerful gamma ray bursts. Stellar remnants of the first generation of stars have very likely been the seeds of supermassive black holes, which we find dormant in the centers of most nearby galaxies - including our own Milky Way. A tight correlation between black hole mass and the global properties of their host galaxies indicates a co-formation and evolution of black holes and galaxies. The X-ray sky is dominated by a diffuse extragalactic background radiation, which our team, together with others, was able to resolve almost completely into discrete sources using the X-ray satellites ROSAT, Chandra and XMM-Newton. Optical and NIR follow-up identifications showed, that we observe the growth phase of the population of supermassive black holes throughout the history of the Universe. The accretion history derived from X-ray observations shows, that the black holes ...

  9. The Formation and Growth of Black Holes in the Universe New cosmological clues

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years a change of paradigm occurred in the field of black hole research. We now believe, that stellar mass black holes are created in powerful gamma ray bursts. Stellar remnants of the first generation of stars have very likely been the seeds of supermassive black holes, which we find dormant in the centers of most nearby galaxies - including our own Milky Way. A tight correlation between black hole mass and the global properties of their host galaxies indicates a co-formation and evolution of black holes and galaxies. The X-ray sky is dominated by a diffuse extragalactic background radiation, which our team, together with others, was able to resolve almost completely into discrete sources using the X-ray satellites ROSAT, Chandra and XMM-Newton. Optical and NIR follow-up identifications showed, that we observe the growth phase of the population of supermassive black holes throughout the history of the Universe. The accretion history derived from X-ray observations shows, that the black holes ...

  10. Can Planck-mass relics of evaporating black holes close the Universe

    MacGibbon, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors propose that the cosmological dark matter consists of the Planck-mass remnants of evaporating primordial black holes. Such remnants would be expected to have close to the critical density if the black holes evaporating at the present epoch have the maximum density consistent with cosmic-ray constraints. Primordial black holes of the required density may form naturally at the end of an inflationary epoch. Planck-mass relics would behave dynamically just like 'cold dark matter' and would therefore share the attractions of other 'cold' candidates. In addition, because the baryonic matter in black holes cannot participate in nucleosynthesis the limits on the baryonic content of the Universe set by primordial nucleosynthesis are circumvented. (author)

  11. Massive black holes and light-element nucleosynthesis in a baryonic universe

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Rees, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine the model proposed by Gnedin & Ostriker (1992) in which Jeans mass black holes (M(sub BH) approximately = 10(exp 6) solar mass) form shortly after decoupling. There is no nonbaryonic dark matter in this model, but we examine the possibility that Omega(sub b) is considerably larger than given by normal nucleosynthesis. Here we allow for the fact that much of the high baryon-to-photon ratio material will collapse leaving the universe of remaining material with light-element abundances more in accord with the residual baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -2)) than with Omega(sub 0) and the initial baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -1)). We find that no reasonable model can be made with random-phase density fluctuations, if the power on scales smaller than 10(exp 6) solar mass is as large as expected. However, phase-correlated models of the type that might occur in connection with topological singularities can be made with Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.013 +/- 0.001, 0.15 approximately less than Omega(sub 0) approximately less than 0.4, which are either flat (Omega(sub lambda) = 1 - Omega(sub 0)) or open (Omega(sub lambda) = 0) and which satisfy all the observational constraints which we apply, including the large baryon-to-total mass ratio found in the X-ray clusters. The remnant baryon density is thus close to that obtained in the standard picture (Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.0125 +/- 0.0025; Walker et al. 1991). The spectral index implied for fluctuations in the baryonic isocurvature scenario, -1 less than m less than 0, is in the range expected by other arguments based on large-scale structure and microwave fluctuation constraints. The dark matter in this picture is in the form of massive black holes. Accretion onto them at early epochs releases high-energy photons which significantly heat and reionize the universe. But photodissociation does not materially change light-element abundances. A typical model gives bar-y approximately = 1 x 10(exp -5

  12. Elementary particles as micro-universes or micro-black holes

    Rodrigues Junior, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    The idea that elementary particles can be presented as micro-universes and/or micro-black holes (Lorentzian manifolds) is presented and the fundamental mathematical problem associated with the simplest world manifold that 'contains' both the macrocosm and the microcosmes is discussed. (Author) [pt

  13. Matter-antimatter separation in the early universe by rotating black holes

    Leahy, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration of the effect of rotating black holes evaporating early in the universe shows that they would have produced oppositely directed neutrino and antineutrino currents, which push matter and antimatter apart. This separation mechanism is, however, too feeble to account for a present baryon-to-photon ratio of 10 to the -9th, and has no significant observational consequences.

  14. Analytical solutions of accreting black holes immersed in a {Lambda}CDM model

    Lima, J.A.S., E-mail: limajas@astro.iag.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo - Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil); Guariento, Daniel C., E-mail: carrasco@fma.if.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo - Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil); Horvath, J.E., E-mail: foton@astro.iag.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo - Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-04

    The evolution of the mass of a black hole embedded in a universe filled with dark energy and cold dark matter is calculated in a closed form within a test fluid model in a Schwarzschild metric, taking into account the cosmological evolution of both fluids. The result describes exactly how accretion asymptotically switches from the matter-dominated to the {Lambda}-dominated regime. For early epochs, the black hole mass increases due to dark matter accretion, and on later epochs the increase in mass stops as dark energy accretion takes over. Thus, the unphysical behaviour of previous analyses is improved in this simple exact model.

  15. Deep-lying hole states in the optical model

    Klevansky, S.P.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The strength function for deep-lying hole states in an optical potential is studied by the method of Green's functions. The role of isospin is emphasized. It is shown that, while the main trends of the experimental data on hole states in isotopes of Sn and Pd can be described by an energy independent optical potential, intermediate structures in these data indicate the specific nuclear polarization effects have to be included. This is done by introducing doorway states of good isospin into the optical model potential. Such states consist of neutron hole plus proton core vibrations as well as more complicated excitations that are analog states of proton hole plus neutron core vibrations of the parent nuclear system. Specific calculations for 115 Sn and 103 Pd give satisfactory fits to the strength function data using optical model and doorway state parameters that are reasonable on physical grounds

  16. Black hole constraints on the running-mass inflation model

    Leach, Samuel M; Grivell, Ian J; Liddle, Andrew R

    2000-01-01

    The running-mass inflation model, which has strong motivation from particle physics, predicts density perturbations whose spectral index is strongly scale-dependent. For a large part of parameter space the spectrum rises sharply to short scales. In this paper we compute the production of primordial black holes, using both analytic and numerical calculation of the density perturbation spectra. Observational constraints from black hole production are shown to exclude a large region of otherwise...

  17. Black-hole kicks from numerical-relativity surrogate models

    Gerosa, Davide; Hébert, François; Stein, Leo C.

    2018-05-01

    Binary black holes radiate linear momentum in gravitational waves as they merge. Recoils imparted to the black-hole remnant can reach thousands of km /s , thus ejecting black holes from their host galaxies. We exploit recent advances in gravitational waveform modeling to quickly and reliably extract recoils imparted to generic, precessing, black-hole binaries. Our procedure uses a numerical-relativity surrogate model to obtain the gravitational waveform given a set of binary parameters; then, from this waveform we directly integrate the gravitational-wave linear momentum flux. This entirely bypasses the need for fitting formulas which are typically used to model black-hole recoils in astrophysical contexts. We provide a thorough exploration of the black-hole kick phenomenology in the parameter space, summarizing and extending previous numerical results on the topic. Our extraction procedure is made publicly available as a module for the Python programming language named surrkick. Kick evaluations take ˜0.1 s on a standard off-the-shelf machine, thus making our code ideal to be ported to large-scale astrophysical studies.

  18. Black holes evaporation and big mass particle (maximon, intermediate boson) creation in nonstationary universe

    Man'ko, V.I.; Markov, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter considers the process of creation of particles with maximally big masses (maximons, intermediate bosons) in the nonstationary Universe within the framework of neutral and charged scalar field theory. The conclusions of the matter creation model for real particles (resonances) and hypothetical particles (maximons, friedmons, intermediate bosons) are analyzed. It is determined that if the mechanism of maximon's creation exists, then these particles must be stable. The maximons could be the final states of decaying black holes. A possible mechanism of cosmic ray creation as a result of ''vacuum'' generation of known unstable particles is discussed. The limits upon the mass and the life time of intermediate bosons are calculated. It is demonstrated that the creation of masses greater than 10 GeV, and with life times less than 10- 24 sec and quantity of elementary particles greater than 100 are in contradiction with the particle creation mechanism and the experimental mass density in the Universe. The formalism of the examined method and its vacuum properties are discussed in an appendix

  19. An 800-million-solar-mass black hole in a significantly neutral Universe at a redshift of 7.5.

    Bañados, Eduardo; Venemans, Bram P; Mazzucchelli, Chiara; Farina, Emanuele P; Walter, Fabian; Wang, Feige; Decarli, Roberto; Stern, Daniel; Fan, Xiaohui; Davies, Frederick B; Hennawi, Joseph F; Simcoe, Robert A; Turner, Monica L; Rix, Hans-Walter; Yang, Jinyi; Kelson, Daniel D; Rudie, Gwen C; Winters, Jan Martin

    2018-01-25

    Quasars are the most luminous non-transient objects known and as a result they enable studies of the Universe at the earliest cosmic epochs. Despite extensive efforts, however, the quasar ULAS J1120 + 0641 at redshift z = 7.09 has remained the only one known at z > 7 for more than half a decade. Here we report observations of the quasar ULAS J134208.10 + 092838.61 (hereafter J1342 + 0928) at redshift z = 7.54. This quasar has a bolometric luminosity of 4 × 10 13 times the luminosity of the Sun and a black-hole mass of 8 × 10 8 solar masses. The existence of this supermassive black hole when the Universe was only 690 million years old-just five per cent of its current age-reinforces models of early black-hole growth that allow black holes with initial masses of more than about 10 4 solar masses or episodic hyper-Eddington accretion. We see strong evidence of absorption of the spectrum of the quasar redwards of the Lyman α emission line (the Gunn-Peterson damping wing), as would be expected if a significant amount (more than 10 per cent) of the hydrogen in the intergalactic medium surrounding J1342 + 0928 is neutral. We derive such a significant fraction of neutral hydrogen, although the exact fraction depends on the modelling. However, even in our most conservative analysis we find a fraction of more than 0.33 (0.11) at 68 per cent (95 per cent) probability, indicating that we are probing well within the reionization epoch of the Universe.

  20. Entropy function and universality of entropy-area relation for small black holes

    Cai Ronggen; Chen, C.-M.; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Ohta, Nobuyoshi; Pang Dawei

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the entropy-area relation for the small black holes with higher curvature corrections by using the entropy function formalism and field redefinition method. We show that the entropy S BH of the small black hole is proportional to its horizon area A. In particular, we find a universal result that S BH =A/2G, the ratio is 2 times of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area formula in many cases of physical interest. In four dimensions, the universal relation is always true irrespective of the coefficients of the higher-order terms if the dilaton couplings are the same, which is the case for string effective theory, while in five dimensions, the relation again holds irrespective of the overall coefficient if the higher-order corrections are in the GB combination. We also discuss how this result generalizes to known physically interesting cases with Lovelock correction terms in various dimensions, and possible implications of the universal relation.

  1. Qubit transport model for unitary black hole evaporation without firewalls*

    Osuga, Kento; Page, Don N.

    2018-03-01

    We give an explicit toy qubit transport model for transferring information from the gravitational field of a black hole to the Hawking radiation by a continuous unitary transformation of the outgoing radiation and the black hole gravitational field. The model has no firewalls or other drama at the event horizon, and it avoids a counterargument that has been raised for subsystem transfer models as resolutions of the firewall paradox. Furthermore, it fits the set of six physical constraints that Giddings has proposed for models of black hole evaporation. It does utilize nonlocal qubits for the gravitational field but assumes that the radiation interacts locally with these nonlocal qubits, so in some sense the nonlocality is confined to the gravitational sector. Although the qubit model is too crude to be quantitatively correct for the detailed spectrum of Hawking radiation, it fits qualitatively with what is expected.

  2. Hole Feature on Conical Face Recognition for Turning Part Model

    Zubair, A. F.; Abu Mansor, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Computer Aided Process Planning (CAPP) is the bridge between CAD and CAM and pre-processing of the CAD data in the CAPP system is essential. For CNC turning part, conical faces of part model is inevitable to be recognised beside cylindrical and planar faces. As the sinus cosines of the cone radius structure differ according to different models, face identification in automatic feature recognition of the part model need special intention. This paper intends to focus hole on feature on conical faces that can be detected by CAD solid modeller ACIS via. SAT file. Detection algorithm of face topology were generated and compared. The study shows different faces setup for similar conical part models with different hole type features. Three types of holes were compared and different between merge faces and unmerge faces were studied.

  3. Black holes

    Feast, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    This article deals with two questions, namely whether it is possible for black holes to exist, and if the answer is yes, whether we have found any yet. In deciding whether black holes can exist or not the central role in the shaping of our universe played by the forse of gravity is discussed, and in deciding whether we are likely to find black holes in the universe the author looks at the way stars evolve, as well as white dwarfs and neutron stars. He also discusses the problem how to detect a black hole, possible black holes, a southern black hole, massive black holes, as well as why black holes are studied

  4. Primordial black holes from scalar field evolution in the early universe

    Cotner, Eric; Kusenko, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Scalar condensates with large expectation values can form in the early universe, for example, in theories with supersymmetry. The condensate can undergo fragmentation into Q-balls before decaying. If the Q-balls dominate the energy density for some period of time, statistical fluctuations in their number density can lead to formation of primordial black holes (PBH). In the case of supersymmetry the mass range is limited from above by 1 023 g . For a general charged scalar field, this robust mechanism can generate black holes over a much broader mass range, including the black holes with masses of 1-100 solar masses, which is relevant for LIGO observations of gravitational waves. Topological defects can lead to formation of PBH in a similar fashion.

  5. An Introduction to Black Holes, Information and the String Theory Revolution: The Holographic Universe

    Israel, W

    2006-01-01

    The evaporation of a black hole formed by the collapse of matter is a nonunitary process involving loss of information. At least, this is how it appears in Hawking's semiclassical description, in which gravity is not quantized and the emergent radiation appears thermal. Since unitarity is one of the pillars of quantum mechanics there has been an understandable reluctance to accept this as an ironclad conclusion. Conformal field theories in flat space are manifestly unitary, and the AdS/CFT correspondence therefore suggests that the information trapped in the depths of the hole must find some way to escape-a conclusion almost universally accepted today, at least among particle theorists. Just how it could escape remains a mystery, however, since nothing can escape without violating causality until the black hole has shrunk too far to hold much information. Gerard 't Hooft and the senior author of this book, Leonard Susskind, have been vocal advocates of the view that the information paradox poses a real crisis for physics requiring significant paradigm shifts. They suggest that locality must be given up as an objective property of physical phenomena (even on large scales) and replaced by a new principle of 'black hole complementarity'. Specifically, there are two very different ways to view the process of collapse and evaporation. To a free-falling observer, nothing unusual happens at the horizon and matter and information fall deep into the hole. To a stationary observer hovering just outside the hole it appears instead that the matter and information are deposited on the horizon (which he experiences as very hot because of his large acceleration), to be eventually re-emitted from there as Hawking radiation. According to 't Hooft and Susskind, these must be viewed as equally valid, 'complementary' descriptions of the same process. Black hole complementarity is essentially the statement (supported by operational arguments) that their simultaneous validity cannot

  6. A universal counting of black hole microstates in AdS4

    Azzurli, Francesco; Bobev, Nikolay; Crichigno, P. Marcos; Min, Vincent S.; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Many three-dimensional N=2 SCFTs admit a universal partial topological twist when placed on hyperbolic Riemann surfaces. We exploit this fact to derive a universal formula which relates the planar limit of the topologically twisted index of these SCFTs and their three-sphere partition function. We then utilize this to account for the entropy of a large class of supersymmetric asymptotically AdS4 magnetically charged black holes in M-theory and massive type IIA string theory. In this context we also discuss novel AdS2 solutions of eleven-dimensional supergravity which describe the near horizon region of large new families of supersymmetric black holes arising from M2-branes wrapping Riemann surfaces.

  7. A toy model of black hole complementarity

    Banerjee, Souvik; Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2016-01-01

    We consider the algebra of simple operators defined in a time band in a CFT with a holographic dual. When the band is smaller than the light crossing time of AdS, an entire causal diamond in the center of AdS is separated from the band by a horizon. We show that this algebra obeys a version of the Reeh-Schlieder theorem: the action of the algebra on the CFT vacuum can approximate any low energy state in the CFT arbitrarily well, but no operator within the algebra can exactly annihilate the vacuum. We show how to relate local excitations in the complement of the central diamond to simple operators in the band. Local excitations within the diamond are invisible to the algebra of simple operators in the band by causality, but can be related to complicated operators called "precursors". We use the Reeh-Schlieder theorem to write down a simple and explicit formula for these precursors on the boundary. We comment on the implications of our results for black hole complementarity and the emergence of bulk locality fr...

  8. MEP parabolic hydrodynamical model for holes in silicon semiconductors

    Mascali, G.; Romano, V.; Sellier, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Consistent hydrodynamical models for electron transport in semi-conductors, free of any fitting parameter, have been formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle in Continuum Mech. Thermodyn., 11 (1999) 307, 12 (2000) 31 for silicon and in Continuum Mech. Thermodyn., 14 (2002) 405 for GaAs. In this paper we use the same approach for studying the hole transport in Si, by considering a parabolic approximation for the valence energy band. Scattering of holes with non-polar optical phonons, acoustic phonons and impurities have been taken into account. On the basis of these results, a limiting energy-transport model and an explicit expression for the low field hole mobility have been obtained. The high field mobility is also analyzed by taking into account the influence of impurities

  9. Influencing Factors and Simplified Model of Film Hole Irrigation

    Yi-Bo Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Film hole irrigation is an advanced low-cost and high-efficiency irrigation method, which can improve water conservation and water use efficiency. Given its various advantages and potential applications, we conducted a laboratory study to investigate the effects of soil texture, bulk density, initial soil moisture, irrigation depth, opening ratio (ρ, film hole diameter (D, and spacing on cumulative infiltration using SWMS-2D. We then proposed a simplified model based on the Kostiakov model for infiltration estimation. Error analyses indicated SWMS-2D to be suitable for infiltration simulation of film hole irrigation. Additional SWMS-2D-based investigations indicated that, for a certain soil, initial soil moisture and irrigation depth had the weakest effects on cumulative infiltration, whereas ρ and D had the strongest effects on cumulative infiltration. A simplified model with ρ and D was further established, and its use was then expanded to different soils. Verification based on seven soil types indicated that the established simplified double-factor model effectively estimates cumulative infiltration for film hole irrigation, with a small mean average error of 0.141–2.299 mm, a root mean square error of 0.177–2.722 mm, a percent bias of −2.131–1.479%, and a large Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient that is close to 1.0.

  10. Deepest X-Rays Ever Reveal universe Teeming With Black Holes

    2001-03-01

    For the first time, astronomers believe they have proof black holes of all sizes once ruled the universe. NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provided the deepest X-ray images ever recorded, and those pictures deliver a novel look at the past 12 billion years of black holes. Two independent teams of astronomers today presented images that contain the faintest X-ray sources ever detected, which include an abundance of active super massive black holes. "The Chandra data show us that giant black holes were much more active in the past than at present," said Riccardo Giacconi, of Johns Hopkins University and Associated Universities, Inc., Washington, DC. The exposure is known as "Chandra Deep Field South" since it is located in the Southern Hemisphere constellation of Fornax. "In this million-second image, we also detect relatively faint X-ray emission from galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies". The images, known as Chandra Deep Fields, were obtained during many long exposures over the course of more than a year. Data from the Chandra Deep Field South will be placed in a public archive for scientists beginning today. "For the first time, we are able to use X-rays to look back to a time when normal galaxies were several billion years younger," said Ann Hornschemeier, Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The group’s 500,000-second exposure included the Hubble Deep Field North, allowing scientists the opportunity to combine the power of Chandra and the Hubble Space Telescope, two of NASA's Great Observatories. The Penn State team recently acquired an additional 500,000 seconds of data, creating another one-million-second Chandra Deep Field, located in the constellation of Ursa Major. Chandra Deep Field North/Hubble Deep Field North Press Image and Caption The images are called Chandra Deep Fields because they are comparable to the famous Hubble Deep Field in being able to see further and fainter objects than any image of the universe taken at X

  11. XFEM Modelling of Multi-holes Plate with Single-row and Staggered Holes Configurations

    Supar Khairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint efficiency is the key to composite structures assembly design, good structures response is dependent upon multi-holes behavior as subjected to remote loading. Current benchmarking work were following experimental testing series taken from literature on multi-holes problem. Eleven multi-hole configurations were investigated with various pitch and gage distance of staggered holes and non-staggered holes (single-row holes. Various failure modes were exhibited, most staggered holes demonstrates staggered crack path but non-staggered holes series displayed crack path along net-section plane. Stress distribution were carried out and good agreement were exhibited in experimental observation as reported in the respective literature. Consequently, strength prediction work were carried out under quasi-static loading, most showed discrepancy between 8% -31%, better prediction were exhibited in thicker and non-staggered holes plate combinations.

  12. A unitary model of the black hole evaporation

    Feng, Yu-Lei; Chen, Yi-Xin

    2014-12-01

    A unitary effective field model of the black hole evaporation is proposed to satisfy almost the four postulates of the black hole complementarity (BHC). In this model, we enlarge a black hole-scalar field system by adding an extra radiation detector that couples with the scalar field. After performing a partial trace over the scalar field space, we obtain an effective entanglement between the black hole and the detector (or radiation in it). As the whole system evolves, the S-matrix formula can be constructed formally step by step. Without local quantum measurements, the paradoxes of the information loss and AMPS's firewall can be resolved. However, the information can be lost due to quantum decoherence, as long as some local measurement has been performed on the detector to acquire the information of the radiation in it. But unlike Hawking's completely thermal spectrum, some residual correlations can be found in the radiations. All these considerations can be simplified in a qubit model that provides a modified quantum teleportation to transfer the information via an EPR pairs.

  13. A tepid model for the early universe

    Carr, B.J.; Rees, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    If the Universe started off with a photon-to-baryon ratio much less than presently observed, massive black holes would have formed at early times even if the initial density fluctuations were very small. These holes could have generated the rest of the background radiation through accretion; in this way, such a Universe might automatically evolve to have the photon-to-baryon ratio observed today. This scenario could explain why the times of decoupling and matterradiation equilibrium are comparable and might provide a critical density of primordial black holes; it could also produce galaxies with black hole 'halos'. If the initial photon-to-baryon ratio was large enough, black hole formation would not occur: one would then have to invoke an alternative scenario in which the rest of the background radiation was generated by primordial stars at a comparatively recent epoch. (orig.) [de

  14. Numerical evidence for universality in the excited instability spectrum of magnetically charged Reissner-Nordstroem black holes

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-05-15

    It is well known that the SU(2) Reissner-Nordstroem black-hole solutions of the Einstein-Yang-Mills theory are characterized by an infinite set of unstable (imaginary) eigenvalues {ω_n(T_B_H)}{sub n=0}{sup n=∞} (here T{sub BH} is the black-hole temperature). In this paper we analyze the excited instability spectrum of these magnetically charged black holes. The numerical results suggest the existence of a universal behavior for these black-hole excited eigenvalues. In particular, we show that unstable eigenvalues in the regime ω{sub n} << T{sub BH} are characterized, to a very good degree of accuracy, by the simple universal relation ω{sub n}(r{sub +} - r{sub -}) = constant, where r{sub ±} are the horizon radii of the black hole. (orig.)

  15. Superresolving Black Hole Images with Full-Closure Sparse Modeling

    Crowley, Chelsea; Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    It is believed that almost all galaxies have black holes at their centers. Imaging a black hole is a primary objective to answer scientific questions relating to relativistic accretion and jet formation. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is set to capture images of two nearby black holes, Sagittarius A* at the center of the Milky Way galaxy roughly 26,000 light years away and the other M87 which is in Virgo A, a large elliptical galaxy that is 50 million light years away. Sparse imaging techniques have shown great promise for reconstructing high-fidelity superresolved images of black holes from simulated data. Previous work has included the effects of atmospheric phase errors and thermal noise, but not systematic amplitude errors that arise due to miscalibration. We explore a full-closure imaging technique with sparse modeling that uses closure amplitudes and closure phases to improve the imaging process. This new technique can successfully handle data with systematic amplitude errors. Applying our technique to synthetic EHT data of M87, we find that full-closure sparse modeling can reconstruct images better than traditional methods and recover key structural information on the source, such as the shape and size of the predicted photon ring. These results suggest that our new approach will provide superior imaging performance for data from the EHT and other interferometric arrays.

  16. Quantum toy model for black-hole backreaction

    Maia, Clovis; Schuetzhold, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    We propose a simple quantum field theoretical toy model for black-hole evaporation and study the backreaction of Hawking radiation onto the classical background. It turns out that the horizon is also ''pushed back'' in this situation (i.e., the interior region shrinks) though this backreaction is not caused by energy conservation but by momentum balance. The effective heat capacity and induced entropy variation can have both signs--depending on the parameters of the model

  17. Numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion during Hole Erosion Tests

    Mercier, F.; Bonelli, S.; Golay, F.; Anselmet, F.; Philippe, P.; Borghi, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion of a cohesive soil by a turbulent flow in axisymmetrical geometry, with application to the Hole Erosion Test (HET). The numerical model is based on adaptive remeshing of the water/soil interface to ensure accurate description of the mechanical phenomena occurring near the soil/water interface. The erosion law governing the interface motion is based on two erosion parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion co...

  18. Particle–hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    Bork, L.V. [Center for Fundamental and Applied Research, N. L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pogosov, W.V., E-mail: walter.pogosov@gmail.com [Center for Fundamental and Applied Research, N. L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle–hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  19. Holes in the t-Jz model: A diagrammatic study

    Chernyshev, A.L.; Leung, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    The t-J z model is the strongly anisotropic limit of the t-J model which captures some general properties of doped antiferromagnets (AF close-quote s). The absence of spin fluctuations simplifies the analytical treatment of hole motion in an AF background, and allows us to calculate single- and two-hole spectra with a high accuracy using a regular diagram technique combined with a real-space approach. At the same time, numerical studies of this model via exact diagonalization on small clusters show negligible finite-size effects for a number of quantities, thus allowing a direct comparison between analytical and numerical results. Both approaches demonstrate that the holes have a tendency to pair in p- and d-wave channels at realistic values of t/J. Interactions leading to pairing and effects selecting p and d waves are thoroughly investigated. The role of transverse spin fluctuations is considered using perturbation theory. Based on the results of the present study, we discuss the pairing problem in the realistic t-J-like model. Possible implications for preformed pairs formation and phase separation are drawn. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  20. Black hole entropy in the O(N) model

    Kabat, D.; Shenker, S.H.; Strassler, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    We consider corrections to the entropy of a black hole from an O(N)-invariant linear σ model. We obtain the entropy from a 1/N expansion of the partition function on a cone. The entropy arises from diagrams which are analogous to those introduced by Susskind and Uglum to explain black hole entropy in string theory. The interpretation of the σ-model entropy depends on scale. At short distances, it has a state counting interpretation, as the entropy of entanglement of the N fields φ a . In the infrared, the effective theory has a single composite field σ∼φ a φ a , and the state counting interpretation of the entropy is lost. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  1. Canonical Ensemble Model for Black Hole Radiation Jingyi Zhang

    Canonical Ensemble Model for Black Hole Radiation. 575. For entropy, there is no corresponding thermodynamical quantity, without loss of generalization. Let us define an entropy operator. ˆS = −KB ln ˆρ. (11). Then, the mean value of entropy is. S ≡〈ˆS〉 = tr( ˆρ ˆS) = −KBtr( ˆρ ln ˆρ). (12). For ideal gases, let y = V , then the ...

  2. Rapid growth of seed black holes in the early universe by supra-exponential accretion.

    Alexander, Tal; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2014-09-12

    Mass accretion by black holes (BHs) is typically capped at the Eddington rate, when radiation's push balances gravity's pull. However, even exponential growth at the Eddington-limited e-folding time t(E) ~ few × 0.01 billion years is too slow to grow stellar-mass BH seeds into the supermassive luminous quasars that are observed when the universe is 1 billion years old. We propose a dynamical mechanism that can trigger supra-exponential accretion in the early universe, when a BH seed is bound in a star cluster fed by the ubiquitous dense cold gas flows. The high gas opacity traps the accretion radiation, while the low-mass BH's random motions suppress the formation of a slowly draining accretion disk. Supra-exponential growth can thus explain the puzzling emergence of supermassive BHs that power luminous quasars so soon after the Big Bang. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Ultrarelativistic boost of a black hole in the magnetic universe of Levi-Civita-Bertotti-Robinson

    Ortaggio, Marcello; Astorino, Marco

    2018-05-01

    We consider an exact Einstein-Maxwell solution constructed by Alekseev and Garcia, which describes a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in the magnetic universe of Levi-Civita, Bertotti, and Robinson (LCBR). After reviewing the basic properties of this spacetime, we study the ultrarelativistic limit in which the black hole is boosted to the speed of light, while sending its mass to 0. This results in a nonexpanding impulsive wave traveling in the LCBR universe. The wave front is a 2-sphere carrying two null point particles at its poles—a remnant of the structure of the original static spacetime. It is also shown that the obtained line element belongs to the Kundt class of spacetimes, and the relation with the known family of exact gravitational waves of finite duration propagating in the LCBR background is clarified. In the limit of a vanishing electromagnetic field, one point particle is pushed away to infinity and the single-particle Aichelburg-Sexl p p -wave propagating in Minkowski space is recovered.

  4. Testing effective string models of black holes with fixed scalars

    Krasnitz, M.; Klebanov, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    We solve the problem of mixing between the fixed scalar and metric fluctuations. First, we derive the decoupled fixed scalar equation for the four-dimensional black hole with two different charges. We proceed to the five-dimensional black hole with different electric (one-brane) and magnetic (five-brane) charges, and derive two decoupled equations satisfied by appropriate mixtures of the original fixed scalar fields. The resulting greybody factors are proportional to those that follow from coupling to dimension (2,2) operators on the effective string. In general, however, the string action also contains couplings to chiral operators of dimension (1,3) and (3,1), which cause disagreements with the semiclassical absorption cross sections. Implications of this for the effective string models are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Dynamical models for M15 without a black hole

    Illingworth, G.; King, I.R.

    1977-01-01

    We have fitted the observed velocity dispersion and brightness profile of M15 with dynamical models that have no need for the central black hole suggested by Newell, Da Costa, and Norris. The stellar mixture is the same as in other globular clusters, but M15 has a higher central concentration. In our models the central brightness peak is caused by the gravitational effect of neutron stars; their number is in accord with a reasonable initial mass function and retention probability. Some modes of binary formation are discussed, as a step toward possible explanation of the X-ray source in M15; but the results are inconclusive

  6. On unitarity of the particle-hole dispersive optical model

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2018-02-01

    For the recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model, weak violations of unitarity due to a phenomenological description of the spreading effect are considered. Methods for unitarity restoration are proposed and implemented for the 208Pb nucleus in the description of the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density and strength functions in a wide excitation energy interval that includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. To illustrate abilities of the model, direct neutron decay of the mentioned giant resonance is also considered.

  7. A Zeroth Law Compatible Model to Kerr Black Hole Thermodynamics

    Viktor G. Czinner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the thermodynamic and stability problem of Kerr black holes arising from the nonextensive/nonadditive nature of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula. Nonadditive thermodynamics is often criticized by asserting that the zeroth law cannot be compatible with nonadditive composition rules, so in this work we follow the so-called formal logarithm method to derive an additive entropy function for Kerr black holes also satisfying the zeroth law’s requirement. Starting from the most general, equilibrium compatible, nonadditive entropy composition rule of Abe, we consider the simplest non-parametric approach that is generated by the explicit nonadditive form of the Bekenstein–Hawking formula. This analysis extends our previous results on the Schwarzschild case, and shows that the zeroth law-compatible temperature function in the model is independent of the mass–energy parameter of the black hole. By applying the Poincaré turning point method, we also study the thermodynamic stability problem in the system.

  8. Hopping models and ac universality

    Dyre, Jeppe; Schrøder, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Some general relations for hopping models are established. We proceed to discuss the universality of the ac conductivity which arises in the extreme disorder limit of the random barrier model. It is shown that the relevant dimension entering into the diffusion cluster approximation (DCA) is the h......Some general relations for hopping models are established. We proceed to discuss the universality of the ac conductivity which arises in the extreme disorder limit of the random barrier model. It is shown that the relevant dimension entering into the diffusion cluster approximation (DCA......) is the harmonic (fracton) dimension of the diffusion cluster. The temperature scaling of the dimensionless frequency entering into the DCA is discussed. Finally, some open problems regarding ac universality are listed....

  9. Numerical evidence for universality in the relaxation dynamics of near-extremal Kerr-Newman black holes

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    The coupled gravitational-electromagnetic quasinormal resonances of charged rotating Kerr-Newman black holes are explored. In particular, using the recently published numerical data of Dias et al. (Phys Rev Lett 114:151101, 2015), we show that the characteristic relaxation times τ ≡ 1/Iω{sub 0} of near-extremal Kerr-Newman black holes in the regime Q/r{sub +} ≤ 0.9 are described, to a very good degree of accuracy, by the simple universal relation τ x T{sub BH} = π{sup -1} (here Q/r{sub +}, and T{sub BH} are respectively the electric charge, horizon radius, and temperature of the Kerr-Newman black hole, and ω{sub 0} is the fundamental quasinormal resonance of the perturbed black-hole spacetime). (orig.)

  10. Numerical evidence for universality in the relaxation dynamics of near-extremal Kerr–Newman black holes

    Hod, Shahar, E-mail: shaharhod@gmail.com [The Ruppin Academic Center, 40250, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, 91010, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-22

    The coupled gravitational-electromagnetic quasinormal resonances of charged rotating Kerr–Newman black holes are explored. In particular, using the recently published numerical data of Dias et al. (Phys Rev Lett 114:151101, 2015), we show that the characteristic relaxation times τ≡1/Iω{sub 0} of near-extremal Kerr–Newman black holes in the regime Q/r{sub +}≤0.9 are described, to a very good degree of accuracy, by the simple universal relation τ×T{sub BH}=π{sup -1} (here Q,r{sub +}, and T{sub BH} are respectively the electric charge, horizon radius, and temperature of the Kerr–Newman black hole, and ω{sub 0} is the fundamental quasinormal resonance of the perturbed black-hole spacetime)

  11. Entropy in the classical and quantum polymer black hole models

    Livine, Etera R; Terno, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the entropy counting for black hole horizons in loop quantum gravity (LQG). We argue that the space of 3D closed polyhedra is the classical counterpart of the space of SU(2) intertwiners at the quantum level. Then computing the entropy for the boundary horizon amounts to calculating the density of polyhedra or the number of intertwiners at fixed total area. Following the previous work (Bianchi 2011 Class. Quantum Grav. 28 114006) we dub these the classical and quantum polymer models for isolated horizons in LQG. We provide exact micro-canonical calculations for both models and we show that the classical counting of polyhedra accounts for most of the features of the intertwiner counting (leading order entropy and log-correction), thus providing us with a simpler model to further investigate correlations and dynamics. To illustrate this, we also produce an exact formula for the dimension of the intertwiner space as a density of ‘almost-closed polyhedra’. (paper)

  12. Vector theory of gravity: Universe without black holes and solution of dark energy problem

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.

    2017-12-01

    We propose an alternative theory of gravity which assumes that background geometry of the Universe is fixed four dimensional Euclidean space and gravity is a vector field A k in this space which breaks the Euclidean symmetry. Direction of A k gives the time coordinate, while perpendicular directions are spatial coordinates. Vector gravitational field is coupled to matter universally and minimally through the equivalent metric f ik which is a functional of A k . We show that such assumptions yield a unique theory of gravity, it is free of black holes and, to the best of our knowledge, passes all available tests. For cosmology our theory predicts the same evolution of the Universe as general relativity with cosmological constant and zero spatial curvature. However, the present theory provides explanation of the dark energy as energy of longitudinal gravitational field induced by the Universe expansion and yields, with no free parameters, the value of {{{Ω }}}{{Λ }}=2/3≈ 0.67 which is consistent with the recent Planck result {{{Ω }}}{{Λ }}=0.686+/- 0.02. Such close agreement with cosmological data indicates that gravity has a vector, rather than tensor, origin. We demonstrate that gravitational wave signals measured by LIGO are compatible with vector gravity. They are produced by orbital inspiral of massive neutron stars which can exist in the present theory. We also quantize gravitational field and show that quantum vector gravity is equivalent to QED. Vector gravity can be tested by making more accurate measurement of the time delay of radar signal traveling near the Sun; by improving accuracy of the light deflection experiments; or by measuring propagation direction of gravitational waves relative to laser interferometer arms. Resolving the supermassive object at the center of our Galaxy with VLBA could provide another test of gravity and also shed light on the nature of dark matter.

  13. Primordial black holes as seeds of magnetic fields in the universe

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher

    2018-06-01

    Although it is assumed that magnetic fields in accretion disks are dragged from the interstellar medium, the idea is likely not applicable to primordial black holes (PBHs) formed in the early universe. Here we show that magnetic fields can be generated in initially unmagnetized accretion disks around PBHs through the Biermann battery mechanism, and therefore provide the small scale seeds of magnetic field in the universe. The radial temperature and vertical density profiles of these disks provide the necessary conditions for the battery to operate naturally. The generated seed fields have a toroidal structure with opposite sign in the upper and lower half of the disk. In the case of a thin accretion disk around a rotating PBH, the field generation rate increases with increasing PBH spin. At a fixed r/risco, where r is the radial distance from the PBH and risco is the radius of the innermost stable circular orbit, the battery scales as M-9/4, where M is the PBH's mass. The very weak dependency of the battery on accretion rate, makes this mechanism a viable candidate to provide seed fields in an initially unmagnetized accretion disk, following which the magnetorotational instability could take over.

  14. Gravity, black holes and the very early Universe an introduction to general relativity and cosmology

    Chow, Tai L

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1900s, Albert Einstein formulated two theories that would forever change the landscape of physics: the Special Theory of Relativity and the General Theory of Relativity. By 1925, quantum mechanics had been born out of the dissection of these two theories, and shortly after that, relativistic quantum field theory. We now had in place some important ties between the laws of physics and the types of particle interactions the new physics was uncovering. Gravity is one of the four types of forces that are found throughout the universe. In fact, although it is a relatively weak force, it operates at huge distances, and so must be accounted for in any cosmological system. Unfortunately, gravity continues to defy our neat categorization of how all the forces in nature work together. Professor Tai Chow, from the California State University at Stanislaus in Turlock, lays out for us the basic ideas of Einstein, including his law of gravitation, explains the physics behind black holes, and weaves into this a...

  15. Multi-hole seismic modeling in 3-D space and cross-hole seismic tomography analysis for boulder detection

    Cheng, Fei; Liu, Jiangping; Wang, Jing; Zong, Yuquan; Yu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    A boulder stone, a common geological feature in south China, is referred to the remnant of a granite body which has been unevenly weathered. Undetected boulders could adversely impact the schedule and safety of subway construction when using tunnel boring machine (TBM) method. Therefore, boulder detection has always been a key issue demanded to be solved before the construction. Nowadays, cross-hole seismic tomography is a high resolution technique capable of boulder detection, however, the method can only solve for velocity in a 2-D slice between two wells, and the size and central position of the boulder are generally difficult to be accurately obtained. In this paper, the authors conduct a multi-hole wave field simulation and characteristic analysis of a boulder model based on the 3-D elastic wave staggered-grid finite difference theory, and also a 2-D imaging analysis based on first arrival travel time. The results indicate that (1) full wave field records could be obtained from multi-hole seismic wave simulations. Simulation results describe that the seismic wave propagation pattern in cross-hole high-velocity spherical geological bodies is more detailed and can serve as a basis for the wave field analysis. (2) When a cross-hole seismic section cuts through the boulder, the proposed method provides satisfactory cross-hole tomography results; however, when the section is closely positioned to the boulder, such high-velocity object in the 3-D space would impact on the surrounding wave field. The received diffracted wave interferes with the primary wave and in consequence the picked first arrival travel time is not derived from the profile, which results in a false appearance of high-velocity geology features. Finally, the results of 2-D analysis in 3-D modeling space are comparatively analyzed with the physical model test vis-a-vis the effect of high velocity body on the seismic tomographic measurements.

  16. A holographic view on matrix model of black hole

    Suyama, Takao; Yi Piljin

    2004-01-01

    We investigate a deformed matrix model proposed by Kazakov et.al. in relation to Witten's two-dimensional black hole. The existing conjectures assert the equivalence of the two by mapping each to a deformed c=1 theory called the sine-Liouville theory. We point out that the matrix theory in question may be naturally interpreted as a gauged quantum mechanics deformed by insertion of an exponentiated Wilson loop operator, which gives us more direct and holographic map between the two sides. The matrix model in the usual scaling limit must correspond to the bosonic SL(2,R)/U(1) theory in genus expansion but exact in α'. We successfully test this by computing the Wilson loop expectation value and comparing it against the bulk computation. For the latter, we employ the α'-exact geometry proposed by Dijkgraaf, Verlinde, and Verlinde, which was further advocated by Tseytlin. We close with comments on open problems. (author)

  17. Universality of projectile fragmentation model

    Chaudhuri, G.; Mallik, S.; Das Gupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Presently projectile fragmentation reaction is an important area of research as it is used for the production of radioactive ion beams. In this work, the recently developed projectile fragmentation model with an universal temperature profile is used for studying the charge distributions of different projectile fragmentation reactions with different projectile target combinations at different incident energies. The model for projectile fragmentation consists of three stages: (i) abrasion, (ii) multifragmentation and (iii) evaporation

  18. Black-holes-hedgehogs in the false vacuum and a new physics beyond the Standard Model

    Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Sidharth, B. G.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2017-12-01

    In the present talk, we consider the existence of the two degenerate universal vacua: a) the first Electroweak vacuum at v = 246 GeV - “true vacuum”, and b) the second Planck scale “false vacuum” at v 2 ∼ 1018 GeV. In these vacua, we investigated the different topological defects. The main aim of this paper is an investigation of the hedgehog’s configurations as defects of the false vacuum. In the framework of the f(R) gravity, suggested by authors in their Gravi-Weak Unification model, we obtained a black hole solution, which corresponds to a “hedgehog” - global monopole, “swallowed” by a black-hole with mass ∼ 1019 GeV. These black-holes form a lattice-like structure of the vacuum at the Planck scale. Considering the results of the hedgehog lattice theory in the framework of the SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge-invariant theory with hedgehogs in the Wilson loops, we have used the critical value of temperature for the hedgehog’s confinement phase. This result gave us the possibility to conclude that there exist triplet Higgs fields which can contribute to the SM at the energy scale ≃ 104 ∼ 105 GeV. Showing a new physics at the scale 10÷100 TeV, these triplet Higgs particles can provide the stability of the EW-vacuum of the SM.

  19. Is Black Hole Growth a Universal Process? Exploring Selection Effects in Measurements of AGN Accretion Rates and Host Galaxies.

    Jones, Mackenzie

    2018-01-01

    At the center of essentially every massive galaxy is a monstrous black hole producing luminous radiation driven by the accretion of gas. By observing these active galactic nuclei (AGN) we may trace the growth of black holes across cosmic time. However, our knowledge of the full underlying AGN population is hindered by complex observational biases. My research aims to untangle these biases by using a novel approach to simulate the impact of selection effects on multiwavelength observations.The most statistically powerful studies of AGN to date come from optical spectroscopic surveys, with some reporting a complex relationship between AGN accretion rates and host galaxy characteristics. However, the optical waveband can be strongly influenced by selection effects and dilution from host galaxy star formation. I have shown that accounting for selection effects, the Eddington ratio distribution for optically-selected AGN is consistent with a broad power-law, as seen in the X-rays (Jones et al. 2016). This suggests that a universal Eddington ratio distribution may be enough to describe the full multiwavelength AGN population.Building on these results, I have expanded a semi-numerical galaxy formation simulation to include this straightforward prescription for AGN accretion and explicitly model selection effects. I have found that a simple model for AGN accretion can broadly reproduce the host galaxies and halos of X-ray AGN, and that different AGN selection techniques yield samples with very different host galaxy properties (Jones et al. 2017). Finally, I will discuss the capabilities of this simulation to build synthetic multiwavelength SEDs in order to explore what AGN populations would be detected with the next generation of observatories. This research is supported by a NASA Jenkins Graduate Fellowship under grant no. NNX15AU32H.

  20. Accuracy of Binary Black Hole Waveform Models for Advanced LIGO

    Kumar, Prayush; Fong, Heather; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Chu, Tony; Brown, Duncan; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Simulating Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) Team

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binaries of compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars, are the primary targets for gravitational-wave (GW) detection with Advanced LIGO. Accurate modeling of the emitted GWs is required to extract information about the binary source. The most accurate solution to the general relativistic two-body problem is available in numerical relativity (NR), which is however limited in application due to computational cost. Current searches use semi-analytic models that are based in post-Newtonian (PN) theory and calibrated to NR. In this talk, I will present comparisons between contemporary models and high-accuracy numerical simulations performed using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC), focusing at the questions: (i) How well do models capture binary's late-inspiral where they lack a-priori accurate information from PN or NR, and (ii) How accurately do they model binaries with parameters outside their range of calibration. These results guide the choice of templates for future GW searches, and motivate future modeling efforts.

  1. Running-mass inflation model and primordial black holes

    Drees, Manuel; Erfani, Encieh

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the question whether the running-mass inflation model allows the formation of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) that are sufficiently long-lived to serve as candidates for Dark Matter. We incorporate recent cosmological data, including the WMAP 7-year results. Moreover, we include ''the running of the running'' of the spectral index of the power spectrum, as well as the renormalization group ''running of the running'' of the inflaton mass term. Our analysis indicates that formation of sufficiently heavy, and hence long-lived, PBHs still remains possible in this scenario. As a by-product, we show that the additional term in the inflaton potential still does not allow significant negative running of the spectral index

  2. Retarded coordinates based at a world line and the motion of a small black hole in an external universe

    Poisson, Eric

    2004-01-01

    In the first part of this article I present a system of retarded coordinates based at an arbitrary world line of an arbitrary curved spacetime. The retarded-time coordinate labels forward light cones that are centered on the world line, the radial coordinate is an affine parameter on the null generators of these light cones, and the angular coordinates are constant on each of these generators. The spacetime metric in the retarded coordinates is displayed as an expansion in powers of the radial coordinate and expressed in terms of the world line's acceleration vector and the spacetime's Riemann tensor evaluated at the world line. The formalism is illustrated in two examples, the first involving a comoving world line of a spatially flat cosmology, the other featuring an observer in circular motion in the Schwarzschild spacetime. The main application of the formalism is presented in the second part of the article, in which I consider the motion of a small black hole in an empty external universe. I use the retarded coordinates to construct the metric of the small black hole perturbed by the tidal field of the external universe, and the metric of the external universe perturbed by the presence of the black hole. Matching these metrics produces the MiSaTaQuWa equations of motion for the small black hole

  3. Self consistent MHD modeling of the solar wind from coronal holes with distinct geometries

    Stewart, G. A.; Bravo, S.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing an iterative scheme, a self-consistent axisymmetric MHD model for the solar wind has been developed. We use this model to evaluate the properties of the solar wind issuing from the open polar coronal hole regions of the Sun, during solar minimum. We explore the variation of solar wind parameters across the extent of the hole and we investigate how these variations are affected by the geometry of the hole and the strength of the field at the coronal base.

  4. ON THE LAMPPOST MODEL OF ACCRETING BLACK HOLES

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Szanecki, Michał [Łódź University, Department of Physics, Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Zdziarski, Andrzej A. [Centrum Astronomiczne im. M. Kopernika, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-04-10

    We study the lamppost model, in which the X-ray source in accreting black hole (BH) systems is located on the rotation axis close to the horizon. We point out a number of inconsistencies in the widely used lamppost model relxilllp, e.g., neglecting the redshift of the photons emitted by the lamppost that are directly observed. They appear to invalidate those model fitting results for which the source distances from the horizon are within several gravitational radii. Furthermore, if those results were correct, most of the photons produced in the lamppost would be trapped by the BH, and the luminosity generated in the source as measured at infinity would be much larger than that observed. This appears to be in conflict with the observed smooth state transitions between the hard and soft states of X-ray binaries. The required increase of the accretion rate and the associated efficiency reduction also present a problem for active galactic nuclei. Then, those models imply the luminosity measured in the local frame is much higher than that produced in the source and measured at infinity, due to the additional effects of time dilation and redshift, and the electron temperature is significantly higher than that observed. We show that these conditions imply that the fitted sources would be out of the e{sup ±} pair equilibrium. On the other hand, the above issues pose relatively minor problems for sources at large distances from the BH, where relxilllp can still be used.

  5. Black holes and the multiverse

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse

  6. Black holes and the multiverse

    Garriga, Jaume [Departament de Fisica Fonamental i Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, Barcelona, 08028 Spain (Spain); Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: jaume.garriga@ub.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: jun.zhang@tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Tufts University, 574 Boston Ave, Medford, MA, 02155 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse.

  7. Dynamical Formation of Kerr Black Holes with Synchronized Hair: An Analytic Model.

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen

    2017-12-29

    East and Pretorius have successfully evolved, using fully nonlinear numerical simulations, the superradiant instability of the Kerr black hole (BH) triggered by a massive, complex vector field. Evolutions terminate in stationary states of a vector field condensate synchronized with a rotating BH horizon. We show that these end points are fundamental states of Kerr BHs with synchronized Proca hair. Motivated by the "experimental data" from these simulations, we suggest a universal (i.e., field-spin independent), analytic model for the subset of BHs with synchronized hair that possess a quasi-Kerr horizon, applicable in the weak hair regime. Comparing this model with fully nonlinear numerical solutions of BHs with a synchronized scalar or Proca hair, we show that the model is accurate for hairy BHs that may emerge dynamically from superradiance, whose domain we identify.

  8. Black Holes

    Townsend, P. K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with several not-quantum aspects of black holes, with emphasis on theoretical and mathematical issues related to numerical modeling of black hole space-times. Part of the material has a review character, but some new results or proposals are also presented. We review the experimental evidence for existence of black holes. We propose a definition of black hole region for any theory governed by a symmetric hyperbolic system of equations. Our definition reproduces the usu...

  9. Entropy - Some Cosmological Questions Answered by Model of Expansive Nondecelerative Universe

    Miroslav Sukenik

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The paper summarizes the background of Expansive Nondecelerative Universe model and its potential to offer answers to some open cosmological questions related to entropy. Three problems are faced in more detail, namely that of Hawkings phenomenon of black holes evaporation, maximum entropy of the Universe during its evolution, and time evolution of specific entropy.

  10. A numerical model for etching through a circular hole

    Rath, P; Chai, J C; Zheng, H; Lam, Y C; Murukeshan, V M

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model based on the total concentration of etchant is proposed to model the wet chemical etching through a circular hole. The reaction at the etchant-substrate interface is assumed to be infinitely fast i.e. etching is controlled by the diffusion of etchant to the interface. The proposed model is based on a fixed-grid approach analogous to the enthalpy method. The total concentration of etchant is the sum of the unreacted etchant concentration and the reacted etchant concentration. The reacted concentration of etchant is a measure of the etchfront position during etching. The governing mass diffusion equation based on the total concentration of etchant includes the interface condition. The etchfront position is found implicitly using the proposed approach. The computational domain is fixed, which includes the whole etchant and substrate domain including the mask region. For demonstration purposes, the finite volume method is used to solve the governing mass diffusion equation with prescribed initial and boundary conditions. The effect of mask thickness and initial etchant concentration on the shape evolution of etchfront is studied

  11. Hierarchical Model for the Similarity Measurement of a Complex Holed-Region Entity Scene

    Zhanlong Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex multi-holed-region entity scenes (i.e., sets of random region with holes are common in spatial database systems, spatial query languages, and the Geographic Information System (GIS. A multi-holed-region (region with an arbitrary number of holes is an abstraction of the real world that primarily represents geographic objects that have more than one interior boundary, such as areas that contain several lakes or lakes that contain islands. When the similarity of the two complex holed-region entity scenes is measured, the number of regions in the scenes and the number of holes in the regions are usually different between the two scenes, which complicates the matching relationships of holed-regions and holes. The aim of this research is to develop several holed-region similarity metrics and propose a hierarchical model to measure comprehensively the similarity between two complex holed-region entity scenes. The procedure first divides a complex entity scene into three layers: a complex scene, a micro-spatial-scene, and a simple entity (hole. The relationships between the adjacent layers are considered to be sets of relationships, and each level of similarity measurements is nested with the adjacent one. Next, entity matching is performed from top to bottom, while the similarity results are calculated from local to global. In addition, we utilize position graphs to describe the distribution of the holed-regions and subsequently describe the directions between the holes using a feature matrix. A case study that uses the Great Lakes in North America in 1986 and 2015 as experimental data illustrates the entire similarity measurement process between two complex holed-region entity scenes. The experimental results show that the hierarchical model accounts for the relationships of the different layers in the entire complex holed-region entity scene. The model can effectively calculate the similarity of complex holed-region entity scenes, even if the

  12. Primordial black holes from single field models of inflation

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    Primordial black holes (PBH) have been shown to arise from high peaks in the matter power spectra of multi-field models of inflation. Here we show, with a simple toy model, that it is also possible to generate a peak in the curvature power spectrum of single-field inflation. We assume that the effective dynamics of the inflaton field presents a near-inflection point which slows down the field right before the end of inflation and gives rise to a prominent spike in the fluctuation power spectrum at scales much smaller than those probed by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Large Scale Structure (LSS) observations. This peak will give rise, upon reentry during the radiation era, to PBH via gravitational collapse. The mass and abundance of these PBH is such that they could constitute the totality of the Dark Matter today. We satisfy all CMB and LSS constraints and predict a very broad range of PBH masses. Some of these PBH are light enough that they will evaporate before structure formation, leaving behind a ...

  13. Two-zone model of coronal hole structure in the high corona

    Wang, Z.; Kundu, M.R.; Yoshimura, H.

    1988-01-01

    The two-zone coronal hole structure model presently proposed for the high corona at 1.5-1.7 solar radii emerges from a comparison of computation results for the potential magnetic fields of the corona and meter-decameter radio observations. The two zones of a coronal hole are defined by the configuration of magnetic field lines around a coronal hole: (1) the central hole of an open diverging magnetic field line system; and (2) the boundary zone between the central zone of the open field line system and the closed field line system or systems surrounding the open field line system. 19 references

  14. Black holes from extended inflation

    Hsu, S.D.H.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that models of extended inflation, in which modified Einstein gravity allows a graceful exit from the false vacuum, lead to copious production of black holes. The critical temperature of the inflationary phase transition must be >10 8 GeV in order to avoid severe cosmological problems in a universe dominated by black holes. We speculate on the possibility that the interiors of false vacuum regions evolve into baby universes. (orig.)

  15. Chaos and order in models of black hole pairs

    Levin, Janna

    2006-01-01

    Chaos in the orbits of black hole pairs has by now been confirmed by several independent groups. While the chaotic behavior of binary black hole orbits is no longer argued, it remains difficult to quantify the importance of chaos to the evolutionary dynamics of a pair of comparable mass black holes. None of our existing approximations are robust enough to offer convincing quantitative conclusions in the most highly nonlinear regime. It is intriguing to note that, in three different approximations to a black hole pair built of a spinning black hole and a nonspinning companion, two approximations exhibit chaos and one approximation does not. The fully relativistic scenario of a spinning test mass around a Schwarzschild black hole shows chaos, as does the post-Newtonian Lagrangian approximation. However, the approximately equivalent post-Newtonian Hamiltonian approximation does not show chaos when only one body spins. It is well known in dynamical systems theory that one system can be regular while an approximately related system is chaotic, so there is no formal conflict. However, the physical question remains: Is there chaos for comparable mass binaries when only one object spins? We are unable to answer this question given the poor convergence of the post-Newtonian approximation to the fully relativistic system. A resolution awaits better approximations that can be trusted in the highly nonlinear regime

  16. A review of the microscopic modeling of the 5-dim. black hole of IIB

    We review the theory of the microscopic modeling of the 5-dim. black hole of type IIB string theory in terms of the 1-5 brane system. A detailed discussion of the low energy effective Lagrangian of the brane system is presented and the black hole micro-states are identified. These considerations are valid in the strong ...

  17. Probing the universality of synchronised hair around rotating black holes with Q-clouds

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen; Subagyo, Bintoro

    2018-04-01

    Recently, various families of black holes (BHs) with synchronised hair have been constructed. These are rotating BHs surrounded, as fully non-linear solutions of the appropriate Einstein-matter model, by a non-trivial bosonic field in synchronised rotation with the BH horizon. Some families bifurcate globally from a bald BH (e.g. the Kerr BH), whereas others bifurcate only locally from a bald BH (e.g. the D = 5 Myers-Perry BH). It would be desirable to understand how generically synchronisation allows hairy BHs to bifurcate from bald ones. However, the construction and scanning of the domain of existence of the former families of BHs can be a difficult and time consuming (numerical) task. Here, we first provide a simple perturbative argument to understand the generality of the synchronisation condition. Then, we observe that the study of Q-clouds is a generic tool to establish the existence of BHs with synchronised hair bifurcating (globally or locally) from a given bald BH without having to solve the fully non-linear coupled system of Einstein-matter equations. As examples, we apply this tool to establish the existence of synchronised hair around D = 6 Myers-Perry BHs, D = 5 black rings and D = 4 Kerr-AdS BHs, where D is the spacetime dimension. The black rings case provides an example of BHs with synchronised hair beyond spherical horizon topology, further establishing the generality of the mechanism.

  18. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  19. Warm anisotropic inflationary universe model

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of warm inflation using vector fields in the background of a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I model of the universe. We formulate the field equations, and slow-roll and perturbation parameters (scalar and tensor power spectra as well as their spectral indices) in the slow-roll approximation. We evaluate all these parameters in terms of the directional Hubble parameter during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by taking the dissipation factor as a function of the scalar field as well as a constant. In each case, we calculate the observational parameter of interest, i.e., the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of the inflaton. The graphical behavior of these parameters shows that the anisotropic model is also compatible with WMAP7 and the Planck observational data. (orig.)

  20. Modelling investigations of DBRs and cavities with photonic crystal holes for application in VCSELs

    Ivanov, P; Ho, Y-L D; Cryan, M J; Rorison, J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the reflection spectra of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and DBR cavities with and without photonic crystal holes fabricated within them. A finite-difference time domain (FDTD) electromagnetic model which is considered to provide the exact solution of Maxwell equations is used as a reference model. Two simplified modelling approaches are compared to the FDTD results: an effective index model where the individual DBR constituent layers penetrated by holes possess an effective index and a spatial loss model where optical losses are introduced spatially where the holes are fabricated. Results of the FDTD and the spatial loss model show that optical loss determines the properties of an etched DBR and DBR cavity when the lattice constant of the holes of exceeds 1 μm and the hole depth is small. The spatial loss model compares well to the FDTD results for holes with a lattice period exceeding 1 μm. We also consider the realistic effect of angling the sides of the etched holes. (paper)

  1. Where are all the gravastars? Limits upon the gravastar model from accreting black holes

    Broderick, Avery E; Narayan, Ramesh [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 51, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2007-02-07

    The gravastar model, which postulates a strongly correlated thin shell of anisotropic matter surrounding a region of anti-de Sitter space, has been proposed as an alternative to black holes. We discuss constraints that present-day observations of well-known black hole candidates place on this model. We focus upon two black hole candidates known to have extraordinarily low luminosities: the supermassive black hole in the galactic centre, Sagittarius A*, and the stellar-mass black hole, XTE J1118 + 480. We find that the length scale for modifications of the type discussed in Chapline et al (2003 Int. J. Mod. Phys. 18 3587-90) must be sub-Planckian.

  2. A Universal Scaling for the Energetics of Relativistic Jets From Black Hole Systems

    Nemmen, R. S.; Georganopoulos, M.; Guiriec, S.; Meyer, E. T.; Gehrels, N.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Black holes generate collimated, relativistic jets which have been observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), microquasars, and at the center of some galaxies (active galactic nuclei; AGN). How jet physics scales from stellar black holes in GRBs to the supermassive ones in AGNs is still unknown. Here we show that jets produced by AGNs and GRBs exhibit the same correlation between the kinetic power carried by accelerated particles and the gamma-ray luminosity, with AGNs and GRBs lying at the low and high-luminosity ends, respectively, of the correlation. This result implies that the efficiency of energy dissipation in jets produced in black hole systems is similar over 10 orders of magnitude in jet power, establishing a physical analogy between AGN and GRBs.

  3. Universal strategy for Ohmic hole injection into organic semiconductors with high ionization energies.

    Kotadiya, Naresh B; Lu, Hao; Mondal, Anirban; Ie, Yutaka; Andrienko, Denis; Blom, Paul W M; Wetzelaer, Gert-Jan A H

    2018-04-01

    Barrier-free (Ohmic) contacts are a key requirement for efficient organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and field-effect transistors. Here, we propose a simple and robust way of forming an Ohmic hole contact on organic semiconductors with a high ionization energy (IE). The injected hole current from high-work-function metal-oxide electrodes is improved by more than an order of magnitude by using an interlayer for which the sole requirement is that it has a higher IE than the organic semiconductor. Insertion of the interlayer results in electrostatic decoupling of the electrode from the semiconductor and realignment of the Fermi level with the IE of the organic semiconductor. The Ohmic-contact formation is illustrated for a number of material combinations and solves the problem of hole injection into organic semiconductors with a high IE of up to 6 eV.

  4. Modeling the fluid/soil interface erosion in the Hole Erosion Test

    Kissi B.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon which yields at its final stage to insidious fluid leakages under the hydraulic infrastructures known as piping and which are the main cause of their rupture. The Hole Erosion Test is commonly used to quantify the rate of piping erosion. In this work, The Hole Erosion Test is modelled by using Fluent software package. The aim is to predict the erosion rate of soil during the hole erosion test. The renormalization group theory – based k–ε turbulence model equations are used. This modelling makes it possible describing the effect of the clay concentration in flowing water on erosion. Unlike the usual one dimensional models, the proposed modelling shows that erosion is not uniform erosion along the hole length. In particular, the concentration of clay is found to increase noticeably the erosion rate.

  5. New particle-hole symmetries and the extended interacting boson model

    De Coster, C; Decroix, B; Heyde, Kris L G; Oros, A M

    1998-01-01

    We describe shape coexistence and intruder many-particle-hole (mp-nh)excitations in the extended interacting boson model EIBM and EIBM-2,combining both the particle-hole and the charge degree of freedom.Besides the concept of I-spin multiplets and subsequently $SU(4)$ multiplets, we touch upon the existence of particle-hole mixed symmetry states. We furthermore describe regular and intrudermany-particle-hole excitations in one nucleus on an equal footing, creating (annihilating) particle-hole pairs using the K-spin operatorand studying possible mixing between these states. As a limiting case,we treat the coupling of two IBM-1 Hamiltonians, each decribing the regular and intruder excitations respectively, in particular lookingat the $U(5)$-$SU(3)$ dynamical symmetry coupling. We apply such coupling scheme to the Po isotopes.

  6. Sustaining Community-University Collaborations: The Durham University Model

    Andrew Russell

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Durham University has initiated a community outreach and engagement program based on an evolving multifaceted model. This article analyses the components of the model and looks at how our work at Durham has become increasingly embedded in the structures and processes of the university as it has developed. The strengths and weaknesses in what has been achieved are highlighted, as is the future vision for the further development of this innovative community-university program. Keywords Public engagement; community partnerships; employer supported volunteering; corporate social responsibility

  7. Model of the static universe within GR

    Karbanovski, V. V.; Tarasova, A. S.; Salimova, A. S.; Bilinskaya, G. V.; Sumbulov, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    Within GR, the problems of the Robertson-Walker universe are discussed. The approach based on transition to a nondiagonal line element is suggested. Within the considered approach, the static universe model is investigated. The possibility of constructing scenarios without an initial singularity and “exotic” matter is discussed. Accordance of the given model to the properties of the observable universe is discussed.

  8. Universality, maximum radiation, and absorption in high-energy collisions of black holes with spin.

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-07-26

    We explore the impact of black hole spins on the dynamics of high-energy black hole collisions. We report results from numerical simulations with γ factors up to 2.49 and dimensionless spin parameter χ=+0.85, +0.6, 0, -0.6, -0.85. We find that the scattering threshold becomes independent of spin at large center-of-mass energies, confirming previous conjectures that structure does not matter in ultrarelativistic collisions. It has further been argued that in this limit all of the kinetic energy of the system may be radiated by fine tuning the impact parameter to threshold. On the contrary, we find that only about 60% of the kinetic energy is radiated for γ=2.49. By monitoring apparent horizons before and after scattering events we show that the "missing energy" is absorbed by the individual black holes in the encounter, and moreover the individual black-hole spins change significantly. We support this conclusion with perturbative calculations. An extrapolation of our results to the limit γ→∞ suggests that about half of the center-of-mass energy of the system can be emitted in gravitational radiation, while the rest must be converted into rest-mass and spin energy.

  9. University Administration on a Political Model.

    Walker, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that recognizing the university as a political community may lead to better management and organization. The patriarchal role, the president as hero, dispersed power, how the university really functions, and a political model are described. (MLW)

  10. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  11. A Model of Nonsingular Universe

    Changjun Gao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the background of Friedmann–Robertson–Walker Universe, there exists Hawking radiation which comes from the cosmic apparent horizon due to quantum effect. Although the Hawking radiation on the late time evolution of the universe could be safely neglected, it plays an important role in the very early stage of the universe. In view of this point, we identify the temperature in the scalar field potential with the Hawking temperature of cosmic apparent horizon. Then we find a nonsingular universe sourced by the temperature-dependent scalar field. We find that the universe could be created from a de Sitter phase which has the Planck energy density. Thus the Big-Bang singularity is avoided.

  12. Particle-hole symmetry in the interacting-boson model: Fermion and boson aspects

    Johnson, A.B.; Vincent, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    We show that the S-D subspaces, which are used in the Otsuka-Arima-Iachello microscopic derivation of the interacting-boson model, form a particle-hole-symmetric family. Consequently, there exist particle-hole-symmetric prescriptions for determining the structure of the S and D pairs. This result holds independently of whether the Hamiltonian conserves generalized seniority. Nevertheless, there are deviations from particle-hole symmetry when boson matrix elements involving more than two d bosons are calculated in lowest order using the boson mapping procedure of Otsuka, Arima, and Iachello. These deviations are used to estimate the inaccuracies introduced by the lowest-order mapping

  13. Universal charge-mass relation: From black holes to atomic nuclei

    Hod, Shahar

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic censorship hypothesis, introduced by Penrose forty years ago, is one of the corner stones of general relativity. This conjecture asserts that spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes. The elimination of a black-hole horizon is ruled out by this principle because that would expose naked singularities to distant observers. We test the consistency of this prediction in a gedanken experiment in which a charged object is swallowed by a charged black hole. We find that the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture requires the existence of a charge-mass bound of the form q≤μ 2/3 E c -1/3 , where q and μ are the charge and mass of the physical system respectively, and E c is the critical electric field for pair-production. Applying this bound to charged atomic nuclei, one finds an upper limit on the number Z of protons in a nucleus of given mass number A: Z≤Z * =α -1/3 A 2/3 , where α=e 2 /h is the fine structure constant. We test the validity of this novel bound against the (Z,A)-relation of atomic nuclei as deduced from the Weizsaecker semi-empirical mass formula.

  14. Universal charge-mass relation: From black holes to atomic nuclei

    Hod, Shahar, E-mail: shaharhod@gmail.co [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2010-10-04

    The cosmic censorship hypothesis, introduced by Penrose forty years ago, is one of the corner stones of general relativity. This conjecture asserts that spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes. The elimination of a black-hole horizon is ruled out by this principle because that would expose naked singularities to distant observers. We test the consistency of this prediction in a gedanken experiment in which a charged object is swallowed by a charged black hole. We find that the validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture requires the existence of a charge-mass bound of the form q{<=}{mu}{sup 2/3}E{sub c}{sup -1/3}, where q and {mu} are the charge and mass of the physical system respectively, and E{sub c} is the critical electric field for pair-production. Applying this bound to charged atomic nuclei, one finds an upper limit on the number Z of protons in a nucleus of given mass number A: Z{<=}Z{sup *}={alpha}{sup -1/3}A{sup 2/3}, where {alpha}=e{sup 2}/h is the fine structure constant. We test the validity of this novel bound against the (Z,A)-relation of atomic nuclei as deduced from the Weizsaecker semi-empirical mass formula.

  15. Virtual Universities: Current Models and Future Trends.

    Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    Describes current models of distance education (single-mode distance teaching universities, dual- and mixed-mode universities, extension services, consortia-type ventures, and new technology-based universities), including their merits and problems. Discusses future trends in potential student constituencies, faculty roles, forms of knowledge…

  16. Virtual Models of European Universities

    Pedersen, Sanya Gertsen

    2003-01-01

    The study provides a detailed report on the current and possible future use of ICT by European universities for educational and organisational purposes. The report presents: • A general description of the current situation regarding the use of ICT in EU universities in both the educational...... and the organisational setting. • An in-depth study of selected institutions through case studies. • A future-oriented analysis. • A set of recommendations for future action....

  17. Three steps to the Universe from the sun to black holes to the mystery of dark matter

    Garfinkle, David

    2009-01-01

    If scientists can't touch the Sun, how do they know what it's made of? And if we can't see black holes, how can we be confident they exist? Gravitational physicist David Garfinkle and his brother, science fiction writer Richard Garfinkle, tackle these questions and more in Three Steps to the Universe, a tour through some of the most complex phenomena in the cosmos and an accessible exploration of how scientists acquire knowledge about the universe through observation, indirect detection, and theory. The authors begin by inviting readers to step away from the Earth and reconsider our Sun. What we can directly observe of this star is limited to its surface, but with the advent of telescopes and spectroscopy, scientists know more than ever about its physical characteristics, origins, and projected lifetime. From the Sun, the authors journey further out into space to explore black holes. The Garfinkle brothers explain that our understanding of these astronomical oddities began in theory, and growing mathematica...

  18. Probing Models of Dark Matter and the Early Universe

    Orlofsky, Nicholas David

    This thesis discusses models for dark matter (DM) and their behavior in the early universe. An important question is how phenomenological probes can directly search for signals of DM today. Another topic of investigation is how the DM and other processes in the early universe must evolve. Then, astrophysical bounds on early universe dynamics can constrain DM. We will consider these questions in the context of three classes of DM models--weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), axions, and primordial black holes (PBHs). Starting with WIMPs, we consider models where the DM is charged under the electroweak gauge group of the Standard Model. Such WIMPs, if generated by a thermal cosmological history, are constrained by direct detection experiments. To avoid present or near-future bounds, the WIMP model or cosmological history must be altered in some way. This may be accomplished by the inclusion of new states that coannihilate with the WIMP or a period of non-thermal evolution in the early universe. Future experiments are likely to probe some of these altered scenarios, and a non-observation would require a high degree of tuning in some of the model parameters in these scenarios. Next, axions, as light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, are susceptible to quantum fluctuations in the early universe that lead to isocurvature perturbations, which are constrained by observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We ask what it would take to allow axion models in the face of these strong CMB bounds. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed, elucidating the difficulties in these constructions. Avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space. Finally, PBHs have received interest in part due to observations by LIGO of merging black hole binaries. We ask how these PBHs could arise through inflationary models and investigate the opportunity

  19. Accuracy of binary black hole waveform models for aligned-spin binaries

    Kumar, Prayush; Chu, Tony; Fong, Heather; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2016-05-01

    Coalescing binary black holes are among the primary science targets for second generation ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Reliable gravitational waveform models are central to detection of such systems and subsequent parameter estimation. This paper performs a comprehensive analysis of the accuracy of recent waveform models for binary black holes with aligned spins, utilizing a new set of 84 high-accuracy numerical relativity simulations. Our analysis covers comparable mass binaries (mass-ratio 1 ≤q ≤3 ), and samples independently both black hole spins up to a dimensionless spin magnitude of 0.9 for equal-mass binaries and 0.85 for unequal mass binaries. Furthermore, we focus on the high-mass regime (total mass ≳50 M⊙ ). The two most recent waveform models considered (PhenomD and SEOBNRv2) both perform very well for signal detection, losing less than 0.5% of the recoverable signal-to-noise ratio ρ , except that SEOBNRv2's efficiency drops slightly for both black hole spins aligned at large magnitude. For parameter estimation, modeling inaccuracies of the SEOBNRv2 model are found to be smaller than systematic uncertainties for moderately strong GW events up to roughly ρ ≲15 . PhenomD's modeling errors are found to be smaller than SEOBNRv2's, and are generally irrelevant for ρ ≲20 . Both models' accuracy deteriorates with increased mass ratio, and when at least one black hole spin is large and aligned. The SEOBNRv2 model shows a pronounced disagreement with the numerical relativity simulation in the merger phase, for unequal masses and simultaneously both black hole spins very large and aligned. Two older waveform models (PhenomC and SEOBNRv1) are found to be distinctly less accurate than the more recent PhenomD and SEOBNRv2 models. Finally, we quantify the bias expected from all four waveform models during parameter estimation for several recovered binary parameters: chirp mass, mass ratio, and effective spin.

  20. Modeling Polarized Emission from Black Hole Jets: Application to M87 Core Jet

    Monika Mościbrodzka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We combine three-dimensional general-relativistic numerical models of hot, magnetized Advection Dominated Accretion Flows around a supermassive black hole and the corresponding outflows from them with a general relativistic polarized radiative transfer model to produce synthetic radio images and spectra of jet outflows. We apply the model to the underluminous core of M87 galaxy. The assumptions and results of the calculations are discussed in context of millimeter observations of the M87 jet launching zone. Our ab initio polarized emission and rotation measure models allow us to address the constrains on the mass accretion rate onto the M87 supermassive black hole.

  1. Quasinormal modes of brane-localized standard model fields. II. Kerr black holes

    Kanti, P.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of the fundamental quasinormal modes of all standard model fields propagating on a brane embedded in a higher-dimensional rotating black-hole spacetime. The equations of motion for fields with spin s=0, 1/2 and 1 propagating in the induced-on-the-brane background are solved numerically, and the dependence of their QN spectra on the black-hole angular momentum and dimensionality of spacetime is investigated. It is found that the brane-localized field perturbations are longer-lived when the higher-dimensional black hole rotates faster, while an increase in the number of transverse-to-the-brane dimensions reduces their lifetime. Finally, the quality factor Q, that determines the best oscillator among the different field perturbations, is investigated and found to depend on properties of both the particular field studied (spin, multipole numbers) and the gravitational background (dimensionality, black-hole angular momentum parameter)

  2. Modeling AGN outbursts from supermassive black hole binaries

    Tanaka T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When galaxies merge to assemble more massive galaxies, their nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs should form bound binaries. As these interact with their stellar and gaseous environments, they will become increasingly compact, culminating in inspiral and coalescence through the emission of gravitational radiation. Because galaxy mergers and interactions are also thought to fuel star formation and nuclear black hole activity, it is plausible that such binaries would lie in gas-rich environments and power active galactic nuclei (AGN. The primary difference is that these binaries have gravitational potentials that vary – through their orbital motion as well as their orbital evolution – on humanly tractable timescales, and are thus excellent candidates to give rise to coherent AGN variability in the form of outbursts and recurrent transients. Although such electromagnetic signatures would be ideally observed concomitantly with the binary’s gravitational-wave signatures, they are also likely to be discovered serendipitously in wide-field, high-cadence surveys; some may even be confused for stellar tidal disruption events. I discuss several types of possible “smoking gun” AGN signatures caused by the peculiar geometry predicted for accretion disks around SMBH binaries.

  3. Emergent universe model with dissipative effects

    Debnath, P. S.; Paul, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    Emergent universe model is presented in general theory of relativity with isotropic fluid in addition to viscosity. We obtain cosmological solutions that permit emergent universe scenario in the presence of bulk viscosity that are described by either Eckart theory or Truncated Israel Stewart (TIS) theory. The stability of the solutions are also studied. In this case, the emergent universe (EU) model is analyzed with observational data. In the presence of viscosity, one obtains emergent universe scenario, which however is not permitted in the absence of viscosity. The EU model is compatible with cosmological observations.

  4. Are black holes a serious threat to scalar field dark matter models?

    Barranco, Juan; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Bernal, Argelia; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Nunez, Dario; Sarbach, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Classical scalar fields have been proposed as possible candidates for the dark matter component of the universe. Given the fact that supermassive black holes seem to exist at the center of most galaxies, in order to be a viable candidate for the dark matter halo a scalar field configuration should be stable in the presence of a central black hole, or at least be able to survive for cosmological time scales. In the present work we consider a scalar field as a test field on a Schwarzschild background, and study under which conditions one can obtain long-lived configurations. We present a detailed study of the Klein-Gordon equation in the Schwarzschild space-time, both from an analytical and numerical point of view, and show that indeed there exist quasistationary solutions that can remain surrounding a black hole for large time scales.

  5. The Offshore Model for Universities

    Ross, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing effort of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to bring higher education services within the purview of the General Agreement on Trade and Services (GATS). One result of the anticipated liberalization of trade in education, the author explains, is the headlong rush of Anglophone universities into the global market…

  6. University Students' Meta-Modelling Knowledge

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background: As one part of scientific meta-knowledge, students' meta-modelling knowledge should be promoted on different educational levels such as primary school, secondary school and university. This study focuses on the assessment of university students' meta-modelling knowledge using a paper-pencil questionnaire. Purpose: The general purpose…

  7. Search for black holes

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M

    2003-01-01

    Methods and results of searching for stellar mass black holes in binary systems and for supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei of different types are described. As of now (June 2002), a total of 100 black hole candidates are known. All the necessary conditions Einstein's General Relativity imposes on the observational properties of black holes are satisfied for candidate objects available, thus further assuring the existence of black holes in the Universe. Prospects for obtaining sufficient criteria for reliably distinguishing candidate black holes from real black holes are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. Particles and holes equivalence for generalized seniority and the interacting boson model

    Talmi, I.

    1982-01-01

    An apparent ambiguity was recently reported in coupling either pairs of identical fermions or hole pairs. This is explained here as due to a Hamiltonian whose lowest eigenstates do not have the structure prescribed by generalized seniority. It is shown that generalized seniority eigenstates can be equivalently constructed from correlated J = 0 and J = 2 pair states of either particles or holes. The interacting boson model parameters calculated can be unambiguously interpreted and then are of real interest to the shell model basis of interacting boson model

  9. Primordial inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. II - General features of spherical models at late times

    Olson, D. W.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper studies the density profile that forms around a spherically symmetric bound central core immersed in a homogeneous-background k = 0 or k = -1 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, with zero pressure. Although the density profile in the linearized regime is almost arbitrary, in the nonlinear regime certain universal features of the density profile are obtained that are independent of the details of the initial conditions. The formation of 'halos' ('holes') with densities greater than (less than) the average cosmological density is discussed. It is shown that in most regions 'halos' form, and universal values are obtained for the slope of the ln (density)-ln (radius) profile in those 'halos' at late times, independently of the shape of the initial density profile. Restrictions are derived on where it is possible for 'holes' to exist at late times and on how such 'holes' must have evolved.

  10. Exotic aspects of black holes: an astronaut near the horizon (on the methodological note by A A Grib and Yu V Pavlov 'Is it possible to see the infinite future of the Universe when falling into a black hole?')

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M

    2009-01-01

    We comment on the methodological note by A A Grib and Yu V Pavlov [Phys. Usp. 52 257 (2009)] to show that its authors are incorrect in understanding a passage that they quote from A M Cherepashchuk's book Black Holes in the Universe (Fryazino: Vek-2, 2005, p.7) and which supposes an astronaut to be at rest in the vicinity of the horizon (not to fall freely into a black hole!). With this error corrected, Grib and Pavlov's note is quite useful methodologically. (letters to the editors)

  11. A computationally exact method of Dawson's model for hole dynamics of one-dimensional plasma

    Kitahara, Kazuo; Tanno, Kohki; Takada, Toshio; Hatori, Tadatsugu; Urata, Kazuhiro; Irie, Haruyuki; Nambu, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Kohichi.

    1990-01-01

    We show a simple but computationally exact solution of the one-dimensional plasma model, so-called 'Dawson's model'. Using this solution, we can describe the evolution of the plasma and find the relative stabilization of a big hole after the instability of two streams. (author)

  12. A semi-analytical model for the acoustic impedance of finite length circular holes with mean flow

    Yang, Dong; Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic response of a circular hole with mean flow passing through it is highly relevant to Helmholtz resonators, fuel injectors, perforated plates, screens, liners and many other engineering applications. A widely used analytical model [M.S. Howe. "Onthe theory of unsteady high Reynolds number flow through a circular aperture", Proc. of the Royal Soc. A. 366, 1725 (1979), 205-223] which assumes an infinitesimally short hole was recently shown to be insufficient for predicting the impedance of holes with a finite length. In the present work, an analytical model based on Green's function method is developed to take the hole length into consideration for "short" holes. The importance of capturing the modified vortex noise accurately is shown. The vortices shed at the hole inlet edge are convected to the hole outlet and further downstream to form a vortex sheet. This couples with the acoustic waves and this coupling has the potential to generate as well as absorb acoustic energy in the low frequency region. The impedance predicted by this model shows the importance of capturing the path of the shed vortex. When the vortex path is captured accurately, the impedance predictions agree well with previous experimental and CFD results, for example predicting the potential for generation of acoustic energy at higher frequencies. For "long" holes, a simplified model which combines Howe's model with plane acoustic waves within the hole is developed. It is shown that the most important effect in this case is the acoustic non-compactness of the hole.

  13. Universality in the relaxation dynamics of the composed black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system: The role of quantum Schwinger discharge

    Shahar Hod

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quasinormal resonance spectrum {ωn(μ,q,M,Q}n=0n=∞ of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime is studied analytically in the large-coupling regime qQ≫Mμ (here {μ,q} are respectively the mass and charge coupling constant of the field, and {M,Q} are respectively the mass and electric charge of the black hole. This physical system provides a striking illustration for the validity of the universal relaxation bound τ×T≥ħ/π in black-hole physics (here τ≡1/ℑω0 is the characteristic relaxation time of the composed black-hole-scalar-field system, and T is the Bekenstein–Hawking temperature of the black hole. In particular, it is shown that the relaxation dynamics of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime may saturate this quantum time-times-temperature inequality. Interestingly, we prove that potential violations of the bound by light scalar fields are excluded by the Schwinger-type pair-production mechanism (a vacuum polarization effect, a quantum phenomenon which restricts the physical parameters of the composed black-hole-charged-field system to the regime qQ≪M2μ2/ħ.

  14. The thermal evolution of universe: standard model

    Nascimento, L.C.S. do.

    1975-08-01

    A description of the dynamical evolution of the Universe following a model based on the theory of General Relativity is made. The model admits the Cosmological principle,the principle of Equivalence and the Robertson-Walker metric (of which an original derivation is presented). In this model, the universe is considered as a perfect fluid, ideal and symmetric relatively to the number of particles and antiparticles. The thermodynamic relations deriving from these hypothesis are derived, and from them the several eras of the thermal evolution of the universe are established. Finally, the problems arising from certain specific predictions of the model are studied, and the predictions of the abundances of the elements according to nucleosynthesis and the actual behavior of the universe are analysed in detail. (author) [pt

  15. Reuleaux models at St. Petersburg State University

    Kuteeva, G. A.; Sinilshchikova, G. A.; Trifonenko, B. V.

    2018-05-01

    Franz Reuleaux (1829 - 1905) is a famous mechanical engineer, a Professor of the Berlin Royal Technical Academy. He became widely known as an engineer-scientist, a Professor and industrial consultant, education reformer and leader of the technical elite of Germany. He directed the design and manufacture of over 300 models of simple mechanisms. They were sold to many famous universities for pedagogical and scientific purposes. Today, the most complete set is at Cornell University, College of Engineering. In this article we discuss the history, the modern state and our using the Reuleaux models that survived at St. Petersburg State University for educational purposes. We present description of certain models and our electronic resource with these models. We provide the information of similar electronic resources from other universities.

  16. Black Holes, the Big Bang and the Habitable Universe: Are They Really Compatible?

    Hujeirat, Ahmad A.

    Astronomical observations have confirmed the existence of BHs and the occurrence of the Big Bang event to beyond any reasonable doubt. While quantum field theory and general theory of relativity predict the mass-spectrum of BHs to be unlimited, both theories agree that their creation is irreversible. In this article I argue that the recently-proposed SuSu-objects (: objects that are made of incompressible superconducting gluon-qurak superfluids), may not only entail the required properties to be excellent BH-candidates, but also encoding a hidden connection to dark matter and dark energy in cosmology. If such connection indeed exists, then the inevitable consequence would be that our universe is infinite and subject to repeated Big Bang events of the second kind, which makes the habitability of the universe certain and our cosmic relevance insignificant and meaningless.

  17. Black holes in multi-fractional and Lorentz-violating models

    Calcagni, Gianluca [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez Fernandez, David [Universidad de Oviedo, Department of Physics, Oviedo (Spain); Ronco, Michele [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    We study static and radially symmetric black holes in the multi-fractional theories of gravity with q-derivatives and with weighted derivatives, frameworks where the spacetime dimension varies with the probed scale and geometry is characterized by at least one fundamental length l{sub *}. In the q-derivatives scenario, one finds a tiny shift of the event horizon. Schwarzschild black holes can present an additional ring singularity, not present in general relativity, whose radius is proportional to l{sub *}. In the multi-fractional theory with weighted derivatives, there is no such deformation, but non-trivial geometric features generate a cosmological-constant term, leading to a de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. For both scenarios, we compute the Hawking temperature and comment on the resulting black-hole thermodynamics. In the case with q-derivatives, black holes can be hotter than usual and possess an additional ring singularity, while in the case with weighted derivatives they have a de Sitter hair of purely geometric origin, which may lead to a solution of the cosmological constant problem similar to that in unimodular gravity. Finally, we compare our findings with other Lorentz-violating models. (orig.)

  18. Black holes in multi-fractional and Lorentz-violating models

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Rodriguez Fernandez, David; Ronco, Michele

    2017-01-01

    We study static and radially symmetric black holes in the multi-fractional theories of gravity with q-derivatives and with weighted derivatives, frameworks where the spacetime dimension varies with the probed scale and geometry is characterized by at least one fundamental length l_*. In the q-derivatives scenario, one finds a tiny shift of the event horizon. Schwarzschild black holes can present an additional ring singularity, not present in general relativity, whose radius is proportional to l_*. In the multi-fractional theory with weighted derivatives, there is no such deformation, but non-trivial geometric features generate a cosmological-constant term, leading to a de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. For both scenarios, we compute the Hawking temperature and comment on the resulting black-hole thermodynamics. In the case with q-derivatives, black holes can be hotter than usual and possess an additional ring singularity, while in the case with weighted derivatives they have a de Sitter hair of purely geometric origin, which may lead to a solution of the cosmological constant problem similar to that in unimodular gravity. Finally, we compare our findings with other Lorentz-violating models. (orig.)

  19. Black holes in multi-fractional and Lorentz-violating models.

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Ronco, Michele

    2017-01-01

    We study static and radially symmetric black holes in the multi-fractional theories of gravity with q -derivatives and with weighted derivatives, frameworks where the spacetime dimension varies with the probed scale and geometry is characterized by at least one fundamental length [Formula: see text]. In the q -derivatives scenario, one finds a tiny shift of the event horizon. Schwarzschild black holes can present an additional ring singularity, not present in general relativity, whose radius is proportional to [Formula: see text]. In the multi-fractional theory with weighted derivatives, there is no such deformation, but non-trivial geometric features generate a cosmological-constant term, leading to a de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. For both scenarios, we compute the Hawking temperature and comment on the resulting black-hole thermodynamics. In the case with q -derivatives, black holes can be hotter than usual and possess an additional ring singularity, while in the case with weighted derivatives they have a de Sitter hair of purely geometric origin, which may lead to a solution of the cosmological constant problem similar to that in unimodular gravity. Finally, we compare our findings with other Lorentz-violating models.

  20. One-Shot Decoupling and Page Curves from a Dynamical Model for Black Hole Evaporation.

    Brádler, Kamil; Adami, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    One-shot decoupling is a powerful primitive in quantum information theory and was hypothesized to play a role in the black hole information paradox. We study black hole dynamics modeled by a trilinear Hamiltonian whose semiclassical limit gives rise to Hawking radiation. An explicit numerical calculation of the discretized path integral of the S matrix shows that decoupling is exact in the continuous limit, implying that quantum information is perfectly transferred from the black hole to radiation. A striking consequence of decoupling is the emergence of an output radiation entropy profile that follows Page's prediction. We argue that information transfer and the emergence of Page curves is a robust feature of any multilinear interaction Hamiltonian with a bounded spectrum.

  1. An improved thin film brick-wall model of black hole entropy

    Liu Wen Biao

    2001-01-01

    The authors improve the brick-wall model to take only the contribution of a thin film near the event horizon into account. This improvement not only gives them a satisfactory result, but also avoids some drawbacks in the original brick-wall method such as the little mass approximation, neglecting logarithm term, and taking the term L/sup 3/ as the contribution of the vacuum surrounding a black hole. It is found that there is an intrinsic relation between the event horizon and the entropy. The event horizon is the characteristic of a black hole, so the entropy calculating of a black hole is also naturally related to its horizon. (12 refs).

  2. Modeling Lolium perenne L. roots in the presence of empirical black holes

    Plant root models are designed for understanding structural or functional aspects of root systems. When a process is not thoroughly understood, a black box object is used. However, when a process exists but empirical data do not indicate its existence, you have a black hole. The object of this re...

  3. Analytic Models of Domain-Averaged Fermi Holes: A New Tool for the

    Ponec, Robert; Cooper, D.L.; Savin, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 11 (2008), s. 3338-3345 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bond theory * fermi hole analysis * lewis model Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.454, year: 2008

  4. Comment on self-consistent model of black hole formation and evaporation

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier work, Kawai et al. proposed a model of black-hole formation and evaporation, in which the geometry of a collapsing shell of null dust is studied, including consistently the back reaction of its Hawking radiation. In this note, we illuminate the implications of their work, focusing on the resolution of the information loss paradox and the problem of the firewall.

  5. Black Hole Entropy Calculation in a Modified Thin Film Model Jingyi ...

    Abstract. The thin film model is modified to calculate the black hole entropy. The difference from the original method is that the Parikh–. Wilczek tunnelling framework is introduced and the self-gravitation of the emission particles is taken into account. In terms of our improvement, if the entropy is still proportional to the area, ...

  6. A universal simulator for ecological models

    Holst, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Software design is an often neglected issue in ecological models, even though bad software design often becomes a hindrance for re-using, sharing and even grasping an ecological model. In this paper, the methodology of agile software design was applied to the domain of ecological models. Thus...... the principles for a universal design of ecological models were arrived at. To exemplify this design, the open-source software Universal Simulator was constructed using C++ and XML and is provided as a resource for inspiration....

  7. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university..

  8. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university.

  9. Lagrangian Modeling of Evaporating Sprays at Diesel Engine Conditions: Effects of Multi-Hole Injector Nozzles With JP-8 Surrogates

    2014-05-01

    Lagrangian Modeling of Evaporating Sprays at Diesel Engine Conditions: Effects of Multi-Hole Injector Nozzles With JP-8 Surrogates by L...efficiency. In this study, three-dimensional numerical simulations of single and two-hole injector nozzles under diesel conditions are conducted to...numerical simulations of single and two-hole injector nozzles under diesel conditions are conducted to study the spray behavior and the effect of

  10. Scattering of topological solitons on barriers and holes of deformed Sine-Gordon models

    Al-Alawi, Jassem H; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J

    2008-01-01

    We study various scattering properties of topological solitons in two classes of models, which are the generalizations of the Sine-Gordon model and which have recently been proposed by Bazeia et al. These two classes of models depend on a positive real nonzero parameter n but in this paper we consider the models only for its integer values as when n = 2 (for the first class) and n = 1 (for the second class), the model reduces to the Sine-Gordon one. We take the soliton solutions of these models (generalizations of the 'kink' solution of the Sine-Gordon model) and consider their scattering on potential holes and barriers. We present our results for n = 1, ..., 6. We find that, like in the Sine-Gordon models, the scattering on the barrier is very elastic while the scattering on the hole is inelastic and can, at times, lead to a reflection. We discuss the dependence of our results on n and find that the critical velocity for the transmission through the hole is lowest for n = 3

  11. Black holes are hot

    Gibbons, G.

    1976-01-01

    Recent work, which has been investigating the use of the concept of entropy with respect to gravitating systems, black holes and the universe as a whole, is discussed. The resulting theory of black holes assigns a finite temperature to them -about 10 -7 K for ordinary black holes of stellar mass -which is in complete agreement with thermodynamical concepts. It is also shown that black holes must continuously emit particles just like ordinary bodies which have a certain temperature. (U.K.)

  12. Faster universal modeling for two source classes

    Nowbakht, A.; Willems, F.M.J.; Macq, B.; Quisquater, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    The Universal Modeling algorithms proposed in [2] for two general classes of finite-context sources are reviewed. The above methods were constructed by viewing a model structure as a partition of the context space and realizing that a partition can be reached through successive splits. Here we start

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Black Hole Accretion

    Avara, Mark J.

    Black holes embody one of the few, simple, solutions to the Einstein field equations that describe our modern understanding of gravitation. In isolation they are small, dark, and elusive. However, when a gas cloud or star wanders too close, they light up our universe in a way no other cosmic object can. The processes of magnetohydrodynamics which describe the accretion inflow and outflows of plasma around black holes are highly coupled and nonlinear and so require numerical experiments for elucidation. These processes are at the heart of astrophysics since black holes, once they somehow reach super-massive status, influence the evolution of the largest structures in the universe. It has been my goal, with the body of work comprising this thesis, to explore the ways in which the influence of black holes on their surroundings differs from the predictions of standard accretion models. I have especially focused on how magnetization of the greater black hole environment can impact accretion systems.

  14. BTZ black hole from Poisson–Lie T-dualizable sigma models with spectators

    A. Eghbali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The non-Abelian T-dualization of the BTZ black hole is discussed in detail by using the Poisson–Lie T-duality in the presence of spectators. We explicitly construct a dual pair of sigma models related by Poisson–Lie symmetry. The original model is built on a 2+1-dimensional manifold M≈O×G, where G as a two-dimensional real non-Abelian Lie group acts freely on M, while O is the orbit of G in M. The findings of our study show that the original model indeed is canonically equivalent to the SL(2,R Wess–Zumino–Witten (WZW model for a given value of the background parameters. Moreover, by a convenient coordinate transformation we show that this model describes a string propagating in a spacetime with the BTZ black hole metric in such a way that a new family of the solutions to low energy string theory with the BTZ black hole vacuum metric, constant dilaton field and a new torsion potential is found. The dual model is built on a 2+1-dimensional target manifold M˜ with two-dimensional real Abelian Lie group G˜ acting freely on it. We further show that the dual model yields a three-dimensional charged black string for which the mass M and axion charge Q per unit length are calculated. After that, the structure and asymptotic nature of the dual space–time including the horizon and singularity are determined.

  15. Cosmological Signature of the Standard Model Higgs Vacuum Instability: Primordial Black Holes as Dark Matter.

    Espinosa, J R; Racco, D; Riotto, A

    2018-03-23

    For the current central values of the Higgs boson and top quark masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops an instability at a scale of the order of 10^{11}  GeV. We show that a cosmological signature of such instability could be dark matter in the form of primordial black holes seeded by Higgs fluctuations during inflation. The existence of dark matter might not require physics beyond the standard model.

  16. Fully-coupled hydro-mechanical modelling of the D-holes and validation drift inflow

    Monsen, K.; Barton, N.; Makurat, A.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents the results from fully-coupled hydro-mechanical modelling of the D-hole and drift inflows. Joints represented in Harwells stochastically generated 8m x 8m x 8m cubes were used to select two possible joint geometries for two-dimensional rock mechanics simulations of the 2.8 x 2.2m validation drift, and the rock mass response to its excavation. The joints intersecting the four end faces of these cubes were set up in distinct element UDEC-BB models and loaded with boundary stresses of 10 MPa vertically and 14 MPa horizontally. In numerical models 5 and 8, which were run first as mechanical response (M) models (TR 91-05), full H-M coupling was performed, with calculations of inflow. In general, response to excavation was a little stronger than in hte un-coupled mechanical response (M) modelling. In the D-hole simulations, however, channel development int he disturbed zone could not occur due to less displacement taking place in the rock mass. For this reason, the stress levels were also generally much more moderate, preventing the joints from closing as much as in the drift simulations. Consequently, the D-hole model had a much better radial connectivity. It was possible to observe that the radial inflow to the D-holes was significantly higher than the flow into the drift models. However, due to the extremely small joint apertures involved (<1μm), time steps and calculation times were very slow in the H-M models, and although mechanical behaviour appeared to have reached equilibrium, there was evidence of continued transients in some of the flow regions. The drift excavation caused nearly total closing of critical joints due to local normal stress inceases. Near-blockage of fluid transportation routes was demonstrated. (au)

  17. Cosmological Signature of the Standard Model Higgs Vacuum Instability: Primordial Black Holes as Dark Matter

    Espinosa, J. R.; Racco, D.; Riotto, A.

    2018-03-01

    For the current central values of the Higgs boson and top quark masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops an instability at a scale of the order of 1 011 GeV . We show that a cosmological signature of such instability could be dark matter in the form of primordial black holes seeded by Higgs fluctuations during inflation. The existence of dark matter might not require physics beyond the standard model.

  18. A universe model confronted to observations

    Souriau, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    Present work is a detailed study of a Universe model elaborated in several steps, and some of its consequences. Absence zone in quasar spatial distribution is first described; demonstration is made it is sufficient to determine a cosmological model. Each following paragraph is concerned with a type of observation, which is confronted with the model. Universe age and density, redshift-luminosity relation for galaxies and quasars, diameter-redshift relation for radiosources, radiation isotropy at 3 0 K, matter-antimatter contact zone physics. An eventual stratification of universe parallel to this zone is more peculiarly studied; absorption lines in quasar spectra are in way interpreted, just as local super-cluster and local group of galaxies, galaxy HI region orientation, and at last neighbouring galaxy kinematics [fr

  19. First Higher-Multipole Model of Gravitational Waves from Spinning and Coalescing Black-Hole Binaries.

    London, Lionel; Khan, Sebastian; Fauchon-Jones, Edward; García, Cecilio; Hannam, Mark; Husa, Sascha; Jiménez-Forteza, Xisco; Kalaghatgi, Chinmay; Ohme, Frank; Pannarale, Francesco

    2018-04-20

    Gravitational-wave observations of binary black holes currently rely on theoretical models that predict the dominant multipoles (ℓ=2,|m|=2) of the radiation during inspiral, merger, and ringdown. We introduce a simple method to include the subdominant multipoles to binary black hole gravitational waveforms, given a frequency-domain model for the dominant multipoles. The amplitude and phase of the original model are appropriately stretched and rescaled using post-Newtonian results (for the inspiral), perturbation theory (for the ringdown), and a smooth transition between the two. No additional tuning to numerical-relativity simulations is required. We apply a variant of this method to the nonprecessing PhenomD model. The result, PhenomHM, constitutes the first higher-multipole model of spinning and coalescing black-hole binaries, and currently includes the (ℓ,|m|)=(2,2),(3,3),(4,4),(2,1),(3,2),(4,3) radiative moments. Comparisons with numerical-relativity waveforms demonstrate that PhenomHM is more accurate than dominant-multipole-only models for all binary configurations, and typically improves the measurement of binary properties.

  20. First Higher-Multipole Model of Gravitational Waves from Spinning and Coalescing Black-Hole Binaries

    London, Lionel; Khan, Sebastian; Fauchon-Jones, Edward; García, Cecilio; Hannam, Mark; Husa, Sascha; Jiménez-Forteza, Xisco; Kalaghatgi, Chinmay; Ohme, Frank; Pannarale, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    Gravitational-wave observations of binary black holes currently rely on theoretical models that predict the dominant multipoles (ℓ=2 ,|m |=2 ) of the radiation during inspiral, merger, and ringdown. We introduce a simple method to include the subdominant multipoles to binary black hole gravitational waveforms, given a frequency-domain model for the dominant multipoles. The amplitude and phase of the original model are appropriately stretched and rescaled using post-Newtonian results (for the inspiral), perturbation theory (for the ringdown), and a smooth transition between the two. No additional tuning to numerical-relativity simulations is required. We apply a variant of this method to the nonprecessing PhenomD model. The result, PhenomHM, constitutes the first higher-multipole model of spinning and coalescing black-hole binaries, and currently includes the (ℓ,|m |)=(2 ,2 ),(3 ,3 ),(4 ,4 ),(2 ,1 ),(3 ,2 ),(4 ,3 ) radiative moments. Comparisons with numerical-relativity waveforms demonstrate that PhenomHM is more accurate than dominant-multipole-only models for all binary configurations, and typically improves the measurement of binary properties.

  1. The universal function in color dipole model

    Jalilian, Z.; Boroun, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we review color dipole model and recall properties of the saturation and geometrical scaling in this model. Our primary aim is determining the exact universal function in terms of the introduced scaling variable in different distance than the saturation radius. With inserting the mass in calculation we compute numerically the contribution of heavy productions in small x from the total structure function by the fraction of universal functions and show the geometrical scaling is established due to our scaling variable in this study.

  2. A black-hole cosmology

    Debney, G.; Farnsworth, D.

    1983-01-01

    Motivated by the fact that 2m/r is of the order of magnitude unity for the observable universe, we explore the possibility that a Schwarzschild or black hole cosmological model is appropriate. Luminosity distance and frequency shifts of freely-falling, standard, monochromatic objects are viewed by a freely-falling observer. The observer is inside r=2m. The observer in such a world does not see the same universe as do astronomers. (author)

  3. Black holes matter

    Kragh, Helge Stjernholm

    2016-01-01

    Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).......Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015)....

  4. Cosmological and black hole brane-world universes in higher derivative gravity

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Ogushi, Sachiko

    2002-01-01

    A general model of multidimensional R 2 gravity including a Riemann tensor square term (nonzero c case) is considered. The number of brane-worlds in such a model is constructed (mainly in five dimensions) and their properties are discussed. The thermodynamics of a Schwarzschild-anti-deSitter (S-AdS) BH (with boundary) is presented when perturbation on c is used. The entropy, free energy, and energy are calculated. For a nonzero c the entropy (energy) is not proportional to the area (mass). The equation of motion of the brane in a BH background is presented as a FRW equation. Using a dual CFT description it is shown that the dual field theory is not a conformal one when c is not zero. In this case the holographic entropy does not coincide with the BH entropy (they coincide for Einstein gravity or c=0 HD gravity where the AdS/CFT description is well applied). An asymmetrically warped background (an analogue of a charged AdS BH) where Lorentz invariance violation occurs is found. The cosmological 4D dS brane connecting two dS bulk spaces is formulated in terms of the parameters of R 2 gravity. Within the proposed dS/CFT correspondence the holographic conformal anomaly from five-dimensional higher derivative gravity in a de Sitter background is evaluated

  5. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  6. Inclusion of TCAF model in XSPEC to study accretion flow dynamics around black hole candidates

    Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu

    Spectral and Temporal properties of black hole candidates can be well understood with the Chakrabarti-Titarchuk solution of two component advective flow (TCAF). This model requires two accretion rates, namely, the Keplerian disk accretion rate and the sub-Keplerian halo accretion rate, the latter being composed of a low angular momentum flow which may or may not develop a shock. In this solution, the relevant parameter is the relative importance of the halo (which creates the Compton cloud region) rate with respect to the Keplerian disk rate (soft photon source). Though this model has been used earlier to manually fit data of several black hole candidates quite satisfactorily, for the first time we are able to create a user friendly version by implementing additive Table model FITS file into GSFC/NASA's spectral analysis software package XSPEC. This enables any user to extract physical parameters of accretion flows, such as two accretion rates, shock location, shock strength etc. for any black hole candidate. Most importantly, unlike any other theoretical model, we show that TCAF is capable of predicting timing properties from spectral fits, since in TCAF, a shock is responsible for deciding spectral slopes as well as QPO frequencies.

  7. Enhanced Tunnelling Models for Child Universe Formation

    Ansoldi, S; Shilon, I

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a recently proposed model that allows for an enhanced rate of child universe production under generic conditions, we elaborate on refinements that may allow for non-singular initial configurations. A possibility to treat both, the initial state and the tunnelling beyond the semiclassical level will also be introduced.

  8. Modeling Environmental Literacy of University Students

    Teksoz, Gaye; Sahin, Elvan; Tekkaya-Oztekin, Ceren

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposed an Environmental Literacy Components Model to explain how environmental attitudes, environmental responsibility, environmental concern, and environmental knowledge as well as outdoor activities related to each other. A total of 1,345 university students responded to an environmental literacy survey (Kaplowitz and Levine…

  9. No tension between assembly models of super massive black hole binaries and pulsar observations.

    Middleton, Hannah; Chen, Siyuan; Del Pozzo, Walter; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-02-08

    Pulsar timing arrays are presently the only means to search for the gravitational wave stochastic background from super massive black hole binary populations, considered to be within the grasp of current or near-future observations. The stringent upper limit from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array has been interpreted as excluding (>90% confidence) the current paradigm of binary assembly through galaxy mergers and hardening via stellar interaction, suggesting evolution is accelerated or stalled. Using Bayesian hierarchical modelling we consider implications of this upper limit for a range of astrophysical scenarios, without invoking stalling, nor more exotic physical processes. All scenarios are fully consistent with the upper limit, but (weak) bounds on population parameters can be inferred. Recent upward revisions of the black hole-galaxy bulge mass relation are disfavoured at 1.6σ against lighter models. Once sensitivity improves by an order of magnitude, a non-detection will disfavour the most optimistic scenarios at 3.9σ.

  10. Black hole algorithm for determining model parameter in self-potential data

    Sungkono; Warnana, Dwa Desa

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of self-potential (SP) data is increasingly popular in geophysical method due to its relevance in many cases. However, the inversion of SP data is often highly nonlinear. Consequently, local search algorithms commonly based on gradient approaches have often failed to find the global optimum solution in nonlinear problems. Black hole algorithm (BHA) was proposed as a solution to such problems. As the name suggests, the algorithm was constructed based on the black hole phenomena. This paper investigates the application of BHA to solve inversions of field and synthetic self-potential (SP) data. The inversion results show that BHA accurately determines model parameters and model uncertainty. This indicates that BHA is highly potential as an innovative approach for SP data inversion.

  11. Particle-hole excitations in the interacting boson model; 4, the U(5)-SU(3) coupling

    De Coster, C; Heyde, Kris L G; Jolie, J; Lehmann, H; Wood, J L

    1999-01-01

    In the extended interacting boson model (EIBM) both particle- and hole-like bosons are incorporated to encompass multi-particle-multi-hole excitations at and near to closed shells.We apply the group theoretical concepts of the EIBM to the particular case of two coexisting systems in the same nucleus exhibiting a U(5) (for the regular configurations) and an SU(3) symmetry (for the intruder configurations).Besides the description of ``global'' symmetry aspects in terms of I-spin , also the very specific local mixing effects characteristic for the U(5)-SU(3) symmetry coupling are studied.The model is applied to the Po isotopes and a comparison with a morerealistic calculation is made.

  12. Fundamental solution of bond pricing in the Ho-Lee stochastic interest rate model under the invariant criteria

    Burhaneddin İzgi

    2017-03-01

    under the invariant criteria. We obtain transformations between Ho-Lee model with the corresponding linear (1 + 1 partial differential equation and the first Lie canonical form which is identical to the classical heat equation. These transformations help us to generate the fundamental solution for the Ho-Lee model with respect to the fundamental solution of the classical heat equation sense. Moreover, as a financial application of the Ho-Lee model, we choose the drift term from power functions and perform simulations via Milstein method. Furthermore, we obtain important results for the parameter calibration of the corresponding drift term by using the simulation results.

  13. Evidence for the Magnetic Breakout Model in an Equatorial Coronal-hole Jet

    Kumar, Pankaj; Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Wyper, Peter F.; DeVore, C. Richard; DeForest, Craig E.

    2018-02-01

    Small, impulsive jets commonly occur throughout the solar corona, but are especially visible in coronal holes. Evidence is mounting that jets are part of a continuum of eruptions that extends to much larger coronal mass ejections and eruptive flares. Because coronal-hole jets originate in relatively simple magnetic structures, they offer an ideal testbed for theories of energy buildup and release in the full range of solar eruptions. We analyzed an equatorial coronal-hole jet observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA on 2014 January 9 in which the magnetic-field structure was consistent with the embedded-bipole topology that we identified and modeled previously as an origin of coronal jets. In addition, this event contained a mini-filament, which led to important insights into the energy storage and release mechanisms. SDO/HMI magnetograms revealed footpoint motions in the primary minority-polarity region at the eruption site, but show negligible flux emergence or cancellation for at least 16 hr before the eruption. Therefore, the free energy powering this jet probably came from magnetic shear concentrated at the polarity inversion line within the embedded bipole. We find that the observed activity sequence and its interpretation closely match the predictions of the breakout jet model, strongly supporting the hypothesis that the breakout model can explain solar eruptions on a wide range of scales.

  14. Shaping Globular Clusters with Black Holes

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    How many black holes lurk within the dense environments of globular clusters, and how do these powerful objects shape the properties of the cluster around them? One such cluster, NGC 3201, is now helping us to answer these questions.Hunting Stellar-Mass Black HolesSince the detection of merging black-hole binaries by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the dense environments of globular clusters have received increasing attention as potential birthplaces of these compact binary systems.The central region of the globular star cluster NGC 3201, as viewed by Hubble. The black hole is in orbit with the star marked by the blue circle. [NASA/ESA]In addition, more and more stellar-mass black-hole candidates have been observed within globular clusters, lurking in binary pairs with luminous, non-compact companions. The most recent of these detections, found in the globular cluster NGC 3201, stands alone as the first stellar-mass black hole candidate discovered via radial velocity observations: the black holes main-sequence companion gave away its presence via a telltale wobble.Now a team of scientists led by Kyle Kremer (CIERA and Northwestern University) is using models of this system to better understand the impact that black holes might have on their host clusters.A Model ClusterThe relationship between black holes and their host clusters is complicated. Though the cluster environment can determine the dynamical evolution of the black holes, the retention rate of black holes in a globular cluster (i.e., how many remain in the cluster when they are born as supernovae, rather than being kicked out during the explosion) influences how the host cluster evolves.Kremer and collaborators track this complex relationship by modeling the evolution of a cluster similar to NGC 3201 with a Monte Carlo code. The code incorporates physics relevant to the evolution of black holes and black-hole binaries in globular clusters, such as two-body relaxation

  15. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN STELLAR SYSTEMS: 'QUIESCENT' ACCRETION AND LUMINOSITY

    Volonteri, M.; Campbell, D.; Mateo, M.; Dotti, M.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small fraction of local galaxies harbor an accreting black hole, classified as an active galactic nucleus. However, many stellar systems are plausibly expected to host black holes, from globular clusters to nuclear star clusters, to massive galaxies. The mere presence of stars in the vicinity of a black hole provides a source of fuel via mass loss of evolved stars. In this paper, we assess the expected luminosities of black holes embedded in stellar systems of different sizes and properties, spanning a large range of masses. We model the distribution of stars and derive the amount of gas available to a central black hole through a geometrical model. We estimate the luminosity of the black holes under simple, but physically grounded, assumptions on the accretion flow. Finally, we discuss the detectability of 'quiescent' black holes in the local universe.

  16. Brane holes

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that in models with large extra dimensions under special conditions one can extract information from the interior of 4D black holes. For this purpose we study an induced geometry on a test brane in the background of a higher-dimensional static black string or a black brane. We show that, at the intersection surface of the test brane and the bulk black string or brane, the induced metric has an event horizon, so that the test brane contains a black hole. We call it a brane hole. When the test brane moves with a constant velocity V with respect to the bulk black object, it also has a brane hole, but its gravitational radius r e is greater than the size of the bulk black string or brane r 0 by the factor (1-V 2 ) -1 . We show that bulk ''photon'' emitted in the region between r 0 and r e can meet the test brane again at a point outside r e . From the point of view of observers on the test brane, the events of emission and capture of the bulk photon are connected by a spacelike curve in the induced geometry. This shows an example in which extra dimensions can be used to extract information from the interior of a lower-dimensional black object. Instead of the bulk black string or brane, one can also consider a bulk geometry without a horizon. We show that nevertheless the induced geometry on the moving test brane can include a brane hole. In such a case the extra dimensions can be used to extract information from the complete region of the brane-hole interior. We discuss thermodynamic properties of brane holes and interesting questions which arise when such an extra-dimensional channel for the information mining exists.

  17. Universality in generalized models of inflation

    Binétruy, P.; Pieroni, M. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Mabillard, J., E-mail: pierre.binetruy@apc.univ-paris7.fr, E-mail: joel.mabillard@ed.ac.uk, E-mail: mauro.pieroni@apc.in2p3.fr [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the cosmological evolution of a scalar field with non standard kinetic term in terms of a Renormalization Group Equation (RGE). In this framework inflation corresponds to the slow evolution in a neighborhood of a fixed point and universality classes for inflationary models naturally arise. Using some examples we show the application of the formalism. The predicted values for the speed of sound c {sub s} {sup 2} and for the amount of non-Gaussianities produced in these models are discussed. In particular, we show that it is possible to introduce models with c {sub s} {sup 2} ≠ 1 that can be in agreement with present cosmological observations.

  18. Charged black holes in a generalized scalar–tensor gravity model

    Yves Brihaye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study 4-dimensional charged and static black holes in a generalized scalar–tensor gravity model, in which a shift symmetry for the scalar field exists. For vanishing scalar field the solution corresponds to the Reissner–Nordström (RN solution, while solutions of the full scalar-gravity model have to be constructed numerically. We demonstrate that these black holes support Galilean scalar hair up to a maximal value of the scalar–tensor coupling that depends on the value of the charge and can be up to roughly twice as large as that for uncharged solutions. The Hawking temperature TH of the hairy black holes at maximal scalar–tensor coupling decreases continuously with the increase of the charge and reaches TH=0 for the highest possible charge that these solutions can carry. However, in this limit, the scalar–tensor coupling needs to vanish. The limiting solution hence corresponds to the extremal RN solution, which does not support regular Galilean scalar hair due to its AdS2×S2 near-horizon geometry.

  19. Self consistent MHD modeling of the solar wind from polar coronal holes

    Stewart, G. A.; Bravo, S.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a 2D self consistent MHD model for solar wind flow from antisymmetric magnetic geometries. We present results in the case of a photospheric magnetic field which has a dipolar configuration, in order to investigate some of the general characteristics of the wind at solar minimum. As in previous studies, we find that the magnetic configuration is that of a closed field region (a coronal helmet belt) around the solar equator, extending up to about 1.6 R · , and two large open field regions centred over the poles (polar coronal holes), whose magnetic and plasma fluxes expand to fill both hemispheres in interplanetary space. In addition, we find that the different geometries of the magnetic field lines across each hole (from the almost radial central polar lines to the highly curved border equatorial lines) cause the solar wind to have greatly different properties depending on which region it flows from. We find that, even though our simplified model cannot produce realistic wind values, we can obtain a polar wind that is faster, less dense and hotter than equatorial wind, and found that, close to the Sun, there exists a sharp transition between the two wind types. As these characteristics coincide with observations we conclude that both fast and slow solar wind can originate from coronal holes, fast wind from the centre, slow wind from the border

  20. Portable University Model of the Atmosphere (PUMA)

    Fraedrich, K.; Kirk, E.; Lunkeit, F. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.

    1998-10-01

    The Portable University Model of the Atmosphere (PUMA) is based on the Reading multi-level spectral model SGCM (Simple Global Circulation Model) described by Hoskins and Simmons (1975) and James and Gray (1986). Originally developed as a numerical prediction model, it was changed to perform as a circulation model. For example, James and Gray (1986) studied the influence of surface friction on the circulation of a baroclinic atmosphere, James and James (1992), and James et al. (1994) investigated ultra-low-frequency variability, and Mole and James (1990) analyzed the baroclinic adjustment in the context of a zonally varying flow. Frisius et al. (1998) simulated an idealized storm track by embedding a dipole structure in a zonally symmetric forcing field and Lunkeit et al. (1998) investigated the sensitivity of GCM (General Circulation Model) scenarios by an adaption technique applicapable to SGCMs. (orig.)

  1. Creating a Universe, a Conceptual Model

    James R. Johnson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Space is something. Space inherently contains laws of nature: universal rules (mathematics, space dimensions, types of forces, types of fields, and particle species, laws (relativity, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism and symmetries (Lorentz, Gauge, and symmetry breaking. We have significant knowledge about these laws of nature because all our scientific theories assume their presence. Their existence is critical for developing either a unique theory of our universe or more speculative multiverse theories. Scientists generally ignore the laws of nature because they “are what they are” and because visualizing different laws of nature challenges the imagination. This article defines a conceptual model separating space (laws of nature from the universe’s energy source (initial conditions and expansion (big bang. By considering the ramifications of changing the laws of nature, initial condition parameters, and two variables in the big bang theory, the model demonstrates that traditional fine tuning is not the whole story when creating a universe. Supporting the model, space and “nothing” are related to the laws of nature, mathematics and multiverse possibilities. Speculation on the beginning of time completes the model.

  2. Is the island universe model consistent with observations?

    Piao, Yun-Song

    2005-01-01

    We study the island universe model, in which initially the universe is in a cosmological constant sea, then the local quantum fluctuations violating the null energy condition create the islands of matter, some of which might corresponds to our observable universe. We examine the possibility that the island universe model is regarded as an alternative scenario of the origin of observable universe.

  3. Baryogenesis model predicting antimatter in the Universe

    Kirilova, D.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray and gamma-ray data do not rule out antimatter domains in the Universe, separated at distances bigger than 10 Mpc from us. Hence, it is interesting to analyze the possible generation of vast antimatter structures during the early Universe evolution. We discuss a SUSY-condensate baryogenesis model, predicting large separated regions of matter and antimatter. The model provides generation of the small locally observed baryon asymmetry for a natural initial conditions, it predicts vast antimatter domains, separated from the matter ones by baryonically empty voids. The characteristic scale of antimatter regions and their distance from the matter ones is in accordance with observational constraints from cosmic ray, gamma-ray and cosmic microwave background anisotropy data

  4. Fast and Accurate Prediction of Numerical Relativity Waveforms from Binary Black Hole Coalescences Using Surrogate Models.

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott E; Galley, Chad R; Szilágyi, Béla; Scheel, Mark A; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A

    2015-09-18

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. Using reduced order modeling techniques, we construct an accurate surrogate model, which is evaluated in a millisecond to a second, for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios in [1, 10] and durations corresponding to about 15 orbits before merger. We assess the model's uncertainty and show that our modeling strategy predicts NR waveforms not used for the surrogate's training with errors nearly as small as the numerical error of the NR code. Our model includes all spherical-harmonic _{-2}Y_{ℓm} waveform modes resolved by the NR code up to ℓ=8. We compare our surrogate model to effective one body waveforms from 50M_{⊙} to 300M_{⊙} for advanced LIGO detectors and find that the surrogate is always more faithful (by at least an order of magnitude in most cases).

  5. Exotic energy injection with ExoCLASS: application to the Higgs portal model and evaporating black holes

    Stöcker, Patrick; Krämer, Michael; Lesgourgues, Julien; Poulin, Vivian

    2018-03-01

    We devise a new user-friendly tool interfaced with the Boltzmann code CLASS to deal with any kind of exotic electromagnetic energy injection in the universe and its impact on anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background. It makes use of the results from standard electromagnetic cascade calculations develop in the context of WIMP annihilation, generalized to incorporate any injection history. We first validate it on a specific WIMP scenario, the Higgs Portal model, confirming that the standard effective on-the-spot treatment is accurate enough. We then analyze the more involved example of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) with masses in the range [3×1013,5×1016] g, for which the standard approximations break down. We derive robust CMB bounds on the relic density of evaporating PBHs, ruling out the possibility for PBHs with a monochromatic distribution of masses in the range [3×1013,2.5×1016] g to represent all of the Dark Matter in our Universe. Remarkably, we confirm with an accurate study that the CMB bounds are several orders of magnitude stronger than those from the galactic gamma-ray background in the range [3×1013,3×1014] g. A future CMB experiment like CORE+, or an experiment attempting at measuring the 21 cm signal from the Dark Ages could greatly improve the sensitivity to these models.

  6. Universality classes for models of inflation

    Binetruy, P.; Mabillard, J.; Pieroni, M.; Rosset, C.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the cosmological evolution of a scalar field in a potential can be obtained from a renormalisation group equation. The slow roll regime of inflation models is understood in this context as the slow evolution close to a fixed point, described by the methods of renormalisation group. This explains in part the universality observed in the predictions of a certain number of inflation models. We illustrate this behavior on a certain number of examples and discuss it in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  7. Bumpy black holes from spontaneous Lorentz violation

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Tinyakov, Peter; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2007-01-01

    We consider black holes in Lorentz violating theories of massive gravity. We argue that in these theories black hole solutions are no longer universal and exhibit a large number of hairs. If they exist, these hairs probe the singularity inside the black hole providing a window into quantum gravity. The existence of these hairs can be tested by future gravitational wave observatories. We generically expect that the effects we discuss will be larger for the more massive black holes. In the simplest models the strength of the hairs is controlled by the same parameter that sets the mass of the graviton (tensor modes). Then the upper limit on this mass coming from the inferred gravitational radiation emitted by binary pulsars implies that hairs are likely to be suppressed for almost the entire mass range of the super-massive black holes in the centers of galaxies

  8. Making Sense of Black Holes: Modeling the Galactic Center and Other Low-power AGN

    Falcke, Heino; Moscibrodzka, Monika

    2018-06-01

    The Galactic center host a well-known flat-spectrum radio source, Sgr A*, that is akin to the radio nuclei of quasars and radio galaxies. It is the main target of the Event Horizon Telescope to image the shadow of the black hole. There is, however, still considerable discussion on where the near-horizon emission originates from. Does it come from an accretion flow or is it produced in a relativistic jet-like outflow? Using advanced three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations coupled to general relativistic ray tracing simulations, we now model the dynamics and emission of the plasma around starving black holes in great detail out to several thousand Schwarzschild radii. Jets appear almost naturally in theses simulations. A crucial parameter is the heating of radiating electrons and we argue that electron-proton coupling is low in the accretion flow and high in the magnetized region of the jets, making the jet an important ingredient for the overall appearance of the source. This comprehensive model is able to predict the radio size and appearance, the spectral energy distribution from radio to X-rays, the variability, and the time lags of Sgr A* surprisingly well. Interestingly, the same model can be easily generalized to other low-power AGN like M87, suggesting that GRMHD models for AGN are finally becoming predictive. With upcoming submm-VLBI experiment on the ground and in space, we will be able to further test these models in great detail and see black holes in action.

  9. The Monash University Interactive Simple Climate Model

    Dommenget, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Monash university interactive simple climate model is a web-based interface that allows students and the general public to explore the physical simulation of the climate system with a real global climate model. It is based on the Globally Resolved Energy Balance (GREB) model, which is a climate model published by Dommenget and Floeter [2011] in the international peer review science journal Climate Dynamics. The model simulates most of the main physical processes in the climate system in a very simplistic way and therefore allows very fast and simple climate model simulations on a normal PC computer. Despite its simplicity the model simulates the climate response to external forcings, such as doubling of the CO2 concentrations very realistically (similar to state of the art climate models). The Monash simple climate model web-interface allows you to study the results of more than a 2000 different model experiments in an interactive way and it allows you to study a number of tutorials on the interactions of physical processes in the climate system and solve some puzzles. By switching OFF/ON physical processes you can deconstruct the climate and learn how all the different processes interact to generate the observed climate and how the processes interact to generate the IPCC predicted climate change for anthropogenic CO2 increase. The presentation will illustrate how this web-base tool works and what are the possibilities in teaching students with this tool are.

  10. Low parameter model to monitor bottom hole pressure in vertical multiphase flow in oil production wells

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the flow patterns through petroleum production wells proved for upstream experts to provide robust production schemes based on the knowledge about flow behavior. To provide accurate flow pattern distribution through production wells, accurate prediction/representation of bottom hole pressure (BHP for determining pressure drop from bottom to surface play important and vital role. Nevertheless enormous efforts have been made to develop mechanistic approach, most of the mechanistic and conventional models or correlations unable to estimate or represent the BHP with high accuracy and low uncertainty. To defeat the mentioned hurdle and monitor BHP in vertical multiphase flow through petroleum production wells, inventive intelligent based solution like as least square support vector machine (LSSVM method was utilized. The evolved first-break approach is examined by applying precise real field data illustrated in open previous surveys. Thanks to the statistical criteria gained from the outcomes obtained from LSSVM approach, the proposed least support vector machine (LSSVM model has high integrity and performance. Moreover, very low relative deviation between the model estimations and the relevant actual BHP data is figured out to be less than 6%. The output gained from LSSVM model are closed the BHP while other mechanistic models fails to predict BHP through petroleum production wells. Provided solutions of this study explicated that implies of LSSVM in monitoring bottom-hole pressure can indicate more accurate monitoring of the referred target which can lead to robust design with high level of reliability for oil and gas production operation facilities.

  11. On the particle-hole symmetry of the fermionic spinless Hubbard model in D=1

    M.T. Thomaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the particle-hole symmetry of the one-dimensional (D=1 fermionic spinless Hubbard model, associating that symmetry to the invariance of the Helmholtz free energy of the one-dimensional spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg model, under reversal of the longitudinal magnetic field and at any finite temperature. Upon comparing two regimes of that chain model so that the number of particles in one regime equals the number of holes in the other, one finds that, in general, their thermodynamics is similar, but not identical: both models share the specific heat and entropy functions, but not the internal energy per site, the first-neighbor correlation functions, and the number of particles per site. Due to that symmetry, the difference between the first-neighbor correlation functions is proportional to the z-component of magnetization of the XXZ Heisenberg model. The results presented in this paper are valid for any value of the interaction strength parameter V, which describes the attractive/null/repulsive interaction of neighboring fermions.

  12. Two aspects of black hole entropy in Lanczos-Lovelock models of gravity

    Kolekar, Sanved; Kothawala, Dawood; Padmanabhan, T.

    2012-03-01

    We consider two specific approaches to evaluate the black hole entropy which are known to produce correct results in the case of Einstein’s theory and generalize them to Lanczos-Lovelock models. In the first approach (which could be called extrinsic), we use a procedure motivated by earlier work by Pretorius, Vollick, and Israel, and by Oppenheim, and evaluate the entropy of a configuration of densely packed gravitating shells on the verge of forming a black hole in Lanczos-Lovelock theories of gravity. We find that this matter entropy is not equal to (it is less than) Wald entropy, except in the case of Einstein theory, where they are equal. The matter entropy is proportional to the Wald entropy if we consider a specific mth-order Lanczos-Lovelock model, with the proportionality constant depending on the spacetime dimensions D and the order m of the Lanczos-Lovelock theory as (D-2m)/(D-2). Since the proportionality constant depends on m, the proportionality between matter entropy and Wald entropy breaks down when we consider a sum of Lanczos-Lovelock actions involving different m. In the second approach (which could be called intrinsic), we generalize a procedure, previously introduced by Padmanabhan in the context of general relativity, to study off-shell entropy of a class of metrics with horizon using a path integral method. We consider the Euclidean action of Lanczos-Lovelock models for a class of metrics off shell and interpret it as a partition function. We show that in the case of spherically symmetric metrics, one can interpret the Euclidean action as the free energy and read off both the entropy and energy of a black hole spacetime. Surprisingly enough, this leads to exactly the Wald entropy and the energy of the spacetime in Lanczos-Lovelock models obtained by other methods. We comment on possible implications of the result.

  13. Noncommutative black holes

    Lopez-DomInguez, J C [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); Obregon, O [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); RamIrez, C [Facultad de Ciencias FIsico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, PO Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sabido, M [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    We study noncommutative black holes, by using a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate Hawking's temperature and entropy for the 'noncommutative' Schwarzschild black hole.

  14. Cosmology with primordial black holes

    Lindley, D.

    1981-09-01

    Cosmologies containing a substantial amount of matter in the form of evaporating primordial black holes are investigated. A review of constraints on the numbers of such black holes, including an analysis of a new limit found by looking at the destruction of deuterium by high energy photons, shows that there must be a negligible population of small black holes from the era of cosmological nucleosynthesis onwards, but that there are no strong constraints before this time. The major part of the work is based on the construction of detailed, self-consistent cosmological models in which black holes are continually forming and evaporating The interest in these models centres on the question of baryon generation, which occurs via the asymmetric decay of a new type of particle which appears as a consequence of the recently developed Grand Unified Theories of elementary particles. Unfortunately, there is so much uncertainty in the models that firm conclusions are difficult to reach; however, it seems feasible in principle that primordial black holes could be responsible for a significant part of the present matter density of the Universe. (author)

  15. A universal model of giftedness - adaptation of the Munich Model

    Jessurun, J.H.; Shearer, C.B.; Weggeman, M.C.D.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Munich Model of Giftedness (MMG) by Heller and his colleagues, developed for the identification of gifted children, is adapted and expanded, with the aim of making it more universally usable as a model for the pathway from talents to performance. On the side of the talent-factors, the concept of

  16. A magnetic model for low/hard state of black hole binaries

    Ye, Yong-Chun; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Huang, Chang-Yin; Cao, Xiao-Feng

    2016-03-01

    A magnetic model for the low/hard state (LHS) of two black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), H1743-322 and GX 339-4, is proposed based on transport of the magnetic field from a companion into an accretion disk around a black hole (BH). This model consists of a truncated thin disk with an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF). The spectral profiles of the sources are fitted in agreement with the data observed at four different dates corresponding to the rising phase of the LHS. In addition, the association of the LHS with a quasi-steady jet is modeled based on transport of magnetic field, where the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) and Blandford-Payne (BP) processes are invoked to drive the jets from BH and inner ADAF. It turns out that the steep radio/X-ray correlations observed in H1743-322 and GX 339-4 can be interpreted based on our model.

  17. Primary black holes

    Novikov, I.; Polnarev, A.

    1981-01-01

    Proves are searched for of the formation of the so-called primary black holes at the very origin of the universe. The black holes would weigh less than 10 13 kg. The formation of a primary black hole is conditional on strong fluctuations of the gravitational field corresponding roughly to a half of the fluctuation maximally permissible by the general relativity theory. Only big fluctuations of the gravitational field can overcome the forces of the hot gas pressure and compress the originally expanding matter into a black hole. Low-mass black holes have a temperature exceeding that of the black holes formed from stars. A quantum process of particle formation, the so-called evaporation takes place in the strong gravitational field of a black hole. The lower the mass of the black hole, the shorter the evaporation time. The analyses of processes taking place during the evaporation of low-mass primary black holes show that only a very small proportion of the total mass of the matter in the universe could turn into primary black holes. (M.D.)

  18. Increasing the Presence of Underrepresented Minorities in the Geosciences: The Woods Hole Partnership Education Program Model and Outcomes

    George, A.; Gutierrez, B.; Jearld, A.; Liles, G.; Scott, O.; Harden, B.

    2017-12-01

    Launched in 2009, the Partnership Education Program (PEP) is supported by six scientific institutions in Woods Hole, Massachusetts through the Woods Hole Diversity Initiative. PEP, which was shaped by experience with other diversity programs as well as input from scientists in Woods Hole, is designed to promote a diverse scientific community by recruiting talent from minority groups that are under-represented in marine and environmental sciences. Focused on college juniors and seniors with course work in marine and/or environmental sciences, PEP is comprised of a four-week course, "Ocean and Environmental Sciences: Global Climate Change," and a six to eight week individual research project under the guidance of a research mentor. Investigators from the six science institutions serve as course faculty and research mentors. Course credit is through PEP's academic partner, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. PEP students also participate in seminars, workshops, field trips, at-sea experiences, career development activities, and attend lectures at participating science institutions throughout the summer. Students present their research results at the end of the summer with a 15-minute public presentation. A number of PEP participants then presented their work at professional and scientific meetings, such as AGU, using the program as a gateway to graduate education and career opportunities in the marine and environmental sciences. From 2009 through 2017, 138 students from 86 colleges and universities, including many that previously had sent few or no students or faculty to Woods Hole, have participated in the program. Participating organizations are: Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NOAA Fisheries), Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Sea Education Association (SEA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC), and University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) - academic partner.

  19. The two-hole ground state of the Hubbard-Anderson model, approximated by a variational RVB-type wave function

    Traa, M.R.M.J.; Traa, M.R.M.J.; Caspers, W.J.; Caspers, W.J.; Banning, E.J.; Banning, E.J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the Hubbard-Anderson model on a square lattice with two holes is studied. The ground state (GS) is approximated by a variational RVB-type wave function. The holes interact by exchange of a localized spin excitation (SE), which is created or absorbed if a hole moves to a

  20. EXPENSES FORECASTING MODEL IN UNIVERSITY PROJECTS PLANNING

    Sergei A. Arustamov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical model presentation of cash flows in project funding. We describe different types of expenses linked to university project activities. Problems of project budgeting that contribute most uncertainty have been revealed. As an example of the model implementation we consider calculation of vacation allowance expenses for project participants. We define problems of forecast for funds reservation: calculation based on methodology established by the Ministry of Education and Science calculation according to the vacation schedule and prediction of the most probable amount. A stochastic model for vacation allowance expenses has been developed. We have proposed methods and solution of the problems that increase the accuracy of forecasting for funds reservation based on 2015 data.

  1. Universality in a Neutral Evolution Model

    King, Dawn; Scott, Adam; Maric, Nevena; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-03-01

    Agent-based models are ideal for investigating the complex problems of biodiversity and speciation because they allow for complex interactions between individuals and between individuals and the environment. Presented here is a ``null'' model that investigates three mating types - assortative, bacterial, and random - in phenotype space, as a function of the percentage of random death δ. Previous work has shown phase transition behavior in an assortative mating model with variable fitness landscapes as the maximum mutation size (μ) was varied (Dees and Bahar, 2010). Similarly, this behavior was recently presented in the work of Scott et al. (submitted), on a completely neutral landscape, for bacterial-like fission as well as for assortative mating. Here, in order to achieve an appropriate ``null'' hypothesis, the random death process was changed so each individual, in each generation, has the same probability of death. Results show a continuous nonequilibrium phase transition for the order parameters of the population size and the number of clusters (analogue of species) as δ is varied for three different mutation sizes of the system. The system shows increasing robustness as μ increases. Universality classes and percolation properties of this system are also explored. This research was supported by funding from: University of Missouri Research Board and James S. McDonnell Foundation

  2. Gravitational perturbation of the cosmic background radiation by density concentrations. [Swiss cheese model universe

    Dyer, C C [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Theoretical Astronomy

    1976-05-01

    The gravitational effect of density concentrations in the Universe on the temperature distribution of the cosmic blackbody background radiation is considered, using the Swiss cheese model universe, and supposing each hole to contain an expanding, homogeneous dust sphere at its centre. The temperature profile across such a hole differs in an essential way from that obtained earlier by Rees et al (Nature; 217:511 (1968)). The evolution of this effect with the expansion of the Universe is considered for 'relatively increasing' density contrasts emerging from the same initial singular state as the rest of the Universe. This effect becomes comparable to the bremsstrahlung and Compton effects on the isotropy of the background radiation for masses of about 10/sup 19/ times the mass of the sun, and exceeds these other effects as about Msup(2/3) for larger masses. If large-scale condensations of the Universe can be found for z approximately 1 to 5, delineated, maybe, by the clustering of quasars, etc., then this effect may be observable.

  3. A fractal model of the Universe

    Gottlieb, Ioan

    The book represents a revisioned, extended, completed and translated version of the book "Superposed Universes. A scientific novel and a SF story" (1995). The book contains a hypothesis by the author concerning the complexity of the Nature. An introduction to the theories of numbers, manyfolds and topology is given. The possible connection with the theory of evolution of the Universe is discussed. The book contains also in the last chapter a SF story based on the hypothesis presented. A connection with fractals theory is given. A part of his earlier studies (1955-1956) were subsequently published without citation by Ali Kyrala (Phys. Rev. vol.117, No.5, march 1, 1960). The book contains as an important appendix the early papers (some of which are published in the coauthoprship with his scientific advisors): 1) T.T. Vescan, A. Weiszmann and I.Gottlieb, Contributii la studiul problemelor geometrice ale teoriei relativitatii restranse. Academia R.P.R. Baza Timisoara. Lucrarile consfatuirii de geometrie diferentiala din 9-12 iunie 1955. In this paper the authors show a new method of the calculation of the metrics. 2) Jean Gottlieb, L'hyphotese d'un modele de la structure de la matiere, Revista Matematica y Fisica Teorica, Serie A, Volumen XY, No.1, y.2, 1964 3) I. Gottlieb, Some hypotheses on space, time and gravitation, Studies in Gravitation Theory, CIP Press, Bucharest, 1988, pp.227-234 as well as some recent papers (published in the coauthorship with his disciples): 4)M. Agop, Gottlieb speace-time. A fractal axiomatic model of the Universe. in Particles and Fields, Editors: M.Agop and P.D. Ioannou, Athens University Press, 2005, pp. 59-141 5) I. Gottlieb, M.Agop and V.Enache, Games with Cantor's dust. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals, vol.40 (2009) pp. 940-945 6) I. Gottlieb, My picture over the World, Bull. of the Polytechnic Institute of Iasi. Tom LVI)LX, Fasc. 1, 2010, pp. 1-18. The book contains also a dedication to father Vasile Gottlieb and wife Cleopatra

  4. Towards a universal model of reading.

    Frost, Ram

    2012-10-01

    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position or context-sensitive coding have revolutionized the field of visual word recognition. The influx of such models stems mainly from consistent findings, coming mostly from European languages, regarding an apparent insensitivity of skilled readers to letter order. Underlying the current revolution is the theoretical assumption that the insensitivity of readers to letter order reflects the special way in which the human brain encodes the position of letters in printed words. The present article discusses the theoretical shortcomings and misconceptions of this approach to visual word recognition. A systematic review of data obtained from a variety of languages demonstrates that letter-order insensitivity is neither a general property of the cognitive system nor a property of the brain in encoding letters. Rather, it is a variant and idiosyncratic characteristic of some languages, mostly European, reflecting a strategy of optimizing encoding resources, given the specific structure of words. Since the main goal of reading research is to develop theories that describe the fundamental and invariant phenomena of reading across orthographies, an alternative approach to model visual word recognition is offered. The dimensions of a possible universal model of reading, which outlines the common cognitive operations involved in orthographic processing in all writing systems, are discussed.

  5. Towards a universal competitive intelligence process model

    Rene Pellissier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competitive intelligence (CI provides actionable intelligence, which provides a competitive edge in enterprises. However, without proper process, it is difficult to develop actionable intelligence. There are disagreements about how the CI process should be structured. For CI professionals to focus on producing actionable intelligence, and to do so with simplicity, they need a common CI process model.Objectives: The purpose of this research is to review the current literature on CI, to look at the aims of identifying and analysing CI process models, and finally to propose a universal CI process model.Method: The study was qualitative in nature and content analysis was conducted on all identified sources establishing and analysing CI process models. To identify relevant literature, academic databases and search engines were used. Moreover, a review of references in related studies led to more relevant sources, the references of which were further reviewed and analysed. To ensure reliability, only peer-reviewed articles were used.Results: The findings reveal that the majority of scholars view the CI process as a cycle of interrelated phases. The output of one phase is the input of the next phase.Conclusion: The CI process is a cycle of interrelated phases. The output of one phase is the input of the next phase. These phases are influenced by the following factors: decision makers, process and structure, organisational awareness and culture, and feedback.

  6. Gravitational wave signatures of inflationary models from Primordial Black Hole dark matter

    García-Bellido, Juan [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autonóma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049 Spain (Spain); Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner, E-mail: juan.garciabellido@uam.es, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, and Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55455 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBH) could be the cold dark matter of the universe. They could have arisen from large (order one) curvature fluctuations produced during inflation that reentered the horizon in the radiation era. At reentry, these fluctuations source gravitational waves (GW) via second order anisotropic stresses. These GW, together with those (possibly) sourced during inflation by the same mechanism responsible for the large curvature fluctuations, constitute a primordial stochastic GW background (SGWB) that unavoidably accompanies the PBH formation. We study how the amplitude and the range of frequencies of this signal depend on the statistics (Gaussian versus χ{sup 2}) of the primordial curvature fluctuations, and on the evolution of the PBH mass function due to accretion and merging. We then compare this signal with the sensitivity of present and future detectors, at PTA and LISA scales. We find that this SGWB will help to probe, or strongly constrain, the early universe mechanism of PBH production. The comparison between the peak mass of the PBH distribution and the peak frequency of this SGWB will provide important information on the merging and accretion evolution of the PBH mass distribution from their formation to the present era. Different assumptions on the statistics and on the PBH evolution also result in different amounts of CMB μ-distortions. Therefore the above results can be complemented by the detection (or the absence) of μ-distortions with an experiment such as PIXIE.

  7. Hybrid Speaker Recognition Using Universal Acoustic Model

    Nishimura, Jun; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    We propose a novel speaker recognition approach using a speaker-independent universal acoustic model (UAM) for sensornet applications. In sensornet applications such as “Business Microscope”, interactions among knowledge workers in an organization can be visualized by sensing face-to-face communication using wearable sensor nodes. In conventional studies, speakers are detected by comparing energy of input speech signals among the nodes. However, there are often synchronization errors among the nodes which degrade the speaker recognition performance. By focusing on property of the speaker's acoustic channel, UAM can provide robustness against the synchronization error. The overall speaker recognition accuracy is improved by combining UAM with the energy-based approach. For 0.1s speech inputs and 4 subjects, speaker recognition accuracy of 94% is achieved at the synchronization error less than 100ms.

  8. Modeling of the effect of intentionally introduced traps on hole transport in single-crystal rubrene

    Dacuñ a, Javier; Desai, Amit; Xie, Wei; Salleo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Defects have been intentionally introduced in a rubrene single crystal by means of two different mechanisms: ultraviolet ozone (UVO) exposure and x-ray irradiation. A complete drift-diffusion model based on the mobility edge (ME) concept, which takes into account asymmetries and nonuniformities in the semiconductor, is used to estimate the energetic and spatial distribution of trap states. The trap distribution for pristine devices can be decomposed into two well defined regions: a shallow region ascribed to structural disorder and a deeper region ascribed to defects. UVO and x ray increase the hole trap concentration in the semiconductor with different energetic and spatial signatures. The former creates traps near the top surface in the 0.3-0.4 eV region, while the latter induces a wider distribution of traps extending from the band edge with a spatial distribution that peaks near the top and bottom interfaces. In addition to inducing hole trap states in the transport gap, both processes are shown to reduce the mobility with respect to a pristine crystal. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  9. Modeling of the effect of intentionally introduced traps on hole transport in single-crystal rubrene

    Dacuña, Javier

    2014-06-05

    Defects have been intentionally introduced in a rubrene single crystal by means of two different mechanisms: ultraviolet ozone (UVO) exposure and x-ray irradiation. A complete drift-diffusion model based on the mobility edge (ME) concept, which takes into account asymmetries and nonuniformities in the semiconductor, is used to estimate the energetic and spatial distribution of trap states. The trap distribution for pristine devices can be decomposed into two well defined regions: a shallow region ascribed to structural disorder and a deeper region ascribed to defects. UVO and x ray increase the hole trap concentration in the semiconductor with different energetic and spatial signatures. The former creates traps near the top surface in the 0.3-0.4 eV region, while the latter induces a wider distribution of traps extending from the band edge with a spatial distribution that peaks near the top and bottom interfaces. In addition to inducing hole trap states in the transport gap, both processes are shown to reduce the mobility with respect to a pristine crystal. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  10. Dilatonic dyon-like black hole solutions in the model with two Abelian gauge fields

    Abishev, M.E. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, RUDN University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boshkayev, K.A. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ivashchuk, V.D. [Center for Gravitation and Fundamental Metrology, VNIIMS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, RUDN University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Dilatonic black hole dyon-like solutions in the gravitational 4d model with a scalar field, two 2-forms, two dilatonic coupling constants λ{sub i} ≠ 0, i = 1,2, obeying λ{sub 1} ≠ -λ{sub 2} and the sign parameter ε = ±1 for scalar field kinetic term are considered. Here ε = -1 corresponds to a ghost scalar field. These solutions are defined up to solutions of two master equations for two moduli functions, when λ{sup 2}{sub i} ≠ 1/2 for ε = -1. Some physical parameters of the solutions are obtained: gravitational mass, scalar charge, Hawking temperature, black hole area entropy and parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters β and γ. The PPN parameters do not depend on the couplings λ{sub i} and ε. A set of bounds on the gravitational mass and scalar charge are found by using a certain conjecture on the parameters of solutions, when 1 + 2λ{sub i}{sup 2} ε > 0, i = 1,2. (orig.)

  11. Effective interactions for valence-hole nuclei with modern meson-exchange potential models

    Hjort-Jensen, M.; Osnes, E.; Kuo, E.

    1991-10-01

    Within the framework of the folded-diagram theory, the authors have studied the effective interaction appropriate for hole-hole nuclei in the mass regions of 16 O and 40 Ca, using the Bonn and Paris potential models. To sum up the folded diagrams the renormalization procedure of Lee and Suzuki has been employed, using a so-called Q-box in which were included all one-body and two-body irreducible valence-linked diagrams through third order in perturbation theory. Discrepancies for the mass dependence of the effective interaction for several JT configurations with respect to empirically deduced mass dependencies is reported. The role of core polarization processes through third order were found to be one of the mechanisms behind these discrepancies. Compared to the results obtained with the Paris potential, more attraction is introduced by the Bonn potential for all matrix elements of concerns, a result which agrees well with previous findings for the particle-particle interaction in the same mass regions. A qualitative agreements with experimental data is obtained. 31 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Towards a universal competitive intelligence process model

    Rene Pellissier

    2013-08-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research is to review the current literature on CI, to look at the aims of identifying and analysing CI process models, and finally to propose a universal CI process model. Method: The study was qualitative in nature and content analysis was conducted on all identified sources establishing and analysing CI process models. To identify relevant literature, academic databases and search engines were used. Moreover, a review of references in related studies led to more relevant sources, the references of which were further reviewed and analysed. To ensure reliability, only peer-reviewed articles were used. Results: The findings reveal that the majority of scholars view the CI process as a cycle of interrelated phases. The output of one phase is the input of the next phase. Conclusion: The CI process is a cycle of interrelated phases. The output of one phase is the input of the next phase. These phases are influenced by the following factors: decision makers, process and structure, organisational awareness and culture, and feedback.

  13. Modelling of web-based virtual university administration for Nigerian ...

    This research work focused on development of a model of web based virtual University Administration for Nigerian universities. This is necessary as there is still a noticeable administrative constraint in our Universities, the establishment of many University Web portals notwithstanding. More efforts are therefore needed to ...

  14. Hole-hole correlations in the U=∞ limit of the Hubbard model and the stability of the Nagaoka state

    Long, M.W.; Zotos, X.

    1993-01-01

    We use exact diagonalization in order to study the infinite-U limit of the two-dimensional Hubbard model. As well as looking at single-particle correlations, such as n kσ =left-angle c kσ † c kσ right-angle, we also study N-particle correlation functions, which compare the relative positions of all the particles in different models. In particular we study 16- and 18-site clusters and compare the charge correlations in the Hubbard model with those of spinless fermions and hard-core bosons. We find that although low densities of holes favor a ''locally ferromagnetic'' fermionic description, the correlations at larger densities resemble those of pure hard-core bosons surprisingly well

  15. Andreev reflections and the quantum physics of black holes

    Manikandan, Sreenath K.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-12-01

    We establish an analogy between superconductor-metal interfaces and the quantum physics of a black hole, using the proximity effect. We show that the metal-superconductor interface can be thought of as an event horizon and Andreev reflection from the interface is analogous to the Hawking radiation in black holes. We describe quantum information transfer in Andreev reflection with a final state projection model similar to the Horowitz-Maldacena model for black hole evaporation. We also propose the Andreev reflection analogue of Hayden and Preskill's description of a black hole final state, where the black hole is described as an information mirror. The analogy between crossed Andreev reflections and Einstein-Rosen bridges is discussed: our proposal gives a precise mechanism for the apparent loss of quantum information in a black hole by the process of nonlocal Andreev reflection, transferring the quantum information through a wormhole and into another universe. Given these established connections, we conjecture that the final quantum state of a black hole is exactly the same as the ground state wave function of the superconductor/superfluid in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity; in particular, the infalling matter and the infalling Hawking quanta, described in the Horowitz-Maldacena model, forms a Cooper pairlike singlet state inside the black hole. A black hole evaporating and shrinking in size can be thought of as the analogue of Andreev reflection by a hole where the superconductor loses a Cooper pair. Our model does not suffer from the black hole information problem since Andreev reflection is unitary. We also relate the thermodynamic properties of a black hole to that of a superconductor, and propose an experiment which can demonstrate the negative specific heat feature of black holes in a growing/evaporating condensate.

  16. The Swiss cheese model of safety incidents: are there holes in the metaphor?

    Perneger Thomas V

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reason's Swiss cheese model has become the dominant paradigm for analysing medical errors and patient safety incidents. The aim of this study was to determine if the components of the model are understood in the same way by quality and safety professionals. Methods Survey of a volunteer sample of persons who claimed familiarity with the model, recruited at a conference on quality in health care, and on the internet through quality-related websites. The questionnaire proposed several interpretations of components of the Swiss cheese model: a slice of cheese, b hole, c arrow, d active error, e how to make the system safer. Eleven interpretations were compatible with this author's interpretation of the model, 12 were not. Results Eighty five respondents stated that they were very or quite familiar with the model. They gave on average 15.3 (SD 2.3, range 10 to 21 "correct" answers out of 23 (66.5% – significantly more than 11.5 "correct" answers that would expected by chance (p Conclusion The interpretations of specific features of the Swiss cheese model varied considerably among quality and safety professionals. Reaching consensus about concepts of patient safety requires further work.

  17. An anatomy of the projected North Atlantic warming hole in CMIP5 models

    Menary, Matthew B.; Wood, Richard A.

    2018-04-01

    Global mean surface air temperature has increased over the past century and climate models project this trend to continue. However, the pattern of change is not homogeneous. Of particular interest is the subpolar North Atlantic, which has cooled in recent years and is projected to continue to warm less rapidly than the global mean. This is often termed the North Atlantic warming hole (WH). In climate model projections, the development of the WH is concomitant with a weakening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Here, we further investigate the possible link between the AMOC and WH and the competing drivers of vertical mixing and surface heat fluxes. Across a large ensemble of 41 climate models we find that the spatial structure of the WH varies considerably from model to model but is generally upstream of the simulated deep water formation regions. A heat budget analysis suggests the formation of the WH is related to changes in ocean heat transport. Although the models display a plethora of AMOC mean states, they generally predict a weakening and shallowing of the AMOC also consistent with the evolving depth structure of the WH. A lagged regression analysis during the WH onset phase suggests that reductions in wintertime mixing lead a weakening of the AMOC by 5 years in turn leading initiation of the WH by 5 years. Inter-model differences in the evolution and structure of the WH are likely to lead to somewhat different projected climate impacts in nearby Europe and North America.

  18. Deformed type 0A matrix model and super-Liouville theory for fermionic black holes

    Ahn, Changrim; Kim, Chanju; Park, Jaemo; Suyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Masayoshi

    2006-01-01

    We consider a c-circumflex = 1 model in the fermionic black hole background. For this purpose we consider a model which contains both the N 1 and the N = 2 super-Liouville interactions. We propose that this model is dual to a recently proposed type 0A matrix quantum mechanics model with vortex deformations. We support our conjecture by showing that non-perturbative corrections to the free energy computed by both the matrix model and the super-Liouville theories agree exactly by treating the N = 2 interaction as a small perturbation. We also show that a two-point function on sphere calculated from the deformed type 0A matrix model is consistent with that of the N = 2 super-Liouville theory when the N = 1 interaction becomes small. This duality between the matrix model and super-Liouville theories leads to a conjecture for arbitrary n-point correlation functions of the N = 1 super-Liouville theory on the sphere

  19. Black holes

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries.

  20. Comparing planar image quality of rotating slat and parallel hole collimation: influence of system modeling

    Holen, Roel van; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-01-01

    The main remaining challenge for a gamma camera is to overcome the existing trade-off between collimator spatial resolution and system sensitivity. This problem, strongly limiting the performance of parallel hole collimated gamma cameras, can be overcome by applying new collimator designs such as rotating slat (RS) collimators which have a much higher photon collection efficiency. The drawback of a RS collimated gamma camera is that, even for obtaining planar images, image reconstruction is needed, resulting in noise accumulation. However, nowadays iterative reconstruction techniques with accurate system modeling can provide better image quality. Because the impact of this modeling on image quality differs from one system to another, an objective assessment of the image quality obtained with a RS collimator is needed in comparison to classical projection images obtained using a parallel hole (PH) collimator. In this paper, a comparative study of image quality, achieved with system modeling, is presented. RS data are reconstructed to planar images using maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) with an accurate Monte Carlo derived system matrix while PH projections are deconvolved using a Monte Carlo derived point-spread function. Contrast-to-noise characteristics are used to show image quality for cold and hot spots of varying size. Influence of the object size and contrast is investigated using the optimal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR o ). For a typical phantom setup, results show that cold spot imaging is slightly better for a PH collimator. For hot spot imaging, the CNR o of the RS images is found to increase with increasing lesion diameter and lesion contrast while it decreases when background dimensions become larger. Only for very large background dimensions in combination with low contrast lesions, the use of a PH collimator could be beneficial for hot spot imaging. In all other cases, the RS collimator scores better. Finally, the simulation of a

  1. Model shear tests of canisters with smectite clay envelopes in deposition holes

    Boergesson, L.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of rock displacement across a deposition hole has been investigated by some model tests. The model was scaled 1:10 to a real deposition hole. It was filled with a canister made of solid copper surrounded by highly compacted water saturated MX-80 bentonite. Before shear the swelling pressure was measured by six transducers in order to follow the water uptake process. During shear, pressure, strain, force and deformation were measured in altogether 18 points. The shearing was made at different rates in the various tests. An extensive sampling after shear was made through which the density, water content, degree of saturation, homogenization and the effect of shear on the bentonite and canister could be studied. One important conlusion from these tests was that the rate dependence is about 10% increased shear resistance per decade increased rate of shear. This resulted also in a very clear increase in strain in the canister with increased rate. The results also showed that the saturated bentonite has excellent stress distributing properties and that there is no risk of destroying the canister if the rock displacement is smaller than the thickness of the bentonite cover. The high density of the clay makes the bentonite produce such a high swelling pressure that the material will be very stiff. In the case of a larger shear deformation corresponding to ≅ 50% of the bentonite thickness the result will be a rather large deformation of the canister. A lower density would be preferable if it can be accepted with respect to other required isolating properties. The results also showed that three-dimensional FEM calculation using non-linear material properties is necessary to simulate the shear process. The rate dependence may be taken into account by adapting the properties to the actual rate of shear but might in a later stage be included in the model by giving the material viscous properties. (orig./HP)

  2. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    Rymzhanov, R.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Medvedev, N.A., E-mail: nikita.medvedev@fzu.cz [Department of Radiation and Chemical Physics, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Laser Plasma Department, Institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Volkov, A.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij pr., 53,119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninskij pr., 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoye sh., 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The ‘effective one-band’ approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott’s atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  3. BPS black holes in a non-homogeneous deformation of the stu model of N=2, D=4 gauged supergravity

    Klemm, Dietmar [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, and INFN - Sezione di Milano,Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Marrani, Alessio [Centro Studi e Ricerche ‘Enrico Fermi’, Via Panisperna 89A, I-00184 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ‘Galileo Galilei’, Università di Padova, and INFN - Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Petri, Nicolò; Santoli, Camilla [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, and INFN - Sezione di Milano,Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-29

    We consider a deformation of the well-known stu model of N=2, D=4 supergravity, characterized by a non-homogeneous special Kähler manifold, and by the smallest electric-magnetic duality Lie algebra consistent with its upliftability to five dimensions. We explicitly solve the BPS attractor equations and construct static supersymmetric black holes with radial symmetry, in the context of U(1) dyonic Fayet-Iliopoulos gauging, focussing on axion-free solutions. Due to non-homogeneity of the scalar manifold, the model evades the analysis recently given in the literature. The relevant physical properties of the resulting black hole solution are discussed.

  4. University - industry collaborations: models, drivers and cultures.

    Ehrismann, Dominic; Patel, Dhavalkumar

    2015-01-01

    The way academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies have been approaching collaborations has changed significantly in recent years. A multitude of interaction models were tested and critical factors that drive successful collaborations have been proposed. Based on this experience the current consensus in the pharmaceutical industry is to pursue one of two strategies: an open innovation approach to source discoveries wherever they occur, or investing selectively into scientific partnerships that churn out inventions that can be translated from bench to bedside internally. While these strategies may be intuitive, to form and build sustainable relationships between academia and large multinational healthcare enterprises is proving challenging. In this article we explore some of the more testing aspects of these collaborations, approaches that various industrial players have taken and provide our own views on the matter. We found that understanding and respecting each other's organisational culture and combining the intellectual and technological assets to answer big scientific questions accelerates and improves the quality of every collaboration. Upon discussing the prevailing cooperation models in the university - industry domain, we assert that science-driven collaborations where risks and rewards are shared equally without a commercial agenda in mind are the most impactful.

  5. A Model for the Development of University Curricula in Nanoelectronics

    Bruun, E.; Nielsen, I.

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having an increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering and in physics. Major influencers affecting developments in university programmes related to nanoelectronics are discussed and a model for university programme development is described. The model takes into account that nanotechnology affects not only…

  6. Black holes and quantum mechanics

    Wilczek, Frank

    1995-01-01

    1. Qualitative introduction to black holes : classical, quantum2. Model black holes and model collapse process: The Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstrom metrics, The Oppenheimer-Volkov collapse scenario3. Mode mixing4. From mode mixing to radiance.

  7. Hydrodynamic Influence Dabanhu River Bridge Holes Widening Based on Two-Dimensional Finite Element Numerical Model

    Li, Dong Feng; Bai, Fu Qing; Nie, Hui

    2018-06-01

    In order to analyze the influence of bridge holes widening on hydrodynamic such as water level, a two-dimensional mathematical model was used to calculate the hydrodynamic factors, river network flow velocity vector distribution is given, water level and difference of bridge widening before and after is calculated and charted, water surface gradient in seven different river sections near the upper reaches of bridges is counted and revealed. The results of hydrodynamic calculation indicate that The Maximum and the minimum deducing numerical value of the water level after bridge widening is 0.028m, and 0.018m respective. the seven sections water surface gradient becomes smaller until it becomes negative, the influence of bridge widening on the upstream is basically over, the range of influence is about 450m from the bridge to the upstream. reach

  8. Studies on entanglement entropy for Hubbard model with hole-doping and external magnetic field

    Yao, K.L.; Li, Y.C.; Sun, X.Z.; Liu, Q.M.; Qin, Y.; Fu, H.H.; Gao, G.Y.

    2005-01-01

    By using the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method for the one-dimensional (1D) Hubbard model, we have studied the von Neumann entropy of a quantum system, which describes the entanglement of the system block and the rest of the chain. It is found that there is a close relation between the entanglement entropy and properties of the system. The hole-doping can alter the charge-charge and spin-spin interactions, resulting in charge polarization along the chain. By comparing the results before and after the doping, we find that doping favors increase of the von Neumann entropy and thus also favors the exchange of information along the chain. Furthermore, we calculated the spin and entropy distribution in external magnetic filed. It is confirmed that both the charge-charge and the spin-spin interactions affect the exchange of information along the chain, making the entanglement entropy redistribute

  9. Down-Hole Heat Exchangers: Modelling of a Low-Enthalpy Geothermal System for District Heating

    M. Carlini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to face the growing energy demands, renewable energy sources can provide an alternative to fossil fuels. Thus, low-enthalpy geothermal plants may play a fundamental role in those areas—such as the Province of Viterbo—where shallow groundwater basins occur and conventional geothermal plants cannot be developed. This may lead to being fuelled by locally available sources. The aim of the present paper is to exploit the heat coming from a low-enthalpy geothermal system. The experimental plant consists in a down-hole heat exchanger for civil purposes and can supply thermal needs by district heating. An implementation in MATLAB environment is provided in order to develop a mathematical model. As a consequence, the amount of withdrawable heat can be successfully calculated.

  10. Soft-Hair-Enhanced Entanglement Beyond Page Curves in a Black Hole Evaporation Qubit Model

    Hotta, Masahiro; Nambu, Yasusada; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2018-05-01

    We propose a model with multiple qubits that reproduces the thermal properties of four-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes (BHs) by simultaneously taking account of the emission of Hawking particles and the zero-energy soft-hair evaporation at the horizon. The results verify that the entanglement entropy between a qubit and other subsystems, including emitted radiation, is much larger than the BH entropy analogue of the qubit, as opposed to the Page curve prediction. Our result suggests that early Hawking radiation is entangled with soft hair and that late Hawking radiation can be highly entangled with the degrees of freedom of a BH, avoiding the emergence of a firewall at the horizon.

  11. The Triad Research University or a Post 20th Century Research University Model

    Tadmor, Zehev

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a model for the future research university is proposed, which answers some of the key challenges facing universities. It consists of three independent yet closely knitted entities: a research institute, a university teaching college and a business unit creating a "triad" structure. The possible inevitability, the advantages and…

  12. X-ray flares in NGC 4151: A thermal model and constraints on a central black hole

    Lightman, A.P.; Giacconi, R.; Tananbaum, H.

    1978-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery that the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 exhibits rapid X-ray flaring, we discuss a thermal model for this source. Inverse Compton scattering of soft photons gives a predicted relationship for rise time versus energy during X-ray flares. A second prediction, arising from the large optical depth to pair production deduced for the source, is that the power law spectrum should not extend to energies E> or approx. =m/sub e/c 2 approx. =500 KeV. If it is assumed that NGC 4151 is powered by accretion onto a black hole, then we deduce a black hole mass M 6 Msun for the source and suggest constraints on such black hole models in general

  13. Finite element model study of the effect of corner rounding on detectability of corner cracks using bolt hole eddy current

    Underhill, P. R.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Recent work has shown that the detectability of corner cracks in bolt-holes is compromised when rounding of corners arises, as might occur during bolt-hole removal. Probability of Detection (POD) studies normally require a large number of samples of both fatigue cracks and electric discharge machined notches. In the particular instance of rounding of bolt-hole corners the generation of such a large set of samples representing the full spectrum of potential rounding would be prohibitive. In this paper, the application of Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling is used to supplement the study of detection of cracks forming at the rounded corners of bolt-holes. FEM models show that rounding of the corner of the bolt-hole reduces the size of the response to a corner crack to a greater extent than can be accounted for by loss of crack area. This reduced sensitivity can be ascribed to a lower concentration of eddy currents at the rounded corner surface and greater lift-off of pick-up coils relative to that of a straight-edge corner. A rounding with a radius of 0.4 mm (.016 inch) showed a 20% reduction in the strength of the crack signal. Assuming linearity of the crack signal with crack size, this would suggest an increase in the minimum detectable size by 25%.

  14. Emergent horizon, Hawking radiation and chaos in the collapsed polymer model of a black hole

    Brustein, Ram [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Medved, A.J.M. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, Grahamstown (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), Western Cape (South Africa)

    2017-02-15

    We have proposed that the interior of a macroscopic Schwarzschild black hole (BH) consists of highly excited, long, closed, interacting strings and, as such, can be modeled as a collapsed polymer. It was previously shown that the scaling relations of the collapsed-polymer model agree with those of the BH. The current paper further substantiates this proposal with an investigation into some of its dynamical consequences. In particular, we show that the model predicts, without relying on gravitational effects, an emergent horizon. We further show that the horizon fluctuates quantum mechanically as it should and that the strength of the fluctuations is inversely proportional to the BH entropy. It is then demonstrated that the emission of Hawking radiation is realized microscopically by the quantum-induced escape of small pieces of string, with the rate of escape and the energy per emitted piece both parametrically matching the Hawking temperature. We also show, using standard methods from statistical mechanics and chaos theory, how our model accounts for some other known properties of BHs. These include the accepted results for the scrambling time and the viscosity-to-entropy ratio, which in our model apply not only at the horizon but throughout the BH interior. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Emergent horizon, Hawking radiation and chaos in the collapsed polymer model of a black hole

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed that the interior of a macroscopic Schwarzschild black hole (BH) consists of highly excited, long, closed, interacting strings and, as such, can be modeled as a collapsed polymer. It was previously shown that the scaling relations of the collapsed-polymer model agree with those of the BH. The current paper further substantiates this proposal with an investigation into some of its dynamical consequences. In particular, we show that the model predicts, without relying on gravitational effects, an emergent horizon. We further show that the horizon fluctuates quantum mechanically as it should and that the strength of the fluctuations is inversely proportional to the BH entropy. It is then demonstrated that the emission of Hawking radiation is realized microscopically by the quantum-induced escape of small pieces of string, with the rate of escape and the energy per emitted piece both parametrically matching the Hawking temperature. We also show, using standard methods from statistical mechanics and chaos theory, how our model accounts for some other known properties of BHs. These include the accepted results for the scrambling time and the viscosity-to-entropy ratio, which in our model apply not only at the horizon but throughout the BH interior. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Particle creation rate for dynamical black holes

    Firouzjaee, Javad T. [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); University of Oxford, Department of Physics (Astrophysics), Oxford (United Kingdom); Ellis, George F.R. [University of Cape Town, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics Department, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2016-11-15

    We present the particle creation probability rate around a general black hole as an outcome of quantum fluctuations. Using the uncertainty principle for these fluctuation, we derive a new ultraviolet frequency cutoff for the radiation spectrum of a dynamical black hole. Using this frequency cutoff, we define the probability creation rate function for such black holes. We consider a dynamical Vaidya model and calculate the probability creation rate for this case when its horizon is in a slowly evolving phase. Our results show that one can expect the usual Hawking radiation emission process in the case of a dynamical black hole when it has a slowly evolving horizon. Moreover, calculating the probability rate for a dynamical black hole gives a measure of when Hawking radiation can be killed off by an incoming flux of matter or radiation. Our result strictly suggests that we have to revise the Hawking radiation expectation for primordial black holes that have grown substantially since they were created in the early universe. We also infer that this frequency cut off can be a parameter that shows the primordial black hole growth at the emission moment. (orig.)

  17. A review of the microscopic modeling of the 5-dim. black hole of IIB ...

    vide quantitative predictions in particle physics. However in case ... Let us list a few properties of classical black holes: (see e.g. the text book by Wald [1]). ..... To explain the basic point let us study the metric of the black hole with the ...... I would also like to acknowledge discussions on the topics discussed here with Daniele.

  18. Strong-coupling superconductivity in the two-dimensional t-J model supplemented by a hole-phonon interaction

    Sherman, A.; Schreiber, M.

    1995-01-01

    We use the Eliashberg formalism for calculating T c in a model of cuprate perovskites with pairing mediated by both magnons and apex-oxygen vibrations. The influence of strong correlations on the energy spectrum is taken into account in the spin-wave approximation. It is shown that the hole-magnon interaction alone cannot yield high T c . But together with a moderate hole-phonon interaction it does lead to d-wave superconductivity at temperatures and hole concentrations observed in cuprates. High T c are connected with a large density of states due to extended Van Hove singularities, a conformity of the two interactions for the d symmetry, and high phonon frequencies

  19. Hole motion in the t-J and Hubbard models: Effect of a next-nearest-neighbor hopping

    Gagliano, E.; Bacci, S.; Dagotto, E.

    1990-01-01

    Using exact diagonalization techniques, we study one dynamical hole in the two-dimensional t-J and Hubbard models on a square lattice including a next-nearest-neighbor hopping t'. We present the phase diagram in the parameter space (J/t,t'/t), discussing the ground-state properties of the hole. At J=0, a crossing of levels exists at some value of t' separating a ferromagnetic from an antiferromagnetic ground state. For nonzero J, at least four different regions appear where the system behaves like an antiferromagnet or a (not fully saturated) ferromagnet. We study the quasiparticle behavior of the hole, showing that for small values of |t'| the previously presented string picture is still valid. We also find that, for a realistic set of parameters derived from the Cu-O Hamiltonian, the hole has momentum (π/2,π/2), suggesting an enhancement of the p-wave superconducting mode due to the second-neighbor interactions in the spin-bag picture. Results for the t-t'-U model are also discussed with conclusions similar to those of the t-t'-J model. In general we found that t'=0 is not a singular point of these models

  20. EVIDENCE FOR LOW BLACK HOLE SPIN AND PHYSICALLY MOTIVATED ACCRETION MODELS FROM MILLIMETER-VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF SAGITTARIUS A*

    Broderick, Avery E [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Fish, Vincent L; Doeleman, Sheperd S [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Loeb, Abraham [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard University, Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-10

    Millimeter very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) provides the novel capacity to probe the emission region of a handful of supermassive black holes on sub-horizon scales. For Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, this provides access to the region in the immediate vicinity of the horizon. Broderick et al. have already shown that by leveraging spectral and polarization information as well as accretion theory, it is possible to extract accretion-model parameters (including black hole spin) from mm-VLBI experiments containing only a handful of telescopes. Here we repeat this analysis with the most recent mm-VLBI data, considering a class of aligned, radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) models. We find that the combined data set rules out symmetric models for Sgr A*'s flux distribution at the 3.9{sigma} level, strongly favoring length-to-width ratios of roughly 2.4:1. More importantly, we find that physically motivated accretion flow models provide a significantly better fit to the mm-VLBI observations than phenomenological models, at the 2.9{sigma} level. This implies that not only is mm-VLBI presently capable of distinguishing between potential physical models for Sgr A*'s emission, but further that it is sensitive to the strong gravitational lensing associated with the propagation of photons near the black hole. Based upon this analysis we find that the most probable magnitude, viewing angle, and position angle for the black hole spin are a = 0.0{sup +0.64+0.86}, {theta}=68{sup o+5o+9o}{sub -20}{sup o}{sub -28}{sup o}, and {xi}=-52{sup o+17o+33o}{sub -15}{sup o}{sub -24}{sup o} east of north, where the errors quoted are the 1{sigma} and 2{sigma} uncertainties.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR LOW BLACK HOLE SPIN AND PHYSICALLY MOTIVATED ACCRETION MODELS FROM MILLIMETER-VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF SAGITTARIUS A*

    Broderick, Avery E.; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) provides the novel capacity to probe the emission region of a handful of supermassive black holes on sub-horizon scales. For Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, this provides access to the region in the immediate vicinity of the horizon. Broderick et al. have already shown that by leveraging spectral and polarization information as well as accretion theory, it is possible to extract accretion-model parameters (including black hole spin) from mm-VLBI experiments containing only a handful of telescopes. Here we repeat this analysis with the most recent mm-VLBI data, considering a class of aligned, radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) models. We find that the combined data set rules out symmetric models for Sgr A*'s flux distribution at the 3.9σ level, strongly favoring length-to-width ratios of roughly 2.4:1. More importantly, we find that physically motivated accretion flow models provide a significantly better fit to the mm-VLBI observations than phenomenological models, at the 2.9σ level. This implies that not only is mm-VLBI presently capable of distinguishing between potential physical models for Sgr A*'s emission, but further that it is sensitive to the strong gravitational lensing associated with the propagation of photons near the black hole. Based upon this analysis we find that the most probable magnitude, viewing angle, and position angle for the black hole spin are a = 0.0 +0.64+0.86 , θ=68 o+5 o +9 o -20 o -28 o , and ξ=-52 o+17 o +33 o -15 o -24 o east of north, where the errors quoted are the 1σ and 2σ uncertainties.

  2. On Singularities and Black Holes in Combination-Driven Models of Technological Innovation Networks.

    Ricard Solé

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that innovations occur mainly by combination: the more inventions accumulate, the higher the probability that new inventions are obtained from previous designs. Additionally, it has been conjectured that the combinatorial nature of innovations naturally leads to a singularity: at some finite time, the number of innovations should diverge. Although these ideas are certainly appealing, no general models have been yet developed to test the conditions under which combinatorial technology should become explosive. Here we present a generalised model of technological evolution that takes into account two major properties: the number of previous technologies needed to create a novel one and how rapidly technology ages. Two different models of combinatorial growth are considered, involving different forms of ageing. When long-range memory is used and thus old inventions are available for novel innovations, singularities can emerge under some conditions with two phases separated by a critical boundary. If the ageing has a characteristic time scale, it is shown that no singularities will be observed. Instead, a "black hole" of old innovations appears and expands in time, making the rate of invention creation slow down into a linear regime.

  3. On Singularities and Black Holes in Combination-Driven Models of Technological Innovation Networks.

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Valverde, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that innovations occur mainly by combination: the more inventions accumulate, the higher the probability that new inventions are obtained from previous designs. Additionally, it has been conjectured that the combinatorial nature of innovations naturally leads to a singularity: at some finite time, the number of innovations should diverge. Although these ideas are certainly appealing, no general models have been yet developed to test the conditions under which combinatorial technology should become explosive. Here we present a generalised model of technological evolution that takes into account two major properties: the number of previous technologies needed to create a novel one and how rapidly technology ages. Two different models of combinatorial growth are considered, involving different forms of ageing. When long-range memory is used and thus old inventions are available for novel innovations, singularities can emerge under some conditions with two phases separated by a critical boundary. If the ageing has a characteristic time scale, it is shown that no singularities will be observed. Instead, a "black hole" of old innovations appears and expands in time, making the rate of invention creation slow down into a linear regime.

  4. Accuracy of finite-element models for the stress analysis of multiple-holed moderator blocks

    Smith, P.D.; Sullivan, R.M.; Lewis, A.C.; Yu, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Two steps have been taken to quantify and improve the accuracy in the analysis. First, the limitations of various approximation techniques have been studied with the aid of smaller benchmark problems containing fewer holes. Second, a new family of computer programs has been developed for handling such large problems. This paper describes the accuracy studies and the benchmark problems. A review is given of some proposed modeling techniques including local mesh refinement, homogenization, a special-purpose finite element, and substructuring. Some limitations of these approaches are discussed. The new finite element programs and the features that contribute to their efficiency are discussed. These include a standard architecture for out-of-core data processing and an equation solver that operates on a peripheral array processor. The central conclusions of the paper are: (1) modeling approximation methods such as local mesh refinement and homogenization tend to be unreliable, and they should be justified by a fine mesh benchmark analysis; and (2) finite element codes are now available that can achieve accurate solutions at a reasonable cost, and there is no longer a need to employ modeling approximations in the two-dimensional analysis of HTGR fuel elements. 10 figures

  5. A model for the development of university curricula in nanoelectronics

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, I

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having an increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering and in physics. Major influencers affecting developments in university programmes related to nanoelectronics are discussed and a model for university programme development is described. The model takes...... engineering. Examples of European curricula following this framework are identified and described. These examples may serve as sources of inspiration for future developments and the model...

  6. Black hole versus cosmological horizon entropy

    Davis, Tamara M; Davies, P C W; Lineweaver, Charles H

    2003-01-01

    The generalized second law of thermodynamics states that entropy always increases when all event horizons are attributed with an entropy proportional to their area. We test the generalized second law by investigating the change in entropy when dust, radiation and black holes cross a cosmological event horizon. We generalize for flat, open and closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes by using numerical calculations to determine the cosmological horizon evolution. In most cases, the loss of entropy from within the cosmological horizon is more than balanced by an increase in cosmological event horizon entropy, maintaining the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics. However, an intriguing set of open universe models shows an apparent entropy decrease when black holes disappear over the cosmological event horizon. We anticipate that this apparent violation of the generalized second law will disappear when solutions are available for black holes embedded in arbitrary backgrounds

  7. "Iron-Clad" Evidence For Spinning Black Hole

    2003-09-01

    Telltale X-rays from iron may reveal if black holes are spinning or not, according to astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton Observatory. The gas flows and bizarre gravitational effects observed near stellar black holes are similar to those seen around supermassive black holes. Stellar black holes, in effect, are convenient `scale models' of their much larger cousins. Black holes come in at least two different sizes. Stellar black holes are between five and 20 times the mass of the Sun. At the other end of the size scale, supermassive black holes contain millions or billions times the mass of our Sun. The Milky Way contains both a supermassive black hole at its center, as well as a number of stellar black holes sprinkled throughout the Galaxy. At a press conference at the "Four Years of Chandra" symposium in Huntsville, Ala., Jon Miller of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. discussed recent results on the X-ray spectra, or distribution of X-rays with energy, from the iron atoms in gas around three stellar black holes in the Milky Way. "Discovering the high degree of correspondence between stellar and supermassive black holes is a real breakthrough," said Miller. "Because stellar black holes are smaller, everything happens about a million times faster, so they can be used as a test-bed for theories of how spinning black holes affect the space and matter around them." X-rays from a stellar black hole are produced when gas from a nearby companion star is heated to tens of millions of degrees as it swirls toward the black hole. Iron atoms in this gas produce distinctive X-ray signals that can be used to study the orbits of particles around the black hole. For example, the gravity of a black hole can shift the X-rays to lower energies. "The latest work provides the most precise measurements yet of the X-ray spectra for stellar black holes," said Miller. "These data help rule out

  8. A Review of Research on Universal Design Educational Models

    Rao, Kavita; Ok, Min Wook; Bryant, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Universal design for learning (UDL) has gained considerable attention in the field of special education, acclaimed for its promise to promote inclusion by supporting access to the general curriculum. In addition to UDL, there are two other universal design (UD) educational models referenced in the literature, universal design of instruction (UDI)…

  9. Our universe as an attractor in a superstring model

    Maeda, Keiichi.

    1986-11-01

    One preferential scenario of the evolution of the universe is discussed in a superstring model. The universe can reach the present state as an attractor in the dynamical system. The kinetic terms of the ''axions'' play an important role so that our present universe is realized almost uniquely. (author)

  10. Gating the holes in the Swiss cheese (part I): Expanding professor Reason's model for patient safety.

    Seshia, Shashi S; Bryan Young, G; Makhinson, Michael; Smith, Preston A; Stobart, Kent; Croskerry, Pat

    2018-02-01

    Although patient safety has improved steadily, harm remains a substantial global challenge. Additionally, safety needs to be ensured not only in hospitals but also across the continuum of care. Better understanding of the complex cognitive factors influencing health care-related decisions and organizational cultures could lead to more rational approaches, and thereby to further improvement. A model integrating the concepts underlying Reason's Swiss cheese theory and the cognitive-affective biases plus cascade could advance the understanding of cognitive-affective processes that underlie decisions and organizational cultures across the continuum of care. Thematic analysis, qualitative information from several sources being used to support argumentation. Complex covert cognitive phenomena underlie decisions influencing health care. In the integrated model, the Swiss cheese slices represent dynamic cognitive-affective (mental) gates: Reason's successive layers of defence. Like firewalls and antivirus programs, cognitive-affective gates normally allow the passage of rational decisions but block or counter unsounds ones. Gates can be breached (ie, holes created) at one or more levels of organizations, teams, and individuals, by (1) any element of cognitive-affective biases plus (conflicts of interest and cognitive biases being the best studied) and (2) other potential error-provoking factors. Conversely, flawed decisions can be blocked and consequences minimized; for example, by addressing cognitive biases plus and error-provoking factors, and being constantly mindful. Informed shared decision making is a neglected but critical layer of defence (cognitive-affective gate). The integrated model can be custom tailored to specific situations, and the underlying principles applied to all methods for improving safety. The model may also provide a framework for developing and evaluating strategies to optimize organizational cultures and decisions. The concept is abstract, the

  11. Gating the holes in the Swiss cheese (part I): Expanding professor Reason's model for patient safety

    Bryan Young, G.; Makhinson, Michael; Smith, Preston A.; Stobart, Kent; Croskerry, Pat

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Although patient safety has improved steadily, harm remains a substantial global challenge. Additionally, safety needs to be ensured not only in hospitals but also across the continuum of care. Better understanding of the complex cognitive factors influencing health care–related decisions and organizational cultures could lead to more rational approaches, and thereby to further improvement. Hypothesis A model integrating the concepts underlying Reason's Swiss cheese theory and the cognitive‐affective biases plus cascade could advance the understanding of cognitive‐affective processes that underlie decisions and organizational cultures across the continuum of care. Methods Thematic analysis, qualitative information from several sources being used to support argumentation. Discussion Complex covert cognitive phenomena underlie decisions influencing health care. In the integrated model, the Swiss cheese slices represent dynamic cognitive‐affective (mental) gates: Reason's successive layers of defence. Like firewalls and antivirus programs, cognitive‐affective gates normally allow the passage of rational decisions but block or counter unsounds ones. Gates can be breached (ie, holes created) at one or more levels of organizations, teams, and individuals, by (1) any element of cognitive‐affective biases plus (conflicts of interest and cognitive biases being the best studied) and (2) other potential error‐provoking factors. Conversely, flawed decisions can be blocked and consequences minimized; for example, by addressing cognitive biases plus and error‐provoking factors, and being constantly mindful. Informed shared decision making is a neglected but critical layer of defence (cognitive‐affective gate). The integrated model can be custom tailored to specific situations, and the underlying principles applied to all methods for improving safety. The model may also provide a framework for developing and evaluating strategies to

  12. Black holes new horizons

    Hayward, Sean Alan

    2013-01-01

    Black holes, once just fascinating theoretical predictions of how gravity warps space-time according to Einstein's theory, are now generally accepted as astrophysical realities, formed by post-supernova collapse, or as supermassive black holes mysteriously found at the cores of most galaxies, powering active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the universe. Theoretical understanding has progressed in recent decades with a wider realization that local concepts should characterize black holes, rather than the global concepts found in textbooks. In particular, notions such as trapping h

  13. Transition from AdS universe to DS universe in the BPP model

    Kim, Wontae; Yoon, Myungseok

    2007-01-01

    It can be shown that in the BPP model the smooth phase transition from the asymptotically decelerated AdS universe to the asymptotically accelerated DS universe is possible by solving the modified semiclassical equations of motion. This transition comes from noncommutative Poisson algebra, which gives the constant curvature scalars asymptotically. The decelerated expansion of the early universe is due to the negative energy density with the negative pressure induced by quantum back reaction, and the accelerated late-time universe comes from the positive energy and the negative pressure which behave like dark energy source in recent cosmological models

  14. White dwarfs - black holes

    Sexl, R.; Sexl, H.

    1975-01-01

    The physical arguments and problems of relativistic astrophysics are presented in a correct way, but without any higher mathematics. The book is addressed to teachers, experimental physicists, and others with a basic knowledge covering an introductory lecture in physics. The issues dealt with are: fundamentals of general relativity, classical tests of general relativity, curved space-time, stars and planets, pulsars, gravitational collapse and black holes, the search for black holes, gravitational waves, cosmology, cosmogony, and the early universe. (BJ/AK) [de

  15. A simple model for normal state in- and out-of-plane resistivities of hole doped cuprates

    Naqib, S.H., E-mail: shnaqib.physicsru@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Azam, M. Afsana [Department of Physics, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Department of Physics, DUET, Gazipur, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Uddin, M. Borhan [Department of Physics, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Department of CSE, International Islamic University Chittagong, Sitakunda, IIUC Rd, Kumira 4314 Bangladesh (Bangladesh); Cole, J.R. [Cambridge Flow Solutions Ltd., Histon, Cambridge CB24 9AD (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • In- and out-of-plane charge transport have been investigated for hole doped cuprates. • Effect of quantum critical point (QCP) on non-Fermi liquid behavior has been explored. • The impact of pseudogap (PG) on carrier scattering rate has been studied. • In- and out-of plane resistivities have been modeled by considering the QCP and the PG. • The model explains the non-Fermi liquid charge transport in hole doped cuprates. - Abstract: The highly anisotropic and qualitatively different nature of the normal state in- and out-of-plane charge dynamics in high-T{sub c} cuprates cannot be accommodated within the conventional Boltzmann transport theory. The variation of in-plane and out-of-plane resistivities with temperature and hole content are anomalous and cannot be explained by Fermi-liquid theory. In this study, we have proposed a simple phenomenological model for the dc resistivity of cuprates by incorporating two firmly established generic features of all hole doped cuprate superconductors—(i) the pseudogap in the quasiparticle energy spectrum and (ii) the T-linear resistivity at high temperatures. This T-linear behavior over an extended temperature range can be attributed to a quantum criticality, affecting the electronic phase diagram of cuprates. Experimental in-plane and out-of-plane resistivities (ρ{sub p}(T) and ρ{sub c}(T), respectively) of double-layer Y(Ca)123 have been analyzed using the proposed model. This phenomenological model describes the temperature and the hole content dependent resistivity over a wide range of temperature and hole content, p. The characteristic PG energy scale, ε{sub g}(p), extracted from the analysis of the resistivity data, agrees quite well with those found in variety of other experiments. Various other extracted parameters from the analysis of ρ{sub p}(T) and ρ{sub c}(T) data showed systematic trends with changing hole concentration. We have discussed important features found from the analysis in

  16. Black Holes

    Horowitz, Gary T.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1998-01-01

    Black holes are among the most intriguing objects in modern physics. Their influence ranges from powering quasars and other active galactic nuclei, to providing key insights into quantum gravity. We review the observational evidence for black holes, and briefly discuss some of their properties. We also describe some recent developments involving cosmic censorship and the statistical origin of black hole entropy.

  17. THE BINARY BLACK HOLE MODEL FOR MRK 231 BITES THE DUST

    Leighly, Karen M. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Terndrup, Donald M. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Centre for Planetary and Space Exploration, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lucy, Adrian B. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 W. 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Mrk 231 is a nearby quasar with an unusually red near-UV-to-optical continuum, generally explained as heavy reddening by dust. Yan et al. proposed that Mrk 231 is a milliparsec black hole binary with little intrinsic reddening. We show that if the observed FUV continuum is intrinsic, as assumed by Yan et al., it fails by a factor of about 100 in powering the observed strength of the near-infrared emission lines and the thermal near and mid-infrared continuum. In contrast, the line and continuum strengths are typical for a reddened AGN spectral energy distribution (SED). We find that the He i*/P β ratio is sensitive to the SED for a one-zone model. If this sensitivity is maintained in general broadline region models, then this ratio may prove a useful diagnostic for heavily reddened quasars. Analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope STIS and Faint Object Camera data revealed evidence that the far-UV continuum emission is resolved on size scales of ∼40 pc. The lack of broad absorption lines in the far-UV continuum might be explained if it were not coincident with the central engine. One possibility is that it is the central engine continuum reflected from the receding wind on the far side of the quasar.

  18. Computation and empirical modeling of UV flux reaching Arabian Sea due to O3 hole

    Yousufzai, M. Ayub Khan

    2008-01-01

    Scientific organizations the world over, such as the European Space Agency, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the United Nations Organization, are deeply concerned about the imbalances, caused to a significant extent due to human interference in the natural make-up of the earth's ecosystem. In particular, ozone layer depletion (OLD) over the South Pole is already a serious hazard. The long-term effect of ozone layer depletion appears to be an increase in the ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth. In order to understand the effects of ozone layer depletion, investigations have been initiated by various research groups. However, to the best of our knowledge, there does not seem to be available any work treating the problem of computing and constructing an empirical model for the UV flux reaching the Arabian Sea surface due to the O3 hole. The communication presents the results of quantifying UV flux and modeling future estimation using time series analysis in a local context to understand the nature of the depletion. (author)

  19. A Global Change in Higher Education: Entrepreneurial University Model

    Süreyya SAKINÇ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities are affected by the social and economic diversity stemmed from globalization and internationalization, and its functions, area of responsibility, organizational structure, funding capability respond this diversity. In today's knowledge society, different new concepts regarding the university education system such as Entrepreneur University, Corporation University, virtual university etc. have been emerged with wave of globalization effect. The rising competition in academic education and the mass demands for education prompt to universities to get seeking new funds for fixing their financial situation, and hit them transforming into entrepreneurial identity. The reflections of neoliberal approach in education have transformed the universities into the corporations which are much more focused on entrepreneurial, student-oriented and aimed to appropriate education and producing creative human resources for global development. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation will be carried on regarding the entrepreneur university model through the litterateur research to investigate its causes and factors that impact and improve it. The aim of the paper is to generate a framework that identifies dynamic processes of entrepreneur university model, dependently the litterateur syntheses. The contribution of the paper will depend on its consequent argument that entrepreneur university model is viable for Turkey. In this paper, the entrepreneur university model will be analyzed by Triple Helix phenomenon with the comparative approach.

  20. Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole - modelling of three scale tests for validation of models

    Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Three model shear tests of very high quality simulating a horizontal rock shear through a KBS-3V deposition hole in the centre of a canister were performed 1986. The tests simulated a deposition hole in the scale 1:10 with reference density of the buffer, very stiff confinement simulating the rock, and a solid bar of copper simulating the canister. The three tests were almost identical with exception of the rate of shear, which was varied between 0.031 and 160 mm/s, i.e. with a factor of more than 5000, and the density of the bentonite, which differed slightly. The tests were very well documented. Shear force, shear rate, total stress in the bentonite, strain in the copper and the movement of the top of the simulated canister were measured continuously during the shear. After finished shear the equipment was dismantled and careful sampling of the bentonite with measurement of water ratio and density were made. The deformed copper 'canister' was also carefully measured after the test. The tests have been modelled with the finite element code Abaqus with the same models and techniques that were used for the full scale cases in the Swedish safety assessment SR-Site. The results have been compared with the measured results, which has yielded very valuable information about the relevancy of the material models and the modelling technique. An elastic-plastic material model was used for the bentonite where the stress-strain relations have been derived from laboratory tests. The material model is also described in another article to this conference. The material model is made a function of both the density and the strain rate at shear. Since the shear is fast and takes place under undrained conditions, the density is not changed during the tests. However, strain rate varies largely with both the location of the elements and time. This can be taken into account in Abaqus by making the material model a function of the strain

  1. The Toy model: Understanding the early universe

    Fisher, Peter H.; Price, Richard H.

    2018-04-01

    In many branches of science, progress is being made by taking advantage of insights from other branches of science. Cosmology, the structure and evolution of the universe, is certainly an area that is currently beset by problems in understanding. We show here that the scientific insights from the studies of early childhood development, in particular, those of Piaget, give a new way of looking at the early universe. This new approach can not only be invaluable in undergraduate teaching, but can even be the basis of semi-quantitative predictions.

  2. The mass of the black hole in 1A 0620-00, revisiting the ellipsoidal light curve modelling

    van Grunsven, Theo F. J.; Jonker, Peter G.; Verbunt, Frank W. M.; Robinson, Edward L.

    2017-12-01

    The mass distribution of stellar-mass black holes can provide important clues to supernova modelling, but observationally it is still ill constrained. Therefore, it is of importance to make black hole mass measurements as accurate as possible. The X-ray transient 1A 0620-00 is well studied, with a published black hole mass of 6.61 ± 0.25 M⊙, based on an orbital inclination i of 51.0° ± 0.9°. This was obtained by Cantrell et al. (2010) as an average of independent fits to V-, I- and H-band light curves. In this work, we perform an independent check on the value of i by re-analysing existing YALO/SMARTS V-, I- and H-band photometry, using different modelling software and fitting strategy. Performing a fit to the three light curves simultaneously, we obtain a value for i of 54.1° ± 1.1°, resulting in a black hole mass of 5.86 ± 0.24 M⊙. Applying the same model to the light curves individually, we obtain 58.2° ± 1.9°, 53.6° ± 1.6° and 50.5° ± 2.2° for V-, I- and H-band, respectively, where the differences in best-fitting i are caused by the contribution of the residual accretion disc light in the three different bands. We conclude that the mass determination of this black hole may still be subject to systematic effects exceeding the statistical uncertainty. Obtaining more accurate masses would be greatly helped by continuous phase-resolved spectroscopic observations simultaneous with photometry.

  3. Black hole production and graviton emission in models with large extra dimensions

    Koch, B.

    2007-11-21

    This thesis studies the possible production of microscopical black holes and the emission of graviational radiation under the assumption of large extra dimensions. We derive observables for the Large Hadron Collider and for ultra high energetic cosmic rays. (orig.)

  4. Black hole production and graviton emission in models with large extra dimensions

    Koch, B.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis studies the possible production of microscopical black holes and the emission of graviational radiation under the assumption of large extra dimensions. We derive observables for the Large Hadron Collider and for ultra high energetic cosmic rays. (orig.)

  5. Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits

    2008-06-01

    The biggest black holes may feed just like the smallest ones, according to data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ground-based telescopes. This discovery supports the implication of Einstein's relativity theory that black holes of all sizes have similar properties, and will be useful for predicting the properties of a conjectured new class of black holes. The conclusion comes from a large observing campaign of the spiral galaxy M81, which is about 12 million light years from Earth. In the center of M81 is a black hole that is about 70 million times more massive than the Sun, and generates energy and radiation as it pulls gas in the central region of the galaxy inwards at high speed. In contrast, so-called stellar mass black holes, which have about 10 times more mass than the Sun, have a different source of food. These smaller black holes acquire new material by pulling gas from an orbiting companion star. Because the bigger and smaller black holes are found in different environments with different sources of material to feed from, a question has remained about whether they feed in the same way. Using these new observations and a detailed theoretical model, a research team compared the properties of M81's black hole with those of stellar mass black holes. The results show that either big or little, black holes indeed appear to eat similarly to each other, and produce a similar distribution of X-rays, optical and radio light. AnimationMulti-wavelength Images of M81 One of the implications of Einstein's theory of General Relativity is that black holes are simple objects and only their masses and spins determine their effect on space-time. The latest research indicates that this simplicity manifests itself in spite of complicated environmental effects. "This confirms that the feeding patterns for black holes of different sizes can be very similar," said Sera Markoff of the Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, who led the study

  6. A Model for Mentoring University Faculty

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Operational characteristics for successful mentoring programs of new university faculty include clarity of purpose of the program, methods for matching mentors and proteges, mentor training, mentor-protege relationship building, and program effectiveness assessment. Strengths of formal, informal, peer, group or consortia, intra-departmental,…

  7. Southwest University's No-Fee Teacher-Training Model

    Chen, Shijian; Yang, Shuhan; Li, Linyuan

    2013-01-01

    The training model for Southwest University's no-fee teacher education program has taken shape over several years. Based on a review of the documentation and interviews with administrators and no-fee preservice students from different specialties, this article analyzes Southwest University's no-fee teacher-training model in terms of three main…

  8. From binary black hole simulation to triple black hole simulation

    Bai Shan; Cao Zhoujian; Han, Wen-Biao; Lin, Chun-Yu; Yo, Hwei-Jang; Yu, Jui-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Black hole systems are among the most promising sources for a gravitational wave detection project. Now, China is planning to construct a space-based laser interferometric detector as a follow-on mission of LISA in the near future. Aiming to provide some theoretical support to this detection project on the numerical relativity side, we focus on black hole systems simulation in this work. Considering the globular galaxy, multiple black hole systems also likely to exist in our universe and play a role as a source for the gravitational wave detector we are considering. We will give a progress report in this paper on our black hole system simulation. More specifically, we will present triple black hole simulation together with binary black hole simulation. On triple black hole simulations, one novel perturbational method is proposed.

  9. Interacting agegraphic dark energy models in non-flat universe

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    A so-called 'agegraphic dark energy' was recently proposed to explain the dark energy-dominated universe. In this Letter, we generalize the agegraphic dark energy models to the universe with spatial curvature in the presence of interaction between dark matter and dark energy. We show that these models can accommodate w D =-1 crossing for the equation of state of dark energy. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all previous results of agegraphic dark energy in flat universe are restored.

  10. Gravitational interaction of a black hole with nearby matter

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.; Redmount, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of a black hole with nearby matter is examined with a membrane paradigm which includes a 3+1 formalism that splits spacetime coordinates into a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces and one-dimensional time. Emphasis is placed on the influence of matter and its gravity on the shape and evolution of the hole horizon and the effects of the hole on the matter. Universal time coordinates and fiduciary observers are defined outside a dynamically perturbed black hole and tidal gravitational fields are assumed to carry information on the disturbances. The exterior of the hole is examined in terms of the perturbed tidal fields and the material energy, momentum and stress which produce the perturbations. Finally, a membrane model is derived for the interaction of matter and its tidal fields with the stretched null horizon

  11. Boundary counterterms and the thermodynamics of 2-D black holes

    Davis, Joshua L.; McNees, Robert

    2005-01-01

    We utilize a novel method to study the thermodynamics of two dimensional type 0A black holes with constant RR flux. Our approach is based on the Hamilton-Jacobi method of deriving boundary counterterms. We demonstrate this approach by recovering the standard results for a well understood example, Witten's black hole. Between this example and the 0A black hole we find universal expressions for the entropy and black hole mass, as well as the infra-red divergence of the partition function. As a non-trivial check of our results we verify the first law of thermodynamics for these systems. Our results for the mass disagree with the predictions of a proposed matrix model dual of the 0A black hole

  12. Post-Newtonian Dynamical Modeling of Supermassive Black Holes in Galactic-scale Simulations

    Rantala, Antti; Pihajoki, Pauli; Johansson, Peter H.; Lahén, Natalia; Sawala, Till [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a (Finland); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: antti.rantala@helsinki.fi [Max-Planck-Insitut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    We present KETJU, a new extension of the widely used smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation code GADGET-3. The key feature of the code is the inclusion of algorithmically regularized regions around every supermassive black hole (SMBH). This allows for simultaneously following global galactic-scale dynamical and astrophysical processes, while solving the dynamics of SMBHs, SMBH binaries, and surrounding stellar systems at subparsec scales. The KETJU code includes post-Newtonian terms in the equations of motions of the SMBHs, which enables a new SMBH merger criterion based on the gravitational wave coalescence timescale, pushing the merger separation of SMBHs down to ∼0.005 pc. We test the performance of our code by comparison to NBODY7 and rVINE. We set up dynamically stable multicomponent merger progenitor galaxies to study the SMBH binary evolution during galaxy mergers. In our simulation sample the SMBH binaries do not suffer from the final-parsec problem, which we attribute to the nonspherical shape of the merger remnants. For bulge-only models, the hardening rate decreases with increasing resolution, whereas for models that in addition include massive dark matter halos, the SMBH binary hardening rate becomes practically independent of the mass resolution of the stellar bulge. The SMBHs coalesce on average 200 Myr after the formation of the SMBH binary. However, small differences in the initial SMBH binary eccentricities can result in large differences in the SMBH coalescence times. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of KETJU, which allows for a straightforward inclusion of gas physics in the simulations.

  13. Planning Model for Peruvian University System

    Chiyon, Isabel; Yague, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    This paper arises from observing the effect that the education policy has had on the European Higher Education Area that promotes the primary objective of this research: the preparation of a planning model that contributes, based on the European experience, the basic elements for the quality of higher education in Peru. To appraise the timeliness and usefulness of the aforementioned model, the scope of the Spanish model is selected and specifically adapted to the Peruvian model, which can be ...

  14. Entropy of quasiblack holes

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2010-01-01

    We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

  15. Measuring organizational learning. Model testing in two Romanian universities

    Alexandra Luciana Guţă

    2014-01-01

    The scientific literature associates organizational learning with superior organization performance. If we refer to the academic environment, we appreciate that it can develop and reach better levels of performance through changes driven from the inside. Thus, through this paper we elaborate on a conceptual model of organizational learning and we test the model on a sample of employees (university teachers and researchers) from two Romanian universities. The model comprises the process of org...

  16. University Start-ups: A Better Business Model

    Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Many universities look to start-up companies as a way to attract faculty, supporting research and students as traditional federal sources become harder to come by. University affiliated start-up companies can apply for a broader suite of grants, as well as market their services to a broad customer base. Often university administrators see this as a potential panacea, but national statistics show this is not the case. Rarely do universities profit significantly from their start-ups. With a success rates of around 20%, most start-ups end up costing the university money as well as faculty-time. For the faculty, assuming they want to continue in academia, a start-up is often unattractive because it commonly leads out of academia. Running a successful business as well as maintaining a strong teaching and research load is almost impossible to do at the same time. Most business models and business professionals work outside of academia, and the models taught in business schools do not merge well in a university environment. To mitigate this a new business model is proposed where university start-ups are aligned with the academic and research missions of the university. A university start-up must work within the university, directly support research and students, and the work done maintaining the business be recognized as part of the faculty member's university obligations. This requires a complex conflict of interest management plan and for the companies to be non-profit in order to not jeopardize the university's status. This approach may not work well for all universities, but would be ideal for many to conserve resources and ensure a harmonious relationship with their start-ups and faculty.

  17. Galaxy Formation with Self-Consistently Modeled Stars and Massive Black Holes. I: Feedback-Regulated Star Formation and Black Hole Growth

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-04

    There is mounting evidence for the coevolution of galaxies and their embedded massive black holes (MBHs) in a hierarchical structure formation paradigm. To tackle the nonlinear processes of galaxy-MBH interaction, we describe a self-consistent numerical framework which incorporates both galaxies and MBHs. The high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo is modified to model the formation and feedback of molecular clouds at their characteristic scale of 15.2 pc and the accretion of gas onto an MBH. Two major channels of MBH feedback, radiative feedback (X-ray photons followed through full three-dimensional adaptive ray tracing) and mechanical feedback (bipolar jets resolved in high-resolution AMR), are employed. We investigate the coevolution of a 9.2 x 10{sup 11} M {circle_dot} galactic halo and its 10{sup 5} {circle_dot} M embedded MBH at redshift 3 in a cosmological CDM simulation. The MBH feedback heats the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) up to 10{sup 6} K through photoionization and Compton heating and locally suppresses star formation in the galactic inner core. The feedback considerably changes the stellar distribution there. This new channel of feedback from a slowly growing MBH is particularly interesting because it is only locally dominant and does not require the heating of gas globally on the disk. The MBH also self-regulates its growth by keeping the surrounding ISM hot for an extended period of time.

  18. GALAXY FORMATION WITH SELF-CONSISTENTLY MODELED STARS AND MASSIVE BLACK HOLES. I. FEEDBACK-REGULATED STAR FORMATION AND BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Abel, Tom; Wise, John H.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2011-01-01

    There is mounting evidence for the coevolution of galaxies and their embedded massive black holes (MBHs) in a hierarchical structure formation paradigm. To tackle the nonlinear processes of galaxy-MBH interaction, we describe a self-consistent numerical framework which incorporates both galaxies and MBHs. The high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo is modified to model the formation and feedback of molecular clouds at their characteristic scale of 15.2 pc and the accretion of gas onto an MBH. Two major channels of MBH feedback, radiative feedback (X-ray photons followed through full three-dimensional adaptive ray tracing) and mechanical feedback (bipolar jets resolved in high-resolution AMR), are employed. We investigate the coevolution of a 9.2 x 10 11 M sun galactic halo and its 10 5 M sun embedded MBH at redshift 3 in a cosmological ΛCDM simulation. The MBH feedback heats the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) up to 10 6 K through photoionization and Compton heating and locally suppresses star formation in the galactic inner core. The feedback considerably changes the stellar distribution there. This new channel of feedback from a slowly growing MBH is particularly interesting because it is only locally dominant and does not require the heating of gas globally on the disk. The MBH also self-regulates its growth by keeping the surrounding ISM hot for an extended period of time.

  19. Hairy AdS black holes with a toroidal horizon in 4D Einstein-nonlinear omega-model system

    Astorino, M.; Canfora, F.; Giacomini, A.; Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 776, 10 January (2018), s. 236-241 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : AdS black holes * nonlinear sigma model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0370269317309437

  20. Hairy AdS black holes with a toroidal horizon in 4D Einstein-nonlinear omega-model system

    Astorino, M.; Canfora, F.; Giacomini, A.; Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 776, 10 January (2018), s. 236-241 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : AdS black holes * nonlinear sigma model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0370269317309437

  1. Black hole physics from two-dimensional dilaton gravity based on the SL(2,R)/U(1) coset model

    Nojiri, S.; Oda, I.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the quantum two-dimensional dilaton gravity model, which is described by the SL(2,R)/U(1) gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten model deformed by a (1,1) operator. We show that the curvature singularity does not appear when the central charge c matter of the matter fields is given by 22 matter matter matter ∝δ(x + -x 0 + ), create a kind of wormholes, i.e., causally disconnected regions. Most of the quantum information in past null infinity is lost in future null infinity but the lost information would be carried by the wormholes. We also discuss the problem of defining the mass of quantum black holes. On the basis of the argument by Regge and Teitelboim, we show that the ADM mass measured by the observer who lives in one of the asymptotically flat regions is finite and does not vanish in general. On the other hand, the Bondi mass is ill defined in this model. Instead of the Bondi mass, we consider the mass measured by observers who live in an asymptotically flat region at first. A class of observers finds the mass of the black hole created by a shock wave changes as the observers' proper time goes by, i.e., they observe Hawking radiation. The measured mass vanishes after the infinite proper time and the black hole evaporates completely. Therefore the total Hawking radiation is positive even when N<24

  2. Standard Model mass spectrum in inflationary universe

    Chen, Xingang [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics,60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wang, Yi [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi [Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications, Harvard University,20 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-04-11

    We work out the Standard Model (SM) mass spectrum during inflation with quantum corrections, and explore its observable consequences in the squeezed limit of non-Gaussianity. Both non-Higgs and Higgs inflation models are studied in detail. We also illustrate how some inflationary loop diagrams can be computed neatly by Wick-rotating the inflation background to Euclidean signature and by dimensional regularization.

  3. Runaway universe

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  4. LETTERS TO THE EDITORS: Exotic aspects of black holes: an astronaut near the horizon(on the methodological note by A A Grib and Yu V Pavlov "Is it possible to see the infinite future of the Universe when falling into a black hole?")

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M.

    2009-08-01

    We comment on the methodological note by A A Grib and Yu V Pavlov [Phys. Usp. 52 257 (2009)] to show that its authors are incorrect in understanding a passage that they quote from A M Cherepashchuk's book Black Holes in the Universe (Fryazino: Vek-2, 2005, p.7) and which supposes an astronaut to be at rest in the vicinity of the horizon (not to fall freely into a black hole!). With this error corrected, Grib and Pavlov's note is quite useful methodologically.

  5. Black holes go supersonic

    Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    In modern physics, the unification of gravity and quantum mechanics remains a mystery. Gravity rules the macroscopic world of planets, stars and galaxies, while quantum mechanics governs the micro-cosmos of atoms, light quanta and elementary particles. However, cosmologists believe that these two disparate worlds may meet at the edges of black holes. Now Luis Garay, James Anglin, Ignacio Cirac and Peter Zoller at the University of Innsbruck in Austria have proposed a realistic way to make an artificial 'sonic' black hole in a tabletop experiment (L J Garay et al. 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 4643). In the February issue of Physics World, Ulf Leonhardt of the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, UK, explains how the simulated black holes work. (U.K.)

  6. Optoelectronic engineering of colloidal quantum-dot solar cells beyond the efficiency black hole: a modeling approach

    Mahpeykar, Seyed Milad; Wang, Xihua

    2017-02-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have been under the spotlight in recent years mainly due to their potential for low-cost solution-processed fabrication and efficient light harvesting through multiple exciton generation (MEG) and tunable absorption spectrum via the quantum size effect. Despite the impressive advances achieved in charge carrier mobility of quantum dot solids and the cells' light trapping capabilities, the recent progress in CQD solar cell efficiencies has been slow, leaving them behind other competing solar cell technologies. In this work, using comprehensive optoelectronic modeling and simulation, we demonstrate the presence of a strong efficiency loss mechanism, here called the "efficiency black hole", that can significantly hold back the improvements achieved by any efficiency enhancement strategy. We prove that this efficiency black hole is the result of sole focus on enhancement of either light absorption or charge extraction capabilities of CQD solar cells. This means that for a given thickness of CQD layer, improvements accomplished exclusively in optic or electronic aspect of CQD solar cells do not necessarily translate into tangible enhancement in their efficiency. The results suggest that in order for CQD solar cells to come out of the mentioned black hole, incorporation of an effective light trapping strategy and a high quality CQD film at the same time is an essential necessity. Using the developed optoelectronic model, the requirements for this incorporation approach and the expected efficiencies after its implementation are predicted as a roadmap for CQD solar cell research community.

  7. Communication: Density functional theory model for multi-reference systems based on the exact-exchange hole normalization.

    Laqua, Henryk; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2018-03-28

    The correct description of multi-reference electronic ground states within Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) requires an ensemble-state representation, employing fractionally occupied orbitals. However, the use of fractional orbital occupation leads to non-normalized exact-exchange holes, resulting in large fractional-spin errors for conventional approximative density functionals. In this communication, we present a simple approach to directly include the exact-exchange-hole normalization into DFT. Compared to conventional functionals, our model strongly improves the description for multi-reference systems, while preserving the accuracy in the single-reference case. We analyze the performance of our proposed method at the example of spin-averaged atoms and spin-restricted bond dissociation energy surfaces.

  8. Communication: Density functional theory model for multi-reference systems based on the exact-exchange hole normalization

    Laqua, Henryk; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2018-03-01

    The correct description of multi-reference electronic ground states within Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) requires an ensemble-state representation, employing fractionally occupied orbitals. However, the use of fractional orbital occupation leads to non-normalized exact-exchange holes, resulting in large fractional-spin errors for conventional approximative density functionals. In this communication, we present a simple approach to directly include the exact-exchange-hole normalization into DFT. Compared to conventional functionals, our model strongly improves the description for multi-reference systems, while preserving the accuracy in the single-reference case. We analyze the performance of our proposed method at the example of spin-averaged atoms and spin-restricted bond dissociation energy surfaces.

  9. Game Based Learning (GBL) adoption model for universities: cesim ...

    Game Based Learning (GBL) adoption model for universities: cesim simulation. ... The global market has escalated the need of Game Based Learning (GBL) to offer a wide range of courses since there is a ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  10. Beyond the standard model of the disc-line spectral profiles from black hole accretion discs

    Sochora, Vjačeslav; Karas, Vladimír; Svoboda, Jiří; Dovčiak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2014), s. 301-304 ISSN 1210-2709 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-00070J Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : accretion discs * black hole physics * galactic nuclei Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  11. Algebraically special space-time in relativity, black holes, and pulsar models

    Adler, R. J.; Sheffield, C.

    1973-01-01

    The entire field of astronomy is in very rapid flux, and at the center of interest are problems relating to the very dense, rotating, neutron stars observed as pulsars. the hypothesized collapsed remains of stars known as black holes, and quasars. Degenerate metric form, or Kerr-Schild metric form, was used to study several problems related to intense gravitational fields.

  12. Search and modelling of remnant radio galaxies in the LOFAR Lockman Hole field

    Brienza, M.; Godfrey, L.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; Harwood, J.; Mahony, E. K.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Murgia, M.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shulevski, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The phase of radio galaxy evolution after the jets have switched off, often referred to as the remnant phase, is poorly understood and very few sources in this phase are known. Aims: In this work we present an extensive search for remnant radio galaxies in the Lockman Hole, a well-studied

  13. Molecular Quantum Similarity Measures from Fermi hole Densities: Modeling Hammett Sigma Constants

    Girónes, X.; Ponec, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 3 (2006), s. 1388-1393 ISSN 1549-9596 Grant - others:SMCT(ES) SAF2000/0223/C03/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : molecula quantum similarity measures * fermi hole densities * substituent effect Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.423, year: 2006

  14. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE; Octavian MOLDOVAN

    2012-01-01

    The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration), the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, u...

  15. Unveiling the edge of time black holes, white holes, wormholes

    Gribbin, John

    1992-01-01

    Acclaimed science writer John Gribbin recounts dramatic stories that have led scientists to believe black holes and their more mysterious kin are not only real, but might actually provide a passage to other universes and travel through time.

  16. A universal throw model and its applications

    Voort, M.M. van der; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Verolme, E.K.; Weerheijm, J.

    2008-01-01

    A deterministic model has been developed that describes the throw of debris or fragments from a source with an arbitrary geometry and for arbitrary initial conditions. The initial conditions are defined by the distributions of mass, launch velocity and launch direction. The item density in an

  17. University Business Models and Online Practices: A Third Way

    Rubin, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Higher Education is in a state of change, and the existing business models do not meet the needs of stakeholders. This article contrasts the current dominant business models of universities, comparing the traditional non-profit against the for-profit online model, examining the structural features and online teaching practices that underlie each.…

  18. DEVELOPING A SEVEN METAPHORS MODEL OF MARKETING FOR UNIVERSITIES

    COITA Dorin-Cristian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of marketing applied in education offers a lot of possibilities of social innovation. It is a tool helping educational organization to acquire resources and to provide value. In this article presented a model of seven metaphors to be used by a universities in order to acquire resources and to provide value to its stakeholders and applied it in the case of a Romanian university called The University. The aim of the paper is to identify sources of social innovations by using this model in the field of educational marketing.

  19. Ricci time in the Lemaître-Tolman model and the block universe

    Elmahalawy, Yasser; Hellaby, Charles; Ellis, George F. R.

    2015-10-01

    It is common to think of our universe according to the "block universe" concept, which says that spacetime consists of many "stacked" three-surfaces, labelled by some kind of proper time, . Standard ideas do not distinguish past and future, but Ellis' "evolving block universe" tries to make a fundamental distinction. One proposal for this proper time is the proper time measured along the timelike Ricci eigenlines, starting from the big bang. This work investigates the shape of the "Ricci time" surfaces relative to the the null surfaces. We use the Lemaître-Tolman metric as our inhomogeneous spacetime model, and we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for these constant surfaces, , to be spacelike or timelike. Furthermore, we look at the effect of strong gravity domains by determining the location of timelike S regions relative to apparent horizons. We find that constant Ricci time surfaces are always spacelike near the big bang, while at late times (near the crunch or the extreme far future), they are only timelike under special circumstances. At intermediate times, timelike S regions are common unless the variation of the bang time is restricted. The regions where these surfaces become timelike are often adjacent to apparent horizons, but always outside them, and in particular timelike S regions do not occur inside the horizons of black-hole-like models.

  20. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C

    2016-01-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar–tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory. (paper)

  1. DISTANCE AS KEY FACTOR IN MODELLING STUDENTS’ RECRUITMENT BY UNIVERSITIES

    SIMONA MĂLĂESCU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Distance as Key Factor in Modelling Students’ Recruitment by Universities. In a previous paper analysing the challenge of keeping up with the current methodologies in the analysis and modelling of students’ recruitment by universities in the case of some ECE countries which still don’t register or develop key data to take advantage from the state of the art knowledge on the domain, we have promised to approach the factor distance in a future work due to the extent of the topic. This paper fulfill that promise bringing a review of the literature especially dealing with modelling the geographical area of recruiting students of an university, where combining distance with the proximate key factors previously reviewed, complete the meta-analysis of existing literature we have started a year ago. Beyond the theoretical benefit from a practical perspective, the metaanalysis aimed at synthesizing elements of good practice that can be applied to the local university system.

  2. Listvenite formation from peridotite: Insights from Oman Drilling Project hole BT1B and preliminary reaction path model approach.

    de Obeso, J. C.; Kelemen, P. B.; Manning, C. E.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project hole BT1B drilled 300 meters through the basal thrust of the Samail ophiolite. The first 200 meters of this hole are dominated by listvenites (completely carbonated peridotites) and serpentinites. Below 200 meters the hole is mainly composed of metasediments and metavolcanics. This core provides a unique record of interaction between (a) mantle peridotite in the leading edge of the mantle wedge and (b) hydrous, CO2 rich fluids derived from subducting lithologies similar to those in the metamorphic sole. We used EQ3/6 to simulate a reaction path in which hydrous fluid in equilibrium with qtz + calcite + feldspar + chlorite or smectite reacts with initially fresh peridotite at 100°C (the estimated temperature of alteration, Falk & Kelemen GCA 2015) and 5 kb. Water was first equilibrated with minerals observed during core description in the metamorphic sole at 100°C and 5kb. This fluid is then reacted with olivine enstatite and diopside (Mg#90) approximating the average composition of residual mantle peridotite (harzburgite) in Oman. Secondary minerals resulting from complete reaction are then reacted again with the initial fluid in an iterative process, up to water/rock > 1000. Water/rock close to 1 results in complete serpentinization of the peridotite, with chrysotile, brucite and magnetite as the only minerals. Water/rock >10 produces carbonates, chlorite and talc. Further increasing water/rock to > 100 produces assemblages dominated by carbonates and quartz with minor muscovite, similar to listvenites of hole BT1B that contain qtz + carbonates + Fe-oxyhydroxides + relict spinel ± chromian muscovite and fuchsite. The results of this preliminary model are consistent with the complex veining history of core from BT1B, with carbonate/iron oxide veins in both listvenites and serpentinites interpreted to be the earliest record of peridotite carbonation after initial serpentinization.

  3. Particle creation by black holes

    Hawking, S.W.

    1975-01-01

    In the classical theory black holes can only absorb and not emit particles. However it is shown that quantum mechanical effects cause black holes to create and emit particles. This thermal emission leads to a slow decrease in the mass of the black hole and to its eventual disappearance: any primordial black hole of mass less than about 10 15 g would have evaporated by now. Although these quantum effects violate the classical law that the area of the event horizon of a black hole cannot decrease, there remains a Generalized Second Law: S + 1/4 A never decreases where S is the entropy of matter outside black holes and A is the sum of the surface areas of the event horizons. This shows that gravitational collapse converts the baryons and leptons in the collapsing body into entropy. It is tempting to speculate that this might be the reason why the Universe contains so much entropy per baryon. (orig.) [de

  4. Imagine the Universe! The Anatomy of Black Holes. Probing the Structure & Evolution of the Cosmos. An Information and Activity Booklet. Grades 9-12, 1998-1999.

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Granger, Kara C.; Mahon, Jane D.

    The information provided in this booklet is meant to give the necessary background information so that the science of black holes can be taught confidently to secondary students. The featured activities can be used to engage and excite students about the topic of black holes in different disciplines and in a number of ways. Activities include: (1)…

  5. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production

  6. The NINJA-2 project: detecting and characterizing gravitational waveforms modelled using numerical binary black hole simulations

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, Rana X.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Austin, L.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the ability to detect GWs emitted from merging binary black holes (BBH) and recover their parameters with next-generation GW observatories. We report here on the results of the second NINJA project, NINJA-2, which employs 60 complete BBH hybrid waveforms consisting of a numerical portion mo...

  7. Modeling Factors with Influence on Sustainable University Management

    Oana Dumitrascu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to present the factors with influence on the sustainable university management and the relationships between them. In the scientific approach we begin from a graphical model, according to which the extracurricular activities together with internal environmental factors influence students’ involvement in such activities, the university attractiveness, their academic performance and their integration into the socially-economic and natural environment (components related with sustainable development. The model emphasizes that individual performances, related to students’ participation in extracurricular activities, have a positive influence on the sustainability of university management. The results of the study have shown that the university sustainability may be influenced by a number of factors, such as students’ performance, students’ involvement in extracurricular activities or university’s attractiveness and can in turn influence implicitly also the sustainability of university management. The originality of the paper consists in the relationships study using the modeling method in general and informatics tools of modeling in particular, as well as through graphical visualization of some influences, on the sustainability university management.

  8. Inflationary universe models and the formation of structure

    Brandenberger, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The main features of inflationary universe models are briefly reviewed. Inflation provides a mechanism which produces energy density fluctuations on cosmological scales. In the original models, it was not possible to obtain the correct magnitude of these fluctuations without fine tuning the particle physics models. Two mechanisms, chaotic inflation, and a dynamical relaxation process are discussed by which inflation may be realized in models which give the right magnitude of fluctuations. 22 references

  9. Partons and black holes

    Susskind, L.; Griffin, P.

    1994-01-01

    A light-front renormalization group analysis is applied to study matter which falls into massive black holes, and the related problem of matter with transplankian energies. One finds that the rate of matter spreading over the black hole's horizon unexpectedly saturates the causality bound. This is related to the transverse growth behavior of transplankian particles as their longitudinal momentum increases. This growth behavior suggests a natural mechanism to implement 't Hooft's scenario that the universe is an image of data stored on a 2 + 1 dimensional hologram-like projection

  10. Universal correlators for multi-arc complex matrix models

    Akemann, G.

    1997-01-01

    The correlation functions of the multi-arc complex matrix model are shown to be universal for any finite number of arcs. The universality classes are characterized by the support of the eigenvalue density and are conjectured to fall into the same classes as the ones recently found for the Hermitian model. This is explicitly shown to be true for the case of two arcs, apart from the known result for one arc. The basic tool is the iterative solution of the loop equation for the complex matrix model with multiple arcs, which provides all multi-loop correlators up to an arbitrary genus. Explicit results for genus one are given for any number of arcs. The two-arc solution is investigated in detail, including the double-scaling limit. In addition universal expressions for the string susceptibility are given for both the complex and Hermitian model. (orig.)

  11. A 3 + 1 Regge calculus model of the Taub universe

    Tuckey, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Piran and Williams [1986 Phys. Rev. D 33,1622] second-order formulation of 3 + 1 Regge calculus is used to calculate the evolution of a model of the Taub universe. The model displays qualitatively the correct behaviour, thereby giving some verification of the 3 + 1 formulation. (author)

  12. Proven collaboration model for impact generating research with universities

    Bezuidenhout, DF

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available -optics, image processing and computer vision. This paper presents the research collaboration model with universities that has ensured the PRISM programme's success. It is shown that this collaboration model has resulted in a pipeline of highly-skilled people...

  13. Integrating an Interprofessional Education Model at a Private University

    Parker, Ramona Ann; Gottlieb, Helmut; Dominguez, Daniel G.; Sanchez-Diaz, Patricia C.; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a private University in South Texas sought to prepare eight cohorts of 25 nursing, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, and health care administration students with an interprofessional education activity as a model for collaborative learning. The two semester interprofessional activity used a blended model (Blackboard Learn®,…

  14. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration, the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, universities and local communities is followed by an empirical analysis that compares the management structures of 12 Romanian Universities of Advanced Research and Education (the best Romanian universities according to a national ranking with those of four local communities where they are located (as geographic proximity would lead to a better diffusion of best practices. Contrary to initial expectations, even in higher education institutions, women are underrepresented both in executive and legislative positions. Since universities are subject to the same major patterns of gender discrimination (such as role theory, glass ceiling and glass elevator as private and public organizations, they lose the moral high ground that theory would suggest. However, medicine and pharmacy universities that can be connected with the traditional roles attributed to women provide better gender integration, but glass escalator phenomena remain present even in these limited fields.

  15. Black holes a very short introduction

    Blundell, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Black holes are a constant source of fascination to many due to their mysterious nature. Black Holes: A Very Short Introduction addresses a variety of questions, including what a black hole actually is, how they are characterized and discovered, and what would happen if you came too close to one. It explains how black holes form and grow—by stealing material that belongs to stars—as well as how many there may be in the Universe. It also explores the large black holes found in the centres of galaxies, and how black holes power quasars and lie behind other spectacular phenomena in the cosmos.

  16. Jets, black holes and disks in blazars

    Ghisellini Gabriele

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Fermi and Swift satellites, together with ground based Cherenkov telescopes, has greatly improved our knowledge of blazars, namely Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars and BL Lac objects, since all but the most powerful emit most of their electro–magnetic output at γ–ray energies, while the very powerful blazars emit mostly in the hard X–ray region of the spectrum. Often they show coordinated variability at different frequencies, suggesting that in these cases the same population of electrons is at work, in a single zone of the jet. The location of this region along the jet is a matter of debate. The jet power correlates with the mass accretion rate, with jets existing at all values of disk luminosities, measured in Eddington units, sampled so far. The most powerful blazars show clear evidence of the emission from their disks, and this has revived methods of finding the black hole mass and accretion rate by modelling a disk spectrum to the data. Being so luminous, blazars can be detected also at very high redshift, and therefore are a useful tool to explore the far universe. One interesting line of research concerns how heavy are their black holes at high redshifts. If we associate the presence of a relativistic jets with a fastly spinning black hole, then we naively expect that the accretion efficiency is larger than for non–spinning holes. As a consequence, the black hole mass in jetted systems should grow at a slower rate. In turn, this would imply that, at high redshifts, the heaviest black holes should be in radio–quiet quasars. We instead have evidences of the opposite, challenging our simple ideas of how a black hole grows.

  17. A time-symmetric Universe model and its observational implication

    Futamase, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1987-01-01

    A time-symmetric closed-universe model is discussed in terms of the radiation arrow of time. The time symmetry requires the occurrence of advanced waves in the recontracting phase of the Universe. The observational consequences of such advanced waves are considered, and it is shown that a test observer in the expanding phase can observe a time-reversed image of a source of radiation in the future recontracting phase

  18. Time-symmetric universe model and its observational implication

    Futamase, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1987-08-01

    A time-symmetric closed-universe model is discussed in terms of the radiation arrow of time. The time symmetry requires the occurrence of advanced waves in the recontracting phase of the Universe. We consider the observational consequences of such advanced waves, and it is shown that a test observer in the expanding phase can observe a time-reversed image of a source of radiation in the future recontracting phase.

  19. University-Industry Research Collaboration: A Model to Assess University Capability

    Abramo, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Di Costa, Flavia

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and policy makers recognize that collaboration between industry and the public research institutions is a necessity for innovation and national economic development. This work presents an econometric model which expresses the university capability for collaboration with industry as a function of size, location and research quality. The…

  20. Faculties of Education in Traditional Universities and Universities of the Third Age: A Partnership Model in Gerontagogy

    Lemieux, Andre; Boutin, Gerald; Riendeau, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses "Universities of the Third Age", whose function is quite distinct from established universities' traditional role in teaching, research, and community services. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a model of partnership between traditional universities and Universities of the Third Age, ensuring better…

  1. Black-hole creation in quantum cosmology

    Zhong Chao, Wu [Rome, Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy). International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics]|[Specola Vaticana, Vatican City State (Vatican City State, Holy See)

    1997-11-01

    It is proven that the probability of a black hole created from the de Sitter space-time background, at the Wkb level, is the exponential of one quarter of the sum of the black hole and cosmological horizon areas, or the total entropy of the universe. This is true not only for the spherically symmetric cases of the Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, but also for the rotating cases of the Kerr black hole and the rotating charged case of the Newman black hole. The de Sitter metric is the most probable evolution at the Planckian era of the universe.

  2. A DPL model of photo-thermal interaction in an infinite semiconductor material containing a spherical hole

    Hobiny, Aatef D.; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2018-01-01

    The dual phase lag (DPL) heat transfer model is applied to study the photo-thermal interaction in an infinite semiconductor medium containing a spherical hole. The inner surface of the cavity was traction free and loaded thermally by pulse heat flux. By using the eigenvalue approach methodology and Laplace's transform, the physical variable solutions are obtained analytically. The numerical computations for the silicon-like semiconductor material are obtained. The comparison among the theories, i.e., dual phase lag (DPL), Lord and Shulman's (LS) and the classically coupled thermoelastic (CT) theory is presented graphically. The results further show that the analytical scheme can overcome mathematical problems by analyzing these problems.

  3. Superresolution Interferometric Imaging with Sparse Modeling Using Total Squared Variation: Application to Imaging the Black Hole Shadow

    Kuramochi, Kazuki; Akiyama, Kazunori; Ikeda, Shiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Fish, Vincent L.; Pu, Hung-Yi; Asada, Keiichi; Honma, Mareki

    2018-05-01

    We propose a new imaging technique for interferometry using sparse modeling, utilizing two regularization terms: the ℓ 1-norm and a new function named total squared variation (TSV) of the brightness distribution. First, we demonstrate that our technique may achieve a superresolution of ∼30% compared with the traditional CLEAN beam size using synthetic observations of two point sources. Second, we present simulated observations of three physically motivated static models of Sgr A* with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) to show the performance of proposed techniques in greater detail. Remarkably, in both the image and gradient domains, the optimal beam size minimizing root-mean-squared errors is ≲10% of the traditional CLEAN beam size for ℓ 1+TSV regularization, and non-convolved reconstructed images have smaller errors than beam-convolved reconstructed images. This indicates that TSV is well matched to the expected physical properties of the astronomical images and the traditional post-processing technique of Gaussian convolution in interferometric imaging may not be required. We also propose a feature-extraction method to detect circular features from the image of a black hole shadow and use it to evaluate the performance of the image reconstruction. With this method and reconstructed images, the EHT can constrain the radius of the black hole shadow with an accuracy of ∼10%–20% in present simulations for Sgr A*, suggesting that the EHT would be able to provide useful independent measurements of the mass of the supermassive black holes in Sgr A* and also another primary target, M87.

  4. The Bright Universe Cosmology

    Surdin, M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that viewed from the 'outside', our universe is a black hole. Hence the 'inside' cosmology considered is termed as the Bright Universe Cosmology. The model proposed avoids the singularities of cosmologies of the Big Bang variety, it gives a good account of the redshifts, the cosmic background radiation, the number counts; it also gives a satisfactory explanation of the 'large numbers coincidence' and of the variation in time of fundamental constants. (Auth.)

  5. Cloud Computing Adoption Model for Universities to Increase ICT Proficiency

    Safiya Okai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world especially those in developing countries are faced with the problem of delivering the level of information and communications technology (ICT needed to facilitate teaching, learning, research, and development activities ideal in a typical university, which is needed to meet educational needs in-line with advancement in technology and the growing dependence on IT. This is mainly due to the high cost involved in providing and maintaining the needed hardware and software. A technology such as cloud computing that delivers on demand provisioning of IT resources on a pay per use basis can be used to address this problem. Cloud computing promises better delivery of IT services as well as availability whenever and wherever needed at reduced costs with users paying only as much as they consume through the services of cloud service providers. The cloud technology reduces complexity while increasing speed and quality of IT services provided; however, despite these benefits the challenges that come with its adoption have left many sectors especially the higher education skeptical in committing to this technology. This article identifies the reasons for the slow rate of adoption of cloud computing at university level, discusses the challenges faced and proposes a cloud computing adoption model that contains strategic guidelines to overcome the major challenges identified and a roadmap for the successful adoption of cloud computing by universities. The model was tested in one of the universities and found to be both useful and appropriate for adopting cloud computing at university level.

  6. Sloppy-model universality class and the Vandermonde matrix.

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Casey, Fergal P; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Brown, Kevin S; Myers, Christopher R; Brouwer, Piet W; Elser, Veit; Sethna, James P

    2006-10-13

    In a variety of contexts, physicists study complex, nonlinear models with many unknown or tunable parameters to explain experimental data. We explain why such systems so often are sloppy: the system behavior depends only on a few "stiff" combinations of the parameters and is unchanged as other "sloppy" parameter combinations vary by orders of magnitude. We observe that the eigenvalue spectra for the sensitivity of sloppy models have a striking, characteristic form with a density of logarithms of eigenvalues which is roughly constant over a large range. We suggest that the common features of sloppy models indicate that they may belong to a common universality class. In particular, we motivate focusing on a Vandermonde ensemble of multiparameter nonlinear models and show in one limit that they exhibit the universal features of sloppy models.

  7. Internal Universes in Models of Homotopy Type Theory

    Licata, Daniel R.; Orton, Ian; Pitts, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    We show that universes of fibrations in various models of homotopy type theory have an essentially global character: they cannot be described in the internal language of the presheaf topos from which the model is constructed. We get around this problem by extending the internal language with a mo...... that the interval in cubical sets does indeed have. This leads to a completely internal development of models of homotopy type theory within what we call crisp type theory.......We show that universes of fibrations in various models of homotopy type theory have an essentially global character: they cannot be described in the internal language of the presheaf topos from which the model is constructed. We get around this problem by extending the internal language...

  8. Magnetic Origin of Black Hole Winds Across the Mass Scale

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Tombesi, Francesco; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Black hole accretion disks appear to produce invariably plasma outflows that result in blue-shifted absorption features in their spectra. The X-ray absorption-line properties of these outflows are quite diverse, ranging in velocity from non-relativistic (approx. 300 km/sec) to sub-relativistic (approx. 0.1c where c is the speed of light) and a similarly broad range in the ionization states of the wind plasma. We report here that semi-analytic, self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wind models that have successfully accounted for the X-ray absorber properties of supermassive black holes, also fit well the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the accreting stellar-mass black hole, GRO J1655-40. This provides an explicit theoretical argument of their MHD origin (aligned with earlier observational claims) and supports the notion of a universal magnetic structure of the observed winds across all known black hole sizes.

  9. Black holes as possible sources of closed and semiclosed worlds

    Frolov, V.P.; Markov, M.A.; Mukhanov, V.F.

    1988-05-01

    The internal structure of spacetime inside a black hole is investigated on the assumption that some limiting curvature exists. It is shown that the Schwarzschild metric inside a black hole can be attached to the de Sitter one at some spacelike junction hypersurface which represents a short transition layer. After passing the deflation stage the de Sitter space inside the black hole begins to inflate and may become a source of a new macroscopic Universe. The corresponding conformal Penrose diagrams are given. The described model may be considered as an example of ''a creation of a closed or semiclosed world in laboratory''. The fate of an evaporating black hole is also briefly discussed. (author). 21 refs, 12 figs

  10. Primordial black holes from passive density fluctuations

    Lin, Chia-Min; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we show that if passive fluctuations are considered, primordial black holes (PBHs) can be easily produced in the framework of single-field, slow-roll inflation models. The formation of PBHs is due to the blue spectrum of passive fluctuations and an enhancement of the spectral range which exits horizon near the end of inflation. Therefore the PBHs are light with masses ≲10 15 g depending on the number of e-folds when the scale of our observable universe leaves horizon. These PBHs are likely to have evaporated and cannot be a candidate for dark matter but they may still affect the early universe.

  11. DFT +U Modeling of Hole Polarons in Organic Lead Halide Perovskites

    Welch, Eric; Erhart, Paul; Scolfaro, Luisa; Zakhidov, Alex

    Due to the ever present drive towards improved efficiencies in solar cell technology, new and improved materials are emerging rapidly. Organic halide perovskites are a promising prospect, yet a fundamental understanding of the organic perovskite structure and electronic properties is missing. Particularly, explanations of certain physical phenomena, specifically a low recombination rate and high mobility of charge carriers still remain controversial. We theoretically investigate possible formation of hole polarons adopting methodology used for oxide perovskites. The perovskite studied here is the ABX3structure, with A being an organic cation, B lead and C a halogen; the combinations studied allow for A1,xA2 , 1 - xBX1,xX2 , 3 - xwhere the alloy convention is used to show mixtures of the organic cations and/or the halogens. Two organic cations, methylammonium and formamidinium, and three halogens, iodine, chlorine and bromine are studied. Electronic structures and polaron behavior is studied through first principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package (VASP). Local density approximation (LDA) pseudopotentials are used and a +U Hubbard correction of 8 eV is added; this method was shown to work with oxide perovskites. It is shown that a localized state is realized with the Hubbard correction in systems with an electron removed, residing in the band gap of each different structure. Thus, hole polarons are expected to be seen in these perovskites.

  12. Scattering of a two skyrmion configuration on potential holes or barriers in a model Landau-Lifshitz equation

    Collins, J C; Zakrzewski, W J

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a baby-skyrmion configuration, in a model Landau-Lifshitz equation, was studied in the presence of various potential obstructions. The baby-skyrmion configuration was constructed from two Q = 1 hedgehog solutions to the baby-skyrme model in (2+1) dimensions. The potential obstructions were created by introducing a new term into the Lagrangian which resulted in a localized inhomogeneity in the potential terms' coefficient. In the barrier system, the normal circular path was deformed as the skyrmions traversed the barrier. During the same period, it was seen that the skyrmions sped up as they went over the barrier. For critical values of the barrier height and width, the skyrmions were no longer bound and were free to separate. In the case of a potential hole, the baby skyrmions no longer formed a bound state and moved asymptotically along the axis of the hole. It is shown how to modify the definition of the angular momentum to include the effects of the obstructions, so that it is conserved

  13. When Black Holes Collide

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  14. A Physical – Geometrical Model of an Early Universe

    Corneliu BERBENTE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A physical-geometrical model for a possible early universe is proposed. One considers an initial singularity containing the energy of the whole universe. The singularity expands as a spherical wave at the speed of light generating space and time. The relations of the special theory of relativity, quantum mechanics and gas kinetics are considered applicable. A structuring of the primary wave is adopted on reasons of geometrical simplicity as well as on satisfying the conservation laws. The evolution is able to lead to particles very close to neutrons as mass and radius. The actually admitted values for the radius and mass of the universe as well as the temperature of the ground radiation (3-5 K can be obtained by using the proposed model.

  15. Determining the maximum diameter for holes in the shoe without compromising shoe integrity when using a multi-segment foot model.

    Shultz, Rebecca; Jenkyn, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Measuring individual foot joint motions requires a multi-segment foot model, even when the subject is wearing a shoe. Each foot segment must be tracked with at least three skin-mounted markers, but for these markers to be visible to an optical motion capture system holes or 'windows' must be cut into the structure of the shoe. The holes must be sufficiently large avoiding interfering with the markers, but small enough that they do not compromise the shoe's structural integrity. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum size of hole that could be cut into a running shoe upper without significantly compromising its structural integrity or changing the kinematics of the foot within the shoe. Three shoe designs were tested: (1) neutral cushioning, (2) motion control and (3) stability shoes. Holes were cut progressively larger, with four sizes tested in all. Foot joint motions were measured: (1) hindfoot with respect to midfoot in the frontal plane, (2) forefoot twist with respect to midfoot in the frontal plane, (3) the height-to-length ratio of the medial longitudinal arch and (4) the hallux angle with respect to first metatarsal in the sagittal plane. A single subject performed level walking at her preferred pace in each of the three shoes with ten repetitions for each hole size. The largest hole that did not disrupt shoe integrity was an oval of 1.7cm×2.5cm. The smallest shoe deformations were seen with the motion control shoe. The least change in foot joint motion was forefoot twist in both the neutral shoe and stability shoe for any size hole. This study demonstrates that for a hole smaller than this size, optical motion capture with a cluster-based multi-segment foot model is feasible for measure foot in shoe kinematics in vivo. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Quasistationary solutions of scalar fields around accreting black holes

    Sanchis-Gual, Nicolas; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Izquierdo, Paula; Font, José A.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2016-08-01

    Massive scalar fields can form long-lived configurations around black holes. These configurations, dubbed quasibound states, have been studied both in the linear and nonlinear regimes. In this paper, we show that quasibound states can form in a dynamical scenario in which the mass of the black hole grows significantly due to the capture of infalling matter. We solve the Klein-Gordon equation numerically in spherical symmetry, mimicking the evolution of the spacetime through a sequence of analytic Schwarzschild black hole solutions of increasing mass. It is found that the frequency of oscillation of the quasibound states decreases as the mass of the black hole increases. In addition, accretion leads to an increase of the exponential decay of the scalar field energy. We compare the black hole mass growth rates used in our study with estimates from observational surveys and extrapolate our results to values of the scalar field masses consistent with models that propose scalar fields as dark matter in the universe. We show that, even for unrealistically large mass accretion rates, quasibound states around accreting black holes can survive for cosmological time scales. Our results provide further support to the intriguing possibility of the existence of dark matter halos based on (ultralight) scalar fields surrounding supermassive black holes in galactic centers.

  17. Explaining formation of Astronomical Jets using Dynamic Universe Model

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical jets are observed from the centres of many Galaxies including our own Milkyway. The formation of such jet is explained using SITA simulations of Dynamic Universe Model. For this purpose the path traced by a test neutron is calculated and depicted using a set up of one densemass of the mass equivalent to mass of Galaxy center, 90 stars with similar masses of stars near Galaxy center, mass equivalents of 23 Globular Cluster groups, 16 Milkyway parts, Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies at appropriate distances. Five different kinds of theoretical simulations gave positive results The path travelled by this test neutron was found to be an astronomical jet emerging from Galaxy center. This is another result from Dynamic Universe Model. It solves new problems like a. Variable Mass Rocket Trajectory Problem b. Explaining Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations c. Astronomical jets observed from Milkyway Center d. Prediction of Blue shifted Galaxies e. Explaining Pioneer Anomaly f. Prediction of New Horizons satellite trajectory etc. Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step

  18. On distinguishing different models of a class of emergent Universe ...

    Souvik Ghose

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... the same class of EU in light of union compilation data (SNIa) which consists of over a hundred data points, thus ... Dark energy; emergent Universe; observational data. .... μ vs. z curve for different EU models along with the.

  19. Modeling Environmental Literacy of Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Shamuganathan, Sheila; Karpudewan, Mageswary

    2015-01-01

    In this study attempt was made to model the environmental literacy of Malaysian pre-university students enrolled in a matriculation college. Students enrolled in the matriculation colleges in Malaysia are the top notch students in the country. Environmental literacy of this group is perceived important because in the future these students will be…

  20. Changing the Business Model of a Distance Teaching University

    Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Reference: Koper, E.J.R. (2014) Changing the Business Model of a Distance Teaching University. In R. Huang, Kinshuk, Price, J.K. (eds.), ICT in Education in Global Context: emerging trends report 2013-2014, Lecture Notes in Educational Technology, Heidelberg: Springer Verlag, pp. 185-203 ISBN

  1. The University Model and Educational Change. SSEC Publication No. 130.

    Ford, Richard B.

    In the sixties the crisis of the credibility and competence of schools resulted in the funding of programs to remedy school problems. The model for curriculum reform came from the university and, more particularly, from liberal arts departments having the capacity to improve curriculum content and teacher expertise. In a few instances attempts…

  2. A Universal Model for the Normative Evaluation of Internet Information.

    Spence, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with the initial premise that as the Internet has a global character, the paper will argue that the normative evaluation of digital information on the Internet necessitates an evaluative model that is itself universal and global in character (I agree, therefore, with Gorniak- Kocikowska’s

  3. Black hole astrophysics

    Blandford, R.D.; Thorne, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Following an introductory section, the subject is discussed under the headings: on the character of research in black hole astrophysics; isolated holes produced by collapse of normal stars; black holes in binary systems; black holes in globular clusters; black holes in quasars and active galactic nuclei; primordial black holes; concluding remarks on the present state of research in black hole astrophysics. (U.K.)

  4. University education: From Humbolt's model to the Bologna process

    Bodroški-Spariosu Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the European university education in the context of the Bologna process are the topic of this article. The aim is to analyze the key issues in university education in comparison to the classic or Humbolt's model. In the periods of extensive reforms of high education it is important to review the place and role of the university from the standpoint of institutional characteristics, a dominant educational orientation and attitudes towards society. The Bologna process initiated three key changes in the European system of university education: a the change of institutional framework - from the binary to the so called uniquely diversified system; b dominant orientation - instead of science the student is in the centre of education; c the social role of the university - from the development of science and impartial critique of the society towards providing educational services to the market. The pedagogic implications of these changes open the questions of the purpose of education, relations between professors and students and the identity of the modern university itself.

  5. Universe before Planck time: A quantum gravity model

    Padmanabhan, T.

    1983-01-01

    A model for quantum gravity can be constructed by treating the conformal degree of freedom of spacetime as a quantum variable. An isotropic, homogeneous cosmological solution in this quantum gravity model is presented. The spacetime is nonsingular for all the three possible values of three-space curvature, and agrees with the classical solution for time scales larger than the Planck time scale. A possibility of quantum fluctuations creating the matter in the universe is suggested

  6. The Development of an Intelligent Leadership Model for State Universities

    Aleme Keikha; Reza Hoveida; Nour Mohammad Yaghoubi

    2017-01-01

    Higher education and intelligent leadership are considered important parts of every country’s education system, which could potentially play a key role in accomplishing the goals of society. In theories of leadership, new patterns attempt to view leadership through the prism of creative and intelligent phenomena. This paper aims to design and develop an intelligent leadership model for public universities. A qualitativequantitative research method was used to design a basic model of intellige...

  7. Modelling the implications of moving towards universal coverage in Tanzania.

    Borghi, Josephine; Mtei, Gemini; Ally, Mariam

    2012-03-01

    A model was developed to assess the impact of possible moves towards universal coverage in Tanzania over a 15-year time frame. Three scenarios were considered: maintaining the current situation ('the status quo'); expanded health insurance coverage (the estimated maximum achievable coverage in the absence of premium subsidies, coverage restricted to those who can pay); universal coverage to all (government revenues used to pay the premiums for the poor). The model estimated the costs of delivering public health services and all health services to the population as a proportion of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and forecast revenue from user fees and insurance premiums. Under the status quo, financial protection is provided to 10% of the population through health insurance schemes, with the remaining population benefiting from subsidized user charges in public facilities. Seventy-six per cent of the population would benefit from financial protection through health insurance under the expanded coverage scenario, and 100% of the population would receive such protection through a mix of insurance cover and government funding under the universal coverage scenario. The expanded and universal coverage scenarios have a significant effect on utilization levels, especially for public outpatient care. Universal coverage would require an initial doubling in the proportion of GDP going to the public health system. Government health expenditure would increase to 18% of total government expenditure. The results are sensitive to the cost of health system strengthening, the level of real GDP growth, provider reimbursement rates and administrative costs. Promoting greater cross-subsidization between insurance schemes would provide sufficient resources to finance universal coverage. Alternately, greater tax funding for health could be generated through an increase in the rate of Value-Added Tax (VAT) or expanding the income tax base. The feasibility and sustainability of efforts to

  8. White holes and eternal black holes

    Hsu, Stephen D H

    2012-01-01

    We investigate isolated white holes surrounded by vacuum, which correspond to the time reversal of eternal black holes that do not evaporate. We show that isolated white holes produce quasi-thermal Hawking radiation. The time reversal of this radiation, incident on a black hole precursor, constitutes a special preparation that will cause the black hole to become eternal. (paper)

  9. Geometric Model of Black Hole Quantum N-portrait, Extradimensions and Thermodynamics

    Antonia M. Frassino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently a short scale modified black hole metric, known as holographic metric, has been proposed in order to capture the self-complete character of gravity. In this paper we show that such a metric can reproduce some geometric features expected from the quantum N-portrait beyond the semi-classical limit. We show that for a generic N this corresponds to having an effective energy momentum tensor in Einstein equations or, equivalently, non-local terms in the gravity action. We also consider the higher dimensional extension of the metric and the case of an AdS cosmological term. We provide a detailed thermodynamic analysis of both cases, with particular reference to the repercussions on the Hawking-Page phase transition.

  10. Black holes and everyday physics

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Black holes have piqued much curiosity. But thus far they have been important only in ''remote'' subjects like astrophysics and quantum gravity. It is shown that the situation can be improved. By a judicious application of black hole physics, one can obtain new results in ''everyday physics''. For example, black holes yield a quantum universal upper bound on the entropy-to-energy ratio for ordinary thermodynamical systems which was unknown earlier. It can be checked, albeit with much labor, by ordinary statistical methods. Black holes set a limitation on the number of species of elementary particles-quarks, leptons, neutrinos - which may exist. And black holes lead to a fundamental limitation on the rate at which information can be transferred for given message energy by any communication system. (author)

  11. THE MODEL OF UNIVERSAL BANKING SUPERMARKET IN UKRAINE

    Tatiana Manolievna GORDITSA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the author's conceptual approach to the multiple scientific concepts of both traditional and universal banking service moreover it shows the level of transformation of the latter to the model of the finance supermarket – the top of the modern retail banking, a structure that was formed due to globalization of the finance-credit industry. The article analyses the category of “finance supermarket” and brings out a common idea considering the main features of the mentioned organization model of banking service. The main features include: 1. Complex banking service satisfying the customers` needs; 2. The Bundling of banking and financial products (services; 3. Product line extension, standardization and large scale character of sale; 4. Remote banking. Bundling of the products (services introduced in this model allows the maximal integration of the finance services, operations and products including banking, consulting, insurance, investment services at the same office. Analysis of the scientific literature shows that the organization structure of the servicing in a Ukrainian universal bank mostly associates the model of a finance supermarket. However, current restrictions of the Ukrainian legal system and the existence of the certain transition level, caused by gradual application of the innovations of both financial and technological origin (evolutionary-innovative development are not taken into account. Looking from this angle, the author describes a transition model – from a universal bank to a financial supermarket, a universal banking supermarket. The model`s distinctive feature is the application of the improved technological service, that induced the transformation of modern banking operations, services and products in Ukraine from simplest to complex.

  12. Grumblings from an Awakening Black Hole

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In June of this year, after nearly three decades of sleep, the black hole V404 Cygni woke up and began grumbling. Scientists across the globe scrambled to observe the sudden flaring activity coming from this previously peaceful black hole. And now were getting the first descriptions of what weve learned from V404 Cygs awakening!Sudden OutburstV404 Cyg is a black hole of roughly nine solar masses, and its in a binary system with a low-mass star. The black hole pulls a stream of gas from the star, which then spirals in around the black hole, forming an accretion disk. Sometimes the material simply accumulates in the disk but every two or three decades, the build-up of gas suddenly rushes toward the black hole as if a dam were bursting.The sudden accretion in these events causes outbursts of activity from the black hole, its flaring easily visible to us. The last time V404 Cyg exhibited such activity was in 1989, and its been rather quiet since then. Our telescopes are of course much more powerful and sensitive now, nearly three decades later so when the black hole woke up and began flaring in June, scientists were delighted at the chance to observe it.The high variability of V404 Cyg is evident in this example set of spectra, where time increases from the bottom panel to the top. [King et al. 2015]Led by Ashley King (Einstein Fellow at Stanford University), a team of scientists observed V404 Cyg with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, obtaining spectra of the black hole during its outbursts. The black hole flared so brightly during its activity that the team had to take precautions to protect the CCDs in their detector from radiation damage! Now the group has released the first results from their analysis.Windy DiskThe primary surprise from V404 Cyg is its winds. Many stellar-mass black holes have outflows of mass, either in the form of directed jets emitted from their centers, or in the form of high-energy winds isotropically emitted from their accretion disks. But V404

  13. Models for universal reduction of macroscopic quantum fluctuations

    Diosi, L.

    1988-10-01

    If quantum mechanics is universal, then macroscopic bodies would, in principle, possess macroscopic quantum fluctuations (MQF) in their positions, orientations, densities etc. Such MQF, however, are not observed in nature. The hypothesis is adopted that the absence of MQF is due to a certain universal mechanism. Gravitational measures were applied for reducing MQF of the mass density. This model leads to classical trajectories in the macroscopic limit of translational motion. For massive objects, unwanted macroscopic superpositions of quantum states will be destroyed within short times. (R.P.) 34 refs

  14. Designs that make a difference: the Cardiac Universal Bed model.

    Johnson, Jackie; Brown, Katherine Kay; Neal, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    Information contained in this article includes some of the findings from a joint research project conducted by Corazon Consulting and Ohio State University Medical Center on national trends in Cardiac Universal Bed (CUB) utilization. This article outlines current findings and "best practice" standards related to the benefits of developing care delivery models to differentiate an organization with a competitive advantage in the highly dynamic marketplace of cardiovascular care. (OSUMC, a Corazon client, is incorporating the CUB into their Ross Heart Hospital slated to open this spring.)

  15. Establishing a business process reference model for Universities

    Svensson, Carsten; Hvolby, Hans-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Modern universities are by any standard complex organizations that, from an IT perspective, present a number of unique challenges. This paper will propose establishing a business process reference framework. The benefit to the users would be a better understanding of the system landscape, business......) have gained popularity among organizations in both the private and public sectors. We speculate that this success can be replicated in a university setting. Furthermore the paper will outline how the research group suggests moving ahead with the research which will lead to a reference model....

  16. Formation of a ''child'' universe in an inflationary cosmological model

    Holcomb, K.A.; Park, S.J.; Vishniac, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of a flat, spherically symmetric cosmological model, containing radiation and an inhomogeneous scalar field, is simulated numerically to determine whether the inhomogeneity could cause a ''child'' universe, connected by a wormhole to the external universe, to form. The gravitational and field quantities were computed self-consistently by means of the techniques of numerical relativity. Although we were unable to follow the process to its completion, preliminary indications are that the ''budding'' phenomenon could occur under very general initial conditions, as long as the scalar field is sufficiently inhomogeneous that the wormhole forms before the inflation is damped by the expansion of the background spacetime

  17. Beyond the black hole

    Boslough, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book is about the life and work of Stephen Hawking. It traces the development of his theories about the universe and particularly black holes, in a biographical context. Hawking's lecture 'Is the end in sight for theoretical physics' is presented as an appendix. In this, he discusses the possibility of achieving a complete, consistent and unified theory of the physical interactions which would describe all possible observations. (U.K.)

  18. Waveform model for an eccentric binary black hole based on the effective-one-body-numerical-relativity formalism

    Cao, Zhoujian; Han, Wen-Biao

    2017-08-01

    Binary black hole systems are among the most important sources for gravitational wave detection. They are also good objects for theoretical research for general relativity. A gravitational waveform template is important to data analysis. An effective-one-body-numerical-relativity (EOBNR) model has played an essential role in the LIGO data analysis. For future space-based gravitational wave detection, many binary systems will admit a somewhat orbit eccentricity. At the same time, the eccentric binary is also an interesting topic for theoretical study in general relativity. In this paper, we construct the first eccentric binary waveform model based on an effective-one-body-numerical-relativity framework. Our basic assumption in the model construction is that the involved eccentricity is small. We have compared our eccentric EOBNR model to the circular one used in the LIGO data analysis. We have also tested our eccentric EOBNR model against another recently proposed eccentric binary waveform model; against numerical relativity simulation results; and against perturbation approximation results for extreme mass ratio binary systems. Compared to numerical relativity simulations with an eccentricity as large as about 0.2, the overlap factor for our eccentric EOBNR model is better than 0.98 for all tested cases, including spinless binary and spinning binary, equal mass binary, and unequal mass binary. Hopefully, our eccentric model can be the starting point to develop a faithful template for future space-based gravitational wave detectors.

  19. New observational constraints on the growth of the first supermassive black holes

    Treister, E.; Schawinski, K.; Volonteri, M.; Natarajan, P.

    2013-01-01

    We constrain the total accreted mass density in supermassive black holes at z > 6, inferred via the upper limit derived from the integrated X-ray emission from a sample of photometrically selected galaxy candidates. Studying galaxies obtained from the deepest Hubble Space Telescope images combined with the Chandra 4 Ms observations of the Chandra Deep Field-South, we achieve the most restrictive constraints on total black hole growth in the early universe. We estimate an accreted mass density <1000 M ☉ Mpc –3 at z ∼ 6, significantly lower than the previous predictions from some existing models of early black hole growth and earlier prior observations. These results place interesting constraints on early black hole growth and mass assembly by accretion and imply one or more of the following: (1) only a fraction of the luminous galaxies at this epoch contain active black holes; (2) most black hole growth at early epochs happens in dusty and/or less massive—as yet undetected—host galaxies; (3) there is a significant fraction of low-z interlopers in the galaxy sample; (4) early black hole growth is radiatively inefficient, heavily obscured, and/or due to black hole mergers as opposed to accretion; or (5) the bulk of the black hole growth occurs at late times. All of these possibilities have important implications for our understanding of high-redshift seed formation models.

  20. A universal calculation model for the controlled electric transmission line

    Zivzivadze, O.; Zivzivadze, L.

    2009-01-01

    Difficulties associated with the development of calculation models are analyzed, and the ways of resolution of these problems are given. A version of the equivalent circuit as a six-pole network, the parameters of which do not depend on the angle of shift Θ between the voltage vectors of circuits is offered. The interrelation between the parameters of the equivalent circuit and the transmission constants of the line was determined. A universal calculation model for the controlled electric transmission line was elaborated. The model allows calculating the stationary modes of lines of such classes at any angle of shift Θ between the circuits. (author)

  1. Universal amplitude ratios in the 3D Ising model

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present a high precision Monte Carlo study of various universal amplitude ratios of the three dimensional Ising spin model. Using state of the art simulation techniques we studied the model close to criticality in both phases. Great care was taken to control systematic errors due to finite size effects and correction to scaling terms. We obtain C + /C - =4.75(3), f +,2nd /f -,2nd =1.95(2) and u * =14.3(1). Our results are compatible with those obtained by field theoretic methods applied to the φ 4 theory and high and low temperature series expansions of the Ising model. (orig.)

  2. Fuzzy Universal Model Approximator for Distributed Solar Collector Field Control

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2014-07-01

    This paper deals with the control of concentrating parabolic solar collectors by forcing the outlet oil temperature to track a set reference. A fuzzy universal approximate model is introduced in order to accurately reproduce the behavior of the system dynamics. The proposed model is a low order state space representation derived from the partial differential equation describing the oil temperature evolution using fuzzy transform theory. The resulting set of ordinary differential equations simplifies the system analysis and the control law design and is suitable for real time control implementation. Simulation results show good performance of the proposed model.

  3. Black Hole Paradox Solved By NASA's Chandra

    2006-06-01

    Black holes are lighting up the Universe, and now astronomers may finally know how. New data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory show for the first time that powerful magnetic fields are the key to these brilliant and startling light shows. It is estimated that up to a quarter of the total radiation in the Universe emitted since the Big Bang comes from material falling towards supermassive black holes, including those powering quasars, the brightest known objects. For decades, scientists have struggled to understand how black holes, the darkest objects in the Universe, can be responsible for such prodigious amounts of radiation. Animation of a Black Hole Pulling Matter from Companion Star Animation of a Black Hole Pulling Matter from Companion Star New X-ray data from Chandra give the first clear explanation for what drives this process: magnetic fields. Chandra observed a black hole system in our galaxy, known as GRO J1655-40 (J1655, for short), where a black hole was pulling material from a companion star into a disk. "By intergalactic standards J1655 is in our backyard, so we can use it as a scale model to understand how all black holes work, including the monsters found in quasars," said Jon M. Miller of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, whose paper on these results appears in this week's issue of Nature. Gravity alone is not enough to cause gas in a disk around a black hole to lose energy and fall onto the black hole at the rates required by observations. The gas must lose some of its orbital angular momentum, either through friction or a wind, before it can spiral inward. Without such effects, matter could remain in orbit around a black hole for a very long time. Illustration of Magnetic Fields in GRO J1655-40 Illustration of Magnetic Fields in GRO J1655-40 Scientists have long thought that magnetic turbulence could generate friction in a gaseous disk and drive a wind from the disk that carries angular momentum outward allowing the gas to fall inward

  4. Evaluation of four biodegradable, injectable bone cements in an experimental drill hole model in sheep.

    von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Génot, Oliver R; Nuss, Katja; Galuppo, Larry; Fulmer, Mark; Jacobson, Evan; Kronen, Peter; Zlinszky, Kati; Auer, Jörg A

    2013-09-01

    Four cement applications were tested in this investigation. Two dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD-brushite) hydraulic cements, an apatite hydraulic fiber loaded cement, and a calcium sulfate cement (Plaster of Paris) were implanted in epiphyseal and metaphyseal cylindrical bone defects in sheep. The in vivo study was performed to assess the biocompatibility and bone remodeling of four cement formulations. After time periods of 2, 4, and 6 months, the cement samples were clinically and histologically evaluated. Histomorphometrically, the amount of new bone formation, fibrous tissue, and bone marrow and the area of remaining cement were measured. In all specimens, no signs of inflammation were detectable either macroscopically or microscopically. Cements differed mainly in their resorption time. Calcium sulfate was already completely resorbed at 2 months and showed a variable amount of new bone formation and/or fibrous tissue in the original drill hole over all time periods. The two DCPD cements in contrast were degraded to a large amount at 6 months, whereas the apatite was almost unchanged over all time periods. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Cosmological models - in which universe do we live

    Hartvigsen, Y.

    1976-01-01

    A general discussion of the present state of cosmological models is introduced with a brief presentation of the expanding universe theory, the red shift and Hubble's Law. Hubble's Constant lies between 30 and 105 km/sec/Mpc, and a value of 55 km/sec/Mpc is assumed in this article. The arguments for the big bang and steady state theories are presented and the reasons for the present acceptance of the former given. Friedmann models are briefly discussed and 'universe density', rho, and 'space curvature',k, and the 'cosmological constant', Λ, are presented. These are shown on the Stabell-Refsdal diagram and the density parameter, sigma 0 , and the retardation parameter, q 0 , are related to Hubble's Constant. These parameters are then discussed and their values restricted such that the part of the Stabell-Refsdal diagram which is of interest may be defined. (JIW)

  6. Establishing a Business Process Reference Model for Universities

    Svensson, Carsten

    2012-09-01

    Modern universities are by any standard complex organizations that, from an IT perspective, present a number of unique challenges. This paper will propose establishing a business process reference framework. The benefit to the users would be a better understanding of the system landscape, business process enablement, collection of performance data and systematic reuse of existing community experience and knowledge. For these reasons reference models such as the SCOR (Supply Chain Operations Reference), DCOR (Design Chain Operations Reference) and ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) have gained popularity among organizations in both the private and public sectors. We speculate that this success can be replicated in a university setting. Furthermore the paper will outline how the research group suggests moving ahead with the research which will lead to a reference model.

  7. Self-gravitating black hole scalar wigs

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    It has long been known that no static, spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat Klein-Gordon scalar field configuration surrounding a nonrotating black hole can exist in general relativity. In a series of previous papers, we proved that, at the effective level, this no-hair theorem can be circumvented by relaxing the staticity assumption: for appropriate model parameters, there are quasibound scalar field configurations living on a fixed Schwarzschild background which, although not being strictly static, have a larger lifetime than the age of the universe. This situation arises when the mass of the scalar field distribution is much smaller than the black hole mass, and following the analogies with the hair in the literature we dubbed these long-lived field configurations wigs. Here we extend our previous work to include the gravitational backreaction produced by the scalar wigs. We derive new approximate solutions of the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon system which represent self-gravitating scalar wigs surrounding black holes. These configurations interpolate between boson star configurations and Schwarzschild black holes dressed with the long-lived scalar test field distributions discussed in previous papers. Nonlinear numerical evolutions of initial data sets extracted from our approximate solutions support the validity of our approach. Arbitrarily large lifetimes are still possible, although for the parameter space that we analyze in this paper they seem to decay faster than the quasibound states. Finally, we speculate about the possibility that these configurations could describe the innermost regions of dark matter halos.

  8. Studies on entanglement entropy for Hubbard model with hole-doping and external magnetic field [rapid communication

    Yao, K. L.; Li, Y. C.; Sun, X. Z.; Liu, Q. M.; Qin, Y.; Fu, H. H.; Gao, G. Y.

    2005-10-01

    By using the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method for the one-dimensional (1D) Hubbard model, we have studied the von Neumann entropy of a quantum system, which describes the entanglement of the system block and the rest of the chain. It is found that there is a close relation between the entanglement entropy and properties of the system. The hole-doping can alter the charge charge and spin spin interactions, resulting in charge polarization along the chain. By comparing the results before and after the doping, we find that doping favors increase of the von Neumann entropy and thus also favors the exchange of information along the chain. Furthermore, we calculated the spin and entropy distribution in external magnetic filed. It is confirmed that both the charge charge and the spin spin interactions affect the exchange of information along the chain, making the entanglement entropy redistribute.

  9. Explanation of model design and talent management system in universities

    AH Nazaripour; SNJ Mosavi; M Hakak; A Pirzad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and aim: Nowadays talented human resources are considerd as the most important and valuable organizational asset. Proper management of these major asset, the the most essential task manager and the progress of any organization in this field is fierce competition with competitor. The aim of this study was to develop a model system for talent management in universities in the country. Methods: In this study the population was composed of 10 Azad Univers...

  10. Uniform relativistic universe models with pressure. Part 2. Observational tests

    Krempec, J.; Krygier, B.

    1977-01-01

    The magnitude-redshift and angular diameter-redshift relations are discussed for the uniform (homogeneous and isotropic) relativistic Universe models with pressure. The inclusion of pressure into the energy-momentum tensor has given larger values of the deceleration parameter q. An increase of the deceleration parameter has led to the brightening of objects as well as to a little larger angular diameters. (author)

  11. Developing a Model for Assessing Public Culture Indicators at Universities

    Meisam Latifi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed to develop a model for assessing public culture at universities and evaluating its indicators at public universities in Mashhad. The research follows an exploratory mixed approach. Research strategies in qualitative and quantitative sections are thematic networks analysis and descriptive- survey method, respectively. In the qualitative section, document analysis and semi-structured interviews with cultural experts are used as research tools. In this section, targeted sampling is carried out. In the quantitative section, a questionnaire which is developed based on the findings of the qualitative section is used as the research tool. Research population of the quantitative section consists of all the students who are admitted to public universities in Mashhad between 2009 and 2012. Sample size was calculated according to Cochran’s formula. Stratified sampling was used to select the sample. The results of the qualitative section led to the identification of 44 basic themes which are referred to as the micro indicators. These themes were clustered into similar groups. Then, 10 organizer themes were identified and recognized as macro indicators. In the next phase, importance factor of each indicator is determined according to the AHP method. The results of the qualitative assessment of indicators at public universities of Mashhad show that the overall cultural index declines during the years the student attends the university. Additionally, the highest correlation exists between national identity and revolutionary identity. The only negative correlations are observed between family and two indicators including social capital and cultural consumption. The results of the present study can be used to assess the state of public culture among university students and also be considered as a basis for assessing cultural planning.

  12. Ab initio analytical model of light transmission through a cylindrical subwavelength hole in an optically thick film

    Bordo, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The rigorous analytical theory of light transmission through a cylindrical hole of arbitrary diameter in an optically thick film is developed. The approach is based on the introduction of fictitious surface currents at both hole openings and both film surfaces. The solution of Maxwell’s equations...... the film thickness considerably exceeds the hole diameter. It is emphasized that a specific pole corresponding to excitation of surface plasmon polaritons does not appear in the analysis. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of light transmission through a subwavelength hole in an Ag film....

  13. Hole superconductivity

    Hirsch, J.E.; Marsiglio, F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors review recent work on a mechanism proposed to explain high T c superconductivity in oxides as well as superconductivity of conventional materials. It is based on pairing of hole carriers through their direct Coulomb interaction, and gives rise to superconductivity because of the momentum dependence of the repulsive interaction in the solid state environment. In the regime of parameters appropriate for high T c oxides this mechanism leads to characteristic signatures that should be experimentally verifiable. In the regime of conventional superconductors most of these signatures become unobservable, but the characteristic dependence of T c on band filling survives. New features discussed her include the demonstration that superconductivity can result from repulsive interactions even if the gap function does not change sign and the inclusion of a self-energy correction to the hole propagator that reduces the range of band filling where T c is not zero

  14. Black Hole Paradoxes

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    We propose here that the well-known black hole paradoxes such as the information loss and teleological nature of the event horizon are restricted to a particular idealized case, which is the homogeneous dust collapse model. In this case, the event horizon, which defines the boundary of the black hole, forms initially, and the singularity in the interior of the black hole at a later time. We show that, in contrast, gravitational collapse from physically more realistic initial conditions typically leads to the scenario in which the event horizon and space-time singularity form simultaneously. We point out that this apparently simple modification can mitigate the causality and teleological paradoxes, and also lends support to two recently suggested solutions to the information paradox, namely, the ‘firewall’ and ‘classical chaos’ proposals. (paper)

  15. Time dependent black holes and scalar hair

    Chadburn, Sarah; Gregory, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    We show how to correctly account for scalar accretion onto black holes in scalar field models of dark energy by a consistent expansion in terms of a slow roll parameter. At leading order, we find an analytic solution for the scalar field within our Hubble volume, which is regular on both black hole and cosmological event horizons, and compute the back reaction of the scalar on the black hole, calculating the resulting expansion of the black hole. Our results are independent of the relative size of black hole and cosmological event horizons. We comment on the implications for more general black hole accretion, and the no hair theorems. (paper)

  16. Universal Regularizers For Robust Sparse Coding and Modeling

    Ramirez, Ignacio; Sapiro, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Sparse data models, where data is assumed to be well represented as a linear combination of a few elements from a dictionary, have gained considerable attention in recent years, and their use has led to state-of-the-art results in many signal and image processing tasks. It is now well understood that the choice of the sparsity regularization term is critical in the success of such models. Based on a codelength minimization interpretation of sparse coding, and using tools from universal coding...

  17. Geometrothermodynamic model for the evolution of the Universe

    Gruber, Christine; Quevedo, Hernando, E-mail: christine.gruber@correo.nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: quevedo@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70543, México, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2017-07-01

    Using the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to derive a fundamental thermodynamic equation, we construct a cosmological model in the framework of relativistic cosmology. In a first step, we describe a system without thermodynamic interaction, and show it to be equivalent to the standard ΛCDM paradigm. The second step includes thermodynamic interaction and produces a model consistent with the main features of inflation. With the proposed fundamental equation we are thus able to describe all the known epochs in the evolution of our Universe, starting from the inflationary phase.

  18. Roles of University Support for International Students in the United States: Analysis of a Systematic Model of University Identification, University Support, and Psychological Well-Being

    Cho, Jaehee; Yu, Hongsik

    2015-01-01

    Unlike previous research on international students' social support, this current study applied the concept of organizational support to university contexts, examining the effects of university support. Mainly based on the social identity/self-categorization stress model, this study developed and tested a path model composed of four key…

  19. A Model for the Expansion of the Universe

    Silva N. P.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One introduces an ansatz for the expansion factor a ( t = e ( H ( t t or our Universe in the spirit of the FLRW model; is a constant to be determined. Considering that the ingredients acting on the Universe expansion ( t > 4 10 12 s 1 : 3 10 are mainly matter (baryons plus dark matter and dark energy, one uses the current mea- sured values of Hubble constant H 0 , the Universe current age T 0 , matter density param- eter Ω m ( T 0 and dark energy parameter Ω ( T 0 together with the Friedmann equations to find = 0 : 5804 and that our Universe may have had a negative expansion accelera- tion up to the age T ⋆ = 3 : 214 G y r ( matter era and positive after that ( dark energy era , leading to an eternal expansion. An interaction between matter and dark energy is found to exist. The deceleration q ( t has been found to be q ( T ⋆ = 0 and q ( T 0 = -0.570.

  20. To Fill or Not to Fill: Sensitivity Analysis of the Influence of Resolution and Hole Filling on Point Cloud Surface Modeling and Individual Rockfall Event Detection

    Michael J. Olsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring unstable slopes with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been proven effective. However, end users still struggle immensely with the efficient processing, analysis, and interpretation of the massive and complex TLS datasets. Two recent advances described in this paper now improve the ability to work with TLS data acquired on steep slopes. The first is the improved processing of TLS data to model complex topography and fill holes. This processing step results in a continuous topographic surface model that seamlessly characterizes the rock and soil surface. The second is an advance in the automated interpretation of the surface model in such a way that a magnitude and frequency relationship of rockfall events can be quantified, which can be used to assess maintenance strategies and forecast costs. The approach is applied to unstable highway slopes in the state of Alaska, U.S.A. to evaluate its effectiveness. Further, the influence of the selected model resolution and degree of hole filling on the derived slope metrics were analyzed. In general, model resolution plays a pivotal role in the ability to detect smaller rockfall events when developing magnitude-frequency relationships. The total volume estimates are also influenced by model resolution, but were comparatively less sensitive. In contrast, hole filling had a noticeable effect on magnitude-frequency relationships but to a lesser extent than modeling resolution. However, hole filling yielded a modest increase in overall volumetric quantity estimates. Optimal analysis results occur when appropriately balancing high modeling resolution with an appropriate level of hole filling.

  1. A CONNECTION BETWEEN PLASMA CONDITIONS NEAR BLACK HOLE EVENT HORIZONS AND OUTFLOW PROPERTIES

    Koljonen, K. I. I.; Russell, D. M.; Bernardini, F. [New York University Abu Dhabi, P.O. Box 129188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (INAF-IAPS), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Markoff, Sera [Astronomical Institute “Anton Pannekoek”, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Curran, P. A.; Soria, R. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research—Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Van der Horst, A. J. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Casella, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Gandhi, P., E-mail: karri.koljonen@nyu.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    Accreting black holes are responsible for producing the fastest, most powerful outflows of matter in the universe. The formation process of powerful jets close to black holes is poorly understood, and the conditions leading to jet formation are currently hotly debated. In this paper, we report an unambiguous empirical correlation between the properties of the plasma close to the black hole and the particle acceleration properties within jets launched from the central regions of accreting stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. In these sources the emission of the plasma near the black hole is characterized by a power law at X-ray energies during times when the jets are produced. We find that the photon index of this power law, which gives information on the underlying particle distribution, correlates with the characteristic break frequency in the jet spectrum, which is dependent on magnetohydrodynamical processes in the outflow. The observed range in break frequencies varies by five orders of magnitude in sources that span nine orders of magnitude in black hole mass, revealing a similarity of jet properties over a large range of black hole masses powering these jets. This correlation demonstrates that the internal properties of the jet rely most critically on the conditions of the plasma close to the black hole, rather than other parameters such as the black hole mass or spin, and will provide a benchmark that should be reproduced by the jet formation models.

  2. Modelling the effect of absorption from the interstellar medium on transient black hole X-ray binaries

    Eckersall, A. J.; Vaughan, S.; Wynn, G. A.

    2017-10-01

    All observations of Galactic X-ray binaries are affected by absorption from gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) which imprints narrow (line) and broad (photoelectric edges) features on the continuum emission spectrum of the binary. Any spectral model used to fit data from a Galactic X-ray binary must therefore take account of these features; when the absorption is strong (as for most Galactic sources) it becomes important to accurately model the ISM absorption in order to obtain unbiased estimates of the parameters of the (emission) spectrum of the binary system. In this paper, we present analysis of some of the best spectroscopic data from the XMM-Newton RGS instrument using the most up-to-date photoabsorption model of the gaseous ISM ISMabs. We calculate column densities for H, O, Ne and Fe for seven transient black hole X-ray binary systems. We find that the hydrogen column densities in particular can vary greatly from those presented elsewhere in the literature. We assess the impact of using inaccurate column densities and older X-ray absorption models on spectral analysis using simulated data. We find that poor treatment of absorption can lead to large biases in inferred disc properties and that an independent analysis of absorption parameters can be used to alleviate such issues.

  3. Are black holes overproduced during preheating?

    Suyama, Teruaki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Bassett, Bruce; Kudoh, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    We provide a simple but robust argument that primordial black hole production generically does not exceed astrophysical bounds during the resonant preheating phase after inflation. This conclusion is supported by fully nonlinear lattice simulations of various models in two and three dimensions which include rescattering but neglect metric perturbations. We examine the degree to which preheating amplifies density perturbations at the Hubble scale and show that, at the end of the parametric resonance, power spectra are universal, with no memory of the power spectrum at the end of inflation. In addition, we show how the probability distribution of density perturbations changes from exponential on very small scales to Gaussian when smoothed over the Hubble scale - the crucial length for studies of primordial black hole formation - hence justifying the standard assumption of Gaussianity

  4. A history of the universe in a superstring model

    Maeda, K.

    1986-07-01

    A superstring theory, which is most promising candidate for a unified theory, predicts a higher-dimensional 'space-time'. Its application to cosmology, especially reconsideration of the early history of the universe, is definitely important and interesting. Here, we discuss some scenario of the universe in a superstring model. Main problems in higher-dimensional unified theories, from the cosmological point of view, are: (i) Can the 4-dim Einstein gravity be obtained, rather than the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory? (ii) Can the 4-dim Friedmann universe (F 4 ) be realized naturally in the higher-dimensional space-time? (iii) Does inflation really occur? The answers for (i) and (ii) are 'yes' in a superstring model, as we will see soon. (iii) is still an open question, although it seems to be difficult. Taking into account a quantum tunnelling effect of the anti-symmetric tensor field H μυρ , we also show that a hierarchical bubble structure might be formed due to a series of phase transitions

  5. Selection bias in dynamically measured supermassive black hole samples: scaling relations and correlations between residuals in semi-analytic galaxy formation models

    Barausse, Enrico; Shankar, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Dubois, Yohan; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2017-07-01

    Recent work has confirmed that the scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes and host-galaxy properties such as stellar masses and velocity dispersions may be biased high. Much of this may be caused by the requirement that the black hole sphere of influence must be resolved for the black hole mass to be reliably estimated. We revisit this issue with a comprehensive galaxy evolution semi-analytic model. Once tuned to reproduce the (mean) correlation of black hole mass with velocity dispersion, the model cannot account for the correlation with stellar mass. This is independent of the model's parameters, thus suggesting an internal inconsistency in the data. The predicted distributions, especially at the low-mass end, are also much broader than observed. However, if selection effects are included, the model's predictions tend to align with the observations. We also demonstrate that the correlations between the residuals of the scaling relations are more effective than the relations themselves at constraining models for the feedback of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In fact, we find that our model, while in apparent broad agreement with the scaling relations when accounting for selection biases, yields very weak correlations between their residuals at fixed stellar mass, in stark contrast with observations. This problem persists when changing the AGN feedback strength, and is also present in the hydrodynamic cosmological simulation Horizon-AGN, which includes state-of-the-art treatments of AGN feedback. This suggests that current AGN feedback models are too weak or simply not capturing the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocity dispersion.

  6. Universality of correlation functions in random matrix models of QCD

    Jackson, A.D.; Sener, M.K.; Verbaarschot, J.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate the universality of the spectral correlation functions of a QCD inspired random matrix model that consists of a random part having the chiral structure of the QCD Dirac operator and a deterministic part which describes a schematic temperature dependence. We calculate the correlation functions analytically using the technique of Itzykson-Zuber integrals for arbitrary complex supermatrices. An alternative exact calculation for arbitrary matrix size is given for the special case of zero temperature, and we reproduce the well-known Laguerre kernel. At finite temperature, the microscopic limit of the correlation functions are calculated in the saddle-point approximation. The main result of this paper is that the microscopic universality of correlation functions is maintained even though unitary invariance is broken by the addition of a deterministic matrix to the ensemble. (orig.)

  7. MicroBlack Holes Thermodynamics in the Presence of Quantum Gravity Effects

    H. Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Black hole thermodynamics is corrected in the presence of quantum gravity effects. Some phenomenological aspects of quantum gravity proposal can be addressed through generalized uncertainty principle (GUP which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of both a minimal measurable length and a maximal momentum on the thermodynamics of TeV-scale black holes. We then extend our study to the case that there are all natural cutoffs as minimal length, minimal momentum, and maximal momentum simultaneously. We also generalize our study to the model universes with large extra dimensions (LED. In this framework existence of black holes remnants as a possible candidate for dark matter is discussed. We study probability of black hole production in the Large Hadronic Collider (LHC and we show this rate decreasing for sufficiently large values of the GUP parameter.

  8. High-redshift Galaxies and Black Holes Detectable with the JWST: A Population Synthesis Model from Infrared to X-Rays

    Volonteri, Marta; Reines, Amy E.; Atek, Hakim; Stark, Daniel P.; Trebitsch, Maxime

    2017-11-01

    The first billion years of the Universe has been a pivotal time: stars, black holes (BHs), and galaxies formed and assembled, sowing the seeds of galaxies as we know them today. Detecting, identifying, and understanding the first galaxies and BHs is one of the current observational and theoretical challenges in galaxy formation. In this paper we present a population synthesis model aimed at galaxies, BHs, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. The model builds a population based on empirical relations. The spectral energy distribution of galaxies is determined by age and metallicity, and that of AGNs by BH mass and accretion rate. We validate the model against observations, and predict properties of galaxies and AGN in other wavelength and/or luminosity ranges, estimating the contamination of stellar populations (normal stars and high-mass X-ray binaries) for AGN searches from the infrared to X-rays, and vice versa for galaxy searches. For high-redshift galaxies with stellar ages < 1 {Gyr}, we find that disentangling stellar and AGN emission is challenging at restframe UV/optical wavelengths, while high-mass X-ray binaries become more important sources of confusion in X-rays. We propose a color-color selection in the James Webb Space Telescope bands to separate AGN versus star-dominated galaxies in photometric observations. We also estimate the AGN contribution, with respect to massive, hot, and metal-poor stars, at driving high-ionization lines, such as C IV and He II. Finally, we test the influence of the minimum BH mass and occupation fraction of BHs in low-mass galaxies on the restframe UV/near-IR and X-ray AGN luminosity function.

  9. When Supermassive Black Holes Wander

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-05-01

    Are supermassive black holes found only at the centers of galaxies? Definitely not, according to a new study in fact, galaxies like the Milky Way may harbor several such monsters wandering through their midst.Collecting Black Holes Through MergersIts generally believed that galaxies are built up hierarchically, growing in size through repeated mergers over time. Each galaxy in a major merger likely hosts a supermassive black hole a black hole of millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun at its center. When a pair of galaxies merges, their supermassive black holes will often sink to the center of the merger via a process known as dynamical friction. There the supermassive black holes themselves will eventually merge in a burst of gravitational waves.Spatial distribution and velocities of wandering supermassive black holes in three of the authors simulated galaxies, shown in edge-on (left) and face-on (right) views of the galaxy disks. Click for a closer look. [Tremmel et al. 2018]But if a galaxy the size of the Milky Way was built through a history of many major galactic mergers, are we sure that all its accumulated supermassive black holes eventually merged at the galactic center? A new study suggests that some of these giants might have escaped such a fate and they now wander unseen on wide orbits through their galaxies.Black Holes in an Evolving UniverseLed by Michael Tremmel (Yale Center for Astronomy Astrophysics), a team of scientists has used data from a large-scale cosmological simulation, Romulus25, to explore the possibility of wandering supermassive black holes. The Romulus simulations are uniquely suited to track the formation and subsequent orbital motion of supermassive black holes as galactic halos are built up through mergers over the history of the universe.From these simulations, Tremmel and collaborators find an end total of 316 supermassive black holes residing within the bounds of 26 Milky-Way-mass halos. Of these, roughly a third are

  10. Universally sloppy parameter sensitivities in systems biology models.

    Ryan N Gutenkunst

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative computational models play an increasingly important role in modern biology. Such models typically involve many free parameters, and assigning their values is often a substantial obstacle to model development. Directly measuring in vivo biochemical parameters is difficult, and collectively fitting them to other experimental data often yields large parameter uncertainties. Nevertheless, in earlier work we showed in a growth-factor-signaling model that collective fitting could yield well-constrained predictions, even when it left individual parameters very poorly constrained. We also showed that the model had a "sloppy" spectrum of parameter sensitivities, with eigenvalues roughly evenly distributed over many decades. Here we use a collection of models from the literature to test whether such sloppy spectra are common in systems biology. Strikingly, we find that every model we examine has a sloppy spectrum of sensitivities. We also test several consequences of this sloppiness for building predictive models. In particular, sloppiness suggests that collective fits to even large amounts of ideal time-series data will often leave many parameters poorly constrained. Tests over our model collection are consistent with this suggestion. This difficulty with collective fits may seem to argue for direct parameter measurements, but sloppiness also implies that such measurements must be formidably precise and complete to usefully constrain many model predictions. We confirm this implication in our growth-factor-signaling model. Our results suggest that sloppy sensitivity spectra are universal in systems biology models. The prevalence of sloppiness highlights the power of collective fits and suggests that modelers should focus on predictions rather than on parameters.

  11. Universally sloppy parameter sensitivities in systems biology models.

    Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Waterfall, Joshua J; Casey, Fergal P; Brown, Kevin S; Myers, Christopher R; Sethna, James P

    2007-10-01

    Quantitative computational models play an increasingly important role in modern biology. Such models typically involve many free parameters, and assigning their values is often a substantial obstacle to model development. Directly measuring in vivo biochemical parameters is difficult, and collectively fitting them to other experimental data often yields large parameter uncertainties. Nevertheless, in earlier work we showed in a growth-factor-signaling model that collective fitting could yield well-constrained predictions, even when it left individual parameters very poorly constrained. We also showed that the model had a "sloppy" spectrum of parameter sensitivities, with eigenvalues roughly evenly distributed over many decades. Here we use a collection of models from the literature to test whether such sloppy spectra are common in systems biology. Strikingly, we find that every model we examine has a sloppy spectrum of sensitivities. We also test several consequences of this sloppiness for building predictive models. In particular, sloppiness suggests that collective fits to even large amounts of ideal time-series data will often leave many parameters poorly constrained. Tests over our model collection are consistent with this suggestion. This difficulty with collective fits may seem to argue for direct parameter measurements, but sloppiness also implies that such measurements must be formidably precise and complete to usefully constrain many model predictions. We confirm this implication in our growth-factor-signaling model. Our results suggest that sloppy sensitivity spectra are universal in systems biology models. The prevalence of sloppiness highlights the power of collective fits and suggests that modelers should focus on predictions rather than on parameters.

  12. Our Universe

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  13. Universality and Thouless energy in the supersymmetric Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model

    García-García, Antonio M.; Jia, Yiyang; Verbaarschot, Jacobus J. M.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the supersymmetric Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, N Majorana fermions with infinite range interactions in 0 +1 dimensions. We have found that, close to the ground state E ≈0 , discrete symmetries alter qualitatively the spectral properties with respect to the non-supersymmetric SYK model. The average spectral density at finite N , which we compute analytically and numerically, grows exponentially with N for E ≈0 . However the chiral condensate, which is normalized with respect the total number of eigenvalues, vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. Slightly above E ≈0 , the spectral density grows exponentially with the energy. Deep in the quantum regime, corresponding to the first O (N ) eigenvalues, the average spectral density is universal and well described by random matrix ensembles with chiral and superconducting discrete symmetries. The dynamics for E ≈0 is investigated by level fluctuations. Also in this case we find excellent agreement with the prediction of chiral and superconducting random matrix ensembles for eigenvalue separations smaller than the Thouless energy, which seems to scale linearly with N . Deviations beyond the Thouless energy, which describes how ergodicity is approached, are universally characterized by a quadratic growth of the number variance. In the time domain, we have found analytically that the spectral form factor g (t ), obtained from the connected two-level correlation function of the unfolded spectrum, decays as 1 /t2 for times shorter but comparable to the Thouless time with g (0 ) related to the coefficient of the quadratic growth of the number variance. Our results provide further support that quantum black holes are ergodic and therefore can be classified by random matrix theory.

  14. Coronal hole evolution from multi-viewpoint data as input for a STEREO solar wind speed persistence model

    Temmer, Manuela; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Reiss, Martin A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a concept study of a solar wind forecasting method for Earth, based on persistence modeling from STEREO in situ measurements combined with multi-viewpoint EUV observational data. By comparing the fractional areas of coronal holes (CHs) extracted from EUV data of STEREO and SoHO/SDO, we perform an uncertainty assessment derived from changes in the CHs and apply those changes to the predicted solar wind speed profile at 1 AU. We evaluate the method for the time period 2008-2012, and compare the results to a persistence model based on ACE in situ measurements and to the STEREO persistence model without implementing the information on CH evolution. Compared to an ACE based persistence model, the performance of the STEREO persistence model which takes into account the evolution of CHs, is able to increase the number of correctly predicted high-speed streams by about 12%, and to decrease the number of missed streams by about 23%, and the number of false alarms by about 19%. However, the added information on CH evolution is not able to deliver more accurate speed values for the forecast than using the STEREO persistence model without CH information which performs better than an ACE based persistence model. Investigating the CH evolution between STEREO and Earth view for varying separation angles over ˜25-140° East of Earth, we derive some relation between expanding CHs and increasing solar wind speed, but a less clear relation for decaying CHs and decreasing solar wind speed. This fact most likely prevents the method from making more precise forecasts. The obtained results support a future L5 mission and show the importance and valuable contribution using multi-viewpoint data.

  15. Coronal hole evolution from multi-viewpoint data as input for a STEREO solar wind speed persistence model

    Temmer Manuela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a concept study of a solar wind forecasting method for Earth, based on persistence modeling from STEREO in situ measurements combined with multi-viewpoint EUV observational data. By comparing the fractional areas of coronal holes (CHs extracted from EUV data of STEREO and SoHO/SDO, we perform an uncertainty assessment derived from changes in the CHs and apply those changes to the predicted solar wind speed profile at 1 AU. We evaluate the method for the time period 2008–2012, and compare the results to a persistence model based on ACE in situ measurements and to the STEREO persistence model without implementing the information on CH evolution. Compared to an ACE based persistence model, the performance of the STEREO persistence model which takes into account the evolution of CHs, is able to increase the number of correctly predicted high-speed streams by about 12%, and to decrease the number of missed streams by about 23%, and the number of false alarms by about 19%. However, the added information on CH evolution is not able to deliver more accurate speed values for the forecast than using the STEREO persistence model without CH information which performs better than an ACE based persistence model. Investigating the CH evolution between STEREO and Earth view for varying separation angles over ∼25–140° East of Earth, we derive some relation between expanding CHs and increasing solar wind speed, but a less clear relation for decaying CHs and decreasing solar wind speed. This fact most likely prevents the method from making more precise forecasts. The obtained results support a future L5 mission and show the importance and valuable contribution using multi-viewpoint data.

  16. Universal autoignition models for designer fuels in HCCI combustion

    Vandersickel, A.; Boulouchos, K.; Wright, Y.M. [LAV - Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory - Institute of Energy Technology, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)], email: vandersickel@lav.mavt.ethz.ch

    2010-07-01

    In the energy sector, stringent regulations have been implemented on combustion emissions in order to address health and environmental concerns and help improve air quality. A novel combustion mode, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), can improve the emissions performance of an engine in terms of NOx and soot release over that of diesel while maintaining the same efficiencies. However, problems of ignition timing control arise with HCCI. The aim of this paper is to determine how fuel properties impact the HCCI ignition process and operating range. This study was carried out as part of a collaboration among several universities and automotive companies and 10 fuels were investigated experimentally and numerically using Arrhenius' model and a lumped reaction model. The two ignition models were successfully adapted to describe the behavior of the studied fuels; atomizer engine experiments validated their results. Further work will be conducted to optimize the reaction mechanism for the remaining process fuels.

  17. Universal free school breakfast: a qualitative model for breakfast behaviors

    Louise eHarvey-Golding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, research examining the effectiveness of school breakfast is still within relative stages of infancy, and findings to date have been rather mixed. Moreover, previous evaluations of school breakfast schemes have been predominantly quantitative in their methodologies. Presently there are few qualitative studies examining the subjective perceptions and experiences of stakeholders, and thereby an absence of knowledge regarding the sociocultural impacts of school breakfast. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs, views and attitudes, and breakfast consumption behaviors, among key stakeholders, served by a council-wide universal free school breakfast initiative, within the North West of England, UK. A sample of children, parents and school staff were recruited from three primary schools, participating in the universal free school breakfast scheme, to partake in semi-structured interviews and small focus groups. A Grounded Theory analysis of the data collected identified a theoretical model of breakfast behaviors, underpinned by the subjective perceptions and experiences of these key stakeholders. The model comprises of three domains relating to breakfast behaviors, and the internal and external factors that are perceived to influence breakfast behaviors, among children, parents and school staff. Findings were validated using triangulation methods, member checks and inter-rater reliability measures. In presenting this theoretically grounded model for breakfast behaviors, this paper provides a unique qualitative insight into the breakfast consumption behaviors and barriers to breakfast consumption, within a socioeconomically deprived community, participating in a universal free school breakfast intervention program.

  18. Universality in random-walk models with birth and death

    Bender, C.M.; Boettcher, S.; Meisinger, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    Models of random walks are considered in which walkers are born at one site and die at all other sites. Steady-state distributions of walkers exhibit dimensionally dependent critical behavior as a function of the birth rate. Exact analytical results for a hyperspherical lattice yield a second-order phase transition with a nontrivial critical exponent for all positive dimensions D≠2, 4. Numerical studies of hypercubic and fractal lattices indicate that these exact results are universal. This work elucidates the adsorption transition of polymers at curved interfaces. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  19. The search for black holes

    Torn, K.

    1976-01-01

    Conceivable experimental investigations to prove the existence of black holes are discussed. Double system with a black hole turning around a star-satellite are in the spotlight. X-radiation emmited by such systems and resulting from accretion of the stellar gas by a black hole, and the gas heating when falling on the black hole might prove the model suggested. A source of strong X-radiation observed in the Cygnus star cluster and referred to as Cygnus X-1 may be thus identified as a black hole. Direct registration of short X-ray pulses with msec intervals might prove the suggestion. The lack of appropriate astrophysic facilities is pointed out to be the major difficulty on the way of experimental verifications

  20. Organizational Models and Mythologies of the American Research University. ASHE 1986 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Alpert, Daniel

    Features of the matrix model of the research university and myths about the academic enterprise are described, along with serious dissonances in the U.S. university system. The linear model, from which the matrix model evolved, describes the university's structure, perceived mission, and organizational behavior. A matrix model portrays in concise,…

  1. Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole. Modelling of three model tests scaled 1:10. Verification of the bentonite material model and the calculation technique

    Boergesson, Lennart (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Hernelind, Jan (5T Engineering AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Three model shear tests of very high quality simulating a horizontal rock shear through a deposition hole in the centre of a canister were performed 1986. The tests and the results are described by /Boergesson 1986/. The tests simulated a deposition hole in the scale 1:10 with reference density of the buffer, very stiff confinement simulating the rock, and a solid bar of copper simulating the canister. The three tests were almost identical with exception of the rate of shear, which was varied between 0.031 and 160 mm/s, i.e. with a factor of more than 5,000 and the density of the bentonite, which differed slightly. The tests were very well documented. Shear force, shear rate, total stress in the bentonite, strain in the copper and the movement of the top of the simulated canister were measured continuously during the shear. After finished shear the equipment was dismantled and careful sampling of the bentonite with measurement of water ratio and density were made. The deformed copper 'canister' was also carefully measured after the test. The tests have been modelled with the finite element code Abaqus with the same models and techniques that were used for the full scale scenarios in SR-Site. The results have been compared with the measured results, which has yielded very valuable information about the relevancy of the material models and the modelling technique. An elastic-plastic material model was used for the bentonite where the stress-strain relations have been derived from laboratory tests. The material model is made a function of both the density and the strain rate at shear. Since the shear is fast and takes place under undrained conditions, the density is not changed during the tests. However, strain rate varies largely with both the location of the elements and time. This can be taken into account in Abaqus by making the material model a function of the strain rate for each element. A similar model, based on tensile tests on the copper used in

  2. A dispersive optical model for n + 120Sn from -15 to +80 MeV and properties of neutron single-particle and single-hole states

    Chen Zemin; Walter, R L; Tornow, W; Weisel, G J; Howell, C R

    2004-01-01

    Data for σ(θ) and A y (θ) previously obtained at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory for 120 Sn(n, n) are combined with other measurements of σ(θ) and A y (θ) to create an elastic-scattering database from 9.9 to 24 MeV. In addition, relatively recent high-accuracy measurements of the neutron total cross section σ T for Sn from 5 to 80 MeV are combined with earlier σ T data to form a detailed σ T database from 0.24 to 80 MeV. All of these data are analysed in the framework of a dispersive optical model (DOM). The DOM is extended to negative energies to investigate properties of single-particle and single-hole bound states. The DOM also is used in calculations of compound-nucleus contributions to σ(θ), so that DOM predictions can be compared to σ(θ) measurements. Excellent agreement is obtained for the entire set of scattering data from 0.4 to 24 MeV, and for σ T values from 0.05 to 80 MeV. Calculations of bound-state quantities are compared to values derived from experiment for energies down to -15 MeV. Reasonable agreement for the binding energies is achieved, while the predicted spectroscopic factors disagree somewhat with the values found in stripping and pickup experiments. Finally, the DOM is modified to investigate two features (volume absorption that is asymmetric about the Fermi energy and zero absorption in the vicinity of the Fermi energy) that have been ignored in many DOM models. These modifications have little effect on the agreement of the calculations with the scattering data or with the bound-state quantities

  3. A dispersive optical model for n + {sup 120}Sn from -15 to +80 MeV and properties of neutron single-particle and single-hole states

    Chen Zemin [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Walter, R L [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Tornow, W [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Weisel, G J [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Howell, C R [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Data for {sigma}({theta}) and A{sub y}({theta}) previously obtained at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory for {sup 120}Sn(n, n) are combined with other measurements of {sigma}({theta}) and A{sub y}({theta}) to create an elastic-scattering database from 9.9 to 24 MeV. In addition, relatively recent high-accuracy measurements of the neutron total cross section {sigma}{sub T} for Sn from 5 to 80 MeV are combined with earlier {sigma}{sub T} data to form a detailed {sigma}{sub T} database from 0.24 to 80 MeV. All of these data are analysed in the framework of a dispersive optical model (DOM). The DOM is extended to negative energies to investigate properties of single-particle and single-hole bound states. The DOM also is used in calculations of compound-nucleus contributions to {sigma}({theta}), so that DOM predictions can be compared to {sigma}({theta}) measurements. Excellent agreement is obtained for the entire set of scattering data from 0.4 to 24 MeV, and for {sigma}{sub T} values from 0.05 to 80 MeV. Calculations of bound-state quantities are compared to values derived from experiment for energies down to -15 MeV. Reasonable agreement for the binding energies is achieved, while the predicted spectroscopic factors disagree somewhat with the values found in stripping and pickup experiments. Finally, the DOM is modified to investigate two features (volume absorption that is asymmetric about the Fermi energy and zero absorption in the vicinity of the Fermi energy) that have been ignored in many DOM models. These modifications have little effect on the agreement of the calculations with the scattering data or with the bound-state quantities.

  4. Anisotropic, nonsingular early universe model leading to a realistic cosmology

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Lasenby, Anthony N.; Hobson, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel cosmological model in which scalar field matter in a biaxial Bianchi IX geometry leads to a nonsingular 'pancaking' solution: the hypersurface volume goes to zero instantaneously at the 'big bang', but all physical quantities, such as curvature invariants and the matter energy density remain finite, and continue smoothly through the big bang. We demonstrate that there exist geodesics extending through the big bang, but that there are also incomplete geodesics that spiral infinitely around a topologically closed spatial dimension at the big bang, rendering it, at worst, a quasiregular singularity. The model is thus reminiscent of the Taub-NUT vacuum solution in that it has biaxial Bianchi IX geometry and its evolution exhibits a dimensionality reduction at a quasiregular singularity; the two models are, however, rather different, as we will show in a future work. Here we concentrate on the cosmological implications of our model and show how the scalar field drives both isotropization and inflation, thus raising the question of whether structure on the largest scales was laid down at a time when the universe was still oblate (as also suggested by [T. S. Pereira, C. Pitrou, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 9 (2007) 6.][C. Pitrou, T. S. Pereira, and J.-P. Uzan, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 4 (2008) 4.][A. Guemruekcueoglu, C. Contaldi, and M. Peloso, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 11 (2007) 005.]). We also discuss the stability of our model to small perturbations around biaxiality and draw an analogy with cosmological perturbations. We conclude by presenting a separate, bouncing solution, which generalizes the known bouncing solution in closed FRW universes.

  5. Completeness of classical spin models and universal quantum computation

    De las Cuevas, Gemma; Dür, Wolfgang; Briegel, Hans J; Van den Nest, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    We study mappings between different classical spin systems that leave the partition function invariant. As recently shown in Van den Nest et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 110501), the partition function of the 2D square lattice Ising model in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field can specialize to the partition function of any Ising system on an arbitrary graph. In this sense the 2D Ising model is said to be 'complete'. However, in order to obtain the above result, the coupling strengths on the 2D lattice must assume complex values, and thus do not allow for a physical interpretation. Here we show how a complete model with real—and, hence, 'physical'—couplings can be obtained if the 3D Ising model is considered. We furthermore show how to map general q-state systems with possibly many-body interactions to the 2D Ising model with complex parameters, and give completeness results for these models with real parameters. We also demonstrate that the computational overhead in these constructions is in all relevant cases polynomial. These results are proved by invoking a recently found cross-connection between statistical mechanics and quantum information theory, where partition functions are expressed as quantum mechanical amplitudes. Within this framework, there exists a natural correspondence between many-body quantum states that allow for universal quantum computation via local measurements only, and complete classical spin systems

  6. Primordial black holes from passive density fluctuations

    Lin, Chia-Min; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we show that if passive fluctuations are considered, primordial black holes (PBHs) can be easily produced in the framework of single-field, slow-roll inflation models. The formation of PBHs is due to the blue spectrum of passive fluctuations and an enhancement of the spectral range which exits horizon near the end of inflation. Therefore the PBHs are light with masses $\\lesssim 10^{15}g$ depending on the number of e-folds when the scale of our observable universe leaves horizon...

  7. Atomic structure in black hole

    Nagatani, Yukinori

    2006-01-01

    We propose that any black hole has atomic structure in its inside and has no horizon as a model of black holes. Our proposal is founded on a mean field approximation of gravity. The structure of our model consists of a (charged) singularity at the center and quantum fluctuations of fields around the singularity, namely, it is quite similar to that of atoms. Any properties of black holes, e.g. entropy, can be explained by the model. The model naturally quantizes black holes. In particular, we find the minimum black hole, whose structure is similar to that of the hydrogen atom and whose Schwarzschild radius is approximately 1.1287 times the Planck length. Our approach is conceptually similar to Bohr's model of the atomic structure, and the concept of the minimum Schwarzschild radius is similar to that of the Bohr radius. The model predicts that black holes carry baryon number, and the baryon number is rapidly violated. This baryon number violation can be used as verification of the model. (author)

  8. Preference Mining Using Neighborhood Rough Set Model on Two Universes.

    Zeng, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Preference mining plays an important role in e-commerce and video websites for enhancing user satisfaction and loyalty. Some classical methods are not available for the cold-start problem when the user or the item is new. In this paper, we propose a new model, called parametric neighborhood rough set on two universes (NRSTU), to describe the user and item data structures. Furthermore, the neighborhood lower approximation operator is used for defining the preference rules. Then, we provide the means for recommending items to users by using these rules. Finally, we give an experimental example to show the details of NRSTU-based preference mining for cold-start problem. The parameters of the model are also discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed method presents an effective solution for preference mining. In particular, NRSTU improves the recommendation accuracy by about 19% compared to the traditional method.

  9. BHDD: Primordial black hole binaries code

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.; Gaggero, Daniele; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2018-06-01

    BHDD (BlackHolesDarkDress) simulates primordial black hole (PBH) binaries that are clothed in dark matter (DM) halos. The software uses N-body simulations and analytical estimates to follow the evolution of PBH binaries formed in the early Universe.

  10. Modeling universal dynamics of cell spreading on elastic substrates.

    Fan, Houfu; Li, Shaofan

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multiscale moving contact line model is combined with a soft matter cell model to study the universal dynamics of cell spreading over elastic substrates. We have studied both the early stage and the late stage cell spreading by taking into account the actin tension effect. In this work, the cell is modeled as an active nematic droplet, and the substrate is modeled as a St. Venant Kirchhoff elastic medium. A complete 3D simulation of cell spreading has been carried out. The simulation results show that the spreading area versus spreading time at different stages obeys specific power laws, which is in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical prediction reported in the literature. Moreover, the simulation results show that the substrate elasticity may affect force dipole distribution inside the cell. The advantage of this approach is that it combines the hydrodynamics of actin retrograde flow with moving contact line model so that it can naturally include actin tension effect resulting from actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and thus it might be capable of simulating complex cellular scale phenomenon, such as cell spreading or even crawling.

  11. Near-horizon states of black holes and Calogero models -2

    Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, ... We find self-adjoint extensions of the rational Calogero model in the presence .... positive integer, corresponding to the choice of z = z1 = π + 2η1. similarly, when.

  12. A review of the microscopic modeling of the 5-dim. black hole of IIB ...

    Firstly the event horizon has an area and there is a area law which states that in ... [4], or as we shall argue, the other possibility is to replace the paradigm of .... of the theory undergoes a drastic enough change, so that the description of ...... Our attitude will be to consider the sigma model on Е, as a resolution of the sigma.

  13. A comphrehensive model for the amplification of acoustic pressure waves by single hole orifices

    Moussou, P.; Testud, Ph.; Auregan, Y.; Hirschberg, A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel flow approximation, a simple model of hydrodynamic instability is proposed for describing the behavior of an orifice as an acoustic amplifier. It is shown that the growing of perturbations in the vena contracta can generate negative damping for Strouhal numbers of the order of

  14. Black holes as possible sources of closed and semiclosed worlds

    Frolov, V.P.; Markov, M.A.; Mukhanov, V.F.

    1990-01-01

    The internal structure of spacetime inside a black hole is investigated on the assumption that some limiting curvature exists. It is shown that the Schwarzschild metric inside the black hole can be attached to the de Sitter one at some spacelike junction surface which may represent a short transition layer. The method of massive thin shells by Israel is used to obtain the characteristics of this layer. It is shown that instead of the singularity the closed world can be formed inside the black hole. It is argued that this property of our model may also be valid in a more general case provided the gravitation theory is asymptotically free and the limiting curvature exists. After passing the deflation stage the closed world in the black-hole interior may begin to inflate and give rise to a new macroscopic universe. The described model may be considered as an example of the creation of a closed or semiclosed world ''in the laboratory.'' The possible fate of the evaporating black hole is also briefly discussed

  15. Filling some black holes: modeling the connection between urbanization, infrastructure, and global service intensity

    Van De Vijver, Elien; Derudder, Ben; Bassens, David; Witlox, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This empirical article combines insights from previous research on the level of knowledge-intensive service in metropolitan areas with the aim to develop an understanding of the spatial structure of the global service economy. We use a stepwise regression model with the Globalization and World Cities research network's measure of globalized service provisioning as the dependent variable and a range of variables focusing on population, infrastructure, urban primacy, and national regulation as ...

  16. Holes in the Bathtub: Water Table Dependent Services and Threshold Behavior in an Economic Model of Groundwater Extraction

    Kirk-lawlor, N. E.; Edwards, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    In many groundwater systems, the height of the water table must be above certain thresholds for some types of surface flow to exist. Examples of flows that depend on water table elevation include groundwater baseflow to river systems, groundwater flow to wetland systems, and flow to springs. Meeting many of the goals of sustainable water resource management requires maintaining these flows at certain rates. Water resource management decisions invariably involve weighing tradeoffs between different possible usage regimes and the economic consequences of potential management choices are an important factor in these tradeoffs. Policies based on sustainability may have a social cost from forgoing present income. This loss of income may be worth bearing, but should be well understood and carefully considered. Traditionally, the economic theory of groundwater exploitation has relied on the assumption of a single-cell or "bathtub" aquifer model, which offers a simple means to examine complex interactions between water user and hydrologic system behavior. However, such a model assumes a closed system and does not allow for the simulation of groundwater outflows that depend on water table elevation (e.g. baseflow, springs, wetlands), even though those outflows have value. We modify the traditional single-cell aquifer model by allowing for outflows when the water table is above certain threshold elevations. These thresholds behave similarly to holes in a bathtub, where the outflow is a positive function of the height of the water table above the threshold and the outflow is lost when the water table drops below the threshold. We find important economic consequences to this representation of the groundwater system. The economic value of services provided by threshold-dependent outflows (including non-market value), such as ecosystem services, can be incorporated. The value of services provided by these flows may warrant maintaining the water table at higher levels than would

  17. Thermodynamic theory of black holes

    Davies, P C.W. [King' s Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Mathematics

    1977-04-21

    The thermodynamic theory underlying black hole processes is developed in detail and applied to model systems. It is found that Kerr-Newman black holes undergo a phase transition at a = 0.68M or Q = 0.86M, where the heat capacity has an infinite discontinuity. Above the transition values the specific heat is positive, permitting isothermal equilibrium with a surrounding heat bath. Simple processes and stability criteria for various black hole situations are investigated. The limits for entropically favoured black hole formation are found. The Nernst conditions for the third law of thermodynamics are not satisfied fully for black holes. There is no obvious thermodynamic reason why a black hole may not be cooled down below absolute zero and converted into a naked singularity. Quantum energy-momentum tensor calculations for uncharged black holes are extended to the Reissner-Nordstrom case, and found to be fully consistent with the thermodynamic picture for Q < M. For Q < M the model predicts that 'naked' collapse also produces radiation, with such intensity that the collapsing matter is entirely evaporated away before a naked singularity can form.

  18. Numerical modelling as a cost-reduction tool for probability of detection of bolt hole eddy current testing

    Mandache, C.; Khan, M.; Fahr, A.; Yanishevsky, M.

    2011-03-01

    Probability of detection (PoD) studies are broadly used to determine the reliability of specific nondestructive inspection procedures, as well as to provide data for damage tolerance life estimations and calculation of inspection intervals for critical components. They require inspections on a large set of samples, a fact that makes these statistical assessments time- and cost-consuming. Physics-based numerical simulations of nondestructive testing inspections could be used as a cost-effective alternative to empirical investigations. They realistically predict the inspection outputs as functions of the input characteristics related to the test piece, transducer and instrument settings, which are subsequently used to partially substitute and/or complement inspection data in PoD analysis. This work focuses on the numerical modelling aspects of eddy current testing for the bolt hole inspections of wing box structures typical of the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules and P-3 Orion aircraft, found in the air force inventory of many countries. Boundary element-based numerical modelling software was employed to predict the eddy current signal responses when varying inspection parameters related to probe characteristics, crack geometry and test piece properties. Two demonstrator exercises were used for eddy current signal prediction when lowering the driver probe frequency and changing the material's electrical conductivity, followed by subsequent discussions and examination of the implications on using simulated data in the PoD analysis. Despite some simplifying assumptions, the modelled eddy current signals were found to provide similar results to the actual inspections. It is concluded that physics-based numerical simulations have the potential to partially substitute or complement inspection data required for PoD studies, reducing the cost, time, effort and resources necessary for a full empirical PoD assessment.

  19. Selections from 2016: Primordial Black Holes as Dark Matter

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2016, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.LIGO Gravitational Wave Detection, Primordial Black Holes, and the Near-IR Cosmic Infrared Background AnisotropiesPublished May2016Main takeaway:A study by Alexander Kashlinsky (NASA Goddard SFC) proposes that the cold dark matter that makes up the majority of the universes matter may be made of black holes. These black holes, Kashlinsky suggests, are primordial: they collapsed directly from dense regions of the universe soon after the Big Bang.Why its interesting:This model would simultaneously explain several observations. In particular, we see similarities in patterns between the cosmic infrared and X-ray backgrounds. This would make sense if accretion onto primordial black holes in halos produced the X-ray background in the same regions where the first stars also formed, producing the infrared background.What this means for current events:In Kashlinskys model, primordial black holes would occasionally form binary pairs and eventually spiral in and merge. The release of energy from such an event would then be observable by gravitational-wave detectors. Could the gravitational-wave signal that LIGO detected last year have been two primordial black holes merging? More observations will be needed to find out.CitationA. Kashlinsky 2016 ApJL 823 L25. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/823/2/L25

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    flatness of the Universe, the horizon problem and isotropy of cosmological microwave background. All this material is covered in chapter seven. Chapter eight contains brief discussion of several popular inflation models. Chapter nine is devoted to the problem of the large-scale structure formation from initial quantum vacuum fluctuation during the inflation and the spectrum of the density fluctuations. It also contains remarks on the baryonic asymmetry of the Universe, baryogenesis and primordial black holes. Part III covers the material on extra dimensions. It describes how Einstein gravity is modified in the presence of one or more additional spatial dimensions and how these extra dimensions are compactified in the Kaluza-Klein scheme. The authors also discuss how extra dimensions may affect low energy physics. They present examples of higher-dimensional generalizations of the gravity with higher-in-curvature corrections and discuss a possible mechanism of self-stabilization of an extra space. A considerable part of the chapter 10 is devoted to cosmological models with extra dimensions. In particular, the authors discuss how extra dimensions can modify 'standard' inflation models. At the end of this chapter they make several remarks on a possible relation of the value of fundamental constants in our universe with the existence of extra dimensions. Finally, in chapter 11 they demonstrate that several observable properties of the Universe are closely related with the special value of the fundamental physical constants and their fine tuning. They give interesting examples of such fine tuning and summarize many other cases. The book ends with discussion of a so-called 'cascade birth of universes in multidimensional spaces' model, proposed by one of the authors. As is evident from this brief summary of topics presented in the book, many interesting areas of modern gravity and cosmology are covered. However, since the subject is so wide, this inevitably implies that the

  1. A Universal Model of Giftedness--An Adaptation of the Munich Model

    Jessurun, J. H.; Shearer, C. B.; Weggeman, M. C. D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Munich Model of Giftedness (MMG) by Heller and his colleagues, developed for the identification of gifted children, is adapted and expanded, with the aim of making it more universally usable as a model for the pathway from talents to performance. On the side of the talent-factors, the concept of multiple intelligences is introduced, and the…

  2. Walking the Walk: Modeling Social Model and Universal Design in the Disabilities Office

    Thornton, Melanie; Downs, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Making the shift from the medical model of disability to the social model requires postsecondary disabilities offices to carefully examine and revise policies and procedures to reflect this paradigm shift, which gives them the credibility to work toward such change on the campus level. The process followed by one university is covered in-depth, as…

  3. Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Miller, M. Coleman; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical simplicity of black holes, combined with their links to some of the most energetic events in the universe, means that black holes are key objects for fundamental physics and astrophysics. Until recently, it was generally believed that black holes in nature appear in two broad mass ranges: stellar-mass (M~3 20 M⊙), which are produced by the core collapse of massive stars, and supermassive (M~106 1010 M⊙), which are found in the centers of galaxies and are produced by a still uncertain combination of processes. In the last few years, however, evidence has accumulated for an intermediate-mass class of black holes, with M~102 104 M⊙. If such objects exist they have important implications for the dynamics of stellar clusters, the formation of supermassive black holes, and the production and detection of gravitational waves. We review the evidence for intermediate-mass black holes and discuss future observational and theoretical work that will help clarify numerous outstanding questions about these objects.

  4. Baryon asymmetry of the Universe in the standard model

    Farrar, G.R.; Shaposhnikov, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    We study the interactions of quarks and antiquarks with the changing Higgs field during the electroweak phase transition, including quantum mechanical and some thermal effects, with the only source of CP violation being the known CKM phase. We show that the GIM cancellation, which has been commonly thought to imply a prediction which is at least 10 orders of magnitude too small, can be evaded in certain kinematic regimes, for instance, when the strange quark is totally reflected but the down quark is not. We report on a quantitative calculation of the asymmetry in a one-dimensional approximation based on the present understanding of the physics of the high-temperature environment, but with some aspects of the problem oversimplified. The resulting prediction for the magnitude and sign of the present baryonic asymmetry of the Universe agrees with the observed value, with moderately optimistic assumptions about the dynamics of the phase transition. Both magnitude and sign of the asymmetry have an intricate dependence on quark masses and mixings, so that quantitative agreement between prediction and observation would be highly nontrivial. At present uncertainties related to the dynamics of the EW phase transition and the oversimplifications of our treatment are too great to decide whether or not this is the correct explanation for the presence of remnant matter in our Universe; however, the present work makes it clear that the minimal standard model cannot be discounted as a contender for explaining this phenomenon

  5. Atomistic modeling trap-assisted tunneling in hole tunnel field effect transistors

    Long, Pengyu; Huang, Jun Z.; Povolotskyi, Michael; Sarangapani, Prasad; Valencia-Zapata, Gustavo A.; Kubis, Tillmann; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2018-05-01

    Tunnel Field Effect Transistors (FETs) have the potential to achieve steep Subthreshold Swing (S.S.) below 60 mV/dec, but their S.S. could be limited by trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) due to interface traps. In this paper, the effect of trap energy and location on OFF-current (IOFF) of tunnel FETs is evaluated systematically using an atomistic trap level representation in a full quantum transport simulation. Trap energy levels close to band edges cause the highest leakage. Wave function penetration into the surrounding oxide increases the TAT current. To estimate the effects of multiple traps, we assume that the traps themselves do not interact with each other and as a whole do not modify the electrostatic potential dramatically. Within that model limitation, this numerical metrology study points to the critical importance of TAT in the IOFF in tunnel FETs. The model shows that for Dit higher than 1012/(cm2 eV) IO F F is critically increased with a degraded IO N/IO F F ratio of the tunnel FET. In order to have an IO N/IO F F ratio higher than 104, the acceptable Dit near Ev should be controlled to no larger than 1012/(cm2 eV) .

  6. Black holes and Higgs stability

    Tetradis, Nikolaos

    2016-09-20

    We study the effect of primordial black holes on the classical rate of nucleation of AdS regions within the standard electroweak vacuum. We find that the energy barrier for transitions to the new vacuum, which characterizes the exponential suppression of the nucleation rate, can be reduced significantly in the black-hole background. A precise analysis is required in order to determine whether the the existence of primordial black holes is compatible with the form of the Higgs potential at high temperature or density in the Standard Model or its extensions.

  7. Universe

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  8. Semiclassical Approach to Black Hole Evaporation

    Lowe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Black hole evaporation may lead to massive or massless remnants, or naked singularities. This paper investigates this process in the context of two quite different two dimensional black hole models. The first is the original CGHS model, the second is another two dimensional dilaton-gravity model, but with properties much closer to physics in the real, four dimensional, world. Numerical simulations are performed of the formation and subsequent evaporation of black holes and the results are fou...

  9. Early universe cosmology. In supersymmetric extensions of the standard model

    Baumann, Jochen Peter

    2012-03-19

    In this thesis we investigate possible connections between cosmological inflation and leptogenesis on the one side and particle physics on the other side. We work in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. A key role is played by the right-handed sneutrino, the superpartner of the right-handed neutrino involved in the type I seesaw mechanism. We study a combined model of inflation and non-thermal leptogenesis that is a simple extension of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with conserved R-parity, where we add three right-handed neutrino super fields. The inflaton direction is given by the imaginary components of the corresponding scalar component fields, which are protected from the supergravity (SUGRA) {eta}-problem by a shift symmetry in the Kaehler potential. We discuss the model first in a globally supersymmetric (SUSY) and then in a supergravity context and compute the inflationary predictions of the model. We also study reheating and non-thermal leptogenesis in this model. A numerical simulation shows that shortly after the waterfall phase transition that ends inflation, the universe is dominated by right-handed sneutrinos and their out-of-equilibrium decay can produce the desired matter-antimatter asymmetry. Using a simplified time-averaged description, we derive analytical expressions for the model predictions. Combining the results from inflation and leptogenesis allows us to constrain the allowed parameter space from two different directions, with implications for low energy neutrino physics. As a second thread of investigation, we discuss a generalisation of the inflationary model discussed above to include gauge non-singlet fields as inflatons. This is motivated by the fact that in left-right symmetric, supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (SUSY GUTs), like SUSY Pati-Salam unification or SUSY SO(10) GUTs, the righthanded (s)neutrino is an indispensable ingredient and does not have to be put in by hand as in the MSSM. We discuss

  10. Early universe cosmology. In supersymmetric extensions of the standard model

    Baumann, Jochen Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate possible connections between cosmological inflation and leptogenesis on the one side and particle physics on the other side. We work in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. A key role is played by the right-handed sneutrino, the superpartner of the right-handed neutrino involved in the type I seesaw mechanism. We study a combined model of inflation and non-thermal leptogenesis that is a simple extension of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with conserved R-parity, where we add three right-handed neutrino super fields. The inflaton direction is given by the imaginary components of the corresponding scalar component fields, which are protected from the supergravity (SUGRA) η-problem by a shift symmetry in the Kaehler potential. We discuss the model first in a globally supersymmetric (SUSY) and then in a supergravity context and compute the inflationary predictions of the model. We also study reheating and non-thermal leptogenesis in this model. A numerical simulation shows that shortly after the waterfall phase transition that ends inflation, the universe is dominated by right-handed sneutrinos and their out-of-equilibrium decay can produce the desired matter-antimatter asymmetry. Using a simplified time-averaged description, we derive analytical expressions for the model predictions. Combining the results from inflation and leptogenesis allows us to constrain the allowed parameter space from two different directions, with implications for low energy neutrino physics. As a second thread of investigation, we discuss a generalisation of the inflationary model discussed above to include gauge non-singlet fields as inflatons. This is motivated by the fact that in left-right symmetric, supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (SUSY GUTs), like SUSY Pati-Salam unification or SUSY SO(10) GUTs, the righthanded (s)neutrino is an indispensable ingredient and does not have to be put in by hand as in the MSSM. We discuss the

  11. Quantum information erasure inside black holes

    Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2015-01-01

    An effective field theory for infalling observers in the vicinity of a quasi-static black hole is given in terms of a freely falling lattice discretization. The lattice model successfully reproduces the thermal spectrum of outgoing Hawking radiation, as was shown by Corley and Jacobson, but can also be used to model observations made by a typical low-energy observer who enters the black hole in free fall at a prescribed time. The explicit short distance cutoff ensures that, from the viewpoint of the infalling observer, any quantum information that entered the black hole more than a scrambling time earlier has been erased by the black hole singularity. This property, combined with the requirement that outside observers need at least of order the scrambling time to extract quantum information from the black hole, ensures that a typical infalling observer does not encounter drama upon crossing the black hole horizon in a theory where black hole information is preserved for asymptotic observers.

  12. Tactile Architectural Models as Universal ‘Urban Furniture’

    Kłopotowska, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    Tactile architectural models and maquettes have been built in the external public spaces of Polish cities since the latter half of the 00s of the 21st century. These objects are designed for the blind, but also other people - tourists, children, and those who arrive in wheelchairs. This collection has got currently more than 70 implements, which places Poland in the group of European leaders. Unfortunately, this “furniture”, is not always “convenient” and safe for all recipients. Studies, which have been conducted together with Maciej Kłopotowski since 2016 across the country, show a number of serious design and executive mistakes or examples of misuse. The purpose of this article is drawing attention to these issues and pointing out ways how they can be avoided. These objects may become completely valuable, universal tool for learning and a great way of studying architecture in an alternative way.

  13. Universal dS vacua in STU-models

    Blåbäck, J. [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Danielsson, UniversityH.; Dibitetto, G.; Vargas, S.C. [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-10-09

    Stable de Sitter solutions in minimal F-term supergravity are known to lie close to Minkowski critical points. We consider a class of STU-models arising from type IIB compactifications with generalised fluxes. There, we apply an analytical method for solving the equations of motion for the moduli fields based on the idea of treating derivatives of the superpotential of different orders up to third as independent objects. In particular, supersymmetric and no-scale Minkowski solutions are singled out by physical reasons. Focusing on the study of dS vacua close to supersymmetric Minkowski points, we are able to elaborate a complete analytical treatment of the mass matrix based on the sGoldstino bound. This leads to a class of interesting universal dS vacua. We finally explore a similar possibility around no-scale Minkowski points and discuss some examples.

  14. Dance of Two Monster Black Holes

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    This past December, researchers all over the world watched an outburst from the enormous black hole in OJ 287 an outburst that had been predicted years ago using the general theory of relativity.Outbursts from Black-Hole OrbitsOJ 287 is one of the largest supermassive black holes known, weighing in at 18 billion solar masses. Located about 3.5 billion light-years away, this monster quasar is bright enough that it was first observed as early as the 1890s. What makes OJ 287 especially interesting, however, is that its light curve exhibits prominent outbursts roughly every 12 years.Diagram illustrating the orbit of the secondary black hole (shown in blue) in OJ 287 from 2000 to 2023. We see outbursts (the yellow bubbles) every time the secondary black hole crosses the accretion disk (shown in red, ina side view) surrounding the primary (the black circle). [Valtonen et al. 2016]What causes the outbursts? Astronomers think that there is a second supermassive black hole, ~100 times smaller, inspiraling as it orbits the central monster and set to merge within the next 10,000 years. In this model, the primary black hole of OJ 287 is surrounded by a hot accretion disk. As the secondary black hole orbits the primary, it regularly punches through this accretion disk, heating the material and causing the release of expanding bubbles of hot gas pulled from the disk. This gas then radiates thermally, causing the outbursts we see.Attempts to model this scenario using Newtonian orbits all fail; the timing of the secondary black holes crossings through the accretion disk (as measured by when we see the outbursts) can only be explained by a model incorporating general-relativistic effects on the orbit. Careful observations and precise timing of these outbursts therefore provide an excellent test of general relativity.Watching a Predicted CrossingThe model of OJ 287 predicted another disk crossing in December 2015, so professional and amateur astronomers around the world readied more

  15. A universal, fault-tolerant, non-linear analytic network for modeling and fault detection

    Mott, J.E.; King, R.W.; Monson, L.R.; Olson, D.L.; Staffon, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The similarities and differences of a universal network to normal neural networks are outlined. The description and application of a universal network is discussed by showing how a simple linear system is modeled by normal techniques and by universal network techniques. A full implementation of the universal network as universal process modeling software on a dedicated computer system at EBR-II is described and example results are presented. It is concluded that the universal network provides different feature recognition capabilities than a neural network and that the universal network can provide extremely fast, accurate, and fault-tolerant estimation, validation, and replacement of signals in a real system

  16. A universal, fault-tolerant, non-linear analytic network for modeling and fault detection

    Mott, J.E. [Advanced Modeling Techniques Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); King, R.W.; Monson, L.R.; Olson, D.L.; Staffon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-03-06

    The similarities and differences of a universal network to normal neural networks are outlined. The description and application of a universal network is discussed by showing how a simple linear system is modeled by normal techniques and by universal network techniques. A full implementation of the universal network as universal process modeling software on a dedicated computer system at EBR-II is described and example results are presented. It is concluded that the universal network provides different feature recognition capabilities than a neural network and that the universal network can provide extremely fast, accurate, and fault-tolerant estimation, validation, and replacement of signals in a real system.

  17. Micro black holes and the democratic transition

    Dvali, Gia; Pujolas, Oriol

    2009-01-01

    Unitarity implies that the evaporation of microscopic quasiclassical black holes cannot be universal in different particle species. This creates a puzzle, since it conflicts with the thermal nature of quasiclassical black holes, according to which all of the species should see the same horizon and be produced with the same Hawking temperatures. We resolve this puzzle by showing that for the microscopic black holes, on top of the usual quantum evaporation time, there is a new time scale which characterizes a purely classical process during which the black hole loses the ability to differentiate among the species and becomes democratic. We demonstrate this phenomenon in a well-understood framework of large extra dimensions, with a number of parallel branes. An initially nondemocratic black hole is the one localized on one of the branes, with its high-dimensional Schwarzschild radius being much shorter than the interbrane distance. Such a black hole seemingly cannot evaporate into the species localized on the other branes that are beyond its reach. We demonstrate that in reality the system evolves classically in time, in such a way that the black hole accretes the neighboring branes. The end result is a completely democratic static configuration, in which all of the branes share the same black hole and all of the species are produced with the same Hawking temperature. Thus, just like their macroscopic counterparts, the microscopic black holes are universal bridges to the hidden sector physics.

  18. The quark mass spectrum in the Universal Seesaw model

    Ranfone, S.

    1993-03-01

    In the context of a Universal Seesaw model implemented in a left-right symmetric theory, we show that, by allowing the two left-handed doublet Higgs fields to develop different vacuum-expectation-values (VEV's), it is possible to account for the observed structure of the quark mass spectrum without the need of any hierarchy among the Yukawa couplings. In this framework the top-quark mass is expected to be of the order of its present experimental lower bound, m t ≅ 90 to 100 GeV. Moreover, we find that, while one of the Higgs doublets gets essentially the standard model VEV of approximately 250 GeV, the second doublet is expected to have a much smaller VEV, of order 10 GeV. The identification of the large mass scale of the model with the Peccei-Quinn scale fixes the mass of the right-handed gauge bosons in the range 10 7 to 10 10 GeV, far beyond the reach of present collider experiments. (author)

  19. Black holes by analytic continuation

    Amati, Daniele

    1997-01-01

    In the context of a two-dimensional exactly solvable model, the dynamics of quantum black holes is obtained by analytically continuing the description of the regime where no black hole is formed. The resulting spectrum of outgoing radiation departs from the one predicted by the Hawking model in the region where the outgoing modes arise from the horizon with Planck-order frequencies. This occurs early in the evaporation process, and the resulting physical picture is unconventional. The theory predicts that black holes will only radiate out an energy of Planck mass order, stabilizing after a transitory period. The continuation from a regime without black hole formation --accessible in the 1+1 gravity theory considered-- is implicit in an S matrix approach and provides in this way a possible solution to the problem of information loss.

  20. NASA's Chandra Finds Black Holes Are "Green"

    2006-04-01

    Black holes are the most fuel efficient engines in the Universe, according to a new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By making the first direct estimate of how efficient or "green" black holes are, this work gives insight into how black holes generate energy and affect their environment. The new Chandra finding shows that most of the energy released by matter falling toward a supermassive black hole is in the form of high-energy jets traveling at near the speed of light away from the black hole. This is an important step in understanding how such jets can be launched from magnetized disks of gas near the event horizon of a black hole. Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine "Just as with cars, it's critical to know the fuel efficiency of black holes," said lead author Steve Allen of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. "Without this information, we cannot figure out what is going on under the hood, so to speak, or what the engine can do." Allen and his team used Chandra to study nine supermassive black holes at the centers of elliptical galaxies. These black holes are relatively old and generate much less radiation than quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes seen in the early Universe. The surprise came when the Chandra results showed that these "quiet" black holes are all producing much more energy in jets of high-energy particles than in visible light or X-rays. These jets create huge bubbles, or cavities, in the hot gas in the galaxies. Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy The efficiency of the black hole energy-production was calculated in two steps: first Chandra images of the inner regions of the galaxies were used to estimate how much fuel is available for the black hole; then Chandra images were used to estimate the power required to produce