WorldWideScience

Sample records for hole gas plasma

  1. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  2. Plasma electron-hole kinematics: momentum conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the kinematic properties of a plasma electron hole: a non-linear self-sustained localized positive electric potential perturbation, trapping electrons, that behaves as a coherent entity. When a hole accelerates or grows in depth, ion and electron plasma momentum is changed both within the hole and outside it, by an energization process we call jetting. We present a comprehensive analytic calculation of the momentum changes of an isolated general one-dimensional hole. The conservation of the total momentum gives the hole's kinematics, determining its velocity evolution. Our results explain many features of the behavior of hole speed observed in numerical simulations, including self-acceleration at formation, and hole pushing and trapping by ion streams.

  3. Plasma phase transition in hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V.; Levashov, P.; Fortov, V. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Ebeling, W. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet Berlin Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Schlanges, M. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Greifswald, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    The plasma phase transition in dense hydrogen and in electron-hole plasmas is investigated by direct path integral Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrogen results for the internal energy at T=10,000 K show a deep minimum and strong fluctuations around the density n=10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} indicating the existence of a phase transition. To verify this explanation, the analogous phenomenon is studied for an electron-hole plasma in Germanium. The calculated phase boundary of the electron-hole liquid is found to agree reasonably well with the available experimental data. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Theory of gas discharge plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the theory of gas discharge plasmas in a didactical way. It explains the processes in gas discharge plasmas. A gas discharge plasma is an ionized gas which is supported by an external electric field. Therefore its parameters are determined by processes in it. The properties of a gas discharge plasma depend on its gas component, types of external fields, their geometry and regimes of gas discharge. Fundamentals of a gas discharge plasma include elementary, radiative and transport processes which are included in its kinetics influence. They are represented in this book together with the analysis of simple gas discharges. These general principles are applied to stationary gas discharge plasmas of helium and argon. The analysis of such plasmas under certain conditions is theoretically determined by numerical plasma parameters for given regimes and conditions.

  5. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  6. Long hole waterjet drilling for gas drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Stockwell; M. Gledhill; S. Hildebrand; S. Adam; Tim Meyer [CMTE (Australia)

    2003-04-01

    In-seam drilling for gas drainage is now an essential part of operations at many Australian underground coalmines. The objective of this project is to develop and trial a new drilling method for the accurate and efficient installation of long inseam boreholes (>1000 metres). This involves the integration of pure water-jet drilling technology (i.e. not water-jet assisted rotary drilling) developed by CMTE with conventional directional drilling technology. The system was similar to conventional directional drilling methods, but instead of relying on a down-hole-motor (DHM) rotating a mechanical drill bit for cutting, high pressure water-jets were used. The testing of the system did not achieve the full objectives set down in the project plan. A borehole greater than 1000 metres was not achieved. The first trial site had coal that was weathered, oxidized and dry. These conditions significantly affected the ability of the drilling tool to stay 'in-seam'. Due to the poor conditions at the first trial, many experimental objectives were forwarded to the second field trial. In the second trial drilling difficulties were experienced, this was due to the interaction between the confinement of the borehole and the dimensions of the down hole drilling assembly. This ultimately reduced the productivity of the system and the distance that could be drilled within the specified trial periods. Testing in the first field trial did not show any indication that the system would have this difficulty.

  7. Plasma electron hole oscillatory velocity instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuteng; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we report a new type of instability of electron holes (EHs) interacting with passing ions. The nonlinear interaction of EHs and ions is investigated using a new theory of hole kinematics. It is shown that the oscillation in the velocity of the EH parallel to the magnetic field direction becomes unstable when the hole velocity in the ion frame is slower than a few times the cold ion sound speed. This instability leads to the emission of ion-acoustic waves from the solitary hole and decay in its magnitude. The instability mechanism can drive significant perturbations in the ion density. The instability threshold, oscillation frequency and instability growth rate derived from the theory yield quantitative agreement with the observations from a novel high-fidelity hole-tracking particle-in-cell code.

  8. The screen hole plasma sheath of an ion accelerator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, G.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Results of the first probing of the screen hole sheath of an ion accelerator system are presented. The screen hole sheath, represented as a set of equipotential contours, extends over a large distance within the discharge plasma. Under no conditions examined does the sheath enter the screen hole. Edge hole defocusing of multiaperture accelerator systems is due primarily to local plasma density variations rather than adjacent screen hole sheath interactions. The sheath boundary is independent of screen-to-accelerator grid spacing when the grid set is operated at the minimum ion beam divergence condition. Significant ion focusing effects occur in the sheath adjacent to the screen grid webbing leading to increased ion source beam current efficiency with decreasing screen-to-accelerator grid separation and/or screen grid thickness.

  9. Single-hole tunneling through a two-dimensional hole gas in intrinsic silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijtenburg, P.C.; Ridderbos, Joost; Ridderbos, Joost; Mueller, Filipp; Müller, F.; Leenstra, Anne W.; Brauns, M.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Zwanenburg, Floris Arnoud

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we report single-hole tunneling through a quantum dot in a two-dimensional hole gas, situated in a narrow-channel field-effect transistor in intrinsic silicon. Two layers of aluminum gate electrodes are defined on Si/SiO2 using electron-beam lithography. Fabrication and subsequent

  10. Structures of quantum 2D electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V S; Levashov, P R; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bldg 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fehske, H [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str 6, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2009-05-29

    We investigate structures of 2D quantum electron-hole (e-h) plasmas by the direct path integral Monte Carlo method (PIMC) in a wide range of temperature, density and hole-to-electron mass ratio. Our simulation includes a region of appearance and decay of the bound states (excitons and biexcitons), the Mott transition from the neutral e-h plasma to metallic-like clusters, formation from clusters of the hexatic-like liquid and formation of the crystal-like lattice.

  11. Structures of quantum 2D electron-hole plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Filinov, V. S.; Bonitz, M.; Fehske, H.; Levashov, P. R.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate structures of 2D quantum electron-hole (e-h) plasmas by the direct path integral Monte Carlo method (PIMC) in a wide range of temperature, density and hole-to-electron mass ratio. Our simulation includes a region of appearance and decay of the bound states (excitons and biexcitons), the Mott transition from the neutral e-h plasma to metallic-like clusters, formation from clusters the hexatic-like liquid and formation of the crystal-like lattice.

  12. Electron holes observed in the Moon Plasma Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Malaspina, D.; Zhou, C.

    2017-10-01

    Electrostatic instabilities are predicted in the magnetized wake of plasma flowing past a non-magnetic absorbing object such as a probe or the moon. Analysis of the data from the Artemis satellites, now orbiting the moon at distances ten moon radii and less, shows very clear evidence of fast-moving isolated solitary potential structures causing bipolar electric field excursions as they pass the satellite's probes. These structures have all the hallmarks of electron holes: BGK solitons typically a few Debye-lengths in size, self-sustaining by a deficit of phase-space density on trapped orbits. Electron holes are now observed to be widespread in space plasmas. They have been observed in PIC simulations of the moon wake to be the non-linear consequence of the predicted electron instabilities. Simulations document hole prevalence, speed, length, and depth; and theory can explain many of these features from kinetic analysis. The solar wind wake is certainly the cause of the overwhelming majority of the holes observed by Artemis, because we observe almost all holes to be in or very near to the wake. We compare theory and simulation of the hole generation, lifetime, and transport mechanisms with observations. Work partially supported by NASA Grant NNX16AG82G.

  13. Laser-induced gas plasma machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadj, Selim; Bass, Isaac Louis; Guss, Gabriel Mark; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2017-10-17

    Techniques for removing material from a substrate are provided. A laser beam is focused at a distance from the surface to be treated. A gas is provided at the focus point. The gas is dissociated using the laser energy to generate gas plasma. The substrate is then brought in contact with the gas plasma to enable material removal.

  14. H-theorem for a relativistic plasma around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, P.; Tessarotto, M.

    2006-05-01

    A statistical description of matter, formed by a relativistic plasma infalling into a black hole, is formulated, adopting a covariant kinetic approach in terms of classical point particles. By assuming that the charged particles are described by the collisionless Vlasov equation and the event horizon can be treated as a classical porous wall, the theory permits us to evaluate the entropy production rate of classical matter in the presence of an event horizon. As a result, an H-theorem is established for the classical (Shannon) kinetic entropy of the infalling matter, which holds for arbitrary models of black holes and is valid also in the presence of contracting (or expanding) event horizons.

  15. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Christopher T., E-mail: c.t.haynes@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Camporeale, Enrico [Multiscale Dynamics, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Expanding plasmas from anti de Sitter black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilo, Giancarlo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica Matematica, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    We introduce a new foliation of AdS{sub 5} black holes such that the conformal boundary takes the form of a 4-dimensional FLRW spacetime with scale factor a(t). The foliation employs Eddington-Finkelstein-like coordinates and is applicable to a large class of AdS black holes, supported by matter fields or not, considerably extending previous efforts in the literature. We argue that the holographic dual picture of a CFT plasma on a FLRW background provides an interesting prototype to study the nonequilibrium dynamics of expanding plasmas and use holographic renormalization to extract the renormalized energy-momentum tensor of the dual plasma. We illustrate the procedure for three black holes of interest, namely AdS-Schwarzschild, AdS-Gauss-Bonnet, and AdS-Reissner-Nordstroem. For the latter, as a by-product, we show that the nonequilibrium dynamics of a CFT plasma subject to a quench in the chemical potential (i.e., a time-dependent chemical potential) resembles a cosmological evolution with the scale factor a(t) being inversely related to the quench profile μ(t). (orig.)

  17. Electron vortex magnetic holes: a nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Christopher T; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional PIC simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is ...

  18. Single-hole tunneling through a two-dimensional hole gas in intrinsic silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Spruijtenburg, P. C.; Ridderbos, Joost; Mueller, Filipp; Müller, F.; Leenstra, Anne W.; Brauns, M.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Zwanenburg, Floris Arnoud

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we report single-hole tunneling through a quantum dot in a two-dimensional hole gas, situated in a narrow-channel field-effect transistor in intrinsic silicon. Two layers of aluminum gate electrodes are defined on Si/SiO2 using electron-beam lithography. Fabrication and subsequent electrical characterization of different devices yield reproducible results, such as typical MOSFET turn-on and pinch-off characteristics. Additionally, linear transport measurements at 4 K result in ...

  19. Precursor Events Involving Plasmas Structures Around Collapsing Black Holes Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, M.; Coppi, B.

    2017-10-01

    The plasma structures that can exist around black hole binaries can sustain intrinsic plasma collective modes that have characteristic low frequencies related to the particle rotation frequencies around the binary system. As the collapse approaches, with the loss of angular momentum by emission of gravitational waves from the binary system we have suggested that the frequency of the fluctuating component of the gravitational potential can go through that of the intrinsic modes of the surrounding plasma structure and lead to a sharp amplification of them. Then the precursor to the event reported in Ref., tentatively identified by the Agile X- γ-ray observatory may be associated with the high energy radiation emission due to the fields produced by excitation of the proposed plasma modes. M. Tavani is thanked for bringing Ref. to our attention while Ref. was being completed. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  20. Plasma phase transition in dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V S [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412, Russia (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Levashov, P [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412, Russia (Russian Federation); Fortov, V E [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412, Russia (Russian Federation); Ebeling, W [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Schlanges, M [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Greifswald, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Koch, S W [Fachbereich Physik, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2003-06-06

    Plasma phase transitions in dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas are investigated by direct path integral Monte Carlo methods. The phase boundary of the electron-hole liquid in germanium is calculated and is found to agree reasonably well with the known experimental results. Analogous behaviour is found for high-density hydrogen. For a temperature of T = 10 000 K it is shown that the internal energy is lowered due to droplet formation for densities between 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 24} cm{sup -3}.

  1. Plasma phase transition in dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Filinov, V S; Levashov, P R; Fortov, V E; Ebeling, W; Schlanges, M; Koch, S W

    2003-01-01

    Plasma phase transitions in dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas are investigated by direct path integral Monte Carlo methods. The phase boundary of the electron-hole liquid in germanium is calculated and is found to agree reasonably well with the known experimental results. Analogous behaviour is found for high-density hydrogen. For a temperature of T = 10 000 K it is shown that the internal energy is lowered due to droplet formation for densities between 10 sup 2 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 and 10 sup 2 sup 4 cm sup - sup 3.

  2. Hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated gold plasma in an elongated diagnostic hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Yang, Jiamin; Song, Tianming; Shenguang Laser Facility Collaboration, II

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic hole used in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion cannot be too large to cause severe radiation loss and affect the radiation uniformity in the hohlraum, or too small in case the plasma filling would block diagnostic holes and affect the diagnosis. An elongated hole is chosen as an extreme case to study the plasma movement in diagnostic hole in order to provide reference for the diagnostic hole design. The elongated diagnostic hole on the gold hohlraum wall was 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The peak radiation temperature of hohlraum was about 180 eV. The hydrodynamic processes in the elongated hole was observed by an X-ray framing camera, with a 2-5 keV backlighter. The plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the elongated hole was quantitatively measured and can be used to assess the effect of hydrodynamic processes on the diagnosis from the diagnostic hole.

  3. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  4. Neutral gas depletion in low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, A.

    2017-11-01

    Neutral depletion can significantly affect the steady state of low temperature plasmas. Processes that lead to neutral depletion and the resulting plasma–neutrals steady state are reviewed. Two such processes are due to collisions of neutrals with plasma. One process is the drag by ions that collide with neutrals and push them towards the wall. Another process is neutral-gas heating by collisions with plasma that makes the gas hotter at the discharge center. These processes, which usually occur under (static) pressure balance between plasma and neutrals, are called here ‘neutral pumping’. When collisions are negligible, neutrals that move ballistically between the chamber walls are depleted through ionization, a process called here ‘ion pumping’. The effect of the magnetic field on neutral depletion is explored in plasma in which the dynamics is governed by cross-field diffusion. Finally, neutral depletion in a flowing plasma is analyzed.

  5. Non-linear Plasma Wake Growth of Electron Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H; Zhou, C

    2015-01-01

    An object's wake in a plasma with small Debye length that drifts \\emph{across} the magnetic field is subject to electrostatic electron instabilities. Such situations include, for example, the moon in the solar wind wake and probes in magnetized laboratory plasmas. The instability drive mechanism can equivalently be considered drift down the potential-energy gradient or drift up the density-gradient. The gradients arise because the plasma wake has a region of depressed density and electrostatic potential into which ions are attracted along the field. The non-linear consequences of the instability are analysed in this paper. At physical ratios of electron to ion mass, neither linear nor quasilinear treatment can explain the observation of large-amplitude perturbations that disrupt the ion streams well before they become ion-ion unstable. We show here, however, that electron holes, once formed, continue to grow, driven by the drift mechanism, and if they remain in the wake may reach a maximum non-linearly stable...

  6. The dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Eliasson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of recent analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma. The new results are based on the class of analytic solutions which were found by Schamel more than three decades ago, and which here work as initial conditions to numerical simulations of the dynamics of ion and electron holes and their interaction with radiation and the background plasma. Our analytic and numerical studies reveal that ion holes in an electron-ion plasma can trap Langmuir waves, due the local electron density depletion associated with the negative ion hole potential. Since the scale-length of the ion holes are on a relatively small Debye scale, the trapped Langmuir waves are Landau damped. We also find that colliding ion holes accelerate electron streams by the negative ion hole potentials, and that these streams of electrons excite Langmuir waves due to a streaming instability. In our Vlasov simulation of two colliding ion holes, the holes survive the collision and after the collision, the electron distribution becomes flat-topped between the two ion holes due to the ion hole potentials which work as potential barriers for low-energy electrons. Our study of the dynamics between electron holes and the ion background reveals that standing electron holes can be accelerated by the self-created ion cavity owing to the positive electron hole potential. Vlasov simulations show that electron holes are repelled by ion density minima and attracted by ion density maxima. We also present an extension of Schamel's theory to relativistically hot plasmas, where the relativistic mass increase of the accelerated electrons have a dramatic effect on the electron hole, with an increase in the electron hole potential and in the width of the electron hole. A study of the interaction between electromagnetic waves with relativistic electron holes shows that electromagnetic waves can be both linearly and nonlinearly

  7. Plasma electron hole kinematics. II. Hole tracking Particle-In-Cell simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Hutchinson, I. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and the effects of “jetting.”.

  8. Exhaustion of the gas next to the supermassive black hole of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Anne-Laure; Combes, Françoise

    2017-11-01

    New observations performed at the IRAM Plateau de Bure reveal the absence of molecular gas next to the black hole of the Andromeda galaxy. We derived a 3σ upper limit on the molecular gas mass of 4300 M⊙ for a line width of 1000 km s-1. This is compatible with infra-red observations, which reveal a hole in the dust emission next to the black hole. Some gas from stellar feedback is expected from the old eccentric stellar disc population, but it is not accreted close to the black hole. This absence of gas explains the absence of stellar formation observed in this region, contrary to what is observed next to Sgr A* in the Milky Way. Either the gas has been swallowed by the black hole, or a feedback mechanism has pushed the gas outside the central 1 pc. Nevertheless, we detect a small clump of gas with a very low velocity dispersion at 2.4″ from the black hole. It is probable that this clumpy gas is seen in projection, as it does not follow the rotation of the disc surrounding the black hole, its velocity dispersion is ten times lower than the expected velocity gradient, and the tidal shear from the black hole requires a gas density for this clump that is not compatible with our observations.

  9. Ordered structure formation in 2D mass asymmetric electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V.S. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vladimir_filinov@mail.ru; Fehske, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bonitz, M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fortov, V.E.; Levashov, P. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-28

    We study strong Coulomb correlations in dense two-dimensional electron-hole plasmas by means of direct path integral Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, the formation and dissociation of bound states, such as excitons, bi-excitons and many particle clusters, is analyzed and the density-temperature regions of their occurrence are identified. At high density, the Mott transition to the fully ionized state (electron-hole hexatic liquid) is detected. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the hole to electron mass ratio M on the properties of the plasma. For high enough values of M we observed the formation of Coulomb hole crystal-like structures.

  10. Sterilization Mechanism of Nitrogen Gas Plasma Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Hideharu Shintani

    2015-01-01

    As already published by Shintani et al, gas plasma sterilization is the alternative sterilization procedures to the existing sterilization procedures due to applicable to the several sensitive healthcare products and attainable both sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10-6 and material/functional compatibility, which authorities and GMP (good manufacturing practice) are required. In addition there was progress in the field of plasma-based sterilization, there are still some questions. The aim ...

  11. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-29

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole-a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Influence of a plasma on the shadow of a spherically symmetric black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Perlick, Volker; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S

    2015-01-01

    We analytically calculate the influence of a plasma on the shadow of a black hole (or of another compact object). We restrict to spherically symmetric and static situations, where the shadow is circular. The plasma is assumed to be non-magnetized and pressure-less. We derive the general formulas for a spherically symmetric plasma density on an unspecified spherically symmetric and static spacetime. The formalism applies not only to black holes but also, e.g., to wormholes. As examples for the underlying spacetime model, we consider the Schwarzschild spacetime and the Ellis wormhole. In particular, we treat the case that the plasma is in radial free fall from infinity onto a Schwarzschild black hole. The perspectives of actually observing the influence of a plasma on the shadows of supermassive black holes are discussed.

  13. Transient evolution of solitary electron holes in low pressure laboratory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, Subroto

    2015-01-01

    Solitary electrons holes (SEHs) are localized electrostatic positive potential structures in collisionless plasmas. These are vortex-like structures in the electron phase space. Its existence is cause of distortion of the electron distribution in the resonant region. These are explained theoretically first time by Schamel et.al [Phys. Scr. 20, 336 (1979) and Phys. Plasmas 19, 020501 (2012)]. Propagating solitary electron holes can also be formed in a laboratory plasma when a fast rising high positive voltage pulse is applied to a metallic electrode [Kar et. al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102113 (2010)] immersed in a low pressure plasma. The temporal evolution of these structures can be studied by measuring the transient electron distribution function (EDF). In the present work, transient EDF is measured after formation of a solitary electron hole in nearly uniform, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma for applied pulse width and, where and are applied pulse width and inverse of ion plasma frequency respectively. Fo...

  14. Direct formation of supermassive black holes via multi-scale gas inflows in galaxy mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Escala, A; Callegari, S

    2010-08-26

    Observations of distant quasars indicate that supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses already existed less than a billion years after the Big Bang. Models in which the 'seeds' of such black holes form by the collapse of primordial metal-free stars cannot explain the rapid appearance of these supermassive black holes because gas accretion is not sufficiently efficient. Alternatively, these black holes may form by direct collapse of gas within isolated protogalaxies, but current models require idealized conditions, such as metal-free gas, to prevent cooling and star formation from consuming the gas reservoir. Here we report simulations showing that mergers between massive protogalaxies naturally produce the conditions for direct collapse into a supermassive black hole with no need to suppress cooling and star formation. Merger-driven gas inflows give rise to an unstable, massive nuclear gas disk of a few billion solar masses, which funnels more than 10(8) solar masses of gas to a sub-parsec-scale gas cloud in only 100,000 years. The cloud undergoes gravitational collapse, which eventually leads to the formation of a massive black hole. The black hole can subsequently grow to a billion solar masses on timescales of about 10(8) years by accreting gas from the surrounding disk.

  15. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  16. Exciton formation and dissociation in mass-asymmetric electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehske, H [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Filinov, V [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Lehrstuhl Statistische Physik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fortov, V [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Levashov, P [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)

    2005-01-01

    First-principle path integral Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to analyze correlation effects in complex electron-hole plasmas, particularly with regard to the appearance of excitonic bound states. Results are discussed in relation to exciton formation in unconventional semiconductors with large electron hole mass asymmetry.

  17. The dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; We present a review of recent analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma. The new results are based on the class of analytic solutions which were found by Schamel more than three decades ago, and which here work as initial conditions to numerical simulations of the dynamics of ion and electron holes and their interaction with radiation and the background plasma. Our analytic and numerical studies reveal that ion...

  18. Influence of a plasma on the shadow of a spherically symmetric black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlick, Volker; Tsupko, Oleg Yu.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S.

    2015-11-01

    We analytically calculate the influence of a plasma on the shadow of a black hole (or of another compact object). We restrict to spherically symmetric and static situations, where the shadow is circular. The plasma is assumed to be nonmagnetized and pressureless. We derive the general formulas for a spherically symmetric plasma density on an unspecified spherically symmetric and static spacetime. Our main result is an analytical formula for the angular size of the shadow. As a plasma is a dispersive medium, the radius of the shadow depends on the photon frequency. The effect of the plasma is significant only in the radio regime. The formalism applies not only to black holes but also, e.g., to wormholes. As examples for the underlying spacetime model, we consider the Schwarzschild spacetime and the Ellis wormhole. In particular, we treat the case that the plasma is in radial free fall from infinity onto a Schwarzschild black hole. We find that for an observer far away from a Schwarzschild black hole, the plasma has a decreasing effect on the size of the shadow. The perspectives of actually observing the influence of a plasma on the shadows of supermassive black holes are discussed.

  19. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-01

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole—a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole.

  20. Long hole waterjet assisted drilling for gas drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Dunn; M. Stockwell; T. Meyer [CMTE Development Ltd. (Australia)

    2000-02-01

    In an effort to improve longwall productivity and address current safety issues associated with methane drainage the CMTE has been investigating the applicability of high pressure (HP) water (20 - 40 MPa) for assisting conventional rotary drilling at both Appin (BHPC) and Dartbrook (Shell) mines. The C6028 ACARP project has allowed the development of the cross panel waterjet rotary drilling technology to be finalised following C5028 project. The project objective was to produce a long hole drilling system that has the accuracy of down hole motor drilling and the productivity of rotary drilling, while minimising the loss of expensive equipment down hole. The ultimate aim of the project was to drill holes of up to 1 km and beyond. During the C6028 project it was not possible to fully demonstrate horizontal azimuth control of the borehole trajectory, using high pressure waterjets to erode the coal preferentially. Problems with drill rod failures and those associated with conducting trials underground, where test time is limited due to production requirements, meant that insufficient testing over long hole lengths (> 300 metres) was conducted. Although a long demonstration hole was not achieved during the project, the authors believe that the technology has now been developed to a stage that a long hole drilling system is possible. Further testing will be required before rotary waterjet drilling can be extended to long holes. Waterjet drilling field trials into a highwall on surface would allow the required testing and development of the horizontal azimuth control before demonstrating the technology underground.

  1. The effect of nuclear gas distribution on the mass determination of supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Restrepo, J. E.; Lira, P.; Netzer, H.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Capellupo, D. M.

    2018-01-01

    Supermassive black holes reside in the nuclei of most galaxies. During their active episodes, black holes are powered by accretion discs where gravitational energy is converted into radiation1. Accurately determining black hole masses is key to understand how the population evolves over time and how the black holes relate to their host galaxies2-4. Beyond the local universe, z ≳ 0.2, the mass is commonly estimated assuming a virialized motion of gas in the close vicinity of the active black holes, traced through broad emission lines5,6. However, this procedure has uncertainties associated with the unknown distribution of the gas clouds. Here, we show that the black hole masses derived from the properties of the accretion disk and virial mass estimates differ by a factor that is inversely proportional to the width of the broad emission lines. This leads to virial mass misestimations up to a factor of six. Our results suggest that a planar gas distribution that is inclined with respect to the line of sight may account for this effect. However, radiation pressure effects on the distribution of gas can also reproduce our results. Regardless of the physical origin, our findings contribute to mitigating the uncertainties in current black hole mass estimations and, in turn, will help us to better understand the evolution of distant supermassive black holes and their host galaxies.

  2. GAS-FOVEAL CONTACT: A New Approach to Evaluating Positioning Regimens in Macular Hole Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Mark; la Cour, Morten

    2017-04-28

    To compare gas-foveal contact in face-down positioning (FDP) and nonsupine positioning (NSP), to analyze causes of gas-foveal separation and to determine how gas-foveal contact affects clinical outcome after idiopathic macular hole repair. Single center, randomized controlled study. Participants with an idiopathic macular hole were allocated to either FDP or NSP. Primary outcome was gas-foveal contact, calculated by analyzing positioning in relation to intraocular gas fill. Positioning was measured with an electronic device recording positioning for 72 hours postoperatively. Positioning data were available for 33/35 in the FDP group and 35/37 in the NSP group, thus results are based on 68 analyzed participants. Median gas-foveal contact was 99.82% (range 73.6-100.0) in the FDP group and 99.57% (range 85.3-100.0) in the NSP group (P = 0.22). In a statistical model, gas fill had a significant relation to gas-foveal contact (P contact seemed to influence idiopathic macular hole closure (P = 0.02). We found no significant difference in gas-foveal contact between the positioning groups. The role of positioning after idiopathic macular hole surgery seems to be better characterized from examining both patient positioning and gas fill objectively. We propose gas-foveal contact as a new outcome for evaluating positioning regimens.

  3. One-Dimensional Hole Gas in Germanium/Silicon Nanowire Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Wei; Xiang, Jie; Timko, Brian P.; Wu, Yue; Lieber, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron and hole gas systems, enabled through band structure design and epitaxial growth on planar substrates, have served as key platforms for fundamental condensed matter research and high-performance devices. The analogous development of one-dimensional (1D) electron or hole gas systems through controlled growth on 1D nanostructure substrates, which could open up opportunities beyond existing carbon nanotube and nanowire systems, has not been realized. Here, we report the ...

  4. Battling Bacterial Biofilms with Gas Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelaya, Anna; Vandervoort, Kurt; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    Most studies dealing with growth and physiology of bacteria have been carried out using free-living cells. However, most bacteria live in communities referred to as biofilms where cooperative interactions among their members make conventional methods of controlling microbial growth often ineffective. The use of gas discharge plasmas represents an alternative to traditional decontamination/sterilization methods. We studied biofilms using two organisms, Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. With the first organism we demonstrated almost complete loss of cell culturability after a 5-min plasma treatment. However, additional determinations showed that non-culturable cells were still alive after short exposure times. We have recently reported the effect of plasma on P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate coupons. In this paper, we present results for plasma treatments of 1-, 3-, and 7-day old P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on polycarbonate or stainless-steel coupons. Results indicate nearly 100% of ­biofilm inactivation after 5 min of exposure with similar inactivation kinetics for 1-, 3-, and 7-day-old biofilms, and for both materials used. The inactivation kinetics is similar for both organisms, suggesting that the method is useful regardless of the type of biofilm. AFM images show changes in biofilm structure for various plasma exposure times.

  5. Study of spatio-temporal dynamics of laser-hole boring in near critical plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong, Chao; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2015-11-01

    At high-intensities of light, radiation pressure becomes one of the dominant mechanisms in laser-plasma interaction. The radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can steepen and push the critical density region of an overdense plasma creating a cavity or a hole. This hole boring phenomenon is of importance in fast-ignition fusion, high-gradient laser-plasma ion acceleration, and formation of collisionless shocks. Here multi-frame picosecond optical interferometry is used for the first direct measurements of space and time dynamics of the density cavity as it is pushed forward by a train of CO2 laser pulses in a helium plasma. The measured values of the hole boring velocity into an overdense plasma as a function of laser intensity are consistent with a theory based on energy and momentum balance between the heated plasma and the laser and with two-dimensional numerical simulations. We show possibility to extract a relative plasma electron temperature within the laser pulse by applying an analytical theory to the measured hole boring velocities. This work was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0010064.

  6. A black-hole mass measurement from molecular gas kinematics in NGC4526.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2013-02-21

    The masses of the supermassive black holes found in galaxy bulges are correlated with a multitude of galaxy properties, leading to suggestions that galaxies and black holes may evolve together. The number of reliably measured black-hole masses is small, and the number of methods for measuring them is limited, holding back attempts to understand this co-evolution. Directly measuring black-hole masses is currently possible with stellar kinematics (in early-type galaxies), ionized-gas kinematics (in some spiral and early-type galaxies) and in rare objects that have central maser emission. Here we report that by modelling the effect of a black hole on the kinematics of molecular gas it is possible to fit interferometric observations of CO emission and thereby accurately estimate black-hole masses. We study the dynamics of the gas in the early-type galaxy NGC 4526, and obtain a best fit that requires the presence of a central dark object of 4.5(+4.2)(-3.1) × 10(8) solar masses (3σ confidence limit). With the next-generation millimetre-wavelength interferometers these observations could be reproduced in galaxies out to 75 megaparsecs in less than 5 hours of observing time. The use of molecular gas as a kinematic tracer should thus allow one to estimate black-hole masses in hundreds of galaxies in the local Universe, many more than are accessible with current techniques.

  7. A saw-tooth plasma actuator for film cooling efficiency enhancement of a shaped hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhan; Yu, Jianyang; Liu, Huaping; Chen, Fu; Song, Yanping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the large eddy simulations of the effects of a saw-tooth plasma actuator and the laidback fan-shaped hole on the film cooling flow characteristics, and the numerical results are compared with a corresponding standard configuration (cylindrical hole without the saw-tooth plasma actuator). For this numerical research, the saw-tooth plasma actuator is installed just downstream of the cooling hole and a phenomenological plasma model is employed to provide the 3D plasma force vectors. The results show that thanks to the downward force and the momentum injection effect of the saw-tooth plasma actuator, the cold jet comes closer to the wall surface and extends further downstream. The saw-tooth plasma actuator also induces a new pair of vortex which weakens the strength of the counter-rotating vortex pair (CRVP) and entrains the coolant towards the wall, and thus the diffusion of the cold jet in the crossflow is suppressed. Furthermore, the laidback fan-shaped hole reduces the vertical jet velocity causing the disappearance of downstream spiral separation node vortices, this compensates for the deficiency of the saw-tooth plasma actuator. Both effects of the laidback fan-shaped hole and the saw-tooth plasma actuator effectively control the development of the CRVP whose size and strength are smaller than those of the anti-counter rotating vortex pair in the far field, thus the centerline and the spanwise-averaged film cooling efficiency are enhanced. The average film cooling efficiency is the biggest in the Fan-Dc = 1 case, which is 80% bigger than that in the Fan-Dc = 0 case and 288% bigger than that in the Cyl-Dc = 0 case.

  8. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Haynes; D. Burgess; E. Camporeale (Enrico); T. Sundberg

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron

  9. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of Electron Vortex Magnetic Hole in the Turbulent Magnetosheath Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G.; Wang, D. D.; Yu, X. D. [School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Sahraoui, F.; Contel, O. Le [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-UPMC, Palaiseau (France); He, J. S. [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhao, J. S. [Key Laboratory of Planetary Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); Deng, X. H.; Pang, Y.; Li, H. M. [Institute of Space Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang (China); Zhou, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Fu, H. S.; Yang, J. [School of Space and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing (China); Shi, Q. Q. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai (China); Lavraud, B. [Institut de Recherche and Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse (UPS), Toulouse (France); Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Torbert, R. B. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Russell, C. T., E-mail: shiyonghuang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    We report on the observations of an electron vortex magnetic hole corresponding to a new type of coherent structure in the turbulent magnetosheath plasma using the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission data. The magnetic hole is characterized by a magnetic depression, a density peak, a total electron temperature increase (with a parallel temperature decrease but a perpendicular temperature increase), and strong currents carried by the electrons. The current has a dip in the core region and a peak in the outer region of the magnetic hole. The estimated size of the magnetic hole is about 0.23 ρ {sub i} (∼30 ρ {sub e}) in the quasi-circular cross-section perpendicular to its axis, where ρ {sub i} and ρ {sub e} are respectively the proton and electron gyroradius. There are no clear enhancements seen in high-energy electron fluxes. However, there is an enhancement in the perpendicular electron fluxes at 90° pitch angle inside the magnetic hole, implying that the electrons are trapped within it. The variations of the electron velocity components V {sub em} and V {sub en} suggest that an electron vortex is formed by trapping electrons inside the magnetic hole in the cross-section in the M – N plane. These observations demonstrate the existence of a new type of coherent structures behaving as an electron vortex magnetic hole in turbulent space plasmas as predicted by recent kinetic simulations.

  10. Hole injection enhancement in organic light emitting devices using plasma treated graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesuraj, P. Justin; Parameshwari, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Kanthasamy, K.; Koch, J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, ATMOS, Appelstr. 2, D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Pfnür, H. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, ATMOS, Appelstr. 2, D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Laboratorium für Nano- und Quantene$ngineering, Schneiderberg 30, D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Jeganathan, K., E-mail: kjeganathan@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Plasma treated Graphene oxide for hole injection enhancement in OLEDs. - Highlights: • Oxygen (O{sub 2}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) plasma exposed graphene oxide (GO) sheets have been demonstrated as hole buffer layers in OLEDs. • O{sub 2} plasma exposure induces assimilation of oxygen contents in GO lattice resulting in improved work function that reduced the hole injection barrier further. Whereas, H{sub 2} plasma contrastingly reduced the GO by excluding oxygen which ensuing lower work function. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy investigations reveal the capricious amount of oxygen in GO lattice and its corresponding work function variations. • GO and O{sub 2} plasma treated GO significantly improves the current efficiency of OLEDs more than one order with notable reduction in turn on voltage. - Abstract: The hole injection layer (HIL) with high work function (WF) is desirable to reduce the injection barrier between anode and hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLED). Here, we report a novel approach to tune the WF of graphene oxide (GO) using oxygen and hydrogen plasma treatment and its hole injection properties in OLEDs. The mild exposure of oxygen plasma on GO (O{sub 2}-GO) significantly reduces the injection barrier by increasing the WF of anode (4.98 eV) through expansion of C−O bonds. In contrast, the hole injection barrier was drastically increased for hydrogen plasma treated GO (H{sub 2}-GO) layers as the WF is lowered by the contraction of C−O bond. By employing active O{sub 2}-GO as HIL in OLEDs found to exhibit superior current efficiency of 4.2 cd/A as compared to 3.3 cd/A for pristine GO. Further, the high injection efficiency of O{sub 2}-GO infused hole only device can be attributed to the improved energy level matching. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to correlate the WF of HIL infused anode towards the enhanced performance of

  11. Nonthermal plasmas around black holes, relevant collective modes, new configurations, and magnetic field amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppi, B., E-mail: coppi@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The radiation emission from Shining Black Holes is most frequently observed to have nonthermal features. It is therefore appropriate to consider relevant collective processes in plasmas surrounding black holes that contain high energy particles with nonthermal distributions in momentum space. A fluid description with significant temperature anisotropies is the simplest relevant approach. These anisotropies are shown to have a critical influence on: (a) the existence and characteristics of stationary plasma and field ring configurations, (b) the excitation of “thermo-gravitational modes” driven by temperature anisotropies and gradients that involve gravity and rotation, (c) the generation of magnetic fields over macroscopic scale distances, and (d) the transport of angular momentum.

  12. The Seepage Simulation of Single Hole and Composite Gas Drainage Based on LB Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhao; Zhong, Qiu; Gong, Zhenzhao

    2018-01-01

    Gas drainage is the most effective method to prevent and solve coal mine gas power disasters. It is very important to study the seepage flow law of gas in fissure coal gas. The LB method is a simplified computational model based on micro-scale, especially for the study of seepage problem. Based on fracture seepage mathematical model on the basis of single coal gas drainage, using the LB method during coal gas drainage of gas flow numerical simulation, this paper maps the single-hole drainage gas, symmetric slot and asymmetric slot, the different width of the slot combined drainage area gas flow under working condition of gas cloud of gas pressure, flow path diagram and flow velocity vector diagram, and analyses the influence on gas seepage field under various working conditions, and also discusses effective drainage method of the center hole slot on both sides, and preliminary exploration that is related to the combination of gas drainage has been carried on as well.

  13. Direct and controllable nitric oxide delivery into biological media and living cells by a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrynin, D; Friedman, G [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Arjunan, K; Clyne, A Morss [School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fridman, A, E-mail: alisam@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-02-23

    Nitric oxide has great potential for improving wound healing through both inflammatory and vascularization processes. Nitric oxide can be produced in high concentrations by atmospheric pressure thermal plasmas. We measured the physical characteristics and nitric oxide production of a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma, as well as plasma-produced nitric oxide delivery into liquid and endothelial cells. The plasma temperature was calculated as 9030 {+-} 320 K by the Boltzmann method, which was adequate to produce nitric oxide, although the average gas temperature was near room temperature. The plasma produced significant UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide, but these were prevented from reaching the cells by adding a straight or curved tube extension to the plasma device. Plasma-produced nitric oxide in gas reached 2000 ppm and rapidly diffused into liquid and cells. Cells remained viable following plasma treatment and showed a linear increase in cGMP concentration with plasma treatment, indicating an intracellular functional response to PHD plasma NO. These data suggest that this plasma may provide a novel method for delivering NO locally and directly for enhanced wound healing.

  14. Accelerating Plasma Mirrors to Investigate the Black Hole Information Loss Paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pisin; Mourou, Gerard

    2017-01-27

    The question of whether Hawking evaporation violates unitarity, and therefore results in the loss of information, has remained unresolved since Hawking's seminal discovery. To date, the investigations have remained mostly theoretical since it is almost impossible to settle this paradox through direct astrophysical black hole observations. Here, we point out that relativistic plasma mirrors can be accelerated drastically and stopped abruptly by impinging intense x-ray pulses on solid plasma targets with a density gradient. This is analogous to the late time evolution of black hole Hawking evaporation. A conception of such an experiment is proposed and a self-consistent set of physical parameters is presented. Critical issues, such as how the black hole unitarity may be preserved, can be addressed through the entanglement between the analog Hawking radiation photons and their partner modes.

  15. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Ding, Yongkun, E-mail: ding-yk@vip.sina.com [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin, E-mail: yjm70018@sina.cn; Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  16. Two-tone nonlinear electrostatic waves in the quantum electron–hole plasma of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinov, A. E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Kitayev, I. N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center–All-Russia Scientific and Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC–VNIIEF) (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Longitudinal electrostatic waves in the quantum electron–hole plasma of semiconductors are considered taking into account the degeneracy of electrons and holes and the exchange interaction. It is found in the framework of linear theory that the dispersion curve of longitudinal waves has two branches: plasmon and acoustic. An expression for the critical cutoff frequency for plasma oscillations and an expression for the speed of sound for acoustic vibrations are derived. It is shown that the plasma wave always exists in the form of a superposition of two components, characterized by different periods and wavelengths. Two nonlinear solutions are obtained within nonlinear theory: one in the form of a simple superposition of two tones and the other in the form of beats.

  17. Dynamical Friction of Black Hole Pairs at Gas-Rich Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun; Kim, W.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    When galaxies merge, their host black holes are believed to coalesce quickly, through gas-dynamical friction, to the point at which gravitational radiation becomes important. A black hole in a binary system certainly experiences dynamical friction due to its own wake as well as due to the wake induced by its companion, but to date little is known about the role of the companion in the coevolution of black hole binaries. We use a semi-analytic approach to study the composite wake due to, and the resulting drag forces on, a point-mass black hole binary orbiting at the opposite sides of the system center in a uniform gaseous medium. Due to the circular orbit, the wake of each black hole becomes asymmetric with a trailing spiral shape, which not only drags the black hole backward but also exerts a positive torque on the companion. The ratio of the positive torque from the companion to the negative torque due to its own wake is 0.4-0.5 and becomes larger for subsonic cases. This suggests that the orbital decay of black holes in a binary system can take considerably longer than in isolation, especially in the subsonic regime. This work was supported by KICOS through the grant K20702020016-07E0200-01610 provided by MOST, and partly for H. Kim by the BK21 project of the Korean Government.

  18. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  19. Expert methods in control systems of deep oil and gas holes building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sementsov, G.; Fadeeva, I.; Chigur, I. [State Technical Univ. of Oil and Gas, Ivano-Frankivsk (Ukraine)

    2000-07-01

    Attempts to provide self-control of process of long holing on oil and gas have not given due effect owing to complication of object, it fuzzy and equivocation of the information. In this connection it is offered to use for management of drilling expert systems, which one use fuzzy models and methods of the theory of fuzzy control systems. (orig.)

  20. Gas plasma sterilization of microorganisms and mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHINTANI, HIDEHARU; SAKUDO, AKIKAZU; BURKE, PETER; McDONNELL, GERALD

    2010-01-01

    The use of true gas plasmas for the inactivation of microorganisms is an area of dynamic research. Many types of gases are used as a source of plasma, and different plasma production methods have been applied. The antimicrobial mechanisms of oxygen-based gas plasmas may be due to an etching effect on microbial structures, particularly bacterial endospores resulting in shrinkage. By contrast, the definite mechanisms of actions of other gas plasma sources, such as N2, He, Ne, Ar and Xe gases, have not been clearly defined and indeed may be distinct. The speculated mechanisms of these gas plasmas involve the direct attack of metastable (excited molecular), UV and/or VUV to microbial structures, specifically the inner membrane and DNA in the core of bacterial endospores. According to this speculation, sterilized spore figures would remain unchanged. However, these mechanisms remain to be clarified. Future perspectives on the use of gas plasma for sterilization are of interest, as it is possible that appropriate sterility assurance levels can be obtained in parallel with material and functional compatibility. Traditional sterilization methods are often limited in these requirements. Therefore, gas plasma sterilization may prove to be an appropriate alternative sterilization procedure. PMID:22993596

  1. Near-infrared flares from accreting gas around the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzel, R; Schödel, R; Ott, T; Eckart, A; Alexander, T; Lacombe, F; Rouan, D; Aschenbach, B

    2003-10-30

    Recent measurements of stellar orbits provide compelling evidence that the compact radio source Sagittarius A* (refs 4, 5) at the Galactic Centre is a 3.6-million-solar-mass black hole. Sgr A* is remarkably faint in all wavebands other than the radio region, however, which challenges current theories of matter accretion and radiation surrounding black holes. The black hole's rotation rate is not known, and therefore neither is the structure of space-time around it. Here we report high-resolution infrared observations of Sgr A* that reveal 'quiescent' emission and several flares. The infrared emission originates from within a few milliarcseconds of the black hole, and traces very energetic electrons or moderately hot gas within the innermost accretion region. Two flares exhibit a 17-minute quasi-periodic variability. If the periodicity arises from relativistic modulation of orbiting gas, the emission must come from just outside the event horizon, and the black hole must be rotating at about half of the maximum possible rate.

  2. ALMA Reveals a Galaxy-Scale Fountain of Cold Molecular Gas Pumped by a Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant

    2016-01-01

    A new ALMA observation of the cool core brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 2597 reveals that a supermassive black hole can act much like a mechanical pump in a water fountain, driving a convective flow of molecular gas that drains into the black hole accretion reservoir, only to be pushed outward again in a jet-driven outflow that then rains back toward the galaxy center from which it came. The ALMA data reveal "shadows" cast by giant molecular clouds falling on ballistic trajectories towards the black hole in the innermost 500 parsecs of the galaxy, manifesting as deep redshifted continuum absorption features. The black hole accretion reservoir, fueled by these infalling cold clouds, powers an AGN that drives a jet-driven molecular outflow in the form of a 10 kpc-scale, billion solar mass expanding molecular bubble or plume. The molecular shell is permeated with young stars, perhaps triggered in situ by the jet. Buoyant X-ray cavities excavated by the propagating radio source may further uplift the molecular filaments, which are observed to fall inward toward the center of the galaxy from which they came, presumably keeping the fountain long-lived. The results show that cold molecular gas can couple to black hole growth via both feedback and feeding, in alignment with "cold chaotic accretion" models for the regulation of star formation in galaxies.

  3. Rapid Formation of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Galaxy Mergers with Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, L.; /Zurich U. /Zurich, ETH; Kazantzidis, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Madau, P.; /UC, Santa Cruz /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Colpi, M.; /Milan Bicocca U.; Quinn, T.; /Washington U., Seattle; Wadsley, J.; /McMaster U.

    2008-03-24

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are a ubiquitous component of the nuclei of galaxies. It is normally assumed that, following the merger of two massive galaxies, a SMBH binary will form, shrink due to stellar or gas dynamical processes and ultimately coalesce by emitting a burst of gravitational waves. However, so far it has not been possible to show how two SMBHs bind during a galaxy merger with gas due to the difficulty of modeling a wide range of spatial scales. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations that track the formation of a SMBH binary down to scales of a few light years following the collision between two spiral galaxies. A massive, turbulent nuclear gaseous disk arises as a result of the galaxy merger. The black holes form an eccentric binary in the disk in less than a million years as a result of the gravitational drag from the gas rather than from the stars.

  4. Analytical model of fast ion behavior in current hole tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.; Goloborod' ko, V.; Neururer, P. [Innsbruck Univ., Institute for Theoretical Physics, Association EURATOM-OEAW (Austria); Goloborod' ko, V. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2004-07-01

    Though a current hole (CH) regime is recognized to provide better detention of the bulk plasma, it may negatively act on the confinement of fast ions such as fusion products and neutral beam injected ions. Since, however, the transport properties of these energetic particles determine the heating profiles and the power loading upon the first wall, and therefore are of crucial importance in a fusion reactor, we examine here analytically the CH effects on the fast ion behavior in a tokamak. For that we employ a simplified model based on an analytical approximation of the poloidal flux function allowing for a complete characterization of possible orbit topologies. In the constants-of-motion space we determine the confinement domains for the different types of ion orbits, calculate the CH induced alterations of the fast ion transport and derive the distribution of neutral beam injected ions for a specific JET current hole plasma scenario.

  5. The pressure and entropy of a unitary Fermi gas with particle-hole fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Ruan, Xiao-Xia; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the pressure and entropy of a unitary Fermi gas based on universal relations combined with our previous prediction of energy which was calculated within the framework of the non-self-consistent T-matrix approximation with particle-hole fluctuation. The resulting entropy and pressure are compared with the experimental data and the theoretical results without induced interaction. For entropy, we find good agreement between our results with particle-hole fluctuation and the experimental measurements reported by ENS group and MIT experiment. For pressure, our results suffer from a systematic upshift compared to MIT data.

  6. Effect of Plasma Gas Flow Direction on Hydrophilicity of Polymer by Small Zone Cold Plasma Treatment and Hydrophobic Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Hsiang Hsu; Ko-Shao Chen; Hong-Ru Lin; Shu-Ju Chang; Tzu-Piao Tang

    2009-01-01

    Plasma treatment is the most popular surface modification process of polymers. A small cold plasma zone treatment is an important modification technique in modern industry. In this study, the effect of gas flow direction on plasma treatment was investigated. In order to decrease the plasma zone area, we added a separate cylinder to surround the upper electrode. The separate cylinder is effective in limiting the plasma discharge area, and we could find a light and dark area in the vacuum chamb...

  7. Degradation and inactivation of Shiga toxins by nitrogen gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) leads to food poisoning by causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Some STEC produce Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and/or Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), a relatively stable protein toxin, necessitating the development of an efficient inactivation method. Here we applied a nitrogen gas plasma apparatus to the inactivation of Stx. Samples of Stx1 and Stx2 were treated with a nitrogen gas plasma generated by a plasma device using a short high-voltage pulse applied by a static induction thyristor power supply at 1.5 kpps (kilo pulse per second). The recovered Stx samples were then analyzed for immunological and biological activities. Immunochromatography demonstrated that Stx1 and Stx2 were degraded by the gas plasma. Quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that both toxins were efficiently degraded to less than 1/10th of their original concentration within 5 min of treatment. Western blotting further showed the gas plasma treatment degraded the A subunit, which mediates the toxicity of Stx. Moreover, an assay using HEp-2 cells as an index of cytotoxicity showed that gas plasma treatment reduced the toxic activity of Stx. Therefore, nitrogen gas plasma might be an efficient method for the inactivation of Stx.

  8. Plasma arc welding torch having means for vortexing plasma gas exiting the welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is described wherein a plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of the welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. The plasma gas is provided with a vortexing motion prior to exiting the body by a vortex motion imparting member which is mounted in an orifice housing member and carried in the forward portion of the torch body. The orifice housing member is provided with an orifice of an predetermined diameter through which the electric arc and the plasma gas exits.

  9. Blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.

    2009-01-01

    The first experimental evidence showing the connection between blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation was obtained in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak. Holes as well as blobs are observed to be born in the edge shear layer, where zonal-flows shear off meso-scale coherent structures, lead...

  10. Collapse of primordial gas clouds and the formation of quasar black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Abraham; Rasio, Frederic A.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of quasar black holes during the hydrodynamic collapse of protogalactic gas clouds is discussed. The dissipational collapse and long-term dynamical evolution of these systems is analyzed using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The calculations focus on the final collapse stages of the inner baryonic component and therefore ignore the presence of dark matter. Two types of initial conditions are considered: uniformly rotating spherical clouds, and iirotational ellipsoidal clouds. In both cases the clouds are initially cold, homogeneous, and not far from rotational support (T/(absolute value of W) approximately equals 0.1). Although the details of the dynamical evolution depend sensitively on the initial conditions, the qualitative features of the final configurations do not. Most of the gas is found to fragment into small dense clumps, that eventually make up a spheroidal component resembling a galactic bulge. About 5% of the initial mass remains in the form of a smooth disk of gas supported by rotation in the gravitational potential potential well of the outer spheroid. If a central seed black hole of mass approximately greater than 10(exp 6) solar mass forms, it can grow by steady accretion from the disk and reach a typical quasar black hole mass approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in less than 5 x 10(exp 8) yr. In the absence of a sufficiently massive seed, dynamical instabilities in a strongly self-gravitating inner region of the disk will inhibit steady accretion of gas and may prevent the immediate formation of quasar.

  11. EDITORIAL: Gas plasmas in biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, Eva

    2006-08-01

    It is my great pleasure to introduce this special cluster devoted to recent developments in biomedical plasma technology. It is an even greater pleasure to behold the enormous progress which has been made in this area over the last five years. Research on biomedical plasma applications proceeds hand in hand with the development of new material processing technologies, based on atmospheric plasma sources. In the beginning, major research effort was invested in the development and control of new plasma sources—in this laborious process, novel devices were constructed and characterized, and also new plasma physical phenomena were discovered. Self-constriction of micro-plasmas, pattern formation, filamentation of glow discharges and various mode transitions are just a few examples. It is a real challenge for theorists to gain an understanding of these complex phenomena. Later, the devices had to be thoroughly tested and automated, and various safety issues had to be addressed. At present, many atmospheric plasma sources are ready to use, but not all fundamental and technical problems have been resolved by far. There is still plenty of room for improvement, as in any dynamic area of research. The recent trends are clear: the application area of plasmas expands into processing of unconventional materials such as biological scaffolds, and eventually living human, animal and plant tissues. The gentle, precise and versatile character of cold plasmas simply invites this new application. Firstly, non-living surfaces have been plasma-treated to attain desired effects in biomedical research; tissue engineering will soon fully profit from this powerful technique. Furthermore, studies on cultured plant and animal cells have provided many findings, which are both fundamentally interesting and potentially applicable in health care, veterinary medicine and agriculture. The most important and hitherto unique property of plasma treatment is that it can evade accidental cell death

  12. Nuclear Gas Dynamics of NGC2110: A Black Hole Offset from the Host Galaxy Mass Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, C. G.; Ferruit, P.; Nagar, N.; Wilson, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the central regions of many galaxies are unlikely to be in a static steady state, with instabilities caused by sinking satellites, the influence of a supermassive black hole or residuals of galaxy formation, resulting in the nuclear black hole orbiting the galaxy center. The observational signature of such an orbiting black hole is an offset of the active nucleus (AGN) from the kinematic center defined by the galaxy rotation curve. This orbital motion may provide fuel for the AGN, as the hole 'grazes' on the ISM, and bent radio jets, due to the motion of their source. The early type (E/SO) Seyfert galaxy, NGC2210, with its striking twin, 'S'-shaped radio jets, is a unique and valuable test case for the offset-nucleus phenomenon since, despite its remarkably normal rotation curve, its kinematically-measured mass center is displaced both spatially (260 pc) and kinematically (170 km/s) from the active nucleus located in optical and radio studies. However, the central kinematics, where the rotation curve rises most steeply, have been inaccessible with ground-based resolutions. We present new, high resolution WFPC2 imaging and long-slit STIS spectroscopy of the central 300 pc of NGC2110. We discuss the structure and kinematics of gas moving in the galactic potential on subarcsecond scales and the reality of the offset between the black hole and the galaxy mass center.

  13. Plasma evolution and dynamics in high-power vacuum-transmission-line post-hole convolutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rose

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-post-hole convolutes are used in pulsed high-power generators to join several magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITL in parallel. Such convolutes add the output currents of the MITLs, and deliver the combined current to a single MITL that, in turn, delivers the current to a load. Magnetic insulation of electron flow, established upstream of the convolute region, is lost at the convolute due to symmetry breaking and the formation of magnetic nulls, resulting in some current losses. At very high-power operating levels and long pulse durations, the expansion of electrode plasmas into the MITL of such devices is considered likely. This work examines the evolution and dynamics of cathode plasmas in the double-post-hole convolutes used on the Z accelerator [R. B. Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.872881]. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC simulations that model the entire radial extent of the Z accelerator convolute—from the parallel-plate transmission-line power feeds to the z-pinch load region—are used to determine electron losses in the convolute. The results of the simulations demonstrate that significant current losses (1.5 MA out of a total system current of 18.5 MA, which are comparable to the losses observed experimentally, could be caused by the expansion of cathode plasmas in the convolute regions.

  14. One-dimensional hole gas in germanium/silicon nanowire heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Xiang, Jie; Timko, Brian P.; Wu, Yue; Lieber, Charles M.

    2005-07-01

    Two-dimensional electron and hole gas systems, enabled through band structure design and epitaxial growth on planar substrates, have served as key platforms for fundamental condensed matter research and high-performance devices. The analogous development of one-dimensional (1D) electron or hole gas systems through controlled growth on 1D nanostructure substrates, which could open up opportunities beyond existing carbon nanotube and nanowire systems, has not been realized. Here, we report the synthesis and transport studies of a 1D hole gas system based on a free-standing germanium/silicon (Ge/Si) core/shell nanowire heterostructure. Room temperature electrical transport measurements clearly show hole accumulation in undoped Ge/Si nanowire heterostructures, in contrast to control experiments on single-component nanowires. Low-temperature studies show well-controlled Coulomb blockade oscillations when the Si shell serves as a tunnel barrier to the hole gas in the Ge channel. Transparent contacts to the hole gas also have been reproducibly achieved by thermal annealing. In such devices, we observe conductance quantization at low temperatures, corresponding to ballistic transport through 1D subbands, where the measured subband energy spacings agree with calculations for a cylindrical confinement potential. In addition, we observe a “0.7 structure,” which has been attributed to spontaneous spin polarization, suggesting the universality of this phenomenon in interacting 1D systems. Lastly, the conductance exhibits little temperature dependence, consistent with our calculation of reduced backscattering in this 1D system, and suggests that transport is ballistic even at room temperature. Author contributions: W.L., J.X., and C.M.L. designed research; W.L. and J.X. performed research; B.P.T. and Y.W. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; W.L., J.X., and C.M.L. analyzed data; W.L., J.X., and C.M.L. wrote the paper; and B.P.T. and Y.W. developed growth of nanowire

  15. Macular hole surgery with short-acting gas and short-duration face-down positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xirou T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tina Xirou,1 Panagiotis G Theodossiadis,2 Michael Apostolopoulos,3 A Stamatina Kabanarou,1 Elias Feretis,1 Ioannis D Ladas,3 Chrysanthi Koutsandrea31Vitreoretinal Unit, Red Cross Hospital, 2B Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, Greece; 3A Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, GreecePurpose: To report on the outcomes of vitrectomy and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 gas tamponade for idiopathic macular holes with 2 days of face-down positioning.Patients and methods: This was a prospective, nonrandomized, observational sequential case-series study on 23 consecutive patients receiving macular hole surgery using 20% SF6 and advised to stay in a face-down position for 2 days postoperatively (SF6 group. These patients were compared to 23 consecutive patients who had previously undergone macular hole surgery, had received 14% C3F8, and were advised to maintain a face-down position for 2 days (C3F8 group. Patients in both groups underwent vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane peeling, and fluid gas exchange using either SF6 or C3F8. Preoperative and postoperative data included best corrected visual acuity recorded in LogMAR units, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography.Results: At a 6-month follow-up, macular hole closure was noted in 23/23 eyes (100% and in 22/23 eyes (96% in the SF6 and C3F8 groups, respectively. The improvement in visual acuity (measured through Snellen acuity lines both preoperatively until 6 months postoperatively was 4.08 ± 2.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08–5.08 for the SF6 group and 2.87 ± 2.30 (95% CI: 1.87–3.86 for the C3F8 group; this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.06.Conclusion: Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and a short-acting gas tamponade using SF6 with posture limitation for 2 days may give a high success rate in macular hole surgery.Keywords: idiopathic macular holes, SF6 gas tamponade, C3F8 gas tamponade

  16. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Spanwise angled injection from multiple rows of holes. [gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckey, D. W.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stagnation region of a cylinder in a cross flow was used in experiments conducted with both a single row and multiple rows of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio with a freestream to wall temperature ratio approximately equal to 1.7 and R(eD) = 90,000. Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, 58.7 deg from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d(o) = 5 and 10. Three multiple row configurations were also investigated. Data are presented for a uniform blowing distribution and for a nonuniform blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply. The data for local Stanton Number reduction demonstrated a lack of lateral spreading by the coolant jets. Heat flux levels larger than those without film cooling were observed directly behind the coolant holes as the blowing ratio exceeded a particular value. The data were spanwise averaged to illustrate the influence of injection location, blowing ratio and hole spacing. The large values of blowing ratio for the blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply resulted in heat flux levels behind the holes in excess of the values without film cooling. An increase in freestream turbulence intensity from 4.4 to 9.5 percent had a negligible effect on the film cooling performance.

  17. Accretion of a relativistic, collisionless kinetic gas into a Schwarzschild black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Rioseco, Paola

    2016-01-01

    We provide a systematic study for the accretion of a collisionless, relativistic kinetic gas into a nonrotating black hole. To this end, we first solve the relativistic Liouville equation on a Schwarzschild background spacetime. The most general solution for the distribution function is given in terms of appropriate symplectic coordinates on the cotangent bundle, and the associated observables, including the particle current density and stress energy-momentum tensor, are determined. Next, we explore the case where the flow is steady-state and spherically symmetric. Assuming that in the asymptotic region the gas is described by an equilibrium distribution function, we determine the relevant parameters of the accretion flow as a function of the particle density and the temperature of the gas at infinity. In particular, we find that in the low temperature limit the tangential pressure at the horizon is about an order of magnitude larger than the radial one, showing explicitly that a collisionless gas, despite ex...

  18. Optimization of liquid and gas flow rates for aerated drilling fluids considering hole cleaning for vertical and low inclination wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbayoglu, M.E. [Middle East Univ., Metn (Lebanon)

    2009-07-01

    One of the most widely used technologies in depleted and/or low pressured formations is underbalanced drilling. Drilling fluids are usually gasified in order to achieve underbalanced conditions. The most commonly used drilling fluids during underbalanced drilling are pure gas, gas-liquid mixtures, and foams. This paper presented a study that focused on gas-liquid mixtures. The purpose of this paper was to express two-phase flow in vertical wellbores, and determine required flow rates for liquid and gas phase by considering formation pressure and hole cleaning properties. It was assumed that the liquid phase is the major contributor for cuttings transport, and that the gas phase only influences the bottom hole pressure. The paper introduced a mechanistic model for estimating the hydraulic behaviour of gas-liquid mixture drilling fluids under different flow patterns. Based on the bottom hole pressure and effective hole cleaning point of view, an algorithm was proposed for estimating the optimum required flow rates for liquid and gas phases based on the introduced mechanistic model. The model also predicts the required backpressure that must be applied. It was concluded that since the liquid flow rate is only dependent on proper hole cleaning, gas flow rate can be adjusted to achieve a bottomhole pressure equal to formation pressure. Also, backpressure should not be kept constant at the same value for static and dynamic conditions. Otherwise, bottomhole pressure cannot be kept constant. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 appendix.

  19. THE M87 BLACK HOLE MASS FROM GAS-DYNAMICAL MODELS OF SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Jonelle L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4574 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sarzi, Marc, E-mail: jlwalsh@astro.as.utexas.edu [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, AL10 9AB Hatfield (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-20

    The supermassive black hole of M87 is one of the most massive black holes known and has been the subject of several stellar and gas-dynamical mass measurements; however, the most recent revision to the stellar-dynamical black hole mass measurement is a factor of about two larger than the previous gas-dynamical determinations. Here, we apply comprehensive gas-dynamical models that include the propagation of emission-line profiles through the telescope and spectrograph optics to new Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. Unlike the previous gas-dynamical studies of M87, we map out the complete kinematic structure of the emission-line disk within {approx}40 pc from the nucleus, and find that a small amount of velocity dispersion internal to the gas disk is required to match the observed line widths. We examine a scenario in which the intrinsic velocity dispersion provides dynamical support to the disk, and determine that the inferred black hole mass increases by only 6%. Incorporating this effect into the error budget, we ultimately measure a mass of M{sub BH}= (3.5{sup +0.9}{sub -0.7}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} (68% confidence). Our gas-dynamical black hole mass continues to differ from the most recent stellar-dynamical mass by a factor of two, underscoring the need for carrying out more cross-checks between the two main black hole mass measurement methods.

  20. Plasma-neutral gas interaction in a tokamak divertor: effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center]|[I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Pigarov, A.Yu. [Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)]|[I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Soboleva, T.K. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]|[I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Sigmar, D.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1997-02-01

    We investigate the influence of hydrogen molecules on plasma recombination using a collisional-radiative model for multispecies hydrogen plasmas and tokamak detached divertor parameters. The rate constant found for molecular activated recombination of a plasma can be as high as 2 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s, confirming our pervious estimates. We investigate the effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination on self-consistent plasma-neutral gas interactions in the recycling region of a tokamak divertor. We treat the plasma flow in a fluid approximation retaining the effects of plasma recombination and employing a Knudsen neutral transport model for a `gas box` divertor geometry. For the model of plasma-neutral interactions we employ we find: (a) molecular activated recombination is a dominant channel of divertor plasma recombination; and (b) plasma recombination is a key element leading to a decrease in the plasma flux onto the target and substantial plasma pressure drop which are the main features of detached divertor regimes. (orig.).

  1. The effects of massive graviton on the equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Pan, Feng; Wu, Xin-Meng

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that the black hole can have temperature and radiate the particles with black body spectrum, i.e. Hawking radiation. Therefore, if the black hole is surrounded by an isolated box, there is a thermal equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas. A simple case considering the thermal equilibrium between the Schwarzschild black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box has been well investigated previously in detail, i.e. taking the conservation of energy and principle of maximal entropy for the isolated system into account. In this paper, following the above spirit, the effects of massive graviton on the thermal equilibrium will be investigated. For the gravity with massive graviton, we will use the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity which has been proven to be ghost free. Because the graviton mass depends on two parameters in the dRGT massive gravity, here we just investigate two simple cases related to the two parameters, respectively. Our results show that in the first case the massive graviton can suppress or increase the condensation of black hole in the radiation gas although the T-E diagram is similar as the Schwarzschild black hole case. For the second case, a new T-E diagram has been obtained. Moreover, an interesting and important prediction is that the condensation of black hole just increases from the zero radius of horizon in this case, which is very different from the Schwarzschild black hole case.

  2. The effects of massive graviton on the equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Peng Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the black hole can have temperature and radiate the particles with black body spectrum, i.e. Hawking radiation. Therefore, if the black hole is surrounded by an isolated box, there is a thermal equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas. A simple case considering the thermal equilibrium between the Schwarzschild black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box has been well investigated previously in detail, i.e. taking the conservation of energy and principle of maximal entropy for the isolated system into account. In this paper, following the above spirit, the effects of massive graviton on the thermal equilibrium will be investigated. For the gravity with massive graviton, we will use the de Rham–Gabadadze–Tolley (dRGT massive gravity which has been proven to be ghost free. Because the graviton mass depends on two parameters in the dRGT massive gravity, here we just investigate two simple cases related to the two parameters, respectively. Our results show that in the first case the massive graviton can suppress or increase the condensation of black hole in the radiation gas although the T–E diagram is similar as the Schwarzschild black hole case. For the second case, a new T–E diagram has been obtained. Moreover, an interesting and important prediction is that the condensation of black hole just increases from the zero radius of horizon in this case, which is very different from the Schwarzschild black hole case.

  3. Light emission from thermally generated electron-hole plasma in a field-effect soi-transistor

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrovol's'kij, V M; Nyinyidze, G K; Pavlyuk, S P

    2002-01-01

    Field-effect silicon-on-insulator (SOI) transistors are investigated at extremely high drain currents.These currents heat the silicon film of a transistor and cause the generation of thermal electron-hole plasma there.We discovered the red light emission from such a plasma.Plasma stratification and formation of lighting spots are explained by the occurrence of thermodiffusion auto solitons.

  4. Sorption properties of NO2 gas and its strong influence on hole concentration of H-terminated diamond surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubovic, Michal; Kasu, Makoto; Kageshima, Hiroyuki

    2010-02-01

    The hole concentration of hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces was studied during exposure to different concentrations of NO2 gas. The hole concentration increased during adsorption of NO2 molecules on the diamond surface, and decreased when the exposure stopped and NO2 molecules desorbed from the surface. The increase in hole concentration can be directly linked to the NO2 concentration. The low NO2 concentration in air (˜20 ppb) is responsible the hole concentration normally measured in air, and with increasing NO2 concentration the maximum hole concentration increases even more. The time evolution of hole concentration was analyzed using the Elovich sorption model. Further analysis based on the Ritchie model indicated that an adsorbed NO2 molecule occupies two different surface sites. Temperature-dependent measurements indicate low activation energy between 0.1 and 0.2 eV.

  5. Optical probing of shocks driven into overdense plasmas by laser hole-boring

    CERN Document Server

    Dover, N P; Babzien, M; Bell, A R; Dangor, A E; Horbury, T; Ispiriyan, M; Polyanskiy, M N; Schreiber, J; Schwartz, S; Shkolnikov, P; Yakimenko, V; Pogorelsky, I; Najmudin, Z

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the interaction of an intense {\\lambda}0 \\approx 10 {\\mu}m laser pulse with near-critical overdense plasmas (ne = 1.8 - 3 nc) are presented. For the first time, transverse optical probing is used to show a recession of the front surface caused by radiation pressure driven hole-boring by the laser pulse with an initial velocity > 10^6 ms-1, and the resulting collisionless shocks. The collisionless shock propagates through the plasma, dissipates into an ion-acoustic solitary wave, and eventually becomes collisional as it slows further. These conclusions are supported by PIC simulations which show that the initial evolution is dominated by collisionless mechanisms.

  6. Dusty Gas Accretion onto Massive Black Holes and Infrared Diagnosis of the Eddington Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Ricotti, Massimo; Park, KwangHo; Sugimura, Kazuyuki

    2017-09-01

    Evidence for dust around supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the early universe is strongly suggested by recent observations. However, the accretion mechanism of SMBHs in dusty gas is not well understood yet. We investigate the growth of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of ˜ {10}4{--}{10}6 {M}⊙ in dusty clouds by using one-dimensional radiative-hydrodynamics simulations. We find that the accretion of dusty gas onto IMBHs proceeds gently with small fluctuations of the accretion rate, whereas that of pristine gas causes more violent periodic bursts. At dust-to-gas mass ratios similar to the solar neighborhood, the time-averaged luminosity becomes smaller than that for primordial gas by one order of magnitude and the time-averaged Eddington ratio ranges from ˜ {10}-4 to ˜ {10}-2 in clouds with initial gas densities of {n}{{H}}=10{--}1000 {{cm}}-3. Our calculations show that the effect of dust opacity alone is secondary compared to the radiation pressure on dust in regulating the BH growth. We also derive spectral energy distributions at IR bands by calculating dust thermal emission and show that the flux ratio between λ ≲ 20 μ {{m}} and ≳ 100 μ {{m}} is closely related to the Eddington ratio. Thermal emission from hot dust near the BH dominates only during the phase of high accretion, producing higher flux density at ≲ 20 μ {{m}}. Therefore, we suggest that a combination of mid-IR observations by the James Webb Space Telescope and far-IR observations by ALMA or Spitzer can be used to estimate the Eddington ratio of massive BHs. We also extend our simple modeling to SMBHs of {10}8{--}{10}9 {M}⊙ and show that ALMA can detect SMBHs of ˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ at z≳ 5.

  7. Gas laser with dual plasma mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.

    1999-01-01

    A gas laser includes an enclosure forming a first chamber, a second chamber and a lasing chamber which communicates through a first opening to the first chamber and through a second opening to the second chamber. The lasing chamber has a pair of reflectors defining a Fabry-Perot cavity. Separate inlets enable different gases to be introduced into the first and second chambers. A first cathode within the first chamber is provided to produce positive ions which travel into the lasing chamber and a second cathode of a pin-hollow type within the second chamber is provided to produce negative ions which travel into the lasing chamber. A third inlet introduces a molecular gas into the lasing chamber, where the molecular gas becomes excited by the positive and negative ions and emits light which lases in the Fabry-Perot cavity.

  8. Experimental study of current loss and plasma formation in the Z machine post-hole convolute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Gomez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Z pulsed-power generator at Sandia National Laboratories drives high energy density physics experiments with load currents of up to 26 MA. Z utilizes a double post-hole convolute to combine the current from four parallel magnetically insulated transmission lines into a single transmission line just upstream of the load. Current loss is observed in most experiments and is traditionally attributed to inefficient convolute performance. The apparent loss current varies substantially for z-pinch loads with different inductance histories; however, a similar convolute impedance history is observed for all load types. This paper details direct spectroscopic measurements of plasma density, temperature, and apparent and actual plasma closure velocities within the convolute. Spectral measurements indicate a correlation between impedance collapse and plasma formation in the convolute. Absorption features in the spectra show the convolute plasma consists primarily of hydrogen, which likely forms from desorbed electrode contaminant species such as H_{2}O, H_{2}, and hydrocarbons. Plasma densities increase from 1×10^{16}  cm^{−3} (level of detectability just before peak current to over 1×10^{17}  cm^{−3} at stagnation (tens of ns later. The density seems to be highest near the cathode surface, with an apparent cathode to anode plasma velocity in the range of 35–50  cm/μs. Similar plasma conditions and convolute impedance histories are observed in experiments with high and low losses, suggesting that losses are driven largely by load dynamics, which determine the voltage on the convolute.

  9. Carbon dioxide as working gas for laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kist, R.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements with a RF probe, retarding potential analyzer and mass spectrometer in a laboratory plasma tank were performed using the gases CO2, N2, A and He in order to compare their properties as working gases for laboratory plasma production. The overall result of that CO2 leads to higher plasma densities at lower neutral-gas pressures as well as to a larger Maxwellian component of the electron population, while the electron temperature is lower than that when N2, A and He are used.

  10. The response of relativistic outflowing gas to the inner accretion disk of a black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael L; Pinto, Ciro; Fabian, Andrew C; Lohfink, Anne; Buisson, Douglas J K; Alston, William N; Kara, Erin; Cackett, Edward M; Chiang, Chia-Ying; Dauser, Thomas; De Marco, Barbara; Gallo, Luigi C; Garcia, Javier; Harrison, Fiona A; King, Ashley L; Middleton, Matthew J; Miller, Jon M; Miniutti, Giovanni; Reynolds, Christopher S; Uttley, Phil; Vasudevan, Ranjan; Walton, Dominic J; Wilkins, Daniel R; Zoghbi, Abderahmen

    2017-03-01

    The brightness of an active galactic nucleus is set by the gas falling onto it from the galaxy, and the gas infall rate is regulated by the brightness of the active galactic nucleus; this feedback loop is the process by which supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxies may moderate the growth of their hosts. Gas outflows (in the form of disk winds) release huge quantities of energy into the interstellar medium, potentially clearing the surrounding gas. The most extreme (in terms of speed and energy) of these-the ultrafast outflows-are the subset of X-ray-detected outflows with velocities higher than 10,000 kilometres per second, believed to originate in relativistic (that is, near the speed of light) disk winds a few hundred gravitational radii from the black hole. The absorption features produced by these outflows are variable, but no clear link has been found between the behaviour of the X-ray continuum and the velocity or optical depth of the outflows, owing to the long timescales of quasar variability. Here we report the observation of multiple absorption lines from an extreme ultrafast gas flow in the X-ray spectrum of the active galactic nucleus IRAS 13224-3809, at 0.236 ± 0.006 times the speed of light (71,000 kilometres per second), where the absorption is strongly anti-correlated with the emission of X-rays from the inner regions of the accretion disk. If the gas flow is identified as a genuine outflow then it is in the fastest five per cent of such winds, and its variability is hundreds of times faster than in other variable winds, allowing us to observe in hours what would take months in a quasar. We find X-ray spectral signatures of the wind simultaneously in both low- and high-energy detectors, suggesting a single ionized outflow, linking the low- and high-energy absorption lines. That this disk wind is responding to the emission from the inner accretion disk demonstrates a connection between accretion processes occurring on very different

  11. Understanding the nuclear gas dispersion in early-type galaxies in the context of black hole demographics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, GAV; van der Marel, RP; Noel-Storr, J

    The majority of nearby early-type galaxies contain detectable amounts of emission-line gas at their centers. The nuclear gas kinematics form a valuable diagnostic of the central black hole (BH) mass. Here we analyze and model Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations of a sample of 27 galaxies; 16

  12. Discharge dynamics and plasma density recovery by on/off switches of additional gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang, E-mail: lhc@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Deuk-Chul [Plasma Technology Research Center, Nation Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, SeungJu; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Measurement of the plasma density is investigated to study plasma dynamics by adding reactive gas (O{sub 2}) or rare gas (He) in Ar plasmas. When the O{sub 2} or He gas is added, plasma density is suddenly decreased, while the plasma density recovers slowly with gas off. It is found that the recovery time is strongly dependent on the gas flow rate, and it can be explained by effect of gas residence time. When the He gas is off in the Ar plasma, the plasma density is overshot compared to the case of the O{sub 2} gas pulsing due to enhanced ionizations by metastable atoms. Analysis and calculation for correlation between the plasma density dynamics and the gas pulsing are also presented in detail.

  13. High mobility of the strongly confined hole gas in AgTaO3/SrTiO3

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-05-18

    A theoretical study of the two-dimensional hole gas at the (AgO)−/(TiO2)0 p-type interface in the AgTaO3/SrTiO3 (001) heterostructure is presented. The Ag 4d states strongly hybridize with the O 2p states and contribute to the hole gas. It is demonstrated that the holes are confined to an ultra thin layer (∼4.9Å) with a considerable carrier density of ∼1014cm−2. We estimate a hole mobility of 18.6 cm2 V−1 s−1, which is high enough to enable device applications.

  14. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A model of plasma current through a hole of Rogowski probe including sheath effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furui, H; Ejiri, A; Nagashima, Y; Takase, Y; Sonehara, M; Tsujii, N; Yamaguchi, T; Shinya, T; Togashi, H; Homma, H; Nakamura, K; Takeuchi, T; Yajima, S; Yoshida, Y; Toida, K; Takahashi, W; Yamazaki, H

    2016-04-01

    In TST-2 Ohmic discharges, local current is measured using a Rogowski probe by changing the angle between the local magnetic field and the direction of the hole of the Rogowski probe. The angular dependence shows a peak when the direction of the hole is almost parallel to the local magnetic field. The obtained width of the peak was broader than that of the theoretical curve expected from the probe geometry. In order to explain this disagreement, we consider the effect of sheath in the vicinity of the Rogowski probe. A sheath model was constructed and electron orbits were numerically calculated. From the calculation, it was found that the electron orbit is affected by E × B drift due to the sheath electric field. Such orbit causes the broadening of the peak in the angular dependence and the dependence agrees with the experimental results. The dependence of the broadening on various plasma parameters was studied numerically and explained qualitatively by a simplified analytical model.

  16. Gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2016-02-01

    The appearance of resonant structures in metamaterials coupled to plasmas motivates the systematic investigation of gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators over a frequency range of 0.5-9 GHz. In co-planar electrode gaps of 100 μm, the breakdown voltage amplitude decreases from 280 V to 225 V over this frequency range in atmospheric argon. At the highest frequency, a microplasma can be sustained using only 2 mW of power. At 20 mW, we measure a central electron density of 2 × 1020 m-3. The plasma-electrode overlap plays a key role in the microplasma impedance and causes the sheath impedance to dominate the plasma resistance at very low power levels. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  17. On the Thermodynamics of a Gas of AdS Black Holes and the Quark-Hadron Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E; Ellis, John

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the thermodynamics of a gas of black holes in five-dimensional anti-de-Sitter (AdS) space, showing that they are described by a van der Waals equation of state. Motivated by the Maldacena conjecture, we relate the energy density and pressure of this non-ideal AdS black-hole gas to those of four-dimensional gauge theory in the unconfined phase. We find that the energy density rises rapidly above the deconfinement transition temperature, whilst the pressure rises more slowly towards its asymptotic high-temperature value, in qualitative agreement with lattice simulations.

  18. The role of gas in the merging of massive black holes in galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Andres

    A long-standing problem in astrophysics is whether galaxy mergers necessarily lead to massive black hole mergers in their centers. Over the past 20 years this problem has been studied in context of the long-term evolution of a black hole binary at the center of a dense stellar system. However, the fate of a binary in the stellar system is unclear and the coalescence possibly stalls unless some additional mechanism is able to extract angular momentum from the binary. The possible additional mechanism is very likely to be gas dynamical in origin, because observational and theoretical work both indicate that large amounts of gas can be present in the central regions of merging galaxies. Using high-resolution SPH numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of gas on the inspiral and merger of a massive black hole binary. We run a variety of models, ranging from simulations with a relatively smooth gas and nearly spherical cloud to cases in which the gas is in a disk and has a more clumpy spatial distribution. We find that in the early evolution of the system the binary separation diminishes due to gravitational drag, and in the later stages the medium responds by forming an ellipsoidal density enhancement whose axis lags behind the binary axis; this offset produces a torque on the binary that causes continuing loss of angular momentum and is able to reduce the separation to distances where gravitational radiation is efficient. Between these two regimes, we find a transition regime in which the evolution is temporarily slowed down when neither of these mechanisms is fully effective. In the variety of simulations that we perform, we find that a MBH binary will merge within few times 10 7 yrs after the galaxies merge. For MBHs that satisfy the observed' m - s c ' relation, we predict that in a merger of galaxies that have at least 1% of their total mass in gas, the MBHs will coalesce soon after the galaxies merge. We also predict that if the MBHs depart considerably

  19. Energy-conserving numerical simulations of electron holes in two-species plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingda; Christlieb, Andrew J.; Zhong, Xinghui

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply our recently developed energy-conserving discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for the two-species Vlasov-Ampère system to simulate the evolution of electron holes (EHs). The EH is an important Bernstein-Greene-Kurskal (BGK) state and is constructed based on the Schamel distribution in our simulation.Even though the knowledge of steady state EHs has advanced significantly, little is known about the full dynamics of EHs that nonlinearly interact with ions in plasmas. In this paper, we simulate the full dynamics of EHs with DG finite element methods, coupled with explicit and implicit time integrators. Our methods are demonstrated to be conservative in the total energy and particle numbers for both species. By varying the mass and temperature ratios, we observe the stationary and moving EHs, as well as the break up of EHs at later times upon initial perturbation of the electron distribution. In addition, we perform a detailed numerical study for the BGK states for the nonlinear evolutions of EH simulations. Our simulation results should help to understand the dynamics of large amplitude EHs that nonlinearly interact with ions in space and laboratory plasmas.

  20. A study of impurity transport in the plasma boundary of TEXTOR using gas puffing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, G. M.; Samm, U.; Fielding, S. J.; Matthews, G. F.; Pitts, R. A.; Pitcher, C. S.; Gray, D.; Lie, Y. T.; Moyer, R. A.; Bertschinger, G.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Rusbuldt, D.; Stangeby, P. C.; Elder, D.; Schweer, B.

    1990-12-01

    The transport of carbon and oxygen impurities has been studied in TEXTOR by introducing the gases CH 4 and CO through a small hole in a test limiter. The toroidal distributions of different charge states of the impurities have been measured using a CCD camera with optical filters. Local impurity ion temperatures have been calculated from the Doppler broadening of line emission measured with a high resolution spectrometer. The spatial distributions and the ion temperatures have been modelled using the LIM Monte Carlo impurity code, with experimentally measured plasma profiles. Good agreement is obtained for both sets of measurements. The comparison shows the breakup energies of the atomic fragments to be ≪ 1 eV. The fuelling efficiency of different gas species is discussed.

  1. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O' Connor

    2007-08-10

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  2. Gas Contamination In Plasma-Arc-Welded Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Document describes experimental investigation on visible and tactile effects of gaseous contaminants in variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of 2219 T-87 aluminum alloy. Contaminant gases (nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen) introduced in argon arc and in helium shield gas in various controlled concentrations. Report represents results of experiments in form of photographs of fronts, backs, polished cross sections, and etched cross sections of welds made with various contaminants at various concentrations. Provides detailed discussion of conditions under which welds made.

  3. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  4. Contributions of gas-phase plasma chemistry to surface modifications and gas-surface interactions: investigations of fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Michael F., II

    The fundamental aspects of inductively coupled fluorocarbon (FC) plasma chemistry were examined, with special emphasis on the contributions of gas-phase species to surface modifications. Characterization of the gas-phase constituents of single-source CF4-, C2F6-, C3F 8-, and C3F6-based plasmas was performed using spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. The effects of varying plasma parameters, including applied rf power (P) and system pressure (p) were examined. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were employed to monitor the behavior of excited and ground CFx (x = 1,2) radicals, respectively. Mass spectrometric techniques, including ion energy analyses, elucidated behaviors of nascent ions in the FC plasmas. These gas-phase data were correlated with the net effect of substrate processing for Si and ZrO2 surfaces. Surface-specific analyses were performed for post-processed substrates via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle goniometry. Generally, precursors with lower F/C ratios tended to deposit robust FC films of high surface energy. Precursors of higher F/C ratio, such as CF4, were associated with etching or removal of material from surfaces. Nonetheless, a net balance between deposition of FC moieties and etching of material exists for each plasma system. The imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique provided insight into the phenomena occurring at the interface of the plasma gas-phase and substrate of interest. IRIS results demonstrate that CFx radicals scatter copiously, with surface scatter coefficients, S, generally greater than unity under most experimental conditions. Such considerable S values imply surface-mediated production of the CFx radicals at FC-passivated sites. It is inferred that the primary route to surface production of CFx arises from energetic ion bombardment and ablation of surface FC films. Other factors which may influence the observed CFx

  5. Mobility in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of a charged projectile in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is simulated. A net force F, opposed by a combination of collisional scattering and gas friction, causes projectiles to drift at a mobility-limited velocity up. The mobility μp=up/F of the projectile's motion is obtained. Two regimes depending on F are identified. In the high-force regime, μp∝F0.23, and the scattering cross section σs diminishes as up-6/5. Results for σs are compared with those for a weakly coupled plasma and for two-body collisions in a Yukawa potential. The simulation parameters are based on microgravity plasma experiments.

  6. WISDOM Project - II. Molecular gas measurement of the supermassive black hole mass in NGC 4697

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Onishi, Kyoko; Cappellari, Michele; Iguchi, Satoru; Sarzi, Marc

    2017-07-01

    As part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses (WISDOM) project, we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotating early-type galaxy NGC 4697. This estimate is based on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle-3 observations of the 12CO(2-1) emission line with a linear resolution of 29 pc (0.53 arcsec). We find that NGC 4697 hosts a small relaxed central molecular gas disc with a mass of 1.6 × 107 M⊙, co-spatial with the obscuring dust disc visible in optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We also resolve thermal 1 mm continuum emission from the dust in this disc. NGC 4697 is found to have a very low molecular gas velocity dispersion, σgas = 1.65^{+0.68}_{-0.65} km s-1. This seems to be partially because the giant molecular cloud mass function is not fully sampled, but other mechanisms such as chemical differentiation in a hard radiation field or morphological quenching also seem to be required. We detect a Keplerian increase of the rotation of the molecular gas in the very centre of NGC 4697, and use forward modelling of the ALMA data cube in a Bayesian framework with the KINematic Molecular Simulation (kinms) code to estimate an SMBH mass of (1.3_{-0.17}^{+0.18}) × 108 M⊙ and an I-band mass-to-light ratio of 2.14_{-0.05}^{+0.04} M⊙/L⊙ (at the 99 per cent confidence level). Our estimate of the SMBH mass is entirely consistent with previous measurements from stellar kinematics. This increases confidence in the growing number of SMBH mass estimates being obtained in the ALMA era.

  7. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in galaxy nuclei mergers - I. Numerical implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Numerical effects are known to plague adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes when treating massive particles, e.g. representing massive black holes (MBHs). In an evolving background, they can experience strong, spurious perturbations and then follow unphysical orbits. We study by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a pair MBHs in the rapidly and violently evolving gaseous and stellar background that follows a galaxy major merger. We confirm that spurious numerical effects alter the MBH orbits in AMR simulations, and show that numerical issues are ultimately due to a drop in the spatial resolution during the simulation, drastically reducing the accuracy in the gravitational force computation. We therefore propose a new refinement criterion suited for massive particles, able to solve in a fast and precise way for their orbits in highly dynamical backgrounds. The new refinement criterion we designed enforces the region around each massive particle to remain at the maximum resolution allowed, independently upon the local gas density. Such maximally resolved regions then follow the MBHs along their orbits, and effectively avoids all spurious effects caused by resolution changes. Our suite of high-resolution, AMR hydrodynamic simulations, including different prescriptions for the sub-grid gas physics, shows that the new refinement implementation has the advantage of not altering the physical evolution of the MBHs, accounting for all the non-trivial physical processes taking place in violent dynamical scenarios, such as the final stages of a galaxy major merger.

  8. WISDOM project - I. Black hole mass measurement using molecular gas kinematics in NGC 3665

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kyoko; Iguchi, Satoru; Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2017-07-01

    As a part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses (WISDOM) project, we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotator early-type galaxy NGC 3665. We obtained the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) B and C array observations of the 12CO(J = 2 - 1) emission line with a combined angular resolution of 0.59 arcsec. We analysed and modelled the three-dimensional molecular gas kinematics, obtaining a best-fitting SMBH mass M_BH=5.75^{+1.49}_{-1.18} × 108 M⊙, a mass-to-light ratio at H-band (M/L)H = 1.45 ± 0.04 (M/L)⊙,H and other parameters describing the geometry of the molecular gas disc (statistical errors, all at 3σ confidence). We estimate the systematic uncertainties on the stellar M/L to be ≈0.2 (M/L)⊙,H, and on the SMBH mass to be ≈0.4 × 108 M⊙. The measured SMBH mass is consistent with that estimated from the latest correlations with galaxy properties. Following our older works, we also analysed and modelled the kinematics using only the major-axis position-velocity diagram, and conclude that the two methods are consistent.

  9. High-frequency Quasi-periodic Light Variations from Arc-shaped Gas Clouds Falling onto a Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kotaro; Mineshige, Shin; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical and radiative properties of arc-shaped gas clouds falling onto a stellar-mass black hole based on the three-dimensional general relativistic radiation-magnetohydrodynamics (3D-GRRMHD) simulation data. Assuming that the gas clouds radiate mainly due to the free-free emission and/or optically thick, inverse Compton scattering, we calculate how the emissivity distributions develop with time. We find that (1) gas clouds, each of which has a ring-like or arc shape, are intermittently formed, and that (2) they slowly fall onto the black hole, keeping nearly the Keplerian orbital velocity. These features support the dynamical properties of the gas clouds assumed in the spin measurement method proposed by Moriyama & Mineshige, but the radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk is larger than that of the marginally stable orbit (ISCO). Next, we examine how each gas cloud is observed by a distant observer by calculating the photon trajectories in the black hole spacetime. The luminosity of the accretion flow exhibits significant time variations on different timescales, reflecting the time evolution of the gas density distributions. The relatively slow variations on the time durations of 0.08-0.10 s is due to the formation and fall of gas clouds, while quasi-periodic flux peaks with short time intervals (0.01 s) are due to the quasi-periodic enhancement of light from the non-axisymmetric arc-shaped clouds through the beaming effect. This may account for the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in black hole binaries. The observational implications and future issues are briefly discussed.

  10. Productivity model for gas reservoirs with open-hole multi-fracturing horizontal wells and optimization of hydraulic fracture parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-fractured horizontal wells are commonly employed to improve the productivity of low and ultra-low permeability gas reservoirs. However, conventional productivity models for open-hole multi-fractured horizontal wells do not consider the interferences between hydraulic fractures and the open-hole segments, resulting in significant errors in calculation results. In this article, a novel productivity prediction model for gas reservoirs with open-hole multi-fractured horizontal wells was proposed based on complex potential theories, potential superimposition, and numerical analysis. Herein, an open-hole segment between two adjacent fractures was regarded as an equivalent fracture, which was discretized as in cases of artificial fractures. The proposed model was then applied to investigate the effects of various parameters, such as the angle between the fracture and horizontal shaft, fracture quantity, fracture length, diversion capacity of fractures, horizontal well length, and inter-fracture distance, on the productivity of low permeability gas reservoirs with multi-fractured horizontal wells. Simulation results revealed that the quantity, length, and distribution of fractures had significant effects on the productivity of low permeability gas reservoirs while the effects of the diversion capacity of fractures and the angle between the fracture and horizontal shaft were negligible. Additionally, a U-shaped distribution of fracture lengths was preferential as the quantity of fractures at shaft ends was twice that in the middle area. Keywords: Low permeability gas reservoir, Multi-fractured horizontal well, Productivity prediction, Open-hole completion, Unsteady-state flow, Fracture parameters optimization

  11. Modular enthalpy probe and gas analyzer for thermal plasma measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, W. D.; Fincke, J. R.; Haggard, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The enthalpy or calorimetric probe is a water-cooled stagnation/sampling probe for studying the temperature, velocity, and composition of hot-gas flow fields. In order to derive the thermodynamic properties of complex flow fields such as plasma arc jets or high-velocity oxygen fuel jets, the specie concentration must be known accurately. To this end a differentially pumped quadrapole mass spectrometer has been integrated with a fully automated enthalpy probe system. An inexpensive modular probe is described along with the system and its theory of operation. Calibration and error are also discussed. Typical results are presented for the system operating in an argon/helium plasma arc jet in atmospheric pressure air. The maximum temperature measured is 13434 K on the center line of the jet, 5 mm from the exit, with a corresponding velocity of 1295 m/s. The utility in integrating the mass spectrometer to the enthalpy probe system is not only an accurate measurement of the gas mixture components for obtaining the correct property information, but also valuable information can be obtained about demixing diffusion and chemical reaction taking place in the plasma plume. The relative amount of argon to helium is shown to deviate from the nominal mixture by as much as 40% at the center of the plume.

  12. Analysis of commingled gas reservoirs with variable bottom-hole flowing pressure and non-Darcy flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Banbi, A. H.; Wattenbarger, R. A. [Texas A and M Univ., TX (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents an extension to a previously proposed method for estimating and forecasting production of commingled gas wells. The proposed method is known as the Layered Stabilized Flow Model (LSFM). The extension described in this paper takes into account bottom-hole flowing pressure variations and non-Darcy flow, and provides simulator verifications and field examples. The essence of the LSFM is the coupling of the material balance equation and the stabilized gas flow equation, including non-Darcy flow, for each layer of the commingled gas. It is a simple method, well adapted to spread-sheet applications. It requires only the flow rate and the bottom-hole flowing pressure history, plus the initial reservoir pressure and gas properties to be able to to proceed with reserve estimates. The LSFM parameters are determined by history matching the well`s production rate over a selected calibration period. The results of the LSFM provide estimates of the original gas in place (OGIP) and the two flow equation parameters for each layer, which then can be used for production forecasting. Excellent results have been achieved in field tests in moderate to high permeability reservoirs, even with long shut-ins and significant variation in bottom-hole flowing pressure. 21 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  13. Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Petersen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    An integrated plasma nozzle and a shield gas box have been investigated for laser welding of 2 mm stainless steel sheets. Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and coaxial and plasma flow show the impact on process...... stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds...... are oxide free. With 2.7 kW power welds have been performed at 3000 mm/min with Ar / He (70%/30%) as coaxial, plasma and shield gas....

  14. A Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    A prototype shield gas box with different plasma control nozzles have been investigated for laser welding of stainless steel (AISI 316). Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and gas flows show the impact on process...... stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds...... are oxide free. With 2.7 kW power welds have been performed at 4000 mm/min with Ar / He (70%/30%) as coaxial, plasma and shield gas....

  15. The late inspiral of supermassive black hole binaries with circumbinary gas discs in the LISA band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yike; Haiman, Zoltán; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of 2D, moving-mesh, viscous hydrodynamical simulations of an accretion disc around a merging supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB). The simulation is pseudo-Newtonian, with the BHs modeled as point masses with a Paczynski-Wiita potential, and includes viscous heating, shock heating, and radiative cooling. We follow the gravitational inspiral of an equal-mass binary with a component mass Mbh = 106M⊙ from an initial separation of 60rg (where rg ≡ GMbh/c2 is the gravitational radius) to the merger. We find that a central, low-density cavity forms around the binary, as in previous work, but that the BHs capture gas from the circumbinary disc and accrete efficiently via their own minidiscs, well after their inspiral outpaces the viscous evolution of the disc. The system remains luminous, displaying strong periodicity at twice the binary orbital frequency throughout the entire inspiral process, all the way to the merger. In the soft X-ray band, the thermal emission is dominated by the inner edge of the circumbinary disc with especially clear periodicity in the early inspiral. By comparison, harder X-ray emission is dominated by the minidiscs, and the light curve is initially more noisy but develops a clear periodicity in the late inspiral stage. This variability pattern should help identify the EM counterparts of SMBHBs detected by the space-based gravitational-wave detector LISA.

  16. Establishing isokinetic flow for a plasma torch exhaust gas diagnostic for a plasma hearth furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, Brian R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Real time monitoring of toxic metallic effluents in confined gas streams can be accomplished through use of Microwave Induced Plasmas to perform atomic emission spectroscopy, For this diagnostic to be viable it is necessary that it sample from the flowstream of interest in an isokinetic manner. A method of isokinetic sampling was established for this device for use in the exhaust system of a plasma hearth vitrification furnace. The flow and entrained particulate environment were simulated in the laboratory setting using a variable flow duct of the same dimensions (8-inch diameter, schedule 40) as that in the field and was loaded with similar particulate (less than 10 μm in diameter) of lake bed soil typically used in the vitrification process. The flow from the furnace was assumed to be straight flow. To reproduce this effect a flow straightener was installed in the device. An isokinetic sampling train was designed to include the plasma torch, with microwave power input operating at 2.45 GHz, to match local freestream velocities between 800 and 2400 ft/sec. The isokinetic sampling system worked as planned and the plasma torch had no difficulty operating at the required flowrates. Simulation of the particulate suspension was also successful. Steady particle feeds were maintained over long periods of time and the plasma diagnostic responded as expected.

  17. Observation of Blobs and Holes in the Boundary Plasma of EAST Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Xu, Guosheng; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    of the turbulence is strongly skewed, with positive skewed events (“blobs") prevailing in the SOL region and negative skewed events (“holes") dominant inside the shear layer. The statistical properties coincide with previous observations from JET. The generation mechanism of blobs and holes is also discussed...

  18. A Connection between Plasma Conditions near Black Hole Event Horizons and Outflow Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koljonen, K.I.I.; Russell, D.M.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J.A.; Markoff, S.; Russell, T.D.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; van der Horst, A.J.; Bernardini, F.; Casella, P.; Curran, P.A.; Gandhi, P.; Soria, R.

    2015-01-01

    Accreting black holes are responsible for producing the fastest, most powerful outflows of matter in the universe. The formation process of powerful jets close to black holes is poorly understood, and the conditions leading to jet formation are currently hotly debated. In this paper, we report an

  19. Investigation of Sterilization Effect by various Gas Plasmas and Electron Microscopic Observation of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yota; Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Oshita, Takaya; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric non-thermal plasmas have attracted attention as a new sterilization method. It is considered that factor of plasma sterilization are mainly reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the sterilization mechanism hasn't been investigated in detail because conventional plasma sources have a limitation in usable gas species and lack variety of ROS. So we developed multi-gas plasma jet which can generate various gas plasmas. In this study, investigation of sterilization effect by various gas plasmas and electron microscopic observation of bacteria were performed. Oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon and air were used as plasma gas. To investigate gas-species dependence of sterilization effect, S.aureus was treated. As a result, nitrogen plasma and carbon dioxide plasma were effective for sterilization. To investigate sterilization mechanism, the surface of S.aureus was observed by scanning electron microscope. As a result, dimples were observed on the surface after irradiation of nitrogen plasma, but no change observed in the case of carbon dioxide plasma. These results suggest that bactericidal mechanism of nitrogen and carbon dioxide plasma should be different. In the presentation, Measurement result of ROS will be reported.

  20. Effect of ambient density and orifice diameter on gas entrainment by a single-hole diesel spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepret, V.; Bazile, R.; Marchal, M.; Couteau, G. [Universite de Toulouse INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Toulouse (France)

    2010-12-15

    The gas entrainment into a non-vaporizing single-hole Diesel spray submitted to variable density is studied experimentally in order to better understand the effect on mixture formation. Particle Image Velocimetry on fluorescent tracers has been applied to obtain measurement in the flow field surrounding the spray. The ''quasi-steady'' region of the spray (far from the head vortex) as well as the non-stationary region has been investigated. Significant effects of both ambient density and nozzle diameter on gas entrainment have been pointed out. (orig.)

  1. Flows of X-ray gas reveal the disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon M; Kaastra, Jelle S; Miller, M Coleman; Reynolds, Mark T; Brown, Gregory; Cenko, S Bradley; Drake, Jeremy J; Gezari, Suvi; Guillochon, James; Gultekin, Kayhan; Irwin, Jimmy; Levan, Andrew; Maitra, Dipankar; Maksym, W Peter; Mushotzky, Richard; O'Brien, Paul; Paerels, Frits; de Plaa, Jelle; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Strohmayer, Tod; Tanvir, Nial

    2015-10-22

    Tidal forces close to massive black holes can violently disrupt stars that make a close approach. These extreme events are discovered via bright X-ray and optical/ultraviolet flares in galactic centres. Prior studies based on modelling decaying flux trends have been able to estimate broad properties, such as the mass accretion rate. Here we report the detection of flows of hot, ionized gas in high-resolution X-ray spectra of a nearby tidal disruption event, ASASSN-14li in the galaxy PGC 043234. Variability within the absorption-dominated spectra indicates that the gas is relatively close to the black hole. Narrow linewidths indicate that the gas does not stretch over a large range of radii, giving a low volume filling factor. Modest outflow speeds of a few hundred kilometres per second are observed; these are below the escape speed from the radius set by variability. The gas flow is consistent with a rotating wind from the inner, super-Eddington region of a nascent accretion disk, or with a filament of disrupted stellar gas near to the apocentre of an elliptical orbit. Flows of this sort are predicted by fundamental analytical theory and more recent numerical simulations.

  2. Optimizing Dense Plasma Focus Neutron Yields With Fast Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Matthew; Stein, Elizabeth; Higginson, Drew; Kueny, Christopher; Link, Anthony; Schmidt, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    We report a study using the particle-in-cell code LSP to perform fully kinetic simulations modeling dense plasma focus (DPF) devices with high density gas jets on axis. The high-density jets are modeled in the large-eddy Navier-Stokes code CharlesX, which is suitable for modeling both sub-sonic and supersonic gas flow. The gas pattern, which is essentially static on z-pinch time scales, is imported from CharlesX to LSP for neutron yield predictions. Fast gas puffs allow for more mass on axis while maintaining the optimal pressure for the DPF. As the density of a subsonic jet increases relative to the background fill, we find the neutron yield increases, as does the variability in the neutron yield. Introducing perturbations in the jet density via super-sonic flow (also known as Mach diamonds) allow for consistent seeding of the m =0 instability leading to more consistent ion acceleration and higher neutron yields with less variability. Jets with higher on axis density are found to have the greatest yield. The optimal jet configuration and the necessary jet conditions for increasing neutron yield and reducing yield variability are explored. Simulations of realistic jet profiles are performed and compared to the ideal scenario. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (15-ERD-034) at LLNL.

  3. Physics and Chemistry of MW Laser-induced Discharge in Gas Flows and Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    can be quasi-stationary coaxial plasma accelerators (MPC). This type of accelerators generates plasma jets of different gases (H2, He, N2, Ar) with...gas is ionizing and accelerating in discharge processing. For this regime the plasma gun generates the plasma jets of different gases3 (H2, He, N2...spectrometers. Spectrometers 1 and 2 are used for measuring of time behavior of single spectral lines, emitting in the focus area of plasma gun . Usually

  4. Tidal control on gas flux from the Precambrian continental bedrock revealed by gas monitoring at the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Wiersberg, Thomas; Korhonen, Kimmo; Pullinen, Arto

    2017-04-01

    Deep groundwaters within Precambrian shields are characteristically enriched in non-atmospheric gases. High concentrations of methane are frequently observed especially in graphite bearing metasedimentary rocks and accumulation of hydrogen and noble gases due to water-rock interaction and radioactive decay within the U, Th and K containing bedrock takes place. These gases can migrate not only through fractures and faults, but also through tunnels and boreholes, thereby potentially mobilizing hazardous compounds for example from underground nuclear waste repositories. Better understanding on fluid migration may also provide tools to monitor changes in bedrock properties such as fracture density or deterioration and failure of engineered barriers. In order to study gas migration mechanisms and variations with time, we conducted a gas monitoring campaign in eastern Finland within the Precambrian Fennoscandian Shield. At the study site, the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole (2516 m), spontaneous bubbling of gases at the well head has been on-going since the drilling was completed in 2005, i.e. over a decade. The drill hole is open below 39 m. In the experiment an inflatable packer was placed 15 cm above the water table inside the collar (Ø 32.4 cm), gas from below the packer was collected and the gas flow in the pipe line carefully assisted by pumping (130 ml/min). Composition of gas was monitored on-line for one month using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with measurement interval of one minute. Changes in the hydraulic head and in situ temperature were simultaneously recorded with two pressure sensors which were placed 1 m apart from each other below the packer such that they remained above and below the water table. In addition, data was compared with atmospheric pressure data and theoretical effect of Earth tides at the study site. Methane was the dominant gas emanating from the bedrock, however, relative gas composition fluctuated with time. Subsurface derived gases

  5. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    Contaminants remaining on implantable medical devices, even following sterilization, include dangerous fever-causing residues of the outer lipopolysaccharide-rich membranes of Gram-negative bacteria such as the common gut microorganism E. coli. The conventional method for endotoxin removal is by Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended dry-heat depyrogenation at 250°C for at least 45 minutes, an excessively time-consuming high-temperature technique not suitable for low-melting or heat-distortable biomaterials. This investigation evaluated the mechanism by which E. coli endotoxin contamination can be eliminated from surfaces during ambient temperature single 3-minute to cumulative 15-minute exposures to radio-frequency glow discharge (RFGD)-generated residual room air plasmas activated at 0.1-0.2 torr in a 35MHz electrodeless chamber. The main analytical technique for retained pyrogenic bio-activity was the Kinetic Chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) Assay, sufficiently sensitive to document compliance with FDA-required Endotoxin Unit (EU) titers less than 20 EU per medical device by optical detection of enzymatic color development corresponding to LAL Assay of sterile water extracts from both glass and Ge specimens. The Ge prism MAIR-IR measurements were repeated after employing 3-minute RFGD treatments sequentially for more than 10 cycles to observe removal of deposited matter that correlated with diminished EU titers. The results showed that 5 cycles, for a total exposure time of 15 minutes to low-temperature gas plasma, was sufficient to reduce endotoxin titers to below 0.05 EU/ml, and correlated with concurrent reduction of major endotoxin reference standard absorption bands at 3391 cm-1, 2887 cm-1, 1646 cm -1 1342 cm-1, and 1103 cm-1 to less than 0.05 Absorbance Units. Band depletion varied from 15% to 40% per 3-minute cycle of RFGD exposure, based on peak-to-peak analyses. In some cases, 100% of all applied biomass was removed within 5 sequential

  6. Improved Back-Side Purge-Gas Chambers For Plasma Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, Kenneth G.; Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved chambers for inert-gas purging of back sides of workpieces during plasma arc welding in keyhole (full-penetration) mode based on concept of directing flows of inert gases toward, and concentrating them on, hot weld zones. Tapered chamber concentrates flow of inert gas on plasma arc plume and surrounding metal.

  7. Foreshock density holes in the context of known upstream plasma structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wilber

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We present case examples of foreshock density holes and results from a statistical survey, which provide additional characterizations of these recently-described structures. Specific effort is made to place these objects into context with well-studied foreshock phenomena, such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs and large-amplitude magnetic pulsations (SLAMS. Density holes are observed during higher-than-average solar wind speeds (~620 km s−1, have well-correlated density and magnetic field intensities, and anti-correlated density and temperature variations. Like HFAs, these structures occur over a wide range of foreshock geometries, suggesting that this is not a determining factor. They are embedded within IMF current sheets, but their cross-structure magnetic shears are considerably lower than for HFAs. When the Cluster spacecraft are widely separated, they are able to measure structure time development, with substantial changes occurring over 10s of seconds, confirming an earlier case study, and possibly indicating short lifetimes as well. We find that density holes can occur in the absence of strong upstream magnetic pulsations and/or density enhancements, which rules out a "wake effect" as the sole explanation for their formation. Most important is the observation that the observed solar wind motional electric fields tend to have components pointing away from the embedding IMF current sheets. Density holes have no connection with magnetic holes and foreshock cavities, and appear not to be early-stage or weakly-formed HFAs.

  8. Foreshock density holes in the context of known upstream plasma structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wilber

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We present case examples of foreshock density holes and results from a statistical survey, which provide additional characterizations of these recently-described structures. Specific effort is made to place these objects into context with well-studied foreshock phenomena, such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs and large-amplitude magnetic pulsations (SLAMS. Density holes are observed during higher-than-average solar wind speeds (~620 km s−1, have well-correlated density and magnetic field intensities, and anti-correlated density and temperature variations. Like HFAs, these structures occur over a wide range of foreshock geometries, suggesting that this is not a determining factor. They are embedded within IMF current sheets, but their cross-structure magnetic shears are considerably lower than for HFAs. When the Cluster spacecraft are widely separated, they are able to measure structure time development, with substantial changes occurring over 10s of seconds, confirming an earlier case study, and possibly indicating short lifetimes as well. We find that density holes can occur in the absence of strong upstream magnetic pulsations and/or density enhancements, which rules out a "wake effect" as the sole explanation for their formation. Most important is the observation that the observed solar wind motional electric fields tend to have components pointing away from the embedding IMF current sheets. Density holes have no connection with magnetic holes and foreshock cavities, and appear not to be early-stage or weakly-formed HFAs.

  9. The Effect of Percentage of Nitrogen in Plasma Gas on Nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of percentage of nitrogen in plasma gas on nitrogen solution from an arc plasma into liquid iron has been investigated by melting iron in an atmosphere of nitrogen and argon using an arc plasma. Results show that both the rate of nitrogen absorption and the steady-state (plateau) solubility are increased as the ...

  10. Characterization of the global impact of low temperature gas plasma on vegetative microorganisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, T.; Winter, J.; Polak, M.; Kusch, K.; Mader, U.; Sietmann, R.; Ehlbeck, J.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Weltmann, K.D.; Hecker, M.; Kusch, H.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma medicine and also decontamination of bacteria with physical plasmas is a promising new field of life science with huge interest especially for medical applications. Despite numerous successful applications of low temperature gas plasmas in medicine and decontamination, the fundamental nature

  11. Effect of gas mixing on physical properties of warm collisional helicon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of inert gas mixing on the physical properties of a helicon plasma source with a Nagoya type III antenna is analytically investigated by taking into account the thermal and collisional effects. The dielectric permittivity tensor of this mixed gas plasma is obtained by using the Bhatnagar-Gross- Krook kinetic theory. Considering the dielectric tensor of mixed gas plasma and solving the electromagnetic field equations, the profiles of electromagnetic fields and plasma resistance are plotted and discussed. The results show that the plasma resistance peaks decrease with increasing Xe fraction in Ar-Xe plasma, and increase with the He fraction in Ar-He plasma. It is also shown that by increasing the xenon filling fraction, the electromagnetic field amplitudes are lowered, and by increasing the helium filling fraction, they are increased.

  12. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  13. WISDOM Project - III. Molecular gas measurement of the supermassive black hole mass in the barred lenticular galaxy NGC4429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Onishi, Kyoko; van de Voort, Freeke; Cappellari, Michele; Iguchi, Satoru; Liu, Lijie; North, Eve V.; Sarzi, Marc; Smith, Mark D.

    2018-01-01

    As part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses project we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotating early-type galaxy NGC4429, that is barred and has a boxy/peanut-shaped bulge. This estimate is based on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle-2 observations of the 12CO(3-2) emission line with a linear resolution of ≈13 pc (0.18 arcsec × 0.14 arcsec). NGC4429 has a relaxed, flocculent nuclear disc of molecular gas that is truncated at small radii, likely due to the combined effects of gas stability and tidal shear. The warm/dense 12CO(3-2) emitting gas is confined to the inner parts of this disc, likely again because the gas becomes more stable at larger radii, preventing star formation. The gas disc has a low velocity dispersion of 2.2^{+0.68}_{-0.65} km s-1. Despite the inner truncation of the gas disc, we are able to model the kinematics of the gas and estimate a mass of (1.5 ± 0.1^{+0.15}_{-0.35}) × 108 M⊙ for the SMBH in NGC4429 (where the quoted uncertainties reflect the random and systematic uncertainties, respectively), consistent with a previous upper limit set using ionized gas kinematics. We confirm that the V-band mass-to-light ratio changes by ≈30 per cent within the inner 400 pc of NGC4429, as suggested by other authors. This SMBH mass measurement based on molecular gas kinematics, the sixth presented in the literature, once again demonstrates the power of ALMA to constrain SMBH masses.

  14. Surgical management of macular holes: results using gas tamponade alone, or in combination with autologous platelet concentrate, or transforming growth factor beta 2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minihan, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Vitrectomy and gas tamponade has become a recognised technique for the treatment of macular holes. In an attempt to improve the anatomic and visual success of the procedure, various adjunctive therapies--cytokines, serum, and platelets--have been employed. A consecutive series of 85 eyes which underwent macular hole surgery using gas tamponade alone, or gas tamponade with either the cytokine transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-beta 2) or autologous platelet concentrate is reported. METHODS: Twenty eyes had vitrectomy and 20% SF6 gas tamponade; 15 had vitrectomy, 20% SF6 gas, and TGF-beta 2; 50 had vitrectomy, 16% C3F8 gas tamponade, and 0.1 ml of autologous platelet concentrate prepared during the procedure. RESULTS: Anatomic success occurred in 86% of eyes, with 96% of the platelet treated group achieving closure of the macular hole. Visual acuity improved by two lines or more in 65% of the SF6 only group, 33% of those treated with TGF-beta 2 and in 74% of the platelet treated group. In the platelet treated group 40% achieved 6\\/12 or better and 62% achieved 6\\/18 or better. The best visual results were obtained in stage 2 holes. CONCLUSION: Vitrectomy for macular holes is often of benefit and patients may recover good visual acuity, especially early in the disease process. The procedure has a number of serious complications, and the postoperative posturing requirement is difficult. Patients need to be informed of such concerns before surgery.

  15. A comparative study of ethylene oxide gas, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma, and low-temperature steam formaldehyde sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemitsu, Keiji; Imasaka, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Shiho; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ueno, Kumi; Takemura, Hiromu; Hirayama, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2005-05-01

    To compare the efficacies of ethylene oxide gas (EOG), hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (PLASMA), and low-temperature steam formaldehyde (LTSF) sterilization methods. The efficacies of EOG, PLASMA, and LTSF sterilization were tested using metal and plastic plates, common medical instruments, and three process challenge devices with narrow lumens. All items were contaminated with Bacillus stearothermophilus spores or used a standard biological indicator. EOG and LTSF demonstrated effective killing of B. stearothermophilus spores, with or without serum, on plates, on instruments, and in process challenge devices. PLASMA failed to adequately sterilize materials on multiple trials in several experiments, including two of three plates, two of three instruments, and all process challenge devices. Our results suggest that PLASMA sterilization may be unsuccessful under certain conditions, particularly when used for items with complex shapes and narrow lumens. Alternatively, LTSF sterilization demonstrates excellent efficacy and is comparable to EOG sterilization. LTSF could potentially act as a substitute if EOG becomes unavailable due to environmental concerns.

  16. Space hardware compatibility tests with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Delphine; Aguila, Alexandre; Debus, Andre; Remaury, Stephanie; Nabarra, Pascale; Darbord, Jacques C.; Soufflet, Caroline; Destrez, Philippe; Coll, Patrice; Coscia, David

    The exploration of the Solar System shall comply with planetary protection requirements handled presently by the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR). The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual contamination carried by return samples or by space systems. For project teams, avoiding the biological contamination of other Solar System bodies such as Mars imposes to perform unusual tasks at technical and operational constraints point of view. The main are the reduction of bioburden on space hardware, the sterile integration of landers, the control of the biological cleanliness and the limitation of crash probability. In order to reduce the bioburden on spacecraft, the use of qualified sterilization processes may be envisaged. Since 1992 now, with the Mars96 mission, one of the most often used is the Sterrad(R) process working with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma. In the view of future Mars exploration programs, after tests performed in the frame of previous missions, a new test campaign has been performed on thermal coatings and miscellaneous materials coming from an experiment in order to assess the compatibility of space hardware and material with this sterilization process.

  17. Salt dissolution in oil and gas test holes in central Kansas. Part I. Salt beds in the subsurface in Russell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Barton, and Rice Counties, central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, R.F.

    1975-06-01

    The Hutchinson Salt Member of the Permian Wellington Formation is described in a five-county study area of 4,000 square miles. Most of the 22,200 oil and gas test holes in the study area were drilled with fresh water, causing dissolution of the salt during drilling, commonly resulting in borehole enlargement to three times the diameter of the drill bit (some older rotary drilled holes have borehole enlargement up to 10 ft). After drilling ceases, no salt dissolution occurs in oil and gas test holes which have properly cemented surface casing protecting all aquifers above the salt. The conclusion is reached that extensive dissolution of the Hutchinson Salt in oil and gas test holes in central Kansas is a rare and unusual event in the 50-year history since the discovery of oil in Russell County in 1923. In only seven known instances (six of which are within the study area) did such dissolution lead to collapse and surface subsidence. With an estimated 72,000 holes drilled through the Hutchinson Salt Member within the State of Kansas, this is a ratio of approximately one occurrence for every 10,000 oil and gas test holes. (DLC)

  18. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Modeling of gas discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Boris M.

    2009-06-01

    The condition for the self-maintenance of a gas discharge plasma (GDP) is derived from its ionization balance expressed in the Townsend form and may be used as a definition of a gas discharge plasma in its simplest form. The simple example of a gas discharge plasma in the positive column of a cylindrical discharge tube allows demonstrating a wide variety of possible GDP regimes, revealing a contradiction between simple models used to explain gas discharge regimes and the large number of real processes responsible for the self-maintenance of GDP. The variety of GDP processes also results in a stepwise change of plasma parameters and developing some instabilities as the voltage or discharge current is varied. As a consequence, new forms and new applications of gas discharge arise as technology progresses.

  19. Gas ionization induced by a high speed plasma injection in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Gas ionization induced by a fast plasma injection has been observed with the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) Experiment on Spacelab-1. When an impulsive high-density plasma was injected from the orbiter, waves near the lower-hybrid frequency were enhanced, and the surrounding gas drifting with the orbiter was ionized for several tens of milliseconds after the plasma injection. The long-duration gas ionization was observed only when the plasma flux incoming to the orbiter cargo bay and the orbital velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field were relatively large. This effect has been explained by the concept of critical velocity ionization (CVI) for the gas drifting with the orbiter, although the gas velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field was less than the Alfven critical velocity.

  20. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  1. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  2. The Lockman Hole project : Gas and galaxy properties from a stacking experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gereb, K.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Guglielmino, G.; Prandoni, I.

    2013-01-01

    We perform an HI stacking analysis to study the relation between HI content and optical/radio/IR properties of galaxies located in the Lockman Hole area. In the redshift range covered by the observations (up to z = 0.09), we use the SDSS to separate galaxies with different optical characteristics,

  3. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon and pressure (from ∼5 × 10−7 Torr up to atmosphere is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  4. Effect of Deuterium Gas Puff On The Edge Plasma In NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S. J.

    2014-02-20

    This paper describes a detailed examination of the effects of a relatively small pulsed deuterium gas puff on the edge plasma and edge turbulence in NSTX. This gas puff caused little or no change in the line-averaged plasma density or total stored energy, or in the edge density and electron temperature up to the time of the peak of the gas puff. The radial profile of the Dα light emission and the edge turbulence within this gas puff did not vary significantly over its rise and fall, implying that these gas puffs did not significantly perturb the local edge plasma or edge turbulence. These measurements are compared with modeling by DEGAS 2, UEDGE, and with simplified estimates for the expected effects of this gas puff.

  5. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. AGN Before and After: Towards a balanced view of the connection between circumnuclear gas and nuclear black hole activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, David

    2017-08-01

    The well-known connections between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies are set by the flow of gas through the circum-nuclear environment. We are currently undertaking a detailed study of the processes that govern these multi-phase, complex flows using deep, high-resolution VLT/SINFONI IFU data and VLT/XSHOOTER spectroscopy from the optical to the near-IR. A novel feature of our program is the uniform analysis of both luminous AGN and carefully matched inactive galaxies. This provides a comparative baseline of the relevant astrophysics with enough numbers for a statistical treatment. An essential input to our study is the small-scale, filamentary structure of cold gas, best visible in dust maps based on multi-band imaging with the HST. Unfortunately, suitable archival imaging is greatly weighted towards the AGN in our sample, and over half of the inactive control have never been observed with HST. Here we propose to correct this imbalance through broad-band optical and NIR imaging of 21 galaxies with the HST/WFC3 camera. The combination of sensitive optical and NIR imaging and spectroscopic constraints at sub-arcsecond resolution will enable a uniquely detailed view of the circum-nuclear environment in our entire sample, with which we will study the dynamics of gaseous inflows and outflows, excitation conditions and black hole feedback with unprecedented contextual accuracy.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Black Hole Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avara, Mark J.

    Black holes embody one of the few, simple, solutions to the Einstein field equations that describe our modern understanding of gravitation. In isolation they are small, dark, and elusive. However, when a gas cloud or star wanders too close, they light up our universe in a way no other cosmic object can. The processes of magnetohydrodynamics which describe the accretion inflow and outflows of plasma around black holes are highly coupled and nonlinear and so require numerical experiments for elucidation. These processes are at the heart of astrophysics since black holes, once they somehow reach super-massive status, influence the evolution of the largest structures in the universe. It has been my goal, with the body of work comprising this thesis, to explore the ways in which the influence of black holes on their surroundings differs from the predictions of standard accretion models. I have especially focused on how magnetization of the greater black hole environment can impact accretion systems.

  8. Effect of fluorine plasma treatment with chemically reduced graphene oxide thin films as hole transport layer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Youn-Yeol; Kang, Byung Hyun; Lee, Yang Doo; Lee, Sang Bin; Ju, Byeong-Kwon, E-mail: bkju@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-15

    The inorganic materials such as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} were investigated to replace PEDOT:PSS as hole transport layer (HTL) in organic electronic devices such as organic solar cells (OSCs) and organic lighting emission diodes. However, these methods require vacuum techniques that are long time process and complex. Here, we report about plasma treatment with SF{sub 6} and CF{sub 4} using reactive ion etching on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films that are obtained using an eco-friendly method with vitamin C. The plasma treated rGO thin films have dipoles since they consist of covalent bonds with fluorine on the surface of rGO. This means it is possible to increase the electrostatic potential energy than bare rGO. Increased potential energy on the surface of rGO films is worth applying organic electronic devices as HTL such as OSCs. Consequently, the power conversion efficiency of OSCs increased more than the rGO films without plasma treatment.

  9. Achieving Ultrahigh Carrier Mobility in Two-Dimensional Hole Gas of Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gen; Maryenko, Denis; Shen, Junying; Xu, Shuigang; Hou, Jianqiang; Wu, Zefei; Wong, Wing Ki; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Cai, Yuan; Lortz, Rolf; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-14

    We demonstrate that a field-effect transistor (FET) made of few-layer black phosphorus (BP) encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in vacuum exhibits a room-temperature hole mobility of 5200 cm(2)/(Vs), being limited just by the phonon scattering. At cryogenic temperatures, the FET mobility increases up to 45 000 cm(2)/(Vs), which is five times higher compared to the mobility obtained in earlier reports. The unprecedentedly clean h-BN-BP-h-BN heterostructure exhibits Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and a quantum Hall effect with Landau level (LL) filling factors down to v = 2 in conventional laboratory magnetic fields. Moreover, carrier density independent effective mass of m(*) = 0.26 m0 is measured, and a Landé g-factor of g = 2.47 is reported. Furthermore, an indication for a distinct hole transport behavior with up- and down-spin orientations is found.

  10. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocarlan, C.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; 10.1063/1.4822333

    2013-01-01

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive selffocusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.01018 cm3, the peak normalized...

  11. Double core-hole spectroscopy of transient plasmas produced in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with neon

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon atomic system in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the highly transient plasmas. For x-ray pulses with photon energy in the range of 937-1030 eV, where $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonance absorption from single core-hole (SCH) states of neon charge states exist, inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects play important roles in the time evolution of population and DCH spectroscopy. Such IRA physical effects are illustrated in detail by investigating the interaction of x-ray pulses at a photon energy of 944 eV, which corresponds to the $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonant absorption from the SCH states ($1s2s^22p^4$, $1s2s2p^5$ and $1s2p^6$) of Ne$^{3+}$. After averaging over the space and time distribution o...

  12. A rapid analysis of plasma/serum ethylene and propylene glycol by headspace gas chromatography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ehlers, Alexandra; Morris, Cory; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    A rapid headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the analysis of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol in plasma and serum specimens using 1,3-propanediol as the internal standard...

  13. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma def...

  14. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Koppers, W. R.; van Rooij, G. J.; W. J. Goedheer,; Engeln, R.; D.C. Schram,; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial

  15. Gas infall into atomic cooling haloes: on the formation of protogalactic disks and supermassive black holes at z > 10

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Joaquin; Haiman, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    We have performed cosmo-hydro simulations using the RAMSES code to study atomic cooling (ACHs) haloes at z=10 with masses 5E7Msun10 to date. We examine the morphology, angular momentum (AM), thermodynamic, and turbulence of these haloes, in order to assess the prevalence of disks and supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find no correlation between either the magnitude or the direction of the AM of the gas and its parent DM halo. Only 3 haloes form rotationally supported cores. Two of the most massive haloes form massive, compact overdense blobs. These blobs have an accretion rate ~0.5 Msun/yr (at a distance of 100 pc), and are possible sites of SMBH formation. Our results suggest that the degree of rotational support and the fate of the gas in a halo is determined by its large-scale environment and merger history. In particular, the two haloes forming blobs are located at knots of the cosmic web, cooled early on, and experienced many mergers. The gas in these haloes is lumpy and highly turbulent, with Mach N....

  16. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  17. Electronic structure of dynamically two-dimensional hole gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutandi, Agustinus; Ruden, P. Paul [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, MN (United States); Brennan, Kevin F. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2002-05-03

    The electronic structure of a quasi-two-dimensional hole gas near the interface of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is examined by calculating the valence band structure in the channel region in the framework of a six-band Rashba-Sheka-Pikus (RSP) Hamiltonian. Self-consistency in the Hartree approximation is achieved. Strain effects are included through deformation potentials and through the modulation of interfacial polarization charges associated with the piezoelectric nature of the constituent materials. It is found that for hole concentrations of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, four subbands are partially populated. The effects of externally applied stress are then considered for the two distinct cases of hydrostatic stress and uniaxial stress applied parallel to the interface. While hydrostatic stress of practical magnitude appears to modulate the electronic structure only slightly, symmetry lowering uniaxial stress leads to significant changes in the population of the subbands and large dispersion anisotropies that should be detectable in piezo-mobility studies. (author)

  18. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaji, T., E-mail: asaji@oshima-k.ac.jp; Ohba, T. [Oshima National College of Maritime Technology, 1091-1 Komatsu, Suo-oshima, Oshima, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan); Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Racz, R.; Biri, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem Tér 18/c (Hungary); Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  19. Generation Control of ZnO Nanoparticles Using a Coaxial Gas-Flow Pulse Plasma Ar/O2 Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Shirahata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of ZnO nanoparticles was investigated using a coaxial gas-flow pulse plasma. We studied how zinc atoms, sputtered from a zinc target, reacted with oxygen in a plasma and/or on a substrate to form ZnO nanoparticles when the discharge parameters, such as applied pulse voltage and gas flow rate, were controlled in an O2/Ar plasma. The formation processes were estimated by SEM, TEM, and EDX. We observed many ZnO nanoparticles deposited on Si substrate. The particle yield and size were found to be controlled by changing the experimental parameters. The diameter of the particles was typically 50–200 nm.

  20. Resonance radiation and high excitation of neutrals in plasma-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litnovsky, A.M. E-mail: litnovsky@mtu-net.ru; Khripunov, B.I.; Sholin, G.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Shapkin, V.V.; Antonov, N.V

    2001-03-01

    Experimental investigation of plasma-gas interaction has been performed in LENTA linear facility in order to model processes expected to occur in the divertor of a fusion tokamak reactor. Steady-state helium plasma with density {approx}(0.2-3)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} generated by beam-plasma discharge flowed into the region with high neutral pressure, interacted with neutral helium there and then reached the target plate. An intensive volume recombination and significant decrease in plasma pressure have been observed while the plasma stream interacted with gas target. Electron temperature fell below 1 eV. These processes were accompanied by an intensive emission from highly excited helium atoms and this radiation became even higher with increase in neutral pressure. Microwave emission absorption at high (P{sub gas}=20 mTorr) neutral pressures in the gas target was detected. A model of plasma-gas transition layer was developed to provide physics understanding of these phenomena. Resonance radiation and stimulated radiative recombination play an important role in this model.

  1. Soft X-ray Tangential Imaging of the NSTX Core Plasma by Means of a MPGD Pin-hole Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Pacella; M. Leigheb; R. Bellazzini; A. Brez; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; R. Kaita; S.A. Sabbagh

    2003-07-24

    A fast X-ray system based on a Micro Pattern Gas Detector has been used, for the first time, to investigate emission from the plasma core of the National Spherical Tokamak eXperiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The results presented in this work demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure with a time resolution of the order of 1 ms the curvature and the elongation of the X-ray iso-emissivity contours, under various plasma conditions. Also, comparisons with the magnetic surface structure calculated by the EFIT code show good agreement between reconstructed flux surface and the soft X-ray emissions (SXR) for poloidal beta values up to 0.6. For greater values of beta, X-ray iso-emissivity contours become circular, while magnetic flux surface reconstructions yield elongation 1.5 < k < 2.2. The X-ray images have been acquired with a (statistical) signal to noise ratio (SNR) per pixel of about 30. Thanks to the direct and efficient X-ray conversion and its operation in a photon counting mode, this new diagnostic tool allows the routine investigation of the plasma core with a sampling rate of 1 kHz and extremely high SNR under all experimental conditions in NSTX.

  2. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  3. Effects of additional vapors on sterilization of microorganism spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Some fundamental experiments are carried out in order to develop a plasma process that will uniformly sterilize both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen are each used as the plasma source gas to which mixed vapors of water and ethanol at different ratios are added. The reactor chamber is remotely located from the plasma area and a metal mesh for eliminating charged particles is installed between them. Thus, only reactive neutral particles such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are utilized. As a result, adding vapors to the source gas markedly enhances the sterilization effect. In particular, air with water and/or ethanol vapor and oxygen with ethanol vapor show more than 6-log reduction for Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

  4. Analysis on discharge process of a plasma-jet triggered gas spark switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihao, TIE; Cui, MENG; Yuting, ZHANG; Zirang, YAN; Qiaogen, ZHANG

    2018-01-01

    The plasma-jet triggered gas switch (PJTGS) could operate at a low working coefficient with a low jitter. We observed and analyzed the discharge process of the PJTGS at the lowest working coefficient of 47% with the trigger voltage of 40 kV and the pulse energy of 2 J to evaluate the effect of the plasma jet. The temporal and spatial evolution and the optical emission spectrum of the plasma jet were captured. And the spraying delay time and outlet velocity under different gas pressures were investigated. In addition, the particle in cell with Monte Carlo collision was employed to obtain the particle distribution of the plasma jet varying with time. The results show that, the plasma jet generated by spark discharge is sprayed into a spark gap within tens of nanoseconds, and its outlet velocity could reach 104 m s‑1. The plasma jet plays a non-penetrating inducing role in the triggered discharge process of the PJTGS. On the one hand, the plasma jet provides the initial electrons needed by the discharge; on the other hand, a large number of electrons focusing on the head of the plasma jet distort the electric field between the head of the plasma jet and the opposite electrode. Therefore, a fast discharge originated from the plasma jet is induced and quickly bridges two electrodes.

  5. Cold atmospheric gas plasma disinfection of chicken meat and chicken skin contaminated with Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, Estefanía; Shama, Gilbert; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario; Kong, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    Gas plasmas generated at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperatures offer a possible decontamination method for poultry products. The efficacy of cold atmospheric gas plasmas for decontaminating chicken skin and muscle inoculated with Listeria innocua was examined. Optimization of operating conditions for maximal bacterial inactivation was first achieved using membrane filters on which L. innocua had been deposited. Higher values of AC voltage, excitation frequency and the presence of oxygen in the carrier gas resulted in the greatest inactivation efficiency, and this was confirmed with further studies on chicken muscle and skin. Under optimal conditions, a 10 s treatment gave > 3 log reductions of L. innocua on membrane filters, an 8 min treatment gave 1 log reduction on skin, and a 4 min treatment gave > 3 log reductions on muscle. These results show that the efficacy of gas plasma treatment is greatly affected by surface topography. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of chicken muscle and skin revealed surface features wherein bacteria could effectively be protected from the chemical species generated within the gas plasma. The developments in gas plasma technology necessary for its commercial application to foods are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced electron yield from a laser-plasma accelerator using high-Z gas jet targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Li, Song; Sokollik, Thomas; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the multi-hundred MeV electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, neon and argon gas jet plasmas in a laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment was carried out. The charge measurement has been made via imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a 14-bit charge coupled device (CCD) which was cross-calibrated with nondestructive electronics-based method. Within given laser and plasma parameters, we found that laser-driven low Z- gas jet targets generate high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with reasonable yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which were observed from high-Z gas jets at higher densities reached much higher yield. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in high-Z gases, especially in the argon gas jet target where we received the highest yield of ~ 3 nC

  7. Feedback by Massive Black Holes in Gas-rich Dwarf Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, Joseph [Institut d’Astrophysique, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/IRFU, CNRS, Univ Paris 7, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-10

    Could there be intermediate-mass black holes in essentially all old dwarf galaxies? I argue that current observations of active galactic nuclei in dwarfs allow such a radical hypothesis that provides early feedback during the epoch of galaxy formation and potentially provides a unifying explanation for many, if not all, of the dwarf galaxy anomalies, such as the abundance, core-cusp, “too-big-to-fail,” ultra-faint, and baryon-fraction issues. I describe the supporting arguments, which are largely circumstantial, and discuss a number of tests. There is no strong motivation for modifying the nature of cold dark matter in order to explain any of the dwarf galaxy “problems.”.

  8. Emission Lines from the Gas Disk Around TW Hydra and the Origin of the Inner Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Najita, J.; Pascucci, I.

    2011-01-01

    We compare line emission calculated from theoretical disk models with optical to submillimeter wavelength observational data of the gas disk surrounding TW Hya and infer the spatial distribution of mass in the gas disk. The model disk that best matches observations has a gas mass ranging from approx.10(exp -4) to 10(exp -5) M for 0.06AU 13.6 eV) flux from TW Hya. H2 pure rotational line emission comes primarily from r approx. 1 to 30 AU. [Oi] 63microns, HCO+, and CO pure rotational lines all arise from the outer disk at r approx. 30-120 AU. We discuss planet formation and photoevaporation as causes for the decrease in surface density of gas and dust inside 4 AU. If a planet is present, our results suggest a planet mass approx. 4-7MJ situated at 3 AU. Using our photoevaporation models and the best surface density profile match to observations, we estimate a current photoevaporative mass loss rate of 4x10(exp -9M)/yr and a remaining disk lifetime of approx.5 million years.

  9. Injection of Ballistic Hot Electrons and Cool Holes in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, J.G.; Houten, H. van; Beenakker, C.W.J.; Broekaart, M.E.I.; Spendeler, L.I.A.; Wees, B.J. van; Foxon, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    We have constructed a novel magnetic spectrometer to study the dynamics of hot electrons and cool missing electron states injected by quantum point contacts in the two-dimensional electron gas of a GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs heterostructure. The mean free path of these quasi-particles is found to be longer

  10. Modeling of gas breakdown and early transients of plasma evolution in cylindrical all-dielectric resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneer Chelvam, P.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the computational modeling of gas break down and evolution of plasma in an all-dielectric resonator structure. Two cylindrical dielectric resonators (DR) of diameter 25 mm with material relative permittivity of 172.5 separated by a 1 mm gap are observed to resonate in a strong constructive interference mode (CIM) at 1.47 GHz. The electric fields in the gap between the DRs are amplified to about 30 times the incident wave strength which leads to gas breakdown in argon at 10 Torr. The species densities in the bulk of plasma rise primarily due to the wave power addition into the plasma. As the species densities rise above 1017 m‑3, the bulk plasma acts as a lossy material and the wave experiences significant damping through collisional losses. As plasma densities in the bulk rise to around 1018 m‑3, the wave is damped significantly in the bulk, and a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave mode develops at the interface of plasma sheath and the DR surfaces. These surface waves are initiated due to a thin negative permittivity region of the plasma in the vicinity of the DR surface. The quasi-steady state operation of the resonator system depends on the propagation of the damped CIM in the bulk regions of the plasma, the SPP waves in the sheath region and the slower ambipolar diffusion process in plasma. Gas temperature rise in plasma is found to be small throughout the time scales considered and electrostatic fields are found to play an equally important role for large plasma densities in the sheath regions.

  11. HST FOS spectroscopy of M87: Evidence for a disk of ionized gas around a massive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Richard J.; Ford, Holland C.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Hartig, George F.; Dressel, Linda L.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Bohlin, Ralph; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Margon, Bruce; Kochhar, Ajay K.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to observe the central region of M87, we have obtained spectra covering approximately 4600-6800 A at a spectral dispersion approximately 4.4 A per resolution element through the .26 sec diameter entrance aperture. One spectrum was obtained centered on the nucleus of M87 and two centered 0.25 sec off the nucleus at position angles of 21 deg and 201 deg, thus sampling the anticipated major axis of the disklike structure (described in a companion Letter) expected to lie approximately perpendicular to the axis of the M87 jet. Pointing errors for these observations are estimated to be less than 0.02 sec. Radial velocities of the ionized gas in the two positions 0.25 sec on either side of the nucleus are measured to be approx. equals +/- 500 km/s relative to the M87 systemic velocity. These observations plus emission-line spectra obtained at two additional locations near the nucleus show the ionized gas to be in Keplerian rotation about a mass M = (2.4 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp 9) solar mass within the inner 0.25 sec of M87. Our results provide strong evidence for the presence of a supermassive nuclear black hole in M87.

  12. Narrowband HST images of M87: Evidence for a disk of ionized gas around a massive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Holland C.; Harms, Richard J.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Hartig, George F.; Dressel, Linda L.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Margon, Bruce; Kochhar, Ajay K.

    1994-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (HST WFPC2) narrowband H-alpha + (N II) images of M87 which show a small disk of ionized gas with apparent spiral structure surrounding the nucleus of M87. The jet projects approximately 19.5 deg from the minor axis of the disk, which suggests that the jet is approximately normal to the disk. In a companion Letter, Harms et al. measure the radial velocities at r = +/- 0.25 sec along a line perpendicular to the jet, showing that one side of the disk is approaching at 500 +/- 50 km/s and the other side of the disk is receding at 500 +/- 50 km/s. Absorption associated with the disk and the sense of rotation imply that the apparent spiral arms trail the rotation. The observed radial velocites corrected for a 42 deg inclination of the disk imply rotation at +/- 750 km/s. Analysis of velocity measurements at four positions near the nucleus gives a total mass of approximately 2.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(exp 9) solar mass within 18 pc of the nucleus, and a mass-to-light ratio (M/L)(sub I) = 170. We conclude that there is a disk of ionized gas feeding a massive black hole in the center of M87.

  13. A Plasma Opening Switch Based on a Gas-Puff/Axial Wire Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Joseph; de Grouchy, Philip; Ouart, Nicholas; Qi, Niansheng; Atoyan, Levon; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce; Giuliani, John

    2015-11-01

    We are investigating an idea for switching current from a gas-puff shell to an axial metal wire as a mechanism for generating inductive voltage spikes and x-rays above 10 keV. The outer annulus of a 7 cm. diameter triple-annular gas-puff nozzle is used to inject gas into the electrode gap of the COBRA 1 MA generator, with a single wire on-axis. We show that the current pulse produced by COBRA initially travels through the lower inductance pre-ionized outer shell plasma, generating an azimuthal magnetic field which drives this shell radially inwards. Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth occurs on the outer edge of this imploding plasma, which disrupts the current carrying column, inhibiting the axial flow of current through the gas-puff plasma and possibly causing the current to switch to the higher inductance wire. A disruption to the current through the gas-puff shell caused by instability growth should be measurable as a voltage spike, as the current finds a new path either through the wire or elsewhere in the imploding plasma shell. We investigate this effect as instability conditions are varied, by adjusting the density and species of the injected gas. This work was sponsored by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE cooperative agreement.

  14. Using open hole and cased-hole resistivity logs to monitor gas hydrate dissociation during a thermal test in the mallik 5L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.I.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Dubourg, I.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates, which are naturally occurring ice-like combinations of gas and water, have the potential to provide vast amounts of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. However, producing gas economically from hydrates entails major technical challenges. Proposed recovery methods such as dissociating or melting gas hydrates by heating or depressurization are currently being tested. One such test was conducted in northern Canada by the partners in the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. This paper describes how resistivity logs were used to determine the size of the annular region of gas hydrate dissociation that occurred around the wellbore during the thermal test in the Mallik 5L-38 well. An open-hole logging suite, run prior to the thermal test, included array induction, array laterolog, nuclear magnetic resonance and 1.1-GHz electromagnetic propagation logs. The reservoir saturation tool was run both before and after the thermal test to monitor formation changes. A cased-hole formation resistivity log was run after the test.Baseline resistivity values in each formation layer (Rt) were established from the deep laterolog data. The resistivity in the region of gas hydrate dissociation near the wellbore (Rxo) was determined from electromagnetic propagation and reservoir saturation tool measurements. The radius of hydrate dissociation as a function of depth was then determined by means of iterative forward modeling of cased-hole formation resistivity tool response. The solution was obtained by varying the modeled dissociation radius until the modeled log overlaid the field log. Pretest gas hydrate production computer simulations had predicted that dissociation would take place at a uniform radius over the 13-ft test interval. However, the post-test resistivity modeling showed that this was not the case. The resistivity-derived dissociation radius was greatest near the outlet of the pipe that circulated hot water in the wellbore

  15. Equilibrium gas pressure in various operating modes of ion-plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, C. V.; Movsesyants, Yu B.; Tyuryukanov, P. M.

    2017-07-01

    The results of measurements gas equilibrium pressure and elemental composition for various operating modes of two-stage ion-plasma accelerators using a discharge in a transverse strongly inhomogeneous magnetic field are presented. It is established that the gas pressure in the chamber is most strongly changed at small ion currents to the collector. The main process of gas separation is the desorption from the surface of the electrodes under the action of low-energy ions. In steady state, with an accelerating voltage more than 1 kV, the gas pressure changes slightly. The main process is spraying.

  16. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  17. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  18. New gamma-ray spectrum from a quark-gluon plasma photosphere around an evaporating primordial black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, W P

    1999-01-01

    It has been shown that once the surface temperature of a primordial black hole (PBH) surpasses LAMBDA sub Q sub C sub D = 200 MeV, the quarks and the gluons emitted through Hawking radiation interact with one another via quantum chromodynamics (QCD) Bremsstrahlung and pair production. They form a nearly thermal quark-gluon plasma (QGP) photosphere, which subsequently expands outward. As a consequence, the quark and the gluons in the photosphere scatter and dramatically lose energy as they propagate away from the PBH. The emergent GAMMA-ray spectrum intensity from pi sup 0 -> 2 GAMMA, which occurs when the quarks and the gluons fragment into hadrons at the outer QGP photosphere, peaks at about E subGAMMA ? 100 MeV, but the intensity is higher than that of the previous published QCD calculation. Here, we calculate the spectrum of the GAMMA-rays which emerge directly from inside of the QGP photosphere and which are due to the quark-antiquark annihilation and the QCD compton processes. We find for T sub p sub b s...

  19. Analysis of whole blood samples with low gas flow inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Sascha; Künnemeyer, Jens; Terborg, Lydia; Trümpler, Stefan; Günsel, Andreas; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Karst, Uwe; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Low gas flow ICP-OES with a total argon consumption below 0.7 L/min is introduced for the analysis of trace elements in blood samples to investigate the influence of samples containing an organic solvent in a demanding matrix on the performance of this plasma for the first time. Therefore, gadolinium was determined in human plasma samples and mercury in red blood cells, human plasma, and precipitated plasma protein fraction. Limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be in the low microgram per liter range for the analytes and the accuracy of the method was assessed by comparison with a conventional Fassel-type torch-based ICP-OES. It was proven that the low gas flow ICP-OES leads to comparable results with the instrument based on the Fassel-type torch.

  20. The effect of clusters and heterogeneous reactions on non-equilibrium plasma flue gas cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapkin, B. V.; Deminsky, M. A.; Fridman, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.

    1995-06-01

    Theoretical investigation of the effect of molecular clusters and aerosol particles on non-equilibrium plasma flue gas cleaning was made in this paper. Two types of heterogeneous reactions in aerosol and clusters are considered. It was shown that in both cases these reactions are essential in the evaluation of chemical composition. As a result of theoretical approach and modelling, the optimum regime of plasma generation for essential decreasing of purification energy cost was established.

  1. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    halide ions as possible gas temperature to 11)0) K results in the gaia coefficient rising VUV laser-active media. Following the trend toward higher...breakdown studies by the school of Meek and Craggs [831. To [94]. At high pressures, CO,. is the dominant negative ion. avoid extremely high voltages

  2. Magnetogasdynamic effects during the interaction between a gas and erosion plasma flows in a magnetoplasma compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelian, N. V.; Kamrukov, A. S.; Kozlov, N. P.; Kosmachevskii, K. V.; Popov, Iu. P.

    The physics of the interaction between a gas and erosion plasma flows is examined with reference to the results of a numerical experiment. It is shown that the interaction of a radially inhomogeneous flow with a deformable gas obstacle leads to the formation of a conical shock MHD-wave, with a local increase in pressure, temperature, and magnetic field at its front. Behind the shock wave, the plasma flow turns parallel to the contact boundary, with a noticeable increase in the radial velocity component. This leads to a significant increase in flow cumulation efficiency in comparison with a vacuum magnetoplasma compressor.

  3. Effects of cold atmospheric gas phase plasma on anthocyanins and color in pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursać Kovačević, Danijela; Putnik, Predrag; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica; Pedisić, Sandra; Režek Jambrak, Anet; Herceg, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate effects of cold atmospheric gas phase plasma on anthocyanins and color in pomegranate juice. Outcomes of plasma treatment were observed at different operating conditions: (i) treatment time (3, 5, 7 min), (ii) treated juice volume (3, 4, 5 cm(3)), and (iii) gas flow (0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3)/min). The greatest anthocyanin stability was found at: 3 min treatment time, 5 cm(3) sample volume, and 0.75 dm(3)/min gas flow. Plasma treatment yielded higher anthocyanin content from 21% to 35%. Multivariate analysis showed that total color change was not associated with sample volume and treatment time, however it declined with increased gas flow. The change of color increased in comparison treated vs. untreated pomegranate juice. Constructed mathematical equation confirmed that increase of anthocyanin content increased with gas flow, sample volume and change in color. In summary, this study showed that plasma treatment had positive influences on anthocyanins stability and color change in cloudy pomegranate juice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of gas composition on spore mortality and etching during low-pressure plasma sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerouge, S; Wertheimer, M R; Marchand, R; Tabrizian, M; Yahia, L

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate possible mechanisms of sterilization by low-temperature gas plasma: spore destruction by plasma is compared with etching of synthetic polymers. Bacillus subtilis spores were inoculated at the bottom of glass vials and subjected to different plasma gas compositions (O(2), O(2)/Ar, O(2)/H(2), CO(2), and O(2)/CF(4)), all known to etch polymers. O(2)/CF(4) plasma exhibited much higher efficacy than all other gases or gas mixtures tested, with a more than 5 log decrease in 7.5 min, compared with a 2 log decrease with pure oxygen. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed that spores were significantly etched after 30 min of plasma exposure, but not completely. We speculate about their etch resistance compared with that of synthetic polymers on the basis of their morphology and complex coating structure. In contrast to so-called in-house plasma, sterilization by Sterrad(R) tended to increase the observed spores' size; chemical modification (oxidation), rather than etching, is believed to be the sterilization mechanism of Sterrad(R). Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Propagation of short pulses in a non-uniform gas-jet induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2017-11-01

    A formalism describing the propagation of short duration (sub-picosecond) Gaussian pulses in a preformed axially non-uniform collisionless plasma has been established; a plasma inhomogeneity consistent with the gas jet induced plasma as super-Gaussian (flat-top) profile has been considered herein. In order to specify the pulse dynamics using nonlinear Schrödinger wave equation (NLSE) in paraxial regime, a set of coupled equations characterizing the transverse focusing (in space) and temporal compression (in time) of the laser pulse has been derived, and further solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of the pulse as it advances through gas jet induced plasma. The effect of plasma inhomogeneity parameters on the characteristic features of the pulse propagation have been analysed and illustrated graphically. The focusing and axial intensity of the propagating pulse is observed to be sensitive to the plasma profile (gas jet parameters), and the focusing length can be tuned up to desired extent by suitable choice of the inhomogeneity parameters.

  6. Gas flow dependence for plasma-needle disinfection of S. mutans bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goree, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Liu Bin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Drake, David [Dows Institute for Dental Research, Dept. of Endodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2006-08-21

    The role of gas flow and transport mechanisms are studied for a small low-power impinging jet of weakly-ionized helium at atmospheric pressure. This plasma needle produces a non-thermal glow discharge plasma that kills bacteria. A culture of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) was plated onto the surface of agar, and spots on this surface were then treated with plasma. Afterwards, the sample was incubated and then imaged. These images, which serve as a biological diagnostic for characterizing the plasma, show a distinctive spatial pattern for killing that depends on the gas flow rate. As the flow is increased, the killing pattern varies from a solid circle to a ring. Images of the glow reveal that the spatial distribution of energetic electrons corresponds to the observed killing pattern. This suggests that a bactericidal species is generated in the gas phase by energetic electrons less than a millimetre from the sample surface. Mixing of air into the helium plasma is required to generate the observed O and OH radicals in the flowing plasma. Hydrodynamic processes involved in this mixing are buoyancy, diffusion and turbulence.

  7. Gas Sensors Based on Tin Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized from a Mini-Arc Plasma Source

    OpenAIRE

    Ganhua Lu; Huebner, Kyle L.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovska; Junhong Chen

    2006-01-01

    Miniaturized gas sensors or electronic noses to rapidly detect and differentiate trace amount of chemical agents are extremely attractive. In this paper, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a functional tin oxide nanoparticle gas sensor. Tin oxide nanoparticles are first synthesized using a convenient and low-cost mini-arc plasma source. The nanoparticle size distribution is measured online using a scanning electrical mobility spectrometer (SEMS). The product nanoparticles a...

  8. Gas heating and plasma expansion in pulsed microwave-excited microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Yared, Alexander; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Microwave resonators are used to generate microplasmas in atmospheric-pressure argon and helium. We present observations of the transient behavior of a microplasma after a fast increase in power, including time-resolved photography and spectroscopic gas temperature measurements. The results show that in argon both plasma filamentation and gas heating continue out to millisecond time scales, while helium microplasmas reach steady-state conditions after a few microseconds.

  9. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  10. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  11. Relative Contribution of Volume and Surface-Plasma Generation of Negative Ions in Gas Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    The relative contribution of volume and surface-plasma generation of extracted ?- ions in gas discharge sources will be analyzed. At the present time, it is well known that surface-plasma generation of extracted ?- ion is dominate above volume processes in discharges with admixture of cesium or other catalysts with low ionization potential. We will attract attention to evidences, that surface-plasma generation can be enhanced in high density discharges without cesium after electrode activation by high temperature conditioning in discharge. A diffusion of impurity with a low ionization potential can be a reason of observed enhancement of H-

  12. On the Internal Gas Dynamics and Efficiency of a Vortex Water-Vapor Plasma Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charakhovski, L.; Essiptchouk, A.; Otani, C.; Petraconi, G.; Marquesi, A.; Sauchyn, V.; Khvedchyn, I.; Olenovich, A.; Liavonchyk, A.; Skamarokhau, D.; Halinouski, A.

    2017-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a new-type generator of an arc water plasma, having a high thermal efficiency close to 100%, are presented. This generator represents a system comprising a vortex arc plasma generator, in which an electric arc is stabilized by water vapor and a straight-through-flow tubular electric steam generator. Such a high efficiency of the plasma generator system was achieved due to the refinement of the internal gas dynamics of the plasma generator and the heat and mass transfer in its discharge channel as a result of the improvement of the vortex stabilization and thermal insulation of an arc discharge in it by the specially organized ″instantly permeable″ channel wall cooled by only the working water used for generation of the plasma.

  13. Analysis of a gas-liquid film plasma reactor for organic compound oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kevin [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Wang, Huijuan [School of Environmental and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Locke, Bruce R., E-mail: blocke@fsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Non-homogeneous filamentary plasma discharge formed along gas-liquid interface. • Hydrogen peroxide formed near interface favored over organic oxidation from liquid. • Post-plasma Fenton reactions lead to complete utilization of hydrogen peroxide. - Abstract: A pulsed electrical discharge plasma formed in a tubular reactor with flowing argon carrier gas and a liquid water film was analyzed using methylene blue as a liquid phase hydroxyl radical scavenger and simultaneous measurements of hydrogen peroxide formation. The effects of liquid flow rate, liquid conductivity, concentration of dye, and the addition of ferrous ion on dye decoloration and degradation were determined. Higher liquid flow rates and concentrations of dye resulted in less decoloration percentages and hydrogen peroxide formation due to initial liquid conductivity effects and lower residence times in the reactor. The highest decoloration energy yield of dye found in these studies was 5.2 g/kWh when using the higher liquid flow rate and adding the catalyst. The non-homogeneous nature of the plasma discharge favors the production of hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-liquid interface over the chemical oxidation of the organic in the bulk liquid phase and post-plasma reactions with the Fenton catalyst lead to complete utilization of the plasma-formed hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Emerging applications of low temperature gas plasmas in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alex; Shama, Gilbert; Iza, Felipe

    2015-06-16

    The global burden of foodborne disease due to the presence of contaminating micro-organisms remains high, despite some notable examples of their successful reduction in some instances. Globally, the number of species of micro-organisms responsible for foodborne diseases has increased over the past decades and as a result of the continued centralization of the food processing industry, outbreaks now have far reaching consequences. Gas plasmas offer a broad range of microbicidal capabilities that could be exploited in the food industry and against which microbial resistance would be unlikely to occur. In addition to reducing the incidence of disease by acting on the micro-organisms responsible for food spoilage, gas plasmas could also play a role in increasing the shelf-life of perishable foods and thereby reduce food wastage with positive financial and environmental implications. Treatment need not be confined to the food itself but could include food processing equipment and also the environment in which commercial food processing occurs. Moreover, gas plasmas could also be used to bring about the degradation of undesirable chemical compounds, such as allergens, toxins, and pesticide residues, often encountered on foods and food-processing equipment. The literature on the application of gas plasmas to food treatment is beginning to reveal an appreciation that attention needs also to be paid to ensuring that the key quality attributes of foods are not significantly impaired as a result of treatment. A greater understanding of both the mechanisms by which micro-organisms and chemical compounds are inactivated, and of the plasma species responsible for this is forming. This is significant, as this knowledge can then be used to design plasma systems with tailored compositions that will achieve maximum efficacy. Better understanding of the underlying interactions will also enable the design and implementation of control strategies capable of minimizing variations in

  15. UV radiation of the GTA welding plasma versus shielding gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioffe, I.; Koss, V.; Perelman, N.; Hilton, D.

    1997-03-01

    UV radiation during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding in argon/helium shielding gas mixtures versus gas composition and arc length has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. UV radiation was found to increase with an increase of argon concentration in the mixture. A physical model describing this phenomenon has been developed. The model predicts an increase in the total amount of ions in the mixture with an increase of argon concentration despite a decrease in plasma temperature. The result of calculations using the model is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Selective etching of semicrystalline polymers CF4 gas plasma treatment of poly(ethylene)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde riekerink, M.B.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Feijen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    A series of poly(ethylene) (PE) films with different degrees of crystallinity was treated with a radio-frequency tetrafluoromethane (CF4) gas plasma (48-49 W, 0.06-0.07 mbar, and continuous vs pulsed treatment). The etching behavior and surface chemical and structural changes of the PE films were

  17. Physiological and transcriptional response of Bacillus cereus treated with low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims - This study was conducted to investigate the inactivation kinetics of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells upon exposure to low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma and to reveal the mode of inactivation by transcriptome profiling. Methods and Results - Exponentially growing B. cereus cells were

  18. Geohydrologic and water-quality characterization of a fractured-bedrock test hole in an area of Marcellus shale gas development, Tioga County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Risser, Dennis W.; Hand , K.L; Clifford H. Dodge,

    2013-01-01

    An integrated analysis of core, geophysical logs, gas isotopes, and specific-depth water-quality samples from the Cherry Flats test hole was used to characterize the stratigraphy, water-bearing zones, and groundwater quality at a site in southern Tioga County, Pennsylvania. The study was completed as a cooperative effort between the Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey (BTGS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The multi-disciplinary characterization of the test hole provided information to aid the bedrock mapping of the Cherry Flats 7.5-minute quadrangle by BTGS, and to help quantify the depth and character of fresh and saline groundwater in an area of shale-gas exploration. The Cherry Flats test hole was cored to a depth of 1,513 feet (ft) below land surface (bls) and cased to 189 ft through the collapsed mine workings of the former Arnot No. 2 underground coal mine. The test hole penetrated

  19. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  20. Processes of noble gas elemental and isotopic fractionations in plasma-produced organic solids: Cosmochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Maïa; Cernogora, Guy; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent; Marty, Bernard

    2017-11-01

    The main carrier of primordial heavy noble gases in chondrites is thought to be an organic phase, known as phase Q, whose precise characterization has resisted decades of investigation. The Q noble gas component shows elemental and isotopic fractionation relative to the Solar, in favor of heavy elements and isotopes. These noble gas characteristics were experimentally simulated using a plasma device called the ;Nebulotron;. In this study, we synthesized thirteen solid organic samples by electron-dissociation of CO, in which a noble gas mixture was added. The analysis of their heavy noble gas (Ar, Kr and Xe) contents and isotopic compositions reveals enrichment in the heavy noble gas isotopes and elements relative to the light ones. The isotope fractionation is mass-dependent and is consistent with a mn-type law, where n ≥ 1. Based on a plasma model, we propose that the ambipolar diffusion of ions in the ionized CO gas medium is at the origin of the noble gas isotopic fractionation. In addition, the elemental fractionation of experimental and chondritic samples can be accounted for by the Saha law of plasma equilibrium, which does not depend on the respective noble gas masses but rather on their ionization potentials. Our results suggest that the Q noble gases were trapped into growing organic particles starting from solar gases that were fractionated in an ionized medium by ambipolar diffusion and Saha processes. This would imply that both the formation of chondritic organic matter and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk.

  1. Application of low pressure plasma spray technique to heavy duty gas turbine. Hatsuden yo gas turbine ni okeru gen prime atsu plasma yosha gijutsu no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, I.; Takahashi, K.; Hirota, N. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-25

    Efficiency of gas turbine depends upon many factors and turbine inlet gas temperature is one of them. In order to obtain high efficiency, it is necessary to increase turbine inlet gas temperature. As the above temperature becomes higher, the surface treatment by plasma spray has been applied as the technique for thermal insulation, antifriction, and hot corrosion resistance. In this article, the low pressure plasma spray (LPPS) equipment, Swiss make, which the Takasago Plant, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries introduced in 1986 and the other one introduced likewise later, the features of LPPS coating and examples of application of LPPS are stated. Concerning LPPS, its powder particle has big impact energy because of its very high flying velocity, hence dense coating is obtained. In case when metallic powder is sprayed, no contamination of the powder is made by oxidation during the spray, and the amount of oxide in the coating is extremely few. Mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of the coating is better than those of atmospheric pressure spray (APS). LPPS is applied to hot corrosion resisting coating and insulation coating, etc. of turbine blades, etc.. 12 figs.

  2. Application of plasma spray technique to heavy duty gas turbine. Hatsuden yo gas turbine ni okeru plasma yosha gijutsu no oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K.; Tsuji, I. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-10-30

    Gas turbines are regarded useful for the effective use of energy resources, and are expected for their high efficiency and improved reliability, especially in the area of power generation. This report introduces an application of the plasma flame coating technology as one of the most advance technology in the production of a gas turbine for power generation of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. This report describes the following items. Progress diagram for higher performance of Mitsubishi gas turbines. Heat-shielding coating for the burner (top coat being ZrO {sub 2}-24 MgO). Wear-resistant coating (Cr {sub 3} C {sub 2}-25 NiCr). Cross sectional micro-structure of high temperature corrosion resistant coating (CoNiCrAlY). Application of low pressure plasma flame coating. Turbine blade TBC (Fender coat CoNiCrAlY, top coat ZrO {sub 2}-8Y {sub 2} O {sub 3}). Effect of TBC application to the parent material strength. TBC application to the static blade of the turbine. 10 figs.

  3. Optimization of plasma sampling depth and aerosol gas flow rates for single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kálomista, Ildikó; Kéri, Albert; Galbács, Gábor

    2017-09-01

    We performed experiments to assess the separate and also the combined effect of the sampling depth and the aerosol gas flow rates on the signal formation in single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) measurements by using dispersions containing Ag and Au NPs. It was found that the NP signal can significantly be improved by the optimization of the sampling depth. With respect to the "robust" setting, a signal improvement of nearly 100% could be achieved, which translates into a 25-30% improvement in size detection limits. It was also found that the shape of the spICP-MS signal histograms also change with the change of the plasma sampling depth. It was demonstrated that nanoparticle peak separation can also be significantly enhanced by using sampling depth optimization. The effect of the aerosol dilution gas flow, now standard in most ICP-MS instruments, on the spICP-MS signal formation was also studied for the first time in the literature, as this flow was hoped to make spICP-MS measurements more practical and faster via the on-line dilution of the aerosol generated from nano-dispersions. Our experimental results revealed that the dilution gas flow can only be used for a moderate aerosol dilution in spICP-MS measurements, if the gas flow going to the pneumatic nebulizer is proportionally lowered at the same time. This however was found to cause a significant worsening in the operation of the sample introduction system, which gives rise to a strong NP signal loss. Thus it was concluded that the use of the aerosol dilution gas flow, in its present form, can not be suggested for spICP-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Finger evolution of a gas bubble driven by atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-12-01

    We report the generation and evolution of a finger-shaped bubble in liquid by dielectric discharge setup. The spherical gas bubble is deformed into a finger-shaped bubble after the ignition of plasma. The presence of the filamentary discharge in the bubble not only provides the local heating to the bubble, it also changes the distribution of the electric field in the bubble and the bubble mutually provides the pathway to the discharge. The reduced surface tension on the liquid-gas interface due to the rise of temperature by plasma heating and the nonuniform electric field caused by the presence of filamentary discharge might induce the concave-shaped bubble. We also observe the formation of the quasi-two-dimensional bubble, which is generated from the bubble and attached on one side of the electrodes. It is found that the discharge induces the growth of the periodic fluctuations in the thin layer of gas.

  5. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    substantially 100 W. In this way, a high sound intensity and power are obtained that efficiently enhances a gas-phase reaction in the plasma, which enhances the plasma process, e.g. enabling more efficient ozone or hydrogen generation using plasma in relation to reaction speed and/or obtained concentration......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount...... of acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy...

  6. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  7. Primordial black hole evolution in two-fluid cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, E. M.; Vieyro, F. L.; Romero, G. E.

    2018-02-01

    Several processes in the early Universe might lead to the formation of primordial black holes with different masses. These black holes would interact with the cosmic plasma through accretion and emission processes. Such interactions might have affected the dynamics of the Universe and generated a considerable amount of entropy. In this paper, we investigate the effects of the presence of primordial black holes on the evolution of the early Universe. We adopt a two-fluid cosmological model with radiation and a primordial black hole gas. The latter is modelled with different initial mass functions taking into account the available constraints over the initial primordial black hole abundances. We find that certain populations with narrow initial mass functions are capable to produce significant changes in the scalefactor and the entropy.

  8. Estimation of Flow Channel Parameters for Flowing Gas Mixed with Air in Atmospheric-pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Saito, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    When the working gas of an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma flows into free space, the diameter of the resulting flow channel changes continuously. The shape of the channel is observed through the light emitted by the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure plasma. When the plasma jet forms a conical shape, the diameter of the cylindrical shape, which approximates the conical shape, defines the diameter of the flow channel. When the working gas flows into the atmosphere from the inside of a quartz tube, the gas mixes with air. The molar ratio of the working gas and air is estimated from the corresponding volume ratio through the relationship between the diameter of the cylindrical plasma channel and the inner diameter of the quartz tube. The Reynolds number is calculated from the kinematic viscosity of the mixed gas and the molar ratio. The gas flow rates for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow are determined by the corresponding Reynolds numbers estimated from the molar ratio. It is confirmed that the plasma jet length and the internal plasma length associated with strong light emission increase with the increasing gas flow rate until the rate for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow, respectively. Thus, we are able to explain the increasing trend in the plasma lengths with the diameter of the flow channel and the molar ratio by using the cylindrical approximation.

  9. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the

  10. Fatigue Property of Open-Hole Steel Plates Influenced by Bolted Clamp-up and Hole Fabrication Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yu Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Steel plates with open holes are commonly used in structural assemblies. The fatigue properties of such details are influenced by bolted clamp-up and hole fabrication methods. The fracture surface, stiffness degradation and fatigue life of test specimens are investigated in detail and compared with the contemporary test data. The analysis results show that the presence of draglines greatly influences the fatigue crack initiation at the open-hole cut by laser. The bolted clamp-up condition greatly enhances the stiffness and the fatigue life of the open-hole details. A discussion is also made from a comparison with the referred fatigue life of hole fabrication details, such as the influence of plate thickness and plasma cutting, drilling and oxy-fuel gas cutting, with the details studied herein. This work could enhance the understanding of the fatigue property and design of such details.

  11. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  12. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-10-08

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE/sub 10/ mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 ..mu..s, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations greater than or equal to 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments in Gas-Filled Hohlraums at the LIL Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Loiseau, Pascal; Casanova, Michel; Rousseaux, Christophe; Teychenne, Denis; Laffite, Stephane; Huser, Gael

    2009-11-01

    The first laser-plasma interaction campaign conducted at the LIL facility, using gas-filled hohlraums, ended in spring 09. Two different gas-filled hohlraums have been designed in order to mimic plasma conditions expected along two particular beam paths in ignition hohlraums. The targets consist of 3- or 4-millimeters long, 1 atm neo-pentane gas-filled gold hohlraums. The LIL quadruplet is aligned with the hohlraum's axis and delivers a 6-ns long pulse with 15 kJ at 3φ. Optical smoothing is achieved by longitudinal dispersion and a phase plate giving a near 10^15 W/cm^2 mean intensity on the focal spot at maximum power. Plasma conditions from hydrodynamic calculations allow to calcule SBS and SRS linear gain with the PIRANAH code. The calculated spectra are compared to experimental results. We use the paraxial code HERA to investigate the propagation of the LIL quad. Finally, 1D and 2D PIC simulations based on the plasma conditions of the cavity will be discussed in order to understand experimental SRS spectrum.

  14. PREFACE: 12th International Conference on Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, N.; Landl, N.; Bogdan, A.; Yudin, A.

    2015-11-01

    The 12th International Conference ''Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications'' (GDP 2015) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 6-11, 2015. GDP 2015 represents a continuation of the conferences on physics of gas discharge held in Russia since 1984 and seminars and conferences on the technological applications of low temperature plasmas traditionally organized in Tomsk. The six-day Conference brought together the specialists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussions on the topics that are of interest to the Conference participants. The selected papers of the Conference cover a wide range of technical areas and modern aspects of the physical processes in the generators of low-temperature plasma, the low and high-pressure discharges, the pulsed plasma sources, the surface modification, and other gas-discharge technologies. The Conference was hosted by Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk Scientific Center, and Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building.

  15. Gas phase microreaction: nanomaterials synthesis via plasma exposure of liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Diver, Declan; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interactions are complex but offer considerable scope for use in nanomaterials synthesis. The introduction of individual picolitre micro-droplets into a steady-state low temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure, offers opportunities for enhanced scope and control of plasma-liquid chemistry and material properties. The gas-phase micro-reactor is similar in concept to liquid bubble microfluidics currently under intense research but with enhanced opportunities for scale-up. For nanomaterials and quantum dot synthesis, the addition of a liquid phase within the plasma expands considerably the scope for core-shell and alloy formation. The synthesis and encapsulation within a liquid droplet allows continuous delivery of nanoparticles to remote sites for plasma medicine, device fabrication or surface coating. We have synthesized Au nanoparticles in flight using AuHCl4 droplets with plasma flight times <0.1 ms. Also, Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized downstream via the delivery of plasma exposed water droplets onto AgNO3 laden substrates. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  16. Gas reservoir and a method to supply gas to plasma tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stautner, Ernst Wolfgang; Michael, Joseph Darryl

    2017-01-31

    A reservoir for storing and supplying a portion of a reservoir gas into a gas-filled tube is presented. The reservoir includes a first vessel having a thermally conductive surface, a meshed vessel having a lid, and placed inside the first vessel to form a cavity between the meshed vessel and the first vessel, at least one tray placed inside the meshed vessel to divide an inner space of the meshed vessel into a plurality of compartments, a sorbent material placed inside the plurality of compartments in the meshed vessel, a temperature control device positioned such that a first portion of the temperature control device is in physical contact with at least a portion of the thermally conductive surface, and a change in the temperature of the temperature control device changes the temperature of the sorbent material, wherein the reservoir gas is retained by the sorbent material at the storage temperature.

  17. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  18. Effect of sheath gas in atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for potato sprouting suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Monma, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs) attract much interest for medical and agricultural applications. We try to apply APPJs for the suppression of potato sprouting in the long-term storage. In this study, we investigated the effect of sheath gas in APPJ on the suppression efficiency of the potato sprouting. Our APPJ was composed of an insulated thin wire electrode, a glass tube, a grounded electrode which was wound on the glass tube, and a sheath gas nozzle which was attached at the end of the glass tube. The wire electrode was connected to a rectangular-waveform power supply at a frequency of 3 kHz and a voltage of +/- 7 kV. Helium was fed through the glass tube, while we tested dry nitrogen, humid nitrogen, and oxygen as the sheath gas. Eyes of potatoes were irradiated by APPJ for 60 seconds. The sprouting probability was evaluated at two weeks after the plasma irradiation. The sprouting probability was 28% when we employed no sheath gases, whereas an improved probability of 10% was obtained when we applied dry nitrogen as the sheath gas. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to diagnose the plasma jet. It was suggested that reactive species originated from nitrogen worked for the efficient suppression of the potato sprouting.

  19. Sterilization of heat-sensitive silicone implant material by low-pressure gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Joerg; Esenwein, Stefan-Alexander; Awakowicz, Peter; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Köller, Manfred; Halfmann, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, plasma treatment of medical devices and implant materials has gained more and more acceptance. Inactivation of microorganisms by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation produced by plasma discharges and sterilization of medical implants and instruments is one possible application of this technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this sterilization technique on silicone implant material. Bacillus atrophaeus spores (10(6) colony-forming units [CFUs]) were sprayed on the surfaces of 12 silicone implant material samples. Four plasma sets with different gas mixtures (argon [Ar], argon-oxygen [Ar:O(2)], argon-hydrogen [Ar:H(2)] and argon-nitrogen [Ar:N(2)]) were tested for their antimicrobial properties. Post-sterilization mechanical testing of the implant material was performed in order to evaluate possible plasma-induced structural damage. The inductively coupled low-pressure plasma technique can achieve fast and efficient sterilization of silicone implant material without adverse materials effects. All four gas mixtures led to a significant spore reduction, and no structural damage to the implant material could be observed.

  20. Real time drilling mud gas response to small-moderate earthquakes in Wenchuan earthquake Scientific Drilling Hole-1 in SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Li, Haibing; Tang, Lijun; Lao, Changling; Zhang, Lei; Li, Li

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the real time drilling mud gas of the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling Hole-1 and their responses to 3918 small-moderate aftershocks happened in the Longmenshan fault zone. Gas profiles for Ar, CH4, He, 222Rn, CO2, H2, N2, O2 are obtained. Seismic wave amplitude, energy density and static strain are calculated to evaluate their power of influence to the drilling site. Mud gases two hours before and after each earthquake are carefully analyzed. In total, 25 aftershocks have major mud gas response, the mud gas concentrations vary dramatically immediately or minutes after the earthquakes. Different gas species respond to earthquakes in different manners according to local lithology encountered during the drill. The gas variations are likely controlled by dynamic stress changes, rather than static stress changes. They have the seismic energy density between 10-5 and 1.0 J/m3 whereas the static strain are mostly less than 10-8. We suggest that the limitation of the gas sources and the high hydraulic diffusivity of the newly ruptured fault zone could have inhibited the drilling mud gas behaviors, they are only able to respond to a small portion of the aftershocks. This work is important for the understanding of earthquake related hydrological changes.

  1. Fuel gas and char from pyrolysis of waste paper in a microwave plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khongkrapan, Parin; Thanompongchart, Patipat; Tippayawong, Nakorn; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a microwave plasma reactor was used for pyrolysis of waste papers. The effects of different argon flow rates on char and gas generation were investigated. Changes in carbon and oxygen contents from those in paper to char were significant. Char yield of over 25 % was obtained with the heating value of about 38 MJ/kg. Average gas yield and total content of combustible fraction (CO, CH4 and H2) in the gas product were 2.56 m3/kg and 36 %, respectively. The heating value of gas product and carbon conversion efficiency of the process were maximum at 6.0 MJ/m3 and 73 %, respectively.

  2. Determination of oxeladin in human plasma by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartigue-Mattei, C; Galmier, M J; Chabard, J L; Beyssac, E; Aiache, J M

    1995-01-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method with mass-selective detection was developed for the determination of oxeladin in human plasma. Plasma samples (1 mL) were alkalinized and extracted using 5mL of hexane: isoamyl alcohol (99:1). The method was demonstrated to be sensitive (limit of quantitation at 1 ng/mL), linear between 1 and 150 mg/mL, accurate and precise enough (mean error and mean coefficient of variation at the limit of quantitation were 2.3 and 13.3%, respectively) to support pharmacokinetic evaluation of the drug at doses down to 30 mg.

  3. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of levodropropizine plasma levels in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaratin, P; De Angelis, L; Cattabeni, F

    1988-08-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526) in plasma is described. The method proved to be highly selective and sensitive. Drug concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml could be measured. Levodropropizine plasma levels were measured in 6 healthy volunteers after administration of an acute 60 mg dose. Peak concentrations were reached between 40 and 60 min and measurable amounts of drug were present till 8 h after administration.

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in detached plasmas with impurity gas seeding in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, C., E-mail: csuzuki@nifs.ac.jp; Murakami, I.; Akiyama, T.; Masuzaki, S.; Funaba, H.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have carried out vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopy of impurity ions in detached plasmas with impurity gas seeding in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In neon (Ne) gas seeding experiments, temporal evolutions of VUV spectral lines from Ne IV–VIII were recorded by a grazing incidence spectrometer. In addition, spatial profiles of fully ionized Ne density were measured by charge exchange spectroscopy. An electron temperature range where each ion emits is inferred based on the comparisons of the measured line intensity ratios with the calculations using collisional-radiative models.

  5. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyabut Burikham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The coexistence conditions for the charged AdS black hole and radiation are derived for the generic case when radiation particles carry charge. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma (QGP and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble, respectively. In the nuclei and heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condense and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  6. Direct luminescence evidence for the degenerate electron-hole plasma formation in A/sup II/B/sup VI/ semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, M.S.; Bandura, V.M.; Matsko, M.G. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Fiziki)

    1983-09-01

    The emission spectra of ZnTe and ZnSe crystals are investigated at T = 4.2 K at high excitation densities by a Coumarin 30 and 120 dye laser. It is shown that for excitation densities R/sub exc/ > 0.1 MW/cm/sup 2/ the emission spectrum of ZnTe exhibits the P-band due to inelastic exciton-exciton scattering. For R/sub exc/ > 6 MW/cm/sup 2/ the emission of a degenerate electron-hole plasma (EHP) is observed. These emission bands may be differentiated by scanning the exciting quanta energy in the short-wavelength tail region.

  7. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet system for silicon etching without fluorocarbon gas feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Yasunori; Nagamatsu, Kenta

    2018-01-01

    We developed an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system with a tungsten rod electrode coated with C2F4 particles of approximately 0.3 µm diameter for the surface treatment of a silicon wafer. The APPJ was generated by dielectric barrier discharge with a driving frequency of 22 kHz using a He gas flow. The characteristics of the APPJ were examined under various experimental conditions. The plasma jet length increased proportionally to the electric field. It was found that the treatment area of the silicon wafer was approximately 1 mm in diameter. By atomic force microscopy analysis, minute irregularities with a maximum length of about 600 nm and part of a ring-shaped trench were observed. A Si etching rate of approximately 400 nm/min was attained at a low power of 6 W and a He flow rate of 1 L/min without introducing molecular gas including F atoms.

  8. Gas mixing enhanced by power modulations in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voráč, J.; Potočňáková, L.; Synek, P.; Hnilica, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave plasma jet operating in atmospheric pressure argon was power modulated by audio frequency sine envelope in the 102 W power range. Its effluent was imaged using interference filters and ICCD camera for several different phases of the modulating signal. The combination of this fast imaging with spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy provides useful insights into the plasmachemical processes involved. Phase-resolved schlieren photography was performed to visualize the gas dynamics. The results show that for higher modulation frequencies the plasma chemistry is strongly influenced by formation of transient flow perturbation resembling a vortex during each period. The perturbation formation and speed are strongly influenced by the frequency and power variations while they depend only weakly on the working gas flow rate. From application point of view, the perturbation presence significantly broadened lateral distribution of active species, effectively increasing cross-sectional area suitable for applications.

  9. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  10. The Second Galactic Center Black Hole? A Possible Detection of Ionized Gas Orbiting around an IMBH Embedded in the Galactic Center IRS13E Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tsutsumi, Takahiro; Uehara, Kenta; Miyoshi, Makoto; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2017-11-01

    The Galactic Center is the nuclear region of the nearest spiral galaxy, the Milky Way, and contains the supermassive black hole with M∼ 4× {10}6 {M}ȯ , Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). One of the basic questions about the Galactic Center is whether or not Sgr A* is the only “massive” black hole in the region. The IRS13E complex is a very intriguing infrared (IR) object that contains a large dark mass comparable to the mass of an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) from the proper motions of the main member stars. However, the existence of the IMBH remains controversial. There are some objections to accepting the existence of the IMBH. In this study, we detected ionized gas with a very large velocity width ({{Δ }}{v}{FWZI}∼ 650 km s‑1) and a very compact size (r∼ 400 au) in the complex using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We also found an extended component connecting with the compact ionized gas. The properties suggest that this is an ionized gas flow on the Keplerian orbit with high eccentricity. The enclosed mass is estimated to be {10}4 {M}ȯ by the analysis of the orbit. The mass does not conflict with the upper limit mass of the IMBH around Sgr A*, which is derived by the long-term astrometry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In addition, the object probably has an X-ray counterpart. Consequently, a very fascinating possibility is that the detected ionized gas is rotating around an IMBH embedded in the IRS13E complex.

  11. Black Hole Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This graphic shows the computer simulation of a black hole from start to finish. Plasma is falling slowly toward the black hole in a (at the upper left). The plasma has a magnetic field, shown by the white lines. It picks up speed as it falls toward the hole in b (at the upper right), c (lower left) and d (lower right). However, the rotating black hole twists up space itself (and the magnetic field lines) and ejects electromagnetic power along the north and south poles above the black hole. The red and white color shows the immense electromagnetic power output, which eventually will pick up particles and form squirting jets. This simulation was conducted using supercomputers at Japan's National Institute for Fusion Science.

  12. Plasma and wave phenomena induced by neutral gas releases in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate plasma and wave disturbances generated by nitrogen (N2 gas releases from the cooling system of an IR-camera on board the Vega 1 and Vega 2 spacecraft, during their flybys of comet Halley in March 1986. N2 molecules are ionized by solar UV radiation at a rate of ~ 7 · 10-7 s-1 and give rise to a plasma cloud expanding around the spacecraft. Strong disturbances due to the interaction of the solar wind with the N+2 ion cloud are observed with a plasma and wave experiment (APV-V instrument. Three gas releases are accompanied by increases in cold electron density and simultaneous decreases of the spacecraft potential; this study shows that the spacecraft potential can be monitored with a reference sensor mounted on a short boom. The comparison between the model and observations suggests that the gas expands as an exhaust plume, and approximately only 1% of the ions can escape the beam within the first meters. The releases are also associated with significant increases in wave electric field emission (8 Hz–300 kHz; this phenomenon lasts for more than one hour after the end of the release, which is most likely due to the temporary contamination of the spacecraft surface by nitrogen gas. DC electric fields associated with the events are complex but interesting. No magnetic field perturbations are detected, suggesting that no significant diamagnetic effect (i.e. magnetic cavity is associated with these events.Key words. Ionosphere (planetary ionosphere – Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; instruments and techniques

  13. Plasma and wave phenomena induced by neutral gas releases in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available We investigate plasma and wave disturbances generated by nitrogen (N2 gas releases from the cooling system of an IR-camera on board the Vega 1 and Vega 2 spacecraft, during their flybys of comet Halley in March 1986. N2 molecules are ionized by solar UV radiation at a rate of ~ 7 · 10-7 s-1 and give rise to a plasma cloud expanding around the spacecraft. Strong disturbances due to the interaction of the solar wind with the N+2 ion cloud are observed with a plasma and wave experiment (APV-V instrument. Three gas releases are accompanied by increases in cold electron density and simultaneous decreases of the spacecraft potential; this study shows that the spacecraft potential can be monitored with a reference sensor mounted on a short boom. The comparison between the model and observations suggests that the gas expands as an exhaust plume, and approximately only 1% of the ions can escape the beam within the first meters. The releases are also associated with significant increases in wave electric field emission (8 Hz–300 kHz; this phenomenon lasts for more than one hour after the end of the release, which is most likely due to the temporary contamination of the spacecraft surface by nitrogen gas. DC electric fields associated with the events are complex but interesting. No magnetic field perturbations are detected, suggesting that no significant diamagnetic effect (i.e. magnetic cavity is associated with these events.

    Key words. Ionosphere (planetary ionosphere – Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; instruments and techniques

  14. Chemical Vapor Identification by Plasma Treated Thick Film Tin Oxide Gas Sensor Array and Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Srivastava

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Present study deals the class recognition potential of a four element plasma treated thick film tin oxide gas sensor array exposed with volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Methanol, Ethanol and Acetone are selected as target VOCs and exposed on sensor array at different concentration in range from 100-1000 ppm. Sensor array consist of four tin oxide sensors doped with 1-4 % PbO concentrations were fabricated by thick film technology and then treated with oxygen plasma for 5-10 minute durations. Sensor signal is analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA for visual classification of VOCs. Further output of PCA is used as input for classification of VOCs by four pattern classification techniques as: linear discriminant analysis (LDA, k-nearest neighbor (KNN, back propagation neural network (BPNN and support vector machine (SVM. All the four classifier results 100 % correct classification rate of VOCs by response analysis of sensor array treated with plasma for 5 minute.

  15. Direct evidence of mismatching effect on H emission in laser-induced atmospheric helium gas plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zener Sukra Lie; Koo Hendrik Kurniawan [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); May On Tjia [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Physics of Magnetism and Photonics Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 10 Ganesha, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rinda, Hedwig [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K.H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha [Research Center for Physics, Indonesia Institute of Sciences, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314, Banten (Indonesia); Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid; Nasrullah Idris [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Alion Mangasi Marpaung [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Jakarta State University, Rawamangun, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Marincan Pardede [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Jobiliong, Eric [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Muliadi Ramli [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Heri Suyanto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Udayana University, Kampus Bukit Jimbaran, Denpasar 80361, Bali (Indonesia); Fukumoto, Kenichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2013-02-07

    A time-resolved orthogonal double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with helium surrounding gas is developed for the explicit demonstration of time mismatch between the passage of fast moving impurity hydrogen atoms and the formation of thermal shock wave plasma generated by the relatively slow moving major host atoms of much greater masses ablated from the same sample. Although this so-called 'mismatching effect' has been consistently shown to be responsible for the gas pressure induced intensity diminution of hydrogen emission in a number of LIBS measurements using different ambient gases, its explicit demonstration has yet to be reported. The previously reported helium assisted excitation process has made possible the use of surrounding helium gas in our experimental set-up for showing that the ablated hydrogen atoms indeed move faster than the simultaneously ablated much heavier major host atoms as signaled by the earlier H emission in the helium plasma generated by a separate laser prior to the laser ablation. This conclusion is further substantiated by the observed dominant distribution of H atoms in the forward cone-shaped target plasma.

  16. Purification of the gas after pyrolysis in coupled plasma-catalytic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Młotek Michał

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gliding discharge and coupled plasma-catalytic system were used for toluene conversion in a gas composition such as the one obtained during pyrolysis of biomass. The chosen catalyst was G-0117, which is an industrial catalyst for methane conversion manufactured by INS Pulawy (Poland. The effects of discharge power, initial concentration of toluene, gas flow rate and the presence of the bed of the G-0117 catalyst on the conversion of C7H8, a model tars compounds were investigated. Conversion of coluene increases with discharge power and the highest one was noted in the coupled plasma-catalytic system. It was higher than that in the homogeneous system of gliding discharge. When applying a reactor with reduced G-0117 and CO (0.15 mol%, CO2 (0.15 mol%, H2 (0.30 mol%, N2 (0.40 mol%, 4000 ppm of toluene and gas flow rate of 1.5 Nm3/h, the conversion of toluene was higher than 99%. In the coupled plasma-catalytic system with G-0117 methanation of carbon oxides was observed.

  17. Study of carbon dioxide gas treatment based on equations of kinetics in plasma discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, Mehdi

    2017-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) as the primary greenhouse gas, is the main pollutant that is warming earth. CO2 is widely emitted through the cars, planes, power plants and other human activities that involve the burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil). Thus, there is a need to develop some method to reduce CO2 emission. To this end, this study investigates the behavior of CO2 in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. The behavior of different species and their reaction rates are studied using a zero-dimensional model based on equations of kinetics inside plasma reactor. The results show that the plasma reactor has an effective reduction on the CO2 density inside the reactor. As a result of reduction in the temporal variations of reaction rate, the speed of chemical reactions for CO2 decreases and very low concentration of CO2 molecules inside the plasma reactor is generated. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental and simulation findings in the literature.

  18. Effects of gas atmospheres on poly(lactic acid) film in acrylic acid plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yun, E-mail: yun.zhaotju@yahoo.com [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fina, Alberto [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino – sede di Alessandria, V. T. Michel 5, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Venturello, Alberto; Geobaldo, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Plasma polymerized acrylic acid (AA) coatings were deposited on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films in various gas atmospheres during the pre-treatment of PLA and the deposition of AA, respectively. Therefore, this work was twofold: the argon pretreated PLA films followed by a deposition in argon were investigated against the mixture of argon and oxygen pretreated ones under the same deposition conditions; the plasma deposition of AA operating in different atmospheres (argon, oxygen and nitrogen) was employed to modify the pretreated PLA in oxygen. Chemical and physical changes on the plasma-treated surfaces were examined using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis. The results showed that the discharge gas can have a significant influence on the chemical composition of the PLA surfaces: oxygen plasmas introduced oxygen-containing groups in company with surface etching in pretreatment and deposition, while argon discharges was able to achieve much better hydrophilic behavior and high retention ratio of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) coating before and after washing in water.

  19. Gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Gunther, Detlef; Ohata, Masaki

    2014-10-21

    A novel gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for the direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was proposed and demonstrated in the present study. The technique is based on a transfer of gas into particle, which can be directly analyzed by ICPMS. Particles from metal carbonyl gases such as Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6 are formed by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonium (NH3) gases within a newly developed gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The reaction mechanism of the gas to particle conversion is based on either oxidation of metal carbonyl gas by O3 or agglomeration of metal oxide with ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which is generated by the reaction of O3 and NH3. To separate the reaction gases (remaining O3 and NH3) from the formed particles, a previously reported gas exchange device (GED) was used and the in argon stabilized analyte particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS. This new technique provided limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 pL L(-1) (0.32 ng m(-3)), 0.02 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)), and 0.01 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)) for Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6, respectively, which were 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than those conventional applied for detecting these gases, e.g., gas chromatography with electron captured detector (GC-ECD) as well as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The achieved LODs were also similar or slightly better than those for ICPMS coupled to GC. Since the gas to particle conversion technique can achieve the direct measurement of metal carbonyl gases as well as the removal of reaction and ambient gases from metal carbonyl gases, the technique is considered to be well suited to monitor gas quality in semiconductor industry, engine exhaust gases, and or waste incineration products.

  20. Magnetic field amplification in electron phase-space holes and related effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional electron phase-space holes are shown to have positive charges on the plasma background, which produce a radial electric field and force the trapped electron component into an azimuthal drift. In this way electron holes generate magnetic fields in the hole. We solve the cylindrical hole model exactly for the hole charge, electric potential and magnetic field. In electron holes, the magnetic field is amplified on the flux tube of the hole; equivalently, in ion holes the field would be decreased. The flux tube adjacent to the electron hole is magnetically depleted by the external hole dipole field. This causes magnetic filamentation. It is also shown that holes are massive objects, each carrying a finite magnetic moment. Binary magnetic dipole interaction of these moments will cause alignment of the holes into chains along the magnetic field or, in the three-dimensional case, produce a magnetic fabric in the volume of hole formation. Since holes, in addition to being carriers of charges and magnetic moments, also have finite masses, they behave like quasi-particles, performing E × B, magnetic field, and diamagnetic drifts. In an inhomogeneous magnetic field, their magnetic moments experience torque, which causes nutation of the hole around the direction of the magnetic field, presumably giving rise to low frequency magnetic modulations like pulsations. A gas of many such holes may allow for a kinetic description, in which holes undergo binary dipole interactions. This resembles the polymeric behaviour. Both magnetic field generation and magnetic structure formation are of interest in auroral, solar coronal and shock physics, in particular in the problem of magnetic field filamentation in relativistic foreshocks and cosmic ray acceleration.

  1. Gas and heat dynamics of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma reference jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Seán; Golda, Judith; Turner, Miles M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Gas and heat dynamics of the ‘Cooperation on Science and Technology (COST) Reference Microplasma Jet’ (COST-jet), a European lead reference device for low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma application, are investigated. Of particular interest to many biomedical application scenarios, the temperature characteristics of a surface impacted by the jet are revealed. Schlieren imaging, thermocouple measurements, infrared thermal imaging and numerical modelling are employed. Temperature spatial profiles in the gas domain reveal heating primarily of the helium fraction of the gas mixture. Thermocouple and model temporal data show a bounded exponential temperature growth described by a single characteristic time parameter to reach  ∼63% or (1-1/e) fraction of the temperature increase. Peak temperatures occurred in the gas domain where the carrier jet exits the COST-jet, with values ranging from ambient temperatures to in excess of 100 °C in ‘α-mode’ operation. In a horizontal orientation of the COST-jet a curved trajectory of the helium effluent at low gas flows results from buoyant forces. Gas mixture profiles reveal significant containment of the helium concentrations for a surface placed in close proximity to the COST-jet. Surface heating of a quartz plate follows a similar bounded exponential temporal temperature growth as device heating. Spatial profiles of surface heating are found to correlate strongly to the impacting effluent where peak temperatures occur in regions of maximum surface helium concentration.

  2. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the SALLE JAUNE terawatt laser at Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée.

  3. Analysis of a gas-liquid film plasma reactor for organic compound oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kevin; Wang, Huijuan; Locke, Bruce R

    2016-11-05

    A pulsed electrical discharge plasma formed in a tubular reactor with flowing argon carrier gas and a liquid water film was analyzed using methylene blue as a liquid phase hydroxyl radical scavenger and simultaneous measurements of hydrogen peroxide formation. The effects of liquid flow rate, liquid conductivity, concentration of dye, and the addition of ferrous ion on dye decoloration and degradation were determined. Higher liquid flow rates and concentrations of dye resulted in less decoloration percentages and hydrogen peroxide formation due to initial liquid conductivity effects and lower residence times in the reactor. The highest decoloration energy yield of dye found in these studies was 5.2g/kWh when using the higher liquid flow rate and adding the catalyst. The non-homogeneous nature of the plasma discharge favors the production of hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-liquid interface over the chemical oxidation of the organic in the bulk liquid phase and post-plasma reactions with the Fenton catalyst lead to complete utilization of the plasma-formed hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of steering-wheel gas sensor against diverse core air hole sizes and core materials in terahertz wave band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, A.; Babu, P. Ramesh; Senthilnathan, K.

    2017-11-01

    We design a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based gas sensor, which works based on evanescent field, by introducing a steering-wheel shape of large noncircular air-hole structure in the cladding region. Further, using the full-vectorial finite element method (FEM), we compute the relative sensitivities of the proposed sensor as 83% and 91% when the operating frequencies are 1THz and 0.5THz, respectively. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting any kind of chemical and biological gases.

  6. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  7. Tungsten oxide coatings deposited by plasma spray using powder and solution precursor for detection of nitrogen dioxide gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangc@yzu.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Wang, Jie [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Geng, Xin [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2016-05-25

    Increasing attention has been paid on preparation methods for resistive-type gas sensors based on semiconductor metal oxides. In this work, tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) coatings were prepared on alumina substrates and used as gas sensitive layers. The coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spray using powder, solution precursor, or a combination of both. Tungsten oxide powder through a powder port and ammonium tungstate aqueous solution through a liquid port were injected into plasma stream respectively or together to deposit WO{sub 3} coatings. Phase structures in the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction analyzer. The field-emission scanning electron microscopy images confirmed that the coatings were in microstructure, nanostructure or micro-nanostructure. The sensing properties of the sensors based on the coatings exposed to 1 ppm nitrogen dioxide gas were characterized in a home-made instrument. Sensing properties of the coatings were compared and discussed. The influences of gas humidity and working temperature on the sensor responses were further studied. - Highlights: • Porous gas sensitive coatings were deposited by plasma spray using powder and solution precursor. • Crystallized WO{sub 3} were obtained through hybrid plasma spray plus a pre-conditioned step. • Plasma power had an important influence on coating microstructure. • The particle size of atmospheric plasma-sprayed microstructured coating was stable. • Solution precursor plasma-sprayed WO{sub 3} coatings had nanostructure and showed good responses to 1 ppm NO{sub 2}.

  8. Control of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in liquid by nonthermal plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Taiki; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    We present the development of a low-frequency nonthermal plasma-jet system, where the surrounding-gas condition of the plasma jet is precisely controlled in open air. By restricting the mixing of the ambient air into the plasma jet, the plasma jet can be selectively changed from a N2 main discharge to an O2 main discharge even in open air. In the plasma-jet system with the controlled surrounding gas, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is successfully controlled in deionized water: the concentration ratio of NO2 - to H2O2 is tuned from 0 to 0.18, and a high NO2 - concentration ratio is obtained at a N2 gas ratio of 0.80 relative to the total N2/O2 gas mixture in the main discharge gas. We also find that the NO2 - concentration is much higher in the plasma-activated medium than in the plasma-activated deionized water, which is mainly explained by the contribution of amino acids to NO2 - generation in the medium.

  9. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  10. Spectroscopic Investigation of Plasma-Fluorinated Monolayer Graphene and Application for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Fan, Liwei; Dong, Huilong; Zhang, Pingping; Nie, Kaiqi; Zhong, Jun; Li, Youyong; Guo, Jinghua; Sun, Xuhui

    2016-04-06

    Large-area monolayer fluorinated graphene (FG) is synthesized by a controllable SF6 plasma treatment. The functional groups of FG are elucidated by various spectroscopies, including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Raman results suggest that the defects are introduced into the monolayer graphene during the fluorination process. The fluorine content can be varied by the plasma treatment and can reach the maximum (∼24.6 atom % F) under 20 s of plasma treatment as examined by XPS measurement. The angle-dependent NEXAFS results reveal that the fluorine atoms interact with the graphene matrix to form covalent C-F bonds, which are perpendicular to the basal plane of FG. FG is applied as a gas-sensing material and owns much better performance for ammonia detection compared to pristine graphene. On the basis of our density functional theory simulation results, the fast response/recovery behavior and high sensitivity of the FG gas sensor are attributed to enhanced physical absorption due to the C-F covalent bonds on the surface of FG.

  11. Effects of Gas Flow Rate on the Discharge Characteristics of a DC Excited Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong; Bao, Wenting; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-09-01

    A direct current (DC) source excited plasma jet consisting of a hollow needle anode and a plate cathode has been developed to form a diffuse discharge plume in ambient air with flowing argon as the working gas. Using optical and electrical methods, the discharge characteristics are investigated for the diffuse plasma plume. Results indicate that the discharge has a pulse characteristic, under the excitation of a DC voltage. The discharge pulse corresponds to the propagation process of a plasma bullet travelling from the anode to the cathode. It is found that, with an increment of the gas flow rate, both the discharge plume length and the current peak value of the pulsed discharge decrease in the laminar flow mode, reach their minima at about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly increase in the turbulent mode. However, the frequency of the pulsed discharge increases in the laminar mode with increasing the argon flow rate until the argon flow rate equals to about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly decreases in the turbulent mode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805013, 11375051), Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012201045), Department of Education for Outstanding Youth Project of China (No. Y2011120), and Youth Project of Hebei University of China (No. 2011Q14)

  12. Formation and Coalescence of Electron Solitary Holes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeki, K.; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Electron solitary holes were observed in a magnetized collisionless plasma. These holes were identified as Bernstein-Green-Kruskal equilibria, thus being purely kinetic phenomena. The electron hole does not damp even though its velocity is close to the electron thermal velocity. Two holes attract...

  13. The magnetic field application for the gas discharge plasma control in processes of surface coating and modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadullin, T. Ya; Galeev, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the method of magnetic field application to control the gas discharge plasma effect on the various surfaces in processes of surface coating and modification is considered. The magnetic field directed perpendicular to the direction of electric current in the gas discharge plasma channel is capable to reject this plasma channel due to action of Lorentz force on the moving electrically charged particles [1,2]. The three-dimensional spatial structure of magnetic field is created by system of necessary quantity of the magnets located perpendicular to the direction of course of electric current in the gas-discharge plasma channel. The formation of necessary spatial distribution of magnetic field makes possible to obtain a required distribution of plasma parameters near the processed surfaces. This way of the plasma channel parameters spatial distribution management is the most suitable for application in processes of plasma impact on a surface of irregular shape and in cases when the selective impact of plasma on a part of a surface of a product is required. It is necessary to apply automated computer management of the process parameters [3] to the most effective plasma impact.

  14. Effect of Injection Location and Multi-Hole Nozzle on Mixing Performance in a CNG-Fuelled Engine with Port Gas Injection, Using CFD Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tianbo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A compressed natural gas injection device with moving-coil electromagnetic linear actuator and mushroom type poppet valve was designed to supply a large-bore intake port injection type engine with sufficient fuel timely. The transient engine CFD model combined with the poppet valve's motion was established to research the effect of injection conditions on the mixing homogeneity in the intake port and cylinder. Computed penetration distances of impinging jet with different k-ε models and different wall functions are compared with measured results in the literature to validate the model. It was observed that the gas injection location and number of nozzle holes have a significant effect on mixing performance both in the intake port and cylinder.

  15. On- and off-axis spectral emission features from laser-produced gas breakdown plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Skrodzki, P. J.; Miloshevsky, A.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Miloshevsky, G.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-heated gas breakdown plasmas or sparks emit profoundly in the ultraviolet and visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum with contributions from ionic, atomic, and molecular species. Laser created kernels expand into a cold ambient with high velocities during its early lifetime followed by confinement of the plasma kernel and eventually collapse. However, the plasma kernels produced during laser breakdown of gases are also capable of exciting and ionizing the surrounding ambient medium. Two mechanisms can be responsible for excitation and ionization of surrounding ambient: viz. photoexcitation and ionization by intense ultraviolet emission from the sparks produced during the early times of its creation and/or heating by strong shocks generated by the kernel during its expansion into the ambient. In this study, an investigation is made on the spectral features of on- and off-axis emission features of laser-induced plasma breakdown kernels generated in atmospheric pressure conditions with an aim to elucidate the mechanisms leading to ambient excitation and emission. Pulses from an Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with 6 ns pulse duration are used to generate plasma kernels. Laser sparks were generated in air, argon, and helium gases to provide different physical properties of expansion dynamics and plasma chemistry considering the differences in laser absorption properties, mass density and speciation. Point shadowgraphy and time-resolved imaging were used to evaluate the shock wave and spark self-emission morphology at early and late times while space and time resolved spectroscopy is used for evaluating the emission features as well as for inferring plasma fundaments at on- and off-axis. Structure and dynamics of the plasma kernel obtained using imaging techniques are also compared to numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics code. The emission from the kernel showed that spectral features from ions, atoms and molecules are separated in

  16. On- and off-axis spectral emission features from laser-produced gas breakdown plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Skrodzki, P. J.; Miloshevsky, A.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Miloshevsky, G.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-heated gas breakdown plasmas or sparks emit profoundly in the ultraviolet and visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum with contributions from ionic, atomic, and molecular species. Laser created kernels expand into a cold ambient with high velocities during their early lifetime followed by confinement of the plasma kernel and eventually collapse. However, the plasma kernels produced during laser breakdown of gases are also capable of exciting and ionizing the surrounding ambient medium. Two mechanisms can be responsible for excitation and ionization of the surrounding ambient: photoexcitation and ionization by intense ultraviolet emission from the sparks produced during the early times of their creation and/or heating by strong shocks generated by the kernel during its expansion into the ambient. In this study, an investigation is made on the spectral features of on- and off-axis emission of laser-induced plasma breakdown kernels generated in atmospheric pressure conditions with an aim to elucidate the mechanisms leading to ambient excitation and emission. Pulses from an Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with a pulse duration of 6 ns are used to generate plasma kernels. Laser sparks were generated in air, argon, and helium gases to provide different physical properties of expansion dynamics and plasma chemistry considering the differences in laser absorption properties, mass density, and speciation. Point shadowgraphy and time-resolved imaging were used to evaluate the shock wave and spark self-emission morphology at early and late times, while space and time resolved spectroscopy is used for evaluating the emission features and for inferring plasma physical conditions at on- and off-axis positions. The structure and dynamics of the plasma kernel obtained using imaging techniques are also compared to numerical simulations using the computational fluid dynamics code. The emission from the kernel showed that spectral features from ions, atoms, and

  17. VLF plasma waves observed during the xenon gas releases on the active satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Z.; Gdalevich, G. L.; Mikhailov, J.; Gousheva, M.; Bankov, L.

    During the ACTIVE satellite mission in 1989/90, neutral xenon gas was released from the satellite. The release, 50g/sec, with velocity 250m/sec quasiperpendicular to the geomagnetic field occurred at different ionospheric altitudes. Parallel with the release process the VLF plasma waves (20Hz-20kHz) were recorded. The very high level of VLF emission during the release was registered and observed for some frequencies to extend some seconds beyond the release. It suggests for creation of expanding plasma cloud close to the satellite. It is difficult to use these observation for a clear CIV test because of incomplete darkness experimental conditions. This paper presents the observed VLF emission characteristics.

  18. Evaluation of the plasma hydrogen isotope content by residual gas analysis at JET and AUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; De Castro, A.; Kruezi, U.; Oberkofler, M.; Panjan, M.; Primc, G.; Reichbauer, T.; Resnik, M.; Rohde, V.; Seibt, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Wauters, T.; Zaplotnik, R.; ASDEX-Upgrade, the; EUROfusion MST1 Teams; contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    The isotope content of the plasma reflects on the dynamics of isotope changeover experiments, efficiency of wall conditioning and the performance of a fusion device in the active phase of operation. The assessment of the isotope ratio of hydrogen and methane molecules is used as a novel method of assessing the plasma isotope ratios at JET and ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG). The isotope ratios of both molecules in general shows similar trends as the isotope ratio detected by other diagnostics. At JET, the absolute values of RGA signals are in relatively good agreement with each other and with spectroscopy data, while at AUG the deviation from neutral particle analyser data are larger, and the results show a consistent spatial distribution of the isotope ratio. It is further shown that the isotope ratio of the hydrogen molecule can be used to study the degree of dissociation of the injected gas during changeover experiments.

  19. Black Holes Are The Rhythm at The Heart of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    The powerful black holes at the center of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters act as hearts to the systems, pumping energy out at regular intervals to regulate the growth of the black holes themselves, as well as star formation, according to new data from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago A New Way To Weigh Giant Black Holes Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy NASA Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers Scientists from the University of Michigan, the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Jacobs University in Germany contributed to the results. The gravitational pull of black holes is so strong that not even light can escape from them. Supermassive black holes with masses of more than a billion suns have been detected at the center of large galaxies. The material falling on the black holes causes sporadic or isolated bursts of energy, by which black holes are capable of influencing the fate of their host galaxies. The insight gained by this new research shows that black holes can pump energy in a gentler and rhythmic fashion, rather then violently. The scientists observed and simulated how the black hole at the center of elliptical galaxy M84 dependably sends bubbles of hot plasma into space, heating up interstellar space. This heat is believed to slow both the formation of new stars and the growth of the black hole itself, helping the galaxy remain stable. Interstellar gases only coalesce into new stars when the gas is cool enough. The heating is more efficient at the sites where it is most needed, the scientists say. Alexis Finoguenov, of UMBC and the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, compares the central black hole to a heart muscle. "Just like our hearts periodically pump our

  20. Gas flow rate dependence of the discharge characteristics of a helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet interacting with a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Economou, Demetre J.

    2017-10-01

    A 2D (axisymmetric) computational study of the discharge characteristics of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet as a function of gas flow rate was performed. The helium jet emerged from a dielectric tube, with an average gas flow velocity in the range 2.5-20 m s-1 (1 atm, 300 K) in a nitrogen ambient, and impinged on a substrate a short distance dowstream. The effect of the substrate conductivity (conductror versus insulator) was also studied. Whenever possible, simulation predictions were compared with published experimental observations. Discharge ignition and propagation in the dielectric tube were hardly affected by the He gas flow velocity. Most properties of the plasma jet, however, depended sensitively on the He gas flow velocity, which determined the concentration distributions of helium and nitrogen in the mixing layer forming in the gap between the tube exit and the substrate. At low gas flow velocity, the plasma jet evolved from a hollow (donut-shaped) feature to one where the maximum of electron density was on axis. When the gas flow velocity was high, the plasma jet maintained its hollow structure until it struck the substrate. For a conductive substrate, the radial ion fluxes to the surface were relatively uniform over a radius of ~0.4-0.8 mm, and the dominant ion flux was that of He+. For a dielectric substrate, the radial ion fluxes to the surface peaked on the symmetry axis at low He gas flow velocity, but a hollow ion flux distribution was observed at high gas flow velocity. At the same time, the main ion flux switched from N2+ to He2+ as the He gas flow velocity increased from a low to a high value. The diameter of the plasma ‘footprint’ on the substrate first increased with increasing He gas flow velocity, and eventually saturated with further increases in velocity.

  1. The charge-exchange induced coupling between plasma-gas counterflows in the heliosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Many hydrodynamic models have been presented which give similar views of the interaction of the solar wind plasma bubble with the counterstreaming partially ionized interstellar medium. In the more recent of these models it is taken into account that the solar and interstellar hydrodynamic flows of neutral atoms and protons are coupled by mass-, momentum-, and energy-exchange terms due to charge exchange processes. We shall reinvestigate the theoretical basis of this coupling here by use of a simplified description of the heliospheric interface and describe the main physics of the H-atom penetration through the more or less standing well-known plasma wall ahead of the heliopause. Thereby we can show that the type of charge exchange coupling terms used in up-to-now hydrodynamic treatments unavoidably leads to an O-type critical point at the sonic point of the H-atom flow, thus not allowing for a continuation of the integration of the hydrodynamic set of differential equations. The remedy for this problem is given by a more accurate formulation of the momentum exchange term for quasi-and sub-sonic H-atom flows. With a refined momentum exchange term derived from basic kinetic Boltzmann principles, we instead arrive at a characteristic equation with an X-type critical point, allowing for a continuous solution from supersonic to subsonic flow conditions. This necessitates that the often treated problem of the propagation of inter-stellar H-atoms through the heliosheath has to be solved using these newly derived, differently effective plasmagas friction forces. Substantially different results are to be expected from this context for the filtration efficiency of the heliospheric interface.Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interstellar gas – Ionosphere (plasma temperature and density

  2. The charge-exchange induced coupling between plasma-gas counterflows in the heliosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available Many hydrodynamic models have been presented which give similar views of the interaction of the solar wind plasma bubble with the counterstreaming partially ionized interstellar medium. In the more recent of these models it is taken into account that the solar and interstellar hydrodynamic flows of neutral atoms and protons are coupled by mass-, momentum-, and energy-exchange terms due to charge exchange processes. We shall reinvestigate the theoretical basis of this coupling here by use of a simplified description of the heliospheric interface and describe the main physics of the H-atom penetration through the more or less standing well-known plasma wall ahead of the heliopause. Thereby we can show that the type of charge exchange coupling terms used in up-to-now hydrodynamic treatments unavoidably leads to an O-type critical point at the sonic point of the H-atom flow, thus not allowing for a continuation of the integration of the hydrodynamic set of differential equations. The remedy for this problem is given by a more accurate formulation of the momentum exchange term for quasi-and sub-sonic H-atom flows. With a refined momentum exchange term derived from basic kinetic Boltzmann principles, we instead arrive at a characteristic equation with an X-type critical point, allowing for a continuous solution from supersonic to subsonic flow conditions. This necessitates that the often treated problem of the propagation of inter-stellar H-atoms through the heliosheath has to be solved using these newly derived, differently effective plasmagas friction forces. Substantially different results are to be expected from this context for the filtration efficiency of the heliospheric interface.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interstellar gas – Ionosphere (plasma temperature and density

  3. Determination of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in plasma by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, J.F.; Bopp, R.J.; Carmichael, R.H.; Farid, K.Z.; Lemberger, L.

    1982-10-01

    This gas-chromatographic method for assay of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in human plasma involves extraction of the drugs and use of a /sup 63/Ni electron-capture detector. The linear range of detection is 25 to 800 micrograms/L for each drug. Overall precision (CV) in the concentration range of 10 to 100 micrograms/L for both drugs was approximately 10%. Accuracy (relative error) in the same concentration range was approximately +10%. None of the commonly prescribed antidepressants or tranquilizers that we tested interfere with the assay.

  4. Soliton-plasma nonlinear dynamics in mid-IR gas-filled hollow-core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Selim; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We investigate numerically soliton-plasma interaction in a noble-gas-filled silica hollow-core anti-resonant fiber pumped in the mid-IR at 3.0 mu m. We observe multiple soliton self-compression stages due to distinct stages where either the self-focusing or the self-defocusing nonlinearity...... by supercontinuum generation spanning 1-4 mu m. We find that the spectral coherence drops as the secondary compression stage is initiated. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America...

  5. Gas dynamic effects on formation of carbon dimers in laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the effect of helium and nitrogen pressures on the dynamics of molecular species formation during laser ablation of carbon. For producing plasmas, planar carbon targets were irradiated with 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from an Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The emission from excited C2 and CN molecules was studied using space resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast imaging. The intensity oscillations in C2 and CN monochromatic fast imaging and their emission space-time contours suggest that recombination is the major mechanism of C2 formation within the laser ablation carbon plumes in the presence of ambient gas.

  6. Screening and plasma oscillations in an electron gas in the hydrodynamic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.

    2017-10-01

    A hydrodynamic theory of screening in a generic electron gas of arbitrary dimensionality is given that encompasses all previously studied cases and clarifies the predictions of the many-body approach. We find that long-wavelength plasma oscillations are classical phenomena with quantum-mechanical effects playing no explicit role. The character of the oscillations is solely dictated by the dimensionality of the electron system and its equation of state in the neutral limit. Materials whose excitations are described by the Dirac dispersion law—such as doped graphene or a Weyl semimetal—are no exception to this rule.

  7. Laser induced aluminiun plasma analysis by optical emission spectroscopy in a nitrogen background gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, J. C.; Uzuriaga, J.; Riascos, H.

    2012-06-01

    We studied an Al plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser with a laser fluence of 4 J/cm2, a wavelength of 1064 nm, energy pulse of 500 mJ and 10 Hz repetition rate. We studied their spectral characteristics at various ambient nitrogen pressures by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The N2 gas pressure was varied from 20 mTorr to 150 mTorr. In Al plume, both atomic and ionic spectra were observed. The electron temperature and electron number density of the plume as of the function ambient gas pressure were determined. The electron temperature was calculated by using the Boltzmann-plot method and the number density was calculated considering the stark effect as dominating on the emission lines.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Effect of Gas-Shrouded Plasma Spraying on Cathode Coating of Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Reißner, R.; Schiller, G.; Ansar, A.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the performance of electrodes prepared via atmospheric plasma spray by means of gas shrouding which is expected to apparently reduce the oxygen content of the plasma plume and subsequently improve the coating quality. Electrodes with dual-layer coating for alkaline water electrolysis were deposited on Ni-coated perforated substrates. Microstructure and morphology were studied by SEM. Element content was measured by EDS. Enthalpy probe was employed for measuring plasma temperature and velocity as well as the gas composition. For verifying and better understanding the shrouding effect numerical calculation was carried out according to the experimental settings. Electrochemical test was carried out to validate the shrouding effect. The results showed slight protecting effect of gas shrouding on plasma plume and the final coating. Over the dual-layer section, the measured oxygen fraction was 3.46 and 3.15% for the case without gas shrouding and with gas shrouding, respectively. With gas shrouding the coating exhibited similar element contents as the coating sprayed by VPS, while no obvious improvement was observed in the microstructure or the morphology. Evident electrochemical improvement was nevertheless achieved that with gas shrouding the electrode exhibited similar performance as that of the VPS-sprayed electrode.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Effect of Gas-Shrouded Plasma Spraying on Cathode Coating of Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Reißner, R.; Schiller, G.; Ansar, A.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the performance of electrodes prepared via atmospheric plasma spray by means of gas shrouding which is expected to apparently reduce the oxygen content of the plasma plume and subsequently improve the coating quality. Electrodes with dual-layer coating for alkaline water electrolysis were deposited on Ni-coated perforated substrates. Microstructure and morphology were studied by SEM. Element content was measured by EDS. Enthalpy probe was employed for measuring plasma temperature and velocity as well as the gas composition. For verifying and better understanding the shrouding effect numerical calculation was carried out according to the experimental settings. Electrochemical test was carried out to validate the shrouding effect. The results showed slight protecting effect of gas shrouding on plasma plume and the final coating. Over the dual-layer section, the measured oxygen fraction was 3.46 and 3.15% for the case without gas shrouding and with gas shrouding, respectively. With gas shrouding the coating exhibited similar element contents as the coating sprayed by VPS, while no obvious improvement was observed in the microstructure or the morphology. Evident electrochemical improvement was nevertheless achieved that with gas shrouding the electrode exhibited similar performance as that of the VPS-sprayed electrode.

  10. Biological Effect of Gas Plasma Treatment on CO2 Gas Foaming/Salt Leaching Fabricated Porous Polycaprolactone Scaffolds in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yeong Bak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds were fabricated by using the CO2 gas foaming/salt leaching process and then PCL scaffolds surface was treated by oxygen or nitrogen gas plasma in order to enhance the cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. The PCL and NaCl were mixed in the ratios of 3 : 1. The supercritical CO2 gas foaming process was carried out by solubilizing CO2 within samples at 50°C and 8 MPa for 6 hr and depressurization rate was 0.4 MPa/s. The oxygen or nitrogen plasma treated porous PCL scaffolds were prepared at discharge power 100 W and 10 mTorr for 60 s. The mean pore size of porous PCL scaffolds showed 427.89 μm. The gas plasma treated porous PCL scaffolds surface showed hydrophilic property and the enhanced adhesion and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells comparing to untreated porous PCL scaffolds. The PCL scaffolds produced from the gas foaming/salt leaching and plasma surface treatment are suitable for potential applications in bone tissue engineering.

  11. Steam Plasma Flows Generated in Gerdien Arc: Environment for Energy Gas Production from Organics and for Surface Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabovský, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2011), s. 792-801 ISSN 1880-5558. [Seventh International Conference on Flow Dynamics. Sendai, 01.11.2010-03.11.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermal Plasma * Dc Arc Plasma Torch * Gerdien Arc * Plasma Gasification Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jfst/6/5/792/_pdf

  12. Black hole gravitohydromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Black hole gravitohydromagnetics (GHM) is developed from the rudiments to the frontiers of research in this book. GHM describes plasma interactions that combine the effects of gravity and a strong magnetic field, in the vicinity (ergosphere) of a rapidly rotating black hole. This topic was created in response to the astrophysical quest to understand the central engines of radio loud extragalactic radio sources. The theory describes a "torsional tug of war" between rotating ergospheric plasma and the distant asymptotic plasma that extracts the rotational inertia of the black hole. The recoil from the struggle between electromagnetic and gravitational forces near the event horizon is manifested as a powerful pair of magnetized particle beams (jets) that are ejected at nearly the speed of light. These bipolar jets feed large-scale magnetized plasmoids on scales as large as millions of light years (the radio lobes of extragalactic radio sources). This interaction can initiate jets that transport energy fluxes exc...

  13. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of british anti-lewisite in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C E; Holloway, E R; Korte, W D; Smith, J R; Clarkson, E D; Platoff, G E; Capacio, B R

    2004-01-01

    British anti-Lewisite (BAL) (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol) is a potential therapeutic compound when used against the effects of cutaneous sulfur mustard, and a method for its determination in plasma has been developed. BAL and the internal standard (IS) ethane dithiol were isolated from plasma samples through solid-phase extraction and then reacted with 1-pentafluoropropionylimidazole, forming stable pentafluoropropionyl derivates that are sensitive to gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. Examination of concentration versus peak-area ratios of the BAL and IS derivatives demonstrated the method to be linear over a concentration range of 0.48 to 124 ng/mL in plasma when fit to a weighted (1/y2) least-squares regression. Correlation coefficients were 0.9943 to 0.9995 for six runs, and coefficients of variation (CV) were 2.5 to 8.7% over the eight concentrations tested. The intra- and interday accuracy and precision of this method was measured by examining six groups of eight unknown test samples (n = 6). Intraday accuracy, as expressed by percent error, was found to range from -15.4 to 0.21%, whereas the precision, expressed as %CV, was less than 9.8% over all sample concentrations. Interday test unknown sample results were similar in that the accuracy was shown to be -7.1 to 0.4%, and precision was 4.7 to 9.5%. BAL levels in frozen plasma (-70 degrees C) remained constant for more than 14 days with a CV of less than 10% for the eight concentrations tested. The data indicate that the method will provide accurate and precise determination of BAL at concentrations down to approximately 1 ng/mL in plasma. This procedure has been applied to determine preliminary time-concentration profile studies of BAL in the hairless guinea pig.

  14. Potential beneficial effects of electron-hole plasmas created in silicon sensors by XFEL-like high intensity pulses for detector development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    There is a compelling need for a high frame rate imaging detector with a wide dynamic range, from single x-rays/pixel/pulse to >10{sup 6} x-rays/pixel/pulse, that is capable of operating at both x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) and 3rd generation sources with sustained fluxes of > 10{sup 11} x-rays/pixel/s [1, 2, 3]. We propose to meet these requirements with the High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) by (a) increasing the speed of charge removal strategies [4], (b) increasing integrator range by implementing adaptive gain [5], and (c) exploiting the extended charge collection times of electron-hole pair plasma clouds that form when a sufficiently large number of x-rays are absorbed in a detector sensor in a short period of time [6]. We have developed a measurement platform similar to the one used in [6] to study the effects of high electron-hole densities in silicon sensors using optical lasers to emulate the conditions found at XFELs. Characterizations of the employed tunable wavelength laser with picosecond pulse duration have shown Gaussian focal spots sizes of 6 ± 1 µm rms over the relevant spectrum and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude increase in available intensity compared to previous measurements presented in [6]. Results from measurements on a typical pixelated silicon diode intended for use with the HDR-PAD (150 µm pixel size, 500 µm thick sensor) are presented.

  15. Structural transformations in silicon under exposure by femtosecond laser pulse: role of electron-hole plasma and phonon-phonon anharmonism

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryashov, S I

    2002-01-01

    It is experimentally shown for the first time that by the effect of the feed-up laser pulse of 100 fs duration on the silicon target the consecutive structural transitions of the substance into the new crystalline and liquid metallic phase occur both during the laser pulse feed-up and after 0.1-10 sup 3 ps, depending on the material excitation conditions. The thresholds of the observed structural transitions are determined and the phonon nodes, responsible for therefore, are identified. The structural transitions dynamics in the silicon by the 01.-10 sup 3 ps times is described within the frames of the model of the phonon modes instability, originating due to the plasma electron-hole effect and also due to the intra- and intermode phonon-phonon anharmonic interactions

  16. Conductive Polymer Synthesis with Single-Crystallinity via a Novel Plasma Polymerization Technique for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon-Sang Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a new nanostructured conductive polymer synthesis method that can grow the single-crystalline high-density plasma-polymerized nanoparticle structures by enhancing the sufficient nucleation and fragmentation of the pyrrole monomer using a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM results show that the plasma-polymerized pyrrole (pPPy nanoparticles have a fast deposition rate of 0.93 µm·min−1 under a room-temperature process and have single-crystalline characteristics with porous properties. In addition, the single-crystalline high-density pPPy nanoparticle structures were successfully synthesized on the glass, plastic, and interdigitated gas sensor electrode substrates using a novel plasma polymerization technique at room temperature. To check the suitability of the active layer for the fabrication of electrochemical toxic gas sensors, the resistance variations of the pPPy nanoparticles grown on the interdigitated gas sensor electrodes were examined by doping with iodine. As a result, the proposed APPJ device could obtain the high-density and ultra-fast single-crystalline pPPy thin films for various gas sensor applications. This work will contribute to the design of highly sensitive gas sensors adopting the novel plasma-polymerized conductive polymer as new active layer.

  17. Elimination of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy infectivity and decontamination of surgical instruments by using radio-frequency gas-plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, H C; Campbell, G A; Whittaker, A G; Jones, A C; Aitken, A; Simpson, A H; Casey, M; Bountiff, L; Gibbard, L; Baxter, R L

    2005-08-01

    It has now been established that transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infectivity, which is highly resistant to conventional methods of deactivation, can be transmitted iatrogenically by contaminated stainless steel. It is important that new methods are evaluated for effective removal of protein residues from surgical instruments. Here, radio-frequency (RF) gas-plasma treatment was investigated as a method of removing both the protein debris and TSE infectivity. Stainless-steel spheres contaminated with the 263K strain of scrapie and a variety of used surgical instruments, which had been cleaned by a hospital sterile-services department, were examined both before and after treatment by RF gas plasma, using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis. Transmission of scrapie from the contaminated spheres was examined in hamsters by the peripheral route of infection. RF gas-plasma treatment effectively removed residual organic residues on reprocessed surgical instruments and gross contamination both from orthopaedic blades and from the experimentally contaminated spheres. In vivo testing showed that RF gas-plasma treatment of scrapie-infected spheres eliminated transmission of infectivity. The infectivity of the TSE agent adsorbed on metal spheres could be removed effectively by gas-plasma cleaning with argon/oxygen mixtures. This treatment can effectively remove 'stubborn' residual contamination on surgical instruments.

  18. Mini Black Holes at the LHC: Discovery Through Di-Jet Suppression, Mono-Jet Emission and a Supersonic Boom in the Quark-Gluon Plasma in ALICE, ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, B; Harbach, U; Humanic, T; Koch, B; Stöcker, H

    2006-01-01

    We examine experimental signatures of TeV-mass black hole formation in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. We find that the black hole production results in a complete disappearance of all very high $p_T$ ({$> 500$} GeV) back-to-back correlated di-jets of total mass {$M > M_f \\sim 1$}TeV. We show that the subsequent Hawking-decay produces multiple hard mono-jets and discuss their detection. We study the possibility of cold black hole remnant (BHR) formation of mass $\\sim M_f$ and the experimental distinguishability of scenarios with BHRs and those with complete black hole decay. Finally we point out that a Heckler-Kapusta-Hawking plasma may form from the emitted mono-jets. In this context we present new simulation data of Mach shocks and of the evolution of initial conditions until the freeze-out.

  19. Measuring xenon in human plasma and blood by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Piper, Thomas; Geyer, Hans; Thomas, Andreas; Schaefer, Maximilian S; Kienbaum, Peter; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-07-15

    Due to the favorable pharmacokinetic properties and minimal side effects of xenon, its use in modern anesthesia has been well accepted, and recent studies further demonstrated the intra- and postoperative neuro-, cardio-, and reno-protective action of the noble gas. Since the production of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its downstream effector erythropoietin as well as noradrenalin reuptake inhibition have been found to play key roles in this context, the question arose as to whether the use of xenon is a matter for doping controls and preventive doping research. The aim of the present study was hence to evaluate whether the (ab)use of xenon can be detected from doping control samples with the instrumentation commonly available in sports drug testing laboratories. Plasma was saturated with xenon according to reported protocols, and the target analyte was measured by means of gas chromatography/time-of-flight and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with headspace injection. Recording the accurate mass of three major xenon isotopes at m/z 128.9048, 130.9045 and 131.9042 allowed for the unequivocal identification of the analyte and the detection assay was characterized concerning limit of detection (LOD), intraday precision, and specificity as well as analyte recovery under different storage conditions. Xenon was detected in fortified plasma samples with detection limits of approximately 0.5 nmol/mL to 50 nmol/mL, depending on the type of mass spectrometer used. The method characteristics of intraday precision (coefficient of variation xenon at non-physiological concentrations in human plasma and blood. Eventually, authentic plasma and blood samples collected pre-, intra-, and post-operative (4, 8, and 24 h) were positively analyzed after storage for up to 30 h, and provided proof-of-concept for the developed assay. If relevant to doping controls, xenon can be determined from plasma and blood samples, i.e. common specimens of routine sports

  20. Modeling laser pulse evolution in ionizing gas and plasma with application to laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James Hamilton

    The interaction of high intensity laser pulses with matter is of current research interest not only for potential applications but also due to the interesting non-linear process that can occur with current experimental facilities. Understanding many of the non-linear processes requires significant modeling and simulation effort. We explore several aspects of laser pulse evolution and plasma response in simulations ranging from modeling laser wakefield accelerators to modeling basic ionization processes. First, we present a model that describes the onset and growth of axial modulation found experimentally during the formation of plasma channels formed using an axicon lens. We provide a systematic development that describes this new type of parametric instability and explains the pressure dependence and the mechanism for formation of these axial modulations in the channel. Next, we describe details of a new three-dimensional laser pulse evolution code that we have developed to model propagation in tenuous gas and plasma and we provide relevant information about the validation and testing of the code. We then use this new code to examine the three-dimensional structure of the laser pulse evolving in the presence of ionizing gas. In particular we present results from the first three-dimensional study of the ionization scattering instability. Finally, we examine injecting electrons into laser wakefield accelerators. We examine in detail the injection and trapping characteristics for an electron beam with an initially broad energy distribution and look at the effect of beam loading on the trapping efficiency. We present estimates for the maximum charge that can be trapped from a low energy beam with a Boltzmann type energy distribution.

  1. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. II. Rare-gas plasmas and Ar-molecular gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffard, John B., E-mail: jboffard@wisc.edu; Lin, Chun C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Culver, Cody [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold [Applied Materials Inc., Gloucester, Massachusetts 01939 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions from excited plasma species can play a variety of roles in processing plasmas, including damaging the surface properties of materials used in semiconductor processing. Depending on their wavelength, VUV photons can easily transmit thin upper dielectric layers and affect the electrical characteristics of the devices. Despite their importance, measuring VUV fluxes is complicated by the fact that few materials transmit at VUV wavelengths, and both detectors and windows are easily damaged by plasma exposure. The authors have previously reported on measuring VUV fluxes in pure argon plasmas by monitoring the concentrations of Ar(3p{sup 5}4s) resonance atoms that produce the VUV emissions using noninvasive optical emission spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared wavelength range [Boffard et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 021304 (2014)]. Here, the authors extend this technique to other rare-gases (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and argon-molecular gas plasmas (Ar/H{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, and Ar/N{sub 2}). Results of a model for VUV emissions that couples radiation trapping and the measured rare-gas resonance level densities are compared to measurements made with both a calibrated VUV photodiode and a sodium salicylate fluorescence detection scheme. In these more complicated gas mixtures, VUV emissions from a variety of sources beyond the principal resonance levels of the rare gases are found to contribute to the total VUV flux.

  2. Gas Sensors Based on Tin Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized from a Mini-Arc Plasma Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganhua Lu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized gas sensors or electronic noses to rapidly detect and differentiate trace amount of chemical agents are extremely attractive. In this paper, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a functional tin oxide nanoparticle gas sensor. Tin oxide nanoparticles are first synthesized using a convenient and low-cost mini-arc plasma source. The nanoparticle size distribution is measured online using a scanning electrical mobility spectrometer (SEMS. The product nanoparticles are analyzed ex-situ by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM for morphology and defects, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy for elemental composition, electron diffraction for crystal structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS for surface composition. Nonagglomerated rutile tin oxide (SnO2 nanoparticles as small as a few nm have been produced. Larger particles bear a core-shell structure with a metallic core and an oxide shell. The nanoparticles are then assembled onto an e-beam lithographically patterned interdigitated electrode using electrostatic force to fabricate the gas sensor. The nanoparticle sensor exhibits a fast response and a good sensitivity when exposed to 100 ppm ethanol vapor in air.

  3. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia eGreig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls.For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  4. Ion Behavior and Gas Mixing in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas as sources of highly charged ions (concept)

    CERN Document Server

    Melin, G; Girard, A; Hitz, D

    1999-01-01

    An ECR ion source is basically an ECR heated plasma confinement machine, with hot electrons and cold ions. The main parameters of the ion population have been analyzed, including temperature, losses, and confinement time. The "gas mixing" effect has been studied in this context. An expression is derived for determining the ion temperature from the values of all extracted ion currents. One aim is to study the ion temperature behavior in argon plasmas without and with mixing different gases into the plasma. For that purpose a series of experiments has been performed where systematically one or a few parameters where changed. One conclusion is that the ion temperature indeed is decreasing due to gas mixing. A second conclusion is that the decreasing ion temperature is not a sufficient requirement for the beneficial effect of gas mixing to the production of highest charge states of argon.

  5. Note: Determination of effective gas diffusion coefficients of stainless steel films with differently shaped holes using a Loschmidt diffusion cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, N G C; Shen, J; Astrath, F B G; Zhou, J; Huang, C; Yuan, X Z; Wang, H; Navessin, T; Liu, Z S; Vlajnic, G; Bessarabov, D; Zhao, X

    2010-04-01

    In this work, an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell is used to measure the effective O(2)-N(2) diffusion coefficients through four porous samples of different simple pore structures. One-dimensional through-plane mass diffusion theory is applied to process the experimental data. It is found that both bulk diffusion coefficient and the effective gas diffusion coefficients of the samples can then be precisely determined, and the measured bulk one is in good agreement with the literature value. Numerical computation of three-dimensional mass diffusion through the samples is performed to calculate the effective gas diffusion coefficients. The comparison between the measured and calculated coefficient values shows that if the gas diffusion through a sample is dominated by one-dimensional diffusion, which is determined by the pore structure of the sample, these two values are consistent, and the sample can be used as a standard sample to test a gas diffusion measurement system.

  6. On the dynamics of supermassive black holes in gas-rich, star-forming galaxies: the case for nuclear star cluster co-evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacki, Pawel; Teyssier, Romain; Bleuler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a new model for the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the ramses code using sink particles, improving over previous work the treatment of gas accretion and dynamical evolution. This new model is tested against a suite of high-resolution simulations of an isolated, gas-rich, cooling halo. We study the effect of various feedback models on the SMBH growth and its dynamics within the galaxy. In runs without any feedback, the SMBH is trapped within a massive bulge and is therefore able to grow quickly, but only if the seed mass is chosen larger than the minimum Jeans mass resolved by the simulation. We demonstrate that, in the absence of supernovae (SN) feedback, the maximum SMBH mass is reached when active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating balances gas cooling in the nuclear region. When our efficient SN feedback is included, it completely prevents bulge formation, so that massive gas clumps can perturb the SMBH orbit, and reduce the accretion rate significantly. To overcome this issue, we propose an observationally motivated model for the joint evolution of the SMBH and a parent nuclear star cluster (NSC), which allows the SMBH to remain in the nuclear region, grow fast and resist external perturbations. In this scenario, however, SN feedback controls the gas supply and the maximum SMBH mass now depends on the balance between AGN heating and gravity. We conclude that SMBH/NSC co-evolution is crucial for the growth of SMBH in high-z galaxies, the progenitors of massive ellipticals today.

  7. Effect of nozzle hole size coupling with exhaust gas re-circulation on the engine emission perfomance based on KH-ACT spray model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To research an effective measure of reducing the Soot and NOx in engine at the same time, different nozzle hole diameters coupled with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR were adopted in this study based on KH-ACT spray breakup model, which takes the aerodynamic-induced ,cavitation-induced and turbulence-induced breakup into account. The SAGE detailed chemistry combustion and the new atomization model used in the simulation have been verified with the experiment data from a YN4100QBZL engine. Different diesel nozzles was adopted in the study combined with different EGR rates ranging from 0% to 40%. The simulation results show that the NOx emission could be reduced effectively for both small(0.1mm and large(0.15mm diesel nozzle when increasing EGR ratio. The soot emission increases for the small nozzle hole size as the EGR increasing. However, when it comes to the large diesel nozzle, the emission increases slightly first and decrease quickly when the EGR rate above 20%.

  8. A Study of the Influence of the Surrounding Gas on the Plasma Jet and Coating Quality during Plasma Spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Taikai; Ansar, Asif; Arnold, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Coating quality is affected by arc and plume instabilities during plasma spraying. In closed chamber plasma spraying, gradual drift is one of the intermediate instabilities, which is mainly due to the electrode erosion. This work focuses on the source of the gradual drift of the plasma jet and the influence on coating quality. The ambient state inside the chamber was controlled by a ventilation system and a vacuum system. The variation in the plasma jet was observed by a particle flux image (...

  9. Non-equilibrium Properties of a Pumped-Decaying Bose-Condensed Electron–Hole Gas in the BCS–BEC Crossover Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanai, R.; Littlewood, P. B.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate a Bose-condensed exciton gas out of equilibrium. Within the framework of the combined BCS-Leggett strong-coupling theory with the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we show how the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of excitons is suppressed to eventually disappear, when the system is in the non-equilibrium steady state. The supply of electrons and holes from the bath is shown to induce quasi-particle excitations, leading to the partial occupation of the upper branch of Bogoliubov single-particle excitation spectrum. We also discuss how this quasi-particle induction is related to the suppression of exciton BEC, as well as the stability of the steady state.

  10. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Bergeson; Lyon, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, ...

  11. Gas temperature measurements in a microwave plasma by optical emission spectroscopy under single-wall carbon nanotube growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, R K [Cummins Inc, 1900 McKinley Ave, MC 50180, Columbus, IN 47201 (United States); Anderson, T N; Lucht, R P; Fisher, T S; Gore, J P [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: rajesh.garg@cummins.com

    2008-05-07

    Plasma gas temperatures were measured via in situ optical emission spectroscopy in a microwave CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} plasma under carbon nanotube (CNT) growth conditions. Gas temperature is an important parameter in controlling and optimizing CNT growth. The temperature has a significant impact on chemical kinetic rates, species concentrations and CNT growth rates on the substrate. H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were determined from the Q-branch spectrum of the d{sup 3}{pi}{sub u}(0){yields}a{sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(0) transition. N{sub 2} rotational and vibrational temperatures were measured by fitting rovibrational bands from the N{sub 2} emission spectrum of the C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u} {yields} B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g} transition. The N{sub 2} rotational temperature, which is assumed to be approximately equal to the translational gas temperature, increases with an increase in input microwave plasma power and substrate temperature. The measured H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were not in agreement with the measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures under the CNT growth conditions in this study. The measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures compared with the H{sub 2} rotational temperatures suggest the partial equilibration of upper excited state due to higher, 10 Torr, operating pressure. Methane addition in the hydrogen plasma increases the gas temperature slightly for methane concentrations higher than 10% in the feed gas.

  12. Electron-ion coupling and ambipolar diffusion in dense electron-hole plasma in thin amorphous Si films studied by single-shot, pulse-width dependent ultrafast laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Pavel; Ionin, Andrey; Khmelnitskii, Roman; Kiseleva, Irina; Kudryashov, Sergey; Mel'nik, Nikolay; Rudenko, Andrey; Smirnov, Nikita; Zayarny, Dmitry

    2017-12-01

    Single-shot ablation of amorphous silicon films of 50-, 100- and 150-nm thickness by laser pulses of variable (0.2-6 ps) widths demonstrates non-monotonous variation of ablation thresholds and characteristic ablation 1/e-radii with their minima at the 0.6-ps pulse-width and the following increase. For the shorter laser pulses the increased thresholds and enhanced transport can be related to fast ambipolar electron-hole plasma diffusion and other electronic energy losses in dense transient plasma prior its energy transfer to the ionic subsystem (electron-ion thermalization) at 0.6 ps, while for the longer laser pulses slower ambipolar diffusion in moderate-density electron-hole plasma, ionic heat conduction and other thermal losses may predominate.

  13. Enhancing the radiative heat dissipation from high-temperature SF6 gas plasma by using selective absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Shinichiro; Horinouchi, Katsuhiko; Yugami, Hiroo

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling accomplished by tailoring the properties of spectral thermal emission is an interesting method for energy harvesting and high-efficiency passive cooling of terrestrial structures. This strategy, however, has not been extended to cool enclosed heat sources, common in engineering applications, and heat sources in high-temperature environments where radiative transfer plays a dominant role. Here we show a radiative cooling scheme for a high-temperature gaseous medium, using radiative heat extraction with selective absorbers matched to the gas-selective emission properties. We used SF6 gas plasma as a model, because this gas is used in gas circuit breakers, which require effective cooling of the hot insulating gas. Our theoretical analysis confirms that a copper photonic absorber, matched to the ultraviolet-to-near-infrared-selective emission properties of the gas, effectively extracts heat from the high-temperature gas plasma and lowers the radiative equilibrium gas temperature by up to 1270 K, exceeding both blackbody-like and metallic surfaces in practical operating conditions.

  14. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  15. Assessment of the efficacy of a low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyi, M S; Holton, J; Ridgway, G L

    1995-12-01

    The STERRAD 100 sterilization system (Johnson & Johnson Medical Ltd) uses low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma for sterilization of heat labile equipment. The efficacy of the machine was tested by contaminating a standard set of instruments with different organisms and using a filtration method to assess recovery of organisms from the wash fluids of instruments post-sterilization. Experiments were performed under clean (the organism only) and dirty (organism mixed with egg protein) conditions. A parallel study conducted using a 3M STERIVAC ethylene oxide sterilizer could not be completed owing to closure of the ethylene oxide plant. For sterilization of instruments with long and narrow lumens, hydrogen peroxide adaptors are necessary. The STERRAD 100 sterilizer can achieve effective sterilization of heat labile instruments with a reduction of 6 log10 cfu/mL of organisms tested. This method has the advantages over ethylene oxide sterilization of safety, ease of maintenance and no requirement for aeration time.

  16. Gas dynamic effects on formation of carbon dimers in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2011-09-26

    We investigated the effect of helium and nitrogen pressures on the dynamics of molecular species formation during laser ablation of carbon. For producing plasmas, planar carbon targets were irradiated with 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from an Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The emission from excited C{sub 2} and CN molecules was studied using space resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast imaging. The intensity oscillations in C{sub 2} and CN monochromatic fast imaging and their emission space-time contours suggest that recombination is the major mechanism of C{sub 2} formation within the laser ablation carbon plumes in the presence of ambient gas.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

    2000-06-19

    It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

  18. Firing distance estimation through the analysis of the gunshot residue deposit pattern around the bullet entrance hole by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa; Vieira, Duarte Nuno; Almeida, Agostinho A; Sousa, António V

    2007-03-01

    The use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the study of gunshot residues (GSR) is relatively recent, and only a few studies have been published on the subject. In the present paper, this instrumental technique has been used to study the deposit pattern of the GSR around the bullet entrance hole, through the analysis of antimony (Sb), barium (Ba), and lead (Pb). The data obtained were used to establish a mathematical model for estimating the firing distance. Test shots using a 6.35-mm pistol were made against a target of cotton tissue, and the amounts of Sb, Ba, and Pb deposited in quadrangular pieces of the target, cut from 4 radial positions, were determined by ICP-MS. In these experimental conditions, it was possible to estimate the firing distance on the interval [20-80] cm. The best linear correlation between ln m and d, where m is the mass of Sb, Ba, or Pb in the samples, expressed in mug/g of target tissue, and d the firing distance, was obtained at radial distances between 3.5 cm and 4.5 cm from the entrance hole. The best regression curve which adjusted to the data was a linear multiple regression between the firing distance and the logarithm of the mass of each element: d = a + b(1)X(1) + b(2)X(2) + b(3)X(3), where X(1) = ln m (Sb), X(2) = ln m(Ba) and X(3) = ln m (Pb). The accuracy of firing distance estimation using only 1 or 2 elements was not significantly different from the one obtained with the 3 elements.

  19. Performance-enhanced "tunable" capillary microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometer for gas chromatography detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, A M; Robbat, A

    2000-07-15

    Improvements in the stability and performance of a capillary microwave-induced plasma-mass spectrometer (MIP-MS) were achieved by optimizing power transfer to the cavity using a tunable coaxial MIP. The MIP, operating at atmospheric pressure, was sustained with 30 mL/min He and 60 W of power. Measurement precision and sensitivity for the standard waveguide and coaxial systems were determined using 16 organochlorine pesticide solutions separated by gas chromatography (GC). The linear dynamic range obtained with the tunable MIP-MS extended over 3 orders of magnitude, a 10 time improvement with respect to the standard MIP. Detection limits were between 3 and 19 pg of Cl mol(-1) s(-1), 7 times lower than the detection limits obtained with the nontunable MIP-MS. Analysis of pesticides containing sulfur atoms was also possible, further demonstrating multielement MIP-MS detection. Excellent accuracy (10% recovery) and precision (5% RSD) were found for the detection of the pesticides in a petroleum-contaminated reference soil. By placing the GC column at the plasma expansion stage, molecular fragmentation of a mixture of volatile organic compounds was also demonstrated. With the MS operated in the selected ion monitoring mode, measurement sensitivity was approximately 500 pg/s per compound.

  20. Detection of water molecules in inert gas based plasma by the ratios of atomic spectral lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach is considered to detect the water leaks in inert plasma-forming gas present in the reactor chamber. It is made up of the intensity ratio of D α and H α spectral lines in combination with O, Ar and Xe lines intensity. The concentrations of H2O, O, H and D particles have been measured with high sensitivity. At the D2 admixture pressure {{p}{{\\text{D}\\text{2}}}}   =  0.025 mbar, we used the acquisition time of 10 s to measure the rate of water molecules injected from the outside, Γ0  =  1.4 · 10-9 mbar · m3 · s-1, and the incoming water molecules to plasma, Γ  =  5 ·10-11 mbar · m3 · s-1. The scaling proves that at small D2 admixtures (10-4 mbar), the leaks with the rates Γ0  ≈  6 · 10-12 mbar · m3 · s-1 and Γ  ≈  2 · 10-13 mbar · m3 · s-1 can be detected and measured. The difference between Γ0 and Γ values is due to the high degree of H2O dissociation, which can be up to 97-98%.

  1. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High density plasma reactive ion etching of Ru thin films using non-corrosive gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Su Min; Garay, Adrian Adalberto; Lee, Wan In; Chung, Chee Won, E-mail: cwchung@inha.ac.kr

    2015-07-31

    Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICPRIE) of Ru thin films patterned with TiN hard masks was investigated using a CH{sub 3}OH/Ar gas mixture. As the CH{sub 3}OH concentration in CH{sub 3}OH/Ar increased, the etch rates of Ru thin films and TiN hard masks decreased. However, the etch selectivity of Ru films on TiN hard masks increased and the etch slope of Ru film improved at 25% CH{sub 3}OH/Ar. With increasing ICP radiofrequency power and direct current bias voltage and decreasing process pressure, the etch rates of Ru films increased, and the etch profiles were enhanced without redeposition on the sidewall. Optical emission spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma and surface chemistry. Based on these results, Ru thin films were oxidized to RuO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 3} compounds that were removed by sputtering of ions and the etching of Ru thin films followed a physical sputtering with the assistance of chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Etching of Ru films in CH{sub 3}OH/Ar was investigated. • High selectivity and etch profile with high degree of anisotropy were obtained. • XPS analysis was examined to identify the etch chemistry. • During etching Ru was oxidized to RuO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 3} can be easily sputtered off.

  3. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  4. Rydberg gas theory of a glow discharge plasma: III. Formation, occupied state distributions, free energy, and kinetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rod S; Douglas, Peter

    2010-04-21

    It has been suggested that Rydberg gas atoms are involved in conducting electricity through a steady state flowing afterglow (FAG) discharge plasma (R. S. Mason, D. J. Mitchell and P. M. Dickinson, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, DOI: ). From known properties of Rydberg atoms, a statistical model is developed here to find the distribution of levels (principal quantum number n) occupied in such a hypothetical Rydberg gas. It behaves non-ideally at positive column plasma densities, predicting 30 states are very long-lived and almost completely separated from the low n states by the low probability of intermediate levels. The effects of Rydberg gas (N(R)) and free charge densities are examined. The gas can exist in a deep free energy well (> 120 kJ mol(-1) below ionisation level when 10(10) collision and deceleration at the opposite NG-Positive Column (PC) plasma boundary. The atoms become stabilized after passing into the PC, by collisionally induced (nlm) mixing of states and the removal of free charge by charge transfer (and hence the passage of electric current through the Rydberg gas). The coupling of Rydberg states with the ionization continuum is poor; therefore, if the rate of their charge transfer is greater than that of their ionization, the Rydberg gas will remain relatively charge free and hence stable when it is conducting a current. When applied to the FAG plasma, the model provides a self-consistent interpretive framework for all its electrical, mass spectrometric and chemical behaviour. The effect on the optical spectroscopy of these plasmas is considered briefly.

  5. A hybrid plasma-chemical system for high-NOx flue gas treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Zwolińska, Ewa; Licki, Janusz; Sun, Yongxia; Zimek, Zbigniew; Bułka, Sylwester

    2018-03-01

    The reduction of high concentrations of NOx and SO2 from simulated flue gas has been studied. Our aim was to optimise energy consumption for NOx and SO2 removal from off-gases from a diesel generator using heavy fuel oil. A hybrid process: electron beam (EB) plasma and wet scrubber has been applied. A much higher efficiency of NOx and SO2 removal was achieved in comparison to dry, ammonia free, electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT). A recorded removal from a concentration of 1500 ppm NOx reached 49% at a low dose of 6.5 kGy, while only 2% NOx was removed at the same dose if EB only was applied. For SO2, removal efficiency at a dose of 6.5 kGy increased from 15% (EB only) to 84% when sea water was used as a wet scrubber agent for 700 ppm SO2. The results of this study indicate that EB combined with wet scrubber is a very promising technology to be applied for removal of high concentrations of NOx and SO2 emitted from diesel engines operated e.g. on cargo ships, which are the main sources of SO2 and NOx pollution along their navigation routes.

  6. Comparison of the quantification of caffeine in human plasma by gas chromatography and ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Carregaro

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we evaluated the precision of the ELISA method to quantify caffeine in human plasma and compared the results with those obtained by gas chromatography. A total of 58 samples were analyzed by gas chromatography using a nitrogen-phosphorus detector and routine techniques. For the ELISA test, the samples were diluted to obtain a concentration corresponding to 50% of the absorbance of the standard curve. To determine whether the proximity between the I50 of the standard curve and that of the sample would bring about a more precise result, the samples were divided into three blocks according to the criterion of difference, in modulus, of the I50 of the standard curve and of the I50 of the sample. The samples were classified into three groups. The first was composed of 20 samples with I50 up to 1.5 ng/ml, the second consisted of 21 samples with I50 ranging from 1.51 to 3 ng/ml, and the third of 17 samples with I50 ranging from 3.01 to 13 ng/ml. The determination coefficient (R² = 0.999 showed that the data obtained by gas chromatography represented a reliable basis. The results obtained by ELISA were also reliable, with an estimated Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.82 between the two methods. This coefficient for the different groups (0.88, 0.79 and 0.49 for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively showed greater reliability for the test with dilutions closer to I50.

  7. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This packet of instructional materials for a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and plasma arc cutting course is comprised of a teacher edition, student edition, and student workbook. The teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages. Introductory pages include training and competency profile, state duty/task crosswalk,…

  8. Lipids rich in phosphatidylethanolamine from natural gas-utilizing bacteria reduce plasma cholesterol and classes of phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H.; Hellgren, Lars; Olsen, E.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the effects of three different high-lipid diets on plasma lipoproteins and phospholipids in mink (Mustela vison). The 18 mink studied were fed one of the three diets during a 25-d period in a parallel group design. The compared diets had 0, 17, and 67% extracted lipids from natural gas...

  9. Infrared gas phase study on plasma-polymer interactions in high-current diffuse dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Welzel, S.; Starostin, S. A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Engeln, R.; de Vries, H. W.

    2017-06-01

    A roll-to-roll high-current diffuse dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure was operated in air and Ar/N2/O2 gas mixtures. The exhaust gas from the discharge was studied using a high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer in the range from 3000 to 750 cm-1 to unravel the plasma-polymer interactions. The absorption features of HxNyOz, COx, and HCOOH (formic acid) were identified, and the relative densities were deduced by fitting the absorption bands of the detected molecules. Strong interactions between plasma and polymer (Polyethylene-2,6-naphthalate, or PEN) in precursor-free oxygen-containing gas mixtures were observed as evidenced by a high COx production. The presence of HCOOH in the gas effluent, formed through plasma-chemical synthesis of COx, turns out to be a sensitive indicator for etching. By adding tetraethylorthosilicate precursor in the plasma, dramatic changes in the COx production were measured, and two distinct deposition regimes were identified. At high precursor flows, a good agreement with the precursor combustion and the COx production was observed, whereas at low precursor flows an etching-deposition regime transpires, and the COx production is dominated by polymer etching.

  10. Inactivation of duck hepatitis B virus by a hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system: laboratory and 'in use' testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, K; Deva, A K; Zou, J; Kumaradeva, P; Bissett, L; Cossart, Y E

    1999-04-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of nosocomial infections and can be transmitted by contaminated instruments. However, tests of the efficacy of sterilization of materials and equipment contaminated by HBV are difficult to perform because the virus cannot be cultured in the laboratory. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the capability of a low temperature, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilizer (Sterrad, Advanced Sterilization Products, Irvine California,) to inactivate duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). In laboratory efficacy studies using DHBV dried on to glass filter carriers and exposed to one-half of the hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization process, there was a 10(7) or greater decrease in the viral titer, with no infectivity detected on the carriers after treatment. In-use studies were performed using a laparoscope that was experimentally contaminated with DHBV to mimic the possible transmission of infection between successive patients. Following exposure to the hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization process no transmission of DHBV infection from the laparoscope occurred despite obvious visual soiling with blood (N = 8) while the transmission rate for the unprocessed laparoscope (positive control) was 100% (26/26), and that for instruments after a water wash was 63% (7/11). In conclusion the hydrogen gas plasma sterilization process completely inactivates DHBV a representative of the hepadna group of viruses.

  11. Influence of gas flow velocity on the transport of chemical species in an atmospheric pressure air plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. I.; Walsh, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on a numerical study of the transport of reactive chemical species generated in an atmospheric-pressure air plasma discharge under the influence of a high velocity flowing gas. Using a 1D air plasma model, it is shown that the reactive species transported downstream of the discharge region can be categorized into three distinct groups based on their spatial distribution: (i) decaying downstream species, (ii) increasing downstream species and (iii) variable density species, where the density is a function of both spatial position and gas flow velocity. It is demonstrated that the gas flow velocity influences the dominant chemical reactions downstream of the discharge region, noticeably altering the composition of several key reactive chemical species transported to a given downstream location. As many emerging applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are driven by the flux of reactive chemical species, this study highlights the importance of gas flow velocity, not only as a means to enhance mass transport but also as a means to manipulate the very nature of the reactive plasma chemistry arriving at a given location.

  12. Ion Behavior and Gas Mixing in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas as sources of highly charged ions (concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melin, G.; Drentje, A. G.; Girard, A.; Hitz, D.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: An ECR ion source is basically an ECR heated plasma confinement machine, with hot electrons and cold ions. The main parameters of the ion population have been analyzed, including temperature, losses, and confinement time. The "gas mixing" effect has been studied in this context. An

  13. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from a few-terawatt laser driven plasma acceleration using a nitrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. S.; Moorti, A.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the laser plasma acceleration of electrons has been carried out using 3 TW, 45 fs duration titanium sapphire laser pulse interaction with a nitrogen gas jet at an intensity of 2 × 1018 W cm-2. We have observed the stable generation of a well collimated electron beam with divergence and pointing variation ˜10 mrad from nitrogen gas jet plasma at an optimum plasma density around 3 × 1019 cm-3. The energy spectrum of the electron beam was quasi-monoenergetic with an average peak energy and a charge around 25 MeV and 30 pC respectively. The results will be useful for better understanding and control of ionization injection and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in high-Z gases and also towards the development of practical LWFA for various applications including injectors for high energy accelerators.

  14. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyou; Wu, Ling; Xu, Chuang; Xia, Cheng; Sun, Lingwei; Shu, Shi

    2013-09-26

    Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver-operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, α-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and α-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences between CK and SK. Our

  15. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  16. The impact of plasma-wall interaction on the gas mixing efficiency in electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, L; Stiebing, K E; Dobrescu, S

    2012-02-01

    It is generally accepted that different effects are necessary to explain the gas mixing method of increasing the output of highly charged ions from an ECRIS. The two most important effects are the mass effect and the dilution effect. Their relative weights have not been determined experimentally yet, but it is generally assumed that the mass effect is dominant in standard ECRIS installations with stainless steel plasma chambers. In order to gain more insight into the physics of the gas mixing effect and in particular on the relevance of the dilution process, we have carried out a study where we have investigated the role of the plasma-wall interaction on the gas mixing effect. In this contribution, we shall discuss Charge state distributions spectra, measured at the Frankfurt ECRIS using different working gases, pure argon, a mixture of argon and oxygen, and argon mixed with neon.

  17. Gas-surface dynamics and charging effects during plasma processing of semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gyeong Soon

    This thesis work attempts to elucidate the fundamentals of gas-surface interactions that occur during plasma etching. Controlled experiments using hyperthermal fluorine beams have enabled us to uncover the scattering dynamics at complex surfaces similar to those encountered in etching. By analyzing energy and angular distributions of inelastically scattered F atoms, we were able to distinguish single- and multiple-bounce scattering and to develop models to describe these exit channels. Furthermore, we found that hard-sphere collision kinematics can capture well the energy transfer of the hyperthermal F atoms onto fluorinated silicon surfaces. Based on the fundamental scattering information, we have developed a kinetic model that is described by two parameters: (1) direct inelastic scattering probability and (2) sticking (reaction) probability. These parameters are formulated as a function of the incident energy and angle of F atoms. By incorporating the empirical kinetic model into Monte Carlo based profile evolution simulations, we have unraveled the origin of many etch profile peculiarities which appear during hyperthermal F-beam etching, such as microtrenching, inverse microloading, and undercutting. The kinetic model has been used to describe successfully etching in Cl2-plasmas. For the study of pattern-dependent charging, we have developed a numerical model that combines plasma, sheath, and charging dynamics. The charging simulations illustrate that the directionality difference between ions and electrons arriving at the wafer, brought about by the sheath, causes differential charging on patterned areas even when the plasma is uniform. Using the newly developed charging model, we have investigated gate oxide damage. The results show that a potential drop across the thin gate oxide caused by differential microstructure charging is primarily responsible for gate oxide degradation by driving Fowler-Nordheim stress currents. In general, increasing the flux of low

  18. Effects of gas temperature in the plasma layer on RONS generation in array-type dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Yi, Changho; Eom, Sangheum; Park, Seungil; Kim, Seong Bong; Ryu, Seungmin; Yoo, Suk Jae

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we studied the control of plasma-produced species under a fixed gas composition (i.e., ambient air) in a 10 kHz-driven array-type dielectric barrier atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge. Instead of the gas composition, only the gas velocity was controlled. Thus, the plasma-maintenance cost was considerably lower than methods such as external N2 or O2 injection. The plasma-produced species were monitored using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The discharge properties were measured using a voltage probe, current probe, infrared camera, and optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that the major plasma products largely depend on the gas temperature in the plasma discharge layer. The gas temperature in the plasma discharge layer was significantly different to the temperature of the ceramic adjacent to the plasma discharge layer, even in the small discharge power density of ˜15 W/cm2 or ˜100 W/cm3. Because the vibrational excitation of N2 was suppressed by the higher gas flow, the major plasma-produced species shifted from NOx in low flow to O3 in high flow.

  19. The plasma line revisited as an aeronomical diagnostic - Suprathermal electrons, solar EUV, electron-gas thermal balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. C., Jr.; Mantas, G. P.; Wickwar, V. B.

    1977-01-01

    Spectra of plasma wave intensities in the ionosphere over Arecibo are calculated and compared with those from observations of the plasma line intensity. This approach involving directly observed quantities avoids the uncertainties that have plagued past comparisons with photoelectron theory. In addition, careful comparisons in physically relevant segments of the spectra show that any significant increase in the magnitude of the solar EUV flux would lead to a contradiction of the observed plasma wave intensities. Further, the comparisons indicate that resolution of the thermal electron-gas heat balance problem must be sought through better heat transfer rates (e.g., heating and cooling rates, etc.), rather than in the solar EUV. This approach utilizes more fully the potential of the plasma line experiment as a diagnostic tool for aeronomical studies, (e.g., photoelectrons, auroral secondaries, ionosphere-modification experiments, etc.).

  20. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. 82 Kr (~11.58%), 83 Kr (~11.49%), 84 Kr (~57%) and 86 Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. 82 Kr, 86 Kr and 83 Kr, 86 Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of 86 Kr to 84 Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Hole dynamics in noble metals

    OpenAIRE

    Campillo, I.; Rubio, A.; Pitarke, J. M.; Goldmann, A.; Echenique, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of hole dynamics in noble metals (Cu and Au), by means of first-principles many-body calculations. While holes in a free-electron gas are known to live shorter than electrons with the same excitation energy, our results indicate that d-holes in noble metals exhibit longer inelastic lifetimes than excited sp-electrons, in agreement with experiment. The density of states available for d-hole decay is larger than that for the decay of excited electrons; however, th...

  2. A rapid analysis of plasma/serum ethylene and propylene glycol by headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexandra; Morris, Cory; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2013-12-01

    A rapid headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the analysis of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol in plasma and serum specimens using 1,3-propanediol as the internal standard. The method employed a single-step derivitization using phenylboronic acid, was linear to 200 mg/dL and had a lower limit of quantitation of 1 mg/dL suitable for clinical analyses. The analytical method described allows for laboratories with HS-GC instrumentation to analyze ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol on a single instrument with rapid switch-over from alcohols to glycols analysis. In addition to the novel HS-GC method, a retrospective analysis of patient specimens containing ethylene glycol and propylene glycol was also described. A total of 36 patients ingested ethylene glycol, including 3 patients who presented with two separate admissions for ethylene glycol toxicity. Laboratory studies on presentation to hospital for these patients showed both osmolal and anion gap in 13 patients, osmolal but not anion gap in 13 patients, anion but not osmolal gap in 8 patients, and 1 patient with neither an osmolal nor anion gap. Acidosis on arterial blood gas was present in 13 cases. Only one fatality was seen; this was a patient with initial serum ethylene glycol concentration of 1282 mg/dL who died on third day of hospitalization. Propylene glycol was common in patients being managed for toxic ingestions, and was often attributed to iatrogenic administration of propylene glycol-containing medications such as activated charcoal and intravenous lorazepam. In six patients, propylene glycol contributed to an abnormally high osmolal gap. The common presence of propylene glycol in hospitalized patients emphasizes the importance of being able to identify both ethylene glycol and propylene glycol by chromatographic methods.

  3. Understanding the Effect of Gas Dynamics in Plasma Gun Performance for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Will; Underwood, Thomas; Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed coaxial plasma accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on both the properties of the plasma flow and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Specific emphasis is placed on quantifying the variation in these properties using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume as the gun volume is progressively filled with more neutral gas. These results are mapped to the operational dynamics of the gun via a time-resolved Schlieren cinematic visualization of the density gradient within the flow. Resulting videos indicate the existence of two distinct modes with vastly different characteristic timescales, spatial evolution, and plasma properties. Time resolved quantification of the associated plasma heat flux for both modes, including a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 10 GW m-2, is presented using both a fast thermocouple gauge and an IR camera. Both diagnostics in conjunction with a heat transfer model provide an accurate description of the energy transfer dynamics and operational characteristics of plasma guns. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program.

  4. Influence of gas flow and applied voltage on interaction of jets in a cross-field helium plasma jet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Meng; Liu, Feng; Fang, Zhi; Zhang, Bo; Wan, Hui

    2017-09-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet arrays can greatly enhance the treatment area to fulfill the need for large-scale surface processing, while the spatial uniformity of the plasma jet array is closely related to the interactions of the adjacent jets. In this paper, a three-tube one-dimensional (1D) He plasma jet array with a cross-field needle-ring electrode structure is used to investigate the influences of the gas flow rate and applied voltage on the interactions of the adjacent jets through electrical, optical, and fluid measurements. The repulsion of the adjacent plume channels is observed using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) and the influence of the gas flow rate and applied voltage on the electrostatic repulsion force, Coulomb force, is discussed. It is found that electrical coupling, mainly electrostatic repulsion force, exists among the jets in the array, which causes both the divergence of the lateral plumes and the nonlinear changes of the discharge power and the transport charge. The deflection angle of the lateral plumes with respect to the central plume in the optical images increases with the increase of applied voltage and decreases with the increase of gas flow rate. The deflection angle of the lateral plumes in the optical images is obviously larger than that of the lateral gas streams in the Schlieren images under the same experimental conditions, and the unconformity of the deflection angles is mainly attributed to the electrostatic repulsion force in adjacent plasma plume channels. The experimental results can help understand the interaction mechanisms of jets in the array and design controllable and scalable plasma jet arrays.

  5. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHertwig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment.Argon + 0.135 % vol. oxygen + 0.2 % vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135 % vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species, whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however the emission of vacuum (VUV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions.The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135 % vol. oxygen + 0.2 % vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135 % vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of reactive oxygen species. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of Bacillus subtilis endospores.

  6. Ion angular distribution in plasma of vacuum arc ion source with composite cathode and elevated gas pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu; Oks, E M

    2014-02-01

    The Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion sources are capable of generating ion beams of almost all metals of the periodic table. For this kind of ion source, a combination of gas feeding with magnetic field allows the simultaneous generation of both metal and gaseous ions. That makes the MEVVA ion source an excellent instrument for science and application. This work presents results of investigation for ion angular distributions in vacuum arc plasma of Mevva-V.Ru ion source for composite cathodes and for elevated gas pressure. It was shown that for all the cathode materials, singly charged ions have wider angular distribution than multiply charged ions. Increasing the working gas pressure leads to a significant change in the angular distribution of gaseous ions, while with the distribution of metal ions gas remains practically unchanged. The reasons for such different influences are discussed.

  7. Design and test of a simple fast electromagnetic inductive gas valve for planar pulsed inductive plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dawei; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2017-10-01

    In support of our planar pulsed inductive plasma thruster research, a fast electromagnetic inductive valve for a gas propellant injection system has been built and tested. A new and important design feature is the use of a conical diaphragm as the action part, which greatly contributes to the virtue of simplicity for adopting the resultant force of the diaphragm deformation as the closing force. An optical transmission technique is adopted to measure the opening and closing characters of the valve while the gas throughput is determined by measuring the pressure change per pulse in a test chamber with a capacitance manometer. The experimental results revealed that the delay time before the valve reaction is less than 40 μs, and the valve pulse width is no longer than 160 μs full width at half maximum. The valve delivers 0-2.5 mg of argon gas per pulse varied by adjusting the drive voltage and gas pressure.

  8. Highly selective dry etching of polystyrene-poly(methyl methacrylate) block copolymer by gas pulsing carbon monoxide-based plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Engelmann, Sebastian U.; Joseph, Eric A.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a very selective PMMA removal method from poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) copolymer using gas pulsing cyclic etching. Flow ratio of hydrogen (H2) added to carbon monoxide (CO) plasma was periodically changed to control etch and deposition processes on PS. By controlling the process time of each etch and deposition step, full PMMA removal including etching of the neutral layer was demonstrated at 28 nm pitch, while PS thickness remained intact. This is more than 10 times higher etch selectivity than conventional continuous plasma etch processes using standard oxygen (O2), CO-H2 and CO-O2-based chemistries.

  9. Determination of Menthol in Plasma and Urine by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Judy; Frazee, Clint; Kearns, Gregory; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Menthol, a monoterpene, is a principal component of peppermint oil and is used extensively in consumer products as a flavoring aid. It is also commonly used medicinally as a topical skin coolant; to treat inflammation of the mucous membranes, digestive problems, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and in preventing spasms during endoscopy and for its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract. Menthol has a half life of 3-6 h and is rapidly metabolized to menthol glucuronide which is detectable in urine and serum following menthol use. We describe a method for the determination of total menthol in human plasma and urine using liquid/liquid extraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode and menthol-d4 as the internal standard. Controls are prepared with menthol glucuronide and all samples undergo enzymatic hydrolysis for the quantification of total menthol. The method has a linear range of 5-1000 ng/mL, and coefficient of variation <10%.

  10. Spark Plasma Sintering of a Gas Atomized Al7075 Alloy: Microstructure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Molnárová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The powder of an Al7075 alloy was prepared by gas atomization. A combination of cellular, columnar, and equiaxed dendritic-like morphology was observed in individual powder particles with continuous layers of intermetallic phases along boundaries. The cells are separated predominantly by high-angle boundaries, the areas with dendritic-like morphology usually have a similar crystallographic orientation. Spark plasma sintering resulted in a fully dense material with a microstructure similar to that of the powder material. The continuous layers of intermetallic phases are replaced by individual particles located along internal boundaries, coarse particles are formed at the surface of original powder particles. Microhardness measurements revealed both artificial and natural ageing behavior similar to that observed in ingot metallurgy material. The minimum microhardness of 81 HV, observed in the sample annealed at 300 °C, reflects the presence of coarse particles. The peak microhardness of 160 HV was observed in the sample annealed at 500 °C and then aged at room temperature. Compression tests confirmed high strength combined with sufficient plasticity. Annealing even at 500 °C does not significantly influence the distribution of grain sizes—about 45% of the area is occupied by grains with the size below 10 µm.

  11. Spark Plasma Sintering and Upsetting of a Gas-Atomized/Air-Atomized Al Alloy Powder Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tünçay, Mehmet Masum; Muñiz-Lerma, José Alberto; Bishop, Donald Paul; Brochu, Mathieu

    2017-10-01

    Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy powder, Alumix 431D, was modified by replacing the native air-atomized pure Al particles with gas-atomized pure Al. Samples were sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS), and upset forging was applied to the sintered samples by SPS. Densities over 98 and 99% of theoretical were obtained for the sintered and forged samples, respectively. Microstructural analysis and characterization of all samples were done using energy-dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical properties were evaluated using microhardness and flexural strength and strain measurements. The microhardness value of the T6 tempered sample was comparable to that of its wrought counterpart AA7075. Particle bonding after sintering was incomplete and reveals that composite oxide layer of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy powder is difficult to disrupt, and it is necessary to apply a secondary process like forging to improve particle bonding. The loss in ductility following T6 tempering is ascribed to void formation due to the dissolution of the secondary phases, remaining undissolved precipitates, and a localized lack of cohesion between particles.

  12. Reactivity and analytical performance of oxygen as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, Alex; Amais, Renata S.; Amaral, Clarice D. B.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Schiavo, Daniela; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivity and analytical performance of O2 as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry was investigated. Selected analytes in a wide mass range were divided in three groups according to their reactivity: G1 represents elements with high oxygen affinity (Ce, La, P, Sc, Ti, and Y), G2 contains elements that may partially react with oxygen (As, Ba, Mo, Si, Sr, and V), and G3 comprises elements expected to be less reactive towards oxygen (Al, Bi, Cu, Mg, Pb, and Pd). On-mass and mass-shift modes were evaluated by monitoring atomic and metal oxide ions, respectively. Analytical signal profiles, oxide percentages, sensitivities and limits of detection for oxygen flow rates varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mL min- 1 were also studied. Group 1 elements plus As and V presented better sensitivities and LODs when measuring oxides, which were the major species for all flow rates evaluated. Molybdenum and Si oxides presented intermediate behavior and MoO fraction was up to 47% and limit of detection was the same as that obtained in on-mass mode. For others G2 and G3 elements, on-mass mode presented higher sensitivity and better LODs, with estimated oxide contents lower than 10%. In most cases, increasing oxygen flow rates led to lower sensitivities and worse LODs.

  13. Inactivation of animal and human prions by hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Kreuz, C; Yousfi, R; Soufflet, C; Quadrio, I; Yan, Z-X; Huyot, V; Aubenque, C; Destrez, P; Roth, K; Roberts, C; Favero, M; Clayette, P

    2009-08-01

    Prions cause various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. They are highly resistant to the chemical and physical decontamination and sterilization procedures routinely used in healthcare facilities. The decontamination procedures recommended for the inactivation of prions are often incompatible with the materials used in medical devices. In this study, we evaluated the use of low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization systems and other instrument-processing procedures for inactivating human and animal prions. We provide new data concerning the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide against prions from in vitro or in vivo tests, focusing on the following: the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide sterilization and possible interactions with enzymatic or alkaline detergents, differences in the efficiency of this treatment against different prion strains, and the influence of contaminating lipids. We found that gaseous hydrogen peroxide decreased the infectivity of prions and/or the level of the protease-resistant form of the prion protein on different surface materials. However, the efficiency of this treatment depended strongly on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the delivery system used in medical devices, because these effects were more pronounced for the new generation of Sterrad technology. The Sterrad NX sterilizer is 100% efficient (0% transmission and no protease-resistant form of the prion protein signal detected on the surface of the material for the mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy 6PB1 strain and a variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease strain). Thus, gaseous or vaporized hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivates prions on the surfaces of medical devices.

  14. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  15. Friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films grown in various source gas plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Nilufer, I. B.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Beschliesser, M.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-01-18

    In this study, the authors investigated the effects of various source gases (methane, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene) on the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films prepared in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Films were deposited on AISI H13 steel substrates and tested in a pin-on-disk machine against DLC-coated M50 balls in dry nitrogen. They found a close correlation between friction coefficient and source gas composition. Specifically, films grown in source gases with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios exhibited lower friction coefficients and higher wear resistance than films grown in source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.014) was achieved with a film derived from methane with an WC ratio of 4, whereas the coefficient of films derived from acetylene (H/C = 1) was of 0.15. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Specifically, films derived from gases with lower H/C values were worn out and the substrate material was exposed, whereas films from methane and ethane remained intact and wore at rates that were nearly two orders of magnitude lower than films obtained from acetylene.

  16. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon films grown in various source gas plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Nilufer, I.B.; Eryilmaz, O.L.; Beschliesser, M.; Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1999-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various source gases (methane, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene) on the friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Films were deposited on AISI H13 steel substrates and tested in a pin-on-disk machine against DLC-coated M50 balls in dry nitrogen. We found a close correlation between friction coefficient and source gas composition. Specifically, films grown in source gases with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios exhibited lower friction coefficients and a higher wear resistance than films grown in source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.014) was achieved with a film derived from methane with an H/C ratio of 4, whereas the coefficient of films derived from acetylene (H/C=1) was 0.15. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Specifically, films derived from gases with lower H/C values were worn out, and the substrate material was exposed, whereas films from methane and ethane remained intact and wore at rates that were almost two orders of magnitude lower than films obtained from acetylene. (orig.)

  17. Effect of helium plasma gas flow rate on the properties of WC-12 wt.%Co coatings sprayed by atmospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cermet coatings of WC-12wt.%Co are extensively used to improve the wear resistance of a wide range of technical components. This paper analyses the influence of the plasma gas flow of helium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-12wt.%Co coatings deposited by plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. In order to obtain homogeneous and denser coatings, three different flows of He ( 8 l/min., 16 l/min. and 32 l/min were used in the research. With the application of He, coatings achieved higher values of hardness due to less degradation of the primary WC carbides. The main goal was to deposit dense and homogeneous layers of WC-12wt.%Co coatings with improved wear resistance for different applications. The test results of the microstructure of the layers were evaluated under a light microscope. The analysis of the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the deposited layers was made in accordance with the standard of Pratt-Whitney. The morphology of the powder particles and the microstructure of the best coating was examined on the SEM (scanning electron microscope. The evaluation of the mechanical properties of the layers was done by applying the HV0.3 method for microhardness testing and by applying tensile testing to test the bond strength. The research has shown that the flow of He plasma gas significantly affects the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the structure of WC-12 wt.%Co coatings.

  18. The effect of processing parameters on the synthesis of tungsten oxide nanomaterials by a modified plasma arc gas condensation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cherng-Yuh; Lin, Hsuan-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Kun; Lin, Chung-Kwei

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, tungsten oxide nanomaterials were synthesized by a modified plasma arc gas condensation technique. The effects of processing parameters (plasma current ranged from 70-90 A and chamber pressure ranged from 200-600 torr) on the preparation of tungsten oxide nanomaterials were investigated. X-ray diffraction results showed that all of the nanomaterials synthesized in the present study exhibited W5O14 phase. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy examinations revealed that the tungsten oxide nanomaterials were equiaxed when prepared at a relatively low plasma current of 70 A, and turned into rod-like nanoparticles with increasing plasma current (80 or 90 A). Generally, the relative amount, diameter, and length of tungsten oxide nanorods increased with increasing plasma currents or chamber pressures. The aspect ratio of the as-prepared tungsten oxide nanorods reached a maximum of 12.7 when a plasma current of 90 A and a chamber pressure of 400 torr were used. A growth mechanism for tungsten oxide nanorods was proposed.

  19. Surface characteristics of etched parylene-C films for low-damaged patterning process using inductively-coupled O2/CHF3 gas plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Yong-Hyun; Shutov, Dmitriy Alexandrovich; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of CHF3 admixture in O2 plasma for a low damage patterning process. We used inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) etching of parylene-C thin films with O2/CHF3 gas mixtures. Plasma diagnostics were performed by using a double Langmuir probe. Also in order to examine the relationship between the plasma and surface energy, we attempted to conduct a simplified model-based analysis of the CHF3/O2 plasma. The surface energy decreased as the admixture fraction increased with fluorocarbon containing gas. The decreased surface energy is related to the functional groups of CFx polymer at binding energy of around 290 eV and low ion physical damage. We observed that a small addition of CHF3 to O2 plasma produced a high etch rate, low surface energy, and low roughness compared to pure oxygen plasma.

  20. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  1. CO2 Laser acceleration of forward directed MeV proton beams in a gas target at critical plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, F.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Haberberger, D. J.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of 1-5 MeV protons from the interaction of a 3 ps TW CO2 laser pulse with a gas target with a peak density around the critical plasma density has been studied by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The proton acceleration in the preformed plasma with a symmetric, linearly ramped density distribution occurs via formation of sheath of the hot electrons on the back surface of the target. The maximum energy of the hot electrons and, hence, net acceleration of protons is mainly defined by Forward Raman scattering instability in the underdense part of the plasma. Forward directed ion beams from a debris free gaseous target can find an application as a high-brightness ion source-injector to a conventional accelerator operating up to kHz pulse repetition frequency.

  2. Study on the effect of atmospheric plasma processing using gas mixture on 3C-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zulaika; Zaaba, S. K.; Nasir, N. F. Mohd; Mustaffa, M. T.; Arcena, Mayvinne; Zakaria, A.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric plasma processing are widely used for improving surfaces properties. Cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) is one of the material used as biosensor for their biocompatibility properties. In this work, we present the results of atmospheric plasma processing treatments using gas mixture on 3C-SiC surface. The 3C-SiC samples were treated at different duration and flow rate. Helium/Nitrogen and Argon/Nitrogen gas mixtures were used as plasma treatments and its effect on the surface was investigated. A significant increment of surface wettability were observed after plasma exposition. Investigation by surface morphological measurements was performed by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Contact angle measurement results showed a decreased in contact angle with increasing of treatment time and flow rate, and Argon/Nitrogen mixture promote more wettability compared to Helium/Nitrogen mixture. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 24 May 2017.

  3. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  4. Comparison of Plasma, Metal Inactive Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inactive Gas (TIG) Processes for Laser Hybrid Welding (302)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    source, ignition and running torch stability, weld phase transformation and change in ductility and overall weld quality are described. The results show that all three processes can successfully be integrated with a CO2 laser beam for hybrid welding. Due to the pilot arc in plasma welding, this process......, the MIG process is more difficult to control than laser/plasma and laser/TIG processes. All three types of secondary heat sources enable an increased ductility of the weld as compared to pure laser welding when welding 1.8 mm GA 260 with a TIG torch and 2.13 mm CMn steel with a plasma arc or MIG......In this paper, TIG, plasma, and MIG processes have been individually combined with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the general benefits and drawbacks of each process have been individually assessed and compared. Aspects such as ease of integration with a CO2 laser...

  5. The Use of Liquid Isopropyl Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma to Biologically Decontaminate Spacecraft Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J. K.; Tudryn, Carissa D.; Choi, Sun J.; Eulogio, Sebastian E.; Roberts, Timothy J.; Tudryn, Carissa D.

    2006-01-01

    Legitimate concern exists regarding sending spacecraft and their associated hardware to solar system bodies where they could possibly contaminate the body's surface with terrestrial microorganisms. The NASA approved guidelines for sterilization as set forth in NPG 8020.12C, which is consistent with the biological contamination control objectives of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), recommends subjecting the spacecraft and its associated hardware to dry heat-a dry heat regimen that could potentially employ a temperature of 110(deg)C for up to 200 hours. Such a temperature exposure could prove detrimental to the spacecraft electronics. The stimulated growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in metallic interconnects and/or thermal degradation of organic materials composing much of the hardware could take place over a prolonged temperature regimen. Such detrimental phenomena would almost certainly compromise the integrity and reliability of the electronics. Investigation of sterilization procedures in the medical field suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H202) gas plasma (HPGP) technology can effectively function as an alternative to heat sterilization, especially for heat-sensitive items. Treatment with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) in liquid form prior to exposure of the hardware to HPGP should also prove beneficial. Although IPA is not a sterilant, it is frequently used as a disinfectant because of its bactericidal properties. The use of IPA in electronics cleaning is widely recognized and has been utilized for many years with no adverse affects reported. In addition, IPA is the principal ingredient of the test fluid used in ionic contamination testers to assess the amount of ionic contamination found on the surfaces of printed wiring assemblies. This paper will set forth experimental data confirming the feasibility of the IPA/H202 approach to reach acceptable microbial reduction (MR) levels of spacecraft electronic hardware. In addition, a proposed process flow in

  6. Ethylene Oxide and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma Sterilization: Precautionary Practices in U.S. Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L

    Evaluate precautionary practices and extent of use of ethylene oxide (EtO) and hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP) sterilization systems, including use of single chamber EtO units. Modular, web-based survey. Members of professional practice organizations who reported using EtO or HPGP in the past week to sterilize medical instruments and supplies. Participating organizations invited members via email which included a hyperlink to the survey. Descriptive analyses were conducted including simple frequencies and prevalences. A total of 428 respondents completed the module on chemical sterilants. Because most respondents worked in hospitals (87%, n=373) analysis focused on these workers. Most used HPGP sterilizers (84%, n=373), 38% used EtO sterilizers, with 22% using both. Nearly all respondents using EtO operated single chamber units (94%, n=120); most of them reported that the units employed single use cartridges (83%, n=115). Examples of where engineering and administrative controls were lacking for EtO include: operational local exhaust ventilation (7%; n=114); continuous air monitoring (6%; n=113); safe handling training (6%; n=142); and standard operating procedures (4%; n=142). Examples of practices which may increase HPGP exposure risk included lack of standard operating procedures (9%; n=311) and safe handling training (8%; n=312). Use of precautionary practices was good but not universal. EtO use appears to have diminished in favor of HPGP which affords higher throughput and minimal regulatory constraints. Separate EtO sterilization and aeration units were still being used nearly one year after U.S. EPA prohibited their use.

  7. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  8. Self-consistent plasma chemistry model for surface microdischarge in humid air including effects of ohmic heating and gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Changho; Yoon, Sung-Young; Eom, Sangheum; Park, Seungil; Kim, Seong Bong; Ryu, Seungmin; Yoo, Suk Jae

    2017-10-01

    A numerical model is presented for surface microdischarges (SMDs) in flowing humid air at atmospheric pressure, to investigate the effects of the direct ohmic heating of gases in the discharge layer, and the transports of heat and particles by gas flow. Using a simplified configuration of heat transfer and gas flow, the proposed model calculated not only the densities of neutral species but also the temperatures of gases as time dependent variables. The calculated dynamics for various reactive oxygen and nitrogen species showed reasonable agreement with the experimental results obtained by Fourier transformed infrared absorption spectroscopy, while the calculated dynamics without ohmic heating of gases in the discharge layer showed significant disagreement. These results imply that local ohmic heating of the thin discharge layer by the microdischarge itself considerably affected the rate constants of the temperature dependent chemical reactions. The dynamics of the neutral species were also affected by gas flow, both directly through particle transport, and indirectly through cooling. Accordingly, to properly simulate the dynamics of reactive neutral species in SMDs, plasma chemistry models should treat plasmas as sources of both particles and heat which can be deliberately transported by gas flow.

  9. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Jiang, Yuze; Wang, Tiecheng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2014-03-15

    The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in simulated flue gas at 110°C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg(0) was oxidized and 20.5μgkJ(-1) of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9JL(-1). A maximal Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O2, H2O, SO2, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N2 metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg(0) oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Effects of feed gas composition and catalyst thickness on carbon nanotube and nanofiber synthesis by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Kim, S S; Hash, D B; Gore, J P; Fisher, T S

    2008-06-01

    Many engineering applications require carbon nanotubes with specific characteristics such as wall structure, chirality and alignment. However, precise control of nanotube properties grown to application specifications remains a significant challenge. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offers a variety of advantages in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes in that several important synthesis parameters can be controlled independently. This paper reports an experimental study of the effects of reacting gas composition (percentage methane in hydrogen) and catalyst film thickness on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and a computational study of gas-phase composition for the inlet conditions of experimentally observed carbon nanotube growth using different chemical reaction mechanisms. The simulations seek to explain the observed effects of reacting gas composition and to identify the precursors for CNT formation. The experimental results indicate that gas-phase composition significantly affects the synthesized material, which is shown to be randomly aligned nanotube and nanofiber mats for relatively methane-rich inlet gas mixtures and non-tubular carbon for methane-lean incoming mixtures. The simulation results suggest that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture coverts to an acetylene-methane-hydrogen mixture with minor amounts of ethylene, hydrogen atom, and methyl radical. Acetylene appears to be the indicator species for solid carbon formation. The simulations also show that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture does not produce enough gas-phase precursors needed to form quality CNTs below 5% CH4 concentrations in the inlet stream.

  11. Scaling behavior of ultrafast two-color terahertz generation in plasma gas targets: energy and pressure dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, George; Dakovski, Georgi L

    2010-07-05

    Ultrafast terahertz emission from two-color generated laser plasma gas targets is studied using air and the noble gases (neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) as the generation media. Terahertz output pulse energy and power spectra are measured as function of gas species, gas pressure, and input pulse energy up to 6 mJ per pulse using a 40-fs 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser system as the drive source. Terahertz pulse energies approaching 1 microJ per pulse with spectral content out to 40 THz and pulse duration of 35 fs is reported. A simple one dimensional transient photocurrent ionization model is used to calculate the spectra showing good agreement with experiments.

  12. 3D simulations of gas puff effects on edge plasma and ICRF coupling in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Coster, D.; Feng, Y.; Guillemaut, C.; Goniche, M.; Harting, D.; Lunt, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Szepesi, G.; Van Eester, D.; JET Contributors, the

    2017-05-01

    Recent JET (ITER-Like Wall) experiments have shown that the fueling gas puffed from different locations of the vessel can result in different scrape-off layer (SOL) density profiles and therefore different radio frequency (RF) coupling. To reproduce the experimental observations, to understand the associated physics and to optimize the gas puff methods, we have carried out three-dimensional (3D) simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code in JET-ILW including a realistic description of the vessel geometry and the gas injection modules (GIMs) configuration. Various gas puffing methods have been investigated, in which the location of gas fueling is the only variable parameter. The simulation results are in quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements. They confirm that compared to divertor gas fueling, mid-plane gas puffing increases the SOL density most significantly but locally, while top gas puffing increases it uniformly in toroidal direction but to a lower degree. Moreover, the present analysis corroborates the experimental findings that combined gas puff scenarios—based on distributed main chamber gas puffing—can be effective in increasing the RF coupling for multiple antennas simultaneously. The results indicate that the spreading of the gas, the local ionization and the transport of the ionized gas along the magnetic field lines connecting the local gas cloud in front of the GIMs to the antennas are responsible for the enhanced SOL density and thus the larger RF coupling.

  13. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  14. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady, E-mail: gennady@purdue.edu; Hassanein, Ahmed [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  15. Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, John

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  16. Effect of piperine on pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate in plasma samples of rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Parveen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piperine (PIP is used as anticonvulsant in traditional Chinese medicine. Co-administration of low-dose sodium valproate with PIP has been regarded to have potential anticonvulsant activity. Aim: This study was intended to investigate the effect of PIP on the pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate (SVP in the plasma samples of rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS method. Materials and Methods: The plasma samples obtained after oral administration of SVP, 150 mg/kg and SVP, 150 mg/kg + PIP, and 5 mg/kg to male Wistar rats were used to quantify the concentrations in plasma using GC-MS method. Results: A simple and accurate method developed in-house was applied for the analysis of plasma samples of Wistar rats after oral administration of SVP and PIP + sodium valproate, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters reported 14.8-fold increase in plasma concentration (maximum observed concentration in the concentration-time profile, 4.6-fold increase in area under the curve and slightly prolonged time to reach that concentration (1 h of SVP in presence of PIP. Conclusion: The study reaffirms the bioenhancing effect of PIP suggesting possibility of dose reduction of SVP while co-adminstering with PIP.

  17. An energy-efficient process for decomposing perfluorooctanoic and perfluorooctane sulfonic acids using dc plasmas generated within gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuoka, K; Sasaki, K; Hayashi, R, E-mail: yasuoka@ee.titech.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are environmentally harmful and persistent substances. Their decomposition was investigated using dc plasmas generated within small gas bubbles in a solution. The plasma characteristics including discharge voltage, voltage drop in the liquid, plasma shape and the emission spectrum were examined with different gases. The decomposition rate and energy efficiency were evaluated by measuring the concentration of fluoride and sulfate ions released from PFOA/PFOS molecules. The concentration of fluoride ions and energy efficiency in the treatment of a PFOS solution were 17.7 mg l{sup -1} (54.8% of the initial amount of fluorine atoms) and 26 mg kWh{sup -1}, respectively, after 240 min of operation. The addition of scavengers of hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons showed little effect on the decomposition. The decomposition processes were analyzed with an assumption that positive species reacted with PFOA/PFOS molecules at the boundary of the plasma-solution surface. This type of plasma showed a much higher decomposition energy efficiency compared with energy efficiencies reported in other studies.

  18. Deuterium thermal desorption from carbon based materials: A comparison of plasma exposure, ion implantation, gas loading, and C-D codeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarev, A., E-mail: pisarev@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHI' , Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHI' , Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Rusinov, A. [Kyushu University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kasuga Koen, 6-1, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Trifonov, N.; Kurnaev, V. [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHI' , Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Spitsyn, A.; Khripunov, B. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Schwarz-Selinger, T. [Max-Plank-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstr.2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rasinski, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Woloska 141, 02-507 (Poland); Sugiyama, K. [Max-Plank-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstr.2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectra from fine grain graphite and carbon fiber composite exposed in different plasma installations have been compared with those obtained after ion implantation, absorption from gas, and those from soft and hard C-D films. Features of the spectra were analysed and led to the conclusion that ion implantation, absorption from gas, and amorphous C:D layer formed on the surface contribute to trapping during plasma irradiation.

  19. Plasma{endash}neutral interaction in tokamak divertor for {open_quote}{open_quote}gas box{close_quote}{close_quote} neutral model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Soboleva, T.K. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1996-06-01

    Plasma flow through the gas cloud in a tokamak divertor for {open_quote}{open_quote}gas box{close_quote}{close_quote} divertor geometry and Knudsen regime of neutral transport is investigated. It is shown that similar to the neutral models that have considered previously, (i) plasma parameters near the target is sensitive to the energy flux into the hydrogen recycling region and can change rapidly, resulting in bifurcation-like behavior, which might be interpreted as a transition to detached regime, (ii) plasma flux onto the target starts to decrease at a very low plasma temperature near the target, while a strong pressure drop already occurs. At low plasma temperature near the target the recombination processes can significantly alter the plasma flux onto the target. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Jiang, Yuze [Shandong Electric Power Research Institute, Jinan 250002 (China); Wang, Tiecheng [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: lijie@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The use of non-thermal plasma injection approach to oxidize Hg{sup 0} in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied. • A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. • Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) contributed to Hg{sup 0} oxidation. • Mercury species mainly existed in the form of HgO(s) adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. - Abstract: The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg{sup 0} was oxidized and 20.5 μg kJ{sup −1} of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9 J L{sup −1}. A maximal Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg{sup 0} oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase.

  1. Simultaneous detection of xenon and krypton in equine plasma by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Wai Him; Choi, Timmy L S; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping; Wan, Terence S M

    2017-02-01

    Xenon can activate the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). As such, it has been allegedly used in human sports for increasing erythropoiesis. Krypton, another noble gas with reported narcosis effect, can also be expected to be a potential and less expensive erythropoiesis stimulating agent. This has raised concern about the misuse of noble gases as doping agents in equine sports. The aim of the present study is to establish a method for the simultaneous detection of xenon and krypton in equine plasma for the purpose of doping control. Xenon- or krypton-fortified equine plasma samples were prepared according to reported protocols. The target noble gases were simultaneously detected by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry using headspace injection. Three xenon isotopes at m/z 129, 131, and 132, and four krypton isotopes at m/z 82, 83, 84, and 86 were targeted in selected reaction monitoring mode (with the precursor ions and product ions at identical mass settings), allowing unambiguous identification of the target analytes. Limits of detection for xenon and krypton were about 19 pmol/mL and 98 pmol/mL, respectively. Precision for both analytes was less than 15%. The method has good specificity as background analyte signals were not observed in negative equine plasma samples (n = 73). Loss of analytes under different storage temperatures has also been evaluated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Determination of lidocaine in plasma by direct solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, EHM; Wemes, C; Morsink, JB; de Jong, GJ

    2000-01-01

    Direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been used to extract the local anesthetic lidocaine from human plasma. A simplified model shows the relationship between the total amount of drug in plasma and the amount of drug extracted. The model takes into account that the drug

  3. 2D hole gas seen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini

    2018-01-01

    A p-type metallic sheet forms between two oxide insulators, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. Suppression of oxygen vacancies in SrTiO3 plays a critical role in forming this sheet.......A p-type metallic sheet forms between two oxide insulators, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. Suppression of oxygen vacancies in SrTiO3 plays a critical role in forming this sheet....

  4. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Huang, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local T{sub e} via the collisional–radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation T{sub e} is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak T{sub e}, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ∼0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  5. Mixing of multiple metal vapours into an arc plasma in gas tungsten arc welding of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hunkwan; Trautmann, Marcus; Tanaka, Keigo; Tanaka, Manabu; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-11-01

    A computational model of the mixing of multiple metal vapours, formed by vaporization of the surface of an alloy workpiece, into the thermal arc plasma in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. The model incorporates the combined diffusion coefficient method extended to allow treatment of three gases, and is applied to treat the transport of both chromium and iron vapour in the helium arc plasma. In contrast to previous models of GTAW, which predict that metal vapours are swept away to the edge of the arc by the plasma flow, it is found that the metal vapours penetrate strongly into the arc plasma, reaching the cathode region. The predicted results are consistent with published measurements of the intensity of atomic line radiation from the metal vapours. The concentration of chromium vapour is predicted to be higher than that of iron vapour due to its larger vaporization rate. An accumulation of chromium vapour is predicted to occur on the cathode at about 1.5 mm from the cathode tip, in agreement with published measurements. The arc temperature is predicted to be strongly reduced due to the strong radiative emission from the metal vapours. The driving forces causing the diffusion of metal vapours into the helium arc are examined, and it is found that diffusion due to the applied electric field (cataphoresis) is dominant. This is explained in terms of large ionization energies and the small mass of helium compared to those of the metal vapours.

  6. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed.

  7. The effect of liquid target on a nonthermal plasma jet—imaging, electric fields, visualization of gas flow and optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Vesna V.; Sretenović, Goran B.; Slikboer, Elmar; Guaitella, Olivier; Sobota, Ana; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2018-02-01

    The article describes the complex study of the interaction of a helium plasma jet with distilled water and saline. The discharge development, spatial distribution of the excited species, electric field measurement results and the results of the Schlieren imaging are presented. The results of the experiments showed that the plasma–liquid interaction could be prolonged with the proper choice of the gas composition between the jet nozzle and the target. This depends on the gas flow and the target distance. Increased conductivity of the liquid does not affect the discharge properties significantly. An increase of the gas flow enables an extension of the plasma duration on the liquid surface up to 10 µs, but with a moderate electric field strength in the ionization wave. In contrast, there is a significant enhancement of the electric field on the liquid surface, up to 30 kV cm‑1 for low flows, but with a shorter time of the overall plasma liquid interaction. Ignition of the plasma jet induces a gas flow modification and may cause turbulences in the gas flow. A significant influence of the plasma jet causing a mixing in the liquid is also recorded and it is found that the plasma jet ignition changes the direction of the liquid circulation.

  8. Production of simplex RNS and ROS by nanosecond pulse N2/O2 plasma jets with homogeneous shielding gas for inducing myeloma cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Xu, Dehui; Liu, Dingxin; Cui, Qingjie; Cai, Haifeng; Li, Qiaosong; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, atmospheric pressure N2/O2 plasma jets with homogeneous shielding gas excited by nanosecond pulse are obtained to generate simplex reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively, for the purpose of studying the simplex RNS and ROS to induce the myeloma cell apoptosis with the same discharge power. The results reveal that the cell death rate by the N2 plasma jet with N2 shielding gas is about two times that of the O2 plasma jet with O2 shielding gas for the equivalent treatment time. By diagnosing the reactive species of ONOO-, H2O2, OH and \\text{O}2- in medium, our findings suggest the cell death rate after plasma jets treatment has a positive correlation with the concentration of ONOO-. Therefore, the ONOO- in medium is thought to play an important role in the process of inducing myeloma cell apoptosis.

  9. Black holes and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    Belief in the existence of black holes is the ultimate act of faith for a physicist. First suggested by the English clergyman John Michell in the year 1784, the gravitational pull of a black hole is so strong that nothing - not even light - can escape. Gravity might be the weakest of the fundamental forces but black-hole physics is not for the faint-hearted. Black holes present obvious problems for would-be observers because they cannot, by definition, be seen with conventional telescopes - although before the end of the decade gravitational-wave detectors should be able to study collisions between black holes. Until then astronomers can only infer the existence of a black hole from its gravitational influence on other matter, or from the X-rays emitted by gas and dust as they are dragged into the black hole. However, once this material passes through the 'event horizon' that surrounds the black hole, we will never see it again - not even with X-ray specs. Despite these observational problems, most physicists and astronomers believe that black holes do exist. Small black holes a few kilometres across are thought to form when stars weighing more than about two solar masses collapse under the weight of their own gravity, while supermassive black holes weighing millions of solar masses appear to be present at the centre of most galaxies. Moreover, some brave physicists have proposed ways to make black holes - or at least event horizons - in the laboratory. The basic idea behind these 'artificial black holes' is not to compress a large amount of mass into a small volume, but to reduce the speed of light in a moving medium to less than the speed of the medium and so create an event horizon. The parallels with real black holes are not exact but the experiments could shed new light on a variety of phenomena. The first challenge, however, is to get money for the research. One year on from a high-profile meeting on artificial black holes in London, for

  10. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinitsky, S. L., E-mail: s.l.sinitsky@inp.nsk.su; Arzhannikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Acad. Lavrentyev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova St., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Acad. Lavrentyev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Prospekt K. Marksa, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-25

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  11. Interference stabilization and UV lasing in a plasma channel formed in gas by intense RF field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Popov, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of interference stabilization of Rydberg atoms in a high-intensity IR laser field is proposed to create a plasma channel with population inversion for conversion of the input laser energy into the VUV and XUV frequency band.

  12. A Method to Determine British Anti-Lewisite in Plasma Utilizing Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byers, Christopher E; Holloway, Evan R; Korte, William D; Smith, John R; Capacio, Bebedict R

    2005-01-01

    British anti-Lewisite (BAL) (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol) is a potential therapeutic compound against the effects of cutaneous sulfur mustard, and an method for its determination in plasma has been developed...

  13. Solid-State 13C NMR Spectroscopy Applied to the Study of Carbon Blacks and Carbon Deposits Obtained by Plasma Pyrolysis of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. C. Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was used in this work to analyze the physical and chemical properties of plasma blacks and carbon deposits produced by thermal cracking of natural gas using different types of plasma reactors. In a typical configuration with a double-chamber reactor, N2 or Ar was injected as plasma working gas in the first chamber and natural gas was injected in the second chamber, inside the arc column. The solid residue was collected at different points throughout the plasma apparatus and analyzed by 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy, using either cross polarization (CP or direct polarization (DP, combined with magic angle spinning (MAS. The 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of a number of plasma blacks produced in the N2 plasma reactor showed two resonance bands, broadly identified as associated with aromatic and aliphatic groups, with indication of the presence of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing groups in the aliphatic region of the spectrum. In contrast to DP experiments, only a small fraction of 13C nuclei in the plasma blacks are effectively cross-polarized from nearby 1H nuclei and are thus observed in spectra recorded with CP. 13C NMR spectra are thus useful to distinguish between different types of carbon species in plasma blacks and allow a selective study of groups spatially close to hydrogen in the material.

  14. Vehicle exhaust gas clearance by low temperature plasma-driven nano-titanium dioxide film prepared by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yu

    Full Text Available A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2 film prepared by radiofrequency (RF magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas.

  15. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  16. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  17. The application of a non-thermal plasma generated by gas-liquid gliding arc discharge in sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chang Ming; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Xia Li, Hong; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Ya

    2012-01-01

    Gliding arc discharge has been investigated in recent years as an innovative physicochemical technique for contaminated water treatment at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. In this study we tested a gas-liquid gliding arc discharge reactor, the bacterial suspension of which was treated circularly. When the bacterial suspension was passed through the electrodes and circulated at defined flow rates, almost 100% of the bacteria were killed in less than 3.0 min. Experimental results showed that it is possible to achieve an abatement of 7.0 decimal logarithm units within only 30 s. Circulation flow rates and types of feeding gas caused a certain impact on bacteria inactivation, but the influences are not obvious. So, under the promise of sterilization effect, industrial applications can select their appropriate operating conditions. All inactivation curves presented the same three-phase profile showing an apparent sterilization effect. Analysis of the scanning electron microscope images of bacterial cells supports the speculation that the gas-liquid gliding arc discharge plasma is acting under various mechanisms driven essentially by oxidation and the effect of electric field. These results enhance the possibility of applying gas-liquid gliding arc discharge decontamination systems to disinfect bacterial-contaminated water. Furthermore, correlational research indicates the potential applications of this technology in rapid sterilization of medical devices, spacecraft and food.

  18. The determination of biperiden in plasma using gas chromatography mass spectrometry: pharmacokinetics after intramuscular administration to guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacio, B R; Caro, S T; Smith, J R; Byers, C E

    2002-02-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method has been developed for the analysis of the biperiden from plasma. The method utilizes 290 microl of plasma and a simple hexane extraction/clean-up procedure. Standard curves were linear over the range of 1.9-250 ng/mL. The range of correlation coefficients for the individual standard curves was 0.9984-0.9999; the largest coefficient of variation expressed as a percentage (% CV) was 11.5%. Precision and accuracy were examined by assessing between-day and within-day variability. For between-day precision, the % CVs ranged from 2.86 to 5.17%. Accuracy as expressed by percentage error ranging from -2.16 to 5.83%. The study for within-day precision demonstrated % CVs from 0.95 to 5.55% with accuracy from -3.37 to 2.45%. Applicability of the method was demonstrated by examining the pharmacokinetics of intramuscular (i.m.) biperiden as an anticonvulsant treatment in a guinea pig model for organophosphate (OP)-induced seizure activity. Mean pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were similar to literature values; selected mean pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were: apparent volume of distribution, 13.9 L/kg; half-life of elimination, 93 min; time to maximal plasma concentration, 27.4 min; and maximal plasma concentration, 32.22 eta g/mL. The time to maximal plasma concentration was found to be similar to the onset time for terminating OP-induced seizure activity in guinea pigs receiving biperiden as an anticonvulsant treatment. The studies indicate that the method affords the required precision, accuracy and sensitivity to assay biperiden at the doses utilized for these pharmacokinetic studies after i.m. administration to guinea pigs. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used: AChE Acetylcholinesterase AUC area under the curve OP organophosphate 2‐PAM pralidoxime chloride PYR pyridostigmine

  19. Coupled two-dimensional edge plasma and neutral gas modeling of tokamak scrape-off-layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, Rajesh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this study is to devise a detailed description of the tokamak scrape-off-layer (SOL), which includes the best available models of both the plasma and neutral species and the strong coupling between the two in many SOL regimes. A good estimate of both particle flux and heat flux profiles at the limiter/divertor target plates is desired. Peak heat flux is one of the limiting factors in determining the survival probability of plasma-facing-components at high power levels. Plate particle flux affects the neutral flux to the pump, which determines the particle exhaust rate. A technique which couples a two-dimensional (2-D) plasma and a 2-D neutral transport code has been developed (coupled code technique), but this procedure requires large amounts of computer time. Relevant physics has been added to an existing two-neutral-species model which takes the SOL plasma/neutral coupling into account in a simple manner (molecular physics model), and this model is compared with the coupled code technique mentioned above. The molecular physics model is benchmarked against experimental data from a divertor tokamak (DIII-D), and a similar model (single-species model) is benchmarked against data from a pump-limiter tokamak (Tore Supra). The models are then used to examine two key issues: free-streaming-limits (ion energy conduction and momentum flux) and the effects of the non-orthogonal geometry of magnetic flux surfaces and target plates on edge plasma parameter profiles.

  20. Gas Composition and Input Waveform Effects on Alpha-to-Gamma Transitions in CCRF Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivkumar, Gayathri; Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Alrefae, Majed; Macheret, Sergey; Fisher, Timothy; Alexeenko, Alina

    2017-10-01

    Optimizing the production of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphitic nanopetals is of great interest to the engineering community owing to their excellent electrical, thermal and structural properties. Roll-to-roll radio frequency chemical vapor deposition (RFCVD) uses capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) plasma to grow carbon nanostructures from radical precursors generated in the plasma. The transition of the plasma from the α mode dominated by impact ionization in the plasma bulk and displacement current in the sheaths, to the γ mode dominated by secondary electron emission and conduction current in the sheaths, controls the heat and precursor fluxes onto the growth substrate. Thus, characterizing these transitions under various input conditions is imperative to the optimization of the deposition. In the current work, we model CCRF plasma using the Poisson equation, hydrodynamic model with drift-diffusion approximation for electrons, modified Maxwell-Stefan equations, and the heat conduction equation. The effect of input voltage, pressure, frequency and waveform on α-to- γ transitions are studied for argon and hydrogen discharges. The differences in properties between monatomic and diatomic gases are explored for square wave voltage input. Work was supported by NSF CMMI Grant No. 1344654.

  1. Comparison of hematology, plasma biochemistry, and blood gas variables between 2 venipuncture sites in Southern Stingrays (Dasyatis americana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brianne E; Christiansen, Emily F; Stoskopf, Michael K; Broadhurst, Heather; George, Robert; Harms, Craig A

    2016-12-01

    The Southern Stingray (Dasyatis americana) is a batoid elasmobranch frequently exhibited in zoological institutions. Blood is commonly collected from the caudal hemal arch at the tail base in stingrays for the purpose of health assessment and clinical pathology tests. An alternative site that allows a dorsal or ventral approach without necessitating puncture of a cartilaginous structure has been identified between the cartilaginous pectoral fin rays (ceratotrichia). The purpose of the study was to compare CBC, plasma biochemistry analytes, and blood gas variables between blood samples collected from the caudal and pectoral fin vasculature sites of the Southern Stingray. Fifteen captive Southern Stingrays (10 females, 5 males) from 4 zoo and aquarium facilities were sampled. Lithium heparinized blood samples were collected from the caudal and pectoral venipuncture sites of each animal. Values from estimated total and differential leukocyte counts, plasma biochemistry analytes, and blood gas variables were compared. There were no statistically significant differences between venipuncture sites for the measured analytes except for CK activity, which was statistically significantly higher in the pectoral site samples. Levels of agreement between sites were good or moderate for 22 analytes and poor for ALT, AST, CK, pO2 , lactate, monocytes, and eosinophils. The good agreement between sampling sites for the majority of the measured analytes and the lack of differences that would alter clinical interpretation support the use of the pectoral site as an alternative to the traditional caudal fin venipuncture site in Southern Stingrays. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Behavior of a plasma in a high-density gas-embedded Z-pinch configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    The theoretical analysis of a high density Z-pinch (HDZP) begins with an examination of the steady state energy balance between ohmic heating and bremsstrahlung radiation losses for a plasma column in pressure equilibrium. The model is then expanded to include the time-varying internal energy and results in a quasi-equilibrium prescription for the load current through a constant radius plasma channel. This set of current waveforms is useful in the design of experimental systems. The behavior of a plasma for physically realizable conditions is first examined by allowing adiabatic changes in the column radius. A more complete model is then developed by incorporating inertial effects into the momentum equation, and the resultant global MHD computational model is compared with more sophisticated, and costly, one- and two-dimensional computer simulations. These comparisons demonstrate the advantages of the global MHD description over previously developed zero-dimensional models.

  3. Pengaruh Pemberian Jeruk dengan Nanas pada Kadar Malondialdehid Plasma Subjek Terpapar Polusi Gas Buang Kendaraan Bermotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusnita

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental insults such as air polution from vehicle emission could increase generation of free radicals inside human body. A study conducted in December 2006 by the Department of Environmental Engineering Bandung Institute of Technology, revealed an increased tendency of air pollution production in certain areas in Bandung such as Jl. Merdeka where busy traffic frequently occurs. The amount of free radicals inside the body can be detected by measuring concentrations of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA. Antioxidants are needed to counteract the damaging effects of increased free radical formation due to air pollution insult. Pineapples and orange are antioxidant food sources. This study aims to find out the differences between orange and pineapple supplementation effects on plasma MDA concentration in subjects exposed to air pollution. The study is an experimental research concerning 21 subjects whom were working on Jl. Merdeka, page between 20--40 years old in January–July 2010. They were divided into three groups. The first group was given 300 grams of orange for 14 days. The second group was given 300 grams of pineapple for 14 days. The third group was the control group. Plasma MDA concentration was measured prior to and after the treatment. The data were analyzed using paired and independent t-test. The study revealed a lower plasma MDA concentration in subjects receiving orange (1.42±0.29 vs 0.68±0.29 (p<0.05 and in subjects receiving pineapple (0.73±0.20 vs0.40±0.13 (p<0.05. Plasma MDA concentration lowering effect of orange supplementation is greater than that of the pineapple supplementation (0.74±0.33 vs 0.24±0.24 (p<0.05. In conclusion, plasma MDA concentration lowering effect of orange is greater than pineapple in subjects exposed to air pollution.

  4. Ion-Plasma Diffusion Aluminide Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades (Structure and Properties)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Budinovskii, S. A.; Terekhova, V. V.

    2003-01-01

    An ion-plasma method for depositing alloy diffusion aluminide coatings on high-temperature alloys, which favorably differs from the traditional processes, is considered. The special features of formation of ion-plasma diffusion coatings on the surface of high-temperature alloys in single-stage and double-stage processes are considered. The process of formation of such coatings and their effect on the long-term high-temperature strength of nickel-base alloys is studied. Examples of advantages of the new method are presented.

  5. Capture of dengue viruses using antibody-integrated graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads produced using gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Viswan, Anchu; Chou, Han; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, global health is threatened by emerging infectious diseases caused by a number of viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito‑borne virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquito vectors. Previously, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan reported the country's first domestically acquired case of dengue fever for almost 70 years. To address this issue, it is important to develop novel technologies for the sensitive detection of DENV. The present study reported on the development of plasma-functionalized, graphite-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (GrMNPs) conjugated with anti-DENV antibody for DENV capture. Radiofrequency wave‑excited inductively‑coupled Ar and ammonia gas plasmas were used to introduce amino groups onto the surface of the GrMNPs. The GrMNPs were then conjugated with an antibody against DENV, and the antibody‑integrated magnetic beads were assessed for their ability to capture DENV. Beads incubated in a cell culture medium of DENV‑infected mosquito cells were separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field and were then washed. The adsorption of DENV serotypes 1‑4 onto the beads was confirmed using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, which detected the presence of DENV genomic RNA on the GrMNPs. The methodology described in the present study, which employed the plasma-functionalization of GrMNPs to enable antibody‑integration, represents a significant improvement in the detection of DENV.

  6. Identification of long non-coding RNAs GAS5, linc0597 and lnc-DC in plasma as novel biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-Cui; Li, Jun; Leng, Rui-Xue; Li, Xiang-Pei; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, De-Guang; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2017-04-04

    Despite increasing evidence that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) widely take part in human diseases, the role of lncRNAs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is largely unknown. In this study, we performed a two-stage study to explore the plasma levels of five lncRNAs (GAS5, linc0949, linc0597, HOTAIRM1 and lnc-DC) and their potential as SLE biomarkers. Compared with healthy controls, plasma levels of GAS5 and lnc-DC were significantly decreased (P nephritis and lupus nephritis (LN), the levels of lnc-DC were significantly higher in LN compared with SLE without nephritis (P = 0.018), but no significant difference in levels of GAS5 and linc0597 were found between LN and SLE without nephritis; plasma linc0949 level showed no significant difference in all comparisons. Further evaluation on potential biomarkers showed that GAS5, linc0597 and lnc-DC may specifically identify patients with SLE, the combination of GAS5 and linc0597 provided better diagnostic accuracy; lnc-DC may discriminate LN from SLE without nephritis. In summary, GAS5, linc0597 and lnc-DC in plasma could be potential biomarkers for SLE.

  7. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  8. Quantum black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, Xavier; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Written by foremost experts, this short book gives a clear description of the physics of quantum black holes. The reader will learn about quantum black holes in four and higher dimensions, primordial black holes, the production of black holes in high energy particle collisions, Hawking radiation, black holes in models of low scale quantum gravity and quantum gravitational aspects of black holes.

  9. On-Line Estimation of Laser-Drilled Hole Depth Using a Machine Vision Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Ying Liao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel method for monitoring and estimating the depth of a laser-drilled hole using machine vision. Through on-line image acquisition and analysis in laser machining processes, we could simultaneously obtain correlations between the machining processes and analyzed images. Based on the machine vision method, the depths of laser-machined holes could be estimated in real time. Therefore, a low cost on-line inspection system is developed to increase productivity. All of the processing work was performed in air under standard atmospheric conditions and gas assist was used. A correlation between the cumulative size of the laser-induced plasma region and the depth of the hole is presented. The result indicates that the estimated depths of the laser-drilled holes were a linear function of the cumulative plasma size, with a high degree of confidence. This research provides a novel machine vision-based method for estimating the depths of laser-drilled holes in real time.

  10. Feasibility study of a novel thermal plasma process for natural gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detering, B.A.; Kong, P.C.; Maffia, G.J. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this research was to conduct a feasibility study on a new process, called the plasma quench process, for the conversion of methane to acetylene. These efforts were focused on determining the economic viability of this process using bench scale experimental data previously generated.

  11. Gas plasma etching of PEO/PBT segmented block copolymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde riekerink, M.B.; Claase, M.B.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    A series of poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEO/PBT) segmented block copolymer films was treated with a radio-frequency carbon dioxide (CO2) or with argon (Ar) plasma. The effects of (preferential) etching on surface structure, topography, chemistry, and wettability were studied

  12. Feed gas effect on plasma inactivation mechanism of Salmonella Typhimurium in onion and quality assessment of the treated sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saiful Islam; Lee, Eun-Jung; Hong, Suk-In; Kim, Yun-Ji

    2017-12-18

    A submerged dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor was used to inactivate artificially inoculated reference strains of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 on sliced onion (3 cm × 3 cm). Salmonella Typhimurium reductions obtained after 10 min of treatment were 3.96 log CFU/slice and 1.64 log CFU/slice for clean dry air and N2 feed gas, respectively. Variations observed in Optical Emission Spectra (OES) for different feed gases are responsible for the inactivation level variations of Salmonella Typhimurium. The physiochemical properties of the onion slices, such as quercetin content, ascorbic acid content and color parameters, were monitored before and after treatment and the changes that occurred were measured to be in the acceptable range. Quercetin content was reduced only 3.74-5.07% for 10 min treatment, higher reduction was obtained for the use of clean dry air than that of N2 feed gas. Ascorbic acid loss was measured to be 11.82% and 7.98% for a 10 min treatment with clean dry air and N2 feed gas, respectively. The color parameters did not show significant changes upon treatment (p > 0.05) of the same duration for the uses of different feed gases.

  13. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between the approximately ten solar mass 'stellar mass' black holes and the 'supermassive' black holes of millions to billions of solar masses are the elusive 'intermediate-mass' black holes. Their discovery is key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth soon after the Big Bang. Currently, tentative evidence suggests that the progenitors of supermassive black holes were formed as ∼10(4)-10(5) M(⊙) black holes via the direct collapse of gas. Ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes at galaxy centres will help shed light on this formation mechanism.

  14. Standard Practice for Measuring Plasma Arc Gas Enthalpy by Energy Balance

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the measurement of total gas enthalpy of an electric-arc-heated gas stream by means of an overall system energy balance. This is sometimes referred to as a bulk enthalpy and represents an average energy content of the test stream which may differ from local values in the test stream. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational radiation waveforms for black hole-neutron star coalescence calculations. The physical input is Newtonian physics, an ideal gas equation of state with...

  16. Effect of nozzle profile on gas mixing in an atmospheric and low pressure DC plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmane, M.; Soucy, G.; Boulos, M.I. [Univ. of Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Henne, R. [Inst. for Technical Thermodynamics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The study combines enthalpy probe and mass spectrometer measurements in a DC-plasma jet under atmospheric and low pressure conditions. Both, standard cylindrical and laval nozzle were used as anode profiles. A detailed description of the experimental technique is given together with preliminary results. These confirm the role by which enthalpy probe measurements can be used to bridge the gap in temperature range between emission spectroscopic techniques and standard thermocouple probing.

  17. Noble Gas Plasmas with Metallic Conductivity: A New Light Source from a New State of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    fiberglass board 2mm conductivity and optical accessibility-- Circuit boards made as a simple fast method of measuring Optical prop and resistivity. ...plasmas can be used for rapid, broadband optical switching and high-harmonic generation. The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are... optical switching and high- harmonic generation. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or

  18. Plasma Assisted Ignition at High Pressures and Low Temperatures. PAI Kinetics and Fast Gas Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-06

    should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of...Combustion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18, NUMBER OF PAGES 97 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Gregg... Blin -Simiand N, Jorand F, Postel C 2009 OH kinetic in high-pressure plasmas of atmospheric gases containing C2H6 studied by abso-lute measurement of the

  19. Removal Dynamics of Nitric Oxide (NO Pollutant Gas by Pulse-Discharged Plasma Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianshui Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonthermal plasma technique has drawn extensive attentions for removal of air pollutants such as NOx and SO2. The NO removal mechanism in pulse discharged plasma is discussed in this paper. Emission spectra diagnosis indicates that the higher the discharge voltage is, the more the NO are removed and transformed into O, N, N2, NO2, and so forth. Plasma electron temperature Te is ranged from 6400 K at 2.4 kV discharge voltage to 9500 K at 4.8 kV. After establishing a zero-dimensional chemical reaction kinetic model, the major reaction paths are clarified as the electron collision dissociation of NO into N and O during discharge and followed by single substitution of N on NO to form N2 during and after discharge, compared with the small fraction of NO2 formed by oxidizing NO. The reaction directions can be adjusted by N2 additive, and the optimal N2/NO mixing ratio is 2 : 1. Such a ratio not only compensates the disadvantage of electron competitive consumption by the mixed N2, but also heightens the total NO removal extent through accelerating the NO oxidization process.

  20. Study of Early Elevated Gas6 Plasma Level as a Predictor of Mortality in a Prospective Cohort of Patients with Sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Stalder

    Full Text Available Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6, a vitamin K-dependent protein interacting with anionic phospholipids and TAM tyrosine kinase receptors, is elevated in plasma of septic patients. Previous studies did not find different levels between survivors and non-survivors at admission because either they included a low number of patients (<50 or a low number of non-survivors (5%.To determine, in a larger cohort of septic patients comprising an expected number of non-survivors, the performance of the plasma level of Gas6 and its soluble receptor Axl (sAxl within 24 hours of admission to predict in-ICU mortality.Septic adults with or without shock.Gas6 and sAxl were prospectively measured by ELISA at day 0, 3, 7, and then weekly until discharge or death.We evaluated 129 septic patients, including 82 with and 47 without shock, with in-ICU mortality rate of 19.4% and in-hospital mortality rate of 26%. Gas6 level was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (238 vs. 167%, P = 0.003; this difference remained constant during the ICU stay. The area under the ROC curve for Gas6 (0.695 [95% CI: 0.58-0.81] was higher than for sAxl, procalcitonin, CRP, IL-1beta, IL-6 and-alpha, and slightly higher than for IL-8, IL-10, SOFA and APACHEII scores in predicting in-ICU mortality. Considering 249% as a cut-off value, Gas6 measurement had a negative predictive value for mortality of 87%.It seems that Gas6 plasma level within 24 hours of ICU admission may predicts in-ICU mortality in patients with sepsis. If our result are confirmed in external validation, Gas6 plasma level measurement could contribute to the identification of patients who may benefit most from more aggressive management.

  1. Formation of the seed black holes: a role of quark nuggets?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, X.Y.; Xu, R.X., E-mail: xylai4861@gmail.com, E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-05-01

    Strange quark nuggets (SQNs) could be the relics of the cosmological QCD phase transition, and they could very likely be the candidate of cold quark matter if survived the cooling of the later Universe, although the formation and evolution of these SQNs depend on the physical state of the hot QGP (quark-gluon plasma) phase and the state of cold quark matter. We reconsider the possibility of SQNs as cold dark matter, and find that the formation of black holes in primordial halos could be significantly different from the standard scenario. In a primordial halo, the collision between gas and SQNs could be frequent enough, and thus the viscosity acting on each SQN would decrease its angular momentum and make it to sink into the center of the halo, as well as heat the gas. The SQNs with baryon numbers less than 10{sup 35} could assemble in the center of the halo before the formation of primordial stars. A black hole could form by merger of these SQNs, and then its mass could quickly become about 10{sup 3}M{sub s}un or higher, by accreting the surrounding SQNs or gas. The black holes formed in this way could be the seeds for the supermassive black holes at redshift as high as z ∼ 6.

  2. Progress with a gas-accepting ion source for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M. L.; von Reden, K. F.; McIntyre, C. P.; Burton, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ocean Sciences AMS (NOSAMS) facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has developed a novel, gas-accepting microwave-plasma ion-source. The source is a key component of a compact Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) system built for the analysis of 14C in a continuously flowing gas stream. The gas source produces carbon currents from a stream of CO 2 with currents typical of a traditional graphite source. Details of the gas source, including ion current achieved, optimal flow rate, efficiency, and memory are presented. Additionally, data obtained from coupling a gas chromatograph to the source shown. Details about ion optics are presented separately [1].

  3. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebner, Keith T. K., E-mail: kloebner@stanford.edu; Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A. [Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  4. Optical characteristics and parameters of gas-discharge plasma in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinina, A. A., E-mail: alexandr_malinin@rambler.ru; Malinin, A. N. [Uzhhorod National University (Ukraine)

    2013-12-15

    Results are presented from studies of the optical characteristics and parameters of plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with neon—the working medium of a non-coaxial exciplex gas-discharge emitter. The electron energy distribution function, the transport characteristics, the specific power losses for electron processes, the electron density and temperature, and the rate constants for the processes of elastic and inelastic electron scattering by the working mixture components are determined as functions of the reduced electric field. The rate constant of the process leading to the formation of exciplex mercury monobromide molecules is found to be 1.6 × 10{sup −14} m{sup 3}/s for a reduced electric field of E/N = 15 Td, at which the maximum emission intensity in the blue-green spectral region (λ{sub max} = 502 nm) was observed in this experiment.

  5. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Plasma-Dynamical Processes in the Technological Inductively Coupled RF Plasmatron with Gas Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Grishin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrodeless inductively coupled RF plasmatron (ICP torches became widely used in various fields of engineering, science and technology. Presently, owing to development of new technologies to produce very pure substances, nanopowders, etc., there is a steadily increasing interest in the induction plasma. This generates a need for a broad range of theoretical and experimental studies to optimize the design and technological parameters of different ICP equipment.The paper presents a numerical model to calculate parameters of inductively coupled RF plasmatron with gas-cooling flow. A finite volume method is used for a numerical solution of a system of Maxwell's and heat transfer equations in the application package ANSYS CFX (14.5. The pseudo-steady approach to solving problems is used.A numerical simulation has been computed in the application package ANSYS CFX (14.5 for a specific design option of the technological ICP, which has a three-coils inductor and current amplitude in the range J к = 50-170 A (3 MHz. The pure argon flows in the ICP. The paper discusses how the value of discharge current impacts on the thermodynamic parameters (pressure, temperature and the power energy in discharge zone. It shows that the ICP can generate a plasma stream with a maximum temperature of about 10 kK and an output speed of 10-15 m/s. The work determines a length of the plasma stream with a weight average temperature of more than 4 kK. It has been found that in order to keep the quartz walls in normal thermal state, the discharge current amplitude should not exceed 150 A. The paper shows the features of the velocity field distribution in the channel of the plasma torch, namely, the formation of vortex in the position of the first coil. The results obtained are important for calculating the dynamics of heating and evaporation of quartz particles in the manufacturing processes for plasma processing of quartz concentrate into high-purity quartz and

  7. Numerical study of the effect of gas temperature on the time for onset of particle nucleation in argon-silane low-pressure plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bhandarkar, U; Girshick, S L

    2003-01-01

    Particle nucleation in silane plasmas has attracted interest for the past decade, both due to the basic problems of plasma chemistry involved and the importance of silane plasmas for many applications. A better understanding of particle nucleation may facilitate the avoidance of undesirable particle contamination as well as enable the controlled production of nanoparticles for novel applications. While understanding of particle nucleation has significantly advanced over the past years, a number of questions have not been resolved. Among these is the delay of particle nucleation with an increasing gas temperature, which has been observed in experiments in argon-silane plasmas. We have developed a quasi-one-dimensional model to simulate particle nucleation and growth in silane containing plasmas. In this paper we present a comparative study of the various effects that have been proposed as explanations for the nucleation delay. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the Brownian diffusion coeffi...

  8. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick M.; Garrett, Travis

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford–Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux. PMID:21768341

  9. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Garrett, Travis

    2011-08-02

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux.

  10. Evaluation of Surface Cleaning Procedures in Terms of Gas Sensing Properties of Spray-Deposited CNT Film: Thermal- and O2 Plasma Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Hyub Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cleaning the surface of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT networks by thermal and the O2 plasma treatments is presented in terms of NH3 gas sensing characteristics. The goal of this work is to determine the relationship between the physicochemical properties of the cleaned surface (including the chemical composition, crystal structure, hydrophilicity, and impurity content and the sensitivity of the SWNT network films to NH3 gas. The SWNT networks are spray-deposited on pre-patterned Pt electrodes, and are further functionalized by heating on a programmable hot plate or by O2 plasma treatment in a laboratory-prepared plasma chamber. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to semi-quantitatively evaluate each surface state of various plasma-treated SWNT-based electrodes. The results show that O2 plasma treatment can more effectively modify the SWNT network surface than thermal cleaning, and can provide a better conductive network surface due to the larger number of carbonyl/carboxyl groups, enabling a faster electron transfer rate, even though both the thermal cleaning and the O2 plasma cleaning methods can eliminate the organic solvent residues from the network surface. The NH3 sensors based on the O2 plasma-treated SWNT network exhibit higher sensitivity, shorter response time, and better recovery of the initial resistance than those prepared employing the thermally-cleaned SWNT networks.

  11. Low gas flow inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the analysis of food samples after microwave digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Sascha; Gesell, Monika; Holtkamp, Michael; Scheffer, Andy; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the recently introduced low flow inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with a total argon consumption below 0.7 L/min is applied for the first time to the field of food analysis. One goal is the investigation of the performance of this low flow plasma compared to a conventional ICP-OES system when non-aqueous samples with a certain matrix are introduced into the system. For this purpose, arsenic is determined in three different kinds of fish samples. In addition several nutrients (K, Na, Mg, Ca) and trace metals (Co, Cu, Mn, Cd, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Ni) are determined in honey samples (acacia) after microwave digestion. The precision of the measurements is characterized by relative standard deviations (RSD) and compared to the corresponding precision values achieved using the conventional Fassel-type torch of the ICP. To prove the accuracy of the low flow ICP-OES method, the obtained data from honey samples are validated by a conventional ICP-OES. For the measurements concerning arsenic in fish, the low flow ICP-OES values are validated by conventional Fassel-type ICP-OES. Furthermore, a certified reference material was investigated with the low gas flow setup. Limits of detection (LOD), according to the 3σ criterion, were determined to be in the low microgram per liter range for all analytes. Recovery rates in the range of 96-106% were observed for the determined trace metal elements. It was proven that the low gas flow ICP-OES leads to results that are comparable with those obtained with the Fassel-type torch for the analysis of food samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution-Processed Cu(In, Ga)(S, Se)2Nanocrystal as Inorganic Hole-Transporting Material for Efficient and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Deng, Lin-Long; Cao, Jing; Wang, Xin; Chen, Wei-Yi; Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2017-12-01

    Perovskite solar cells are emerging as one of the most promising candidates for solar energy harvesting. To date, most of the high-performance perovskite solar cells have exclusively employed organic hole-transporting materials (HTMs) such as 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) or polytriarylamine (PTAA) which are often expensive and have low hole mobility. Almost all these HTMs reported needed lithium salt, e.g., lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Li-TFSI) doping, to improve hole mobility and performance. However, the use of Li-TFSI should be avoided because the hygroscopic nature of Li-TFSI could cause decomposition of perovskite and reduce device stability. Herein, we employed solution-processed CuIn 0.1 Ga 0.9 (S 0.9 Se 0.1 ) 2 (CIGSSe) nanocrystals as a novel inorganic HTM in perovskite solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 9.15% was obtained for CIGSSe-based devices with improved stability, compared to devices using spiro-OMeTAD as HTM. This work offers a promising candidate of Cu-based inorganic HTM for efficient and stable perovskite solar cells.

  13. Simulations of jets driven by black hole rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Vladimir; Dyadechkin, Sergey; Punsly, Brian

    2004-08-13

    The origin of jets emitted from black holes is not well understood; however, there are two possible energy sources: the accretion disk or the rotating black hole. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations show a well-defined jet that extracts energy from a black hole. If plasma near the black hole is threaded by large-scale magnetic flux, it will rotate with respect to asymptotic infinity, creating large magnetic stresses. These stresses are released as a relativistic jet at the expense of black hole rotational energy. The physics of the jet initiation in the simulations is described by the theory of black hole gravitohydromagnetics.

  14. On the Visualization of Gas Metal Arc Welding Plasma and the Relationship Between Arc Length and Voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel B. F. Dos Santos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the camera settings for high-speed imaging of the arc, metal transfer, and weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW are investigated. The results show that by only changing camera exposure times and the selection of narrow bandpass filters, images that reveal features of the arc such as the iron vapor-dominated region, metal transfer and weld pool behavior can be produced without the need for external light sources. Using the images acquired, the arc length was measured and the relationship between arc length and arc voltage is discussed. The results show that for low values of current, the measured welding voltage increases with increasing arc length; however, for high current values, the arc voltage increases even though the measured arc length becomes shorter. It is suggested that the increase in arc voltage for high values of welding current is due to the increased evaporation of the wire electrode which decreases the plasma temperature and consequently the arc plasma electrical conductivity.

  15. Antibody-integrated and functionalized graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, produced using ammonia gas plasma technology, for capturing Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Chou, Han; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella spp. is the single and most important causative agent of foodborne infections, especially involving foods such as eggs, milk and meat. To prevent infection, a reliable surveillance system is required that can quickly and sensitively detect Salmonella. Here, we describe the development of antibody-integrated magnetic beads that are functionalized by a novel strategy using ammonia gas plasma. Ammonia plasma, produced by a radio frequency (RF) power supply, was allowed to react with the surface of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, resulting in the introduction of amino groups. An anti-Salmonella antibody was then anchored by sulfide groups present on the protein surface to the amino groups of the magnetic beads via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The potential usefulness of these magnetic beads for capturing Salmonella was examined as follows. The beads were incubated with Salmonella in liquid medium and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thorough washing, adsorption of Salmonella to the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction and a direct culture assay. Our findings indicate that the capture and concentration of Salmonella using the antibody-integrated magnetic beads was more efficient than commercial Dynabeads® anti-Salmonella, which are conventionally used for concentrating Salmonella from liquid cultures. We believe this novel bead technology will contribute to the enhanced detection of Salmonella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stability of hybrid modes of a single-component electron plasma containing an admixture of background gas ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeliseyev, Yu. N.

    2014-05-01

    The spectrum of eigenmodes of a waveguide completely filled with a cold electron plasma containing a small admixture of ions produced due to electron-impact ionization of background gas atoms is calculated numerically. The calculations were performed within the entire range of allowable values of the radial electric and longitudinal magnetic fields for both magnetized and unmagnetized ions by using the earlier derived nonlocal dispersion relation [Plasma Phys. Rep. 36, 563 (2010)]. The spectrum consists of three families of electron modes with frequencies equal to the Doppler-shifted upper and lower hybrid frequencies and modified ion cyclotron (MIC) modes. When the Doppler shift caused by electron rotation in the crossed electric and magnetic fields compensates for the hybrid frequency, the electron modes become low-frequency modes and interact with the ion modes. For m = 1, only the lower hybrid modes can be low-frequency ones, whereas at m ≥ 2, both lower and upper hybrid modes can be low-frequency ones. The spectrum of modes having the azimuthal number m = 2 is thoroughly analyzed. It is shown that, in this case, the lower hybrid modes behave similar to the m = 1 modes. The dispersion curves of the upper hybrid modes intersect with all harmonics of the MIC frequency (positive, negative, and zero) and are unstable in the vicinities of the intersections. The maximum value of the instability growth rate is several times higher than the ion plasma frequency. The MIC modes are unstable within a wide range of the field strengths, and their growth rates are two orders of magnitude slower. Instabilities are caused by the relative motion of electrons and ions (the transverse current) and the anisotropy of the ion distribution function.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: The mechanism of the drilling of holes in vertical metallic plates by cw CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, V. V.; Loboiko, A. I.; Antonova, G. F.; Krasyukov, A. G.; Sayapin, V. P.

    1999-02-01

    The possibility of making a hole in a vertical plate with the aid of laser radiation at a surface temperature not exceeding the boiling point is analysed neglecting the vapour pressure. The mechanism of the degradation of the liquid layer involving a reduction of its thickness, as a result of the redistribution of the molten mass owing to the operation of the force of gravity and of thermocapillary convection, is examined. The theoretical dependence of the critical size of the molten zone on the plate thickness is obtained and a comparison is made with experimental data.

  18. Modeling Flows Around Merging Black Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are produced by the merger of galaxies. The final stages of the black hole coalescence produce strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. In cases in which the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a first step towards this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, 3-D general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We report on the results of these initial simulations and discuss their likely importance for future hydrodynamical simulations.

  19. Hydrogen analysis in solid samples by utilizing He metastable atoms induced by TEA CO{sub 2} laser plasma in He gas at 1 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Muliadi [Program of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Idris, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh, Aceh 23111 (Indonesia); Fukumoto, Kenichi; Niki, Hideaki [Program of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Sakan, Fujio [Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Maruyama, Tadashi [Integrated Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Regional Studies, University of Fukui (Japan)], E-mail: kagawa@edu00.f-edu.fukui-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-15

    A TEA CO{sub 2} laser (350 mJ-1.5 J, 10.6 {mu}m, 200 ns, 10 Hz) was focused onto a metal sub-target under He as host gas at 1 atmospheric pressure with a small amount of impurity gas, such as water and ethanol vapors. It was found that the TEA CO{sub 2} laser with the help of the metal sub-target is favorable for generating a strong, large volume helium gas breakdown plasma at 1 atmospheric pressure, in which the helium metastable-excited state was then produced overwhelmingly. While the metal sub-target itself was never ablated. The helium metastable-excited state produced after the strong helium gas breakdown plasma was considered to play an important role in exciting the atoms. This was confirmed by the specific characteristics of the detected H{alpha} emission, namely the strong intensity with low background, narrow spectral width, and the long lifetime. This technique can be used for gas and solid samples analysis. For nonmetal solid analysis, a metal mesh was introduced in front of the nonmetal sample surface to help initiation of the helium gas breakdown plasma. For metal sample, analysis can be carried out by combining the TEA CO{sub 2} laser and an Nd-YAG laser where the Nd-YAG laser is used to ablate the metal sample. The ablated atoms from the metal sample are then sent into the region of helium gas breakdown plasma induced by the TEA CO{sub 2} laser to be excited through the helium metastable-excited state. This technique can be extended to the analysis of other elements, not limited only to hydrogen, such as halogens.

  20. Feedback model of secondary electron emission in DC gas discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, ARUMUGAM; Prince, ALEX; Suraj, Kumar SINHA

    2018-01-01

    Feedback is said to exist in any amplifier when the fraction of output power in fed back as an input. Similarly, in gaseous discharge ions that incident on the cathode act as a natural feedback element to stabilize and self sustain the discharge. The present investigation is intended to emphasize the feedback nature of ions that emits secondary electrons (SEs) from the cathode surface in DC gas discharges. The average number of SEs emitted per incident ion and non ionic species (energetic neutrals, metastables and photons) which results from ion is defined as effective secondary electron emission coefficient (ESEEC,{γ }{{E}}). In this study, we derive an analytic expression that corroborates the relation between {γ }{{E}} and power influx by ion to the cathode based on the feedback theory of an amplifier. In addition, experimentally, we confirmed the typical positive feedback nature of SEE from the cathode in argon DC glow discharges. The experiment is done for three different cathode material of same dimension (tungsten (W), copper (Cu) and brass) under identical discharge conditions (pressure: 0.45 mbar, cathode bias: ‑600 V, discharge gab: 15 cm and operating gas: argon). Further, we found that the {γ }{{E}} value of these cathode material controls the amount of feedback power given by ions. The difference in feedback leads different final output i.e the power carried by ion at cathode ({P}{{i}}{\\prime }{| }{{C}}). The experimentally obtained value of {P}{{i}}{\\prime }{| }{{C}} is 4.28 W, 6.87 W and 9.26 W respectively for W, Cu and brass. In addition, the present investigation reveals that the amount of feedback power in a DC gas discharges not only affect the fraction of power fed back to the cathode but also the entire characteristics of the discharge.

  1. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  2. Cosmic microwave background limits on accreting primordial black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Interest in the idea that primordial black holes (PBHs) might comprise some or all of the dark matter has recently been rekindled following LIGO's first direct detection of a binary-black-hole merger. Here we revisit the effect of accreting PBHs on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) frequency spectrum and the angular temperature and polarization power spectra. We compute the accretion rate and luminosity of PBHs, accounting for their suppression by Compton drag and Compton cooling by CMB photons. We estimate the gas temperature near the Schwarzschild radius and, hence, the free-free luminosity, accounting for the cooling resulting from collisional ionization when the background gas is mostly neutral. We account approximately for the velocities of PBHs with respect to the background gas. We provide a simple analytic estimate of the efficiency of energy deposition in the plasma. We find that the spectral distortions generated by accreting PBHs are too small to be detected by FIRAS, as well as by future experiments now being considered. We analyze Planck CMB temperature and polarization data and find, under our most conservative hypotheses, and at the order-of-magnitude level, that they rule out PBHs with masses ≳1 02 M⊙ as the dominant component of dark matter.

  3. Fatty acid profiling of raw human plasma and whole blood using direct thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Irth, H.; Pel, R.; Stellaard, F.

    2008-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) has in recent times become an important tool for the fatty acid profiling of human blood and plasma. An at-line procedure used in the fatty acid profiling of whole/intact aquatic micro-organisms without any sample preparation was adapted for this work. A direct thermal

  4. Fatty acid profiling of raw human plasma and whole blood using direct thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, Lawrence; Vreuls, Rene J. J.; Irth, Hubertus; Pel, Roel; Stellaard, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) has in recent times become an important tool for the fatty acid profiling of human blood and plasma. An at-line procedure used in the fatty acid profiling of whole/intact aquatic micro-organisms without any sample preparation was adapted for this work. A direct thermal

  5. The effects of ethylene oxide and gas-plasma sterilization on failure strength and failure mode of pre-tied monofilament ligature loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trostle, Steven S; Hendrickson, Dean A; Franke, Chad

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of ethylene oxide and gas-plasma sterilization on the failure strength and failure mode of pre-tied monofilament ligature loops. A randomized block design was used by blocking for suture (size 1 polyglyconate, size 2 polydioxanone) and sterilization technique (control, ethylene oxide, gas plasma). Twenty replicates of each suture-sterilization technique combination. Ligature loops were pre-tied using a 4S-modified Roeder knot then exposed to 1 of 3 treatments (control, ethylene oxide, or gas-plasma sterilization). Ligature loops were mounted onto a mechanical testing machine to evaluate the effects of sterilization on failure strength and failure mode (disruption, untying). There were no differences between polydioxanone and polyglyconate suture materials in failure strength or mode within sterilization methods. Both sterilization methods significantly increased the likelihood that suture loops would untie compared with controls subjects. Ligature loops that disrupted had a greater breaking strength than those that untied, regardless of sterilization method or suture type. Sterilization with either ethylene oxide or gas plasma of pre-tied, polyglyconate, or polydioxanone ligature loops significantly increases the in vitro likelihood of a modified Roeder knot untying. Further studies need to be conducted to determine the in vivo requirements for ligature loops. Copyright 2002 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  6. The role of gas composition in plasma-dust structures in RF discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorov, S. A., E-mail: maiorov-sa@mail.ru [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov st. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Kodanova, S. K.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Utegenov, A. U. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi 71, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Golyatina, R. I. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov st. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The influence of a mixture of light and heavy gases, i.e., helium and argon, on plasma-dust structures in the radiofrequency discharge has been studied. The dust chains in the sheath of the radiofrequency discharge, the average distance between the dust particles and their chains, have been analyzed. A significant effect of small amounts of argon on the correlation characteristics of dust particles has been observed. The results of numerical simulation of ion and electron drift in the mixture of helium and argon are presented. It is shown that even 1% of argon admixture to helium produces such an effect that argon ions become the main components of the discharge, as they drift with lightweight helium forming a strongly anisotropic velocity distribution function.

  7. Effects of background gas on sulfur hexafluoride removal by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of background gases (He, Ar, N2 and air on SF6 removal in a dielectric barrier reactor were investigated at atmospheric pressure. A comparison among these background gases was performed in terms of discharge voltage, discharge power, mean electron energy, electron density, removal efficiency and energy yield for the destruction of SF6. Results showed that the discharge voltage of He and Ar was lower than that of N2 and air, but the difference of their discharge power was small. Compared with three other background gases, Ar had a relatively superior destruction and removal rate and energy yield since the mean electron energy and electron density in SF6/H2O/Ar plasma were both maintained at a high level. Complete removal of 2% SF6 could be achieved at a discharge power of 48.86 W with Ar and the corresponding energy yield can reach 4.8 g/kWh.

  8. Methods of gas purification and effect on the ion composition in an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet investigated by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse-Kreul, Simon; Huebner, Simon; Schneider, Simon; Keudell, Achim von; Benedikt, Jan [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Experimental Physics II, Bochum (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The analysis of the ion chemistry of atmospheric pressure plasmas is essential to evaluate ionic reaction pathways during plasma-surface or plasma-analyte interactions. In this contribution, the ion chemistry of a radio-frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated in helium is investigated by mass spectrometry (MS). It is found, that the ion composition is extremely sensitive to impurities such as N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Without gas purification, protonated water cluster ions of the form H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} are dominating downstream the positive ion mass spectrum. However, even after careful feed gas purification to the sub-ppm level using a molecular sieve trap and a liquid nitrogen trap as well as operation of the plasma in a controlled atmosphere, the positive ion mass spectrum is strongly influenced by residual trace gases. The observations support the idea that species with a low ionization energy serve as a major source of electrons in atmospheric pressure helium plasmas. Similarly, the neutral density of atomic nitrogen measured by MS in a He/N{sub 2} mixture is varying up to a factor 3, demonstrating the significant influence of impurities on the neutral species chemistry as well. (orig.)

  9. Multistage plasma initiation process by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti sample in an ambient gas (He, Ar, or N2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Dubreuil, B.

    1993-02-01

    New experimental results are reported on plasma initiation in front of a titanium sample irradiated by ir (λ=10.6 μm) laser pulses in an ambient gas (He, Ar, and N2) at pressures ranging from several Torr up to the atmosphere. The plasma is studied by space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy, while sample vaporization is probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Threshold laser intensities leading to the formation of a plasma in the vapor and in the ambient gases are determined. Experimental results support the model of a vaporization mechanism for the plasma initiation (vaporization-initiated plasma breakdown). The plasma initiation is described by simple numerical criteria based on a two-stage process. Theoretical predictions are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the experiment. This study provides also a clear explanation of the influence of the ambient gas on the laser beam-metal surface energy transfer. Laser irradiation always causes an important vaporization when performed in He, while in the case of Ar or N2, the interaction is reduced in heating and vaporization of some surface defects and impurities.

  10. A differentially pumped argon plasma in the linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI: gas flow and dynamics of the ionized fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Hansen, T. A. R.; Kleyn, A. W.; van der Meiden, H. J.; D.C. Schram,; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2011-01-01

    Magnum-PSI is a linear plasma generator designed to reach the plasma-surface interaction (PSI) regime of ITER and nuclear fusion reactors beyond ITER. To reach this regime, the influx of cold neutrals from the source must be significantly lower than the plasma flux reaching the target. This is

  11. Investigation of stability and x-ray spectrum in gas-puff z-pinch plasmas diriven by inductive energy storage pulsed power generator with a plasma opening switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, K.; Fukudome, I. [Yatsushiro National College of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Yatsushiro, Kumamoto (Japan); Teramoto, Y.; Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Gas-puff z-pinch plasmas are driven by an inductive voltage adder - inductive energy storage pulsed power generator ''ASO-X''. ASO-X has the performance of the maximum output voltage and current are 180 kV and 400 kA respectively and can provide a fast rise time current with operating POS. The stability of the plasma column, spectrum radiated from z-pinch plasmas and the spatial distribution of hot spots are investigated in the case with and without operating POS. By driving ASO-X with operating POS the kink instability is restrained and the stability of plasma column is improved about three times in regard to the average dispersion. Furthermore the duration of soft x-ray radiation is increased and the spatial distribution of hot spots is 50% improved with regard to kurtosis of the intensity profile of pinhole photographs compared to those without operating POS. (author)

  12. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  13. Massive Black Holes and Galaxies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for several decades that many galaxies harbor central mass concentrations that may be in the form of black holes with masses between a few million to a few billion time the mass of the Sun. I will discuss measurements over the last two decades, employing adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy on large ground-based telescopes that prove the existence of such a massive black hole in the Center of our Milky Way, beyond any reasonable doubt. These data also provide key insights into its properties and environment. Most recently, a tidally disrupting cloud of gas has been discovered on an almost radial orbit that reached its peri-distance of ~2000 Schwarzschild radii in 2014, promising to be a valuable tool for exploring the innermost accretion zone. Future interferometric studies of the Galactic Center Black hole promise to be able to test gravity in its strong field limit.

  14. Black holes and galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Propst, Raphael J

    2010-01-01

    Galaxies are the basic unit of cosmology. The study of galaxy formation is concerned with the processes that formed a heterogeneous universe from a homogeneous beginning. The physics of galaxy formation is complicated because it deals with the dynamics of stars, thermodynamics of gas and energy production of stars. A black hole is a massive object whose gravitational field is so intense that it prevents any form of matter or radiation to escape. It is hypothesized that the most massive galaxies in the universe- "elliptical galaxies"- grow simultaneously with the supermassive black holes at their centers, giving us much stronger evidence that black holes control galaxy formation. This book reviews new evidence in the field.

  15. Holes at High Blowing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip M. Ligrani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented which describe the development and structure of flow downstream of a single row of holes with compound angle orientations producing film cooling at high blowing ratios. This film cooling configuration is important because similar arrangements are frequently employed on the first stage of rotating blades of operating gas turbine engines. With this configuration, holes are spaced 6d apart in the spanwise direction, with inclination angles of 24 degrees, and angles of orientation of 50.5 degrees. Blowing ratios range from 1.5 to 4.0 and the ratio of injectant to freestream density is near 1.0. Results show that spanwise averaged adiabatic effectiveness, spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios, surveys of streamwise mean velocity, and surveys of injectant distributions change by important amounts as the blowing ratio increases. This is due to injectant lift-off from the test surface just downstream of the holes.

  16. HCO+ Detection of Dust-depleted Gas in the Inner Hole of the LkCa 15 Pre-transitional Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabek-Maunder, E.; Mohanty, S.; Greaves, J.; Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.

    2016-12-01

    LkCa 15 is an extensively studied star in the Taurus region, known for its pre-transitional disk with a large inner cavity in the dust continuum and normal gas accretion rate. The most popular hypothesis to explain the LkCa 15 data invokes one or more planets to carve out the inner cavity, while gas continues to flow across the gap from the outer disk onto the central star. We present spatially unresolved HCO+ J=4\\to 3 observations of the LkCa 15 disk from the James Clerk Maxwell telescope (JCMT) and model the data with the ProDiMo code. We find that: (1) HCO+ line-wings are clearly detected, certifying the presence of gas in the cavity within ≲50 au of the star. (2) Reproducing the observed line-wing flux requires both a significant suppression of cavity dust (by a factor ≳104 compared to the interstellar medium (ISM)) and a substantial increase in the gas scale-height within the cavity (H 0/R 0 ˜ 0.6). An ISM dust-to-gas ratio (d:g = 10-2) yields too little line-wing flux, regardless of the scale-height or cavity gas geometry, while a smaller scale-height also under-predicts the flux even with a reduced d:g. (3) The cavity gas mass is consistent with the surface density profile of the outer disk extended inwards to the sublimation radius (corresponding to mass M d ˜ 0.03 M ⊙), and masses lower by a factor ≳10 appear to be ruled out.

  17. Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether at 473 K by electron beam generated plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H H; Kojima, T

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether (DPE) in the order of several parts per million by volume (ppmv) was studied as a model compound of dioxin using a flow-type electron-beam reactor at an elevated temperature of 473 K. The ground state oxygen ( sup 3 P) atoms played an important role in the decomposition of DPE resulting in the formation of 1,4-hydroquinone (HQ) as a major ring retaining product. The high yield of hydroquinone indicated that the breakage of ether bond (C-O) is important in the initial step of DPE decomposition. Ring cleavage products were CO and CO sub 2 , and NO sub 2 was also produced from background N sub 2 -O sub 2. The sum of the yields of HQ, CO sub 2 and CO accounts for over 90% of the removed DPE. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) were less important in the dilute DPE decomposition at a high water content, and were mostly consumed by recombination reactions to form hydrogen peroxide. The smaller the initial DPE concentrations, the higher the decomposition efficiency and the lower the yield...

  18. Retention of deuterium in damaged low-activation steel Rusfer (EK-181) after gas and plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, A.V. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubeva, A.V., E-mail: anna-golubeva@yandex.ru [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bobyr, N.P.; Khripunov, B.I. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cherkez, D.I., E-mail: cherkez@list.ru [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, V.B. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayer, M.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Alimov, V.Kh. [Max-Planck-Institut fürPlasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Klimov, N.S.; Putrik, A. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M.V. [A.A. Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu.M.; Efimov, V.S. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic steels (RAFMS) are advanced structural materials for the construction of future fusion reactors with high fluxes of neutrons, such as DEMO or a Fusion Neutron Source (FNS). In the present work the influence of different damages on deuterium retention in the RAFM Rusfer (Chernov et al., 2007) was investigated. Three different types of damage were applied: (i)irradiation by 20 MeV W{sup 6+} ions to a damage fluence of 0.89 dpa (1.4 × 10{sup 18} ions/m{sup 2}). Tungsten ion irradiation was used as proxy for displacement damage created by neutrons; (ii)heat loads in the QSPA-T facility with 10 pulses of 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} with a duration of 0.5 ms; (iii)low-temperature hydrogen plasma irradiation in the LENTA facility at 320 and 600 K to a fluence of 10{sup 25} H/m{sup 2}. The hydrogen isotope retention properties of the damaged and undamaged material were investigated by exposure to deuterium gas several weeks after damaging. The deuterium retention was investigated in the temperature range of RT–773 K at pressure 10{sup 4} Pa. Deuterium depth profiles were measured a month after gas exposure by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the D({sup 3}He,p)α nuclear reaction. Deuterium retention in damaged and undamaged Rusfer in the temperature range of 300–600 K has a maximum at 500 K for all types of damage investigated. The typical value of deuterium concentration in the bulk is 10{sup −3} at.%. Peculiarities of D retention in damaged samples are discussed.

  19. Plasma confinement modification and convective transport suppression in the scrape-off layer using additional gas puffing in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreval, M.; Hubeny, M.; Ding, Y.; Onchi, T.; Liu, Y.; Hthu, K.; Elgriw, S.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of short gas puffing (GP) pulses on the scrape-off layer (SOL) transport is studied. Similar responses of ion saturation current and floating potential measured near the GP injection valve and in the 90° toroidally separated cross-section suggest that the GP influence on the SOL region should be global. A drop in plasma temperature and a decrease in the rotational velocity of the plasma are observed in the SOL region immediately after the GP pulse; however, an unexpected increase in electron and ion temperatures is observed in the second stage of the plasma response. The decrease in floating potential fluctuations indicates that the turbulent transport is dumped immediately after the GP pulse. The GP-induced modification of turbulence properties in the SOL points to a convective transport suppression in the STOR-M tokamak. A substantial decrease in the skewness and kurtosis of ion saturation current fluctuations is observed in the SOL region resulting in the probability distribution function (PDF) getting closer to the Gaussian distribution. The plasma potential reduction, the change in plasma rotation and the suppression of turbulent transport in the SOL region indicate that the plasma confinement is modified after the GP injection. Some features of the H-mode-like confinement in the plasma bulk also accompany the SOL observations after application of the additional sharp GP pulse.

  20. Rapid determination of acetone in human plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2004-06-15

    Acetone is an important volatile disease marker. Due to its nature of activity and volatility, it is a difficult task to measure the concentration of acetone in biological samples with accuracy. In this paper, we developed a novel method for determination of trace amount acetone in human plasma by solid-phase microextraction technique with on-fiber derivatization. In this method, the poly(dimethylsiloxane)/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fiber was used and O-2,3,4,5,6-(pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) was first loaded on the fiber. Acetone in plasma sample was agitated into headspace and extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber and subsequently derivatized with PFBHA on the fiber. Acetone oxime was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Quantitative analysis of acetone in plasma was carried out by using external standard method. The SPME conditions (extraction temperature and time) and the method validation were studied. The present method was tested by determination of acetone in diabetes plasma and normal plasma. Acetone concentration in diabetes plasma was found to be higher than 1.8mM, while in normal plasma was lower than 0.017 mM. The results show that the present method is a potential tool for diagnosis of diabetes.

  1. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  2. Investigation of plasma behavior during noble gas injection in the end-cell of GAMMA 10/PDX by using the multi-fluid code ‘LINDA’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. S.; Nakashima, Y.; Hatayama, A.

    2017-12-01

    The linear divertor analysis with fluid model (LINDA) code has been developed in order to simulate plasma behavior in the end-cell of linear fusion device GAMMA 10/PDX. This paper presents the basic structure and simulated results of the LINDA code. The atomic processes of hydrogen and impurities have been included in the present model in order to investigate energy loss processes and mechanism of plasma detachment. A comparison among Ar, Kr and Xe shows that Xe is the most effective gas on the reduction of electron and ion temperature. Xe injection leads to strong reduction in the temperature of electron and ion. The energy loss terms for both the electron and the ion are enhanced significantly during Xe injection. It is shown that the major energy loss channels for ion and electron are charge-exchange loss and radiative power loss of the radiator gas, respectively. These outcomes indicate that Xe injection in the plasma edge region is effective for reducing plasma energy and generating detached plasma in linear device GAMMA 10/PDX.

  3. Dual jets from binary black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L

    2010-08-20

    The coalescence of supermassive black holes--a natural outcome when galaxies merge--should produce gravitational waves and would likely be associated with energetic electromagnetic events. We have studied the coalescence of such binary black holes within an external magnetic field produced by the expected circumbinary disk surrounding them. Solving the Einstein equations to describe black holes interacting with surrounding plasma, we present numerical evidence for possible jets driven by these systems. Extending the process described by Blandford and Znajek for a single, spinning black hole, the picture that emerges suggests that the electromagnetic field extracts energy from the orbiting black holes, which ultimately merge and settle into the standard Blandford-Znajek scenario. Emissions along these jets could potentially be observable at large distances.

  4. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  5. Rethinking Black Hole Accretion Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Greg

    magnetized state of the gas, spanning weak-to-strong disc magnetization regimes. We also demonstrate that a background poloidal magnetic flux is required to form and sustain a strongly magnetized accretion disc. This thesis motivates the need for understanding how magnetic fields affect the observed spectrum from black hole accretion discs.

  6. Effect of precursor solutions on ZnO film via solution precursor plasma spray and corresponding gas sensing performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z.X., E-mail: zexin.yu@utbm.fr [Univ Bourgogne Franche Comte, CNRS, Lab ICB, UMR 6303, Site UTBM, F-90010 Belfort (France); Ma, Y.Z., E-mail: yangzhou.ma@outlook.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma’anshan 243002 (China); Zhao, Y.L. [Univ Bourgogne Franche Comte, CNRS, Lab ICB, UMR 6303, Site UTBM, F-90010 Belfort (France); Huang, J.B.; Wang, W.Z. [Key Lab of Safety Science of Pressurized System, Ministry of Education, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Moliere, M.; Liao, H.L. [Univ Bourgogne Franche Comte, CNRS, Lab ICB, UMR 6303, Site UTBM, F-90010 Belfort (France)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • C-axis preferential oriented grown ZnO films were firstly deposited via SPPS with different solutions. • ZnO films were hydrophobic due to cauliflower and honeycomb-like surface morphologies with high surface specific area. • Gas detecting performance of (002) plane oriented ZnO was predicted and compared by “first principle calculation method”. - Abstract: Solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) as a novel thermal spray method was employed to deposit nano-structured ZnO thin film using different formulations of the precursor solution. This article focuses on the influence of the solution composition on the preferential orientation of crystal growth, on crystal size and surface morphology of the resulting ZnO films. The trend of preferential growth along (002) lattice plane of ZnO film was studied by slow scanning X-ray diffraction using a specific coefficient P{sub (002).} It appears that the thermal spray process promotes the buildup of ZnO films preferentially oriented along the c-axis. The shape of single particle tends to change from round shaped beads to hexagonal plates by increasing the volume ratio of ethanol in the solvent. Both cauliflower and honeycomb-like surface morphologies featuring high specific surface area and roughness were obtained through the SPPS process by varying solution composition. These ZnO films are hydrophobic with contact angle as high as 136°, which is seemingly associated with micro reliefs developing high surface specific area. Then the gas sensing performances of ZnO films preferentially oriented along (002) face were tentatively predicted using the “first principle calculation method” and were compared with those of conventional films that are mainly oriented along the (101) face. The (002) face displays better hydrogen adsorption capability than the (101) face with much larger resulting changes in electrical resistance. In conclusion, the c-axis oriented ZnO films obtained through SSPS have

  7. Suitability of diecast aluminum for plasma and electron beam welding - gas content of diecast metal and consequences for welding. Eignung von Aluminiumdruckguss zum Plasma- und Elektronenstrahlschweissen - Gasgehalt von Druckguss und Folgen fuer das Schweissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruge, J.; Lutze, P. (Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Schweisstechnik)

    1989-05-01

    Due to the gas content caused by manufacture, diecast aluminum tends to a great deal of pore formation when welded. In previous investigations, the cases of gas absorption during diecasting were cleared up and many welding processes were checked for their usability for the jointing of diecastings. Pressure welding and among welding processes plasma and electron beam welding proved to be promising. The physical and chemical bases are dealt with. The various groups of processes are also compared based on the laws found. (orig.).

  8. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    OpenAIRE

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spe...

  9. Possible evidence for partial demagnetization of electrons in the auroral E-region plasma during electron gas heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available A previous study, based on incoherent and coherent radar measurements, suggested that during auroral E-region electron heating conditions, the electron flow in the auroral electrojet undergoes a systematic counterclockwise rotation of several degrees relative to the E×B direction. The observational evidence is re-examined here in the light of theoretical predictions concerning E-region electron demagnetization caused by enhanced anomalous cross-field diffusion during strongly-driven Farley-Buneman instability. It is shown that the observations are in good agreement with this theory. This apparently endorses the concept of wave-induced diffusion and anomalous electron collision frequency, and consequently electron demagnetization, under circumstances of strong heating of the electron gas in the auroral electrojet plasma. We recognize, however, that the evidence for electron demagnetization presented in this report cannot be regarded as definitive because it is based on a limited set of data. More experimental research in this direction is thus needed.

  10. Optical characteristics and parameters of gas-discharge plasma in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinina, A. A., E-mail: alexandr-malinin@rambler.ru; Malinin, A. N. [Uzhhorod National University (Ukraine)

    2015-03-15

    Results are presented from studies of the optical characteristics and parameters of the plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with argon—the working medium of an exciplex gas-discharge emitter. It is established that the partial pressures of mercury dibromide vapor and argon at which the average and pulsed emission intensities in the blue—green spectral region (λ{sub max} = 502 nm) reach their maximum values are 0.6 and 114.4 kPa, respectively. The electron energy distribution function, the transport characteristics, the specific power spent on the processes involving electrons, the electron density and temperature, and the rate constants for the processes of elastic and inelastic electron scattering from the molecules and atoms of the working mixture are determined by numerical simulation, and their dependences on the reduced electric field strength are analyzed. The rate constant of the process leading to the formation of exciplex mercury monobromide molecules for a reduced electric field of E/N = 20 Td, at which the maximum emission intensity in the blue—green spectral region was observed in this experiment, is found to be 8.1 × 10{sup −15} m{sup 3}/s.

  11. The behavior of plasma with an arbitrary degree of degeneracy of electron gas in the conductive layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latyshev, A. V.; Gordeeva, N. M.

    2017-09-01

    We obtain an analytic solution of the boundary problem for the behavior (fluctuations) of an electron plasma with an arbitrary degree of degeneracy of the electron gas in the conductive layer in an external electric field. We use the kinetic Vlasov-Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision integral and the Maxwell equation for the electric field. We use the mirror boundary conditions for the reflections of electrons from the layer boundary. The boundary problem reduces to a one-dimensional problem with a single velocity. For this, we use the method of consecutive approximations, linearization of the equations with respect to the absolute distribution of the Fermi-Dirac electrons, and the conservation law for the number of particles. Separation of variables then helps reduce the problem equations to a characteristic system of equations. In the space of generalized functions, we find the eigensolutions of the initial system, which correspond to the continuous spectrum (Van Kampen mode). Solving the dispersion equation, we then find the eigensolutions corresponding to the adjoint and discrete spectra (Drude and Debye modes). We then construct the general solution of the boundary problem by decomposing it into the eigensolutions. The coefficients of the decomposition are given by the boundary conditions. This allows obtaining the decompositions of the distribution function and the electric field in explicit form.

  12. Determinação de resíduos de pesticidas em plasma bovino por cromatografia gasosa-espectrometria de massas Pesticides residue determination in cattle plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fernanda Maffei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method for the isolation based on matrix solid-phase dispersion technique and gas chromatographic determination of pesticides in cattle plasma is presented. It was fortified 0.25 g of plasma with pesticides and blended with 1 g each C18 and Na2SO4. The homogenized matter was transferred to a SPE cartridge, which contained 1 g of activated florisil with 5 mL acetonitrile. The analites were eluted under vaccum with 15 mL acetonitrile, the extract was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification of the method was 0.04 mg L-1 for chlorphenvinfos and fipronil and 0.02 mg L-1 for cypermethrin..

  13. Experiments on penetration of a plasma with magnetized electrons across a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, R. E.; Cohen, R. H.; Hooper, E. B.; Molvik, A. W.; Porter, G. D.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1998-11-01

    In a number of situations of practical interest, one has to deal with plasma flow past bodies whose size is much greater than the electron gyroradius but much smaller than the ion gyroradius (examples from two very different environments are: spaceraft in the geomagnetic field, and irregularities on the surface of divertor plates). The ions are then repelled from the region inaccessible for electrons by the ambipolar potential, and a shadow with a size much less than the ion gyro-radius is formed. We present a systematic experimental study of plasma penetration into such shadows across the magnetic field lines. The experiments are performed on the Bluebell device situated at LLNL. The flow of an Argon plasma with density up to 10^12 cm-3 and electron temperature 2-3 eV is collimated by holes with diameters from 0.5 to 2 cm made in a thin aluminum disk that intersepts the rest of the plasma. The magnetic field strength is in the range of a few tens of gauss. The plasma density distribution in the gradually expanding plasma jets behind the holes is measured by electrostatic probes. In order to eliminate direct electric contact with the upstream plasma (which is sometimes quite "noisy"), some of the holes are covered with fine metal meshes. We report on the measurements of the cross-field expansion rate of the jets vs. the plasma density, the density of the background gas, and the magnetic field intensity.

  14. Life inside black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside a black hole, which are stable, periodic and neither come out of the black hole nor terminate at the singularity. Interiors of supermassive black holes may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on planets with the third-kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of black holes by observing their white hole counterparts.

  15. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  16. Decomposition of acetaminophen in water by a gas phase dielectric barrier discharge plasma combined with TiO2-rGO nanocomposite: Mechanism and degradation pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guyu; Sun, Yabing, E-mail: sybnju@163.com; Zhang, Chunxiao; Yu, Zhongqing

    2017-02-05

    Highlights: • Graphene Oxide-based catalyst was first applied with dielectric barrier discharge plasma. • The TiO{sub 2}-rGO showed efficient synergistic effect with gas phase dielectric barrier discharge plasma. • The property changes of TiO{sub 2}-rGO nanocomposite after plasma treatment were characterized. • The mechanism and possible pathways of APAP degradation in plasma/TiO{sub 2}-rGO system were proposed. - Abstract: Acetaminophen (APAP) served as the model pollutant to evaluate the feasibility of pollutant removal by gas phase dielectric barrier discharge plasma combined with the titanium dioxide-reduced Graphene Oxide (TiO{sub 2}-rGO) nanocomposite. TiO{sub 2}-rGO nanocomposite was prepared using the modified hydrothermal method and characterized by TEM and XPS before and after plasma process. The results indicated that the APAP degradation efficiency was significantly improved to 92% after 18 min of discharge plasma treatment coupling 0.25 g L{sup −1} TiO{sub 2}-rGO 5% wt at 18 kV, compared with the plasma alone and plasma combined with P25 TiO{sub 2}. The degradation mechanism for APAP in this system was studied by investigating the effects of the operational variables (e.g. discharge voltage and pH value) and the amount of the generated active species; and the results showed that O{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yields were influenced notably by adding TiO{sub 2}-rGO. Also, it was observed that, compared with unused TiO{sub 2}-rGO, the photocatalytic performance of used TiO{sub 2}-rGO declined after several recirculation times due to the further reduction of Graphene Oxide in plasma system. Finally, intermediate products were analyzed by UV–vis spectrometry and HPLC/MS, and possible transformation pathways were identified with the support of theoretically calculating the frontier electron density of APAP.

  17. Extraction of negative pionlike particles from a H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} gas discharge plasma in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uramoto, Joshin

    1995-09-01

    Electron density in outside region of H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} gas discharge plasma along magnetic field, is abruptly reduced as H{sup -} or D{sup -} ions are produced. From the region, negative pionlike particles are extracted together with H{sup -} or D{sup -} ions. Then, a positive bias voltage is necessary for the beam collector of magnetic mass analyzer. (author).

  18. The mathematical description of the gasification process of woody biomass in installations with a plasma heat source for producing synthesis gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrtdinov, A. R.; Safin, R. G.; Gerasimov, M. K.; Petrov, V. I.; Gilfanov, K. K.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the scheme of processing of plant biomass in the gasification installation with a plasma heat source to produce synthesis gas suitable for chemical industry. The analyzed physical picture of raw materials' recycling process underlies a mathematical description of the process set out in the form of the basic differential equations with boundary conditions. The received mathematical description allows calculating of the main parameters of equipment for biomass recycling and to determine the optimal modes of its operation.

  19. Investigación de la influencia del tipo de gas utilizado en el plasma atmosférico, en la modificación superficial del polipropileno

    OpenAIRE

    Monzó Pérez, Matías Raimundo

    2016-01-01

    [EN] "Investigation of the influence of the type of gas used in atmospheric plasma in surface modification of polypropylene." ABSTRACT. Polypropylene is one of the most consumed thermoplastics worldwide, with an estimated annual demand of 790,000 tons. High demand for polypropylene is directly related to its versatility and good physical and chemical properties. Polypropylene is a suitable plastic for many applications because of its low density, good mechanical and chemical resistanc...

  20. Production and correlation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas- and liquid-phase generated by helium plasma jets under different pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Zhou, Chunxi; Liu, Dingxin; Xu, Dehui; Xia, Wenjie; Cui, Qingjie; Wang, Bingchuan; Kong, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present the effects of the pulse width (PW) on the plasma jet's discharge characteristics, particularly focusing on the production and correlation of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in gas- and liquid-phase. It is found that the length of plasma jet plume first increases before the PW of 10 μs, then gradually decreases and finally almost remains unchanged beyond 150 μs. The plasma bullet disappears after the falling edge of the voltage pulse at low PW, while it terminates far ahead of the falling edge of voltage pulse at high PW. This is mainly attributed to accumulation of space charges that lead to weakening of the reduced electric field with an increase of PW from low to high. More important, it is found that the excited reactive species, the positive and negative ions from plasma jet, and the concentrations of NO2- and NO3- in deionized water exposed to plasma jet also display the first increasing and then decreasing change trend with increase of PW, while the concentration of H2O2 in water almost displays the linearly increasing trend. This mainly results from the formation of the H3O+ and HO2-, as well as their ion water clusters that can produce more OH radicals to be converted into H2O2, while the NO2- and NO3- in gas phase can transport into water and exist most stably in water. The water cluster formation at gas-liquid interface is an important key process that can affect the chemical nature and dose of aqueous RONS in water; this is beneficial for understanding how the RONS are formed in liquid-phase.

  1. Testing black hole candidates with electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2017-04-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity, but there is not yet direct observational evidence that the spacetime geometry around these objects is described by the Kerr solution. The study of the properties of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by gas or stars orbiting these objects can potentially test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. This paper reviews the state of the art of this research field, describing the possible approaches to test the Kerr metric with current and future observational facilities and discussing current constraints.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of silicon carbonitride films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS), as membrane for a small molecule gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafrouni, W.; Rouessac, V.; Julbe, A.; Durand, J.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon carbonitride thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) as a function of X = (BDMADMS/(BDMADMS + NH 3)) between 0.1 and 1, and plasma power P (W) between 100 and 400 W. The microstructure of obtained materials has been studied by SEM, FTIR, EDS, ellipsometrie, and contact angle of water measurements. The structure of the materials is strongly depended on plasma parameters; we can pass from a material rich in carbon to a material rich in nitrogen. Single gas permeation tests have been carried out and we have obtained a helium permeance of about 10 -7 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 and ideal selectivity of helium over nitrogen of about 20.

  3. Respiratory mechanics and plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 are affected by gas humidification during mechanical ventilation in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hernández-Jiménez

    Full Text Available The use of dry gases during mechanical ventilation has been associated with the risk of serious airway complications. The goal of the present study was to quantify the plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 and to determine the radiological, hemodynamic, gasometric, and microscopic changes in lung mechanics in dogs subjected to short-term mechanical ventilation with and without humidification of the inhaled gas. The experiment was conducted for 24 hours in 10 dogs divided into two groups: Group I (n = 5, mechanical ventilation with dry oxygen dispensation, and Group II (n = 5, mechanical ventilation with oxygen dispensation using a moisture chamber. Variance analysis was used. No changes in physiological, hemodynamic, or gasometric, and radiographic constants were observed. Plasma TNF-alpha levels increased in group I, reaching a maximum 24 hours after mechanical ventilation was initiated (ANOVA p = 0.77. This increase was correlated to changes in mechanical ventilation. Plasma IL-6 levels decreased at 12 hours and increased again towards the end of the study (ANOVA p>0.05. Both groups exhibited a decrease in lung compliance and functional residual capacity values, but this was more pronounced in group I. Pplat increased in group I (ANOVA p = 0.02. Inhalation of dry gas caused histological lesions in the entire respiratory tract, including pulmonary parenchyma, to a greater extent than humidified gas. Humidification of inspired gases can attenuate damage associated with mechanical ventilation.

  4. Respiratory mechanics and plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 are affected by gas humidification during mechanical ventilation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jiménez, Claudia; García-Torrentera, Rogelio; Olmos-Zúñiga, J Raúl; Jasso-Victoria, Rogelio; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, Miguel O; Baltazares-Lipp, Matilde; Gutiérrez-González, Luis H

    2014-01-01

    The use of dry gases during mechanical ventilation has been associated with the risk of serious airway complications. The goal of the present study was to quantify the plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 and to determine the radiological, hemodynamic, gasometric, and microscopic changes in lung mechanics in dogs subjected to short-term mechanical ventilation with and without humidification of the inhaled gas. The experiment was conducted for 24 hours in 10 dogs divided into two groups: Group I (n = 5), mechanical ventilation with dry oxygen dispensation, and Group II (n = 5), mechanical ventilation with oxygen dispensation using a moisture chamber. Variance analysis was used. No changes in physiological, hemodynamic, or gasometric, and radiographic constants were observed. Plasma TNF-alpha levels increased in group I, reaching a maximum 24 hours after mechanical ventilation was initiated (ANOVA p = 0.77). This increase was correlated to changes in mechanical ventilation. Plasma IL-6 levels decreased at 12 hours and increased again towards the end of the study (ANOVA p>0.05). Both groups exhibited a decrease in lung compliance and functional residual capacity values, but this was more pronounced in group I. Pplat increased in group I (ANOVA p = 0.02). Inhalation of dry gas caused histological lesions in the entire respiratory tract, including pulmonary parenchyma, to a greater extent than humidified gas. Humidification of inspired gases can attenuate damage associated with mechanical ventilation.

  5. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlitsky, M A; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a "shelf Coulomb" model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The "shelf Coulomb" model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ɛ parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ɛ and γ = βe(2)n(1/3) (where β = 1/kBT, n is the particle's density, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ɛ and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ɛ(crit) ≈ 13(T(*)(crit) ≈ 0.076), γ(crit) ≈ 1.8(v(*)(crit) ≈ 0.17), P(*)(crit) ≈ 0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ(3) and reduced temperature T(*) = ɛ(-1).

  6. Effects of gas temperature, pressure, and discharge power on nucleation time of nano-particles in low pressure C2H2/Ar RF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiashu; Orazbayev, Sagi; Hénault, Marie; Lecas, Thomas; Takahashi, Kazuo; Boufendi, Laïfa

    2017-10-01

    The formation of dust particles in low-pressure plasmas is a 3-step process. The first one corresponds to nucleation and growth of nanoparticles by chain reactions between ions and gas molecules, the second one is agglomeration of the nanoparticles to form larger particles, and finally, the particles grow by radical deposition on their surfaces. In this work, the nucleation time for carbon dust particles was studied in low pressure acetylene/argon radio frequency (RF) plasmas. Since the self-bias voltage on a powered electrode was drastically affected by the transition from the nucleation to the agglomeration phases, the nucleation time was measured by observing the self-bias voltage time evolution. The nucleation time increases with the gas temperature and decreases when the gas pressure and the RF power are increased. A kinetic model, involving balance between diffusion and charging times of the nanoparticles as well as the chain reactions, is used to explain the exponential dependence of the nucleation time on the gas temperature. The balance between the times was especially indispensable to get good agreement between the model and the experimental results.

  7. Down the Rabbit Hole: toward appropriate discussion of methane release from gas hydrate systems during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum and other past hyperthermal events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Dickens

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Enormous amounts of 13C-depleted carbon rapidly entered the exogenic carbon cycle during the onset of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, as attested to by a prominent negative carbon isotope (δ13C excursion and deep-sea carbonate dissolution. A widely cited explanation for this carbon input has been thermal dissociation of gas hydrate on continental slopes, followed by release of CH4 from the seafloor and its subsequent oxidation to CO2 in the ocean or atmosphere. Increasingly, papers have argued against this mechanism, but without fully considering existing ideas and available data. Moreover, other explanations have been presented as plausible alternatives, even though they conflict with geological observations, they raise major conceptual problems, or both. Methane release from gas hydrates remains a congruous explanation for the δ13C excursion across the PETM, although it requires an unconventional framework for global carbon and sulfur cycling, and it lacks proof. These issues are addressed here in the hope that they will prompt appropriate discussions regarding the extraordinary carbon injection at the start of the PETM and during other events in Earth's history.

  8. Bottom hole blowout preventer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineham, D.H.

    1991-04-24

    An automatically controlled ball-valve type bottom-hole blowout preventer is provided for use in drilling oil or gas wells. The blowout preventer of the invention operates under normal drilling conditions in a fully open position with an unrestricted bore. This condition is maintained by a combination of spring and mud flow pressure acting against the upper surfaces of the valve. In the event of a well kick or blowout, pressures from gas or fluid volumes acting against the lower surfaces of the valve force it into the fully closed position. A system of ports and check valves within the blowout preventer forces hydraulic fluid from one chamber to another. The metering effect of these ports determines the rate of closure of the valve, thereby allowing normal running and pulling of the drill string or tubing, without interference to pipe fill-up or drainage, from valve closure. The blowout preventer is placed in a subassembly that is an integral part of the drill string and can be incorporated in a string in any location. 3 figs.

  9. Chandra Catches "Piranha" Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Supermassive black holes have been discovered to grow more rapidly in young galaxy clusters, according to new results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These "fast-track" supermassive black holes can have a big influence on the galaxies and clusters that they live in. Using Chandra, scientists surveyed a sample of clusters and counted the fraction of galaxies with rapidly growing supermassive black holes, known as active galactic nuclei (or AGN). The data show, for the first time, that younger, more distant galaxy clusters contained far more AGN than older, nearby ones. Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe, consisting of many individual galaxies, a few of which contain AGN. Earlier in the history of the universe, these galaxies contained a lot more gas for star formation and black hole growth than galaxies in clusters do today. This fuel allows the young cluster black holes to grow much more rapidly than their counterparts in nearby clusters. Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus "The black holes in these early clusters are like piranha in a very well-fed aquarium," said Jason Eastman of Ohio State University (OSU) and first author of this study. "It's not that they beat out each other for food, rather there was so much that all of the piranha were able to really thrive and grow quickly." The team used Chandra to determine the fraction of AGN in four different galaxy clusters at large distances, when the Universe was about 58% of its current age. Then they compared this value to the fraction found in more nearby clusters, those about 82% of the Universe's current age. The result was the more distant clusters contained about 20 times more AGN than the less distant sample. AGN outside clusters are also more common when the Universe is younger, but only by factors of two or three over the same age span. "It's been predicted that there would be fast-track black holes in clusters, but we never

  10. Plasma spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Plasma is ubiquitous, whether it occurs in cooking gas flames, fluorescent lamps or in the sun and the stars. This book deals with the light that these plasmas emit, the characteristics of the light, and why it occurs. The author provides a framework from which a coherent account of this phenomena can be made.

  11. Higher spin black holes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutperle, Michael; Kraus, Per

    2011-01-01

    .... We find solutions that generalize the BTZ black hole and carry spin-3 charge. The black hole entropy formula yields a result for the asymptotic growth of the partition function at finite spin-3 chemical potential...

  12. Surface reactivity of molybdenum thin films exposed to (Ar-N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}) expanding microwave plasma at low temperature: influence of the addition of H{sub 2} gas in the plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauberteau, I [UMR 6638 CNRS, SPCTS, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, F-87060 Limoges cedex (France); Jauberteau, J L [UMR 6638 CNRS, SPCTS, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, F-87060 Limoges cedex (France); Cahoreau, M [UMR 6630 CNRS, SP2MI, UFR des Sciences, Bd3, Teleport 2, BP 179, F-86960 Futuroscope (France); Aubreton, J [UMR 6638 CNRS, SPCTS, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, F-87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2005-10-07

    The rapid transfer of a large amount of nitrogen into the surface layers followed by diffusion into the inner layers occurs in thin molybdenum films exposed to expanding microwave plasma using (Ar-35%N{sub 2}) and (Ar-25%N{sub 2}-30%H{sub 2}) gas mixtures. The nitrogen transfer into the surface layers nearly correlates to a Gaussian distribution law, which is explained by the formation of a large number of defects at the film surface in which nitrogen piles up before diffusing into the inner metal layers. Such an effect could be induced by the impinging energetic plasma species as ions, NH{sub x<3} radicals. The diffusion part is successfully fitted to Fick's second law by introducing diffusion coefficients of about (5-7) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} at 673 K. These values are lower than the diffusion coefficient calculated for a solid solution of nitrogen in molybdenum which is equal to about 4 x 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. A surprisingly high diffusion coefficient of about 3 x 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} is found for the molybdenum film exposed to (Ar-25%N{sub 2}-30%H{sub 2}) plasma at room temperature. These results highlight the role of plasma hydrogen species on the enhancement of the metal surface reactivity and nitrogen diffusion into the inner metal layers. A modification of the morphology of the film surface exposed to hydrogen species is also seen. The values of electron densities measured in the various (Ar-N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}) gas mixtures are consistent with the formation of expanded plasma far from the centre of the discharge, apart from(Ar-30%N{sub 2}-12%H{sub 2}) where the plasma expansion is very low. At a distance of 10.5 cm from the centre of the discharge, the electron density is equal to about 1.66 x 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and 1.16 x 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} for (Ar-25%N{sub 2}-30%H{sub 2}) and (Ar-35%N{sub 2}) gas mixtures, respectively.

  13. Bullet-shaped ionization front of plasma jet plumes driven by microwave pulses at atmospheric gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Xia, Guangqing; Zou, Changlin; Liu, Xiaodong; Feng, Deren; Li, Ping; Hu, Yelin; Stepanova, Olga; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization waves (propagating bullet-shaped plasma) are always present in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets generated by a pulsed DC power supply or low-frequency voltages. Nevertheless, whether these ionization waves exist for pulsed microwave plasma jets remains unclear. In this paper, a coaxial transmission line resonator driven by microwave pulses is capable of generating atmospheric pressure plasma jet plumes. Depending on the discharges, these plasma jet plumes exhibit distinctive characteristics, such as bullet-shaped ionization fronts for argon plasma and ball-shaped for helium plasma. Fast images show argon plasma plumes generating several small branches but only one dominant ionization front travels more distance along the jet axis. Both ionization-wave images and electromagnetic simulation results indicate that the bullet-shaped ionization front forms a plasma jet plume immediately. The dominant ionization wave is resonantly excited by the local enhanced electric field, which originates from the local net charge of the streamer plus surface plasmon polariton located at the open end of the resonator.

  14. Monopole black hole skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I.G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  15. Quantum interference and spin-orbit effects in the heterostructure with the 2D hole gas in the Si sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ge sub 0 sub . 8 quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Andrievskij, V V; Komnik, Y F; Mironov, M; Mironov, O A; Whall, T E

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic field (approx 110 kOe)dependences of resistance of the Si sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 3 /Si sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 8 /Si sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 3 heterostructure with a 2D hole gas in the Si sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 8 quantum well were measured at T = 0.335-10 K with varying current between 100 nA and 50 mA. It was found that in high magnetic fields there occurred Shubnikov-de-Haas oscillations, while in weak fields (H<= kOe) a positive magnetoresistance transforming than in a negative one was observed. This peculiarity is due to the effects of weak localization of 2D charge carriers with very close spin-orbit and inelastic scattering time,tau sub s sub o and tau subphi, respectively. This suggests that the spin states are splitted in response to the perturbing potential associated with the generation of a two-dimensional potential well (Rashba mechanism). The analysis of the effects of weak localization yields the characteristic relaxation time...

  16. Interaction of 0.53 μm laser pulse with millimeter-scale plasmas generated with gas-bag target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Jian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reported are the interactions of 0.53 μm laser pulse with millimeter-scale plasmas that are produced with gas-bag target irradiated with 0.35 μm laser pulses. The generated plasmas are characterized with collective Thomson scattering and space- and time-resolved X-ray images. The density of the plasmas is about 0.1 nc corresponding to the 0.53 μm laser beam, and the temperature is about 0.64 keV with a filling gas of C5H12. The interaction laser beam can output 1.0 kJ energy within the duration of 1 ns at the wavelength of 0.53 μm, leading to a nominal intensity less than 1.5 × 1015 W/cm2. The reflectivity of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS is measured with a full aperture backscatter system. The experimental results show than the reflectivity of SBS is less than 5% and that of SRS is less than 1%. It is a positive result with respect to using 0.53 μm lasers as drivers for laser fusion.

  17. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  18. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A. [High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  19. Emission of mercury monobromide exciplex in gas-discharge plasma based on mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinina, A. A.; Shuaibov, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the results of investigations of an emission of a mercury monobromide exciplex in gas-discharge plasma of an atmospheric pressure barrier discharge based on a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor, sulfur hexafluoride, and helium. We optimized the emission power of mercury monobromide exciplexes with respect to the partial pressures of the working mixture. An average emission power of 0.42 W (λmax = 502 nm) is achieved in a cylindrical emission source with a small working volume (0.8 cm3) at a pumping pulse repetition rate of 6 kHz. We determined electron energy distribution functions, transport characteristics, specific discharge power losses for electron processes, electron concentration and temperature, as well as rate constants of elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons by components of the working mixture in relation to the ratio of the field strength to the total concentration of components of the working mixture. We discuss processes that increase the population of the mercury monobromide exciplex. Gas-discharge plasma created in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with sulfur hexafluoride and helium can be used as a working medium of an emission source in the blue-green spectral range for the use in scientific research in biotechnology, photonics, and medicine, as well as for creating indicator gas-discharge panels.

  20. Black hole feedback in the luminous quasar PDS 456

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardini, E.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy. Over five different...... gas. The outflow’s kinetic power larger than 1046 ergs per second is enough to provide the feedback required by models of black hole and host galaxy coevolution....

  1. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  2. BLACK HOLE FORAGING: FEEDBACK DRIVES FEEDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnen, Walter; King, Andrew, E-mail: wd11@leicester.ac.uk, E-mail: ark@astro.le.ac.uk [Theoretical Astrophysics Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10

    We suggest a new picture of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth in galaxy centers. Momentum-driven feedback from an accreting hole gives significant orbital energy, but little angular momentum to the surrounding gas. Once central accretion drops, the feedback weakens and swept-up gas falls back toward the SMBH on near-parabolic orbits. These intersect near the black hole with partially opposed specific angular momenta, causing further infall and ultimately the formation of a small-scale accretion disk. The feeding rates into the disk typically exceed Eddington by factors of a few, growing the hole on the Salpeter timescale and stimulating further feedback. Natural consequences of this picture include (1) the formation and maintenance of a roughly toroidal distribution of obscuring matter near the hole; (2) random orientations of successive accretion disk episodes; (3) the possibility of rapid SMBH growth; (4) tidal disruption of stars and close binaries formed from infalling gas, resulting in visible flares and ejection of hypervelocity stars; (5) super-solar abundances of the matter accreting on to the SMBH; and (6) a lower central dark-matter density, and hence annihilation signal, than adiabatic SMBH growth implies. We also suggest a simple subgrid recipe for implementing this process in numerical simulations.

  3. Charged cosmological black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Rahim; Stahl, Clément; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-11-01

    The cosmological black holes are black holes living not in an asymptotically flat universe but in an expanding spacetime. They have a rich dynamics especially for their mass and horizon. In this article, we perform a natural step in investigating this new type of black hole: we consider the possibility of a charged cosmological black hole. We derive the general equations of motion governing its dynamics and report a new analytic solution for the special case of the charged Lematre-Tolman-Bondi equations of motion that describe a charged cosmological black hole. We then study various relevant quantities for the characterization of the black hole, such as the C-function, the effect of the charge on the black hole flux, and the nature of the singularity. We also perform numerical investigations to strengthen our results. Finally, we challenge a model of gamma ray burst within our framework.

  4. X-ray Winds from Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon M.

    2017-08-01

    Across the mass scale, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has transformed our view of accretion onto black holes. The ionized disk winds observed from stellar-mass black holes may sometimes eject more mass than is able to accrete onto the black hole. It is possible that these winds can probe the fundamental physics that drive disk accretion. The most powerful winds from accretion onto massive black holes may play a role in feedback, seeding host bulges with hot gas and halting star formation. The lessons and techniques emerging from these efforts can also reveal the accretion flow geometry in tidal disruption events (TDEs), an especially rich discovery space. This talk will review some recent progress enabled by high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy, and look at the potential of gratings spectrometers and microcalorimeters in the years ahead.

  5. Determination of Muscone in Rats Plasma following Oral Administration of Artificial Musk: Using of Combined Headspace Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qibiao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop an analytical method for determination of plasma concentrations of muscone in rats following oral administration of artificial musk, with the aim of investigating the pharmacokinetic profile of artificial musk. Plasma samples were pretreated with acetonitrile to precipitate proteins. Headspace injection coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for quantitative analysis of muscone concentrations. A strong linear relationship was obtained for plasma muscone concentrations ranging from 75.6 to 7560 ng·mL−1  R2=0.9998, with the minimum detectable concentration being 25 ng·mL−1. The within-day and interday precision for determination of three different concentrations of muscone were favorable (RSD < 25%. The average absolute recovery ranged from 83.7 to 88.6%, with an average relative recovery of 100.5 to 109.8%. The method described was characterized by stability and reliability, and in the present study showed significant specificity and high sensitivity. This method would be applicable to the analysis of plasma concentrations of muscone in preclinical contexts, where artificial musk is used.

  6. Development of a solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of pentachlorophenol in human plasma using experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Jiang, Qingwu; Peng, Qian; Xuan, Dongliang; Qu, Weidong

    2007-12-01

    A new method, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which was used for the determination of trace amount of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in human plasma was presented. The acetylation derivatization reaction was firstly optimized using a Doehlert design. Then a series of parameters relevant to the headspace SPME procedure, including fiber coating, extraction temperature, extraction time and salt addition, were optimized using a two-level full factorial design expanded further to a central composite design. The validation of method showed that the optimized method had good linearity (R(2)=0.999) within the concentration ranges 0.1-50.0ngml(-1), and was sensitive with the limit of detection of 0.02ngml(-1). Intra- and inter-day precision for pentachlorophenol in human plasma samples were not greater than 11.9% and 12.6%, respectively. The proposed method, to our knowledge, describes the first application of HS-SPME with GC-MS for analysis of PCP in blood plasma sample. Application of the method to real human plasma samples, PCP was successfully detected in some cases at concentration levels 1.2-6.3ngml(-1).

  7. Simultaneous determination of cis-permethrin and trans-permethrin in rat plasma and brain tissue using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshfar, Shirin; Gullick, Darren R; Linzey, Michael R; Mortuza, Tanzir; Abdel Rahman, Mona Hamdy; Rogers, Clinton A; Bruckner, James V; White, Catherine A; Bartlett, Michael G

    2017-08-15

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of cis-permethrin (cis-PERM) and trans-permethrin (trans-PERM) in small volumes (100μL) of rat plasma and brain homogenate was developed, using a liquid-liquid extraction for sample preparation and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GCNCI-MS) for detection. Quantitation of trace levels of the insecticide in small volumes of biological samples is essential to support toxicokinetic studies in small animals. There are currently no validated methods in the literature for determining cis-PERM and trans- PERM in volumes as low as 100μL of rat plasma or brain homogenate. The method provided a linear range of 0.2-150.0ng/mL for analytes in both matrices. The intra- and inter-batch precision (as% relative standard deviation, RSD) and accuracy (as relative error, RE) of the method were better than 20% at the limit of quantitation and better than 15% across the remaining linear range. The validated method was applied in a toxicokinetic study in adult rats with oral dosing of 10mg/kg (cis-PERM) and 100mg/kg (trans-PERM) in corn oil. cis-PERM and trans- PERM were monitored in rat plasma and brain tissue samples for 6h following dosing, and both analytes were detected in all plasma and brain samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling of low pressure plasma sources for microelectronics fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Bera, Kallol; Kenney, Jason; Likhanskii, Alexandre; Rauf, Shahid

    2017-10-01

    Chemically reactive plasmas operating in the 1 mTorr-10 Torr pressure range are widely used for thin film processing in the semiconductor industry. Plasma modeling has come to play an important role in the design of these plasma processing systems. A number of 3-dimensional (3D) fluid and hybrid plasma modeling examples are used to illustrate the role of computational investigations in design of plasma processing hardware for applications such as ion implantation, deposition, and etching. A model for a rectangular inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source is described, which is employed as an ion source for ion implantation. It is shown that gas pressure strongly influences ion flux uniformity, which is determined by the balance between the location of plasma production and diffusion. The effect of chamber dimensions on plasma uniformity in a rectangular capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is examined using an electromagnetic plasma model. Due to high pressure and small gap in this system, plasma uniformity is found to be primarily determined by the electric field profile in the sheath/pre-sheath region. A 3D model is utilized to investigate the confinement properties of a mesh in a cylindrical CCP. Results highlight the role of hole topology and size on the formation of localized hot-spots. A 3D electromagnetic plasma model for a cylindrical ICP is used to study inductive versus capacitive power coupling and how placement of ground return wires influences it. Finally, a 3D hybrid plasma model for an electron beam generated magnetized plasma is used to understand the role of reactor geometry on plasma uniformity in the presence of E  ×  B drift.

  9. Effect of ambient gas pressure and nature on the temporal evolution of aluminum laser-induced plasmas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawood, M. S; Margot, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved analysis of emission spectra, electron densities and excitation temperatures of Aluminum laser induced plasmas produced in argon, nitrogen and helium at different pressures have been studied experimentally...

  10. Total introduction of microsamples in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry by high-temperature evaporation chamber with a sheathing gas stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotti, Marco; Ardini, Francisco; Todolì, Josè Luis

    2013-03-12

    A systematic study on the high-temperature Torch Integrated Sample Introduction System (TISIS) for use in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been performed. The investigation included the optimization of the relevant parameters (chamber temperature, sheathing gas flow rate, nebulizer gas flow rate, sample uptake rate), the evaluation of its performance characteristics (sensitivity, limits of detection, stability, memory effects, use with the dynamic reaction cell) and representative applications to environmental, biological and clinical samples. Under the optimal conditions (T=150°C; nebulizer gas flow rate of 0.7Lmin(-1) along with sheathing gas flow rate of 0.35Lmin(-1) and a sample uptake rate of 20μLmin(-1)), the sensitivity was from 2 to 8 times higher than that measured using a conventional micronebulizer/mini-spray chamber system, due to the enhanced analyte mass transport toward the plasma and the solvent introduction in the vapour form. In addition, for several elements, TISIS provided lower limits of detection than the conventional system, even when the latter worked at 5-fold higher sample uptake rate. Short-term and long-term precision was better than 5%. Spectroscopic interferences arising from common matrices were efficiently removed by the dynamic reaction cell technique. The application of TISIS/ICP-MS to representative certified reference samples (spinach leaves, marine plankton, bone tissue, human blood) proved the suitability of this system for the accurate analysis of limited-size samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The biggest black holes may feed just like the smallest ones, according to data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ground-based telescopes. This discovery supports the implication of Einstein's relativity theory that black holes of all sizes have similar properties, and will be useful for predicting the properties of a conjectured new class of black holes. The conclusion comes from a large observing campaign of the spiral galaxy M81, which is about 12 million light years from Earth. In the center of M81 is a black hole that is about 70 million times more massive than the Sun, and generates energy and radiation as it pulls gas in the central region of the galaxy inwards at high speed. In contrast, so-called stellar mass black holes, which have about 10 times more mass than the Sun, have a different source of food. These smaller black holes acquire new material by pulling gas from an orbiting companion star. Because the bigger and smaller black holes are found in different environments with different sources of material to feed from, a question has remained about whether they feed in the same way. Using these new observations and a detailed theoretical model, a research team compared the properties of M81's black hole with those of stellar mass black holes. The results show that either big or little, black holes indeed appear to eat similarly to each other, and produce a similar distribution of X-rays, optical and radio light. AnimationMulti-wavelength Images of M81 One of the implications of Einstein's theory of General Relativity is that black holes are simple objects and only their masses and spins determine their effect on space-time. The latest research indicates that this simplicity manifests itself in spite of complicated environmental effects. "This confirms that the feeding patterns for black holes of different sizes can be very similar," said Sera Markoff of the Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, who led the study

  12. Stimulated Black Hole Evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Spaans, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Black holes are extreme expressions of gravity. Their existence is predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity and is supported by observations. Black holes obey quantum mechanics and evaporate spontaneously. Here it is shown that a mass rate $R_f\\sim 3\\times 10^{-8} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ $M_0$ yr$^{-1}$ onto the horizon of a black hole with mass $M$ (in units of solar mass $M_0$) stimulates a black hole into rapid evaporation. Specifically, $\\sim 3 M_0$ black holes can emit a large fraction of their mass, and explode, in $M/R_f \\sim 3\\times 10^7 (M/M_0)^{3/2}$ yr. These stimulated black holes radiate a spectral line power $P \\sim 2\\times 10^{39} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ erg s$^{-1}$, at a wavelength $\\lambda \\sim 3\\times 10^5 (M/M_0)$ cm. This prediction can be observationally verified.

  13. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nisticò

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  14. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  15. Hole crystallization in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonitz, M [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Filinov, V S [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Fortov, V E [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Levashov, P R [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskay 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Fehske, H [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Greifswald, l7487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    When electrons in a solid are excited to a higher energy band they leave behind a vacancy (hole) in the original band which behaves like a positively charged particle. Here we predict that holes can spontaneously order into a regular lattice in semiconductors with sufficiently flat valence bands. The critical hole to electron effective mass ratio required for this phase transition is found to be of the order of 80.

  16. Hole crystallization in semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Bonitz, M.; Filinov, V. S.; Fortov, V. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Fehske, H.

    2005-01-01

    When electrons in a solid are excited to a higher energy band they leave behind a vacancy (hole) in the original band which behaves like a positively charged particle. Here we predict that holes can spontaneously order into a regular lattice in semiconductors with sufficiently flat valence bands. The critical hole to electron effective mass ratio required for this phase transition is found to be of the order of 80.

  17. The use of cold plasma generators in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolomiiets R.O.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cold plasma treatment of wounds is a modern area of therapeutic medicine. We describe the physical mechanisms of cold plasma, the principles of therapeutic effects and design of two common types of cold plasma generators for medical use. This work aims at disclosing the basic principles of construction of cold atmospheric plasma generators in medicine and prospects for their further improvement. The purpose of this work is to improve the existing cold atmospheric plasma generators for use in medical applications. Novelty of this work consists in the application of new principles of construction of cold atmospheric plasmas medical apparatus, namely the combination of the gas discharge chamber, electrodes complex shape forming device and plasma flow in a single package. This helps to achieve a significant reduction in the size of the device, and a discharge chamber design change increases the therapeutic effect. The design of cold atmospheric plasma generator type «pin-to-hole», which is able to control parameters using the plasma current (modulation fluctuations in the primary winding and mechanically (using optional rotary electrode. It is also possible to combine some similar generators in the set, which will increase the surface area of the plasma treatment. We consider the basic principles of generating low atmospheric plasma flow, especially the formation of the plasma jet, changing its shape and modulation stream. The features of cold plasma generator design and information about prospects for further application, and opportunities for further improvement are revealed. The recommendations for further use of cold atmospheric plasma generators in medicine are formulated.

  18. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sungjoon; Kim, Joonhyub; Park, Chanwon; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Min, Nam Ki

    2017-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH3 gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response characteristics including sensitivity and response time of the p-SWCNT to ammonia gas are stabilized and eventually saturated.

  19. Asymptotic black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  20. Particle- and gas-phase PAHs toxicity equivalency quantity emitted by a non-road diesel engine with non-thermal plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianbing; Ma, Chaochen; Xing, Shikai; Zhang, Yajie; Liu, Jiangquan; Feng, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) toxicity equivalency quantity (TEQ, denoted by benzo(a)pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) concentration) is more meaningful when evaluating the influence of non-road diesel engines PAH toxicity on environment. Particle- and gas-phase PAH BaPeq concentrations were calculated based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) results and toxic equivalency factors. A non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor was applied to a non-road diesel engine to decrease PAH TEQ content. Only the gas-phase Nap BaPeq concentration increased slightly with the action of NTP at three different generator power outputs. BaP dominated the BaPeq concentration for 15 samples with, and without NTP except in the gas-phase at 4 kW. Almost all medium molecular weight (MMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) PAH TEQs increased for particle- and gas-phases at 3 kW power output compared to 2 kW without the use of NTP. Particle-phase Nap, Acp, and AcPy (low molecular weight, LMW) TEQ were under detection at 3 and 4 kW, while gas-phase BkF, IND, DBA, and BghiP (HMW) concentrations were below the limits of detection. The most abundant PAH TEQ compounds were MMW and HMW PAHs for gas- and particle-phase while they were BaA, CHR, BbF, BaP, and IND for PM aggregation. The total BaPeq emission factors were 15.1, 141.4, and 46.5 μg m(-3) at three engine loads, respectively. Significant BaPeq concentration percentage reduction was obtained (more than 80 and 60 %) with the use of NTP for particle- and gas-phases. A high TEQ content was observed for PM aggregation (38.8, 98.4, and 50.0 μg kg(-1)) which may have caused secondary PAH toxicity emissions. With the action of NTP, the breakup of MMW and HMW into LMW PAHs led to reduction of some PAH concentrations.