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Sample records for hockey stick technique

  1. PENGEMBANGAN MODEL ALAT STICK HOCKEY UNTUK LATIHAN PEMAIN PEMULA HOCKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In’am Attaqi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background issues that hamper the development of hockey in Central Java due to the lack of means of stick that is expensive and so difficult to get it. The focus of this research problem is to design products hockey stick model development tool for training novice players and test products hockey stick model development tool for training novice players.The approach used in this research is the Research and Development. Phase of the study include preliminary research, design modeling, model development testing procedures, expert Judgment, small-scale trials, trials broad scale. The subject of this study is Mts Miftahussalam 1 Wonosalam Demak. Hockey expert of experts and specialists timber expert. The data analysis phase of field work and data analysis stage include observation, observation, interviews, documentation and effectiveness testing of products, expert judgment hockey expert of experts and specialists timber expert.The results of this study are the product hockey stick for beginner hockey players training in Mts Miftahussalam 1 Wonosalam.PANDAWA hockey stick product can be used as a means of practicing basic techniques for beginner hockey players, hockey stick PANDAWA product can be used as a training tool in improving the ability of the basic techniques of playing hockey, hockey stick PANDAWA product can be used as a means of playing hockey for the novice player.

  2. The modified inverse hockey stick technique for adjuvant irradiation after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukolowicz, P.; Selerski, B.; Kuszewski, T.; Wieczorek, A.

    2004-01-01

    To present the technique of irradiation of post-mastectomy patients used in the Holycross Cancer Centre in Kielce.The paper presents a detailed description of the technique which is referred to as the 'modified inverse hockey stick technique (MIHS)'. The dosimetric characteristic of dose distribution for the MIHS technique is presented basing on dose distributions calculated for 40 patients. The measurements used to evaluate dose distribution included standard deviation of the dose in the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the percentage of the PTV volume receiving a dose larger than 110% and smaller than 90%; the lung volume received at least 20 Gy (LV20) and the heart volume received at least 30 Gy (HV30). The distribution of the electron beam energy is also presented. The standard deviation of the dose in the PTV was approx. 10% in a majority of patients. About 12% of the PTV volume received a dose more than 10% smaller than intended and about 10% of the PTV volume received a dose more than 10% greater than intended. For patients irradiated on the left side of the chest wall the LV20 was always lesser than 25% and for patients irradiated on the right side of the chest wall - always less than 35%, except for one patient, in whom it reached 37%. The HV30 was always below 8%. The MIHS technique is a safe and reliable modality. The main advantages of the technique include very convenient and easily repeated positioning of the patient and small doses applied to the organs at risk. The individually calculated bolus plays an important role in diminishing the dose to the lung and heart. The disadvantages of the technique include poor dose homogeneity within the PTV and long matching lines of the electron and photon beams. (author)

  3. Hypothenar hammer syndrome from ice hockey stick-handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Mohamed A; McDonald, Joey; Tittley, Jacques G

    2013-11-01

    Ulnar artery thrombosis and hypothenar hammer syndrome are rare vascular complications that could potentially occur with repeated blows or trauma to the hand. Although initially reported as an occupational hazard among laborers and craftsmen, it has been observed more recently among recreationalists and athletes. Until now, it has never been reported as a complication in ice hockey players. In this case report, a 26-year-old Canadian professional ice hockey player presented with acute dominant right hand paleness, coolness, and pain with hand use. The patient used a wooden hockey stick with a large knob of tape at the end of the handle, which he regularly gripped in the palm of his right hand to help with face-offs and general stick-handling. Sonographic evaluation demonstrated no arterial flow in the distal right ulnar artery distribution, and ulnar artery occlusion with no aneurysmal degeneration was confirmed by magnetic resonance angiogram. Intraarterial thrombolytic therapy was initiated, and subsequent serial angiograms demonstrated significant improvement in distal ulnar artery flow as well as recanalization of right hand deep palmar arch and digital arteries. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was maintained on therapeutic anticoagulation for 3 months prior to returning to playing ice hockey professionally, but with a padded glove and no tape knob at the handle tip. This case highlights a unique presentation of hockey stick-handling causing ulnar artery thrombosis that was likely from repeated palmar hypothenar trauma. Appropriate diagnostic imaging, early intraarterial thrombolysis, and postoperative surveillance and follow-up were crucial for the successful outcome in this patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel hockey-stick mesogens with the nematic, synclinic and anticlinic smectic C phase sequence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Vladimíra; Žurek, J.; Kozmik, V.; Svoboda, J.; Glogarová, Milada; Kroupa, Jan; Pociecha, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 8 (2008), 1023-1036 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : liquid crystals * synclinic and anticlinic ordering * hockey-stick mezogens Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.132, year: 2008

  5. The hockey-stick method to estimate evening dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilenko, Konstantin V; Verevkin, Evgeniy G; Antyufeev, Viktor S; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The onset of melatonin secretion in the evening is the most reliable and most widely used index of circadian timing in humans. Saliva (or plasma) is usually sampled every 0.5-1 hours under dim-light conditions in the evening 5-6 hours before usual bedtime to assess the dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO). For many years, attempts have been made to find a reliable objective determination of melatonin onset time either by fixed or dynamic threshold approaches. The here-developed hockey-stick algorithm, used as an interactive computer-based approach, fits the evening melatonin profile by a piecewise linear-parabolic function represented as a straight line switching to the branch of a parabola. The switch point is considered to reliably estimate melatonin rise time. We applied the hockey-stick method to 109 half-hourly melatonin profiles to assess the DLMOs and compared these estimates to visual ratings from three experts in the field. The DLMOs of 103 profiles were considered to be clearly quantifiable. The hockey-stick DLMO estimates were on average 4 minutes earlier than the experts' estimates, with a range of -27 to +13 minutes; in 47% of the cases the difference fell within ±5 minutes, in 98% within -20 to +13 minutes. The raters' and hockey-stick estimates showed poor accordance with DLMOs defined by threshold methods. Thus, the hockey-stick algorithm is a reliable objective method to estimate melatonin rise time, which does not depend on a threshold value and is free from errors arising from differences in subjective circadian phase estimates. The method is available as a computerized program that can be easily used in research settings and clinical practice either for salivary or plasma melatonin values.

  6. Why do sleeping nematodes adopt a hockey-stick-like posture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Tramm

    Full Text Available A characteristic posture is considered one of the behavioral hallmarks of sleep, and typically includes functional features such as support for the limbs and shielding of sensory organs. The nematode C. elegans exhibits a sleep-like state during a stage termed lethargus, which precedes ecdysis at the transition between larval stages. A hockey-stick-like posture is commonly observed during lethargus. What might its function be? It was previously noted that during lethargus, C. elegans nematodes abruptly rotate about their longitudinal axis. Plausibly, these "flips" facilitate ecdysis by assisting the disassociation of the old cuticle from the new one. We found that body-posture during lethargus was established using a stereotypical motor program and that body bends during lethargus quiescence were actively maintained. Moreover, flips occurred almost exclusively when the animals exhibited a single body bend, preferentially in the anterior or mid section of the body. We describe a simple biomechanical model that imposes the observed lengths of the longitudinally directed body-wall muscles on an otherwise passive elastic rod. We show that this minimal model is sufficient for generating a rotation about the anterior-posterior body axis. Our analysis suggests that posture during lethargus quiescence may serve a developmental role in facilitating flips and that the control of body wall muscles in anterior and posterior body regions are distinct.

  7. Ground reaction forces produced by two different hockey skating arm swing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward-Ellis, Julie; Alexander, Marion J L; Glazebrook, Cheryl M; Leiter, Jeff

    2017-10-01

    The arm swing in hockey skating can have a positive effect on the forces produced by each skate, and the resulting velocity from each push off. The main purpose of this study was to measure the differences in ground reaction forces (GRFs) produced from an anteroposterior versus a mediolateral style hockey skating arm swing. Twenty-four elite-level female hockey players performed each technique while standing on a ground-mounted force platform, and all trials were filmed using two video cameras. Force data was assessed for peak scaled GRFs in the frontal and sagittal planes, and resultant GRF magnitude and direction. Upper limb kinematics were assessed from the video using Dartfish video analysis software, confirming that the subjects successfully performed two distinct arm swing techniques. The mediolateral arm swing used a mean of 18.38° of glenohumeral flexion/extension and 183.68° of glenohumeral abduction/adduction while the anteroposterior technique used 214.17° and 28.97° respectively. The results of this study confirmed that the mediolateral arm swing produced 37% greater frontal plane and 33% less sagittal plane GRFs than the anteroposterior arm swing. The magnitudes of the resultant GRFs were not significantly different between the two techniques; however, the mediolateral technique produced a resultant GRF with a significantly larger angle from the direction of travel (44.44°) as compared to the anteroposterior technique (31.60°). The results of this study suggest that the direction of GRFs produced by the mediolateral arm swing more closely mimic the direction of lower limb propulsion during the skating stride.

  8. Ice hockey injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the distribution and determinants of injuries reported in the pediatric ice hockey literature, and suggests potential injury prevention strategies and directions for further research. Thirteen electronic databases, the ISI Web of Science, and 'grey literature' databases were searched using a combination of Medical Subject Headings and text words to identify potentially relevant articles. The bibliographies of selected studies were searched to identify additional articles. Studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A comparison between studies on this topic area was difficult due to the variability in research designs, definition of injury, study populations, and measurements used to assess injury. The majority of injuries were sustained during games compared with practices. The two most commonly reported injuries were sprains/strains and contusions. Players competing at the Minor hockey, High School, and Junior levels of competition sustained most of their injuries to the upper extremity, head, and lower extremity, respectively. The primary mechanism of injury was body checking, followed by stick and puck contact. The frequency of catastrophic eye injuries has been significantly reduced with the world-wide mandation of full facial protection for all Minor hockey players. Specific hockey-related injury risk factors are poorly delineated and rarely studied among pediatric ice hockey players leaving large gaps in the knowledge of appropriate prevention strategies. Risk management strategies should be focused at avoiding unnecessary foreseeable risk, and controlling the risks inherent to the sport. Suggestions for injury prevention and future research are discussed.

  9. New Surface-Treatment Technique of Concrete Structures Using Crack Repair Stick with Healing Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hong-Gi; Ryou, Jae-Suk

    2016-08-04

    This study focused on the development of a crack repair stick as a new repair method along with self-healing materials that can be used to easily repair the cracks in a concrete structure at the construction site. In developing this new repair technique, the self-healing efficiency of various cementitious materials was considered. Likewise, a crack repair stick was developed to apply to concrete structures with 0.3 mm or lower crack widths. The crack repair stick was made with different materials, such as cement, an expansive material (C 12 A₇), a swelling material, and calcium carbonate, to endow it with a self-healing property. To verify the performance of the crack repair stick for concrete structures, two types of procedures (field experiment and field absorption test) were carried out. As a result of such procedures, it was concluded that the developed crack repair stick could be used on concrete structures to reduce repair expenses and for the improved workability, usability, and serviceability of such structures. On the other hand, to evaluate the self-healing performance of the crack repair stick, various tests were conducted, such as the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity test, the water tightness test, the water permeability test, observation via a microscope, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. From the results, it is found that water leakage can be prevented and that the durability of a concrete structure can be improved through self-healing. Also, it was verified that the cracks were perfectly closed after 28 days due to application of the crack repair stick. These results indicate the usability of the crack repair stick for concrete structures, and its self-healing efficiency.

  10. La eficacia del efecto látigo en el drag flick en el hockey hierba The effectiveness of the bullwhip effect in the Drag-flick in field hockey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. López de Subijana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    El penalty córner es una de las jugadas más importantes en el hockey hierba. El drag-flick es la técnica de golpeo más eficaz en las jugadas de penalty córner (McLaughin, 1997. Los objetivos del presente estudio fueron el describir los parámetros cinemáticos del drag-flick en jugadores de nivel internacional y analizar las diferencias intergénero. La muestra fueron trece sujetos, un modelo, seis hombres y seis mujeres. El sistema de captura automático VICON registró 20 lanzamientos de cada jugador con una frecuencia de muestreo de 250 Hz. Las velocidades máximas angulares de las caderas, hombros y stick  fueron superiores  (p<0.01 en el modelo que en ambos grupos de género. Mediante la comparación estadística del modelo con ambos grupos de género se han podido determinar las claves de este gesto técnico, siendo necesario un movimiento hacia atrás del stick (efecto látigo antes de la aceleración de caderas y hombros, para terminar el gesto con la máxima aceleración del stick.
    Palabras Clave: Biomecánica, drag-flick, hockey hierba, cinemática

    The penalty corner is one of the most important goal plays in field hockey. The drag-flick is more efficient than other techniques when playing a penalty corner. The aims of this study were to describe the kinematics of international field hockey players during the drag-flick and to analyse gender differences. Thirteen participants, one male drag-flicker, six males and six females participated in the study. VICON optoelectronic system measured the kinematic parameters from the drag-flick with six cameras sampling at 250 Hz. Twenty trials were captured from each subject. Ball velocity at release, hips maximum angular velocity, stick minimum and maximum angular velocities were higher (p<0.01 in the drag-flicker than in both gender groups. Comparing with the drag-flicker we have found the cues of the skill, being necessary a

  11. Expert-novice differences in brain function of field hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimshurst, Z L; Sowden, P T; Wright, M

    2016-02-19

    The aims of this study were to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a hockey anticipation task. Thirty participants (15 hockey players, 15 non-hockey players) lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted the direction of an oncoming shot in either a hockey or a badminton scenario. Video clips were temporally occluded either 160 ms before the shot was made or 60 ms after the ball/shuttle left the stick/racquet. Behavioral data showed a significant hockey expertise×video-type interaction in which hockey experts were superior to novices with hockey clips but there were no significant differences with badminton clips. The imaging data on the other hand showed a significant main effect of hockey expertise and of video type (hockey vs. badminton), but the expertise×video-type interaction did not survive either a whole-brain or a small-volume correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of the expertise main effect revealed that when watching hockey clips, experts showed greater activation in the rostral inferior parietal lobule, which has been associated with an action observation network, and greater activation than novices in Brodmann areas 17 and 18 and middle frontal gyrus when watching badminton videos. The results provide partial support both for domain-specific and domain-general expertise effects in an action anticipation task. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of low energy electron beam irradiation techniques. Application to sticking adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hisashi; Enomoto, Ichiro

    1997-01-01

    Sticking adhesives were developed by use of blend with electron beam crosslinked type stylene - isoprene block copolymer (SIS) as a basic component. The sticking adhesive has object to change from sticking to adhesion and peeling by irradiation. SIS was blended with reactive monomer and resins or alicyclic hydrocarbon as tackifier and investigated. The results showed change of peel force by irradiation was influenced by compatibility, composition and the quality of objective materials. SIS such as Kraton D1320X (Shell Co. Ltd.) and tackifier such as rosin (ROSIN) and arcone P100 (ARP) were used at the basic ratio SIS/tackifier=64. Modified urethane acrylate (UA306H), isobornyl acrylate (IBXA), epoxy ester (3002M), lauryl methacrylate (LM) and lauryl acrylate (LA) were used as monomer. The large changes of peel force were observed by blends with UA306H or 3002M of which properties were incompatibility. These results indicated that we made possible to control the peel force by irradiation by means of adding the specific incompatibility monomer to the mixture of SIS and tackifier. (S.Y.)

  13. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  14. Tsunami Hockey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    An important issue that vexes tsunami warning centers (TWCs) is when to cancel a tsunami warning once it is in effect. Emergency managers often face a variety of pressures to allow the public to resume their normal activities, but allowing coastal populations to return too quickly can put them at risk. A TWC must, therefore, exercise caution when cancelling a warning. Kim and Whitmore (2013) show that in many cases a TWC can use the decay of tsunami oscillations in a harbor to forecast when its amplitudes will fall to safe levels. This technique should prove reasonably robust for local tsunamis (those that are potentially dangerous within only 100 km of their source region) and for regional tsunamis (whose danger is limited to within 1000km of the source region) as well. For ocean-crossing destructive tsunamis such as the 11 March 2011 Tohoku tsunami, however, this technique may be inadequate. When a tsunami propagates across the ocean basin, it will encounter topographic obstacles such as seamount chains or coastlines, resulting in coherent reflections that can propagate great distances. When these reflections reach previously-impacted coastlines, they can recharge decaying tsunami oscillations and make them hazardous again. Warning center scientists should forecast sea-level records for 24 hours beyond the initial tsunami arrival in order to observe any potential reflections that may pose a hazard. Animations are a convenient way to visualize reflections and gain a broad geographic overview of their impacts. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has developed tools based on tsunami simulations using the RIFT tsunami forecast model. RIFT is a linear, parallelized numerical tsunami propagation model that runs very efficiently on a multi-CPU system (Wang et al, 2012). It can simulate 30-hours of tsunami wave propagation in the Pacific Ocean at 4 arc minute resolution in approximately 6 minutes of real time on a 12-CPU system. Constructing a 30-hour animation using 1

  15. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Robert J; Gill, Dawn P; Zou, Guangyong; DE Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Bartol, Cassandra; Danylchuk, Karen; Hunt, Kate; Wyke, Sally; Gray, Cindy M; Bunn, Christopher; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-12-01

    Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 wk and 12 months. Male fans of two ice hockey teams (35-65 yr; body mass index ≥28 kg·m) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-wk active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behavior change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-wk minimally supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity, private online social network, standardized e-mails, booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 wk (both groups) and 12 months (intervention group only) included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, and self-rated health. Eighty men were recruited in 4 wk; trial retention was >80% at 12 wk and >75% at 12 months. At 12 wk, the intervention group lost 3.6 kg (95% confidence interval, -5.26 to -1.90 kg) more than the comparator group (P < 0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet, and self-rated health at 12 wk; most sustained to 12 months. Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and, thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

  16. An Australasian hockey stick and associated climate wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, David; Gergis, Joelle; Neukom, Raphael; Gallant, Ailie

    2017-04-01

    Multiproxy warm season (September-February) temperature reconstructions are presented for the combined land-ocean region of Australasia (0°-50°S, 110°E-180°) covering the last millennium (1000-2001CE). Using between 2 (R2) and 28 (R28) paleoclimate records, four 1000-member ensemble reconstructions of regional temperature are developed using four different statistical methods: principal component regression (PCR), composite plus scale (CPS), Bayesian hierarchical models (LNA), and pairwise comparison (PaiCo). The reconstructions are then compared with a three-member ensemble of GISS-E2-R climate model simulations and independent paleoclimate records. Decadal fluctuations in Australasian temperatures are remarkably similar between the four reconstruction methods. There are, however, differences in the amplitude of temperature variations between the different statistical methods and proxy networks. When the largest R28 network is used, the warmest 30-yr periods occur after 1950 in 77% of ensemble members over all methods. However, reconstructions based on only the longest records (R2 and R3 networks) indicate that single 30- and 10-yr periods of similar or slightly higher temperatures than in the late twentieth century may have occurred during the first half of the millennium. Regardless, the most recent instrumental temperatures (1985-2014) are above the 90th percentile of all 12 reconstruction ensembles (four reconstruction methods based on three proxy networks — R28, R3, and R2). An earlier manuscript describing this study and its results was accepted for publication in the Journal of Climate in May 2012, after two thorough rounds of review. However, as described by Gergis (2016), after the early online release of the paper, a typo in the methods section was identified. While the paper said the study had used "detrended" data - observed temperature data from which the longer-term trends had been removed - the study had in fact used raw data. Both raw and detrended data have been used in similar studies, and both are scientifically justifiable approaches. Instead of taking the easy way out and just correcting the single word in the page proof, we asked the publisher to put our paper on hold and remove the online version while we assessed the influence that the different method had on the results. Gergis (2016) describes the saga of attacks on the study and the authors by bloggers and online experts over the next four years, until the manuscript was finally accepted and published in July 2016 following a further three rounds of peer review and four new reviewers. This is another cautionary tale of the climate wars described by Mike Mann, efforts to discredit studies showing that recent large-scale warming is very likely outside the range of natural climate variability over the last millennium. Gergis, J., R. Neukom, A. J. E. Gallant and D. J. Karoly (2016) Australasian temperature reconstructions spanning the last millennium. J Clim., 29, 5365-5392. Gergis, J., (2016) How a single word sparked a four year sage of climate fact checking and blog backlash. The Conversation, 11 July 2016. https://theconversation.com/how-a-single-word-sparked-a-four-year-saga-of-climate-fact-checking-and-blog-backlash-62174

  17. Head-impact mechanisms in men's and women's collegiate ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany J; Machan, Jason T; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Burmeister, Emily; Crisco, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Concussion injury rates in men's and women's ice hockey are reported to be among the highest of all collegiate sports. Quantification of the frequency of head impacts and the magnitude of head acceleration as a function of the different impact mechanisms (eg, head contact with the ice) that occur in ice hockey could provide a better understanding of this high injury rate. To quantify and compare the per-game frequency and magnitude of head impacts associated with various impact mechanisms in men's and women's collegiate ice hockey players. Cohort study. Collegiate ice hockey rink. Twenty-three men and 31 women from 2 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I ice hockey teams. We analyzed magnitude and frequency (per game) of head impacts per player among impact mechanisms and between sexes using generalized mixed linear models and generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures within players. Participants wore helmets instrumented with accelerometers to allow us to collect biomechanical measures of head impacts sustained during play. Video footage from 53 games was synchronized with the biomechanical data. Head impacts were classified into 8 categories: contact with another player; the ice, boards or glass, stick, puck, or goal; indirect contact; and contact from celebrating. For men and women, contact with another player was the most frequent impact mechanism, and contact with the ice generated the greatest-magnitude head accelerations. The men had higher per-game frequencies of head impacts from contact with another player and contact with the boards than did the women (P < .001), and these impacts were greater in peak rotational acceleration (P = .027). Identifying the impact mechanisms in collegiate ice hockey that result in frequent and high-magnitude head impacts will provide us with data that may improve our understanding of the high rate of concussion in the sport and inform injury-prevention strategies.

  18. Swimming literacy field hockey woman player ground.

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming literacy field hockey woman player ground. Objectives: To obtain and analyze data on the level ground swimming literacy field hockey woman player. Their perception swimming literacy for life, the use of non-specific regeneration and as a training resource. Methods: Analysis of scientific literature, survey, case study, data analysis and graphical presentation of results. Results of the work: field hockey player as swimming literate, benefits swimming but not used as a means of...

  19. Coste energético del dribling en hockey sobre patines

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Dr. Alfonso; Balagué, Dra. Natàlia

    1997-01-01

    El objetivo del presente estudio ha sido analizar y comparar el coste energético del dribling en hockey sobre patines con respecto a la acción de patinar. Doce jugadores amateurs bien entrenados han realizado, durante cinco minutos a 11, 13 y 15 km/h, patinaje solamente y patinaje mientras driblaban la bola con el stick. En ambos casos se evaluaron directamente y compararon consumo de oxígeno, ventilación, frecuencia cardíaca y nivel de percepción subjetiva del esfuerzo. Las variables fisioló...

  20. Optimization of the Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) weight loss and healthy lifestyle program for male hockey fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Wendy; Gill, Dawn P; Sibbald, Shannon L; Riggin, Brendan; Pulford, Roseanne W; Scott, Ryan; Danylchuk, Karen; Gray, Cindy M; Wyke, Sally; Bunn, Christopher; Petrella, Robert J

    2017-11-28

    The health outcomes of men continue to be poorer than women globally. Challenges in addressing this problem include difficulties engaging men in weight loss programs as they tend to view these programs as contrary to the masculine narrative of independence and self-reliance. Researchers have been turning towards sports fans to engage men in health promotion programs as sports fans are typically male, and tend to have poor health habits. Developed from the highly successful gender-sensitized Football Fans in Training program, Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) recruited 80 male hockey fans of the London Knights and Sarnia Sting who were overweight or obese into a weekly, 90-minute classroom education and group exercise program held over 12 weeks; a 40-week minimally-supported phase followed. A process evaluation of the Hockey FIT program was completed alongside a pragmatic randomized controlled trial and outcome evaluation in order to fully explore the acceptability of the Hockey FIT program from the perspectives of coaches delivering and participants engaged in the program. Data sources included attendance records, participant focus groups, coach interviews, assessment of fidelity (program observations and post-session coach reflections), and 12-month participant interviews. Coaches enjoyed delivering the program and found it simple to deliver. Men valued being among others of similar body shape and similar weight loss goals, and found the knowledge they gained through the program helped them to make and maintain health behaviour changes. Suggested improvements include having more hockey-related information and activities, greater flexibility with timing of program delivery, and greater promotion of technology support tools. We confirmed Hockey FIT was an acceptable "gender-sensitized" health promotion program for male hockey fans who were overweight or obese. Minor changes were required for optimization, which will be evaluated in a future definitive trial

  1. Differences in Lower Body Kinematics during Forward Treadmill Skating Between Two Different Hockey Skate Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike R. Hellyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in ankle flexibility and skating technique between a traditional hockey skate boot and a hockey skate boot with a flexible rear tendon guard. Skating technique was further investigated at different speeds to give insight on how skating technique alters as skating speed is increased. Methods: Eight elite hockey players were selected for the present study, which was conducted while skating on an Endless Ice Skating Treadmill.  Variables were recorded using a three-camera setup and measured from video records at five selected treadmill speeds using the Dartfish Team Pro v6 software.  Kinematic variables were then compared between the two skate designs with a doubly multivariate repeated measures design.  Statistical significance was set at p<0.05.  Results: Post hoc univariate tests comparing skate designs displayed significant increases in plantar flexion, plantar flexion angular velocity, hip extension, hip extension angular velocity, stride length, and stride velocity while participants were wearing the skates that had a flexible rear tendon guard.  Significant increases were also displayed in plantar flexion, plantar flexion angular velocity, knee extension, knee extension angular velocity, hip extension, hip extension angular velocity, hip abduction range of motion, hip abduction angular velocity, stride width, stride length, and stride velocity as the treadmill speed increased. There was also a significant decrease in the time the skate was in contact with the treadmill as treadmill speed increased. Conclusion: The results suggested that while skating forward, hockey players could improve their hockey skating technique by using hockey skates that have a flexible rear tendon guard.  This flexible tendon guard improved skating technique by increasing the time of force application to the ice by increasing the range of ankle plantar flexion during propulsion of the

  2. Sticking it to Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellie Collier

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath & Dan Heath I always feel the need to preface my praise for this book with a little background. I’ve read a slew of best sellers on behavior. I started when a friend was raving about Malcolm Gladwell. I picked up Blink [...

  3. Sticking it to Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Ellie Collier

    2008-01-01

    Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath & Dan Heath I always feel the need to preface my praise for this book with a little background. I’ve read a slew of best sellers on behavior. I started when a friend was raving about Malcolm Gladwell. I picked up Blink [...

  4. Impact of visors on eye and orbital injuries in the National Hockey League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Zurakowski, David; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2014-06-01

    Eye and orbital injuries are a significant risk to professional hockey league players and have resulted in career-ending injuries. The goal of this study was to determine the incidence, value lost, mechanism, and effect of visors on eye and orbital injuries over the last 10 National Hockey League (NHL) seasons: 2002-2003 to 2012-2013. Retrospective case-control study. Participants were 8741 NHL players who had played at least 1 game during the last 10 seasons. Using The Sports Network (TSN), ProSportsTransactions, and the Sporting News Hockey Register, NHL players were searched to identify eye and orbital injuries. The mechanism of injury was obtained from media reports and direct observation from online videos. The number of players wearing visors each year was obtained from The Hockey News annual visor survey. A total of 149 eye or orbital injuries over the last 10 seasons resulted in an overall incidence of 2.48 per 10 000 athlete exposures. A total of 1120 missed games led to a lost financial value of more than $33 million. Visor use among players grew from 32% in 2002-2003 to 73% in 2012-2013, and there was a significantly increased risk for having an eye or orbital injury when a visor was not worn (OR 4.23, 95% CI 2.84-6.30). Most injuries were a result of being hit by a deflected or direct puck (37%) followed by being struck by a high stick (28%). Players who did not wear a visor were found to be involved in more fights, hits, and penalty minutes (p < 0.001). Eye and orbital injuries are mostly accidental in nature and represent a significant risk and cost to the NHL and its players. Eye and orbital injuries are significantly more likely in players who do not wear visors. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The physics of a popsicle stick bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautel, Jérémy; Bourges, Andréane; Caussarieu, Aude; Plihon, Nicolas; Taberlet, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    Popsicle sticks can be interlocked in the so-called "cobra weave" to form a chain under tension. When one end of the chain is released, the sticks rapidly disentangle, forming a traveling wave that propagates down the chain. In this paper, the properties of the traveling front are studied experimentally, and classical results from the theory of elasticity allow for a dimensional analysis of the height and speed of the traveling wave. The study presented here can help undergraduate students familiarize themselves with experimental techniques of image processing, and it also demonstrates the power of dimensional analysis and scaling laws.

  6. Popsicle-Stick Cobra Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jean-Philippe; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Chevy, Frédéric

    2017-08-25

    The cobra wave is a popular physical phenomenon arising from the explosion of a metastable grillage made of popsicle sticks. The sticks are expelled from the mesh by releasing the elastic energy stored during the weaving of the structure. Here we analyze both experimentally and theoretically the propagation of the wave front depending on the properties of the sticks and the pattern of the mesh. We show that its velocity and its shape are directly related to the recoil imparted to the structure by the expelled sticks. Finally, we show that the cobra wave can only exist for a narrow range of parameters constrained by gravity and rupture of the sticks.

  7. Skating start propulsion: three-dimensional kinematic analysis of elite male and female ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Jaymee R; Robbins, Shawn M K; Dixon, Philippe C; Renaud, Philippe J; Turcotte, René A; Wu, Tom; Pearsall, David J

    2017-09-01

    The forward skating start is a fundamental skill for male and female ice hockey players. However, performance differences by athlete's sex cannot be fully explained by physiological variables; hence, other factors such as skating technique warrant examination. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the body movement kinematics of ice hockey skating starts between elite male and female ice hockey participants. Male (n = 9) and female (n = 10) elite ice hockey players performed five forward skating start accelerations. An 18-camera motion capture system placed on the arena ice surface captured full-body kinematics during the first seven skating start steps within 15 meters. Males' maximum skating speeds were greater than females. Skating technique sex differences were noted: in particular, females presented ~10° lower hip abduction throughout skating stance as well as ~10° greater knee extension at initial ice stance contact, conspicuously followed by a brief cessation in knee extension at the moment of ice contact, not evident in male skaters. Further study is warranted to explain why these skating technique differences exist in relation to factors such as differences in training, equipment, performance level, and anthropometrics.

  8. Are Canadian-born Major League Baseball players more likely to bat left-handed? A partial test of the hockey-influence on batting hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, John; Chirico, Daniele; Li, Yao-Chuen; Bremer, Emily; Graham, Jeffrey D

    2018-01-01

    It has been suggested that Canadian-born Major League Baseball (MLB) players are more likely to bat left-handed, possibly owing to the fact that they learn to play ice hockey before baseball, and that there is no clear hand-preference when shooting with a hockey stick; approximately half of all ice hockey players shoot left. We constructed a database on active (i.e., October, 2016) MLB players from four countries/regions based on place of birth (Canada, United States of America [USA], Dominican Republic and South Asia [i.e., Japan, Taiwan and South Korea]), including information on which hand they use to bat and throw. We also extracted information on all Canadian-born MLB players, dating back to 1917. Our results confirm that the proportion of left-handed batters born in Canada is higher when compared to the other countries selected; also, since 1917, the proportion of Canadian MLB players who bat left has been consistently higher than the league average. We also compared the proportion of left-handed batters in Canada with players born in states in the USA grouped into high, average and low based on hockey participation. The proportion of MLB players born in states with a high level of hockey participation were more likely to bat left, although the differences were significant at trend level only (p bat left-handed, this did not correspond with a greater left-hand dominance, as determined by throwing hand. In conclusion, the present study confirms that Canadian-born MLB players are more likely to bat left-handed when compared to American, Dominican Republic and South Asian-born MLB players, providing partial support for the hockey influence on batting hypothesis.

  9. Craft Stick Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  10. Body composition of italian female hockey players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Pavan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this work the anthropometric features and the body composition of Italian hockey players, members of the Female National team, were analysed. The purpose of the research was to verify if morphological features could influence the performance of different positional groups. Materials and Methods: Each player was measured for her total and sitting height, weight, 9 skinfolds thickness and bioelectrical impedance analysis. Different equations were used to calculate the Fat% from skinfolds thickness. Results: Average height is not a crucial advantage for this sport. On the contrary the proportion trunk-limb seems to play an important role for the performance of the midfield players. Percentage of body fat of the hockey players was lower than the Fat% of the non-athletes women of the same age. Significant differences were found between Fat% determined by skinfolds thickness and Fat% obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that there are significant differences in anthropometric features and in body composition between positional groups, stressing the importance of a specific training program. Keywords: field hockey, bioelectrical impedance, skinfolds thickness, anthropometry.

  11. Hockey lines for simulation-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topps, David; Ellaway, Rachel; Kupsh, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Simulation-based health professional education is often limited in accommodating large numbers of students. Most organisations do not have enough simulation suites or staff to support growing demands. We needed to find ways to make simulation sessions more accommodating for larger groups of learners, so that more than a few individuals could be active in a simulation scenario at any one time. Moreover, we needed to make the experience meaningful for all participating learners. We used the metaphor of (ice) hockey lines and substitution 'on the fly' to effectively double the numbers of learners that can be actively engaged at once. Team players must communicate clearly, and observe keenly, so that currently playing members understand what is happening from moment to moment and incoming substitutes can take over their roles seamlessly. Most organisations do not have enough simulation suites or staff to support growing demands We found that this hockey lines approach to simulation-based team scenarios will raise learners' levels of engagement, reinforce good crew resource management (CRM) practices, enhance closed-loop communication, and help learners to understand their cognitive biases and limitations when working in high-pressure situations. During our continuing refinement of the hockey-lines approach, we developed a number of variations on the basic activity model, with various benefits and applications. Both students and teachers have been enthusiastically positive about this approach when it was introduced at our various courses and participating institutions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Knee joint position sense of roller hockey players: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, João; Lopes, Diogo; Lourenço, Joaquim; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare knee joint position sense of roller hockey players with an age-matched group of non-athletes. Forty-three male participants voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study: 21 roller hockey players (mean age: 23.2 ± 4.2 years old, mean weight: 81.8 ± 9.8 kg, mean height: 180.5 ± 4.1 cm) and 22 age-matched non-athletes (mean age: 23.7 ± 3.9 years old, mean weight: 85.0 ± 6.2 kg, mean height: 181.5 ± 5.0 cm). Knee joint position sense of the dominant limb was evaluated using a technique of open-kinetic chain and active knee positioning. Joint position sense was reported using absolute, relative and variable angular errors. The main results indicated that the group of roller hockey players showed significantly lower absolute (2.4 ± 1.2º vs. 6.5 ± 3.2º, p ≤ 0.001) and relative (1.7 ± 2.1º vs. 5.8 ± 4.4º, p ≤ 0.001) angular errors in comparison with the non-athletes group. In conclusion, the results from this present study suggest that proprioceptive acuity, assessed by measuring joint position sense, is increased in roller hockey players. The enhanced proprioception of the roller hockey players could contribute to injury prevention and improved performance during sporting activities.

  13. Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) pilot study protocol: a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program for overweight and obese male hockey fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Dawn P; Blunt, Wendy; De Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Hunt, Kate; Zou, Guangyong; Sibbald, Shannon; Danylchuk, Karen; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Gray, Cindy M; Wyke, Sally; Bunn, Christopher; Petrella, Robert J

    2016-10-19

    Effective approaches that engage men in weight loss and lifestyle change are important because of worldwide increases, including in Canada, in obesity and chronic diseases. Football Fans in Training (FFIT), developed in Scotland, successfully tackled these problems by engaging overweight/obese male football fans in sustained weight loss and positive health behaviours, through program deliveries at professional football stadia. Aims: 1) Adapt FFIT to hockey within the Canadian context and integrate with HealtheSteps™ (evidence-based lifestyle program) to develop Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT); 2) Explore potential for Hockey FIT to help overweight/obese men lose weight and improve other outcomes by 12 weeks, and retain these improvements to 12 months; 3) Evaluate feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight/obese men; 4) Evaluate acceptability of Hockey FIT; and 5) Conduct program optimization via a process evaluation. We conducted a two-arm pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial (pRCT) whereby 80 overweight/obese male hockey fans (35-65 years; body-mass index ≥28 kg/m 2 ) were recruited through their connection to two junior A hockey teams (London and Sarnia, ON) and randomized to Intervention (Hockey FIT) or Comparator (Wait-List Control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-week Active Phase (classroom instruction and exercise sessions delivered weekly by trained coaches) and a 40-week Maintenance Phase. Data collected at baseline and 12 weeks (both groups), and 12 months (Intervention only), will inform evaluation of the potential of Hockey FIT to help men lose weight and improve other health outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability will be assessed using data from self-reports at screening and baseline, program fidelity (program observations and coach reflections), participant focus group discussions, coach interviews, as well as program questionnaires and interviews with participants. This information will be analyzed to inform program

  14. Physical profiles of elite male field hockey and soccer players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The physical demands of field hockey and soccer, based on match analysis, are comparable. As a consequence many exercise scientists and coaches have started to use the same type of field tests for hockey and soccer for the purposes of talent identification and training prescription. The validity of this ...

  15. Bodychecking rules and concussion in elite hockey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Donaldson

    Full Text Available Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010-11 and 2011-12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL. A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL, was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009-10 to 2011-12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50. When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32. The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009-10 than in 2010-11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83, but did not increase from 2010-11 to 2011-12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38. 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries.

  16. Biofuel from jute stick by pyrolysis technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, J.; Parveen, M.; Islam, M. R.; Haniu, H.; Takai, K.

    2017-06-01

    In this study the conversion of jute stick into biofuels and chemicals by externally heated fixed-bed pyrolysis reactor have been taken into consideration. The solid jute stick was characterized through proximate and ultimate analysis, gross calorific values and thermo-gravimetric analysis to investigate their suitability as feedstock for this consideration. The solid biomass particles were fed into the reactor by gravity feed type reactor feeder. The products were oil, char and gases. The liquid and char products were collected separately while the gas was flared into the atmosphere. The process conditions were varied by fixed-bed temperature; feed stock particle size, N2 gas flow rate and running time. All parameters were found to influence the product yields significantly. The maximum liquid yields were 50 wt% of solid jute stick at reactor temperature 425°C for N2 gas flow rate 6 l/min, feed particle size 1180-1700 µm and running time 30 min. Liquid products obtained at these conditions were characterized by physical properties, chemical analysis and GC-MS techniques. The results show that it is possible to obtained liquid products that are comparable to petroleum fuels and valuable chemical feedstock from the selected biomass if the pyrolysis conditions are chosen accordingly.

  17. Fuerza lumbar en jugadores de hockey hierba

    OpenAIRE

    Til Pérez, Lluís; Barceló Peiró, Oriol; Pomés Díes, Teresa; Martínez Navas, Roberto; Galilea Ballarini, Pedro; Bellver Vives, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    Introducción: El dolor lumbar tiene una alta prevalencia entre los deportistas, se ha relacionado con déficits en la fuerza extensora lumbar, y el hecho de padecerlo representa un obstáculo importante para la práctica de deportes de alta intensidad. Método: Se ha medido la fuerza lumbar en 2 grupos de practicantes de hockey hierba mediante máquina MedX® y un test de resistencia isométrico lumbar. Resultados: Entre ambos grupos los resultados han sido muy homogéneos....

  18. Creation of a strategic framework for global development of ice hockey

    OpenAIRE

    Nieminen, Aku

    2016-01-01

    The International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) is the international governing body of ice hockey and inline hockey. Among many responsibilities and objectives, one of the main tasks of the IIHF is to develop ice hockey on a global scale. The IIHF has 74 Member National Associations which can benefit from the development programs of the IIHF. These development programs have the purpose of assisting and supporting the National Association in the domestic development of ice hockey in their count...

  19. An on-ice measurement approach to analyse the biomechanics of ice hockey skating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Buckeridge

    Full Text Available Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High and nine low caliber (Low hockey players performed 30 m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65 to excellent (r>0.95 scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05. High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05. The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice.

  20. An on-ice measurement approach to analyse the biomechanics of ice hockey skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30 m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice.

  1. NHL Heavyweights: Narratives of Violence and Masculinity in Ice Hockey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjønndal Anne

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport is often considered a masculine area of social life, and few sports are more commonly associated with traditional norms of masculinity than ice hockey. Ice hockey is played with a great level of intensity and body contact. This is true for both men and women’s hockey. However, men’s ice hockey in particular has been subjected to criticism for its excessive violence. Sport has also been analyzed as an arena where boys and men learn masculine values, relations, and rituals, and is often linked to orthodox masculinity in particular. Tolerance for gender diversity and diverse forms of masculinity has generally increased during the last 30 years. However, orthodox masculinity seems to maintain a dominate position in sports, particularly in hyper-masculine sports such as ice hockey. In this article, narratives of masculinity and violence in professional ice hockey are a central focus. Through a narrative analysis of the biographies of two former National Hockey League (NHL players, Bob Probert and Derek Boogaard, this article explores how narratives of masculinity and violence among hockey players have been described and how these narratives tell stories of the interplay between masculinity and violence in modern sport. The analysis illustrates how the narratives of the lives and careers of these athletes provide insight into the many personal risks and implications athletes in highly masculine sporting environments face. The analysis also illustrates how the common acceptance (and sometimes encouragement of player violence and ‘violence against the self’ in ice hockey has led to many broken bodies, lives, and careers among professional male athletes.

  2. Stabilizing Stick-Slip Friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capozza, Rosario; Barel, Itay; Urbakh, Michael; Rubinstein, Shmuel M.; Fineberg, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Even the most regular stick-slip frictional sliding is always stochastic, with irregularity in both the intervals between slip events and the sizes of the associated stress drops. Applying small-amplitude oscillations to the shear force, we show, experimentally and theoretically, that the stick-slip periods synchronize. We further show that this phase locking is related to the inhibition of slow rupture modes which forces a transition to fast rupture, providing a possible mechanism for observed remote triggering of earthquakes. Such manipulation of collective modes may be generally relevant to extended nonlinear systems driven near to criticality.

  3. Incidence of concussions in youth ice hockey players

    OpenAIRE

    Linzmeier, Kathleen A.; LaBella, Cynthia R.

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the University of Pittsburg, University of Arkansas, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, and Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical College researched the incidence of concussions in youth hockey in relation to age and activity setting.

  4. Process Development for the Design and Manufacturing of Personalizable Mouth Sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Veronika M; Pölzer, Stephan; Nussbaum, Gerhard; Ernst, Waltraud; Major, Zoltan

    2017-01-01

    To increase the independence of people with reduced hand/arm functionality, a process to generate personalizable mouth sticks was developed based on the participatory design principle. In a web tool, anybody can choose the geometry and the materials of their mouth piece, stick and tip. Manufacturing techniques (e.g. 3D printing) and materials used in the process are discussed and evaluated.

  5. More Popsicle-Stick Multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkels, Andrejs

    1982-01-01

    A way to use tongue depressors in a model of multiplication is presented. The original intent was to use the sticks to teach about fractions, but "mistakes" in student responses led to new ideas. It is felt that teachers should use the model in teaching multiplication. (MP)

  6. Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Anthony P; Elbin, R J; Sufrinko, Alicia; Dakan, Scott; Bookwalter, Kylie; Price, Ali; Meehan, William P; Collins, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced collision sport that entails both intentional (ie, body checking) and incidental contact that may involve the head. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of concussions in relation to games/practices and age among competition-level youth ice hockey players (ages 12-18 years). Participants included 397 youth ice hockey players from Western Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; and Birmingham, Alabama, during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 youth ice hockey seasons. Incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of concussion were calculated for games/practices and age groups. A total of 23 369 (12 784 practice/10 585 game) athletic exposures (AEs) involving 37 medically diagnosed concussions occurred. More than 40% of concussions involved illegal contact. The combined IR for games and practices was 1.58 concussions per 1000 AEs. The IRR was 2.86 times (95% confidence interval 0.68-4.42) higher during games (2.49 per 1000 AEs) than practices (1.04 per 1000 AEs). The overall IR for concussion in youth ice hockey was comparable to those reported in other youth collision sports. The game-to-practice IRR was lower than previously reported in ice hockey and other youth sports, although more concussions per exposure occurred in games compared with practices. Younger players had a higher rate of concussions than older players. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Upper body strength and power are associated with shot speed in men's ice hockey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Bežák

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies that addressed shot speed in ice hockey have focused on the relationship between shot speed and variables such as a player's skills or hockey stick construction and its properties. There has been a lack of evidence that considers the relationship between shot speed and player strength, particularly in players at the same skill level. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between maximal puck velocity of two shot types (the wrist shot and the slap shot and players' upper body strength and power. Methods: Twenty male professional and semi-professional ice hockey players (mean age 23.3 ± 2.4 years participated in this study. The puck velocity was measured in five trials of the wrist shot and five trials of the slap shot performed by every subject. All of the shots were performed on ice in a stationary position 11.6 meters in front of an electronic device that measures the speed of the puck. The selected strength and power variables were: muscle power in concentric contraction in the countermovement bench press with 40 kg and 50 kg measured with the FiTRODyne Premium device; bench press one-repetition maximum; and grip strength measured by digital hand dynamometer. Results: The correlations between strength/power variables and the puck velocity in the wrist shot and the slap shot ranged between .29-.72 and .16-.62, respectively. Puck velocities produced by wrist shots showed significant correlations with bench press muscle power with 40 kg (p = .004 and 50 kg (p < .001; and one-repetition maximum in bench press (p = .004. The slap shot puck velocity was significantly associated with bench press muscle power with 40 kg (p = .014 and 50 kg (p = .004. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that there are significant associations between shot speed and upper body strength and power.

  8. Effect of ice surface size on collision rates and head impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Richard

    2005-03-01

    To determine if collision rates and head impacts in elite junior hockey differed between games played on the small North American ice surface (85 ft wide), an intermediate-size Finnish ice surface (94 ft wide), and the large standard international ice surface (100 ft wide). Videotape analysis of all games involving Team Canada from the 2002 (large ice, Czech Republic), 2003 (small ice, Canada), and 2004 (intermediate ice, Finland) World Junior Championships. All collisions were counted and separated into various categories (volitional player/player bodychecks, into boards or open ice, plus accidental/incidental player/boards, player/ice, head/stick, head/puck). Further subdivisions included collisions involving the head directly or indirectly and notably severe head impacts. Small, intermediate, and large ice surface mean collisions/game, respectively, were 295, 258, 222, total collisions; 251, 220, 181, volitional bodychecks; 126, 115, 88, into boards; 125, 106, 93, open ice; 71, 52, 44, total head; 44, 36, 30, indirect head; 26, 16, 13, direct head; and 1.3, 0.5, 0.3, severe head (P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice and intermediate-large ice differences in total collisions; P < 0.005 for small-large ice difference; P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice differences in head impacts; P < 0.01 for small-large ice differences in total and severe head impacts). There is a significant inverse correlation between ice size and collision rates in elite hockey, including direct, indirect, and severe head impacts. These findings suggest that uniform usage of the larger international rinks could reduce the risk of injury, and specifically, concussions in elite hockey by decreasing the occurrence of collisions and head impacts.

  9. The Assessment of Airway Maneuvers and Interventions in University Canadian Football, Ice Hockey, and Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J. Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Baylis, Penny-Jane; Troutman, Tracy; Aljufaili, Mahmood; Correa, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Managing an airway in an unconscious athlete is a lifesaving skill that may be made more difficult by the recent changes in protective equipment. Different airway maneuvers and techniques may be required to help ventilate an unconscious athlete who is wearing full protective equipment. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of different airway maneuvers with football, ice hockey, and soccer players wearing full protective equipment. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University sports medicine clinic. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 146 university varsity athletes, consisting of 62 football, 45 ice hockey, and 39 soccer players. Intervention(s): Athletes were assessed for different airway and physical characteristics. Three investigators then evaluated the effectiveness of different bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation techniques in supine athletes who were wearing protective equipment while inline cervical spine immobilization was maintained. Main Outcome Measure(s): The effectiveness of 1-person BVM ventilation (1-BVM), 2-person BVM ventilation (2-BVM), and inline immobilization and ventilation (IIV) was judged by each investigator for each athlete using a 4-point rating scale. Results: All forms of ventilation were least difficult in soccer players and most difficult in football players. When compared with 1-BVM, both 2-BVM and IIV were deemed more effective by all investigators for all athletes. Interference from the helmet and stabilizer were common reasons for difficult ventilation in football and ice hockey players. Conclusions: Sports medicine professionals should practice and be comfortable with different ventilation techniques for athletes wearing full equipment. The use of a new ventilation technique, termed inline immobilization and ventilation, may be beneficial, especially when the number of responders is limited. PMID:21391796

  10. A Volunteer program guidebook for sport managers organizing large scale ice hockey tournaments

    OpenAIRE

    Frison, Logan

    2010-01-01

    The guidebook is a tool to assist the tournament coordinator when recruting, training, and leading the best possible team of ice hockey volunteers to work at International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) tournaments and within the Sport Function - Ice Hockey events at Olympic Winter Games. The select volunteers are termed the ‘Ice Hockey Volunteers’ and consist of the six crews that make up the ‘Sport Team’ which work closely with the National Teams (athletes and team staff) and Officials (re...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Youth Ice Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnow, Theodore; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effect of ice resurfacer type on carboxyhemoglobin levels in youth hockey players. We hypothesized that players in arenas with electric resurfacers would have normal, stable carboxyhemoglobin levels during games, whereas those in arenas with internal combustion engine (IC) resurfacers would have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin levels. Prospective cohort study. Enclosed ice arenas in the northeastern United States. Convenience sample of players aged 8 to 18 years old in 16 games at different arenas. Eight arenas (37 players) used an IC ice resurfacer and 8 arenas (36 players) an electric resurfacer. Carboxyhemoglobin levels (SpCO) were measured using a pulse CO-oximeter before and after the game. Arena air was tested for carbon monoxide (CO) using a metered gas detector. Players completed symptom questionnaires. The change in SpCO from pregame to postgame was compared between players at arenas with electric versus IC resurfacers. Carbon monoxide was present at 6 of 8 arenas using IC resurfacers, levels ranged from 4 to 42 parts per million. Carbon monoxide was not found at arenas with electric resurfacers. Players at arenas with IC resurfacers had higher median pregame SpCO levels compared with those at electric arenas (4.3% vs 1%, P carboxyhemoglobin during games and have elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin levels compared with players at arenas with electric resurfacers. Electric resurfacers decrease the risk of CO exposure.

  12. Spinal mobility and trunk muscle strength in elite hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, S; Twomey, L

    1988-01-01

    Elite hockey players of both sexes from the Australian Institute of Sport were assessed for lumbar spine mobility, trunk flexion and back extensor muscle strength, hamstring flexibility and postural characteristics over a two year period. All the athletes were more mobile in rotation than the 'normal' West Australian population, and demonstrated flexible hamstrings and powerful back extensor muscles; trunk flexion was less strong initially, but improved after intervention in the form of a specific exercise programme, over the measurement period. A questionnaire disclosed that low back pain is a common complaint of hockey players, but rarely required intensive physical and medical treatment. The term 'hockey player's back' has been coined in recognition of the long flat thoracolumbar spine frequently noted in these subjects. Copyright © 1988 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  13. Social Problems in Canadian Ice Hockey: An Exploration Through Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogel Curtis A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While celebrated as a highly popular sport in Canada, there are many social problems existing within and around Canadian ice hockey. These problems are often overlooked and rarely depicted in academic and journalistic research on sport. These social problems include, but are not limited to: extreme violence resulting in injuries and death, hazing rituals, multiple types of sexual violence, drug abuse, financial corruption, as well as various forms of prejudice and discrimination. Prompted by pop-cultural depictions in films, this paper further identifies and explores social problems in Canadian ice hockey revealing the realism embedded within various seemingly fictional films.

  14. Creating a goaltending development manual for Belgium Ice Hockey

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the thesis and was to create a goalie development manual for the Royal Belgian Ice Hockey Federation (RBIHF). The manual will provide goalies and coaches a guide for developing players in the position. The manual aims to provide a technical resources for goalies and coaches on the skills that goalies need to focus on to allow them to improve their play. ! “The backbone of a hockey team”or “The most important position in sports” are two of many phrases that i...

  15. 16 CFR 1507.10 - Rockets with sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rockets with sticks. 1507.10 Section 1507.10... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.10 Rockets with sticks. Rockets with sticks (including skyrockets and bottle rockets) shall utilize a straight and rigid stick to provide a direct and stable flight. Such sticks shall...

  16. Development of Stick and Ball Sports on Gateball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indriyanti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to make product design development of stick and ball sports in gateball. The approach used in this study is a method of Research and Development. The subject of this research is the Central Java on gateball club event gateball in Semarang and Yogyakarta. Experts and expert expert gateball expert in mechanical engineering. The data analysis phase the work field, and the data analysis stage include observation, observation, interviews, and documentation of the test kefektifan products, expert judgment expert expert gateball and expert mechanical engineering expert. The results of this research are stick and ball exercise for beginner players gateball gateball. The result of the validator 3 expert expert from the expert gateball and expert mechanical engineering product validation data beginning the first phase obtained a score above 73 definitions of the criteria of “good”, on the second stage of the product validation data obtained a score above the 81 criteria for “excellent”. The results of the interviews to the development of gateball players 19 stick and ball gateball can not be used to play in a match and can be used for subsequent exercises but for beginners a product development tool model stick and ball gateball “ INC. “can be used to enhance the ability of basic techniques in motion game for players, gateball.

  17. Is hockey just a game? Contesting meanings of the ice hockey life projects through a career-threatening injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkainen, Noora J.; Ryba, Tatiana V.

    2017-01-01

    This study is situated within an existential–narrative theoretical framework to examine the impact of career-threatening injury on professional ice hockey players’ well-being and career construction. Professional ice hockey culture is construed as a privileged space characterised by hegemonic...... masculinity, fierce competition as well as high-risk behaviours often resulting in sports injuries. In this paper, we analyse two players’ life stories with a particular focus on injury as a boundary situation involving social and temporal breakdown and re-evaluation of meaning of sporting life projects...

  18. Learning control of a flight simulator stick

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, W.J.R.; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.; Vrielink, Koen H.J.; Wierda, G.J.; Borghuis, André

    1998-01-01

    Aimportant part of a flight simulator is its control loading system, which is the part that emulates the behaviour of an aircraft as experienced by the pilot through the stick. Such a system consists of a model of the aircraft that is to be simulated and a stick that is driven by an electric motor.

  19. A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

  20. Ice hockey arena: national pride or normal business?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Münich, Daniel; Humphreys, B. R.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2002), s. 11 ISSN 1211-3514 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : ice hockey arena * costs and benefits Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=6129219&site=ehost-live

  1. Gender in ice hockey: women in a male territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilenstam, K; Karp, S; Henriksson-Larsén, K

    2008-04-01

    This study investigates how female ice hockey players describe and explain their situation within as well as outside their sport. Information was obtained by semi-structured interviews with female ice hockey players. The results were analyzed in a gender perspective where the main starting point was the concepts of different levels of power relations in society developed by Harding and applied to sports by Kolnes (the symbolic, structural, and individual level). The study shows that the players appeared to share the traditional views of men and women. They also described gender differences in terms of financial and structural conditions as well as differences in ice hockey history. Even though the players described structural inequalities, they were quite content with their situation and the differences in conditions were not considered when they explained the gender differences in ice hockey performance. At the individual level, the players considered themselves different from other women and appeared to share the traditional views of femininity and masculinity. It has been suggested that performance of a sport traditionally associated with the other sex might alter the traditional view of men and women; however, our results lend little support to this suggestion.

  2. An intelligent talent recognition of male youth field hockey players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the most significant of physical fitness, anthro-energy intake and psychological variables in identifying the talented male youth field hockey players. 40 male players (age, 14.6 ± 1.2 years) from Terengganu sport academy were evaluated in different tests and measurements.

  3. The popsicle-stick cobra wave

    OpenAIRE

    Boucher , Jean-Philippe; Clanet , Christophe; Quéré , David; Chevy , Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The cobra wave is a popular physical phenomenon arising from the explosion of a metastable grillage made of popsicle sticks. The sticks are expelled from the mesh by releasing the elastic energy stored during the weaving of the structure. Here we analyse both experimentally and theoretically the propagation of the wave-front depending on the properties of the sticks and the pattern of the mesh. We show that its velocity and its shape are directly related to the recoil imparted to the structur...

  4. Nuclear energy and the greenhouse effect. A different hockey stick; Kernenergie en het broeikaseffect. Een andere hockeystick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm van Leeuwen, J.W. [Ceedata Consultancy, Chaam (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    This article takes a closer look at uranium mining. The nuclear system consists of conventional industrial processes that use fossil fuels, electricity and materials and cause CO2 emissions. Question arises about quantity and where the end points lie. [mk]. [Dutch] In dit artikel wordt de winning van uranium onder de loep genomen. Het nucleaire systeem bestaat uit conventionele industriele processen, die fossiele brandstoffen, elektriciteit en materialen verbruiken en CO2-emissie veroorzaken. De vraag is hoeveel en waar liggen de omslagpunten?.

  5. Common Ice Hockey Injuries and Treatment: A Current Concepts Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenthal, William; Kim, Michael; Holzshu, Robert; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Athiviraham, Aravind

    Injuries are common in ice hockey, a contact sport where players skate at high speeds on a sheet of ice and shoot a vulcanized rubber puck in excess of one hundred miles per hour. This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of concussions, injuries to the cervical spine, and lower and upper extremities as they pertain to hockey players. Soft tissue injury of the shoulder, acromioclavicular joint separation, glenohumeral joint dislocation, clavicle fractures, metacarpal fractures, and olecranon bursitis are discussed in the upper-extremity section of the article. Lower-extremity injuries reviewed in this article include adductor strain, athletic pubalgia, femoroacetabular impingement, sports hernia, medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, skate bite, and ankle sprains. This review is intended to aid the sports medicine physician in providing optimal sports-specific care to allow their athlete to return to their preinjury level of performance.

  6. Prevalence of Os Styloideum in National Hockey League Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greditzer, Harry G.; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Geannette, Christian S.; Hotchkiss, Robert N.; Kelly, Bryan T.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Os styloideum describes an accessory carpal ossicle between the trapezoid, the capitate, and the second and third metacarpals. Injuries to this tissue have been described as part of the carpal boss syndrome. While the etiology of os styloideum remains uncertain, it may represent a physiologic response to altered loading forces in the wrist, similar to the development of cam-type deformity in the hips of ice hockey players or the Bennett lesion in the shoulders of baseball pitchers. Hypothesis: Professional hockey players will have a higher prevalence of os styloideum compared with the general population. Study Design: Case series. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: A retrospective review of 16 professional hockey players from 4 different National Hockey League (NHL) teams who underwent unilateral imaging of the wrist was performed. Seventeen wrists were reviewed for the presence of os styloideum. Results: Thirteen of 16 players (81%) had an os styloideum, representing an increased prevalence compared with the general population. Previous clinical and cadaveric studies estimated a general prevalence of up to 19% (P < 0.001). For the 10 players who had their leading wrist scanned, 9 had an os styloideum (90%). Ten of 11 (91%) players demonstrated a bone marrow edema pattern within the metacarpal and the os styloideum on magnetic resonance imaging. There was no significant association between the presence of an os styloideum and the player’s position, leading wrist, or years in the league. Conclusion: There appears to be an increased prevalence of os styloideum among NHL players, and team physicians should consider this finding while formulating a differential diagnosis for dorsal wrist pain. Clinical Relevance: This study identified NHL players as having an increased prevalence of os styloideum compared with the general population. By doing so, these findings represent an opportunity to enhance our understanding of the etiology, clinical significance

  7. Computer Security: USB sticks - the silent killers

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    You've just found a USB stick in Restaurant 1. You'd like to return it … but who is the owner? Maybe the contents can tell you? Connect it to your laptop, and you might figure it out. But hold on, what if its content is dangerous…?   USB sticks are an excellent vehicle for infecting countless PCs and laptops. Years ago, several dozen laptops were infected during a conference when someone passed around a USB stick with flight departure information. Unfortunately, this stick was infected. Similarly, we have seen a domino effect of infections in the FP and EN departments after some USB sticks made the rounds, infecting one PC after another. In the end, a massive number of PCs had to be reinstalled. Some USB sticks are even worse. They pretend to be “just a keyboard” (named “RubberDucky”) and, once inserted, they execute a pre-programmed sequence of keystrokes intended to extract information from your computer or take ...

  8. Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle θ, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large θ. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

  9. PIGE-PIXE analysis of chewing sticks of pharmacological importance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padua (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Makanju, O.V. [Drug Research and Production Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy, Obafemi Awolowo University (O.A.U.), Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Haque, A.M.I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padua (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Buoso, M.C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padua (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padua (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro]|[Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Cherubini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padua (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padua (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro]|[Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    1996-06-01

    PIGE and PIXE techniques were employed for the determination of the major, minor and trace elemental concentrations in chewing sticks of pharmacological importance namely: Butyrospermum paradoxum, Garcinia kola, Distemonanthus benthamianus, Bridelia ferruginea, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Terminalia glaucescens and Fagara rubescens, respectively. The concentration of fluorine which is very important for human dental enamel was specially determined using the {sup 19}F(p,p`{gamma}){sup 19}F reaction. For decades these chewing sticks when used alone without toothpastes have proven to be very efficient, effective and reliable in cleaning the teeth of many people particularly in Nigeria and some other countries in Africa. The teeth of users are usually very strong, clean, fresh and devoid of germs and caries. Even with the advent of modern toothpastes with special additions of fluorine, the use of these popular and efficient chewing sticks is still unabated. Many people including the elite use them solely, a few others combine their use with modern toothpastes and brush. Proton beams produced by the 7 MV CN and 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerators at INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), Padova, Italy were used for the PIGE and PIXE analysis, respectively. Results of this novel study are presented and discussed. (orig.).

  10. PIGE-PIXE analysis of chewing sticks of pharmacological importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olabanji, S.O.; Haque, A.M.I.; Cherubini, R.

    1996-01-01

    PIGE and PIXE techniques were employed for the determination of the major, minor and trace elemental concentrations in chewing sticks of pharmacological importance namely: Butyrospermum paradoxum, Garcinia kola, Distemonanthus benthamianus, Bridelia ferruginea, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Terminalia glaucescens and Fagara rubescens, respectively. The concentration of fluorine which is very important for human dental enamel was specially determined using the 19 F(p,p'γ) 19 F reaction. For decades these chewing sticks when used alone without toothpastes have proven to be very efficient, effective and reliable in cleaning the teeth of many people particularly in Nigeria and some other countries in Africa. The teeth of users are usually very strong, clean, fresh and devoid of germs and caries. Even with the advent of modern toothpastes with special additions of fluorine, the use of these popular and efficient chewing sticks is still unabated. Many people including the elite use them solely, a few others combine their use with modern toothpastes and brush. Proton beams produced by the 7 MV CN and 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerators at INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), Padova, Italy were used for the PIGE and PIXE analysis, respectively. Results of this novel study are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  11. PIGE-PIXE analysis of chewing sticks of pharmacological importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabanji, S. O.; Makanju, O. V.; Haque, A. M. I.; Buoso, M. C.; Ceccato, D.; Cherubini, R.; Moschini, G.

    1996-06-01

    PIGE and PIXE techniques were employed for the determination of the major, minor and trace elemental concentrations in chewing sticks of pharmacological importance namely: Butyrospermum paradoxum, Garcinia kola, Distemonanthus benthamianus, Bridelia ferruginea, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Terminalia glaucescens and Fagara rubescens, respectively. The concentration of fluorine which is very important for human dental enamel was specially determined using the 19F(p, p'γ) 19F reaction. For decades these chewing sticks when used alone without toothpastes have proven to be very efficient, effective and reliable in cleaning the teeth of many people particularly in Nigeria and some other countries in Africa. The teeth of users are usually very strong, clean, fresh and devoid of germs and caries. Even with the advent of modern toothpastes with special additions of fluorine, the use of these popular and efficient chewing sticks is still unabated. Many people including the elite use them solely, a few others combine their use with modern toothpastes and brush. Proton beams produced by the 7 MV CN and 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerators at INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), Padova, Italy were used for the PIGE and PIXE analysis, respectively. Results of this novel study are presented and discussed.

  12. Evaluation of set-up deviations during the irradiation of patients suffering from breast cancer treated with two different techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KukoIowicz, Pawel Franciszek; Debrowski, Andrzej; Gut, Piotr; Chmielewski, Leszek; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Kedzierawski, Piotr

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare reproducibility of set-up for two different treatment techniques for external irradiation of the breast. Methods and materials: In total, the analysis comprised 56 pairs of portal and simulator films for 14 consecutive patients treated following breast conserving therapy and 98 pairs of portal and simulator films for 20 consecutive patients treated after mastectomy. For the first group the tangential field technique (TF technique) was used, for the second the inverse hockey stick technique (IHS technique). Evaluation of the treatment reproducibility was performed in terms of systematic and random error calculated for the whole groups, comparison of set-up accuracy by means of comparison of cumulative distribution of the length of the displacement vector. Results: In the IHS and TF techniques for medial and lateral fields, displacement larger than 5 mm occurred in 28.3, 15.8 and 25.4%, respectively. For the IHS technique, the systematic errors for lateral and cranial-caudal direction were 1.9 and 1.7 mm, respectively (1 SD), the random errors for lateral and cranial-caudal direction were 2.0 and 2.5 mm. For the TF technique, the systematic errors for ventral-dorsal and cranial-caudal direction were 2.6 and 1.3 mm for medial field and 3.7 and 0.7 mm for lateral fields, respectively, the random errors for lateral and cranial-caudal direction were 2.2 and 1.0 mm for medial field and 2.9 and 1.1 for lateral field, respectively. Rotations were negligible in the IHS technique. For the TF technique the systematic and random components amounted to about 2.0 degrees (1 SD). Conclusions: Both the inverse hockey stick and standard tangential techniques showed good reproducibility of patients' set-up with respect to cranial-caudal direction. For the TF technique, the accuracy should be improved for the medial field with respect to the ventral-dorsal direction

  13. Numerical analysis for the stick-slip vibration of a transversely moving beam in contact with a frictional wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hong-In; Chung, Jintai

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis for the stick-slip vibration of a transversely moving beam, considering both stick-slip transition and friction force discontinuity. The dynamic state of the beam was separated into the stick state and the slip state, and boundary conditions were defined for both. By applying the finite element method, two matrix-vector equations were derived: one for stick state and the other for slip state. However, the equations have different degrees of freedom depending on whether the end of a beam sticks or slips, so we encountered difficulties in time integration. To overcome the difficulties, we proposed a new numerical technique to alternatively use the matrix-vector equations with different matrix sizes. In addition, to eliminate spurious high-frequency responses, we applied the generalized-α time integration method with appropriate value of high-frequency numerical dissipation. Finally, the dynamic responses of stick-slip vibration were analyzed in time and frequency domains: the dynamic behavior of the beam was explained to facilitate understanding of the stick-slip motion, and frequency characteristics of the stick-slip vibration were investigated in relation to the natural frequencies of the beam. The effects of the axial load and the moving speed upon the dynamic response were also examined.

  14. Assessment of basic physical parameters of current Canadian-American National Hockey League (NHL ice hockey players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sigmund

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical parameters represent an important part of the structure of sports performance and significantly contribute to the overall performance of an ice hockey player. Basic physical parameters are also an essential part of a comprehensive player assessment both during the initial NHL draft and further stages of a professional career. For an objective assessment it is desirable to know the current condition of development of monitored somatic parameters with regard to the sports discipline, performance level and gaming position. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze and present the level of development of basic physical characteristics [Body Height (BH and Body Weight (BW] in current ice hockey players in the Canadian-American NHL, also with respect to various gaming positions. Another aim is to compare the results with relevant data of elite ice hockey players around the world. Methods: The data of 751 ice hockey players (age range: 18-43 years; 100% male from NHL (2014/2015 season are analyzed (goalkeepers, n = 67; defenders, n = 237; forwards, n = 447. Statistical data processing was performed using a single factor ANOVA and Fisher's (LSD post hoc test. The level of statistical significance was tested at a level of p ≤ .05; p ≤ .01. Effect size was expressed according to Cohen's d. Results: Current levels of monitored parameters of NHL players represent the values: BH = 186.0 ± 5.3 cm, BW = 91.7 ± 6.9 kg. Significant differences among positions were found for the BH (goalkeepers > defenders > forwards and BW (defenders > goalkeepers > forwards. Differences among forwards positions were also found for the BH (left wings > right wings > centers and BW (left wings > right wings > centers. Conclusion: The observed values represent the current level of basic physical parameters in professional ice hockey players in the NHL and can be considered

  15. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkin CA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Charles A Popkin,1 Brian M Schulz,2 Caroline N Park,1 Thomas S Bottiglieri,1 T Sean Lynch1 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Center for Shoulder, Elbow and Sports Medicine at Columbia University, New York, NY, 2Kerlan‑Jobe Orthopedic Clinic, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13–14 years (Bantam level from 11–12 years (Pee Wee. Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries. Keywords: youth hockey, body checking, injury prevention, femoroacetabular impingement, apophyseal avulsions

  16. Incidence of hockey ankle injuries in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ankle injuries amongst hockey players was 26.41%. The most frequent ankle injury sustained by male adolescent hockey players was an inversion ankle sprain (84.62% of the 26.41% injured subjects of the sample cohort). The mechanisms of ankle injuries were attributed to rapid rotational movements of the ankle joint ...

  17. Self-appraisal of hockey players of high class of different playing position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksiy Mikhnov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to expose the features of display of self-appraisal for the hockey players of high class of different playing position. Material and Methods: for the exposure of level of self-appraisal for hockey players, information of sportsmen of high class, taking part in the matches of the Kontinental hockey league (KHL in a season 2013–2014 was probed sixteen hockey players, having a sporting digit MS and MSWC, took part in researches. Methods were used: pedagogical supervision, pedagogical analysis and generalization of front-rank experience, psychological testing, analysis of data of the special scientific-methodical literature, expert questioning, an analysis of data is the Internet. Results: findings allowed to set that the players of line of attack (central and extreme forward have more high level of self-appraisal for certain, than players of defence and hockey goalkeepers. This tendency is looked over both on the separate constituents of self-appraisal and on the whole on all spectrums of the studied indexes. The got results of researches rotined that the hockey players of high class had or middle or high level of self-appraisal. Among testable hockey players, players were not exposed with the low level of self-appraisal. Conclusions: the exposed distinctions in the level of self-appraisal of hockey players of high class can be used for diagnostics of playing predisposition and choice of playing line of business in a command.

  18. Innovative Climate Communication Strategies: What Sticks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, M. F.; Heid, M.; Spanger-Siegfried, E.; Sideris, J.; Sanford, T. J.; Nurnberger, L.; Huertas, A.; Ekwurzel, B.; Cleetus, R.; Cell, K.

    2013-12-01

    A unique aspect of our work at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) is the melding of scientific research and a robust communications initiative to bring salient information to decision makers and the public. Over the years, we have tried many different strategies to convey complex scientific information in an effective and appealing way, from movie stars to hope psychology, from dire warnings to academic appeals. But now that we are seeing climate impacts locally and climate change is no longer a future reality, what new vision do we need to support ongoing education? In this session we will present some of the techniques we have used to convey climate science concepts including our use of metaphors, data visualization, photography, blogs, social media, video, and public outreach events. Realizing that messages that stick are those that contain powerful narrative and speak to the emotional centers of our brains, we use innovative infographics as well as personal stories to encourage people to care about creating a healthier, cleaner planet. Reaching new audiences using unexpected messengers is a key focus. Some of the questions we will explore are: What metrics can we use to determine the efficacy of these tools? What are the best ways to convey urgency without a sense of hopelessness? How can we improve our communication at a time when action on climate is a necessity? Research shows infographics convey concepts much more easily and quickly than text alone, as our brains are wired to process visual scenes. Making complex scientific information accessible to the non-specialist public involves creativity and excellent data visualization.

  19. THE COMPETITIVE DEMANDS OF ELITE MALE RINK HOCKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aladino Fernández

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min-1. There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively. Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min-1 and 70.3±14.0 L · min-1 (60% of VEmax, respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg-1 · min-1, and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg-1 · min-1 (70% of VO2max. Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min-1. These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption.

  20. Self-esteem and injury in competitive field hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolt, G S; Roberts, P D

    1998-08-01

    A volunteer sample of 50 competitive field hockey players completed the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory at pre- and postseason and prospectively collected injury data over a 20-wk. season. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between scores on Self-esteem and the number of injuries, the participation time affected due to injury, and sex of players. Further multiple regression analysis showed that frequency of the more severe injuries significantly predicted scores on Self-esteem. This finding can be interpreted as evidence of the relationship between low self-esteem and injury in sport.

  1. Cardiovascular Response to Recreational Hockey in Middle-Aged Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Zack A; Thomas, Scott G; Wald, Robert C; Goodman, Jack M

    2017-06-15

    The present study examined the hemodynamic response to recreational pick-up hockey relative to maximal exercise testing in middle-aged men. A total of 23 men with a mean age of 53 ± 7 years were studied. Graded exercise testing on a cycle ergometer determined maximal oxygen consumption, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR). Ambulatory BP and Holter electrocardiographic monitoring was performed during one of their weekly hockey games (mean duration = 45 ± 7.2 minutes): for "On-Ice" responses (PLAY; data recorded while standing immediately after a shift; 8.0 ± 1.4 shifts per game) and during seated recovery (BENCH), 15 minutes after the game. On-Ice HRs and BPs were significantly higher than values obtained during maximal cycle exercise, respectively (HR 174 ± 8.9 vs 163 ± 11.0 beats/min) (systolic blood pressure 202 ± 20 vs 173 ± 31 mm Hg; p game, whereas HR increased from 139 ± 20 to 155 ± 16 beats/min during the game. The myocardial oxygen demand (myocardial time tension index) increased significantly during PLAY concurrent with a decrease in estimated myocardial oxygen supply (diastolic pressure time index), with the endocardial viability ratio during PLAY demonstrating a significant decrease during the third quarter of the game (1.25 ± 0.24) versus the first quarter (1.56 ± 0.30), which remained depressed 15 minutes post-game (p men is an extremely vigorous interval exercise with increasing relative intensity as the game progresses. Hockey elicits peak BPs and HRs that can exceed values observed during maximal exercise testing and is characterized by progressive increases in myocardial oxygen demand and lowered supply during PLAY and BENCH time. Given the progressive and high cardiovascular demands, caution is warranted when estimating the cardiovascular demands of hockey from clinical stress testing, particularly in those whom coronary reserve may be compromised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nutrition review for hockey players : enhancing performance through nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Bursich, Chris

    2011-01-01

    With the advancement of sports medicine in the past decade, hockey players all over the world are always trying to find a competitive edge through nutritional education and proper eating. It is very common to find young junior players looking to make the jump into the professional game always trying to find ways to get bigger and add lean muscle mass, likewise, there are always players looking to drop a few pounds while keeping their muscle mass. Research has proven that through proper educat...

  3. ANÁLISIS DE LA ACCIÓN DE GOL EN EL PORTERO DE HOCKEY HIERBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sampedro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    RESUMEN

    El objetivo fundamental del estudio es analizar el rendimiento del portero de hockey hierba, desde la perspectiva del número de goles encajados en función de la zona de tiro y del lugar por donde entra el lanzamiento. Se analizó una muestra de 278 lanzamientos a portería que acabaron en gol, marcados a 30 porteros/as de nivel internacional de selecciones nacionales absolutas. La técnica de recogida de datos empleada fue la observación sistemática utilizando para ello la base de datos OBANGOHH (Piñeiro, 2006. Los resultados obtenidos determinan que la zona de la tabla, la zona izquierda de la portería, la zona GIT, y el poste largo, son “puntos débiles” del portero/a. Los porteros/as tienen mayores o menores probabilidades de encajar gol dependiendo de la zona del área desde la que tira el delantero y la zona de portería por la que entra el lanzamiento. Además existen diferencias significativas en relación al género del portero. El nivel de significación establecido fue del 95% (p<0,05.
    Palabras Clave: hockey hierba, rendimiento, portero, gol.

     

    ABSTRACT

    The main aim of the study is to analyze the performance of field hockey goalkeeper, from the perspective of the number of goals achieved depending on the zone of shot and of the place where the throwing was goal. 278 shots on goal scored to different goalkeepers of international level of senior national teams were analyzed. According to Piñeiro (2006, the technique of collection of the data used was the systematic observation; using for it the notational data base OBANGOFH. The obtained results determine that the side-boards and back-boards zone, the left zone of the goal, the zone

  4. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  5. The Donkey and the Stick: Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clifford E.

    The fable of the "Donkey and the Stick" is used as an analogy to present day industrial relations problems. The managerial approach of autocratic leadership has long since outlived its usefulness; rewards based along Maslow's hierarchy of needs should be used for employee motivation. The point is made from the fable that employees can't be…

  6. Analytical approximations for stick-slip vibration amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Fidlin, A.

    2003-01-01

    , the amplitudes, and the base frequencies of friction-induced stick¿slip and pure-slip oscillations. For stick¿slip oscillations, this is accomplished by using perturbation analysis for the finite time interval of the stick phase, which is linked to the subsequent slip phase through conditions of continuity...

  7. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allisse, Maxime; Sercia, Pierre; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years) were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p skating performance tests exhibited significant enhancements during the hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally skating performance tests indicated important gaps, both in the choice of the off-ice assessment tools as well as in training methods conventionally used. The reflection on the best way to assess and train hockey players certainly deserves to be continued.

  8. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allisse Maxime

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p < 0.05. However, maximal aerobic power improved only during the off-season. All skating performance tests exhibited significant enhancements during the hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally <20% of the explained variance between physiological variables measured off-ice and on-ice skating performance tests indicated important gaps, both in the choice of the off-ice assessment tools as well as in training methods conventionally used. The reflection on the best way to assess and train hockey players certainly deserves to be continued.

  9. The Sticking Probability for Hydrogen on Ni, Pd, and Pt at a Hydrogen pressure of 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Lytken, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2007-01-01

    A technique for measurements of the sticking probability of hydrogen on metal surfaces at high (ambient) pressure is described. As an example, measurements for Ni, Pd and Pt at a hydrogen pressure of 1 bar and temperatures between 40 and 200 degrees C are presented. The sticking probabilities are......, Pt. The transition between beta- and alpha-phase in the H-Pd system has a significant effect on the activity for Pd....

  10. Relationship Between Skating Economy and Performance During a Repeated-Shift Test in Elite and Subelite Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Nicholas R; Tomkinson, Grant R; Peterson, Benjamin J; Fitzgerald, John S

    2018-04-01

    Lamoureux, NR, Tomkinson, GR, Peterson, BJ, and Fitzgerald, JS. Relationship between skating economy and performance during a repeated-shift test in elite and subelite ice hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 1109-1113, 2018-The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of skating economy to fatigue during repeated high-intensity efforts of a simulated ice hockey shift. Forty-five collegiate and Junior A male ice hockey players (aged 18-24 years) performed a continuous graded exercise test using a skate treadmill. Breath-by-breath data for oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) and respiratory exchange ratio were collected and used to derive energy expenditure (EE) averaged over the final 10 seconds of each stage. Economy was determined as the slope of the regression line relating V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and EE against skating speed separately. Participants also completed 8 bouts of maximal ice skating through a course designed to simulate typical shift, with timing gates determining first half, second half, and total fatigue decrement, calculated by a percent decrement score. Partial correlation was used to determine the association between economy measures and decrement during the repeated-shift test. Twenty-six participants met inclusion criteria and were included in data analysis. Skating economy measures (both relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and EE) were very likely moderate positive correlates of total fatigue decrement (r [95% confidence interval]: V[Combining Dot Above]O2, 0.46 [0.09, 0.72] and EE, 0.44, [0.06, 0.71]) but not with first or second gate decrement. Our results indicate that skating economy plays an important role in fatigue resistance over repeated on-ice sprints designed to simulate a typical shift. This supports the use of technical skating coaching and training techniques to enhance skating economy as a means of improving ice hockey performance.

  11. Sports chiropractic management at the World Ice Hockey Championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitiello Andrew L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ice hockey is an international sport. Injuries occur in a full body fashion, to a number of tissues, commonly through body contact. There is a lack of literature documenting the scope of sports chiropractic practice. Thus, it was the aim to document the type, scope and severity of conditions presenting to, and the treatment provided by, the New Zealand team chiropractor acting as a primary health provider for the duration of the 2007 World Ice Hockey Championships. Methods All conditions presenting were recorded. Diagnosis was recorded along with clinical parameters of injury: injury type, severity, mechanism and whether referral or advanced imaging was required. All treatment provided was continuously recorded, including information on the number of treatments required and the reason, duration, type and location of treatment. Results Players presented for diagnosis of injury 50 times. Muscle (34%, joint (24% and tendon injuries (18% were most common. Players presented with a new injury 76% of the time. Most injuries had been present for less than one week (84%, with 53% occurring through a contact mechanism. Injuries were common at training and match locations. Only two injuries required the player to stop playing or training, both of which were referred for advanced imaging. During the study, 134 treatment consultations were rendered to 45 player injuries. Eighty per-cent of injuries were managed with four or less treatments. Three quarters of treatment was provided at training locations with treatment duration predominantly being between 11-15 minutes (71% and 16-20 minutes (27%. Most treatment delivered was passive in nature (71% although combination active and passive care was provided (27%. Treatment typically involved joint (81% and soft tissue based therapies (81% and was delivered in a full body manner. Conclusions This study documented the injury profile of ice hockey at an international level of competition. It

  12. Age estimates and stick-nest rat middens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, S.; Lawson, E.

    1998-01-01

    A total of 112 radiocarbon analyses on stick-nest rat middens gathered from published and grey literature show (see figure) that the middens of stick-nest rats have a positively skewed distribution. The average of all the estimates is ca. 2967 BP with the oldest midden dated at around 10870 BP. Over 75% of the results are younger than -4480 BP. Possible explanations for this pattern include; sample bias, rate of midden and cave decay, a real pattern of midden age distribution and development of techniques. The components of the midden being used for radiocarbon analysis has been remarkably uniform. This reflects the small number of researchers in the field and the experience of the American packrat midden research. Early researchers using conventional methods used charcoal and large mixtures of material whereas AMS now allows individual scats to be analysed. In fact 37% of analyses have been on scats as these provide direct evidence of midden occupation and are plentiful in the midden matrix. 66% of analyses used AINSE's AMS method and 23% used conventional methods - the distribution of results using the two methods are similar. A number of dates have incomplete laboratory or methods information. Similar analysis of packrat midden dates in the United States identified both ecological and systematic bias in the age patterns (Webb 1986). The efficacy of midden analysis in Australia, as in America, is limited by the cost of age estimates

  13. A survey of mental skills training among South African field hockey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... observed for concentration, achievement motivation and activation control. ... The participants in the study perceived MST as an important tool to enhance performance in field hockey.

  14. The effect of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players.

  15. Mental skill levels of South African male student field hockey players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental skill levels of South African male student field hockey players in different playing positions. ... African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... The positional results were compared by means of effect sizes (expressed as ...

  16. Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

    2014-06-01

    Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age.

  17. Sampling problems for randomly broken sticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huillet, Thierry [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, CNRS-UMR 8089 et Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay-Lussac, 95031, Neuville sur Oise (France)

    2003-04-11

    Consider the random partitioning model of a population (represented by a stick of length 1) into n species (fragments) with identically distributed random weights (sizes). Upon ranking the fragments' weights according to ascending sizes, let S{sub m:n} be the size of the mth smallest fragment. Assume that some observer is sampling such populations as follows: drop at random k points (the sample size) onto this stick and record the corresponding numbers of visited fragments. We shall investigate the following sampling problems: (1) what is the sample size if the sampling is carried out until the first visit of the smallest fragment (size S{sub 1:n})? (2) For a given sample size, have all the fragments of the stick been visited at least once or not? This question is related to Feller's random coupon collector problem. (3) In what order are new fragments being discovered and what is the random number of samples separating the discovery of consecutive new fragments until exhaustion of the list? For this problem, the distribution of the size-biased permutation of the species' weights, as the sequence of their weights in their order of appearance is needed and studied.

  18. Player and Game Characteristics and Head Impacts in Female Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Nick; Taha, Tim; Greenwald, Richard; Keightley, Michelle

    2017-08-01

      Despite the growing popularity of ice hockey among female youth and interest in the biomechanics of head impacts in sport, the head impacts sustained by this population have yet to be characterized.   To describe the number of, biomechanical characteristics of, and exposure to head impacts of female youth ice hockey players during competition and to investigate the influences of player and game characteristics on head impacts.   Cohort study.   Twenty-seven female youth ice hockey players (mean age = 12.5 ± 0.52 years) wore instrumented ice hockey helmets during 66 ice hockey games over a 3-year period. Data specific to player, game, and biomechanical head impact characteristics were recorded. A multiple regression analysis identified factors most associated with head impacts of greater frequency and severity.   A total of 436 total head impacts were sustained during 6924 minutes of active ice hockey participation (0.9 ± 0.6 impacts per player per game; range, 0-2.1). A higher body mass index (BMI) significantly predicted a higher number of head impacts sustained per game (P = .008). Linear acceleration of head impacts was greater in older players and those who played the forward position, had a greater BMI, and spent more time on the ice (P = .008), whereas greater rotational acceleration was present in older players who had a greater BMI and played the forward position (P = .008). During tournament games, increased ice time predicted increased severity of head impacts (P = .03).   This study reveals for the first time that head impacts are occurring in female youth ice hockey players, albeit at a lower rate and severity than in male youth ice hockey players, despite the lack of intentional body checking.

  19. Development of offensive individual game skills and offensive game combinations in ice hockey

    OpenAIRE

    Janek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Title: Development of offensive individual game skills and offensive game combinations in ice hockey Goals: The main aim of this thesis is to gather theoretical information about development and improvement of offensive individual game skills and offensive game combinations in ice hockey and suggest essential and key exercises of this issue. Methods: The thesis was primarily written with the use of searching method based on information from available expert literature, electronic sources and ...

  20. Analisys and energy saving measures of kastvallen ice hockey rink arena

    OpenAIRE

    Igual Bueno, Mario; Bielsa Azcona, José Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays efficiency measures are more and more important because the price of the energy is increasing every year. Moreover, saving energy it is also important for decrease the environmental impact. Kastvallen is a hockey arena built in 1997 that cools the hockey rink with electric compressors. The changing rooms are heating by using district heating. Actually the total invoice of electricity is above the 800000 SEK. Meanwhile the district heating invoice reaches the 60000SE...

  1. The Existence of a Sticking Region in Free Weight Squats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tillaar Roland van den

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of the sticking region in two legged free weight squats. Fifteen resistance-training males (age 24 ± 4 years, body mass 82 ± 11 kg, body height 179 ± 6 cm with 6 ± 3 years of resistance-training experience performed 6-RM in free weight squats. The last repetition was analyzed for the existence of a sticking region. Only in 10 out of 15 participants a sticking region was observed. The observed sticking region was much shorter than in the bench press. Furthermore, rectus femoris decreased the EMG activity in contrast to increased EMG activity in biceps femoris around the sticking and surrounding region. No significant change in EMG activity was found for the lateral and medial vastus muscles. It is suggested that a combination of these muscle activity changes could be one of the causes of the existence of the sticking region in free weight squats

  2. The existence of a sticking region in free weight squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Andersen, Vidar; Saeterbakken, Atle Hole

    2014-09-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of the sticking region in two legged free weight squats. Fifteen resistance-training males (age 24 ± 4 years, body mass 82 ± 11 kg, body height 179 ± 6 cm) with 6 ± 3 years of resistance-training experience performed 6-RM in free weight squats. The last repetition was analyzed for the existence of a sticking region. Only in 10 out of 15 participants a sticking region was observed. The observed sticking region was much shorter than in the bench press. Furthermore, rectus femoris decreased the EMG activity in contrast to increased EMG activity in biceps femoris around the sticking and surrounding region. No significant change in EMG activity was found for the lateral and medial vastus muscles. It is suggested that a combination of these muscle activity changes could be one of the causes of the existence of the sticking region in free weight squats.

  3. Epidemiology of Injuries in Women Playing Competitive Team Bat-or-Stick Sports: A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagodage Perera, Nirmala Kanthi; Joseph, Corey; Kemp, Joanne Lyn; Finch, Caroline Frances

    2018-03-01

    Team bat-or-stick sports, including cricket, softball and hockey, are popular among women. However, little is known about the injury profile in this population. The aim was to describe the incidence, nature and anatomical location of injuries in bat-or-stick sports played by women in a competitive league. This review was prospectively registered (PROSPERO CRD42015026715). CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, SPORTDiscus were systematically searched from January 2000 to September 2016, inclusive. Peer-reviewed original research articles reporting the incidence, nature and anatomical location of injuries sustained by women aged 18 + years in competitive bat-or-stick sports were included. Two meta-analyses based on injury incidence proportions (injury IP) and injury rates per 1000 person-days of athletic exposure (AE) were performed. A total of 37 studies satisfied the inclusion criteria, and five had low risk of bias. The weighted injury IP was 0.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.45]. The weighted injury rate was 6.12 (95% CI 6.05-6.18) overall, and greater in games [15.79 (95% CI 15.65-15.93)] than in practice [3.07 (95% CI 2.99-3.15)]. The ankle was the most commonly injured anatomical location, followed by the hand (including wrist and fingers), knee and head. Soft tissue and ligament injuries were most common types of injuries. Injury prevention in women's sports is a novel and emerging field of research interest. This review highlights that injury incidence is high among female bat-or-stick players, but little information is known about direct causal mechanisms. This review clearly establishes the need for enhancements to injury data collection. Without this information, it will not be possible to develop evidence-based injury prevention interventions.

  4. Preparation of graphene by electrical explosion of graphite sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Xu, Chunxiao; Yin, Hao; Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Chen, Pengwan

    2017-08-03

    Graphene nanosheets were produced by electrical explosion of high-purity graphite sticks in distilled water at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by various techniques to find different forms of carbon phases, including graphite nanosheets, few-layer graphene, and especially, mono-layer graphene with good crystallinity. Delicate control of energy injection is critical for graphene nanosheet formation, whereas mono-layer graphene was produced under the charging voltage of 22.5-23.5 kV. On the basis of electrical wire explosion and our experimental results, the underlying mechanism that governs the graphene generation was carefully illustrated. This work provides a simple but innovative route for producing graphene nanosheets.

  5. Active Sticks: a New Dimension in Controller Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repperger, D. W.; Mccollor, D.

    1984-01-01

    A smart stick controller was built which actively produces a force to interact with the subject's hand and to aid in tracking. When the human tracks in this situation, the man-machine system can be viewed as the combination of two closed loop feedback paths. The inner loop occurs as a result of a tactile information channel effecting the man-controller interaction through force with this stick in the active mode (the stick generates a force) and the passive mode (the stick not generating a force) are reported. The most noteworthy observation is a significant increase in apparent neuromotor bandwidth and consequently better tracking performance.

  6. Wooden Calendar Sticks in Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Vesselina; Koleva, Svetlana

    Wooden calendar sticks have preserved an archaic time-keeping tradition, which, during the Middle Ages, was one of the tools for establishing and disseminating Christian chronology and the liturgical calendars of the Western and Eastern Churches. The calendars vary in size and shape, type of signs, and structure of the record. Christian symbols interwoven with signs and pictograms mark days of importance in the ritual and economic year cycle. The wooden calendars are considered one of the proofs of the syncretism between the pagan tradition and Christian rites in folk cultures.

  7. Three-dimensional kinematics of the lower limbs during forward ice hockey skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upjohn, Tegan; Turcotte, René; Pearsall, David J; Loh, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe lower limb kinematics in three dimensions during the forward skating stride in hockey players and to contrast skating techniques between low- and high-calibre skaters. Participant motions were recorded with four synchronized digital video cameras while wearing reflective marker triads on the thighs, shanks, and skates. Participants skated on a specialized treadmill with a polyethylene slat bed at a self-selected speed for 1 min. Each participant completed three 1-min skating trials separated by 5 min of rest. Joint and limb segment angles were calculated within the local (anatomical) and global reference planes. Similar gross movement patterns and stride rates were observed; however, high-calibre participants showed a greater range and rate of joint motion in both the sagittal and frontal planes, contributing to greater stride length for high-calibre players. Furthermore, consequent postural differences led to greater lateral excursion during the power stroke in high-calibre skaters. In conclusion, specific kinematic differences in both joint and limb segment angle movement patterns were observed between low- and high-calibre skaters.

  8. Game Intensity Analysis of Elite Adolescent Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanula Arkadiusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine ice-hockey players’ playing intensity based on their heart rates (HRs recorded during a game and on the outcomes of an incremental maximum oxygen uptake test. Twenty ice-hockey players, members of the Polish junior national team (U18, performed an incremental test to assess their maximal oxygen uptake (V̇ O2max in the two week’s period preceding 5 games they played at the World Championships. Players’ HRs at the first and second ventilatory thresholds obtained during the test were utilized to determine intensity zones (low, moderate, and high that were subsequently used to classify HR values recorded during each of the games. For individual intensity zones, the following HRs expressed as mean values and as percentages of the maximal heart rate (HRmax were obtained: forwards 148-158 b⋅min-1 (79.5-84.8% HRmax, 159-178 b⋅min-1 (85.4-95.6% HRmax, 179-186 b⋅min-1 (96.1-100.0% HRmax; defensemen 149-153 b⋅min-1 (80.0-82.1% HRmax, 154-175 b⋅min-1 (82.6- 94.0% HRmax, 176-186 b⋅min-1 (94.5-100.0% HRmax. The amount of time the forwards and defensemen spent in the three intensity zones expressed as percentages of the total time of the game were: 54.91 vs. 55.62% (low, 26.40 vs. 22.38% (moderate and 18.68 vs. 22.00% (high. The forwards spent more time in the low intensity zone than the defensemen, however, the difference was not statistically significant. The results of the study indicate that using aerobic and anaerobic metabolism variables to determine intensity zones can significantly improve the reliability of evaluation of the physiological demands of the game, and can be a useful tool for coaches in managing the training process.

  9. The Los Alamos Gap Stick Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel; Hill, Larry; Johnson, Carl

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we describe a novel shock sensitivity test, the Gap Stick Test, which is a generalized variant of the ubiquitous Gap Test. Despite the popularity of the Gap Test, it has some disadvantages: multiple tests must be fired to obtain a single metric, and many tests must be fired to obtain its value to high precision and confidence. Our solution is a test wherein multiple gap tests are joined in series to form a rate stick. The complex re-initiation character of the traditional gap test is thereby retained, but the propagation speed is steady when measured at periodic intervals, and initiation delay in individual segments acts to decrement the average speed. We measure the shock arrival time before and after each inert gap, and compute the average detonation speed through the HE alone (discounting the gap thicknesses). We perform tests for a range of gap thicknesses. We then plot the aforementioned propagation speed as a function of gap thickness. The resulting curve has the same basic structure as a Diameter Effect (DE) curve, and (like the DE curve) terminates at a failure point. Comparison between experiment and hydrocode calculations using ALE3D and the Ignition and Growth reactive burn model calibrated for short duration shock inputs in PBX 9501 is discussed.

  10. Physiological, physical and on-ice performance criteria for selection of elite ice hockey teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Roczniok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine physiological and physical determinants of ice-hockey performance in order to assess their impact on the result during a selection for ice hockey. A total of 42 ice hockey players took part in the selection camp. At the end of the camp 20 best players were selected by team of expert coaches to the ice hockey team and created group G1, while the second group (G2 consisted of not selected players (non-successful group Evaluation of goodness of fit of the model to the data was based on the Hosmer Lemeshow test Ice hockey players selected to the team were taller 181.95±4.02 cm, had lower % body fat 13.17±3.17%, a shorter time to peak power 2.47±0.35 s , higher relative peak power 21.34±2.41 W • kg-1 and higher relative total work 305.18±28.41 J • kg-1. The results of the aerobic capacity test showed significant differences only in case of two variables. Ice hockey players in the G1 had higher VO2max 4.07±0.31 l • min-1 values than players in the G2 as well as ice hockey players in G1 showed a higher level of relative VO2max 51.75±2.99 ml • min-1 • kg-1 than athletes in G2. Ice hockey players selected to the team (G1 performed better in the 30 m Forwards Sprint 4.28±0.31 s; 6x9 Turns 12.19±0.75 s; 6x9 stops 12.79±0.49 s and Endurance test (6x30 m stops 32.01±0.80 s than players in G2. The logistic regression model showed that the best predictors of success in the recruitment process of top level ice hockey players were time to peak power, relative peak power, VO2max and 30 m sprint forwards on ice. On the basis of the constructed predictive logistic regression model it will be possible to determine the probability of success of the athletes during following the selection processes to the team.

  11. Do physical maturity and birth date predict talent in male youth ice hockey players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherar, Lauren B; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Faulkner, Robert A; Russell, Keith W

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among biological maturity, physical size, relative age (i.e. birth date), and selection into a male Canadian provincial age-banded ice hockey team. In 2003, 619 male ice hockey players aged 14-15 years attended Saskatchewan provincial team selection camps, 281 of whom participated in the present study. Data from 93 age-matched controls were obtained from the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (1991-1997). During the initial selection camps, birth dates, heights, sitting heights, and body masses were recorded. Age at peak height velocity, an indicator of biological maturity, was determined in the controls and predicted in the ice hockey players. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance, logistic regression, and a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The ice hockey players selected for the final team were taller, heavier, and more mature (P born in the months January to June. In conclusion, team selectors appear to preferentially select early maturing male ice hockey players who have birth dates early in the selection year.

  12. Conservative management of an elite ice hockey goaltender with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Kyle; Gomes, Brendan; MacKenzie, Steven; D’Angelo, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of an elite male ice hockey goaltender with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears. This case will outline the prevalence, clinical presentation, imaging criteria, pathomechanics, and management of FAI, with specific emphasis on the ice hockey goaltender. Clinical Features: A 22-year old retired ice hockey goaltender presented to a chiropractor after being diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon with MRI confirmed left longitudinal and chondral flap acetabular labral tears and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). As the patient was not a candidate for surgical intervention, a multimodal conservative treatment approach including manual therapy, electroacupuncture and rehabilitation exercises were implemented. Summary: FAI is prevalent in ice hockey players, particularly with goaltenders. Both skating and position-dependent hip joint mechanics involved in ice hockey may exacerbate or contribute to acquired and congenital forms of symptomatic FAI. As such, practitioners managing this population must address sport-specific demands in manual therapy, rehabilitation and physical training, to improve functional outcomes and prevent future injury. PMID:26816416

  13. Integration of the functional movement screen into the National Hockey League Combine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Chip P; Kuropkat, Christiane; Gumieniak, Robert J; Gledhill, Norman; Jamnik, Veronica K

    2015-05-01

    The sport of ice hockey requires coordination of complex skills involving musculoskeletal and physiological abilities while simultaneously exposing players to a high risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed to assess fundamental movement patterns that underlie both sport performance and injury risk. The top 111 elite junior hockey players from around the world took part in the 2013 National Hockey League Entry Draft Combine (NHL Combine). The FMS was integrated into the comprehensive medical and physiological fitness evaluations at the request of strength and conditioning coaches with affiliations to NHL teams. The inclusion of the FMS aimed to help develop strategies that could maximize its utility among elite hockey players and to encourage or inform further research in this field. This study evaluated the outcomes of integrating the FMS into the NHL Combine and identified any links to other medical plus physical and physiological fitness assessment outcomes. These potential associations may provide valuable information to identify elements of future training programs that are individualized to athletes' specific needs. The results of the FMS (total score and number of asymmetries identified) were significantly correlated to various body composition measures, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, leg power, timing of recent workouts, and the presence of lingering injury at the time of the NHL Combine. Although statistically significant correlations were observed, the implications of the FMS assessment outcomes remain difficult to quantify until ongoing assessment of FMS patterns, tracking of injuries, and hockey performance are available.

  14. Exploring Gaps in Concussion Knowledge and Knowledge Translation Among Coaches of Youth Female Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, David; Verweel, Lee; Reed, Nick

    2017-10-27

    To better understand the level of concussion knowledge of youth female hockey coaches and to identify preferred methods of knowledge translation for this population. Cross-sectional survey. Participants independently completed written surveys before in-person concussion information sessions or online surveys through link provided in emails. Convenience sampling yielded 130 coaches of youth female hockey from Canada. Knowledge level on concussion, resources from which coaches obtained information on concussion, opinions on the current level of concussion knowledge, and knowledge translation. Coaches demonstrated adequate knowledge on concussion, achieving 84% correct on true-false questions and 92% correct on symptom identification accuracy. However, coaches showed limited awareness of concussion specific to mechanisms for injury (identification) and postconcussion symptoms. Internet resources were rated as the most used resources for concussion yet were not rated very helpful. Nonetheless, coaches indicated online courses and web sites as the most preferred method for concussion knowledge translation. Youth female hockey coaches have overall adequate knowledge of concussion; however, gaps in knowledge do exist. Future efforts to raise the concussion knowledge among coaches of female youth hockey should include information specific to the mechanism of injury, along with sign and symptom identification, with particular attention paid to emotional symptoms. Given the reported preferences and the widespread availability of the Internet, further exploration and research validation of online courses and web sites tailored to the youth female hockey community is encouraged.

  15. Mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Correa, José A

    2014-05-01

    To examine the mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer. Prospective cohort design. McGill University Sport Medicine Clinic. Male and female athletes participating in varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer. Athletes were followed prospectively over a 10-year period to determine the mechanisms of injury for concussions and whether contact with certain areas of the body or individual variables predisposed to longer recovery from concussions. For soccer, data were collected on whether concussions occurred while attempting to head the ball. There were 226 concussions in 170 athletes over the study period. The side/temporal area of the head or helmet was the most common area to be struck resulting in concussion in all 3 sports. Contact from another player's head or helmet was the most probable mechanism in football and soccer. In hockey, concussion impacts were more likely to occur from contact with another body part or object rather than another head/helmet. Differences in mechanisms of injuries were found between males and females in soccer and ice hockey. Athletes with multiple concussions took longer to return to play with each subsequent concussion. Half of the concussions in soccer were related to attempting to head the soccer ball. The side of the head or helmet was the most common area to be struck resulting in concussion in all 3 sports. In ice hockey and soccer, there are differences in the mechanisms of injury for males and females within the same sport.

  16. Individual Alpha Peak Frequency in Ice Hockey Shooting Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommer Christie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There are several important inter- and intra-individual variations in individual alpha peak frequency (IAPF in the cognitive domain. The rationale for the present study was to extend the research on IAPF in the cognitive domain to IAPF in the sport domain. Specifically, the purpose of the present study was twofold: (a to explore whether baseline IAPF is related to performance in an ice hockey shooting task and (b to explore whether a shooting task has an effect on IAPF variability. The present investigation is one of the first studies to examine links between IAPF and sport performance. Study results did not show significant changes in IAPF when comparing baseline IAPF and pre- to post-task IAPF across three performance levels. The findings support previous literature in the cognitive domain suggesting that IAPF is a stable neurophysiological marker. Future research should consider the following methodological suggestions: (a measuring IAPF during sport performance instead of at a resting state, (b changing the pre-performance resting baseline instructions to take into account sport-specific mental preparation, (c exploring an expert-novice paradigm to accentuate performance ability differences between groups (d comparing tasks with different levels of complexity, and (e analyzing the possible correlation between IAPF and performance on different days.

  17. Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lignell, Erik; Fransson, Dan; Krustrup, Peter

    2018-01-01

    of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post...

  18. Dissuasive cigarette sticks: the next step in standardised ('plain') packaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Janet; Gendall, Philip; Eckert, Christine; Louviere, Jordan

    2016-11-01

    Standardised (or 'plain') packaging has reduced the appeal of smoking by removing imagery that smokers use to affiliate themselves with the brand they smoke. We examined whether changing the appearance of cigarette sticks could further denormalise smoking and enhance the negative impact of standardised packaging. We conducted an online study of 313 New Zealand smokers who comprised a Best-Worst Choice experiment and a rating task. The Best-Worst experiment used a 2×3×3×6 orthogonal design to test the following attributes: on-pack warning message, branding level, warning size and stick appearance. We identified three segments whose members' choice patterns were strongly influenced by the stick design, warning theme and size, and warning theme, respectively. Each of the dissuasive sticks tested was less preferred and rated as less appealing than the most common stick in use; a 'minutes of life lost' stick was the most aversive of the stimuli tested. Dissuasive sticks could enhance the effect of standardised packaging, particularly among older smokers who are often more heavily addicted and resistant to change. Countries introducing standardised packaging legislation should take the opportunity to denormalise the appearance of cigarette sticks, in addition to removing external tobacco branding from packs and increasing the warning size. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. D'Nealian Handwriting versus Circle-Stick Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Donald N.

    This paper argues against teaching children to make letters using circle-stick writing. It contends that the circle-stick method requires continued pen/pencil lifts hindering rhythm or flow in the writing process and that there is little carry-over value into cursive writing as the two scripts are totally different. D'Nealian print, one type of…

  20. STICKING OF MOLECULES ON NONPOROUS AMORPHOUS WATER ICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco [Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Acharyya, Kinsuk, E-mail: gvidali@syr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    Accurate modeling of physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM) requires detailed knowledge of how atoms and molecules adsorb on dust grains. However, the sticking coefficient, a number between 0 and 1 that measures the first step in the interaction of a particle with a surface, is usually assumed in simulations of ISM environments to be either 0.5 or 1. Here we report on the determination of the sticking coefficient of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} on nonporous amorphous solid water. The sticking coefficient was measured over a wide range of surface temperatures using a highly collimated molecular beam. We showed that the standard way of measuring the sticking coefficient—the King–Wells method—leads to the underestimation of trapping events in which there is incomplete energy accommodation of the molecule on the surface. Surface scattering experiments with the use of a pulsed molecular beam are used instead to measure the sticking coefficient. Based on the values of the measured sticking coefficient, we suggest a useful general formula of the sticking coefficient as a function of grain temperature and molecule-surface binding energy. We use this formula in a simulation of ISM gas–grain chemistry to find the effect of sticking on the abundance of key molecules both on grains and in the gas phase.

  1. Prevalence of Needle Stick Injuries among Healthcare Workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Needle stick injuries represent one of the most important occupational hazards to which health workers are exposed. These injuries result from accidental piercing of the skin and or mucous membranes by sharp objects. Needle stick injuries carry the risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, especially ...

  2. Lesbian erotics at women's hockey: fans, flashing, and the Booby Orrs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes a public breast flashing event that occurred during the women's ice hockey tournament at the OutGames/Western Cup Lesbigay athletic event in 2007. Employing a postfoundational perspective, I first contextualize the ice hockey subculture of the team called the Booby Orrs, outlining some of our history, norms, and context. I then tell the particular story that leads to our fans flashing their breasts as we finally scored some goals. I end with my analysis of this event: how a public nude display of sexualized women's breasts in a lesbian-coded public space prompted a resistant sporting moment, at least contingently.

  3. The "sticking period" in a maximum bench press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Ettema, Gertjan

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine muscle activity and three-dimensional kinematics in the ascending phase of a successful one-repetition maximum attempt in bench press for 12 recreational weight-training athletes, with special attention to the sticking period. The sticking period was defined as the first period of deceleration of the upward movement (i.e. from the highest barbell velocity until the first local lowest barbell velocity). All participants showed a sticking period during the upward movement that started about 0.2 s after the initial upward movement, and lasted about 0.9 s. Electromyography revealed that the muscle activity of the prime movers changed significantly from the pre-sticking to the sticking and post-sticking periods. A possible mechanism for the existence of the sticking period is the diminishing potentiation of the contractile elements during the upward movement together with the limited activity of the pectoral and deltoid muscles during this period.

  4. Stick-slip friction and wear of articular joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    Stick-slip friction was observed in articular cartilage under certain loading and sliding conditions and systematically studied. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus, we show that stick-slip friction can induce permanent morphological changes (a change in the roughness indicative of wear/damage) in cartilage surfaces, even under mild loading and sliding conditions. The different load and speed regimes can be represented by friction maps—separating regimes of smooth and stick-slip sliding; damage generally occurs within the stick-slip regimes. Prolonged exposure of cartilage surfaces to stick-slip sliding resulted in a significant increase of surface roughness, indicative of severe morphological changes of the cartilage superficial zone. To further investigate the factors that are conducive to stick-slip and wear, we selectively digested essential components of cartilage: type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Compared with the normal cartilage, HA and GAG digestions modified the stick-slip behavior and increased surface roughness (wear) during sliding, whereas collagen digestion decreased the surface roughness. Importantly, friction forces increased up to 2, 10, and 5 times after HA, GAGs, and collagen digestion, respectively. Also, each digestion altered the friction map in different ways. Our results show that (i) wear is not directly related to the friction coefficient but (ii) more directly related to stick-slip sliding, even when present at small amplitudes, and that (iii) the different molecular components of joints work synergistically to prevent wear. Our results also suggest potential noninvasive diagnostic tools for sensing stick-slip in joints. PMID:23359687

  5. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and Volkmann's Contracture in a Field Hockey Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Sawyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A 19-year-old female field hockey player presents with bilateral upper trapezius and rhomboid tightness and spasm beginning in January of 2016. She has no previous history of upper back pain or injury. The student first reported the injury immediately after running sprints. She stated that she could not move or feel her fingers or hands. She presents with a visible hump on her left upper trapezius. She also has forward-rounded shoulders. She has regular and equal radial pulses. She has decreased sensation upon palpation of her fingers, hands and forearms. After extraneous exercise, the athlete’s hands, wrists and forearms go into contracture and flexion and she is unable to move from this position until manual extension is applied, or 10 or more minutes of rest occurs. She is TTP over her upper trapezius musculature. She had a positive Military Brace test. Differential Diagnosis: Based on evaluation, the athlete could simply just have upper trapezius musculature spasms. The diagnosis could also be shoulder impingement syndrome, due to the neurological signs and symptoms. Compartment syndrome could produce similar s/s that the athlete experiences, as well. Treatment: X-rays show no bony abnormalities and no extra ribs. The athlete’s injury has been treated with ice post-practice, heat pre-practice and upper body stretching exercises. Three days a week the athlete works on postural exercises that strengthen her back musculature. The athlete also receives combination therapy over her upper trapezius trigger points, along with massage and Hawkgrip technique over the same areas. Uniqueness: The uniqueness in this case is that the athlete has both TOS and Volkmann’s contracture. Volkmann’s contractures typically occur in pediatrics, which is another reason why this particular case is unique. Conclusion: This case allows other clinicians to understand the causes of TOS and the secondary s/s that TOS can potentially cause.

  6. Comparison of dynamic balance in collegiate field hockey and football players using star excursion balance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rashi; Moiz, Jamal Ali

    2013-09-01

    The preliminary study aimed to compare dynamic balance between collegiate athletes competing or training in football and hockey using star excursion balance test. A total thirty university level players, football (n = 15) and field hockey (n = 15) were participated in the study. Dynamic balance was assessed by using star excursion balance test. The testing grid consists of 8 lines each 120 cm in length extending from a common point at 45° increments. The subjects were instructed to maintain a stable single leg stance with the test leg with shoes off and to reach for maximal distance with the other leg in each of the 8 directions. A pencil was used to point and read the distance to which each subject's foot reached. The normalized leg reach distances in each direction were summed for both limbs and the total sum of the mean of summed normalized distances of both limbs were calculated. There was no significant difference in all the directions of star excursion balance test scores in both the groups. Additionally, composite reach distances of both groups also found non-significant (P=0.5). However, the posterior (P=0.05) and lateral (P=0.03) normalized reach distances were significantly more in field hockey players. Field hockey players and football players did not differ in terms of dynamic balance.

  7. Describing Strategies Used by Elite, Intermediate, and Novice Ice Hockey Referees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about sport officials' decisions (e.g., anticipation, visual search, and prior experience). Comprehension of the entire decision process, however, requires an ecologically valid examination. To address this, we implemented a 2-part study using an expertise paradigm with ice hockey referees. Purpose: Study 1 explored the…

  8. Multidimensional performance characteristics and standard of performance in talented youth field hockey players : A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Mulder, Theo

    2007-01-01

    To identify performance characteristics that could help predict future elite field hockey players, we measured the anthropometric, physiological, technical, tactical, and psychological characteristics of 30 elite and 35 sub-elite youth players at the end of three consecutive seasons. The mean age of

  9. Today's talented youth field hockey players, the stars of tomorrow? : a study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink-Gemser, Marije Titia

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was addressed by conducting research within a group of all talented field hockey players, measuring multidimensional performance characteristics in a sports-specific way, and following talented players across time by adopting a longitudinal study design. With caution because

  10. Understanding the resistance to creating safer ice hockey: essential points for injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ryan A; Soklaridis, Sophie; Treen, Alice K; Bhalerao, Shree U; Cusimano, Michael D

    2017-11-27

    Despite the known negative health outcomes of concussions in minor level boys' hockey, there has been significant resistance to creating a safer game with less body checking. To better understand cultural barriers that prevent making the sport safer for youth and adolescents, semistructured interviews, with 20 ice hockey stakeholders, were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. Through this analysis, two primary concepts arose from respondents. The first concept is that body checking, despite the harm it can cause, should be done in a respectful sportsmanlike fashion. The second concept is the contradiction that the game of ice hockey is both dynamic and unchangeable. Using structural functionalist theory, we propose an argument that the unfortunate perpetuation of violence and body checking in youth ice hockey serves to maintain the social order of the game and its culture. Any strategies aimed at modifying and promoting healthy behaviour in the game should take these concepts into account. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. A test of motor skill-specific action embodiment in ice-hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Nicole T; Lohse, Keith R; Chua, Romeo; Sinnett, Scott; Hodges, Nicola J

    2014-07-01

    To further our understanding of the role of the motor system in comprehending action-related sentences, we compared action experts (athletes) to visual experts (fans) and novices when responding with an action-specific effector (either hand or foot). These conditions allowed inferences about the degree and specificity of embodiment in language comprehension. Ice hockey players, fans and novices made speeded judgments regarding the congruence between an auditorily presented sentence and a subsequently presented picture. Picture stimuli consisted of either hockey or everyday items. Half of these pictures 'matched' the action implied in the preceding sentence. Further, the action in these images involved either primarily the hand or the foot. For everyday items, action-matched items were responded to faster than action-mismatched items. However, only the players and fans showed the action-match effect for hockey items. There were no consistent effector-stimuli compatibility effects, nor skill-based interactions with compatibility, suggesting that the action-match effect was not based on motor ability per se, but rather a construction of the action based on knowledge or visual experience with the hockey related sentences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An Examination of the Relative Age Effect in Developmental Girls' Hockey in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristy L.; Weir, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) suggests that athletes may be provided with greater opportunities for success depending on the position of their birthdate in a sport's selection year. While the effect has been well established in men's sports, less is known about women's sports. This study examined the RAE in developmental girls' hockey in Ontario.…

  13. Validation of the FAST skating protocol to predict aerobic power in ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Nicholas J; Montelpare, William J; Nystrom, Murray; Plyley, Michael; Faught, Brent E

    2007-08-01

    Few studies have reported a sport-specific protocol to measure the aerobic power of ice hockey players using a predictive process. The purpose of our study was to validate an ice hockey aerobic field test on players of varying ages, abilities, and levels. The Faught Aerobic Skating Test (FAST) uses an on-ice continuous skating protocol on a course measuring 160 feet (48.8 m) using a CD to pace the skater with a beep signal to cross the starting line at each end of the course. The FAST incorporates the principle of increasing workload at measured time intervals during a continuous skating exercise. Step-wise multiple regression modelling was used to determine the estimate of aerobic power. Participants completed a maximal aerobic power test using a modified Bruce incremental treadmill protocol, as well as the on-ice FAST. Normative data were collected on 406 ice hockey players (291 males, 115 females) ranging in age from 9 to 25 y. A regression to predict maximum aerobic power was developed using body mass (kg), height (m), age (y), and maximum completed lengths of the FAST as the significant predictors of skating aerobic power (adjusted R2 = 0.387, SEE = 7.25 mL.kg-1.min-1, p < 0.0001). These results support the application of the FAST in estimating aerobic power among male and female competitive ice hockey players between the ages of 9 and 25 years.

  14. Development of the interval endurance capacity in elite and sub-elite youth field hockey players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink-Gemser, MT; Visscher, C; van Duijn, MAJ; Lemmink, KAPM

    Objectives: To gain more insight into the mechanisms that underlie the development of interval endurance capacity in talented youth field hockey players in the 12-19 age band. Methods: A total of 377 measurements were taken over three years. A longitudinal model for interval endurance capacity was

  15. Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad and the Video Physics application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics…

  16. Role of energy systems in two intermittent field tests in women field hockey players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Visscher, Susan H.

    The energetics of 2 field tests that reflect physical performance in intermittent sports (i.e., the Interval Shuttle Sprint Test [ISST] and the Interval Shuttle Run Test [ISRT]) were examined in 21 women field hockey players. The ISST required the players to perform 10 shuttle sprints starting every

  17. Checking in: An Analysis of the (Lack of) Body Checking in Women's Ice Hockey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper, we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not…

  18. Stick-slip and Torsional Friction Factors in Inclined Wellbores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarsnes Ulf Jakob F.

    2018-01-01

    The model is shown to have a good match with the surface and downhole behavior of two deviated wellbores for depths ranging from 1500 to 3000 meters. In particular, the model replicates the amplitude and period of the oscillations, in both the topside torque and the downhole RPM, as caused by the along-string stick slip. It is further shown that by using the surface behavior of the drill-string during rotational startup, an estimate of the static and dynamic friction factors along the wellbore can be obtained, even during stick-slip oscillations, if axial tension in the drillstring is considered. This presents a possible method to estimate friction factors in the field when off-bottom stick slip is encountered, and points in the direction of avoiding stick slip through the design of an appropriate torsional start-up procedure without the need of an explicit friction test.

  19. Prevalence of needle stick injuries among healthcare workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abe Olugbenga

    stick injury among healthcare workers at the Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Owerri. Materials and ... health workers when exposed to work .... factors and prevention of Health care workers at .... software called Statistical Package for Social.

  20. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. Methods: We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. Results: We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2–5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Interpretation: Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required. PMID:23209118

  1. Aggression, Violence and Injury in Minor League Ice Hockey: Avenues for Prevention of Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Cusimano

    Full Text Available In North America, more than 800,000 youth are registered in organized ice hockey leagues. Despite the many benefits of involvement, young players are at significant risk for injury. Body-checking and aggressive play are associated with high frequency of game-related injury including concussion. We conducted a qualitative study to understand why youth ice hockey players engage in aggressive, injury-prone behaviours on the ice.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 61 minor ice hockey participants, including male and female players, parents, coaches, trainers, managers and a game official. Players were aged 13-15 playing on competitive body checking teams or on non-body checking teams. Interviews were manually transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes relating to aggressive play in minor ice hockey.Parents, coaches, teammates and the media exert a large influence on player behavior. Aggressive behavior is often reinforced by the player's social environment and justified by players to demonstrate loyalty to teammates and especially injured teammates by seeking revenge particularly in competitive, body-checking leagues. Among female and male players in non-body checking organizations, aggressive play is not reinforced by the social environment. These findings are discussed within the framework of social identity theory and social learning theory, in order to understand players' need to seek revenge and how the social environment reinforces aggressive behaviors.This study provides a better understanding of the players' motivations and environmental influences around aggressive and violent play which may be conducive to injury. The findings can be used to help design interventions aimed at reducing aggression and related injuries sustained during ice hockey and sports with similar cultures and rules.

  2. Aggression, Violence and Injury in Minor League Ice Hockey: Avenues for Prevention of Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D; Ilie, Gabriela; Mullen, Sarah J; Pauley, Christopher R; Stulberg, Jennifer R; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    In North America, more than 800,000 youth are registered in organized ice hockey leagues. Despite the many benefits of involvement, young players are at significant risk for injury. Body-checking and aggressive play are associated with high frequency of game-related injury including concussion. We conducted a qualitative study to understand why youth ice hockey players engage in aggressive, injury-prone behaviours on the ice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 61 minor ice hockey participants, including male and female players, parents, coaches, trainers, managers and a game official. Players were aged 13-15 playing on competitive body checking teams or on non-body checking teams. Interviews were manually transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes relating to aggressive play in minor ice hockey. Parents, coaches, teammates and the media exert a large influence on player behavior. Aggressive behavior is often reinforced by the player's social environment and justified by players to demonstrate loyalty to teammates and especially injured teammates by seeking revenge particularly in competitive, body-checking leagues. Among female and male players in non-body checking organizations, aggressive play is not reinforced by the social environment. These findings are discussed within the framework of social identity theory and social learning theory, in order to understand players' need to seek revenge and how the social environment reinforces aggressive behaviors. This study provides a better understanding of the players' motivations and environmental influences around aggressive and violent play which may be conducive to injury. The findings can be used to help design interventions aimed at reducing aggression and related injuries sustained during ice hockey and sports with similar cultures and rules.

  3. Estudio etnográfico del portero de hockey sobre patines: una vida entre paradojas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Trabal Tañá

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio es la primera investigación en las ciencias de la actividad física y el deporte que ha analizado desde una perspectiva etnográfica el portero de hockey sobre patines. El objetivo principal es conocer cuáles son las valoraciones y los juicios que la comunidad del hockey sobre patines ha otorgado a esta figura y poder comprender cuál es la lógica externa existente a su alrededor. La metodología utilizada en este estudio ha sido la observación, la observación participante y 8 entrevistas en profundidad a porteros, jugadores y entrenadores de la máxima categoría del hockey sobre patines nacional. Los principales resultados muestran que: a el portero es considerado el jugador más determinante del equipo; b los juicios que se hacen de las actuaciones del portero tienen en cuenta variables cuantitativas: los goles encajados y el resultado final de un partido y/o competición; c dentro de la comunidad del hockey sobre patines se ha enquistado una definición de la identidad del portero que lo asocia a la locura, la soledad, la extravagancia y la rareza; d los porteros comparten una forma particular de comprender este deporte que fundamenta su asociación y su cooperación, y e la existencia del portero dentro del hockey sobre patines está llena de paradojas que se contraponen a la alta importancia atribuida a esta figura.

  4. Physiological correlates of skating performance in women's and men's ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilenstam, Kajsa M; Thorsen, Kim; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin B

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to identify relationships between physiological off-ice tests and on-ice performance in female and male ice hockey players on a comparable competitive level. Eleven women, 24 ± 3.0 years, and 10 male ice hockey players, 23 ± 2.4 years, were tested for background variables: height, body weight (BW), ice hockey history, and lean body mass (LBM) and peak torque (PT) of the thigh muscles, VO2peak and aerobic performance (Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation [OBLA], respiratory exchange ratio [RER1]) during an incremental bicycle ergometer test. Four different on-ice tests were used to measure ice skating performance. For women, skating time was positively correlated (p skating time was positively correlated to VO2peak (L O2·min(-1)) in the Acceleration test. The male group had significantly higher physiological test values in all variables (absolute and relative to BW) but not in relation to LBM. Selected off-ice tests predict skating performance for women but not for men. The group of women was significantly smaller and had a lower physiological performance than the group of men and were slower in the on-ice performance tests. However, gender differences in off-ice variables were reduced or disappeared when values were related to LBM, indicating a similar capacity of producing strength and aerobic power in female and male hockey players. Skating performance in female hockey players may be improved by increasing thigh muscle strength, oxygen uptake, and relative muscle mass.

  5. Factors Influencing the Underreporting of Concussion in Sports: A Qualitative Study of Minor Hockey Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley; Mullen, Sarah J; Wong, Mattew; Ilie, Gabriela

    2017-07-01

    The present study is to identify factors contributing to underreporting of concussion in adolescent athletes. Qualitative interviews. Participants were interviewed in an office environment. Interviews were conducted with 31 minor hockey players, 10 parents, 6 coaches, 4 trainers, 2 managers, and one game official. Players were 13 to 15 year old. With selective sampling, an inductive approach of analyzing the interviews was undertaken and themes were identified and analyzed. Underreporting is a complex phenomenon. A number of risk factors related to hockey culture, players, reference others, and rules of play were assessed. Reasons not reporting concussion is accepted in minor hockey. Aspects of hockey culture such as an overemphasis on winning games and upheld misperceptions about the risks associated with concussion were identified as relevant to the underreporting of concussions. Various factors relevant to the underreporting of concussions include player's motivation to win, group membership dynamics such as a player's role as the team's "enforcer," coaches' own motivation to win to further their own opportunities in the sport, and parents' personal financial interest or alternative agenda in terms of time commitments and their child's future career prospects. Our findings indicate that underreporting of concussion among those players interviewed appears to be prevalent and associated with misconceptions about injury risk, and a culture that both reinforces and encourages underreporting with tacit or overt complicity of parents and coaches. Our findings support the need to alter the culture of violence and tough play in hockey by education, rule changes, economic measures, and changes in governance of the sport. Interviewing more stakeholders and policy makers would shed light on such potential interventions.

  6. Found a USB stick? Go and infect your PC!

    CERN Document Server

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    Err. Wait. Please no! USB sticks are not innocent little things. They can quickly mutate into malicious nasty beasts! Just in the recent past, at least two physics experiments were suffering as their control and data acquisition PCs, respectively, were infected by USB sticks holding malicious code. A bit longer ago, a series of laptops were infected at a 2008 computing conference as an infected USB stick made its tour around. Bad luck for those who ran a Windows operating system and inserted that stick…   So, you found a USB stick in the cafeteria? Take care. If this were a lollipop, you wouldn’t just pick it up and lick it, would you? So beware of USB sticks whose origin or previous usage you don’t know. They might infect your PC once plugged in. In order to be on the safe side, accept and share only USB sticks whose owner you trust. Run up-to-date anti-virus software on your PC, make sure that its operating system is patched...

  7. Kinematics of the field hockey penalty corner push-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rebecca; Ness, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The aims of the study were to determine those variables that significantly affect push-in execution and thereby formulate coaching recommendations specific to the push-in. Two 50 Hz video cameras recorded transverse and longitudinal views of push-in trials performed by eight experienced and nine inexperienced male push-in performers. Video footage was digitized for data analysis of ball speed, stance width, drag distance, drag time, drag speed, centre of massy displacement and segment and stick displacements and velocities. Experienced push-in performers demonstrated a significantly greater (p push-in and a significantly faster ball speed than inexperienced performers. In addition, the experienced performers showed a significant positive correlation between ball speed and playing experience and tended to adopt a combination of simultaneous and sequential segment rotation to achieve accuracy and fast ball speed. The study yielded the following coaching recommendations for enhanced push-in performance: maximize drag distance by maximizing front foot-ball distance at the start of the push-in; use a combination of simultaneous and sequential segment rotations to optimise both accuracy and ball speed and maximize drag speed.

  8. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  9. Adolescent perspectives of the recreational ice hockey food environment and influences on eating behaviour revealed through photovoice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, M Susan; Hanning, Rhona M

    2018-05-01

    Unhealthy dietary behaviours are prevalent among adolescents. This might relate, in part, to obesogenic environments, including recreation food facilities. The REFRESH Study (Recreation Environment and Food Research: Experiences from Hockey) aimed to explore, from the perspectives of adolescent ice hockey players and parents, broad social and physical environmental influences on adolescent food behaviours associated with hockey participation. Players used photovoice to describe their food experiences in relation to ice hockey. The approach included photos, individual interviews and focus groups. Exemplar photographs were exhibited for stakeholders, including five parents who were interviewed. Interview and focus group transcripts were thematically analysed. Recreational ice hockey environment, Ontario, Canada, 2015-16. Ice hockey players (n 24) aged 11-15 years recruited from five leagues. Dominant influences among players included: their perceived importance of nutrients (e.g. protein) or foods (e.g. chocolate milk) for performance and recovery; marketing and branding (e.g. the pro-hockey aura of Tim Horton's®, Canada's largest quick-service restaurant); social aspects of tournaments and team meals; and moral values around 'right' and 'wrong' food choices. Both players and parents perceived recreational facility food options as unhealthy and identified that travel and time constraints contributed to less healthy choices. Results indicate recreation facilities are only one of a range of environments that influence eating behaviours of adolescent ice hockey players. Players' susceptibility to advertising/brand promotion and the value of healthy food choices for performance are findings that can inform policy and interventions to support healthy environments and behaviours.

  10. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (˜0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  11. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  12. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  13. Needle stick injury in a radiology department: a decade analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayani, R.; Rajani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of needle stick injury in health care workers of radiology department. Study type, settings and duration: Cross sectional, observational study conducted at the Radiology department of Aga Khan University hospital from January 2000 to May 2010. Subject and Methods: All self-reported needle stick injuries data of Health care workers of radiology department was recorded. The personnel involved (Radiologist, resident, radiographer, nurses etc), area of working and the causes of injury were identified including the procedural or post procedural details. Patient's status of hepatitis or blood borne infection was also noted. Data was recorded and analyzed in Excel worksheet. Results: A total of 55 health workers reported needle stick injuries at all sections of radiology departments with maximum number needle stick injuries at general radiography, fluoroscopy and IVP section. Radiographers and radiology residents received the maximum number of injuries. Major cause of injury was cannulation however, many injuries occurred during disposing or handling of bin. In majority of cases the patients were not infected with any known blood borne infections. Conclusions: Doctors and nurses get needle-stick injuries while carrying out clinical procedures, while, ancillary staff get infected post procedure during disposal of garbage. Policy message: Good occupational health and safety practices must be promoted to all staff. Safer disposal of needles is an important area where practice and procedure needs to be carefully reviewed. It is necessary to undertake a risk assessment, to offer counseling and Post Exposure Prophylaxis and treatment where necessary. (author)

  14. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated

  15. Scheduling for the National Hockey League Using a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Sam; While, Lyndon; Barone, Luigi

    We describe a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that derives schedules for the National Hockey League according to three objectives: minimising the teams' total travel, promoting equity in rest time between games, and minimising long streaks of home or away games. Experiments show that the system is able to derive schedules that beat the 2008-9 NHL schedule in all objectives simultaneously, and that it returns a set of schedules that offer a range of trade-offs across the objectives.

  16. Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in Division I Field Hockey Players During Competitive Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Katie M; Ledesma, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Sell, KM and Ledesma, AB. Heart rate and energy expenditure in Division I field hockey players during competitive play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2122-2128, 2016-The purpose of this study was to quantify energy expenditure and heart rate data for Division I female field hockey players during competitive play. Ten female Division I collegiate field hockey athletes (19.8 ± 1.6 years; 166.4 ± 6.1 cm; 58.2 ± 5.3 kg) completed the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test to determine maximal heart rate. One week later, all subjects wore a heart rate monitor during a series of 3 matches in an off-season competition. Average heart rate (AvHR), average percentage of maximal heart rate (AvHR%), peak exercise heart rate (PExHR), and percentage of maximal heart rate (PExHR%), time spent in each of the predetermined heart rate zones, and caloric expenditure per minute of exercise (kcalM) were determined for all players. Differences between positions (backs, midfielders, and forwards) were assessed. No significant differences in AvHR, AvHR%, PExHR, PExHR%, and %TM were observed between playing positions. The AvHR% and PExHR% for each position fell into zones 4 (77-93% HRmax) and 5 (>93% HRmax), respectively, and significantly more time was spent in zone 4 compared with zones 1, 2, 3, and 5 across all players (p ≤ 0.05). The kcalM reflected very heavy intensity exercise. The results of this study will contribute toward understanding the sport-specific physiological demands of women's field hockey and has specific implications for the duration and schedule of training regimens.

  17. The Size and Strength Development in Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff R. Leiter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ice hockey is a fast, physical sport that requires high levels of muscular strength, muscular endurance and agility. Objectives: This study was conducted to create a profile including: anthropometric measurement, muscular strength, muscular endurance, lower body jump height and distance, and agility characteristics for elite youth hockey players.  Methods: Pre-season off-ice testing results were retrospectively reviewed from a human performance database.  Variables included height, weight, body fat percentage, grip strength, push-ups/bench press, supine rows, the plank test, vertical jump, standing long jump, hip adductor and abductor strength, and the 5-10-5 shuttle, and. One-way ANOVAs (1group x 4 time and Tukeys post-hoc tests were performed to determine changes in the immediately successive age group (p<0.05. Results: Participants included male Bantam-(age: 13-14 and Midget-(age: 15-17 AAA ice-hockey players (n=260.  Age categories were grouped as 13 years old (yo(n=75, 14 yo (n=70, 15 yo (n=58, and 16-17 yo (n=57.  Increases between successive age groups were observed in the following variables: weight (13, 14, 15 and 16-17 yo, height (13 and 14 yo, left and right grip strength (13, 14, 15, and 16-17 yo, bench press (15 and 16-17 yo, left and right hip abduction (14, 15, and 16-17 yo, and vertical and standing long jump (13, 14, and 15 yo. Total time for the 5-10-5 shuttle run test decreased from 13 to 14yo, and 14 to 15 yo. Conclusion: Changes with age in off-ice performance variables of elite amateur hockey players should be recognized, followed, and addressed during player development to maximize the potential for elite performance and reduce the risk of injury.   Keywords: Athletic Performance, Training, Physical Fitness

  18. The positioning of federate sports in Portugal: handball, basketball, roller hockey and volleyball

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Celina; Correia, Abel

    2005-01-01

    Sport is constituted by a multiplicity of activities with different purposes, concepts and cultural representations. Before the increase of supply, Sports Federations need to understand the practitioners in relation to the several possibilities of practice and to position their sports according to their competitors. In this context, the purpose of this study is the positioning of team federate sports (handball, basketball, roller hockey and volleyball). According to Lindon et al.,...

  19. Comparison of effectiveness of advertising expenses during broadcasts of main hockey events

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlová, Natálie

    2017-01-01

    Title: Comparison of effectiveness of advertising expenses during broadcasts of main hockey events Objectives: The main goal of this dissertation is to compare the amount of money invested into the commercial advertisement during sport broadcasts at the ČT sport channel with viewer ratings. The used metric is a coefficient computed as a ratio between the viewer rating of the particular broadcast and the corresponding advertisement cost, normalized using Cost per Thousand method. Another goal ...

  20. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    OpenAIRE

    Kujala, U. M.; Taimela, S.; Antti-Poika, I.; Orava, S.; Tuominen, R.; Myllynen, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. DESIGN--Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. SETTING--Finland during 1987-91. SUBJECTS--621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and...

  1. Does self-confidence link to motivation? A study in field hockey athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, İhsan; Ekici, Sümmani; Soyer, Fikret; Eskiler, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicated some evidence of a positive relationship between motivation and self-efficacy beliefs/perceived competence/self-perceptions. Therefore, the relationship between self-confidence and motivation was investigated in sport context in this study. Participants of this study were 111 field hockey athletes. Sport Motivation Scale (Pelletier et al., 1995) and Self-confidence Scales (Tokinan, 2008) were used for data collection. SPSS.17 package program was used to analyse the...

  2. Constellation Stick Figures Convey Information about Gravity and Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Leod, David Matthew; Mc Leod, Roger David

    2008-10-01

    12/21/98, at America's Stonehenge, DMM detected, and drew, the full stick-figure equivalent of Canis Major, CM, as depicted by our Wolf Clan leaders, and many others. Profound, foundational physics is implied, since this occurred in the Watch House there, hours before the ``model rose.'' Similar configurations like Orion, Osiris of ancient Egypt, show that such figures are projected through solid parts of the Earth, as two-dimensional equivalents of the three-dimensional star constellations. Such ``sticks'' indicate that ``line equivalents'' connect the stars, and the physical mechanism projects outlines detectable by traditional cultures. We had discussed this ``flashlight'' effect, and recognized some of its implications. RDM states that the flashlight is a strong, distant neutrino source; the lines represent neutrinos longitudinally aligned in gravitational excitation, opaque, to earthbound, transient, transversely excited neutrinos. ``Sticks'' represent ``graviton'' detection. Neutrinos' longitudinal alignment accounts for the weakness of gravitational force.

  3. Light-stick: A problem of marine pollution in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar-Ribeiro, Caio; Rosa, Helena Costi; Rocha, Daniele Oliveira; Dos Reis, Camila Galli Baldini; Prado, Tabata Sarti; Muniz, Daniela Hernandes Coimbra; Carrasco, Raquel; Silva, Flávia Milão; Martinelli-Filho, José Eduardo; Palanch-Hans, Maria Fernanda

    2017-04-15

    Light-sticks are used as bait in surface long-line fishing, to capture swordfish and other large pelagic predators. When discharged in the ocean, it may reach the beaches. The traditional Brazilian community of Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia, use light-sticks as a medicine for rheumatism, vitiligo and mycoses. It may affect the marine life when its content leak in the open ocean. This work evaluated and identified the acute and chronic toxicity of the light-stick. A high acute toxicity was observed in the mobility/mortality of Artemia sp.; in the fertilization of sea urchin eggs, and a high chronic toxicity in the development of the pluteus larvae of the same sea urchin. The main compounds that probably caused toxicity were the volatiles such as the fluorescent PAH and oxidants such as the hydrogen peroxide. Its disposal in the open ocean is a potential threat for marine life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Back Squat Potentiates Both Vertical and Horizontal Jump Performance in Collegiate Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cale Bechtel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back squats (BSQ have been shown to transiently improve performance in explosive vertical movements such as the vertical jump (VJ. Still, understanding of this phenomenon, termed post-activation potentiation (PAP, remains nebulous as it relates to explosive horizontal movements. Objective: Therefore, the purpose of the present investigation was to assess whether heavy BSQ can potentiate both VJ and horizontal jump (HJ performance. Method: Nine male ice hockey players from the Long Beach State ice hockey team performed five testing sessions separated by 96-hours. The first testing session consisted of a one repetition maximum (1-RM BSQ to determine subsequent testing loads. The four subsequent testing sessions, which were randomized for order, consisted of five repetitions of BSQ at 87% 1-RM followed by horizontal jump (BSQ-HJ, five repetitions of BSQ at 87% 1-RM followed by vertical jump (BSQ-VJ, horizontal jump only (CT-HJ and vertical jump only (CT-VJ. During the potentiated conditions, rest intervals were set at five minutes between the BSQ and either VJ or HJ. Alpha-level was set a priori at 0.05. Results: The results indicate that both vertical (p=0.017 and horizontal (p=0.003 jump were significantly increased (VJ= +5.51cm, HJ= +11.55cm following a BSQ.  Conclusion: These findings suggest that BSQ may improve both vertical and horizontal jump performance in athletes who participate in sports emphasizing horizontal power, such as ice hockey.

  5. Improvement of Ice Hockey Players' On-Ice Sprint With Combined Plyometric and Strength Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dæhlin, Torstein E; Haugen, Ole C; Haugerud, Simen; Hollan, Ivana; Raastad, Truls; Rønnestad, Bent R

    2017-08-01

    Combined plyometric and strength training has previously been suggested as a strategy to improve skating performance in ice hockey players. However, the effects of combined plyometric and strength training have not previously been compared with the effects of strength training only. To compare the effects of combined plyometric and strength training on ice hockey players' skating sprint performance with those of strength training only. Eighteen participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups that completed 5 strength-training sessions/wk for 8 wk. One group included plyometric exercises at the start of 3 sessions/wk (PLY+ST), and the other group included core exercises in the same sessions (ST). Tests of 10- and 35-m skating sprints, horizontal jumping, 1-repetition-maximum (1 RM) squat, skating multistage aerobic test (SMAT), maximal oxygen consumption, repeated cycle sprints, and body composition were performed before and after the intervention. The participants increased their 1RM squat, lean mass, and body mass (P plyometric and strength training for 8 wk was superior to strength training alone at improving 10-m on-ice sprint performance in high-level ice hockey players.

  6. Evaluation of cardiovascular demands of game play and practice in women's ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Barry A; Wilson, Meredith H; Judelson, Daniel A; Rundell, Kenneth W

    2003-05-01

    Preparation for the physical demands of competition often involves game simulation during practice. This paradigm is thought to promote physiological adaptations that enhance maximal performance. However, a mismatch between practice intensity and actual competition intensity may not provide adequate training to achieve optimal game-play fitness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of practice in meeting the cardiovascular demands of a women's ice hockey game. Heart rate (HR) data from 11 U.S. National Women's Ice Hockey team members were collected (5-second intervals) during a game and a typical practice session. Data was normalized to individual HRmax determined during Vo(2)max testing. Working time was defined as a game shift or practice-working interval. Mean working HR was greater during the game than the practice, 90 +/- 2% and 76 +/- 3% of HRmax, respectively (p game or practice) >90% HRmax was also longer during the game than the practice, 10.5 +/- 4.1% and 5.6 +/- 3.5% (p 80% HRmax, and mean resting HR were not different between game and practice (68 +/- 7% vs. 69 +/- 5%, 23.2 +/- 5.3% vs. 26.1 +/- 9.2%, and 59 +/- 8% vs. 56 +/- 5%, respectively). Elite women hockey players experience significantly greater cardiovascular load during game play than during practice. This mismatch in cardiovascular demand may prevent players from achieving "game shape," thus affecting competition play.

  7. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, U. M.; Taimela, S.; Antti-Poika, I.; Orava, S.; Tuominen, R.; Myllynen, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. DESIGN--Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. SETTING--Finland during 1987-91. SUBJECTS--621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. RESULTS--54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. CONCLUSIONS--Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball. PMID:8520333

  8. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, U M; Taimela, S; Antti-Poika, I; Orava, S; Tuominen, R; Myllynen, P

    1995-12-02

    To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. Finland during 1987-91. 621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. 54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball.

  9. A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinney, H A; Dewart, Randy; Game, Alex; Snydmiller, Gary; Warburton, Darren; Bell, Gordon

    2008-08-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.

  10. Dissociative sticking of CH4 on Ru(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk; Holmblad, Peter Mikal; Chorkendorff, Ib

    1999-01-01

    In this study the CH4 dissociation probability on Ru(0001) is found for various translational and vibrational energies. The absolute sticking values are determined from King and Wells experiments and carbon uptake curves. The carbon amount is determined from the recombination signal of carbon...... with oxygen obtained after the beam exposure when heating in an oxygen atmosphere. The measured sticking coefficient of CH4 is strongly enhanced both by increasing the translational and the vibrational energy of the CH4 molecule. A model is applied to the data and an estimate of the thermal activation energy...

  11. Movement Characteristics and Heart Rate Profiles Displayed by Female University Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women’s ice hockey is widely popular but the various movement patterns, heart rate responses and work to rest ratios during competitive games has not been adequately investigated.  Objectives: This study determined the frequency and duration of movements that female players perform in ice hockey games using time-motion analysis. The intensity of the game activities were also assessed by heart rate (HR responses and work to rest ratios (W:R. Methods: Twenty-two university female ice hockey players were filmed performing a number of movements during three regular season league games. Results: The following movement patterns were categorized in percent of time performed during the games: forward gliding on ice (36.3 ± 6.2%, forward skating at a moderate intensity (31.2 ± 6.2%, backward glide (9.5 ± 4.1%, standing (7.1 ± 5.9%, struggling (6.3 ± 2.6%, forward skating at maximal intensity (5.3 ± 3.3%, backwards skating at moderate intensity (3.1 ± 3.3%. Defense stood and glided backward more than forwards but skated less at a high or maximal intensity. Positional differences were also observed during different game play situations. The highest HR (±SD achieved during shifts was 182 ± 10 and HR averaged 174 ± 9 bpm for the whole duration of the shifts. The shift and game W:R ratios for all players were 1:1.6 and 1: 3.7, respectively. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that female ice hockey games are played at a low to moderate intensity most of the time (~84% of the time spent and are interspersed with brief, intermittent high intensity activities that vary according to player position and game play situation. It was also apparent that female players display markedly high HR responses during game-play indicative of a substantial cardiovascular demand in ice hockey. Keywords: game analysis, work to rest ratios, exercise intensity

  12. Powder properties and compaction parameters that influence punch sticking propensity of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shubhajit; Taylor, Lisa J; Murphy, Brendan; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F; Dawson, Neil; Mullarney, Matthew P; Meenan, Paul; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2017-04-15

    Punch sticking is a frequently occurring problem that challenges successful tablet manufacturing. A mechanistic understanding of the punch sticking phenomenon facilitates the design of effective strategies to solve punch sticking problems of a drug. The first step in this effort is to identify process parameters and particle properties that can profoundly affect sticking performance. This work was aimed at elucidating the key material properties and compaction parameters that influence punch sticking by statistically analyzing punch sticking data of 24 chemically diverse compounds obtained using a set of tooling with removable upper punch tip. Partial least square (PLS) analysis of the data revealed that particle surface area and tablet tensile strength are the most significant factors attributed to punch sticking. Die-wall pressure, ejection force, and take-off force also correlate with sticking, but to a lesser extent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Lipsticks and Blush Sticks in Genetic Profiling for Human Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Nouman Rasool; Ahmad Farooq

    2016-01-01

    The core objectives of the current study are to generate human DNA profiles from used lipsticks and blush sticks of various brands available in Pakistan. A total of 12 international and local brands of lipsticks and blush sticks were selected. The lipsticks and blush sticks were applied by twenty different healthy female volunteers of 21-30 years of age. The heads of used lipsticks and blush sticks were swabbed with dry sterile cotton swabs. The qualitative and quantitative analysis was done ...

  14. Hepatitis B Vaccination Status and Needle stick Injuries among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatits B virus (HBV) is the most common blood borne pathogen that poses an occupational risk to Health-care workers. The incidence of infection following needle stick injury has been reported to be high among medical students. Effective vaccines against HBV are available. The aim of this study was to ...

  15. Incense and Joss Stick Making in Small Household Factories, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Siripanich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incense and joss stick are generally used in the world. Most products were made in small household factories. There are many environmental and occupational hazards in these factories. Objective: To evaluate the workplace environmental and occupational hazards in small household incense and joss stick factories in Roi-Et, Thailand. Methods: Nine small household factories in rural areas of Roi-Et, Thailand, were studied. Dust concentration and small aerosol particles were counted through real time exposure monitoring. The inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES was used for quantitative measurement of heavy metal residue in incense products. Results: Several heavy metals were found in dissolved dye and joss sticks. Those included barium, manganese, and lead. Rolling and shaking processes produced the highest concentration of dust and aerosols. Only 3.9 % of female workers used personal protection equipment. Conclusion: Dust and chemicals were major threats in small household incense and joss stick factories in Thailand. Increasing awareness towards using personal protection equipment and emphasis on elimination of environmental workplace hazards should be considered to help the workers of this industry.

  16. The Rise of Carrots and the Decline of Sticks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geest, G.; Dari-Mattiacci, G.

    2013-01-01

    There is a remarkable tendency in modern legal systems to increasingly use carrots. This trend is not limited to legal systems but can also be observed in, for instance, parenting styles, social control mechanisms, and even law schools’ teaching methods. Yet, at first glance, sticks appear to be a

  17. "Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun": Getting Real in Upward Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Barbara G.; Adkins, Theresa A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a teacher found literature for Upward Bound students. Presents Geoffrey Canada's "Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun: A Personal History of Violence in America" as a nonfiction work to provide clarity and connections that might not have been available in a fictional work, yet it had elements of literary fiction that made the text…

  18. Phytochemical screening and mineral composition of chewing sticks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical screening of the stems of Garcinia kola, Dennettia tripetala, Acioa barteri, Dialium guineense, Maesobotrya barteri, Mallotus oppositifolius and Psidium guajava which are commonly used as chewing sticks in southern Nigeria revealed the presence of bioactive compounds comprising saponins, tannins, ...

  19. Neither a Toddler nor a Stick-in-the-Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrea Livi

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to express the views from the "outside," from laypeople who want to go to museums, but perhaps find themselves not going very often. Adult visitors to history museums are often treated as either toddlers or sticks-in-the-mud, where they are assumed to break anything they touch, or enjoy didactic lectures. As a result,…

  20. Vehicle steering by side stick: optimising steering characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, J.; Hogema, J.H.; Brekelmans, J.A.W.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a study that was conducted to investigate the possibilities for optimizing task performance when driving a side stick-steered vehicle. Using steer-by-wire technology, a conventional steering system was mimicked, thus yielding the possibility to modify the steering

  1. Sticking in muon catalyzed D-T fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitjean, C.; Sherman, R.H.; Bossy, H.; Daniel, H.; Hartmann, F.J.; Neumann, W.; Schmidt, G.; Egidy, T. von

    1986-10-01

    The issue of μα sticking after muon catalyzed DT fusion is controversial, since a number of theoretical and experimental results came out recently with sticking values ω s varying over a large range. After a review of this situation, our measurements at SIN and methods of sticking analysis from neutron time structures are presented in detail. The important point is the correct understanding of the experimentally observed time distributions. At high density (liquid DT) we find, after correction for other fusion channels, for DT sticking ω s (0.45 +- 0.05)%, not dependent on tritium concentration c t and in accordance with our X-ray observations. At low density (DT gas, φ 3% - 8%) our preliminary result is 0.50 +- 0.10%, giving a ratio 1.1 +- 0.2 in agreement with conventional theories, but strongly disagreeing with the LAMPF experiment of S.E. Jones et al. Our result sets the maximum fusion output per muon to less than 220 +- 20. (author)

  2. A biomechanical comparison in the lower limb and lumbar spine between a hit and drag flick in field hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Leo; Rosalie, Simon M; Sherry, Dorianne; Loh, Wei Bing; Sjurseth, Andreas M; Iyengar, Shrikant; Wild, Catherine Y

    2018-03-01

    Research has revealed that field hockey drag flickers have greater odds of hip and lumbar injuries compared to non-drag flickers (DF). This study aimed to compare the biomechanics of a field hockey hit and a specialised field hockey drag flick. Eighteen male and seven female specialised hockey DF performed a hit and a drag flick in a motion analysis laboratory with an 18-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system and a calibrated multichannel force platform to examine differences in lower limb and lumbar kinematics and kinetics. Results revealed that drag flicks were performed with more of a forward lunge on the left lower limb resulting in significantly greater left ankle dorsiflexion, knee, hip and lumbar flexion (Pshit. Drag flicks were also performed with significantly greater lateral flexion (P hit. Differences in kinematics lead to greater shear, compression and tensile forces in multiple left lower limb and lumbar joints in the drag flick compared to the hit (P hit may have ramifications with respect to injury in field hockey drag flickers.

  3. MODEL PENGEMBANGAN PERMAINAN FUN HOCKEY PADA SISWA KELAS XI SMA NEGERI 1 BAWANG KECAMATAN BAWANG KABUPATEN BATANG TAHUN 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Putri Vembriana Dewi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to produce a model of the development of the game Fun Hockey in the XI student class of SMAN 1 Bawang, Bawang Subdistrict, Batang. The method used is the development of Borg & Gall, namely: (1 to analyze the products that will be developed that are obtained from the information collection, including field observations and study of literature, (2 develop a form of initial product model game Fun Hockey, (3 expert validation test which uses a physical education expert (hockey skills and learning experts physical education in high school, as well as small scale test, using questionnaires and consultations later in the analysis, (4 the first product revision, revision of the product based on the results of expert evaluation and testing of small-scale (12 students, (5 field trials (28 students, (6 the revision of the final product is done based on the results of field trials, (7 the outcome Fun Hockey game for students of XI class generated through the revision of field trials. From the data on the differences can concluded that the Fun Hockey Game model development can be implemented as an alternative model for students learning physical education XI class SMAN 1 Bawang, Bawang Subdistrict, Batang.

  4. 21 CFR 102.45 - Fish sticks or portions made from minced fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fish sticks or portions made from minced fish. 102... for Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.45 Fish sticks or portions made from minced fish. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as fish sticks or...

  5. Occurrence and knowledge about needle stick injury in nursing students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasuna, J.; Sharma, R.

    2015-01-01

    Needle stick injury (NSI) became a major issue and most of the research focuses on Nurses, Doctors and other health care workers, but at the same time nursing students in clinical duties are at high risk. Studies are available which examined NSI only in Medical students and health care workers. The present study is aimed to measure the occurrence of needle stick injury along with post exposure measures and evaluation of the knowledge regarding needle stick injury among nursing student. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in North-East India in 2013. The study participants comprised of 83 nursing students studying in 4th year B.Sc. (N) and 3rd year General Nursing and Midwifery (GNM). Students were questioned regarding their occurrence to Needle Stick Injury throughout their clinical training and measures taken following the exposure. They were also asked to complete the Knowledge questionnaire on NSI. Results: The study among 83 nursing students included 43 (51.81%) GNM 3rd year and 40 (48.19%) B.Sc. Nursing Students. Out of a total 83 students, 75 (90.36%) were females. The occurrence of NSI during their course was reported by 33 (39.76%) participants. The maximum NSI occurred during first year of course (57.57%). It was found that 18 (54.54%) of NSIs were not reported. Among those exposed, only 5 (15.15%) students had undergone blood investigation and very few students took post exposure measures. It was found that, only 23 (69.69%) students were immunized against Hepatitis B before NSI. Conclusion: The present study indicated a high incidence of needle stick injuries among nursing students with more under-reported cases and subjects were not aware of post exposure measures. It is essential to deal above problems by regular training on real-life procedure at the entry level and reporting system should be more user-friendly platform. (author)

  6. Examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates in male youth ice-hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemez, S; Baker, J; Horton, S; Wattie, N; Weir, P

    2014-12-01

    The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey players from ages 10 to 15 years (n = 14 325). In Study 1, dropout was highest among players born in quartiles three and four [χ(2) (3) = 16.32, P < 0.05; w = 0.06], while Study 2 found dropped out players to have less movement between competition levels compared to retained players. This study confirms a relationship between relative age and dropout from ice-hockey and adds further depth to our understanding of this persistent phenomenon. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. THE ROLE OF AEROBIC CAPACITY IN HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT EFFORTS IN ICE-HOCKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stanula

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity ( ·VO2max and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake ( ·VO2max. The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001. An analysis of the fatigue index (FI calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%. The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between ·VO2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =–0.584 was significant (p=0.003. The variance in the index of players’ fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in ·VO2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78. Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players.

  8. Professional-applied physical training students by means of field hockey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pylypey L.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the modern crisis state of health and physical preparedness of graduating students of higher institutes is resulted. Most graduating students can not high-quality work on a production. Not efficiency of the existent system of physical education is rotined in the institutes of higher. The terms of intensification of educational process are considered. Efficiency and forming actuality is investigational for the students of motivation to the select kind of sport (field hockey. The stages of introduction of innovative approaches, new credit-module technologies in the river-bed of the Bologna system are presented.

  9. Four Weeks of Off-Season Training Improves Peak Oxygen Consumption in Female Field Hockey Players

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsey T. Funch; Erik Lind; Larissa True; Deborah Van Langen; John T. Foley; James F. Hokanson

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the changes in peak oxygen consumption ( V ˙O2peak) and running economy (RE) following four-weeks of high intensity training and concurrent strength and conditioning during the off-season in collegiate female field hockey players. Fourteen female student-athletes (age 19.29 ± 0.91 years) were divided into two training groups, matched from baseline V ˙O2peak: High Intensity Training (HITrun; n = 8) and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT; ...

  10. Cardiovascular prevention in a high risk sport, ice hockey: applications in wider sports physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H

    2006-11-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk - including history taking, chart review, physical examination - and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients.

  11. The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis W. Carlton; Alan S. Frankel; Elisabeth M. Landes

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on franchise relocation. Before one can fully understand the effect of the restriction, one must understand the theory of how sports leagues operate an...

  12. Sports hernia in National Hockey League players: does surgery affect performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoi, Andre; O'Neill, Craig; Damsgaard, Christopher; Fehring, Keith; Tom, James

    2013-01-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a complex injury that results in loss of play in competitive athletes, especially hockey players. The number of reported sports hernias has been increasing, and the importance of their management is vital. There are no studies reporting whether athletes can return to play at preinjury levels. The focus of this study was to evaluate the productivity of professional hockey players before an established athletic pubalgia diagnosis contrasted with the productivity after sports hernia repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Professional National Hockey League (NHL) players who were reported to have a sports hernia and who underwent surgery from 2001 to 2008 were identified. Statistics were gathered on the players' previous 2 full seasons and compared with the statistics 2 full seasons after surgery. Data concerning games played, goals, average time on ice, time of productivity, and assists were gathered. Players were divided into 3 groups: group A incorporated all players, group B were players with 6 or fewer seasons of play, and group C consisted of players with 7 or more seasons of play. A control group was chosen to compare player deterioration or improvement over a career; each player selected for the study had a corresponding control player with the same tenure in his career and position during the same years. Forty-three hockey players were identified to have had sports hernia repairs from 2001 to 2008; ultimately, 80% would return to play 2 or more full seasons. Group A had statistically significant decreases in games played, goals scored, and assists. Versus the control group, the decreases in games played and assists were supported. Statistical analysis showed significant decreases in games played, goals scored, assists, and average time on ice the following 2 seasons in group C, which was also seen in comparison with the control group. Group B (16 players) showed only statistical significance in games played versus the control group

  13. Effects of stick design features on perceptions of characteristics of cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Ron; Savvas, Steven

    2013-09-01

    To examine the extent (if any) that cigarette stick dimension, tipping paper design and other decorative design/branding have on Australian smokers' perceptions of those cigarettes. An internet survey of 160 young Australian adult ever-smokers who were shown computer images of three sets of cigarette sticks--five sticks of different lengths and diameters (set A), five sticks with different tipping paper design (set B) and four sticks of different decorative design (set C). Branding was a between-subjects randomised condition for set C. For each set, respondents ranked sticks on most and least attractive, highest and lowest quality and strongest and weakest taste. Cigarette sticks were perceived as different on attractiveness, quality and strength of taste. Standard stick length/diameter was perceived as the most attractive and highest quality stick, with men more inclined to rate a slim stick as less attractive. A stick with a cork-patterned tipping paper and a gold band was seen as most attractive, of highest quality and strongest in taste compared to other tipping designs. Branded sticks were seen as more attractive, higher in quality and stronger tasting than non-branded designs, regardless of brand, although the effects were stronger for a prestige compared with a budget brand. Characteristics of the cigarette stick affect smokers' perceptions of the attributes of those cigarettes and thus are a potential means by which product differentiation can occur. A comprehensive policy to eliminate promotional aspects of cigarette design and packaging needs to include rules about stick design.

  14. Fatigue effects upon sticking region and electromyography in a six-repetition maximum bench press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Saeterbakken, Atle Hole

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the sticking region and concomitant neuromuscular activation of the prime movers during six-repetition maximum (RM) bench pressing. We hypothesised that both peak velocities would decrease and that the electromyography (EMG) of the prime movers (deltoid, major pectoralis and triceps) would increase during the pre-sticking and sticking region during the six repetitions due to fatigue. Thirteen resistance-trained males (age 22.8 ± 2.2 years, stature 1.82 ± 0.06 m, body mass 83.4 ± 7.6 kg) performed 6-RM bench presses. Barbell kinematics and EMG activity of pectoralis major, deltoid anterior, and triceps brachii during the pre-, sticking and post-sticking region of each repetition in a 6-RM bench press were analysed. For both the sticking as the post-sticking region, the time increased significantly from the first to the sixth repetition. Vertical barbell height at the start of sticking region was lower, while the height at the end of the sticking region and post-sticking region did not change during the six repetitions. It was concluded that in 6-RM bench pressing performance, the sticking region is a poor mechanical force region due to the unchanged barbell height at the end of the sticking region. Furthermore, when fatigue occurs, the pectoralis and the deltoid muscles are responsible for surpassing the sticking region as indicated by their increased activity during the pre- and sticking region during the six-repetitions bench press.

  15. Slip-stick excitation and travelling waves excite silo honking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warburton Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silo honking is the harmonic sound generated by the discharge of a silo filled with a granular material. In industrial storage silos, the acoustic emission during discharge of PET-particles forms a nuisance for the environment and may ultimately result in structural failure. This work investigates the phenomenon experimentally using a laboratory-scale silo, and successfully correlates the frequency of the emitted sound with the periodicity of the mechanical motion of the grains. The key driver is the slip-stick interaction between the wall and the particles, characterized as a wave moving upwards through the silo. A quantitative correlation is established for the first time between the frequency of the sound, measured with an electret microphone, and the slip-frequency, measured with a high-speed camera. In the lower regions of the tube, both the slip-stick motion and the honking sound disappear.

  16. Natural oils and waxes: studies on stick bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Lívia; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre; Budai, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present article was to examine the role of origin and quantity of selected natural oils and waxes in the determination of the thermal properties and hardness of stick bases. The natural oils and waxes selected for the study were sunflower, castor, jojoba, and coconut oils. The selected waxes were yellow beeswax, candelilla wax, and carnauba wax. The hardness of the formulations is a critical parameter from the aspect of their application. Hardness was characterized by the measurement of compression strength along with the softening point, the drop point, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It can be concluded that coconut oil, jojoba oil, and carnauba wax have the greatest influence on the thermal parameters of stick bases.

  17. Slip-stick excitation and travelling waves excite silo honking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Katarzyna; Porte, Elze; Vriend, Nathalie

    2017-06-01

    Silo honking is the harmonic sound generated by the discharge of a silo filled with a granular material. In industrial storage silos, the acoustic emission during discharge of PET-particles forms a nuisance for the environment and may ultimately result in structural failure. This work investigates the phenomenon experimentally using a laboratory-scale silo, and successfully correlates the frequency of the emitted sound with the periodicity of the mechanical motion of the grains. The key driver is the slip-stick interaction between the wall and the particles, characterized as a wave moving upwards through the silo. A quantitative correlation is established for the first time between the frequency of the sound, measured with an electret microphone, and the slip-frequency, measured with a high-speed camera. In the lower regions of the tube, both the slip-stick motion and the honking sound disappear.

  18. Antioxidant capacity of chewing stick miswak Salvadora persica

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Khan, Jalaluddin A

    2013-01-01

    Background Chewing stick (miswak Salvadora persica L.) is an effective tool for oral hygiene. It possessed various biological properties including significant antibacterial and anti-fungal effects. In the present study, we evaluated the antioxidant compounds in miswak. Method Miswak root was extracted with 80% methanol. Methanol extract as antioxidant was evaluated by using DPPH, ABTS and phosphomolybdenum complex assays and analysis by GC-MS. Peroxidase, catalase and polyphenoloxidase assays...

  19. Studying Hooke's Law by Using a Pogo Stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Perhaps the pogo stick was little Robert Hooke's favorite childhood toy, consisting of a stiff spring inserted in a tube fixed at the upper end and connected to a moveable rod at the other. Hand grips and a foot rest are connected to the tube. The idea is to jump on it taking advantage of the force provided by the spring when it is compressed.…

  20. Development of Stick and Ball Sports on Gateball

    OpenAIRE

    Indriyanti; Tri Nur Harsono; Rumini

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to make product design development of stick and ball sports in gateball. The approach used in this study is a method of Research and Development. The subject of this research is the Central Java on gateball club event gateball in Semarang and Yogyakarta. Experts and expert expert gateball expert in mechanical engineering. The data analysis phase the work field, and the data analysis stage include observation, observation, interviews, and documentation of the te...

  1. Nonparametric Bayesian models through probit stick-breaking processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Abel; Dunson, David B

    2011-03-01

    We describe a novel class of Bayesian nonparametric priors based on stick-breaking constructions where the weights of the process are constructed as probit transformations of normal random variables. We show that these priors are extremely flexible, allowing us to generate a great variety of models while preserving computational simplicity. Particular emphasis is placed on the construction of rich temporal and spatial processes, which are applied to two problems in finance and ecology.

  2. Squeal vibrations, glass sounds, and the stick-slip effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patitsas, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the squeal acoustic emissions when a chalk is rubbed on a blackboard or better on a ceramic plate, and those when a wet finger is rubbed on a smooth surface, such as a glass surface, is sought in the stick-slip effect between the rubbing surfaces. In the case of the squealing chalk, the stick-slip effect is anchored by shear modes of vibration in about a 0.3 mm thick chalk powder band at the rubbing interface, while in the case of the wet finger on glass, by such modes in a band comprising the finger skin. Furthermore, there are the interfacial bands at the contact areas that result in the decrease of the friction coefficient with relative velocity of slide, i.e., the condition for the stick-slip effect to occur. Such bands are basically composed of the asperities on the surface of the chalk band and of the epidermis ridges and the water layer, respectively. (author)

  3. Earthquake source properties from instrumented laboratory stick-slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Lockner, David A.; Thomas, Marion Y.; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2017-01-01

    Stick-slip experiments were performed to determine the influence of the testing apparatus on source properties, develop methods to relate stick-slip to natural earthquakes and examine the hypothesis of McGarr [2012] that the product of stiffness, k, and slip duration, Δt, is scale-independent and the same order as for earthquakes. The experiments use the double-direct shear geometry, Sierra White granite at 2 MPa normal stress and a remote slip rate of 0.2 µm/sec. To determine apparatus effects, disc springs were added to the loading column to vary k. Duration, slip, slip rate, and stress drop decrease with increasing k, consistent with a spring-block slider model. However, neither for the data nor model is kΔt constant; this results from varying stiffness at fixed scale.In contrast, additional analysis of laboratory stick-slip studies from a range of standard testing apparatuses is consistent with McGarr's hypothesis. kΔt is scale-independent, similar to that of earthquakes, equivalent to the ratio of static stress drop to average slip velocity, and similar to the ratio of shear modulus to wavespeed of rock. These properties result from conducting experiments over a range of sample sizes, using rock samples with the same elastic properties as the Earth, and scale-independent design practices.

  4. The transperiosteal "inside-out" occipital artery harvesting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Arnau; Tabani, Halima; Ding, Xinmin; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Rodriguez Rubio, Roberto; Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Nisson, Peyton; Kola, Olivia; Gandhi, Sirin; Yousef, Sonia; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-01-26

    OBJECTIVE The occipital artery (OA) is a frequently used donor vessel for posterior circulation bypass procedures due to its proximity to the recipient vessels and its optimal caliber, length, and flow rate. However, its tortuous course through multiple layers of suboccipital muscles necessitates layer-by-layer dissection. The authors of this cadaveric study aimed to describe a landmark-based novel anterograde approach to harvest OA in a proximal-to-distal "inside-out" fashion, which avoids multilayer dissection. METHODS Sixteen cadaveric specimens were prepared for surgical simulation, and the OA was harvested using the classic (n = 2) and novel (n = 14) techniques. The specimens were positioned three-quarters prone, with 45° contralateral head rotation. An inverted hockey-stick incision was made from the spinous process of C-2 to the mastoid tip, and the distal part of the OA was divided to lift up a myocutaneous flap, including the nuchal muscles. The OA was identified using the occipital groove (OG), the digastric muscle (DM) and its groove (DG), and the superior oblique muscle (SOM) as key landmarks. The OA was harvested anterogradely from the OG and within the flap until the skin incision was reached (proximal-to-distal technique). In addition, 35 dry skulls were assessed bilaterally (n = 70) to study additional craniometric landmarks to infer the course of the OA in the OG. RESULTS The OA was consistently found running in the OG, which was found between the posterior belly of the DM and the SOM. The mean total length of the mobilized OA was 12.8 ± 1.2 cm, with a diameter of 1.3 ± 0.1 mm at the suboccipital segment and 1.1 ± 0.1 mm at the skin incision. On dry skulls, the occipitomastoid suture (OMS) was found to be medial to the OG in the majority of the cases (68.6%), making it a useful landmark to locate the OG and thus the proximal OA. CONCLUSIONS The anterograde transperiosteal inside-out approach for harvesting the OA is a fast and easy technique

  5. Practicing field hockey skills along the contextual interference continuum: a comparison of five practice schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Lay, Brendan; Grove, J Robert; Medic, Nikola; Razman, Rizal

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI) effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners. Key pointsThe contextual interference effect did not surface when using sport skills.There appears to be no difference between blocked and random practice schedules in the learning of field hockey skills.Low (blocked), moderate (mixed) or high (random) interference practice schedules can be used effectively when conducting a multiple skill practice session for beginners.

  6. Moral disengagement in the legitimation and realization of aggressive behavior in soccer and ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traclet, Alan; Moret, Orlan; Ohl, Fabien; Clémence, Alain

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify that the level of tolerance for aggression is higher in a collective context than in an individual context (polarization effect), and to test the association between moral disengagement, team and self-attitudes toward aggression, and tolerance and realization of aggressive acts in Swiss male soccer and ice hockey. In individual or collective answering conditions, 104 soccer and 98 ice hockey players viewed videotaped aggressive acts and completed a questionnaire, including measures of the perceived legitimacy of videotaped aggression, of the teammates, coach, and self attitudes toward transgressions (modified TNQ), of the moral disengagement in sport (modified MDSS-S), and of self-reported aggressive behavior. A multilevel analysis confirmed a strong polarization effect on the perception of instrumental aggression, the videotaped aggressive acts appearing more tolerated in the collective than in the individual answering condition. Using a structural equation modeling, we found that the moral disengagement, which mediates the effects of perceived coach and ego attitudes toward transgressions, correlates positively with the tolerance of hostile aggression within teams, and with the level of aggressive acts reported by the participants. Aggr. Behav. Aggr. Behav. 42:123-133, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Skating mechanics of change-of-direction manoeuvres in ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Antoine; Turcotte, René A; Pearsall, David J

    2014-11-01

    Ice hockey requires rapid transitions between skating trajectories to effectively navigate about the ice surface. Player performance relates in large part to effective change-of-direction manoeuvres, but little is known about how those skills are performed mechanically and the effect of equipment design on them. The purpose of this study was to observe the kinetics involved in those manoeuvres as well as to compare whether kinetic differences may result between two skate models of varying ankle mobility. Eight subjects with competitive ice hockey playing experience performed rapid lateral (90°) left and right change-of-direction manoeuvres. Kinetic data were collected using force strain gauge transducers on the blade holders of the skates. Significantly greater forces were applied by the outside skate (50-70% body weight, %BW) in comparison to the inside skate (12-24%BW, p Skate model and turn direction had no main effect, though significant mixed interactions between leg side (inside/outside) with skate model or turn direction (p skating change-of-direction tasks.

  8. Bebop on the Hockey pitch: Cross-disciplinary creativity and skills transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Maxwell Harrison

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper generalises task-specific (but dissimilar skills, from the jazz concert stage and from the hockey field, into the domain of creativity research. What is sought are clues to what skills or creativities are transferable across dissimilar domains. It is argued that certain domain-general skills are transferable across domains, but a domain-general or ‘c’ creative capacity, is not. Rather than transferring some over-arching capacity to be universally creative, this research highlights factors likely to facilitate successful cross-disciplinary creative expression and posits a correlation between the capacities for discriminant pattern-recognition, task-specific expertise, and sensory data-collection, and the transferability of creativity. Of particular significance is the capacity for informed, selective pattern-breaking based on the ‘depth’ or ‘insider’ perspective of the domain expert; such ‘expert variation and selective retention’ (EVSR provides creative choices and responses that are likely to be perceived by the field as creative: valuable, novel and surprising. The author is a renowned Australian studio bassist, jazz musician, and music educator who also plays field hockey for Australia at Masters level. His recently completed PhD thesis, based on a performance and composition career spanning 46 years, takes the form of an analytical autoethnography drawn from personal field notes, diaries and interviews as well as published record albums.

  9. Campo de hockey Mariñamansa. Orense (España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Tolosana, Carlos

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the construction of a Hockey Court made of artificial green and the building where is located the changing room. The arrangement of the surrounding land and the forecast of the necessary room lo allow the construction of a complementary building where the gymnasium will be located, as well as the Federation headquarters, classrooms, a center lo control drugs and some warehouses, are also foreseen.La actuación de que se trata se concreta en la construcción de un Campo de Hockey de Hierba Artificial y del edificio de vestuarios que lo apoya y complementa. También se contempla la ordenación del entorno próximo y la previsión de espacio para permitir la construcción de un edificio complementario en el que ubicar un gimnasio, los locales de la federación, aulas, un centro de control de dopaje y una dotación de almacenes.

  10. Motivational climate, goal orientation, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment within Finnish junior ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, T; Ntoumanis, N; Liukkonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relations among situational motivational climate, dispositional approach and avoidance achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment in Finnish male junior ice hockey players. The sample comprised 265 junior B-level male players with a mean age of 17.03 years (SD = 0.63). Players filled questionnaires tapping their perceptions of coach motivational climate, achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment. For the statistical analysis, players were divided into high and low perceived sport ability groups. Multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed an indirect path from task-involving motivational climate via task-approach goal to enjoyment. Additionally, SEM demonstrated four other direct associations, which existed in both perceived ability groups: from ego-involving motivational climate to ego-approach and ego-avoidance goals; from ego-approach goal to ego-avoidance goal; and from task-avoidance goal to ego-avoidance goal. Additionally, in the high perceived sport ability group, there was an association from task-involving motivational climate to enjoyment. The results of this study reveal that motivational climate emphasizing effort, personal development and improvement, and achievement goal mastering tasks are significant elements of enjoyment in junior ice hockey. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High-intensity interval training has positive effects on performance in ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimo, M A; de Souza, E O; Wilson, J M; Carpenter, A L; Gilchrist, P; Lowery, R P; Averbuch, B; White, T M; Joy, J

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the well-known benefits that have been shown, few studies have looked at the practical applications of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance. This study investigated the effects of a HIIT program compared to traditional continuous endurance exercise training. 24 hockey players were randomly assigned to either a continuous or high-intensity interval group during a 4-week training program. The interval group (IG) was involved in a periodized HIIT program. The continuous group (CG) performed moderate intensity cycling for 45-60 min at an intensity that was 65% of their calculated heart rate reserve. Body composition, muscle thickness, anaerobic power, and on-ice measures were assessed pre- and post-training. Muscle thickness was significantly greater in IG (p=0.01) when compared to CG. The IG had greater values for both ∆ peak power (p<0.003) and ∆ mean power (p<0.02). Additionally, IG demonstrated a faster ∆ sprint (p<0.02) and a trend (p=0.08) for faster ∆ endurance test time to completion for IG. These results indicate that hockey players may utilize short-term HIIT to elicit positive effects in muscle thickness, power and on-ice performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J S; Al-Kashmiri, A

    2005-04-01

    To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission were used to generate estimates for the total number of neck injuries and the more specific diagnoses of neck fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains, strains, and lacerations occurring nationally from 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injury presenting to emergency departments for each sport. There were an estimated 5038 neck injuries from ice hockey, 19,341 from soccer, and 114 706 from American football. These could be broken down as follows: 4964 contusions, sprains, or strains from ice hockey, 17,927 from soccer, and 104 483 from football; 105 neck fractures or dislocations from ice hockey, 214 from soccer, and 1588 from football; 199 neck lacerations for ice hockey, 0 for soccer, and 621 for football. The rates for total neck injuries and combined neck contusions, sprains, or strains were higher for football than for ice hockey or soccer in all years for which data were available. The rate of neck injury in the United States was higher in football than in ice hockey or soccer in the time period studied.

  13. Frictional melting and stick-slip behavior in volcanic conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie Evan; Lavallee, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; di Toro, Giulio; Hornby, Adrian Jakob; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Dome-building eruptions have catastrophic potential, with dome collapse leading to devastating pyroclastic flows with almost no precursory warning. During dome growth, the driving forces of the buoyant magma may be superseded by controls along conduit margins; where brittle fracture and sliding can lead to formation of lubricating cataclasite and gouge. Under extreme friction, pseudotachylyte may form at the conduit margin. Understanding the conduit margin processes is vital to understanding the continuation of an eruption and we postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic "drumbeats", which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes. This view is supported by field evidence in the form of pseudotachylytes identified in lava dome products at Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) and Mount St. Helens (USA). Both eruptions were characterised by repetitive, periodic seismicity and lava spine extrusion of highly viscous magma. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of the andesitic and dacitic material (from Soufrière Hills and Mount St. Helens respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions (HVR experiments which mimic rapid velocity fluctuations in stick-slip behavior demonstrate velocity-weakening behavior of melt, with a tendency for unstable slip. During ascent, magma may slip and undergo melting along the conduit margin. In the process the shear resistance of the slip zone is increased, acting as a viscous brake halting slip (the "stick" of stick-slip motion). Sufficient buoyancy-driven pressures from ascending magma below eventually overcome resistance to produce a rapid slip event (the "slip") along the melt-bearing slip zone, which is temporarily lubricated due to velocity-weakening. New magma below experiences the same slip event more slowly (as the magma decompresses) to produce a viscous brake and the process is repeated. This allows a

  14. MASCULINITY AND SPORT REVISTED: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE ON HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY AND MEN'S ICE HOCKEY IN CANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A. MacDonald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ice hockey is particularly significant in Canada as it acts as a primary site of socialization for boys and men. This form of socialization raises questions about masculinity on the public agenda in terms of the problematic nature of hypermasculinity in sport, stereotypical images of athletes, and questions of social responsibility as both men and athletes. These issues are presently relevant as Canada (and perhaps all of North America finds itself in an era characterized by accounts in mainstream media of competitive athletes’ cavalier lifestyles, hazing, violence, homophobia, drug addictions, and suicides. This review of literature uses secondary research to problematize masculinity in the ice hockey context by presenting the overarching claim that male hockey players are hegemonically masculine individuals. The piece begins by defining Australian sociologist R.W. Connell’s (1987 concept of hegemonic masculinity and situating it in the contemporary academic context. Next, it offers an overview of relevant literature on masculinity and sport along with a concise examination of scholarly work on the relationship between hegemonic masculinity and ice hockey in Canada. It concludes by summarising calls for further research in the literature and by suggesting approaches to future studies in the field.

  15. Increasing Social Interactions Using Prompts and Rewards for Adolescents with ASD in an Ice Hockey Practice Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiers, Kevin; Derby, K. Mark; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of using prompts and reinforcement procedures to increase the social interaction of two children with autism (ASD). This study took place during the context of a hockey practice. Two adolescent participants were evaluated using an ABAB single subject reversal design. Baseline data were collected prior to and after the…

  16. Development and Validation of a Method for Determining Tridimensional Angular Displacements with Special Applications to Ice Hockey Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Micheline; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A method for determining the tridimensional angular displacement of skates during the two-legged stop in ice hockey was developed and validated. The angles were measured by geometry, using a cinecamera and specially equipped skates. The method provides a new tool for kinetic analyses of skating movements. (Authors/PP)

  17. The effect of laryngoscope handle size on possible endotracheal intubation success in university football, ice hockey, and soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Baylis, Penny-Jane; Aljufaili, Mahmood; Correa, José A

    2012-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a standard long-handle laryngoscope and a short-handle laryngoscope on ease of possible intubation in football, ice hockey, and soccer players. Prospective crossover study. University Sport Medicine Clinic. Sixty-two university varsity football (62 males), 45 ice hockey (26 males and 19 females), and 39 soccer players (20 males, 19 females). Athletes were assessed for different airway and physical characteristics. Three different physicians then assessed the use of laryngoscopes of different handle sizes in supine athletes who were wearing protective equipment while in-line cervical spine immobilization was maintained. The ease of passage of a laryngoscope blade into the posterior oropharynx of a supine athlete was assessed using both a standard long-handle and a short-handle laryngoscope. Use of a short-handle laryngoscope was easier for all physicians in all sports as compared with a standard-sized laryngoscope. Passage of a laryngoscope blade into the posterior oropharynx of a supine athlete was easiest in soccer players and most difficult in football and ice hockey players for both sizes of laryngoscope. Interference from chest or shoulder pads was a common cause for difficulty in passing the laryngoscope blade into the posterior oropharynx for football and ice hockey players. In the rare instances that an endotracheal intubation is to be attempted on an unconscious athlete, a short-handle laryngoscope may provide the best chance for successful intubation.

  18. Acidity, oxophilicity and hydrogen sticking probability of supported metal catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lup, A. Ng K.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. W.; Aroua, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation is an oxygen removal process that occurs in the presence of hydrogen and catalysts. This study has shown the importance of acidity, oxophilicity and hydrogen sticking probability of supported metal catalysts in having high hydrodeoxygenation activity and selectivity. These properties are required to ensure the catalyst has high affinity for C-O or C=O bonds and the capability for the adsorption and activation of H2 and O-containing compounds. A theoretical framework of temperature programmed desorption technique was also discussed for the quantitative understanding of these properties. By using NH3-TPD, the nature and abundance of acid sites of catalyst can be determined. By using H2-TPD, the nature and abundance of metallic sites can also be determined. The desorption activation energy could also be determined based on the Redhead analysis of TPD spectra with different heating rates.

  19. Evaluating non-stick properties of different surface materials for contact frying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashokkumar, Saranya; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    to evaluate non-stick and cleaning properties of the coatings. In accordance with industry standards pancake was selected as the food model for the non-stick properties. The performance of different frying surfaces (stainless steel, aluminium, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) and three ceramic coatings with two...... on their non-stick properties, so that the smoother surfaces gave a higher force of adhesion between pancake and surface....

  20. Method to determine the sticking coefficient of precursor molecules in atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, M.; Bartha, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    A method to determine the sticking coefficient of precursor molecules used in atomic layer deposition (ALD) will be introduced. The sticking coefficient is an interesting quantity for comparing different ALD processes and reactors but it cannot be observed easily. The method relies on free molecular flow in nanoscale cylindrical holes. The sticking coefficient is determined for tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium in combination with ozone. The proposed method can be applied independent of the type of reactor, precursor delivery system and precursors.

  1. Transorbital impalement by a wooden stick in a 3-year-old child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anders; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Klemp, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 3-year-old girl with a transorbital impalement injury due to a wooden stick penetrating the lower inferior palpebra and progressing through the orbita, after the child jumped from a table and hit a wooden basket containing pieces of exposed stick. CT revealed the stick prog...... and discharged 2 days later. Follow-up examination 2 months after the trauma demonstrated normal visual acuity and ocular motility, with no diplopia, tearing or pain....

  2. Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, J; Al-Kashmiri, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999.

  3. PRACTICING FIELD HOCKEY SKILLS ALONG THE CONTEXTUAL INTERFERENCE CONTINUUM: A COMPARISON OF FIVE PRACTICE SCHEDULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadeera Phaik Geok Cheong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners

  4. Ice Hockey Lung – A Case of Mass Nitrogen Dioxide Poisoning in The Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Brat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 is a toxic gas, a product of combustion in malfunctioning ice-resurfacing machines. NO2 poisoning is rare but potentially lethal. The authors report a case of mass NO2 poisoning involving 15 amateur ice hockey players in the Czech Republic. All players were treated in the Department of Respiratory Diseases at Brno University Hospital in November 2010 – three as inpatients because they developed pneumonitis. All patients were followed-up until November 2011. Complete recovery in all but one patient was achieved by December 2010. None of the 15 patients developed asthma-like disease or chronic cough. Corticosteroids appeared to be useful in treatment. Electric-powered ice-resurfacing machines are preferable in indoor ice skating arenas.

  5. An examination of the cohesion-performance relationship in university hockey teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, M R; Sewell, D F

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, using the Group Environment Questionnaire, whether team cohesion in university-level field hockey was a cause for, or an effect of, successful performance. A quasi-experimental longitudinal design with cross-lagged correlational analysis was adopted and measures of cohesion and performance were taken midway and later in the season. The results of the synchronous correlations showed a positive relationship (with good stationarity) between team cohesion and performance outcome. Although non-significant cross-lagged differentials indicated a circular relationship, the magnitudes of both the cross-lagged correlations and the partial correlations, together with multiple-regression analyses, revealed that the stronger flow was from cohesion to performance. The socially oriented aspects of cohesion, in particular, had significant associations with performance. The results imply that cohesion-performance relationships should be examined within a circular model, in which cohesion and performance are interdependent.

  6. Multiparametric MRI changes persist beyond recovery in concussed adolescent hockey players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kathryn Y.; Schranz, Amy; Bartha, Robert; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Barreira, Christy; Brown, Arthur; Fischer, Lisa; Asem, Kevin; Doherty, Timothy J.; Fraser, Douglas D.; Holmes, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether multiparametric MRI data can provide insight into the acute and long-lasting neuronal sequelae after a concussion in adolescent athletes. Methods: Players were recruited from Bantam hockey leagues in which body checking is first introduced (male, age 11–14 years). Clinical measures, diffusion metrics, resting-state network and region-to-region functional connectivity patterns, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy absolute metabolite concentrations were analyzed from an independent, age-matched control group of hockey players (n = 26) and longitudinally in concussed athletes within 24 to 72 hours (n = 17) and 3 months (n = 14) after a diagnosed concussion. Results: There were diffusion abnormalities within multiple white matter tracts, functional hyperconnectivity, and decreases in choline 3 months after concussion. Tract-specific spatial statistics revealed a large region along the superior longitudinal fasciculus with the largest decreases in diffusivity measures, which significantly correlated with clinical deficits. This region also spatially intersected with probabilistic tracts connecting cortical regions where we found acute functional connectivity changes. Hyperconnectivity patterns at 3 months after concussion were present only in players with relatively less severe clinical outcomes, higher choline concentrations, and diffusivity indicative of relatively less axonal disruption. Conclusions: Changes persisted well after players' clinical scores had returned to normal and they had been cleared to return to play. Ongoing white matter maturation may make adolescent athletes particularly vulnerable to brain injury, and they may require extended recovery periods. The consequences of early brain injury for ongoing brain development and risk of more serious conditions such as second impact syndrome or neural degenerative processes need to be elucidated. PMID:29070666

  7. The relationship between ventilatory threshold and repeated-sprint ability in competitive male ice hockey players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Lowery

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/objective: The relationship between ventilatory threshold (VT1, VT2 and repeated-sprint ability (RSA in competitive male ice hockey players was investigated. Methods: Forty-three male ice hockey players aged 18–23 years competing in NCAA Division I, NCAA Division III, and Junior A level participated. Participants performed an incremental graded exercise test on a skate treadmill to determine V˙O2peak, VT1, and VT2 using MedGraphics Breezesuit™ software (v-slope. Participants performed an on-ice repeated shift (RSA test consisting of 8-maximal skating bouts, lasting approximately 25 s and interspersed with 90 s of passive recovery, to determine first gate, second gate, and total sprint decrement (%dec. Pearson product-moment correlations and multiple regressions were used to assess relationships between ventilatory threshold variables (VT1, VT2, Stage at VT1, and Stage at VT2 and RSA (first gate, second gate, and total course decrement. Results: Stage at VT2 was the only variable substantially correlated with first gate (r = −0.35; P < 0.05, second gate (r = −0.58; P < 0.001 and total course decrement (r = −0.42; P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that VT is substantially associated with RSA, and VT2 is more strongly correlated with RSA than V˙O2peak. This study suggests that longer duration high-intensity interval training at intensities that increase workrate at VT2 may lead to possible improvements in RSA. Keywords: Athletes, Aerobic capacity, Fatigue, Sprint decrement

  8. Variables determinantes del drag-flick en jugadoras de hockey hierba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina López de Subijana Hernández

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El penalti córner es una de las situaciones de juego más importantes en el hockey hierba. Las mujeres utilizan menos el drag-flick que los hombres. Los objetivos de este estudio fueron describir los parámetros cinemáticos del drag-flick en jugadoras especialistas y hallar las variables determinantes en el rendimiento en este gesto técnico en jugadoras de hockey. Se analizaron quince lanzamientos de cinco lanzadoras con 6 cámaras del sistema de captura automática VICON registrando a 250 Hz. Para la comparación de medias se utilizó un análisis no paramétrico Kruskall Wallis de un factor (sujeto. Aquellos parámetros en los que se hallaron diferencias significativas, se compararon por pares por medio de una U de Mann Whitney. Las jugadoras 1 (22,5 ± 0,9 m/s y 3 (22,6 ± 0,7 m/s registraron velocidades de salida de la bola superiores (p < 0,001 a todas las demás jugadoras (19,1 ± 0,7 m/s jugadora 2; 20,5 ± 0,4 m/s jugadora 4 y 19,9 ± 0,4 m/s jugadora 5. La jugadora 1 basa su aceleración final en un doble apoyo largo, con una secuencia de velocidades y una distancia recorrida lo más amplia posible. Sin embargo, jugadora 3 basa su velocidad en la carrera previa, y en una secuencia de movimientos explosiva. Las características individuales de cada jugadora juegan un papel importante en la elección de una estrategia técnica u otra de lanzamiento.

  9. The Role of Visual Feedback on Power Output During Intermittent Wingate Testing in Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stastny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visual feedback may help elicit peak performance during different types of strength and power testing, but its effect during the anaerobic Wingate test is unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visual feedback on power output during a hockey-specific intermittent Wingate test (AnWT6x6 consisting of 6 stages of 6 s intervals with a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio. Methods: Thirty elite college-aged hockey players performed the AnWT6x6 with either constant (n = 15 visual feedback during all 6 stages (CVF or restricted (n = 15 visual feedback (RVF where feedback was shown only during the 2nd through 5th stages. Results: In the first stage, there were moderate-to-large effect sizes for absolute peak power (PP output and PP relative to body mass and PP relative to fat-free mass. However, the remaining stages (2–6 displayed small or negligible effects. Conclusions: These data indicate that visual feedback may play a role in optimizing power output in a non-fatigued state (1st stage, but likely does not play a role in the presence of extreme neuromuscular fatigue (6th stage during Wingate testing. To achieve the highest peak power, coaches and researchers could provide visual feedback during Wingate testing, as it may positively influence performance in the early stages of testing, but does not result in residual fatigue or negatively affect performance during subsequent stages.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in the National Hockey League: Epidemiology and Performance Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, Robert; Leiter, Jeff; MacDonald, Peter

    2018-03-27

    To determine the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the National Hockey League (NHL) and to examine the effects of this injury on return-to-play status and performance. Case series; level of evidence, 4. This was a 2-phase study. Phase I used the NHL electronic injury surveillance system and Athlete Health Management System to collect data on ACL injuries and man games lost over 10 seasons (2006/2007-2015/2016). Data collected in phase I were received in deidentified form. Phase II examined the performance impact of an ACL injury. Players were identified through publically available sources, and performance-related statistics were analyzed. Data collected in phase II were not linked to data collected in phase I. A paired t test was used to determine any difference in the matching variables between controls and cases in the preinjury time period. A General linear model (mixed) was used to determine the performance impact. Phase I: 67 ACL injuries occurred over 10 seasons. The incidence for all players was 0.42/1000 player game hours (forward, 0.61; defenseman, 0.32, goalie, 0.08) and by game exposure was 0.2/1000 player game exposures (forward, 0.33; defenseman, 0.11; goalie, 0.07). Forwards had a greater incidence rate of ACL tears with both game hours and game exposures when compared with defensemen and goalies (P game (P game (0.001). Number of games and seasons played after an ACL injury did not differ compared with controls (P = 0.068, 0.122, respectively). Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur infrequently, as it relates to other hockey injuries. Despite a high return to play, the performance after an ACL injury demonstrated a decrease in points and goals per game and per season.

  11. Examining social identity and intrateam moral behaviours in competitive youth ice hockey using stimulated recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Mark W; Boardley, Ian D; Allan, Veronica; Root, Zach; Buckham, Sara; Forrest, Chris; Côté, Jean

    2017-10-01

    Social identity - identity formed through membership in groups - may play an important role in regulating intrateam moral behaviour in youth sport (Bruner, M. W., Boardley, I., & Côté, J. (2014). Social identity and prosocial and antisocial behavior in youth sport. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 15(1), 56-64. doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.09.003). The aim of this study was to qualitatively examine this potential role through stimulated recall interviews with competitive youth-ice-hockey players. Twenty-three players (M age  = 13.27 years, SD = 1.79) who reported engaging in high, median or low frequency of antisocial teammate behaviour (determined through pre-screening with the Prosocial and Antisocial Behaviour in Sport Scale [Kavussanu, M., & Boardley, I. D. (2009). The prosocial and antisocial behavior in sport scale. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 31(1), 97-117. doi:10.1123/jsep.31.1.97]) were recruited from eight youth-ice-hockey teams in Canada. Interviews involved participants recalling their thoughts during prosocial/antisocial interactions with teammates, prompted by previously recorded video sequences of such incidents. Thematic analysis of interview data revealed all athletes - regardless of reported frequency of intrateam antisocial behaviour - felt prosocial interactions with teammates enhanced social identity. In contrast, the perceived influence of antisocial teammate behaviour on social identity differed depending on athletes' reported frequency of intrateam antisocial behaviour; those reporting low and median frequencies described how such behaviour undermines social identity, whereas athletes reporting high frequency did not perceive this effect. The study findings highlight the potential importance of intrateam moral behaviour and social identity for youth-sport team functioning.

  12. Relating stick-slip friction experiments to earthquake source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur F.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical results for parameters, such as static stress drop, for stick-slip friction experiments, with arbitrary input parameters, can be determined by solving an energy-balance equation. These results can then be related to a given earthquake based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone, assuming that the rupture process entails the same physics as stick-slip friction. This analysis yields overshoots and ratios of apparent stress to static stress drop of about 0.25. The inferred earthquake source parameters static stress drop, apparent stress, slip rate, and radiated energy are robust inasmuch as they are largely independent of the experimental parameters used in their estimation. Instead, these earthquake parameters depend on C, the ratio of maximum slip to the cube root of the seismic moment. C is controlled by the normal stress applied to the rupture plane and the difference between the static and dynamic coefficients of friction. Estimating yield stress and seismic efficiency using the same procedure is only possible when the actual static and dynamic coefficients of friction are known within the earthquake rupture zone.

  13. Carbon nanotube forests: a non-stick workbench for nanomanipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjerde, Kjetil; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Clausen, Casper H; Teo, Kenneth B K; Milne, William I; Rubahn, Horst-Guenter; Boeggild, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitous static friction (stiction) and adhesion forces comprise a major obstacle in the manipulation of matter at the nanoscale (Falvo et al 1999 Nature 397 236; Urbakh M et al 2004 Nature 430 525). In this work it is shown that a surface coated with vertically aligned carbon nanotubes-a nanotube forest-acts as an effective non-stick workbench for the manipulation of micro-objects and fibres/wires with one or more dimensions in the nano-range. These include organic nanofibres (Balzer and Rubahn 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 79 3860) and microsized latex beads, which adhere strongly even to a conventional low surface-energy material like Teflon. Although organic nanofibres are attractive as device components due to their chemical adaptability, adhesion forces nearly always rule out manipulation as a route to assembly of prototype devices based on such materials, because organic materials are soft and fragile, and tend to stick to any surface. We demonstrate here that the nanotube forest due to its roughness not only exhibits very low stiction and dynamic friction; it also acts as a springy and mechanically compliant surface, making it possible to lift up and manipulate delicate nanostructures such as organic nanofibres in ways not possible on planar, rigid surfaces

  14. Detonation Propagation in Slabs and Axisymmetric Rate Sticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romick, Christopher; Aslam, Tariq

    Insensitive high explosives (IHE) have many benefits; however, these IHEs exhibit longer reaction zones than more conventional high explosives (HE). This makes IHEs less ideal explosives and more susceptible to edge effects as well as other performance degradation issues. Thus, there is a resulting reduction in the detonation speed within the explosive. Many HE computational models, e. g. WSD, SURF, CREST, have shock-dependent reaction rates. This dependency places a high value on having an accurate shock speed. In the common practice of shock-capturing, there is ambiguity in the shock-state due to smoothing of the shock-front. Moreover, obtaining an accurate shock speed with shock-capturing becomes prohibitively computationally expensive in multiple dimensions. The use of shock-fitting removes the ambiguity of the shock-state as it is one of the boundaries. As such, the required resolution for a given error in the detonation speed is less than with shock-capturing. This allows for further insight into performance degradation. A two-dimensional shock-fitting scheme has been developed for unconfined slabs and rate sticks of HE. The HE modeling is accomplished by Euler equations utilizing several models with single-step irreversible kinetics in slab and rate stick geometries. Department of Energy - LANL.

  15. The effect of a 10-week Zulu stick fighting intervention programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article is based on the study that investigated the influence that traditional martial arts of Zulu stick fighting has on body composition of prepubescent males. A sample of fortyfive children were divided into an experimental group (n=22) which underwent a ten week stick fighting intervention programme facilitated by two ...

  16. On a credit oscillatory system with the inclusion of stick-slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parovik Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The work was a mathematical model that describes the effect of the sliding attachment (stick-slip, taking into account hereditarity. This model can be regarded as a mechanical model of earthquake preparation. For such a model was proposed explicit finite- difference scheme, on which were built the waveform and phase trajectories hereditarity effect of stick-slip.

  17. A study of needle stick injuries among non-consultant hospital doctors in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, M B

    2011-06-01

    NCHDs are exposed to a great number of blood-borne infections. Needle stick injuries are possibly the main route of acquiring such infections from a non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) perspective. This study examines NCHDs experiences surrounding needle stick injuries.

  18. From Fact to Fiction – An Introduction to the Mythology of Ice Hockey in Canadian Life and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Blake

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The title of Alice Munro’s Who do you think you are? could just as easily be asked of Canada, without eliciting an easy answer. In ethnic, linguistic, even geographical terms, Canada is hardly homogeneous. Because of this, we can only dream of a unified identity; we are, as Leonard Cohen writes in Beautiful Losers, condemned to “nightmares of identity.” If Canada is too complex for a uniform national identity, one derived from a convenient mythology and distilled into simple symbols, it often seems we have yet to realize it. We long for a mythology, even a modern, and blatantly constructed one. In contemporary Canadian society, ice hockey has filled that symbolic role, serving as a mythology that binds a fragmented people. This paper examines the role of ice hockey as a mythologized symbol of Canadian unity in literature, and questions the appropriateness of that usage.

  19. Proprioception of foot and ankle complex in young regular practitioners of ice hockey, ballet dancing and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing Xian; Xu, Dong Qing; Hoshizaki, Blaine

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion (EV) at 0.4 degrees /s using a custom-made device. The results showed the following: (1) significantly better perceived passive motion sense in PF/DF was found as compared with the measurements in IV/EV within each group (P ballet groups perceived significantly better passive motion sense in IV/EV than the running (P ballet dancing on proprioception may be associated with their movement characteristics.

  20. Existence of Stick-Slip Periodic Solutions in a Dry Friction Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qun-Hong; Chen Yu-Ming; Qin Zhi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    The stick-slip behavior in friction oscillators is very complicated due to the non-smoothness of the dry friction, which is the basic form of motion of dynamical systems with friction. In this paper, the stick-slip periodic solution in a single-degree-of-freedom oscillator with dry friction is investigated in detail. Under the assumption of kinetic friction being the Coulomb friction, the existence of the stick-slip periodic solution is considered to give out an analytic criterion in a class of friction systems. A two-parameter unfolding diagram is also described. Moreover, the time and states of motion on the boundary of the stick and slip motions are semi-analytically obtained in a single stick-slip period. (general)

  1. [Survey of studies on time factor in acupoint sticking therapy for the bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-e; Guo, Jian-hong; Lin, Ying

    2010-02-01

    Based on the retrieval of literatures in recent fifteen years, the time factors in the acupoint sticking therapy for the bronchial asthma are analyzed and compared in terms of the stage classification of patients, timing selection of acupoint sticking therapy and medication application, and times of application. The acupoint sticking therapy is mostly practiced during remittent stage of bronchial asthma; the timing selection is mostly during the hottest period of summer, the timing selection in certain cases is the coldest period of winter or any day; the duration of medication application is not consistent; therefore, the effectiveness of these cases is different. It may be that the ef fectiveness is proportional to the times and courses of acupoint sticking therapy for the bronchial asthma. In the future, the scientific designs which involve time factor are needed to elucidate the importance of time factor in acupoint sticking therapy for the bronchial asthma.

  2. Head injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J Scott

    2004-03-01

    To examine the number and rates of head injuries occurring in the community as a whole for the team sports of ice hockey, soccer, and football by analyzing data from patients presenting to US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 to 1999. Retrospective analysis. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were used to generate estimates for the total number of head injuries, concussions, internal head injuries, and skull fractures occurring on a national level from the years 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injuries presenting to the ED for each sport. There were an estimated 17,008 head injuries from ice hockey, 86,697 from soccer, and 204,802 from football that presented to US EDs from 1990 to 1999. The total number of concussions presenting to EDs in the United States over the same period was estimated to be 4820 from ice hockey, 21,715 from soccer, and 68,861 from football. While the rates of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/internal head injuries/skull fractures presenting to EDs per 10,000 players were not always statistically similar for all 3 sports in each year data were available, they were usually comparable. While the total numbers of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/skull fractures/internal head injuries presenting to EDs in the United States are different for ice hockey, soccer, and football for the years studied, the yearly rates for these injuries are comparable among all 3 sports.

  3. Upper respiratory tract infection and mucosal immunity in young ice hockey players during the pre-tournament training period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orysiak, Joanna; Witek, Konrad; Malczewska-Lenczowska, Jadwiga; Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Pokrywka, Andrzej; Sitkowski, Dariusz

    2018-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 17 days of training during preparation for the Ice Hockey Under 18 World Championship of the Polish ice hockey national team on the mucosal immune function and monitor upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) incidence before, during and after the competition. Twelve male ice hockey players (age 17.7±0.5 years) were recruited for this study. The first saliva/blood collection took place at the beginning of the training camp (without training at the training camp), the second one was conducted on the 9th day of the training camp immediately after the intensification of training, and the third collection was carried out on the 13th day of training (4 days before leaving for the World Championship) in the tapering phase. To assess the mucosal immune function, concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), sIgA1, and sIgA2 were analyzed in saliva. Cortisol concentration and creatine kinase activity were determined in blood, as indicators of stress and muscle damage, respectively. The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 questionnaire was used to assess URTI symptoms. A significant increase in the sIgA1 and sIgA2 concentrations was observed in the third collection compared with the second time point (114.45±33.00 vs 77.49±27.29 and 88.97±25.33 vs 71.65±32.44 U, respectively). There were no statistically significant correlations between the URTI incidence and saliva variables. In conclusion, the tapering period positively affects the mucosal immune function, especially sIgA1 and sIgA2 concentrations, with no significant change in frequency of URTI in young ice hockey players.

  4. Less efficient oculomotor performance is associated with increased incidence of head impacts in high school ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Adam W; DiCesare, Christopher; Nalepka, Patrick; Foss, Kim Barber; Thomas, Staci; Myer, Gregory D

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate associations between pre-season oculomotor performance on visual tracking tasks and in-season head impact incidence during high school boys ice hockey. Prospective observational study design. Fifteen healthy high school aged male hockey athletes (M=16.50±1.17years) performed two 30s blocks each of a prosaccade and self-paced saccade task, and two trials each of a slow, medium, and fast smooth pursuit task (90°s -1 ; 180°s -1 ; 360°s -1 ) during the pre-season. Regular season in-game collision data were collected via helmet-mounted accelerometers. Simple linear regressions were used to examine relations between oculomotor performance measures and collision incidence at various impact thresholds. The variability of prosaccade latency was positively related to total collisions for the 20g force cutoff (p=0.046, adjusted R 2 =0.28). The average self-paced saccade velocity (p=0.020, adjusted R 2 =0.37) and variability of smooth pursuit gaze velocity (p=0.012, adjusted R 2 =0.47) were also positively associated with total collisions for the 50g force cutoff. These results provide preliminary evidence that less efficient oculomotor performance on three different oculomotor tasks is associated with increased incidence of head impacts during a competitive ice hockey season. The variability of prosaccade latency, the average self-paced saccade velocity and the variability of gaze velocity during predictable smooth pursuit all related to increased head impacts. Future work is needed to further understand player initiated collisions, but this is an important first step toward understanding strategies to reduce incidence of injury risk in ice hockey, and potentially contact sports more generally. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MASCULINITY AND SPORT REVISTED: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE ON HEGEMONIC MASCULINITY AND MEN'S ICE HOCKEY IN CANADA

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl A. MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Ice hockey is particularly significant in Canada as it acts as a primary site of socialization for boys and men. This form of socialization raises questions about masculinity on the public agenda in terms of the problematic nature of hypermasculinity in sport, stereotypical images of athletes, and questions of social responsibility as both men and athletes. These issues are presently relevant as Canada (and perhaps all of North America) finds itself in an era characterized by accounts in main...

  6. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J

    2011-05-17

    In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players' Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997-2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33-3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04-2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players.

  7. Effects of badminton and ice hockey on bone mass in young males: a 12-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, Taru; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of weight bearing physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and evaluate any residual benefits after the active sports career. Beginning at 17 years of age, BMD was measured 5 times, during 12 years, in 19 badminton players, 48 ice hockey players, and 25 controls. During the active career, badminton players gained significantly more BMD compared to ice hockey players at all sites: in their femoral neck (mean difference (Delta) 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.04), humerus (Delta 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.01), lumbar spine (Delta 0.08 g/cm(2), p=0.01), and their legs (Delta 0.05 g/cm(2), p=0.003), after adjusting for age at baseline, changes in weight, height, and active years. BMD gains in badminton players were higher also compared to in controls at all sites (Delta 0.06-0.17 g/cm(2), pbadminton players and 37 ice hockey players stopped their active career a mean of 6 years before the final follow-up. Both these groups lost significantly more BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to the control group (Delta 0.05-0.12 g/cm(2), pbadminton players had significantly higher BMD of the femoral neck, humerus, lumbar spine, and legs (Delta 0.08-0.20 g/cm(2), pbadminton is a more osteogenic sport compared to ice hockey. The BMD benefits from previous training were partially sustained with reduced activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experiments on vibration-driven stick-slip locomotion: A sliding bifurcation perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhouwei; Fang, Hongbin; Zhan, Xiong; Xu, Jian

    2018-05-01

    Dry friction appears at the contact interface between two surfaces and is the source of stick-slip vibrations. Instead of being a negative factor, dry friction is essential for vibration-driven locomotion system to take effect. However, the dry-friction-induced stick-slip locomotion has not been fully understood in previous research, especially in terms of experiments. In this paper, we experimentally study the stick-slip dynamics of a vibration-driven locomotion system from a sliding bifurcation perspective. To this end, we first design and build a vibration-driven locomotion prototype based on an internal piezoelectric cantilever. By utilizing the mechanical resonance, the small piezoelectric deformation is significantly amplified to drive the prototype to achieve effective locomotion. Through identifying the stick-slip characteristics in velocity histories, we could categorize the system's locomotion into four types and obtain a stick-slip categorization diagram. In each zone of the diagram the locomotion exhibits qualitatively different stick-slip dynamics. Such categorization diagram is actually a sliding bifurcation diagram; crossing from one stick-slip zone to another corresponds to the triggering of a sliding bifurcation. In addition, a simplified single degree-of-freedom model is established, with the rationality of simplification been explained theoretically and numerically. Based on the equivalent model, a numerical stick-slip categorization is also obtained, which shows good agreement with the experiments both qualitatively and quantitatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that experimentally generates a sliding bifurcation diagram. The obtained stick-slip categorizations deepen our understanding of stick-slip dynamics in vibration-driven systems and could serve as a base for system design and optimization.

  9. The Effect of Stick Stiffness of Friction Models on the Bending Behavior in Non-Bonded Flexible Risers

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Tianjiao; Ye, Naiquan; Sævik, Svein

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of stick stiffness on the bending behavior in non-bonded flexible risers. The stick stiffness was normally implemented in the friction model for calculating the friction stress between layers in such structures. As the stick stiffness may be too small to achieve the plane-surfaces-remain-plane assumption under low contact pressure in some friction models [1], a new friction model was proposed for maintaining the constant stick stiffness in the present work. ...

  10. Developmental contexts and sporting success: birth date and birthplace effects in national hockey league draftees 2000-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph; Logan, A Jane

    2007-08-01

    To examine relative age and birth place effects in hockey players drafted to play in the National Hockey League (NHL) between 2000 and 2005 and determine whether these factors influenced when players were chosen in the draft. 1013 North American draftees were evaluated from the official NHL website, which provided birthplace, date of birth and selection order in the draft. Population size was collected from Canadian and American census information. Athletes were divided into four quartiles on the basis of selection date to define age cohorts in hockey. Data between the Canadian and American players were also compared to see if the optimal city sizes differed between the two nations. Relative age and birthplace effects were found, although the optimal city size found was dissimilar to that found in previous studies. Further, there were inconsistencies between the Canadian and American data. Contextual factors such as relative age and size of birthplace have a significant effect on likelihood of being selected in the NHL draft.

  11. Muscle Power and Velocity During Trunk Rotations after 6 Weeks of Training in Ice-Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poór Oliver

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates changes of muscle power and velocity during trunk rotations in ice-hockey players after six weeks of training in competition period. A group of 15 ice-hockey players performed 2 trunk rotations to each direction in a standing position with barbell of 6, 10, 12, 16, 20, 22, 26 kg placed on the shoulders. Basic biomechanical parameters during the movement were monitored using the FiTRO Torso Dyne system. Results showed that mean velocity in acceleration phase of trunk rotation significantly increased after 6 weeks of training at 6 kg (from 259 to 282.6 deg/s, p = 0.003 and 12 kg (from 218.8 to 244.1 deg/s p = 0.004. However, its values did not changed significantly during rotations with 10, 16, 20, 22 and 26 kg. Mean power of trunk rotation did not changed significantly with any of used weight. These findings indicate that there are only small changes in muscle power in competition period of ice hockey-players.

  12. A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part I: who, when, where and what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2015-04-01

    Although there is a growing understanding of the consequences of concussions in hockey, very little is known about the precipitating factors associated with this type of injury. To describe player characteristics and situational factors associated with concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL). Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons using an inclusive cohort of professional hockey players. Digital video records were coded and analysed using the Heads Up Checklist. Of 197 medically diagnosed concussions, 88% involved contact with an opponent. Forwards accounted for more concussions than expected compared with on-ice proportional representation (95% CI 60 to 73; p=0.04). Significantly more concussions occurred in the first period (47%) compared with the second and third periods (p=0.047), with the majority of concussions occurring in the defensive zone (45%). Approximately 47% of the concussions occurred in open ice, 53% occurred in the perimeter. Finally, 37% of the concussions involved injured players' heads contacting the boards or glass. This study describes several specific factors associated with concussions in the NHL, including period of the game, player position, body size, and specific locations on the ice and particular situations based on a player's position. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2010-10-15

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  14. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Nguyen, H. D.; Takehara, K.; Etoh, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  15. The Effect of Teaching Games of Understanding as a Coaching Instruction had on Adjust, Cover and Heart Rate among Malaysian and Indian Junior Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmuga Nathan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The field hockey coaching process across both Malaysia and India favours a traditional, coach-centred approach of mastering technical skills in terms of game play parameters, fitness, intensity, and load training, whereas a tactical- and player-centred pedagogical approach still takes a backseat. On the other hand, the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU model offers tactical-cognitive instruction and is gaining international recognition for its ability to produce intelligent players via a problem-solving approach in game play. Therefore, the purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the effect of TGfU compared to skill mastery instruction, termed as Skill Drill Technical (SDT, among Malaysian and Indian elite junior hockey players in term of the game play attributes of adjust and cover in 5 vs. 5 small-sided game play and game play intensity via heart rate (HR at different points of game play. A total of n = 60 players with an average age of 15 ± 1.03 was selected via simple random sampling from both countries involved in this study and assigned equally to groups, with 15 per group for TGfU and for SDT across Malaysia and India. Gathered data were analysed using the ANOVA and ANCOVA techniques. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences for adjust in 5 vs. 5 game play between TGfU and SDT across Malaysia and India after the intervention. For cover, there was significant improvement for Malaysian players using the TGfU model compared to SDT. In contrast, there was no significant difference between these two models among the Indian players after the intervention. There was significant difference between these two models in terms of warm-up HR across the two countries, and HR was higher via TGfU. For HR immediately after the 5 vs. 5 game play intervention and HR after three minutes’ recovery, Indian players with TGfU recorded a higher and significant difference compared to SDT. However, findings indicated

  16. The Effect of Teaching Games of Understanding as a Coaching Instruction had on Adjust, Cover and Heart Rate among Malaysian and Indian Junior Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Sanmuga

    2017-06-20

    The field hockey coaching process across both Malaysia and India favours a traditional, coach-centred approach of mastering technical skills in terms of game play parameters, fitness, intensity, and load training, whereas a tactical- and player-centred pedagogical approach still takes a backseat. On the other hand, the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) model offers tactical-cognitive instruction and is gaining international recognition for its ability to produce intelligent players via a problem-solving approach in game play. Therefore, the purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the effect of TGfU compared to skill mastery instruction, termed as Skill Drill Technical (SDT), among Malaysian and Indian elite junior hockey players in term of the game play attributes of adjust and cover in 5 vs. 5 small-sided game play and game play intensity via heart rate (HR) at different points of game play. A total of n = 60 players with an average age of 15 ± 1.03 was selected via simple random sampling from both countries involved in this study and assigned equally to groups, with 15 per group for TGfU and for SDT across Malaysia and India. Gathered data were analysed using the ANOVA and ANCOVA techniques. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences for adjust in 5 vs. 5 game play between TGfU and SDT across Malaysia and India after the intervention. For cover, there was significant improvement for Malaysian players using the TGfU model compared to SDT. In contrast, there was no significant difference between these two models among the Indian players after the intervention. There was significant difference between these two models in terms of warm-up HR across the two countries, and HR was higher via TGfU. For HR immediately after the 5 vs. 5 game play intervention and HR after three minutes' recovery, Indian players with TGfU recorded a higher and significant difference compared to SDT. However, findings indicated no significant

  17. The diversity of stick insects (phasmatodea) on Gunung Jerai, Kedah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabihah, I.; Lailatul-Nadhirah, A.; Azman, S.

    2018-04-01

    A total of 14 stick insects species from 11 genera under 4 families (Aschiphasmatidae: one species in one genus; Heteronemiidae, 10 species in 7 genera; Phasmatidae: two species in two genera; Bacillidae: one species in one genus) was recorded for Gunung Jerai, Kedah. This was based on 86 individuals obtained through five sampling occasions in December 2016 until April 2017, by active searching using high intensity LED torch lights at three sampling locations down the trails starting at (L1: 1130m; L2: 800m; L3: 230m) that were selected based on altitudes. The most common and abundant species in L1 is Abrosoma festinatum Brock & Seow-Choen. Lopaphus iolas (Westwood) appeared as the most common and abundant species in L2, represented by 5 individuals which covers 31.25 % of the total collected specimen in that area. In L3, Lopaphus iolas (Westwood) is also appeared as the most abundant species represented by 6 individuals or 54.54 %. Shannon's Species Diversity Index (H') in L2 was the highest (H'=1.836) followed by L3 (H'=1.295) and L1 (H'=1.264), and the evenness index in L2 was the highest (E= 0.7843), followed by L3 (E= 0.7229), and L1 (E= 0.4424). Margalef Species Richness Index in L2 was the highest (R'=2.525), followed by L1 (R'=1.717) and L3 (R'=1.668). It can be summarized that L2 at the altitude 800m appear as the best sampling site for stick insects species in Gunung Jerai, Kedah with the highest value of species diversity and richness index.

  18. Antioxidant capacity of chewing stick miswak Salvadora persica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Khan, Jalaluddin A

    2013-02-21

    Chewing stick (miswak Salvadora persica L.) is an effective tool for oral hygiene. It possessed various biological properties including significant antibacterial and anti-fungal effects. In the present study, we evaluated the antioxidant compounds in miswak. Miswak root was extracted with 80% methanol. Methanol extract as antioxidant was evaluated by using DPPH, ABTS and phosphomolybdenum complex assays and analysis by GC-MS. Peroxidase, catalase and polyphenoloxidase assays were performed for crude extract of miswak root. The methanol extract of miswak contained the highest amount of crude extract among the various solvent extracts. The methanol extract showed a concentration dependent scavenging of DPPH and ABTS radicals with IC50 values 4.8 and 1.6 μg crude extract, respectively. The total antioxidant activities, based on the reduction of molybdenum (VI) to molybdenum (V), increased with increasing crude extract content. The correlation coefficients (R2) between total crude extract and DPPH, ABTS scavenging activities and the formation of phosphomolybdenum complex were 0.97, 0.99 and 0.95, respectively. The GC-MS analysis showed that the methanol extract doesn't contain phenolic and flavonoid compounds or under detected limit. After silylation of methanol extract, three compounds namely 2-furancarboxaldehyde-5-(hydroxymethyl), furan-2-carboxylic acid-3-methyl- trimethylsilyl ester and D-erythro-pentofuranose-2-deoxy-1,3,5-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl) were identified by GC-MS analysis. These furan derivatives as they contain hydroxyl groups could be possessed antioxidant activities. The antioxidant enzymes were also detected in the miswak extract with high level of peroxidase and low level of catalase and polyphenoloxidase. The synergistic actions of antioxidant compounds and antioxidant enzymes make miswak is a good chewing stick for oral hygiene and food purposes.

  19. Inoculation Technique for Fungus Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Ramon M.

    1972-01-01

    A plastic straw and wood applicator stick serve as a simple, inexpensive, and disposable inoculation unit for fungal studies. The method gives a uniform and intact inoculum. The technique is especially useful because a large number of agar plates can be inoculated rapidly. Images PMID:5059618

  20. Physical fitness and performance of polish ice-hockey players competing at different sports levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roczniok Robert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the values of selected aerobic and anaerobic capacity variables, physical profiles, and to analyze the results of on-ice tests performed by ice-hockey players relegated to a lower league. Performance of 24 ice-hockey players competing in the top league in the 2012/2013 season was analysed to this end. In the 2013/2014 season, 14 of them still played in the top league (the control group, while 10 played in the first league (the experimental group. The study was conducted one week after the end of the playoffs in the seasons under consideration. The results revealed that only in the experimental group the analysed variables changed significantly between the seasons. In the Wingate test, significant changes were only noted in mean relative power (a decrease from 9.91 to 9.14 W/kg; p=0.045 and relative total work (a decrease from 299.17 to 277.22 J/kg; p=0.048. The ramp test indicated significantly lower power output in its final stages (364 compared with 384 W; p=0.034, as well as a significant decrease in relative VO2max (from 52.70 to 48.30 ml/min/kg. Blood lactate concentrations were recorded at the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th min of recovery after the ramp test. The rate of post-exercise recovery, ∆LA, recorded after the ramp test turned out to be significantly lower. The times recorded in the on-ice “6x30 m stop” test increased from 32.18 to 33.10 s (p=0.047. The study showed that playing in a lower league where games were less intensive, training sessions shorter and less frequent, had an adverse effect on the performance level of the investigated players. Lower VO2max recorded in the study participants slowed down their rates of post-exercise recovery and led to a significantly worse performance in the 6x30 m stop test, as well as lower relative power and relative total work in the Wingate test.

  1. Comparison of Concussion Rates Between NCAA Division I and Division III Men's and Women's Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosene, John M; Raksnis, Bryan; Silva, Brie; Woefel, Tyler; Visich, Paul S; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-09-01

    Examinations related to divisional differences in the incidence of sports-related concussions (SRC) in collegiate ice hockey are limited. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of concussion in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) ice hockey by sex and division. Descriptive epidemiology study. A convenience sample of men's and women's ice hockey teams in Divisions I and III provided SRC data via the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 to 2014-2015 academic years. Concussion counts, rates, and distributions were examined by factors including injury activity and position. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) and injury proportion ratios (IPRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare concussion rates and distributions, respectively. Overall, 415 concussions were reported for men's and women's ice hockey combined. The highest concussion rate was found in Division I men (0.83 per 1000 athlete-exposures [AEs]), followed by Division III women (0.78/1000 AEs), Division I women (0.65/1000 AEs), and Division III men (0.64/1000 AEs). However, the only significant IRR was that the concussion rate was higher in Division I men than Division III men (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.65). The proportion of concussions from checking was higher in men than women (28.5% vs 9.4%; IPR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.63-5.59); however, this proportion was higher in Division I women than Division III women (18.4% vs 1.8%; IPR = 10.47; 95% CI, 1.37-79.75). The proportion of concussions sustained by goalkeepers was higher in women than men (14.2% vs 2.9%; IPR = 4.86; 95% CI, 2.19-10.77), with findings consistent within each division. Concussion rates did not vary by sex but differed by division among men. Checking-related concussions were less common in women than men overall but more common in Division I women than Division III women. Findings highlight the need to better understand the reasons underlying divisional differences within men's and women's ice hockey and the

  2. The effects of grip width on sticking region in bench press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomo, Olav; Van Den Tillaar, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of the sticking region by examining how three different grip widths affect the sticking region in powerlifters' bench press performance. It was hypothesised that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width, indicating a poor mechanical region for vertical force production at these joint angles. Twelve male experienced powerlifters (age 27.7 ± 8.8 years, mass 91.9 ± 15.4 kg) were tested in one repetition maximum (1-RM) bench press with a narrow, medium and wide grip. Joint kinematics, timing, bar position and velocity were measured with a 3D motion capture system. All participants showed a clear sticking region with all three grip widths, but this sticking region was not found to occur at the same joint angles in all three grip widths, thereby rejecting the hypothesis that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width. It is suggested that, due to the differences in moment arm of the barbell about the elbow joint in the sticking region, there still might be a poor mechanical region for total force production that is joint angle-specific.

  3. Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignell, Erik; Fransson, Dan; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2018-05-01

    Lignell, E, Fransson, D, Krustrup, P, and Mohr, M. Analysis of high-intensity skating in top-class ice hockey match-play in relation to training status and muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1303-1310, 2018-We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post-game to determine markers of muscle damage. Players performed 119 ± 8 and 31 ± 3 m·min of high intensity and sprint skating, respectively, during a game. Total distance covered was 4,606 ± 219 m (2,260-6,749 m), of which high-intensity distance was 2042 ± 97 m (757-3,026 m). Sprint-skating speed was 5-8% higher (p ≤ 0.05) in periods 1 and 2 vs. period 3 and overtime. Defensemen (D) covered 29% more (p ≤ 0.05) skating in total than forwards (F) and were on the ice 47% longer. However, F performed 54% more (p ≤ 0.05) high-intensity skating per minute than defensemen. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was 338 ± 45 (78-757) U·L 24-hour post-game. Heart rate loading during YYIR1-IHSUB correlated inversely (p ≤ 0.05) to the frequency of high-intensity skating bouts (r = -0.55) and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (r = -0.85) and positively to post-game CK (r = 0.49; p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, ice hockey is a multiple-sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite ice-hockey players should improve the ability for repeated high-intensity skating, and testing should include the YYIR1-IHSUB test as an indicator for ice-hockey

  4. The surface temperature effect on the dissociative sticking of N2 on Fe(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, Gert Due

    1995-01-01

    We present the first realistic calculation of the surface temperature effect on the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on Fe(111). Extensive quantum dynamical calculations show that, depending on the impact point in the unit cell, the sticking probabilities can increase as well...... as decrease as a function of the surface temperature. The magnitude of the temperature effect on randomly chosen impact points is comparable with the experimental observation. Since only a small fraction of the impacts give a significant contribution to the sticking and the alternating temperature effect...

  5. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Steib, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular training effects on functional, dynamic and static balance measures. Thirty youth (14.9 ± 3 years) field hockey athletes were randomised to an intervention or control group. The intervention included a 20-min neuromuscular warm-up program performed twice weekly for 10 weeks. Balance assessments were performed at baseline, week three, week six and post-intervention. They included the star excursion balance test (SEBT), balance error scoring system (BESS), jump-landing time to stabilization (TTS) and center of pressure (COP) sway velocity during single-leg standing. No baseline differences were found between groups in demographic data and balance measures. Adherence was at 86%. All balance measures except the medial-lateral TTS improved significantly over time (p controls (31.8 ± 22.1%). There were no significant group by time interactions in the SEBT, TTS and COP sway velocity. Neuromuscular training was effective in improving postural control in youth team athletes. However, this effect was not reflected in all balance measures suggesting that the neuromuscular training did not influence all dimensions of postural control. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential of specific warm-up programs to improve postural control.

  6. Habituation of 10-year-old hockey players to treadmill skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Kelly L; Frost, Gail

    2007-05-01

    This study assessed changes in selected physiological and kinematic variables over 6 weeks of treadmill skating in an effort to understand the process of habituation to this novel training modality. Seven male, Atom-A hockey players who were injury-free and had no previous treadmill skating experience participated in the study. Players performed four 1-min skating bouts at progressively increasing speeds, each week, for 6 weeks. One speed (10.5 km/h) was repeated weekly to allow for assessment of the habituation process. Our criteria for habituation were: a decrease in stride rate, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion, and an increase in stride length, trunk angle and vertical movement of the centre of mass, leading to a plateau, over the course of the 6-week study. Significant decreases were seen in stride rate, heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion, and significant increases were found in stride length. Some of these changes were evident after only one week of training and all were present by week 4. After 6 weeks (24 min) of exposure to treadmill skating, all participants displayed a visibly more efficient skating style.

  7. Does fair play reduce concussions? A prospective, comparative analysis of competitive youth hockey tournaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aynsley M; Gaz, Daniel V; Larson, Dirk; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Eickhoff, Chad; Krause, David A; Fenske, Brooke M; Aney, Katie; Hansen, Ashley A; Nanos, Stephanie M; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    To determine if Boys Bantam and Peewee and Girls U14 sustain fewer concussions, head hits, 'other injuries' and penalties in hockey tournaments governed by intensified fair play (IFP) than non-intensified fair play (NIFP). A prospective comparison of IFP, a behaviour modification programme that promotes sportsmanship, versus control (non-intensified, NIFP) effects on numbers of diagnosed concussions, head hits without diagnosed concussion (HHWDC), 'other injuries', number of penalties and fair play points (FPPs). 1514 players, ages 11-14 years, in 6 IFP (N=950) and 5 NIFP (N=564) tournaments were studied. Two diagnosed concussions, four HHWDC, and six 'other injuries' occurred in IFP tournaments compared to one concussion, eight HHWDC and five 'other injuries' in NIFP. There were significantly fewer HHWDC in IFP than NIFP (p=0.018). However, diagnosed concussions, 'other injuries', penalties and FPPs did not differ significantly between conditions. In IFP, a minority of teams forfeited the majority of FPPs. Most diagnosed concussions, HHWDC, and other injuries occurred to Bantam B players and usually in penalised teams that forfeited their FPPs. In response to significant differences in HHWDC between IFP and NIFP tournaments, the following considerations are encouraged: mandatory implementation of fair play in regular season and tournaments, empowering tournament directors to not accept heavily penalised teams, and introducing 'no body checking' in Bantam.

  8. Stick and feel system design: Systèmes de restitution des efforts au manche

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, J. C; Hess, R. A

    1997-01-01

    Since the earliest days of manned flight, designers have to sought to assist the pilot in the performance of tasks by using stick and feel systems to bring these tasks within the bounds of human physical capabilities...

  9. Coordination of the Walking Stick Insect Using a System of Nonlinear Coupled Oscillators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marvin, Daryl J

    1992-01-01

    The area of walking machines is investigated. A design for a central pattern generator composed of nonlinear coupled oscillators which generates the characteristic gaits of the walking stick insect is presented...

  10. First observation of Dorylus ant feeding in Budongo chimpanzees supports absence of stick-tool culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Steven; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Hobaiter, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    The use of stick- or probe-tools is a chimpanzee universal, recorded in all long-term study populations across Africa, except one: Budongo, Uganda. Here, after 25 years of observation, stick-tool use remains absent under both natural circumstances and strong experimental scaffolding. Instead, the chimpanzees employ a rich repertoire of leaf-tools for a variety of dietary and hygiene tasks. One use of stick-tools in other communities is in feeding on the aggressive Dorylus 'army ant' species, consumed by chimpanzees at all long-term study sites outside of mid-Western Uganda. Here we report the first observation of army-ant feeding in Budongo, in which individuals from the Waibira chimpanzee community employed detached leaves to feed on a ground swarm. We describe the behaviour and discuss whether or not it can be considered tool use, together with its implication for the absence of stick-tool 'culture' in Budongo chimpanzees.

  11. RF Energy Harvesting Peel-and-Stick Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalau-Keraly, Christopher [PARC; Schwartz, David; Daniel, George; Lee, Joseph

    2017-08-29

    PARC, a Xerox Company, is developing a low-cost system of peel-and-stick wireless sensors that will enable widespread building environment sensor deployment with the potential to deliver up to 30% energy savings. The system is embodied by a set of RF hubs that provide power to the automatically located sensor nodes, and relays data wirelessly to the building management system (BMS). The sensor nodes are flexible electronic labels powered by rectified RF energy transmitted by a RF hub and can contain multiple printed and conventional sensors. The system design overcomes limitations in wireless sensors related to power delivery, lifetime, and cost by eliminating batteries and photovoltaic devices. The sensor localization is performed automatically by the inclusion of a programmable multidirectional antenna array in the RF hub. Comparison of signal strengths when the RF beam is swept allows for sensor localization, further reducing installation effort and enabling automatic recommissioning of sensors that have been relocated, overcoming a significant challenge in building operations. PARC has already demonstrated wireless power and temperature data transmission up to a distance of 20m with a duty cycle less than a minute between measurements, using power levels well within the FCC regulation limits in the 902-928 MHz ISM band. The sensor’s RF energy harvesting antenna dimensions was less than 5cmx9cm, demonstrating the possibility of small form factor for the sensor nodes.

  12. Peel-and-Stick Sensors Powered by Directed RF Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalau-Keraly, Christopher; Daniel, George; Lee, Joseph; Schwartz, David

    2017-08-30

    PARC, a Xerox Company, is developing a low-cost system of peel-and-stick wireless sensors that will enable widespread building environment sensor deployment with the potential to deliver up to 30% energy savings. The system is embodied by a set of RF hubs that provide power to automatically located sensor nodes, and relay data wirelessly to the building management system (BMS). The sensor nodes are flexible electronic labels powered by rectified RF energy transmitted by an RF hub and can contain multiple printed and conventional sensors. The system design overcomes limitations in wireless sensors related to power delivery, lifetime, and cost by eliminating batteries and photovoltaic devices. Sensor localization is performed automatically by the inclusion of a programmable multidirectional antenna array in the RF hub. Comparison of signal strengths while the RF beam is swept allows for sensor localization, reducing installation effort and enabling automatic recommissioning of sensors that have been relocated, overcoming a significant challenge in building operations. PARC has already demonstrated wireless power and temperature data transmission up to a distance of 20m with less than one minute between measurements, using power levels well within the FCC regulation limits in the 902-928 MHz ISM band. The sensor’s RF energy harvesting antenna achieves high performance with dimensions below 5cm x 9cm

  13. Electricity Submetering on the Cheap: Stick-on Electricity Meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzisera, Steven; Lorek, Michael; Pister, Kristofer

    2014-08-17

    We demonstrate a low-cost, 21 x 12 mm prototype Stick-on Electricity Meter (SEM) to replace traditional in-circuit-breaker-panel current and voltage sensors for building submetering. A SEM sensor is installed on the external face of a circuit breaker to generate voltage and current signals. This allows for the computation of real and apparent power as well as capturing harmonics created by non-linear loads. The prototype sensor is built using commercially available components, resulting in a production cost of under $10 per SEM. With no highvoltage install work requiring an electrician, home owners or other individuals can install the system in a few minutes with no safety implications. This leads to an installed system cost that is much lower than traditional submetering technology.. Measurement results from lab characterization as well as a real-world residential dwelling installation are presented, verifying the operation of our proposed SEM sensor. The SEM sensor can resolve breaker power levels below 10W, and it can be used to provide data for non-intrusive load monitoring systems at full sample rate.

  14. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G; Galea, Anthony M

    2015-12-01

    To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy.

  15. Measuring sticking and stripping in muon catalyzed dt fusion with multilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.C.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.

    1995-12-01

    The authors propose a direct measurement of muon sticking to alpha particles in muon catalyzed dt fusion at a high density. Exploiting the features of a multilayer thin film target developed at TRIUMF, the sticking is determined directly by detection of charged fusion products. Experimental separation of initial ticking and stripping may become possible for the first time. Monte Carlo simulations, as well as preliminary results of test measurements are described

  16. SMART STICK DESIGN WITH OBSTACLE DETECTION AND NAVIGATION AS THE HELPING TOOL FOR BLIND PEOPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Sumar Hadi*, Susilo Adi Widyanto, Paryanto, Kurnia Chamid, Rachmat Muhamad Andika

    2018-01-01

    Smart stick designed for the blind people, this appliance can help detect obstacles with the use of infrared sensor, ultrasonic and water. The obstacles in a distance of about 3 m can be detected assistance from this sensor. In addition, we use GPS (Global Positioning System) to give the position and navigation on the stick. Using GPS (Global Positioning System) help the blind people reaches its destination. GPS (Global Positioning System) recipients to get the location of the latest and the ...

  17. The Role of Lipsticks and Blush Sticks in Genetic Profiling for Human Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouman Rasool

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The core objectives of the current study are to generate human DNA profiles from used lipsticks and blush sticks of various brands available in Pakistan. A total of 12 international and local brands of lipsticks and blush sticks were selected. The lipsticks and blush sticks were applied by twenty different healthy female volunteers of 21-30 years of age. The heads of used lipsticks and blush sticks were swabbed with dry sterile cotton swabs. The qualitative and quantitative analysis was done by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, using a Quantifiler® Duo DNA Quantification Kit on Real Time PCR ABI™ 7500. Samples were amplified for 16 STR loci using an AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® PCR amplification kit on Thermocycler ABI 9700. The amplified product was run on Applied Biosystems 3130™ Genetic Analyzer. The genetic profiles were analyzed on GeneMapper® ID-X software version 1.0. The quantification results showed that the yield of DNA obtained from lipstick samples was greater than that of DNA obtained from blush stick samples. The real-time PCR results showed that only 16% of cosmetic samples had shown inhibition. The DNA profiles obtained from all blush stick samples were of good quality compared to those from lipstick samples. No profile was obtained from one blush stick sample (DNA 0.001 ng/μL and four lipstick samples (DNA 0.001-0.003 ng/μL because the amount of DNA in each of these samples was less than the amount required for successful amplification. DNA profiles were successfully generated from most of the samples of various available brands of lipsticks and blush sticks. This is the first study proving that DNA profiles can be generated from various lip and face cosmetics.

  18. Update and Overview of Spinal Injuries in Canadian Ice Hockey, 1943 to 2011: The Continuing Need for Injury Prevention and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tator, Charles H; Provvidenza, Christine; Cassidy, J David

    2016-05-01

    To identify spinal injuries in Canadian ice hockey from 2006 to 2011 and to discuss data from 1943 to 2011 and impact of injury prevention programs. Data about spinal injuries with and without spinal cord injury in ice hockey have been collected by ThinkFirst's (now Parachute Canada) Canadian Ice Hockey Spinal Injuries Registry since 1981 through questionnaires from practitioners, ice hockey organizations, and media. All Canadian provinces and territories. All registered Canadian ice hockey players. Age, gender, level of play, location, mechanism of injury. Incidence, incidence rate, prevalence, and nature (morbidity) of the injuries. Between 2006 and 2011, 44 cases occurred, 4 (9.1%) of which were severe. The incidence in the recent years continues to be lower than the peak years. From 1943 to 2011, 355 cases have been documented, primarily males (97.7%) and cervical spine injuries (78.9%), resulting from impact with the boards (64.2%). Check or push from behind (36.0%) was still the most common cause of injury, although slightly lower during 2006 to 2011. From 1943 to 2011, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and British Columbia/Yukon had the highest injury rates. Ontario and Quebec continued to show markedly different injury rates, with Ontario more than twice that of Quebec. Current data for 2006 to 2011 indicate that spinal injuries in ice hockey continue to occur, although still at lower rates than the peak years 1982 to 1995. It is imperative to continue educating players and team officials about spinal injury prevention and to reinforce the rules against checking or pushing from behind to reduce the incidence of these serious injuries.

  19. Evaluation of rheological, bioactives and baking characteristics of mango ginger (curcuma amada) enriched soup sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassina, K; Sudha, M L

    2015-09-01

    Wheat flour was replaced with mango ginger powder (MGP) at 0, 5, 10 and 15 %. Influence of MGP on rheological and baking characteristics was studied. Farinograph was used to study the mixing profile of wheat flour-MGP blend. Pasting profile of the blends namely gelatinization and retrogradation were carried out using micro-visco-amylograph. Test baking was done to obtain the optimum level of replacement and processing conditions. Sensory attributes consisting texture, taste, overall quality and breaking strength were assessed. Nutritional characterization of the soup sticks in terms of protein and starch in vitro digestibility, dietary fiber, minerals, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were determined using standard methods. With the increasing levels of MGP from 0 to 15 %, the farinograph water absorption increased from 60 to 66.7 %. A marginal increase in the gelatinization temperature from 65.4 to 66.2 °C was observed. Retrogradation of gelatinized starch granules decreased with the addition of MGP. The results indicated that the soup stick with 10 % MG had acceptable sensory attributes. The soup stick showed further improvement in terms of texture and breaking strength with the addition of gluten powder, potassium bromate and glycerol monostearate. The total dietary fiber and antioxidant activity of the soup sticks having 10 % MGP increased from 3.31 to 8.64 % and 26.83 to 48.06 % respectively as compared to the control soup sticks. MGP in soup sticks improved the nutritional profile.

  20. Characterization of cosmetic sticks at Xiaohe Cemetery in early Bronze Age Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huijuan; Yang, Yimin; Abuduresule, Idelisi; Li, Wenying; Hu, Xingjun; Wang, Changsui

    2016-01-28

    Cosmetics have been studied for a long time in the society and culture research, and its consumption is regarded as a cultural symbol of human society. This paper focuses on the analysis of the red cosmetic sticks, found in Xiaohe Cemetery (1980-1450BC), Xinjiang, China. The structure of the red cosmetic sticks was disclosed by SR-μCT scanning (Synchrotron Radiation Micro-computed Tomography), while the chemical components were characterized by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy), Raman Spectroscopy and Proteomics. The results suggested that the cosmetic sticks were made from the cattle heart and covered with a layer of hematite powders as the pigment. Given the numerous red painted relics in Xiaohe Cemetery, this kind of cosmetic sticks might be used as a primitive form of crayon for makeup and painting. The usage of cattle hearts as cosmetic sticks is firstly reported up to our knowledge, which not only reveals the varied utilizations of cattle in Xiaohe Cemetery but also shows the distinctive religious function. Furthermore, these red cosmetic sticks were usually buried with women, implying that the woman may be the painter and play a special role in religious activities.

  1. Vertical drying of a suspension of sticks: Monte Carlo simulation for continuous two-dimensional problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovka, Nikolai I.; Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V.

    2018-02-01

    The vertical drying of a two-dimensional colloidal film containing zero-thickness sticks (lines) was studied by means of kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The continuous two-dimensional problem for both the positions and orientations was considered. The initial state before drying was produced using a model of random sequential adsorption with isotropic orientations of the sticks. During the evaporation, an upper interface falls with a linear velocity in the vertical direction, and the sticks undergo translational and rotational Brownian motions. The MC simulations were run at different initial number concentrations (the numbers of sticks per unit area), pi, and solvent evaporation rates, u . For completely dried films, the spatial distributions of the sticks, the order parameters, and the electrical conductivities of the films in both the horizontal, x , and vertical, y , directions were examined. Significant evaporation-driven self-assembly and stratification of the sticks in the vertical direction was observed. The extent of stratification increased with increasing values of u . The anisotropy of the electrical conductivity of the film can be finely regulated by changes in the values of pi and u .

  2. Effects of alloying elements on sticking occurring during hot rolling of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Kim, Yong Jin; Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Sung Hak; Lee, Jong Seog

    2008-01-01

    In this study, effects of alloying elements on the sticking occurring during hot rolling of five kinds of ferritic STS430J1L stainless steels were investigated by analyzing high-temperature hardness and oxidation behavior of the rolled steels. Hot-rolling simulation tests were conducted by a high-temperature wear tester which could simulate actual hot rolling. The simulation test results revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation. Since the hardness continuously decreased as the test temperature increased, whereas the formation of Fe-Cr oxides in the rolled steel surface region increased, the sticking of five stainless steels was evaluated by considering both the high-temperature hardness and oxidation effects. The addition of Zr, Cu, or Si had a beneficial effect on the sticking resistance, while the Ni addition did not show any difference in the sticking. Particularly in the case of the Si addition, Si oxides formed first in the initial stage of high-temperature oxidation, worked as initiation sites for Fe-Cr oxides, accelerated the formation of Fe-Cr oxides, and thus raised the sticking resistance by about 10 times in comparison with the steel without Si content

  3. Relationship between body composition, leg strength, anaerobic power, and on-ice skating performance in division I men's hockey athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potteiger, Jeffrey A; Smith, Dean L; Maier, Mark L; Foster, Timothy S

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between laboratory tests and on-ice skating performance in division I men's hockey athletes. Twenty-one men (age 20.7 +/- 1.6 years) were assessed for body composition, isokinetic force production in the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and anaerobic muscle power via the Wingate 30-second cycle ergometer test. Air displacement plethysmography was used to determine % body fat (%FAT), fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass. Peak torque and total work during 10 maximal effort repetitions at 120 degrees .s were measured during concentric muscle actions using an isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle power was measured using a Monark cycle ergometer with resistance set at 7.5% of body mass. On-ice skating performance was measured during 6 timed 89-m sprints with subjects wearing full hockey equipment. First length skate (FLS) was 54 m, and total length skate (TLS) was 89 m with fastest and average skating times used in the analysis. Correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships between laboratory testing and on-ice performance. Subjects had a body mass of 88.8 +/- 7.8 kg and %FAT of 11.9 +/- 4.6. First length skate-Average and TLS-Average skating times were moderately correlated to %FAT ([r = 0.53; p = 0.013] and [r = 0.57; p = 0.007]) such that a greater %FAT was related to slower skating speeds. First length skate-Fastest was correlated to Wingate percent fatigue index (r = -0.48; p = 0.027) and FLS-Average was correlated to Wingate peak power per kilogram body mass (r = -0.43; p = 0.05). Laboratory testing of select variables can predict skating performance in ice hockey athletes. This information can be used to develop targeted and effective strength and conditioning programs that will improve on-ice skating speed.

  4. Locating the origin of stick slip instabilities in sheared granular layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is a non-invasive technique widely used to evaluate the state of materials and structures. We have developed a system that can locate the source of AE events associated with unstable sliding (stick-slip) of sheared granular layers during laboratory friction experiments. Our aim is to map the spatial distribution of energy release due to permanent microstructural changes, using AE source locations as proxies. This will allow us to determine the distribution of applied work in a granular medium, which will be useful in developing constitutive laws that describe the frictional behavior of such materials. The AE monitoring system is installed on a rotary shear apparatus. This type of apparatus is used to investigate the micromechanical processes responsible for the macroscopic frictional behavior of granular materials at large shear displacements. Two arrays of 8 piezoelectric sensors each are installed into the ring-shaped steel pistons that confine our samples. The sensors are connected to a high-speed, multichannel oscilloscope that can record full waveforms. The apparatus is also equipped with a system that continuously records normal and lateral (shear) loads and displacements, as well as pore fluid pressure. Thus, we can calculate the frictional and volumetric response of our granular aggregates, as well as the location of AE sources. Here, we report on the results of room temperature experiments on granular aggregates consisting of glass beads or segregated mixtures of glass beads and calcite, at up to 5 MPa normal stress and sliding velocities between 1 and 100 μm/s. Under these conditions, glass beads exhibit unstable sliding behavior accompanied by significant AE activity, whereas calcite exhibits stable sliding and produces no AEs. We recorded a range of unstable sliding behaviors, from fast, regular stick slip at high normal stress (> 4 MPa) and sliding velocities below 20 μm/s, to irregular stick slip at low normal

  5. [The relevance of core muscles in ice hockey players: a feasibility study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, S; Blasimann, A; Nyffenegger, D; Zimmerli, N; Radlinger, L

    2013-12-01

    Good core strength is seen as a condition for high performance in sports. In general, especially maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and strength endurance (SE) measurements of the core muscles are used. In addition, a few studies can be found that examine the core muscles in terms of MVC, rate of force development (RFD) and SE. Primary aims of this feasibility study were to investigate the feasibility regarding recruiting process, compliance and safety of the testing conditions and raise the force capabilities MVC, RFD and SE of the core muscles in amateur ice hockey players. Secondarily, tendencies of correlations between muscle activity and either shot speed and sprint time shall be examined. In this feasibility study the recruitment process has been approved by 29 ice hockey players, their adherence to the study measurements of trunk muscles, and safety of the measurements was evaluated. To determine the MVC, RFD and SE for the ventral, lateral and dorsal core muscles a dynamic force measurement was performed. To determine the correlation between core muscles and shot speed and 40-m sprint, respectively, the rank correlation coefficient (rho) from Spearman was used. The recruited number of eight field players and one goal-keeper was not very high. The compliance with 100 % was excellent. The players reported no adverse symptoms or injuries after the measurements. The results show median values for the ventral core muscles for MVC with 46.5 kg for RFD with 2.23 m/s2 and 96 s for the SE. For lateral core muscle median values of the lateral core muscles for MVC with 71.10 kg, RFD with 2.59 m/s2 and for SE over 66 s were determined. The dorsal core muscles shows values for MVC 69.7 kg, for RFD 3.39 m/s2 and for SE of 75 s. High correlations between MVC of the ventral core muscles (rho = -0.721, p = 0.021), and between the SE of the ventral core muscles (rho = 0.787, p = 0.012), and the shot velocity rate were determined. Another

  6. A Comparison of Somatic Variables of Elite Ice Hockey Players from the Czech ELH and Russian KHL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutáč Petr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this study were to evaluate the basic morphological variables of contemporary elite ice hockey players, compare the parameters of players in the top Russian ice hockey league (KHL with those of the top Czech ice hockey league (ELH, and to evaluate the parameters of players according to their position in the game. The research participants included 30 KHL players (mean age: 27.1 ± 5.1 years and 25 ELH players (mean age: 26.4 ± 5.8 years. We determined body height, body mass, and body composition (body fat, fat-free mass, segmental fat analysis. All measurements were performed at the end of preseason training. The KHL players had the following anthropometric characteristics: body height 182.97 ± 5.61 cm (forward and 185.72 ± 3.57 cm (defenseman, body mass 89.70 ± 5.28 kg (forward and 92.52 ± 4.01 kg (defenseman, body fat 10.76 ± 0.63 kg (forward and 11.10 ± 0.48 kg (defenseman, fatfree mass 78.94 ± 4.65 kg (forward and 81.42 ± 3.52 kg (defenseman. The values for ELH players were as follows: body height 182.06 ± 5.93 cm (forward and 185.88 ± 7.13 cm (defenseman, body mass 88.47 ± 7.06 kg (forward and 89.36 ± 10.91 kg (defenseman, body fat 12.57 ± 2.89 kg (forward and 11.91 ± 3.10 kg (defenseman, fat-free mass 75.93 ± 6.54 kg (forward and 77.46 ± 7.89 kg (defenseman. The results indicate that it is beneficial to ice hockey players to have increased body mass and lower body fat, which leads to higher muscle mass, thus enabling a player to perform at the highest level and meet the specific challenges of the game.

  7. Four Weeks of Off-Season Training Improves Peak Oxygen Consumption in Female Field Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey T. Funch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the changes in peak oxygen consumption ( V ˙O2peak and running economy (RE following four-weeks of high intensity training and concurrent strength and conditioning during the off-season in collegiate female field hockey players. Fourteen female student-athletes (age 19.29 ± 0.91 years were divided into two training groups, matched from baseline V ˙O2peak: High Intensity Training (HITrun; n = 8 and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT; n = 6. Participants completed 12 training sessions. HITrun consisted of 30 min of high-intensity running, while HIIT consisted of a series of whole-body high intensity Tabata-style intervals (75–85% of age predicted maximum heart rate for a total of four minutes. In addition to the interval training, the off-season training included six resistance training sessions, three team practices, and concluded with a team scrimmage. V ˙O2peak was measured pre- and post-training to determine the effectiveness of the training program. A two-way mixed (group × time ANOVA showed a main effect of time with a statistically significant difference in V ˙O2peak from pre- to post-testing, F(1, 12 = 12.657, p = 0.004, partial η2 = 0.041. Average (±SD V ˙O2peak increased from 44.64 ± 3.74 to 47.35 ± 3.16 mL·kg−1·min−1 for HIIT group and increased from 45.39 ± 2.80 to 48.22 ± 2.42 mL·kg−1·min−1 for HITrun group. Given the similar improvement in aerobic power, coaches and training staff may find the time saving element of HIIT-type conditioning programs attractive.

  8. Muscle oxygen changes following Sprint Interval Cycling training in elite field hockey players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Jones

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT. Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP and a control group (CON. The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2, tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb, total tissue haemoglobin (tHb and tissue oxygenation (TSI % were taken. In the EXP group (5.34 ± 0.14 to 5.50 ± 0.14 m.s(-1 but not the CON group (pre = 5.37 ± 0.27 to 5.39 ± 0.30 m.s(-1 significant changes were seen in the 30-15 IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%; ΔHHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 μM.cm; and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 μM.cm. No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24. NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes.

  9. Foreshocks during the nucleation of stick-slip instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Kilgore, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on laboratory experiments which investigate interactions between aseismic slip, stress changes, and seismicity on a critically stressed fault during the nucleation of stick-slip instability. We monitor quasi-static and dynamic changes in local shear stress and fault slip with arrays of gages deployed along a simulated strike-slip fault (2 m long and 0.4 m deep) in a saw cut sample of Sierra White granite. With 14 piezoelectric sensors, we simultaneously monitor seismic signals produced during the nucleation phase and subsequent dynamic rupture. We observe localized aseismic fault slip in an approximately meter-sized zone in the center of the fault, while the ends of the fault remain locked. Clusters of high-frequency foreshocks (Mw ~ −6.5 to −5.0) can occur in this slowly slipping zone 5–50 ms prior to the initiation of dynamic rupture; their occurrence appears to be dependent on the rate at which local shear stress is applied to the fault. The meter-sized nucleation zone is generally consistent with theoretical estimates, but source radii of the foreshocks (2 to 70 mm) are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the theoretical minimum length scale over which earthquake nucleation can occur. We propose that frictional stability and the transition between seismic and aseismic slip are modulated by local stressing rate and that fault sections, which would typically slip aseismically, may radiate seismic waves if they are rapidly stressed. Fault behavior of this type may provide physical insight into the mechanics of foreshocks, tremor, repeating earthquake sequences, and a minimum earthquake source dimension.

  10. Intervention study of needle stick injury in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Abne-Shahidi, Sayed A.; Mohammadi, Nazafarin A.; Abazari, Fereshteh

    2005-01-01

    Injury resulting from contaminated sharp devices among health care workers (HCWs) is one of the most important concerns in medical centers. This can lead to dangerous infections such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus among such people. The documentation of needle stick injuries started in Sadi Hospital, Isfahan, Iran in 2003, and our objective was to study cases of injuries by sharp devices before and after the implementation of intervention methods. In an intervention survey of the type of before and after study, we studied injuries by needle and other sharp devices among 87 HCWs in Sadi Hospital, a private hospital in Isfahan, Iran, during the years 2003-2004. The groups under study were workers and paramedical staff; and the wards under study included surgery, internal, lab, x-ray and laundry. We entered and evaluated the data in SPSS software. In the first phase of the study in 2003, 55.2% of those injured had been injured by sharp devices. After intervention in 2004, this percentage was reduced to 19.5% (p < 0.05). At the beginning of the study, 26.4% of the injured had been injured by sharp devices more than twice, and at the end of the study this number was reduced to 2.3% (p < 0.05). Also, injuries resulting from recapping were 45.8% at the beginning of the study, which was reduced to 5.9% at the end (p < 0.05). With regard to this study and other studies carried out in other countries, a large number of injuries by contaminated sharp devices can be prevented by implementing suitable educational programs regarding disposal of sharp devices, and by using safe needle devices. (author)

  11. Ecological niche dimensionality and the evolutionary diversification of stick insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Nosil

    Full Text Available The degree of phenotypic divergence and reproductive isolation between taxon pairs can vary quantitatively, and often increases as evolutionary divergence proceeds through various stages, from polymorphism to population differentiation, ecotype and race formation, speciation, and post-speciational divergence. Although divergent natural selection promotes divergence, it does not always result in strong differentiation. For example, divergent selection can fail to complete speciation, and distinct species pairs sometimes collapse ('speciation in reverse'. Widely-discussed explanations for this variability concern genetic architecture, and the geographic arrangement of populations. A less-explored possibility is that the degree of phenotypic and reproductive divergence between taxon pairs is positively related to the number of ecological niche dimensions (i.e., traits subject to divergent selection. Some data supporting this idea stem from laboratory experimental evolution studies using Drosophila, but tests from nature are lacking. Here we report results from manipulative field experiments in natural populations of herbivorous Timema stick insects that are consistent with this 'niche dimensionality' hypothesis. In such insects, divergent selection between host plants might occur for cryptic colouration (camouflage to evade visual predation, physiology (to detoxify plant chemicals, or both of these niche dimensions. We show that divergent selection on the single niche dimension of cryptic colouration can result in ecotype formation and intermediate levels of phenotypic and reproductive divergence between populations feeding on different hosts. However, greater divergence between a species pair involved divergent selection on both niche dimensions. Although further replication of the trends reported here is required, the results suggest that dimensionality of selection may complement genetic and geographic explanations for the degree of

  12. Drawing of metals inclined to sticking to tools surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatrushin, L.S.; Osintsev, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    A technological process is described of coating metals and alloys which have a tendency to stick to tools during rolling and drawing of wires and pipes. For electrodeposition it is the best to use chlorides of tin, bismuth, zinc, copper and indium bromide or a combination of metal salts with nonmetallic salts. Such coatings are applied to such stock materials as stainless steel, Kh18N10T and titanium alloys, VT1-0, OT4, VT16, VT20. The speeds employed during wire drawing reach 8-15 m/min and during rolling- 1-3.6 m/min. When applying a mixture of zinc chloride and nonmetallic salt the surface of titanium and zirconium alloys is first coated with a metallic sublayer. In drawing and rolling pipes of T10 alloys, the degree of elongation between the intermediate annealings reach 6.34%, and for alloys 100, VT1-0 and VT22- 23, 10 and 2.3% respectively. The coating has a strong adhesion to base metal and good plasticity characteristics. Industrial-scale tests show that a preliminary zinc coating on zirconium semi-finished stock makes it possible to shorten the technological process 1.5 times and achieve a twofold decrease in labor intensiveness and the cost of the treatment, to obtain a 7% increase in the output of non-detective product and to exclude sandblasting and hand scouring. Preliminary estimates indicate that about 4.4 thousand rubles per ton of wire can be saved by using the coating procedure

  13. Numerical Simulations of Slow Stick Slip Events with PFC, a DEM Based Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S. H.; Young, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    Nonvolcanic tremors around subduction zone have become a fascinating subject in seismology in recent years. Previous studies have shown that the nonvolcanic tremor beneath western Shikoku is composed of low frequency seismic waves overlapping each other. This finding provides direct link between tremor and slow earthquakes. Slow stick slip events are considered to be laboratory scaled slow earthquakes. Slow stick slip events are traditionally studied with direct shear or double direct shear experiment setup, in which the sliding velocity can be controlled to model a range of fast and slow stick slips. In this study, a PFC* model based on double direct shear is presented, with a central block clamped by two side blocks. The gauge layers between the central and side blocks are modelled as discrete fracture networks with smooth joint bonds between pairs of discrete elements. In addition, a second model is presented in this study. This model consists of a cylindrical sample subjected to triaxial stress. Similar to the previous model, a weak gauge layer at a 45 degrees is added into the sample, on which shear slipping is allowed. Several different simulations are conducted on this sample. While the confining stress is maintained at the same level in different simulations, the axial loading rate (displacement rate) varies. By varying the displacement rate, a range of slipping behaviour, from stick slip to slow stick slip are observed based on the stress-strain relationship. Currently, the stick slip and slow stick slip events are strictly observed based on the stress-strain relationship. In the future, we hope to monitor the displacement and velocity of the balls surrounding the gauge layer as a function of time, so as to generate a synthetic seismogram. This will allow us to extract seismic waveforms and potentially simulate the tremor-like waves found around subduction zones. *Particle flow code, a discrete element method based numerical simulation code developed by

  14. Rationale set of indicators and prioritize relevant to assess competitive activity of hockey players of high qualification of different roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Mikhnov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: organize technical and tactical actions and determine their priority importance for high-end players of different roles. Establish their priority importance for the success of competitive activity hockey with the game roles. Material : the study involved 54 experts on hockey coaches and players of high class. The significance of technical and tactical actions evaluated for players of different roles. Results : systematic account of technical and tactical actions of athletes and prioritize them to assess the significance of competitive activity. Three groups of technical and tactical actions: 1 active attacks; 2 - active safety; 3 - organizational and maneuvering. Set priorities for technical and tactical actions for players of different roles. Conclusions : the proposed technical and tactical actions can be recommended for the evaluation of the effectiveness of competitive activity players. In the process of estimating the action game players need to consider their role playing. Identification of priority in the implementation of technical and tactical actions in the game can be used in integrated assessment of actions players different roles.

  15. Determination of the concentration of alum additive in deep-fried dough sticks using dielectric spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Kang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of alum additive in deep-fried dough sticks (DFDSs was investigated using a coaxial probe method based on dielectric properties in the 0.3–10-GHz frequency range. The dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions with different concentrations of alum, sodium bicarbonate, and mixtures thereof were used. The correspondence between dielectric loss and alum concentration was thereby revealed. A steady, uniform correspondence was successfully established by introducing ω·ε″(ω, the sum of dielectric loss and conductor loss (i.e., total loss, according to the electrical conductivity of the alum-containing aqueous solutions. Specific, resonant-type dielectric dispersion arising from alum due to atomic polarization was identified around 1 GHz. This was used to discriminate the alum additive in the DFDS from other ingredients. A quantitative relationship between alum and sodium bicarbonate concentrations in the aqueous solutions and the differential dielectric loss Δε″(ω at 0.425 GHz was also established with a regression coefficient over 0.99. With the intention of eliminating the effects of the chemical reactions with sodium bicarbonate and the physical processes involved in leavening and frying during preparation, the developed technique was successfully applied to detect the alum dosage in a commercial DFDS (0.9942 g/L. The detected value agreed well with that determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (0.9722 g/L. The relative error was 2.2%. The results show that the proposed dielectric differential dispersion and loss technique is a suitable and effective method for determining the alum content in DFDSs.

  16. Using Elite Athletes to Promote Drug Abstinence: Evaluation of a Single-Session School-Based Drug Use Prevention Program Delivered by Junior Hockey Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    School-based substance use prevention programs are a common method to approaching drug use in youths. Project SOS is a single-session drug prevention program developed by police officers and delivered by elite junior hockey players to students in grades 6 and 7. The current study evaluates the effects of Project SOS at achieving its objectives of…

  17. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  18. Relationship between Physiological Off-Ice Testing, On-Ice Skating, and Game Performance in Division I Women's Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michelle; Miele, Emily M; Delude, Katie

    2017-10-07

    The purpose was to identify off-ice testing variables that correlate to skating and game performance in Division I collegiate women ice hockey players. Twenty female, forward and defensive players (19.95 ± 1.35 yr) were assessed for weight, height, percent fat mass (%FAT), bone mineral density, predicted one repetition maximum (RM) absolute and relative (REL%) bench press (BP) and hex bar deadlift (HDL), lower body explosive power, anaerobic power, countermovement vertical jump (CMJ), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and on-ice repeated skate sprint (RSS) performance. The on-ice RSS test included 6 timed 85.6 m sprints with participants wearing full hockey equipment; fastest time (FT), average time (AT) and fatigue index (FI) for the first length skate (FLS; 10 m) and total length skate (TLS; 85.6 m) were used for analysis. Game performance was evaluated with game statistics: goals, assists, points, plus-minus, and shots on goal (SOG). Correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships. Percent fat mass was positively correlated (p Game performance in women ice hockey players may be enhanced by greater MIP, repeat acceleration ability, and mode-specific training. Faster skating times were associated with lower %FAT. Skating performance in women ice hockey players may be enhanced by improving body composition, anaerobic power, and both lower and upper body strength in off-ice training.

  19. Knowing what to do and doing it : Differences in self-assessed tactical skills of regional, sub-elite, and elite youth field hockey players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Kannekens, Rianne; Lyons, Jim; Tromp, Yvonne; Visscher, Chris

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether youth athletes with an oaverageo (regional), ohigho (sub-elite), and overy higho (elite) level of performance differ with respect to their self-assessed tactical skills, 191 youth field hockey players (mean age 15.5 years, s=1.6) completed the Tactical Skills Inventory for

  20. What Governs Ice-Sticking in Planetary Science Experiments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Sabrina; Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2018-06-01

    Water ice plays an important role, alongside dust, in current theories of planet formation. Decades of laboratory experiments have proven that water ice is far stickier in particle collisions than dust. However, water ice is known to be a metastable material. Its physical properties strongly depend on its environmental parameters, the foremost being temperature and pressure. As a result, the properties of ice change not only with the environment it is observed in, but also with its thermal history.The abundance of ice structures that can be created by different environments likely explains the discrepancies observed across the multitude of collisional laboratory studies in the past [1-16]; unless the ices for such experiments have been prepared in the same way and are collided under the same environmental conditions, these experiments simply do not collide the same ices.This raises several questions:1. Which conditions and ice properties are most favourable for ice sticking?2. Which conditions and ice properties are closest to the ones observed in protoplanetary disks?3. To what extent do these two regimes overlap?4. Consequently, which collisional studies are most relevant to planetary science and therefore best suited to inform models of planet formation?In this presentation, I will give a non-exhaustive overview of what we already know about the properties of ice particles, covering those used in planetary science experiments and those observed in planet forming regions. I will discuss to what extent we can already answer questions 1-3, and what information we still need to obtain from observations, laboratory experiments, and modelling to be able to answer question 4.References:1. Bridges et al. 1984 Natur 309.2. Bridges et al. 1996 Icar 123.3. Deckers & Teiser 2016 MNRAS 456.4. Dilley & Crawford 1996 JGRE 101.5. Gundlach & Blum 2015 ApJ 798.6. Hatzes et al. 1991 Icar 89.7. Hatzes et al. 1988 MNRAS 231.8. Heißelmann et al. 2010 Icar 206.9. Higa et al. 1996 P

  1. Parametric analysis of the statistical model of the stick-slip process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Roberta; Sampaio, Rubens

    2017-06-01

    In this paper it is performed a parametric analysis of the statistical model of the response of a dry-friction oscillator. The oscillator is a spring-mass system which moves over a base with a rough surface. Due to this roughness, the mass is subject to a dry-frictional force modeled as a Coulomb friction. The system is stochastically excited by an imposed bang-bang base motion. The base velocity is modeled by a Poisson process for which a probabilistic model is fully specified. The excitation induces in the system stochastic stick-slip oscillations. The system response is composed by a random sequence alternating stick and slip-modes. With realizations of the system, a statistical model is constructed for this sequence. In this statistical model, the variables of interest of the sequence are modeled as random variables, as for example, the number of time intervals in which stick or slip occur, the instants at which they begin, and their duration. Samples of the system response are computed by integration of the dynamic equation of the system using independent samples of the base motion. Statistics and histograms of the random variables which characterize the stick-slip process are estimated for the generated samples. The objective of the paper is to analyze how these estimated statistics and histograms vary with the system parameters, i.e., to make a parametric analysis of the statistical model of the stick-slip process.

  2. An experimental and numerical investigation of head dynamics due to stick impacts in girls' lacrosse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Justin D; Franck, Jennifer A; Wilcox, Bethany J; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2014-12-01

    A method of investigating head acceleration and intracranial dynamics from stick impacts in girls' and women's lacrosse was developed using headform impact experiments and a finite element head model. Assessing the likelihood of head injury due to stick-head impacts is of interest in girls' and women's lacrosse due to the current lack of head protection during play. Experimental and simulation data were compared to characterize the head acceleration caused by stick-head impacts. Validation against cadaver head impact experiments ensures that the finite element model, with its relatively simple material properties, can provide means to develop a better understanding of the intracranial dynamics during lacrosse stick impacts. Our numerical results showed the peak acceleration at the center of gravity increased linearly with impact force, and was generally in agreement with the experimental data. von Mises stresses and peak principal strains, two common literature injury indicators, were examined within the finite element model, and peak values were below the previously reported thresholds for mild traumatic brain injury. By reconstructing typical in-game, unprotected stick-head impacts, this investigation lays the foundation for a quantitative methodology of injury prediction in girls' and womens' lacrosse.

  3. Development of flow-through and dip-stick immunoassays for screening of sulfonamide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shuo

    2008-08-20

    Two formats of membrane-based competitive enzyme immunoassays (flow-through and dip-stick) have been developed for the screening of sulfonamide residues in pig muscle and milk. Membrane was coated with anti-sulfonamide antibody and a sulfonamide hapten D2-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugant was used as the labeled antigen for competitive assay of sulfonamides. Visual detection limits of the flow-through or dip-stick assay were 1-5 microg L(-1) or 1-10 microg L(-1) in buffer for seven sulfonamides, respectively. Assay validation was performed using samples spiked with single sulfonamide, spiked samples were tested using the developed strip assays and results were compared with those obtained by a validated high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) method. Results showed that the two strip assays were correlated well with HPLC, respectively. With assay times of 5 min (flow-through) and 15 min (dip-stick), these rapid tests could offer simple, rapid and cost-effective on-site screening tools to detect sulfonamides in pig muscle (flow-through or dip-stick) or milk (only dip-stick).

  4. Intermittent stick-slip dynamics during the peeling of an adhesive tape from a roller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Guerra, Claudia; Cohen, Caroline; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc

    2013-02-01

    We study experimentally the fracture dynamics during the peeling at a constant velocity of a roller adhesive tape mounted on a freely rotating pulley. Thanks to a high speed camera, we measure, in an intermediate range of peeling velocities, high frequency oscillations between phases of slow and rapid propagation of the peeling fracture. This so-called stick-slip regime is well known as the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive in a certain range of peeling velocity coupled to the elasticity of the peeled tape. Simultaneously with stick slip, we observe low frequency oscillations of the adhesive roller angular velocity which are the consequence of a pendular instability of the roller submitted to the peeling force. The stick-slip dynamics is shown to become intermittent due to these slow pendular oscillations which produce a quasistatic oscillation of the peeling angle while keeping constant the peeling fracture velocity (averaged over each stick-slip cycle). The observed correlation between the mean peeling angle and the stick-slip amplitude questions the validity of the usually admitted independence with the peeling angle of the fracture energy of adhesives.

  5. Smart Blinding Stick with Holes,Obstacles and Ponds Detector Based on Microcontroller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Azher Therib

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a device is designed and implemented that it is doing three jobs in order to help blind people to walk without accidents may occur. The first proposed one is accomplished by putting the ultrasonic sensor in a measured angle about 40o on a suitable blinding stick to detect if there is a hole or stair in front of blind at about 48 cm distance to prevent him from falling and as a result may be causing many injuries. The second one uses a moisture sensor in the first leg of the four legs stick to measure the degree of the land soil moisture in front of the blind and alert him when that degree exceeds a measured level that may immerse the feet of him. While, the third one is made by using another ultrasonic sensor on the stick to turn an alarm ON when there is an obstacle, person, or wall at a small distance about 50 cm near him to prevent a collision accident. The stick is implemented practically using four leg blinding cane, Arduino microcontroller and the three sensors. Also, the three buzzers and one vibrator motor and three LEDs are used on the stick to turn on when a such problems occur. The device gives good results when many visually impaired people in Merjan medical city in Babylon used it.

  6. Gaze characteristics of elite and near-elite athletes in ice hockey defensive tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Stephen G; Vickers, Joan N

    2004-04-01

    Traditional visual search experiments, where the researcher pre-selects video-based scenes for the participant to respond to, shows that elite players make more efficient decisions than non-elites, but disagree on how they temporally regulate their gaze. Using the vision-in-action [J.N. Vickers, J. Exp. Psychol.: Human Percept. Perform. 22 (1996) 342] approach, we tested whether the significant gaze that differentiates elite and non-elite athletes occurred either: early in the task and was of more rapid duration [A.M. Williams et al., Res. Quart. Exer. Sport 65 (1994) 127; A.M. Williams and K. Davids, Res. Quart. Exer. Sport 69 (1998) 111], or late in the task and was of longer duration [W. Helsen, J.M. Pauwels, A cognitive approach to visual search in sport, in: D. Brogan, K. Carr (Eds.), Visual Search, vol. II, Taylor and Francis, London, 1992], or whether a more complex gaze control strategy was used that consisted of both early and rapid fixations followed by a late fixation of long duration prior to the final execution. We tested this using a live defensive zone task in ice hockey. Results indicated that athletes temporally regulated their gaze using two different gaze control strategies. First, fixation/tracking (F/T) gaze early in the trial were significantly shorter than the final F/T and confirmed that the elite group fixated the tactical locations more rapidly than the non-elite on successful plays. And secondly, the final F/T prior to critical movement initiation (i.e. F/T-1) was significantly longer for both groups, averaging 30% of the final part of the phase and occurred as the athletes isolated a single object or location to end the play. The results imply that expertise in defensive tactics is defined by a cascade of F/T, which began with the athletes fixating or tracking specific locations for short durations at the beginning of the play, and concluded with a final gaze of long duration to a relatively stable target at the end. The results are

  7. IE Information Notice No. 85-17, Supplement 1: Possible sticking of ASCO solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    This notice is to inform recipients of the results of follow up investigations regarding the reasons for sticking of Automatic Switch Company (ASCO) solenoid valves used to shut main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) under accident conditions. GE has recommend that the licensee replace the potentially contaminated MSIV solenoid valves and institute a periodic examination and cleaning of the MSIV solenoid valves. Grand Gulf has replaced the eight MSIV HTX832320V dual solenoid valves with fully environmentally qualified ASCO Model NP 8323A20E dual solenoid valves. The environmentally qualified valve Model NP 8323A20E was included in a control sample placed in the test ovens with the solenoid valves that stuck at Grand Gulf. The environmentally qualified model did not stick under the test conditions that cause sticking in the other solenoid valves

  8. R.E.A.C.H. to Teach: Making Patient and Family Education "Stick".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutilli, Carolyn Crane

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals teach patients and families about their health every day. Regulatory and accreditation organizations mandate patient and family education to promote better health outcomes. And recently, financial rewards for healthcare organizations are being tied to patient satisfaction (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems-HCAHPS). A University of Pennsylvania Health System group of staff and patients, devoted to excellence in patient and family education, developed the graphic "R.E.A.C.H. to Teach." The purpose of the graphic is to make evidence-based practice (EBP) for patient and family education "stick" with staff. The group used concepts from the marketing book, Made to Stick, to demonstrate how to develop effective staff and patient and family education. Ideas (education) that survive ("stick") have the following attributes: simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and narrative (story). This article demonstrates how to apply these principles and EBP to patient and family education.

  9. Sticking efficiency of nanoparticles in high-velocity collisions with various target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissaus, Philipp; Waldemarsson, Tomas; Blum, Juergen; Clement, Dominik; Llamas, Isabel; Mutschke, Harald; Giovane, Frank

    2006-01-01

    In order to find reliable collector surfaces for the Mesospheric Aerosol - Genesis, Interaction and Composition (MAGIC) sounding rocket experiment, intended to collect atmospheric nanoparticles, the sticking efficiency of nanoparticles was measured on several targets of different materials. The nanoparticles were generated by a molecular beam apparatus in Jena, Germany, by laser ablation (Al 2 O 3 particles, diameter 5-50 nm) and by laser pyrolysis (carbon particles, diameter 10-20 nm). In a vacuum environment (>10 -5 mbar) the particles condensed from the gas phase, formed a particle beam, and were accelerated to ∼∼1 km/s. The sticking efficiency on the target materials carbon, gold and grease was measured by a microbalance. Results demonstrate moderate to high sticking probabilities. Thus, the capture and retrieval of atmospheric nanoparticles was found to be quantitatively feasible

  10. A study of needle stick injuries among non-consultant hospital doctors in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, M B

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: NCHDs are exposed to a great number of blood-borne infections. Needle stick injuries are possibly the main route of acquiring such infections from a non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) perspective. This study examines NCHDs experiences surrounding needle stick injuries. METHODS: A cross-sectional self-administered anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted on 185 NCHDs working in a clinical setting among seven teaching hospitals in Ireland. Implied consent was obtained. The data was analysed using Excel spreadsheets. Ethical approval was received. RESULTS: A response rate of 85.4% (158\\/185) was achieved. Findings of the study are shown in the manuscript table. CONCLUSIONS: A needle stick injury (NI) history is greater among surgical NCHDs than medical NCHDs. The level of disposable glove usage is worryingly poor. Training in sharps handling and dealing with a NI needs to be addressed. HIV is the blood-borne infection most fear of being contracting as a consequence of a NI.

  11. Human stick balancing: Tuning Lèvy flights to improve balance control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Juan Luis; Milton, John G.

    2004-09-01

    State-dependent, or parametric, noise is an essential component of the neural control mechanism for stick balancing at the fingertip. High-speed motion analysis in three dimensions demonstrates that the controlling movements made by the fingertip during stick balancing can be described by a Lévy flight. The Lévy index, α, is approximately 0.9; a value close to optimal for a random search. With increased skill, the index α does not change. However, the tails of the Lévy distribution become broader. These observations suggest a Lévy flight that is truncated by the properties of the nervous and musculoskeletal system; the truncation decreasing as skill level increases. Measurements of the cross-correlation between the position of the tip of the stick and the fingertip demonstrate that the role of closed-loop feedback changes with increased skill. Moreover, estimation of the neural latencies for stick balancing show that for a given stick length, the latency increases with skill level. It is suggested that the neural control for stick balancing involves a mechanism in which brief intervals of consciously generated, corrective movements alternate with longer intervals of prediction-free control. With learning the truncation of the Lévy flight becomes better optimized for balance control and hence the time between successive conscious corrections increases. These observations provide the first evidence that changes in a Lévy flight may have functional significance for the nervous system. This work has implications for the control of balancing problems ranging from falling in the elderly to the design of two-legged robots and earthquake proof buildings.

  12. Mild Dehydration Does Not Influence Performance Or Skeletal Muscle Metabolism During Simulated Ice Hockey Exercise In Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Matthew S; Heigenhauser, George J F; Duong, MyLinh; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2017-04-01

    This study determined whether mild dehydration influenced skeletal muscle glycogen use, core temperature or performance during high-intensity, intermittent cycle-based exercise in ice hockey players vs. staying hydrated with water. Eight males (21.6 ± 0.4 yr, 183.5 ± 1.6 cm, 83.9 ± 3.7 kg, 50.2 ± 1.9 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ) performed two trials separated by 7 days. The protocol consisted of 3 periods (P) containing 10 × 45-s cycling bouts at ~133% VO 2max , followed by 135 s of passive rest. Subjects drank no fluid and dehydrated during the protocol (NF), or maintained body mass by drinking WATER. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately before and after P3. Subjects were mildly dehydrated (-1.8% BM) at the end of P3 in the NF trial. There were no differences between the NF and WATER trials for glycogen use (P1+P2; 350.1 ± 31.9 vs. 413.2 ± 33.2, P3; 103.5 ± 16.2 vs. 131.5 ± 18.9 mmol·kg dm -1 ), core temperature (P1; 37.8 ± 0.1 vs. 37.7 ± 0.1, P2; 38.2 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1, P3; 38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 38.2 ± 0.1 °C) or performance (P1; 156.3 ± 7.8 vs. 154.4 ± 8.2, P2; 150.5 ± 7.8 vs. 152.4 ± 8.3, P3; 144.1 ± 8.7 vs. 148.4 ± 8.7 kJ). This study demonstrated that typical dehydration experienced by ice hockey players (~1.8% BM loss), did not affect glycogen use, core temperature, or voluntary performance vs. staying hydrated by ingesting water during a cycle-based simulation of ice hockey exercise in a laboratory environment.

  13. Multielement analysis of Nigerian chewing sticks by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asubiojo, O.I.; Guinn, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    In Nigeria, various parts of various species of native plants have long been used for dental hygiene, with reportedly considerable effectiveness. These materials are known as 'chewing sticks'. This study was an effort to ascertain whether any unusual trace element concentrations might be present in Nigerian chewing sticks. Results are presented for 17 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Br, Cs, La, Sm, Au) detected and measured in 12 species of such plants, via instrumental thermal-neutron activation analysis. (author)

  14. Multielement analysis of Nigerian chewing sticks by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asubiojo, O.I.; Guinn, V.P. (California Univ., Irvine (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Okunuga, A. (California Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (USA))

    1982-01-01

    In Nigeria, various parts of various species of native plants have long been used for dental hygiene, with reportedly considerable effectiveness. These materials are known as 'chewing sticks'. This study was an effort to ascertain whether any unusual trace element concentrations might be present in Nigerian chewing sticks. Results are presented for 17 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Br, Cs, La, Sm, Au) detected and measured in 12 species of such plants, via instrumental thermal-neutron activation analysis.

  15. Knowledge, attitude and practices about needle stick injuries in health care workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waqar, S.H.; Siraj, M.U.; Razzaq, Z.; Malik, Z.I.; Zahid, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitude and practices about needle stick Injuries in health care workers. Study type, settings and duration: Hospital based study carried out at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, from August 2010 to November 2010. Subjects and Methods: A self administered 19 items questionnaire was prepared which contained information about needle stick injuries, its awareness, frequency of injury and the protocols that were followed after an injury had occurred. These questionnaires were given to 500 health care workers working in different wards and theaters of the hospital after obtaining their informed written consent. The health care workers included doctors, nurses and paramedical staff of Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. The data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results: A total of 500 health care workers filled the questionnaire and returned it. Out of these 416(83.2%) reported ever experiencing needle stick injuries in their professional life. Health care workers working in Emergency department were most frequently affected (65%) followed by those working in different wards (27%) and operation theatre (8%). Most (93.6%) workers had knowledge about needle stick injuries and only 6.4% were not aware of it. Needle stick injury occurred from a brand new (unused) syringe in 51.2% cases, while in 32.8% cases, the needle caused an injury after it had been used for an injection. In 5% cases, injury occurred with blood stained needles. The commonest reasons for needle injury in stick injuries were heavy work load (36.8%) followed by hasty work (33.6%) and needle recapping (18.6%). About 66% health care workers were already vaccinated against hepatitis B. Only 13% workers followed universal guidelines of needle stick injuries and no case was reported to hospital authorities. Conclusions: Health care workers had inadequate knowledge about the risk associated with needle stick injuries and do not

  16. On the stick-slip vibration in the suspension of a freight wagon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazilu Traian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damping based on the dry friction is frequently in suspensions of the freight wagons. The paper presents some aspects of vertical vibration of freight wagons. It uses a simple model considering that the vehicle was reduced to a mass suspended on a wheel, moving at constant speed on a rigid track with harmonic irregularity. Stick-slip vibration can occur due to the friction and it is characterized by sudden changes in the wheel acceleration affecting the ride quality. The paper shows the influence of stick-slip vibration on the wheel-rail dynamic force.

  17. Molecular beam study of dissociative sticking of methane on Ni(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmblad, Peter Mikal; Wambach, Jørg; Chorkendorff, Ib

    1995-01-01

    of the methane leads to a dramatic enhancement of the sticking, emphasizing that the initial vibrational state is of crucial importance. These results are consistent with a mechanism of direct activated dissociative chemisorption where the dynamics is dominated by a barrier in the potential energy surface mainly...... located in the vibrational coordinates. Normal-energy scaling is only approximately observed. The effect of surface temperature is also investigated but is found to be smaller than activation by translational or vibrational energy. A simplified analysis in terms of state resolved sticking curves, Snu...... American Institute of Physics....

  18. Push-and-stick mechanism for charged and excited small cluster emission under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitensky, I.S.; Parilis, E.S.; Wojciechowski, I.A.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism for the formation, excitation and ionization of small clusters emitted under ion bombardment is discussed. It is shown that the increased degree of ionization for the transition metal dimers, trimers and tetramers can be explained by the existence of an additional effective channel for their formation, namely the associative ionization process. A simple estimate shows that the sticking together of a fast cascade atom and the pushed out surface atom is 30-40 times more effective for dimer formation, than the recombination of two fast atoms. This push-and-stick mechanism of cluster formation could also be effective for the formation of trimers and tetramers. (orig.)

  19. On evaluation of the nuclear interaction effect on muon sticking in μ-catalyzed dt synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiger, L.Ya.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of nucler interaction on the muon -alpha-particle sticking coefficient is considered on the basis of the previously developed formalism of description of the deuterium and tritium nuclei muon catalysed fusion. The account of Coulomb interaction between the muon and nuclear subsystem in the intermediate state is shown to change substantially this coefficient. The results of numerical calculations of the sticking coefficient are presented, the value of the coefficient turns out to be 3 - 4% higher than that found in the sudden approximation

  20. Determination of the sticking coefficient of low-energy hydrocarbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichmann, Klaus Markus

    2011-01-01

    The maximum lifetime of future fusion facilities like ITER will be limited by the retention of radioactive tritium in the vessel walls. The retention is significantly affected by the sticking coefficient of hydrocarbon molecules that form in the machine. Using a particle-beam experiment, this sticking coefficient was determined for multiple species at energies below 200 eV. The equipment for the production of the particle beam was optimised and a new ion source for hydrocarbon ions was developed. Simulations using molecular dynamics were performed in parallel to improve the understanding of the processes at the surface.

  1. Juego, Cultura y Desarrollo en la Infancia: El caso del Palín Mapuche y el Hockey. Play, Culture and Development in Childhood: Analysis of Mapuche’s Palin and Hockey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoz , Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl propósito del presente trabajo consiste en analizar los juegos de reglas, partiendo de su papel como transmisores de conocimiento sobre el mundo social (valores, creencias, normas, roles, etc., a partir del planteamiento piagetiano de la comprensión de las reglas de los juegos por los niños. Se aborda cómo se produce la evolución del conocimiento práctico y teórico de las reglas y se incorpora el estudio sobre el desarrollo del conocimiento del significado de los juegos, de sus reglas y acciones. Se utiliza un enfoque transcultural que nos permita comprender las diferencias entre el desarrollo de la regla a través de un juego deportivo como el hockey hierba en España y un juego tradicional del pueblo indígena mapuche de Chile, el palín o chueca.AbstractThe aim of this work is to analyse rule games and their importance in conveying understanding of the social world (values, beliefs, norms, roles, etc., following the Piagetian explanation of how children understand the rules of the games. Starting with the development of practical and theoretical grasp of rules the study includes children's understanding of meaning of games, their rules and play actions. A crosscultural comparison is used to explore the differences between how an understanding of rule is developed in a sporting game such as grass hockey in Spain and in a traditional game of the Mapuche indigenous tribe of Chile, such as palin (or chueca.

  2. Inicios del Hockey patines en Sevilla. El Patín Claret en la década de los 70 del siglo XX = Beginnings of Roller Hockey in Seville. Claret Skate in the Decade of the Twenthieh Century 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Segundo Cuesta Pérez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available En el siguiente artículo, se trata de presentar una de las páginas más importantes de la historia del Hockey Patines en Andalucía y más concretamente en la ciudad de Sevilla. Un deporte prácticamente copado desde sus inicios por equipos catalanes y cuya implantación en el resto del país ha sido muy complicada, siendo aún hoy en día muy escasa por toda España, salvo en regiones muy localizadas como Cataluña, Madrid, o Galicia. Estos que ahora presentamos son parte de los orígenes de este deporte en la capital andaluza, de los cuales nacería, para sorpresa de muchos, un equipo que alcanzaría importantes hitos en la División de Honor Nacional de este deporte.---------------------------------------------------------------------In the next article, we try to present one of the most important papers of the roller hockey history in Andalucía, concretely in Seville. This sport has been surrounded from its beginning by teams from Cataluña, while the establishment in the rest of the country has been very difficult, being still today quite scarce all over Spain, except in some regions such as Cataluña, Madrid or Galicia. We will try to show you the origin of this sport in the capital of Andalucía, from where was born, surprising everybody, a team wich achieved great landmark in the Pride National Division of this sport.

  3. Evaluation of purity with its uncertainty value in high purity lead stick by conventional and electro-gravimetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nahar; Singh, Niranjan; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Soni, Daya; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K

    2013-06-26

    A conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry study has been carried out for the precise and accurate purity determination of lead (Pb) in high purity lead stick and for preparation of reference standard. Reference materials are standards containing a known amount of an analyte and provide a reference value to determine unknown concentrations or to calibrate analytical instruments. A stock solution of approximate 2 kg has been prepared after dissolving approximate 2 g of Pb stick in 5% ultra pure nitric acid. From the stock solution five replicates of approximate 50 g have been taken for determination of purity by each method. The Pb has been determined as PbSO4 by conventional gravimetry, as PbO2 by electro gravimetry. The percentage purity of the metallic Pb was calculated accordingly from PbSO4 and PbO2. On the basis of experimental observations it has been concluded that by conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry the purity of Pb was found to be 99.98 ± 0.24 and 99.97 ± 0.27 g/100 g and on the basis of Pb purity the concentration of reference standard solutions were found to be 1000.88 ± 2.44 and 1000.81 ± 2.68 mg kg-1 respectively with 95% confidence level (k = 2). The uncertainty evaluation has also been carried out in Pb determination following EURACHEM/GUM guidelines. The final analytical results quantifying uncertainty fulfills this requirement and gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. Gravimetry is the most reliable technique in comparison to titremetry and instrumental method and the results of gravimetry are directly traceable to SI unit. Gravimetric analysis, if methods are followed carefully, provides for exceedingly precise analysis. In classical gravimetry the major uncertainties are due to repeatability but in electro-gravimetry several other factors also affect the final results.

  4. The sticking probability for H-2 on some transition metals at a hydrogen pressure of 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Lytken, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2008-01-01

    The sticking probability for hydrogen on films of Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt supported on graphite has been measured at a hydrogen pressure of 1 bar in the temperature range 40–200 °C. The sticking probability is found to increase in the order Ni, Co, Ir, Pd, Pt, Rh, and Ru at temperature...

  5. Effectiveness of competitive activity of high class hockey players accounting a level of their self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhnov A.P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : study the effect of increasing the level of self-esteem on the efficiency of competitive activity of high class players. Material : the study involved sixteen athletes (Atlanta, Moscow region. - Continental Hockey League. Results : it was found that the application of special training self-esteem increases the level of implementation of technical and tactical action games. Number of goals increased by 8.92%, assists - 21.5%, the total number of shots on goal - to 20.02%. Conclusions : it is recommended specialized program correction level of self-esteem from 10 separate studies. Classes have different target setting: habit forming positive attitudes towards themselves, develop skills of active life position, securing high self-esteem. The program is used for two weeks in the preparatory period of training.

  6. The CRESST-III iStick veto. Stable operation of multiple transition edge sensors in one readout circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut f. Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: CRESST-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    To enable complete rejection of holder-related events in the upcoming CRESST-III dark matter search experiment, the scintillating target crystals are held by calcium tungstate sticks (iSticks) instrumented with tungsten transition edge sensors (TESs). Since the iStick signals are used exclusively for vetoing, it is sufficient to register if an event happened in any stick, without knowing which one. This allows the operation of all iSticks in a single readout circuit, requiring just one SQUID magnetometer. The talk describes the effect of bias current heating and corresponding hysteresis phenomena known in single-TES circuits, and the resulting conditions for stability in multiple-TES circuits. The fundamentally different behaviour of parallel and series circuits and resulting design choices are explored.

  7. Effect of the improving teaching method on the prevention of needle stick injuries in the department of infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi CHEN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the effect of improving teaching method and strengthening the training of occupational protection on the prevention of needle stick injuries in the department of infectious disease. Methods: Collect 17 cases of needle stick injuries that occurred in 2012 among 178 nurses in department of infectious disease. The same cases occurred in 2013 when the nurses had received the occupational protection training and targeted countermeasures were also collected. Results: The incidence of needle stick injuries was 9.55% in infectious department in 2012, and it is down to 3.4% in 2013. Conclusion: Nursing students are more likely to cause needle stick injuries. Training of occupational protection together with nursing technical operation specification can effectively control the occurrence of needle stick injuries.

  8. Development of a risk prediction model among professional hockey players with visible signs of concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jared M; Echemendia, Ruben J; Meeuwisse, Willem; Hutchison, Michael G; Aubry, Mark; Comper, Paul

    2017-04-04

    Little research examines how to best identify concussed athletes. The purpose of the present study was to develop a preliminary risk decision model that uses visible signs (VS) and mechanisms of injury (MOI) to predict the likelihood of subsequent concussion diagnosis. Coders viewed and documented VS and associated MOI for all NHL games over the course of the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 regular seasons. After coding was completed, player concussions were identified from the NHL injury surveillance system and it was determined whether players exhibiting VS were subsequently diagnosed with concussions by club medical staff as a result of the coded event. Among athletes exhibiting VS, suspected loss of consciousness, motor incoordination or balance problems, being in a fight, having an initial hit from another player's shoulder and having a secondary hit on the ice were all associated with increased risk of subsequent concussion diagnosis. In contrast, having an initial hit with a stick was associated with decreased risk of subsequent concussion diagnosis. A risk prediction model using a combination of the above VS and MOI was superior to approaches that relied on individual VS and associated MOI (sensitivity=81%, specificity=72%, positive predictive value=26%). Combined use of VS and MOI significantly improves a clinician's ability to identify players who need to be evaluated for possible concussion. A preliminary concussion prediction log has been developed from these data. Pending prospective validation, the use of these methods may improve early concussion detection and evaluation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. "Sticking Together": The Adolescent Experience of the Cohesion Process in Rural School Counseling Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tara M.; Rubel, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a grounded theory of how adolescents experience the cohesion process in rural school counseling groups. A total of 20 individual interviews with 7 participants were conducted. Data analysis generated the central category of the cohesion process as "sticking together," which describes a "tight…

  10. 78 FR 67077 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... adequacy under section 611 of Public Law 92-574, the ``Noise Control Act of 1972.'' The FAA issues special... crew. 3. Pilot control: It must be shown by flight tests that the use of side stick controllers does... and roll control instead of conventional wheels and columns. The applicable airworthiness regulations...

  11. Evaluation of the dimethylglyoxime stick test for the detection of nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kaaber, K

    1987-01-01

    The value of the dimethylglyoxime stick test for the detection of nickel was determined for 54 randomly purchased metal objects designed for prolonged skin contact, and for 15 metal alloys of known composition. Surface nickel content was determined by EDAX analysis (energy dispersive X-ray) and n...

  12. Studying friction while playing the violin: exploring the stick-slip phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the stick-slip friction phenomenon is of major importance for many familiar situations. This effect originates from the periodic rupture of junctions created between two rubbing surfaces due to the increasing shear stress at the interface. It is ultimately responsible for the behavior of many braking systems, earthquakes, and unpleasant squeaky sounds caused by the scratching of two surfaces. In the case of a musical bow-stringed instrument, stick-slip is controlled in order to provide well-tuned notes at different intensities. A trained ear is able to distinguish slight sound variations caused by small friction differences. Hence, a violin can be regarded as a perfect benchmark to explore the stick-slip effect at the mesoscale. Two violin bow hairs were studied, a natural horse tail used in a professional philharmonic orchestra, and a synthetic one used with a violin for beginners. Atomic force microscopy characterization revealed clear differences when comparing the surfaces of both bow hairs, suggesting that a structure having peaks and a roughness similar to that of the string to which both bow hairs rubbed permits a better control of the stick-slip phenomenon.

  13. Design and Experimental Research of a Novel Stick-Slip Type Piezoelectric Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A linear piezoelectric actuator based on the stick-slip principle is presented and tested in this paper. With the help of changeable vertical preload force flexure hinge, the designed linear actuator can achieve both large travel stick-slip motion and high-resolution stepping displacement. The developed actuator mainly consists of a bridge-type flexure hinge mechanism, a compound parallelogram flexure hinge mechanism, and two piezoelectric stacks. The mechanical structure and motion principle of the linear actuator were illustrated, and the finite element method (FEM is adopted. An optimal parametric study of the flexure hinge is performed by a finite element analysis-based response surface methodology. In order to investigate the actuator’s working performance, a prototype was manufactured and a series of experiments were carried out. The results indicate that the maximum motion speed is about 3.27 mm/s and the minimum stepping displacement is 0.29 μm. Finally, a vibration test was carried out to obtain the first natural frequency of the actuator, and an in situ observation was conducted to investigate actuator’s stick-slip working condition. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed actuator, and the motion speed and displacement are both improved compared with the traditional stick-slip motion actuator.

  14. Creep and stick-slip in subglacial granular beds forced by ocean tides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.

    and laboratory experiments provide important constraints, but existing models have not been able to explain the internal processes driving transitions from stability to stick-slip within the sediment. In this presentation we use a coupled numerical model of grain and fluid dynamics to show that rapid...

  15. Creep and stick-slip in subglacial granular beds forced by variations in water pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.

    of these sediment remains poorly understood. Measurements and laboratory experiments provide important constraints, but existing models have not been able to explain the internal processes driving transitions from stability to stick-slip within the sediment. In this presentation we use a coupled numerical model...

  16. MolPrint3D: Enhanced 3D Printing of Ball-and-Stick Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukstelis, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of noncommercial 3D printers has provided instructors and students improved access to printing technology. However, printing complex ball-and-stick molecular structures faces distinct challenges, including the need for support structures that increase with molecular complexity. MolPrint3D is a software add-on for the…

  17. Robust output-feedback control to eliminate stick-slip oscillations in drill-string systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromen, T.G.M.; Dai, C.H.; van de Wouw, N.; Oomen, T.A.E.; Astrid, P.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to design a robust output-feedback controller to eliminate torsional stick-slip vibrations. A multi-modal model of the torsional dynamics with a nonlinear bit-rock interaction model is used. The controller design is based on skewed-μ DK-iteration and the stability of the

  18. 'Food Sticking in My Throat': Videofluoroscopic Evaluation of a Common Symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Aarthi; Carnaby, Giselle D; Crary, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of the symptom of food 'sticking' during swallowing has been reported to range from 5 to 50%, depending on the assessment setting. However, limited objective evidence has emerged to clarify factors that contribute to this symptom. Three hundred and fifteen patient records from an outpatient dysphagia clinic were reviewed to identify patients with symptoms of 'food sticking in the throat.' Corresponding videofluoroscopic swallowing studies for patients with this complaint were reviewed for the following variables: accuracy of symptom localization, identification and characteristics (anatomic, physiologic) of an explanatory cause for the symptom, and the specific swallowed material that identified the explanatory cause. One hundred and forty one patients (45%) were identified with a complaint of food 'sticking' in their throat during swallowing. Prevalence of explanatory findings on fluoroscopy was 76% (107/141). Eighty five percent (91/107) of explanatory causes were physiologic in nature, while 15% (16/107) were anatomic. The majority of explanatory causes were identified in the esophagus (71%). Symptom localization was more accurate when the explanatory cause was anatomic versus physiologic (75 vs. 18%). A non-masticated marshmallow presented with the highest diagnostic yield in identification of explanatory causes (71%). Patients complaining of 'food sticking in the throat' are likely to present with esophageal irregularities. Thus, imaging studies of swallowing function should include the esophagus. A range of materials, including a non-masticated marshmallow, is helpful in determining the location and characteristics of swallowing deficits contributing to this symptom.

  19. 78 FR 76248 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... one hand. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These proposed special conditions contain the additional safety standards...-hand operation by wrist and not by arms. Discussion Special conditions for Airbus side stick...

  20. A semi-analytical study of stick-slip oscillations in drilling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, B.; Wouw, van de N.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2011-01-01

    Rotary drilling systems are known to exhibit torsional stick-slip vibrations, which decrease drilling efficiency and accelerate the wear of drag bits. The mechanisms leading to these torsional vibrations are analyzed using a model that includes both axial and torsional drill string dynamics, which

  1. Listening in on Friction: Stick-Slip Acoustical Signatures in Velcro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado Parra, Sebastian; Morrow, Leslie; Radziwanowski, Miles; Angiolillo, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The onset of kinetic friction and the possible resulting stick-slip motion remain mysterious phenomena. Moreover, stick-slip dynamics are typically accompanied by acoustic bursts that occur temporally with the slip event. The dry sliding dynamics of the hook-and-loop system, as exemplified by Velcro, manifest stick-slip behavior along with audible bursts that are easily micrphonically collected. Synchronized measurements of the friction force and acoustic emissions were collected as hooked Velcro was driven at constant velocity over a bed of looped Velcro in an anechoic chamber. Not surprising, the envelope of the acoustic bursts maps well onto the slip events of the friction force time series and the intensity of the bursts trends with the magnitude of the difference of the friction force during a stick-slip event. However, the analysis of the acoustic emission can serve as a sensitive tool for revealing some of the hidden details of the evolution of the transition from static to kinetic friction. For instance, small acoustic bursts are seen prior to the Amontons-Coulomb threshold, signaling precursor events prior to the onset of macroscopically observed motion. Preliminary spectral analysis of the acoustic emissions including intensity-frequency data will be presented.

  2. Effects of variable sticking coefficients on the stability of reactive sputtering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chuan; Hsieh Janghsing

    2004-01-01

    In reactive sputtering, the introduction of a reactive gas can lead to a hysteresis transition from metal to compounds in both the target and substrate. The hysteresis transition is characterized by a sudden change in partial pressure, sputtering rate, fraction of compound formation, etc. Therefore, stability is an important issue in the process control. In this paper, a mathematical model with variable sticking coefficients based on surface kinetics is used to study the stability of the process. The variable sticking coefficient represents different mechanisms for surface reactions from the Langmuir to precursor type. In order to facilitate the analysis, several nondimensional parameters are identified and used for formulation. Results show that an unsteady system converges to a steady state relatively fast at low inflow rates. With an eigenvalue analysis, the range of positive eigenvalues is consistent with the presence of a hysteresis loop. It is also found that when the chemical reaction on the substrate is moderate, a higher sputter yield of the compound leads to a more stable steady state at lower inflow rates. Regarding the sticking mechanism, for the type of precursors with the parameter k < 1, the compound is easier to form and saturate on the surface due to the higher default sticking coefficient and the lower operating conditions for the hysteresis transition

  3. Stick-slip behaviour of a viscoelastic flat sliding along a rigid indenter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budi Setiyana, Budi; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; Schipper, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    The sliding contact of soft material surface due to a rigid indenter is different from metal and some other polymers. A stick-slip motion is more frequently obtained than a smooth motion. By modeling the soft material as low damping viscoelastic material, this study proposes an analytical model to

  4. Fracture energy of stick-slip events in a large scale biaxial experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, P.G.; Dieterich, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of apparent fracture energy for the shear failure process is employed by many authors in modeling earthquake sources as dynamically extending shear cracks. Using records of shear strain and relative displacement from stick-slip events generated along a simulated, prepared fault surface in a large (1.5m x 1.5m x 0.4m) granite block and a slip-weakening model for the fault, direct estimates of the apparent shear fracture energy of the stick-slip events have been obtained. For events generated on a finely ground fault surface, apparent fracture energy ranges from 0.06 J/m 2 at a normal stress of 1.1 MPa to 0.8 J/m 2 at a normal stress of 4.6 MPa. In contrast to estimates for tensile crack formation, we find that the apparent fracture energy of stick-slip events increases linearly with normal stress. The results for the slip-weakening model for the stick-slip events are generally consistent with constitutive fault models suggested by observations of stable sliding in smaller scale experiments

  5. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems.

  6. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Han, Haijun; Liu, Tao; Yi, Jingang; Li, Qingguo; Inoue, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems. PMID:27023545

  7. Short stick exercises for fall prevention among older adults: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Katsushi; Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Takemura, Shigeki; Fukumoto, Jin; Kurasawa, Shigeki; Miyashita, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of short stick exercise (SSEs) on fall prevention and improvement of physical function in older adults. A cluster randomized trial was conducted in five residential care facilities. The intervention group (n = 51) practiced SSEs for six months, followed by routine care for six more months. The control group (n = 54) received ordinary care for 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the number of fallers, taking into account the time to first fall using the Kaplan-Meier method. The secondary outcome measures were physical and mental functions. The number of fallers was significantly lower in the intervention group (n = 6) than in the control group (n = 16) during the 12 months. The adjusted hazard ratio for a first fall in the intervention group compared with the control group was 0.15 (CI, 0.03 to 0.74, p = 0.02). The fall-free period was significantly longer in the intervention group than in controls (mean ± SD, 10.1 ± 3.0 versus 9.0 ± 4.1 months, p = 0.027). The functional reach and sit and reach tests were significantly improved at three and six months. The SSEs appeared effective for fall prevention and improvement of physical function in older adults. Implications for Rehabilitation The newly developed short stick exercises appear an effective means of reducing falls among older adults in residential care facilities. The short stick exercises seem to have an immediate effect on improving physical functions. Effects gained by performing the short stick exercises, such as static balance, flexibility and agility may last for six months. The short stick exercises were found to be easy for older adults to practice continuously in residential care facilities.

  8. Moxa-stick suffumigation for disinfecting air in hematology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation wards with class 100 laminar flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing-song; Yang, Qing; Huang, Wei-jia; Hu, Xiao-rong

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of moxa-stick suffumigation in the hematology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) wards with luminar flow. The plate exposure method was used to measure the effect of air-disinfection of moxa-stick suffumigation in hematology and HSCT wards. The yearly average qualified rates of air sampling in HSCT wards were evaluated from 2007 to 2010. To further investigate the disinfecting effect of moxa-stick suffumigation, the colony counts of common pathogens (including Staphylcoccus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) before and after moxa-stick suffumigation were compared. The mean air quality rates of the HSCT wards with class 100 laminar flow were all above 90.0% (91.2%-96.2%) from 2007 to 2010. Moxa-stick suffumigation effectively decreased the presence of bacteria in the hematology ward's air (Pplates exposed to air treated with moxa-stick suffumigation (77.1±52.9 cfu/m(2) vs 196.1±87.5 cfu/m(2), P<0.01; and 100.2±35.3 cfu/m(2) vs 371.5±35.3 cfu/m(2), P<0.01). Moxa-stick suffumigation proved to be a reliable and effective airdisinfection method for hematology and HSCT wards, and hence, it should be employed extensively.

  9. A Change in Team Culture Towards an Autonomy Supportive Working Environment - A Case Study of the Finnish Women’s National Ice Hockey Team

    OpenAIRE

    Andler, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This study presents how the change in team culture has impacted the Finnish Women’s National Ice Hockey Team. The structure of the study is based on the self-determination theory, autonomy supportive coaching and change in team culture. The sub chapters’ focus on motivation, the coaches' and athletes' role within the autonomy supportive team working environment, autonomous goal setting and transformational leadership. The subchapter for cultural change is focused on the complex on-going proce...

  10. Investigation of Positional Differences in Fitness of Male University Ice Hockey Players and the Frequency, Time Spent and Heart Rate of Movement Patterns during Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Jackson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Men’s university ice hockey has received little scientific attention over the past 30 years, a time in which the traits of the players and the demands of the game have evolved.  Objectives: This study compared the physiological characteristics of university ice hockey players and examined the frequency and duration of the different movement patterns and heart rate (HR responses during competition. Methods: Twenty male ice hockey players from the same team ( age ± SD = 22±2 years underwent a fitness evaluation and were filmed and HR monitored during regular season games. Results: Forwards and defense had similar fitness and only differed on % fatigue index and peak heart during on-ice sprinting (P<0.05. Defense stood, glided and skated backwards more than forwards and forwards skated at a moderate intensity and glided forward more than defense (P<0.05. All players spent the majority of game time gliding forward (60% of the time followed by skating forward at a moderate intensity (17% and standing with little movement (9%. Average HR during the game reached 96 and 92 % and peak HR was 100 and 96 % of maximum in forwards and defense, respectively. Conclusions: Male university hockey players present with a high level of physical fitness in a variety of categories with few differences between forwards and defense. Movement patterns during games suggest that players are performing low to moderate intensity on-ice activities the majority of the time. Paradoxically, HR continues to climb to near maximum during on ice shifts.

  11. The role of visual perception measures used in sports vision programmes in predicting actual game performance in Division I collegiate hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Biberdorf, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the growing field of sports vision little is still known about unique attributes of visual processing in ice hockey and what role visual processing plays in the overall athlete's performance. In the present study we evaluated whether visual, perceptual and cognitive/motor variables collected using the Nike SPARQ Sensory Training Station have significant relevance to the real game statistics of 38 Division I collegiate male and female hockey players. The results demonstrated that 69% of variance in the goals made by forwards in 2011-2013 could be predicted by their faster reaction time to a visual stimulus, better visual memory, better visual discrimination and a faster ability to shift focus between near and far objects. Approximately 33% of variance in game points was significantly related to better discrimination among competing visual stimuli. In addition, reaction time to a visual stimulus as well as stereoptic quickness significantly accounted for 24% of variance in the mean duration of the player's penalty time. This is one of the first studies to show that some of the visual skills that state-of-the-art generalised sports vision programmes are purported to target may indeed be important for hockey players' actual performance on the ice.

  12. Three-dimensional kinematics of the knee and ankle joints for three consecutive push-offs during ice hockey skating starts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Dany

    2007-09-01

    Little biomechanical research has been conducted recently on hockey skating despite the sport's worldwide appeal. One reason for this lack of biomechanical knowledge stems from the difficulty of collecting data. The lack of accuracy, the disputable realism of treadmills, and the large field of view required are some of the technical challenges that have to be overcome. The main objective of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the joint kinematics during the skating stroke. A second objective was to improve the data collection system we developed and the third was to establish if a kinematic progression exists in the hockey skating stroke similar to that in speed skating. Relative motions at the knee and ankle joints were computed using a joint coordinate system approach. The differences at the knee joints in push-offs indicated that the skating skill was progressively changing with each push-off. The relative stability of the ankle angles can be attributed to the design of the skate boots, which have recently become very rigid. Further research on ice hockey skating is warranted and should include more skaters and investigate the effect various starting strategies and variations in equipment have on skaters' performance.

  13. Spatio-temporal foreshock activity during stick-slip experiments of large rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Y.; Kawakata, H.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Xu, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Hirano, S.

    2016-12-01

    Foreshock activity has sometimes been reported for large earthquakes, and has been roughly classified into the following two classes. For shallow intraplate earthquakes, foreshocks occurred in the vicinity of the mainshock hypocenter (e.g., Doi and Kawakata, 2012; 2013). And for intraplate subduction earthquakes, foreshock hypocenters migrated toward the mainshock hypocenter (Kato, et al., 2012; Yagi et al., 2014). To understand how foreshocks occur, it is useful to investigate the spatio-temporal activities of foreshocks in the laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. We have conducted stick-slip experiments by using a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus at NIED in Japan (e.g., Fukuyama et al., 2014). Our previous results showed that stick-slip events repeatedly occurred in a run, but only those later events were preceded by foreshocks. Kawakata et al. (2014) inferred that the gouge generated during the run was an important key for foreshock occurrence. In this study, we proceeded to carry out stick-slip experiments of large rock samples whose interface (fault plane) is 1.5 meter long and 0.5 meter wide. After some runs to generate fault gouge between the interface. In the current experiments, we investigated spatio-temporal activities of foreshocks. We detected foreshocks from waveform records of 3D array of piezo-electric sensors. Our new results showed that more than three foreshocks (typically about twenty) had occurred during each stick-slip event, in contrast to the few foreshocks observed during previous experiments without pre-existing gouge. Next, we estimated the hypocenter locations of the stick-slip events, and found that they were located near the opposite end to the loading point. In addition, we observed a migration of foreshock hypocenters toward the hypocenter of each stick-slip event. This suggests that the foreshock activity observed in our current experiments was similar to that for the interplate earthquakes in terms of the

  14. Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competitive-level female ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Tommy; Vescovi, Jason D; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Gilenstam, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15-25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm), with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex). The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables. Regression models (adj R (2)) for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing long jump alone explained 57.1%, 38.1%, and 29.1% of the variance in skating time during transition agility skate, agility cornering s-turn, and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Isokinetic peak torque in the quadriceps at 90° explained 42.0% and 32.2% of the variance in skating time during agility cornering s-turn and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Field-based assessments, particularly single-leg tests, are an adequate substitute to more expensive and time

  15. TALKING STICK SEBAGAI INOVASI DALAM AKTIVITAS MENGOMUNIKASIKAN UNTUK MENINGKATKAN PEMAHAMAN SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Gede Agung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh aktivitas mengomunikasikan dalam pendekatan saintifik berbantuan talking stick terhadap dimensi proses kognitif siswa kelas IV tahun pelajaran 2016/2017 di Sd Kabupaten Buleleng.  Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen semu dengan populasi seluruh kelompok siswa kelas IV di SD rintisan kurikulum  2013 di Kabupaten buleleng. Sampel penelitian sebanyak dua kelas yang berjumlah 76 siswa. Data dikumpulkan dengan teknik tes serta dianalisis dengan teknik statistik deskriptif dan  inferensial (uji t. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa terdapat perbedaan dimensi proses kognitif yang signifikan antara siswa yang dibelajarkan dengan aktivitas mengomunikasikan dalam pendekatan saintifik berbantuan talking stick dan siswa yang dibelajarkan dengan aktivitas pembelajaran konvensional (thitung = 5,27 > ttabel = 1,99, serta kategori pemahaman dalam dimensi proses kognitif lebih tinggi dari pada kategori lainnya.

  16. An unusual cause of duodenal perforation due to a lollipop stick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jin Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Children have a natural tendency to explore objects with their mouths; this can result in the swallowing of foreign objects. Most ingested foreign bodies pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract.However, some foreign bodies cause obstruction or perforation of the gastrointestinal tract, requiring surgical intervention. Perforation of the gastrointestinal tract may be associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The most common sites of intestinal foreign body perforation are the ileocecal and rectosigmoid regions. Foreign body perforation of the duodenum is relatively uncommon. We report the first Korean case of duodenal perforation by an ingested 8-cm lollipop stick. Lollipops are popular with the children and fairly accessible to them, as most parents are not aware of their potential harm. Pediatric clinicians should be aware of the risks associated with lollipop stick ingestion. Our report also describes the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with peritonitis induced by the ingestion of foreign bodies.

  17. Stick-slip chaos in a mechanical oscillator with dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousaka, Takuji; Asahara, Hiroyuki; Inaba, Naohiko

    2018-03-01

    This study analyzes a forced mechanical dynamical system with dry friction that can generate chaotic stick-slip vibrations. We find that the dynamics proposed by Yoshitake et al. [Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng. C 61, 768 (1995)] can be expressed as a nonautonomous constraint differential equation owing to the static friction force. The object is constrained to the surface of a moving belt by a static friction force from when it sticks to the surface until the force on the object exceeds the maximal static friction force. We derive a 1D Poincaré return map from the constrained mechanical system, and prove numerically that this 1D map has an absolutely continuous invariant measure and a positive Lyapunov exponent, providing strong evidence for chaos.

  18. Prediction of Seismic Slope Displacements by Dynamic Stick-Slip Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausilio, Ernesto; Costanzo, Antonio; Silvestri, Francesco; Tropeano, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    A good-working balance between simplicity and reliability in assessing seismic slope stability is represented by displacement-based methods, in which the effects of deformability and ductility can be either decoupled or coupled in the dynamic analyses. In this paper, a 1D lumped mass ''stick-slip'' model is developed, accounting for soil heterogeneity and non-linear behaviour, with a base sliding mechanism at a potential rupture surface. The results of the preliminary calibration show a good agreement with frequency-domain site response analysis in no-slip conditions. The comparison with rigid sliding block analyses and with the decoupled approach proves that the stick-slip procedure can result increasingly unconservative for soft soils and deep sliding depths

  19. Identification, rearing, and distribution of stick insects of Madeira Island: an example of raising biodiversity awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, António M F; Pombo, Dora Aguin; Gonçalves, Ysabel M

    2014-04-10

    Two species of stick insects are currently known to be present in the Macaronesian archipelagos: Clonopsis gallica (Charpentier) (Phasmatodea: Bacillidae) on the Canary Islands and in the Azores and Carausius morosus (Sinéty) (Phasmatidae) in the Azores. Here, we provide the first reliable records of the presence and distribution of C. gallica and C. morosus on Madeira Island. Egg and adult stages are briefly described along with some notes on the life history of these species in captivity. Data on islandwide distribution are based on specimens donated by the public in response to an article published in a daily newspaper. This method of data collection raised great popular interest in stick insects. The role of newspapers as a means of communicating awareness in biodiversity issues is discussed. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  20. METODE TALKING STICK DENGAN MEDIA AUDIO UNTUK MENINGKATKAN MOTIVASI BELAJAR SISWA PADA MATA PELAJARAN STENOGRAFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyuni Sri Utami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Stenography learning in class X Office Administration 3 at SMK Negeri 1Pemalang indicated the low learning motivation. The purpose of this research was toknow the students’ learning motivation improvement after using talking stick methodwith audio media at Stenography subject in class X Office Administration at SMK N 1Pemalang. It was a classroom action research conducted in three cycles which eachcycle was consisted of planning, implementation, observation, and reflection. The datawere collected by observation and test. Then, the data were analyzed by percentagedescriptive. The results showed that talking stick method with audio media can improvestudents' motivation at Stenography subject in class X Office Administration 3 at SMKN 1 Pemalang. The average of students’ motivation on the first cycle was 63.08%, thenincreased up to 72.08% on the second cycle and finally, it went up to 85.08% on thethird cycle.

  1. Sustained frictional instabilities on nanodomed surfaces: Stick-slip amplitude coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quignon, Benoit; Pilkington, Georgia A.; Thormann, Esben

    2013-01-01

    to sustained frictional instabilities, effectively with no contact frictional sliding. The amplitude of the stick-slip oscillations, σf, was found to correlate with the topographic properties of the surfaces and scale linearly with the applied load. In line with the friction coefficient, we define the slope......-defined nanodomes comprising densely packed prolate spheroids, of diameters ranging from tens to hundreds of nanometers. Our results show that the average lateral force varied linearly with applied load, as described by Amontons' first law of friction, although no direct correlation between the sample topographic...... properties and their measured friction coefficients was identified. Furthermore, all the nanodomed textures exhibited pronounced oscillations in the shear traces, similar to the classic stick-slip behavior, under all the shear velocities and load regimes studied. That is, the nanotextured topography led...

  2. Modelling the tuned criticality in stick-slip friction during metal cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q; Ye, G G; Dai, L H; Lu, C

    2015-01-01

    Cutting is a ubiquitous process in nature and man-made systems. Here we demonstrate that, based on morphological patterns observed in experiments, the friction behaviour of metal cutting exhibits a criticality with cutting speed as a tuned parameter. The corresponding stick-slip events can be described by a power law distribution. A dynamic thermo-mechanical model is developed to investigate how such a tuned criticality occurs. It is shown that, in terms of the linear stability analysis, stick-slip friction is due to the thermo-mechanical instability and dynamical interaction between shear dissipation and nonlinear friction. Moreover, there is a secondary transition from a criticality state to a limit cycle that is dominated by the inertia effect, which is similar to the frequency lock phenomenon in a forced Duffing oscillator. (paper)

  3. Limited Investigation of the Effects of Elevator Rate Limiting and Stick Dynamics on Longitudinal Pilot Induced Oscillations (HAVE GRIP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peters, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of the HAVE GRIP flight test program. This program performed a limited investigation of the effects of stick dynamics and elevator rate limiting on longitudinal pilot induced oscillations (PIOs...

  4. Effect of video-game experience and position of flight stick controller on simulated-flight performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bo-Keun; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Al-Qaisi, Saif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of video-game experience and flight-stick position on flying performance. The study divided participants into 2 groups; center- and side-stick groups, which were further divided into high and low level of video-game experience subgroups. The experiment consisted of 7 sessions of simulated flying, and in the last session, the flight stick controller was switched to the other position. Flight performance was measured in terms of the deviation of heading, altitude, and airspeed from their respective requirements. Participants with high experience in video games performed significantly better (p increase (0.78 %). However, after switching from a center- to a side-stick controller, performance scores decreased (4.8%).

  5. Experimental evidence of reduced sticking of nanoparticles on a metal grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulijk, C. van; Bal, E.A.; Schmidt-Ott, A.

    2009-01-01

    Filtering of NaCl, CaCl2, (NH4)2SO4 and NiSO4 aerosol particles 7–20 nm in diameter by a stainless steel grid was studied in order to find out if there is perfect sticking or partial rebound. Our experiment used particles from a spray-drying process, the majority of which were electrically neutral.

  6. Changes in Quality Properties and Kinetics of Reducing Sugar Removal in Potato Sticks during Blanching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Asadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to problems in storage, transportation and price fluctuation of fresh potato, production of ready-to-use products like French fries is of particular importance. French fries quality mainly depends on the appearance, taste, color, texture and oil uptake. One of the important steps in product processing is blanching. This step improves product texture and color due to the decrease in reducing sugar content, and causes reduction of oil uptake due to the gelatinization of surface starch. Therefore, by selecting a suitable method and condition, the improvement of product quality is possible. In order to investigate the effect of blanching temperature on kinetic of the reducing sugar content and changes in potato stick color and texture, sticks with 0.8 0.8 8 cm dimensions were prepared and blanching was carried out with hot water at different temperatures (60, 70, 80 and 90°C and various times up to 120 minutes. Color, texture and reducing sugar content of samples were measured during blanching. The results showed that reducing sugar content was reduced during the blanching as a function of temperature and time. Also, product color and texture were mainly affected by blanching temperature, with the low temperature being more suitable to improve potato stick quality. According to the results, there was no significant difference between blanching at 80, 90°C and 60°C for reducing sugar content. Also, for this parameter, there was no significant difference between times of 100 and 5 minutes at 60°C. The least texture damage was obtained by blanching at 60°C in a short time. It could be concluded that to preserve potato stick color and texture and reduce energy consumption, blanching can be done at 60°C for 5 minutes if enzymes are inactivated.

  7. A change management approach to improving safety and preventing needle stick injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    2017-09-01

    Key drivers for preventing healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) include evidence-based practices and procedures that prevent infection. Among the current guidance for preventing HCAIs is evidence and mandatory requirements for reducing needle stick injuries (NSIs). This article highlights how John Kotter's model for change could help healthcare workers plan for successful and sustained deployment of needle safety devices (NSDs) and ultimately reduce the risk of a NSI.

  8. Role of Salvadora persica chewing stick (miswak): A natural toothbrush for holistic oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Niazi, Fayez; Naseem, Mustafa; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad S.; Almas, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    From an ancient tool to a modern way of improving oral health, miswak (chewing stick) has proven to be an effective tool for oral health. The miswak removes the bacterial plaque by mechanical and chemical actions. It provides a cheap and easily accessible way of improving oral health of the individuals and populations. The use of miswak was promoted centuries ago by Prophet Muhammad (Peace be Upon Him). In the modern era, the beneficial role of using miswak such as antiseptic, antimicrobial, ...

  9. Determination of histamine in milkfish stick implicated in food-borne poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An incident of food-borne poisoning causing illness in 37 victims due to ingestion of fried fish sticks occurred in September 2014, in Tainan city, southern Taiwan. Leftovers of the victims' fried fish sticks and 16 other raw fish stick samples from retail stores were collected and tested to determine the occurrence of histamine and histamine-forming bacteria. Two suspected fried fish samples contained 86.6 mg/100 g and 235.0 mg/100 g histamine; levels that are greater than the potential hazard action level (50 mg/100 g in most illness cases. Given the allergy-like symptoms of the victims and the high histamine content in the suspected fried fish samples, this food-borne poisoning was strongly suspected to be caused by histamine intoxication. Moreover, the fish species of suspected samples was identified as milkfish (Chanos chanos, using polymerase chain reaction direct sequence analysis. In addition, four of the 16 commercial raw milkfish stick samples (25% had histamine levels greater than the US Food & Drug Administration guideline of 5.0 mg/100 g for scombroid fish and/or products. Ten histamine-producing bacterial strains, capable of producing 373–1261 ppm of histamine in trypticase soy broth supplemented with 1.0% L-histidine, were identified as Enterobacter aerogenes (4 strains, Enterobacter cloacae (1 strain, Morganella morganii (2 strains, Serratia marcescens (1 strain, Hafnia alvei (1 strain, and Raoultella orithinolytica (1 strain, by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing with polymerase chain reaction amplification.

  10. Physicochemical and functional properties, microstructure, and storage stability of whey protein/polyvinylpyrrolidone based glue sticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorong Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A glue stick is comprised of solidified adhesive mounted in a lipstick-like push-up tube. Whey is a byproduct of cheese making. Direct disposal of whey can cause environmental pollution. The objective of this study was to use whey protein isolate (WPI as a natural polymer along with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP to develop safe glue sticks. Pre-dissolved WPI solution, PVP, sucrose, 1,2-propanediol (PG, sodium stearate, defoamer, and preservative were mixed and dissolved in water at 90 oC and then molded in push-up tubes. Chemical composition, functional properties (bonding strength, glue setting time, gel hardness, extension/retraction, and spreading properties, microstructure, and storage stability of the prototypes were evaluated in comparison with a commercial control. Results showed that all WPI/PVP prototypes had desirable bonding strength and exhibited faster setting than PVP prototypes and control. WPI could reduce gel hardness and form less compact and rougher structures than that of PVP, but there was no difference in bonding strength. PVP and sucrose could increase the hygroscopicity of glue sticks, thus increasing storage stability. Finally, the optimized prototype GS3 (major components: WPI 8.0%, PVP 12.0%, 1,2-propanediol 10.0%, sucrose 10.0%, and stearic sodium 7.0% had a comparable functionality to the commercial control. Results indicated that whey protein could be used as an adhesive polymer for glue stick formulations, which could be used to bond fiber or cellulose derived substrates such as paper.

  11. StickOn Adhesive Limited: A Strategic Pursuit in Challenging Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sumita Rai; Ashok Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    This case focuses upon the issues that have arisen as StickOn Adhesive Limited (SOAL) faces the challenges of competition in the industry through two-pronged strategies — backward integration and product diversification. The case discusses various initiatives taken by SOAL to meet strategic goals. SOAL has initiated changes in its marketing policies, re-layered the organization structure, and empowered the internal management to realize growth objectives. The case examines the corporate dilem...

  12. Some remarks on sticking fraction calculations in muon-catalyzed deuterium-tritium fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Ciftci, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    The sticking coefficient in muon catalyzed dt fusion is an important parameter affecting feasibility for practical applications. This paper discusses a procedure, developed for an accurate calculation of this parameter, and show that a well-defined limit produces precisely the often-criticized heuristic sudden approximation. Why this should be is discussed in some detail from a very different, possibly surprising, point of view

  13. Science 101: Why Don't Spiders Stick to Their Own Webs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This article explains why spiders don't stick to their webs. Spiders don't get stuck in their own webs (and they aren't immune to their own glue) because they use a combination of sticky and nonsticky threads (different glands for producing those), and the glue is in droplets that the spider can avoid but the prey can't. The spider's nervous…

  14. Stick-slip friction of gecko-mimetic flaps on smooth and rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Cadirov, Nicholas; Chary, Sathya; Kaufman, Yair; Hogan, Jack; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-03-06

    The discovery and understanding of gecko 'frictional-adhesion' adhering and climbing mechanism has allowed researchers to mimic and create gecko-inspired adhesives. A few experimental and theoretical approaches have been taken to understand the effect of surface roughness on synthetic adhesive performance, and the implications of stick-slip friction during shearing. This work extends previous studies by using a modified surface forces apparatus to quantitatively measure and model frictional forces between arrays of polydimethylsiloxane gecko footpad-mimetic tilted microflaps against smooth and rough glass surfaces. Constant attachments and detachments occur between the surfaces during shearing, as described by an avalanche model. These detachments ultimately result in failure of the adhesion interface and have been characterized in this study. Stick-slip friction disappears with increasing velocity when the flaps are sheared against a smooth silica surface; however, stick-slip was always present at all velocities and loads tested when shearing the flaps against rough glass surfaces. These results demonstrate the significance of pre-load, shearing velocity, shearing distances, commensurability and shearing direction of gecko-mimetic adhesives and provide us a simple model for analysing and/or designing such systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Grain scale observations of stick-slip dynamics in fluid saturated granular fault gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. A.; Dorostkar, O.; Guyer, R. A.; Marone, C.; Carmeliet, J.

    2017-12-01

    We are studying granular mechanics during slip. In the present work, we conduct coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) simulations to study grain scale characteristics of slip instabilities in fluid saturated granular fault gouge. The granular sample is confined with constant normal load (10 MPa), and sheared with constant velocity (0.6 mm/s). This loading configuration is chosen to promote stick-slip dynamics, based on a phase-space study. Fluid is introduced in the beginning of stick phase and characteristics of slip events i.e. macroscopic friction coefficient, kinetic energy and layer thickness are monitored. At the grain scale, we monitor particle coordination number, fluid-particle interaction forces as well as particle and fluid kinetic energy. Our observations show that presence of fluids in a drained granular fault gouge stabilizes the layer in the stick phase and increases the recurrence time. In saturated model, we observe that average particle coordination number reaches higher values compared to dry granular gouge. Upon slip, we observe that a larger portion of the granular sample is mobilized in saturated gouge compared to dry system. We also observe that regions with high particle kinetic energy are correlated with zones of high fluid motion. Our observations highlight that spatiotemporal profile of fluid dynamic pressure affects the characteristics of slip instabilities, increasing macroscopic friction coefficient drop, kinetic energy release and granular layer compaction. We show that numerical simulations help characterize the micromechanics of fault mechanics.

  16. Analysis of bit-rock interaction during stick-slip vibrations using PDC cutting force model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, P.A.; Teodoriu, C. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE

    2013-08-01

    Drillstring vibration is one of the limiting factors maximizing the drilling performance and also causes premature failure of drillstring components. Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit enhances the overall drilling performance giving the best rate of penetrations with less cost per foot but the PDC bits are more susceptible to the stick slip phenomena which results in high fluctuations of bit rotational speed. Based on the torsional drillstring model developed using Matlab/Simulink for analyzing the parametric influence on stick-slip vibrations due to drilling parameters and drillstring properties, the study of relations between weight on bit, torque on bit, bit speed, rate of penetration and friction coefficient have been analyzed. While drilling with the PDC bits, the bit-rock interaction has been characterized by cutting forces and the frictional forces. The torque on bit and the weight on bit have both the cutting component and the frictional component when resolved in horizontal and vertical direction. The paper considers that the bit is undergoing stick-slip vibrations while analyzing the bit-rock interaction of the PDC bit. The Matlab/Simulink bit-rock interaction model has been developed which gives the average cutting torque, T{sub c}, and friction torque, T{sub f}, values on cutters as well as corresponding average weight transferred by the cutting face, W{sub c}, and the wear flat face, W{sub f}, of the cutters value due to friction.

  17. Waffle Production: Influence of Baking Plate Material on Sticking of Waffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Regina; Kalss, Georg; Schoenlechner, Regine

    2017-01-01

    Background of this study was to understand the factors that contribute to sticking of fresh egg waffles on baking plates. The aim of this study was to investigate the sticking (adhesion) behavior of waffles on 4 different baking plate materials (ductile iron, grey iron, low alloyed steel, and steel with titanium nitrite coating) at different baking parameters (temperature and time) and application of 3 different release agents (different fat compositions). Baking plates from ductile and grey iron showed lower release properties of waffles than the 2 steel baking plates. Baking parameters had to be high enough to allow rapid product crust formation but prevent burning, which again increases sticking behavior. Release agents based on short-chain fatty acids with higher degree of saturation provided better release behavior of waffles than those based on long-chain fatty acids or on emulsifier-acid combinations. Baking plates with increased hardness, good heat storage capacity, and smooth surface seemed to be best suitable. Further research on appropriate coating material might be promising for future. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Styrofoam-and-Velcro: An Alternative to Ball-and-Stick Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Rowan Masonjones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For students learning biology at introductory levels, one of the most significant instructional barriers is their lack of preparation in chemistry. In upper-division college chemistry and biology courses, students employ ball-and-stick models in order to visualize molecular structures, but at the introductory biology level, models are inconsistently used and at the secondary level they are avoided altogether. Traditional ball-and-stick models perform poorly at all levels because they only show bonds, never valence electrons. This poses a problem for students who are visual or kinesthetic learners, as modeling electrons in the bonding process may be critical to understanding the mechanisms behind the biochemical reactions that serve as a foundation for biological concepts. Our molecular modeling kits show the action of valence electrons and correctly deal with the issue of polarity and partial charge, while still illustrating structure and function similarly to ball-and-stick models, allowing students to model nearly every reaction or molecule they may need to learn.  Additionally, this kit will foster model building exercises required as part of the Next Generation Science Standards (http://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards. This model was devloped in conjunction with 'Molecular Twister: A Game for Exploring Solution Chemistry' (JMBE Vol 15, No 1; http://jmbe.asm.org/index.php/jmbe/article/view/652 by the same authors, which uses principles derived from the present paper.

  19. On a Desert Island with Unit Sticks, Continued Fractions and Lagrange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Ricchezza

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available GLY 4866, Computational Geology, provides an opportunity, welcomed by our faculty, to teach quantitative literacy to geology majors at USF. The course continues to evolve although the second author has been teaching it for some 20 years. This paper describes our experiences with a new lab activity that we are developing on the core issue of measurement and units. The activity is inspired by a passage in the 2008 publication of lectures that Joseph Louis Lagrange delivered at the Ecole Normale in 1795. The activity envisions that young scientists are faced with the need to determine the dimensions of a rectangle with no measuring device other than an unruled stick of unknown length – to hundredths of a stick length. Following Lagrange, the students use the stick to measure the lengths with continued fractions, and then they reduce the continued fractions and convert them to decimal form. In the process, these student veterans of calculus instruction learn that as a group they are not very good at the arithmetic of fractions, which they thought they learned in the fifth grade. The group score on a continued fraction item improved from 44% on the pre-course test to 84% on the post-course test in the first semester in which the new lab was included (Fall 2015.

  20. Ballasting pipeline moving in horizontal well as method of control sticking phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, V. S.; Toropov, E. S.

    2018-05-01

    The mechanism of the phenomenon of sticking a pipeline moving in a well while pulled by the facility horizontal directional drilling is investigated. A quantitative evaluation of the force arising from sticking is given. At the same time, the working hypothesis takes a view of the combined effect of adhesion and friction interactions as the reasons that cause this phenomenon. As a measure to control the occurrence of sticking and to reduce the resistance force to movement of the pipeline in the well, several methods of ballasting the working pipeline are proposed, depending on the profile of the well and the ratio of the length of the curved sections of the inlet and outlet and the straight horizontal sections of the profile. It is shown that for crossings, which profile contains an extended horizontal section, it is possible to partially fill the pipeline with water to achieve zero buoyancy, and for crossings with curvature along the entire profile, the ballasting efficiency will be minimal.

  1. Accurate alpha sticking fractions from improved calculations relevant for muon catalyzed fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalewicz, K.

    1990-05-01

    Recent experiments have shown that under proper conditions a single muon may catalyze almost two hundred fusions in its lifetime. This process proceeds through formation of muonic molecular ions. Properties of these ions are central to the understanding of the phenomenon. Our work included the most accurate calculations of the energy levels and Coulombic sticking fractions for tdμ and other muonic molecular ions, calculations of Auger transition rates, calculations of corrections to the energy levels due to interactions with the most molecule, and calculation of the reactivation of muons from α particles. The majority of our effort has been devoted to the theory and computation of the influence of the strong nuclear forces on fusion rates and sticking fractions. We have calculated fusion rates for tdμ including the effects of nuclear forces on the molecular wave functions. We have also shown that these results can be reproduced to almost four digit accuracy by using a very simple quasifactorizable expression which does not require modifications of the molecular wave functions. Our sticking fractions are more accurate than any other theoretical values. We have used a more sophisticated theory than any other work and our numerical calculations have converged to at least three significant digits

  2. A geophone wireless sensor network for investigating glacier stick-slip motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kirk; Hart, Jane K.; Basford, Philip J.; Bragg, Graeme M.; Ward, Tyler; Young, David S.

    2017-08-01

    We have developed an innovative passive borehole geophone system, as part of a wireless environmental sensor network to investigate glacier stick-slip motion. The new geophone nodes use an ARM Cortex-M3 processor with a low power design capable of running on battery power while embedded in the ice. Only data from seismic events was stored, held temporarily on a micro-SD card until they were retrieved by systems on the glacier surface which are connected to the internet. The sampling rates, detection and filtering levels were determined from a field trial using a standard commercial passive seismic system. The new system was installed on the Skalafellsjökull glacier in Iceland and provided encouraging results. The results showed that there was a relationship between surface melt water production and seismic event (ice quakes), and these occurred on a pattern related to the glacier surface melt-water controlled velocity changes (stick-slip motion). Three types of seismic events were identified, which were interpreted to reflect a pattern of till deformation (Type A), basal sliding (Type B) and hydraulic transience (Type C) associated with stick-slip motion.

  3. The effect of vacuum packaging on histamine changes of milkfish sticks at various storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chiang-Wei; Huang, Yu-Ru; Cheng, Chao-An; Lin, Chia-Min; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2017-10-01

    The effects of polyethylene packaging (PEP) (in air) and vacuum packaging (VP) on the histamine related quality of milkfish sticks stored at different temperatures (-20°C, 4°C, 15°C, and 25°C) were studied. The results showed that the aerobic plate count (APC), pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN), and histamine contents increased as storage time increased when the PEP and VP samples were stored at 25°C. At below 15°C, the APC, TVBN, pH, and histamine levels in PEP and VP samples were retarded, but the VP samples had considerably lower levels of APC, TVBN, and histamine than PEP samples. Once the frozen fish samples stored at -20°C for 2 months were thawed and stored at 25°C, VP retarded the increase of histamine in milkfish sticks as compared to PEP. In summary, this result suggested the milkfish sticks packed with VP and stored below 4°C could prevent deterioration of product quality and extend shelf-life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Inertial and stick-slip regimes of unstable adhesive tape peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Villey, Richard; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Vanel, Loïc

    2016-05-18

    We present an experimental characterization of the detachment front unstable dynamics observed during the peeling of pressure sensitive adhesives. We use an experimental set-up specifically designed to control the peeling angle θ and the peeled tape length L, while peeling an adhesive tape from a flat substrate at a constant driving velocity V. High-speed imaging allows us to report the evolution of the period and amplitude of the front oscillations, as well as the relative durations of their fast and slow phases, as a function of the control parameters V, L and θ. Our study shows that, as the driving velocity or the peeling angle increases, the oscillations of the peeling front progressively evolve from genuine "stick-slip" oscillations, made of alternating long stick phases and very brief slip phases, to sinusoidal oscillations of amplitude twice the peeling velocity. We propose a model which, taking into account the peeling angle-dependent kinetic energy cost to accelerate and decelerate the peeled tape, explains the transition from the "stick-slip" to the "inertial" regime of the dynamical instability. Using independent direct measurements of the effective fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint, we show that our model quantitatively accounts for the two regimes of the unstable dynamics.

  5. Investigation of PDC bit failure base on stick-slip vibration analysis of drilling string system plus drill bit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiqiang; Xie, Dou; Xie, Bing; Zhang, Wenlin; Zhang, Fuxiao; He, Lei

    2018-03-01

    The undesired stick-slip vibration is the main source of PDC bit failure, such as tooth fracture and tooth loss. So, the study of PDC bit failure base on stick-slip vibration analysis is crucial to prolonging the service life of PDC bit and improving ROP (rate of penetration). For this purpose, a piecewise-smooth torsional model with 4-DOF (degree of freedom) of drilling string system plus PDC bit is proposed to simulate non-impact drilling. In this model, both the friction and cutting behaviors of PDC bit are innovatively introduced. The results reveal that PDC bit is easier to fail than other drilling tools due to the severer stick-slip vibration. Moreover, reducing WOB (weight on bit) and improving driving torque can effectively mitigate the stick-slip vibration of PDC bit. Therefore, PDC bit failure can be alleviated by optimizing drilling parameters. In addition, a new 4-DOF torsional model is established to simulate torsional impact drilling and the effect of torsional impact on PDC bit's stick-slip vibration is analyzed by use of an engineering example. It can be concluded that torsional impact can mitigate stick-slip vibration, prolonging the service life of PDC bit and improving drilling efficiency, which is consistent with the field experiment results.

  6. Creep to inertia dominated stick-slip behavior in sliding friction modulated by tilted non-uniform loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengyi; Tao, Dashuai; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Tian, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Comprehension of stick-slip motion is very important for understanding tribological principles. The transition from creep-dominated to inertia-dominated stick-slip as the increase of sliding velocity has been described by researchers. However, the associated micro-contact behavior during this transition has not been fully disclosed yet. In this study, we investigated the stick-slip behaviors of two polymethyl methacrylate blocks actively modulated from the creep-dominated to inertia-dominated dynamics through a non-uniform loading along the interface by slightly tilting the angle of the two blocks. Increasing the tilt angle increases the critical transition velocity from creep-dominated to inertia-dominated stick-slip behaviors. Results from finite element simulation disclosed that a positive tilt angle led to a higher normal stress and a higher temperature on blocks at the opposite side of the crack initiating edge, which enhanced the creep of asperities during sliding friction. Acoustic emission (AE) during the stick-slip has also been measured, which is closely related to the different rupture modes regulated by the distribution of the ratio of shear to normal stress along the sliding interface. This study provided a more comprehensive understanding of the effect of tilted non-uniform loading on the local stress ratio, the local temperature, and the stick-slip behaviors.

  7. [Correlation between physical characteristics of sticks and quality of traditional Chinese medicine pills prepared by plastic molded method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Xian, Jiechen; Hong, Yanlong; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi

    2012-05-01

    To quantify the physical characteristics of sticks of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) honeyed pills prepared by the plastic molded method and the correlation of adhesiveness and plasticity-related parameters of sticks and quality of pills, in order to find major parameters and the appropriate range impacting pill quality. Sticks were detected by texture analyzer for their physical characteristic parameters such as hardness and compression action, and pills were observed by visual evaluation for their quality. The correlation of both data was determined by the stepwise discriminant analysis. Stick physical characteristic parameter l(CD) can exactly depict the adhesiveness, with the discriminant equation of Y0 - Y1 = 6.415 - 41.594l(CD). When Y0 Y1, pills were adhesive with each other. Pills' physical characteristic parameters l(CD) and l(AC), Ar, Tr can exactly depict smoothness of pills, with the discriminant equation of Z0 - Z1 = -195.318 + 78.79l(AC) - 3 258. 982Ar + 3437.935Tr. When Z0 Z1, pills were rough on surface. The stepwise discriminant analysis is made to show the obvious correlation between key physical characteristic parameters l(CD) and l(AC), Ar, Tr of sticks and appearance quality of pills, defining the molding process for preparing pills by the plastic molded and qualifying ranges of key physical characteristic parameters characterizing intermediate sticks, in order to provide theoretical basis for prescription screening and technical parameter adjustment for pills.

  8. Study of the influences of rotary table speed on stick-slip vibration of the drilling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stick-slip vibration presents one of the major causes of drilling problems, such as premature tool failures, low drilling efficiency and poor wellbore quality. The objective of this work is to investigate the influences of rotary table speed (RTS on stick-slip phenomenon of the drilling system. In this study, the drilling system is treated as a lumped torsional pendulum model of which the bit/rock interaction is regarded as Coulomb friction. By analyzing cases with different RTS, two types of vibrations on the bit are found: stick-slip vibration and uniform motion. With an increase in the RTS, the stick-slip vibration on the drill bit disappears once the RTS arrives at its critical value. For the cases that stick-slip vibrations occur, the phase trajectories converge toward a limit cycle. For the cases that stick-slip vibration does not appear, the drill bit tends to stabilize at a uniform motion and the phase trajectories correspond to contracting spirals observed in the phase plane.

  9. A simple video-based timing system for on-ice team testing in ice hockey: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David P; Noonan, Benjamin C

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a newly developed on-ice timing system for team evaluation in the sport of ice hockey. We hypothesized that this new, simple, inexpensive, timing system would prove to be highly accurate and reliable. Six adult subjects (age 30.4 ± 6.2 years) performed on ice tests of acceleration and conditioning. The performance times of the subjects were recorded using a handheld stopwatch, photocell, and high-speed (240 frames per second) video. These results were then compared to allow for accuracy calculations of the stopwatch and video as compared with filtered photocell timing that was used as the "gold standard." Accuracy was evaluated using maximal differences, typical error/coefficient of variation (CV), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the timing methods. The reliability of the video method was evaluated using the same variables in a test-retest analysis both within and between evaluators. The video timing method proved to be both highly accurate (ICC: 0.96-0.99 and CV: 0.1-0.6% as compared with the photocell method) and reliable (ICC and CV within and between evaluators: 0.99 and 0.08%, respectively). This video-based timing method provides a very rapid means of collecting a high volume of very accurate and reliable on-ice measures of skating speed and conditioning, and can easily be adapted to other testing surfaces and parameters.

  10. Sticking non-stick: Surface and Structure control of Diamond-like Carbon in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J.; Nelson, N.

    2016-10-01

    This short review article explores the practical use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Using as an example issues relating to the DLC coating of a hand-held surgical device, we draw on previous works using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensiometry and electron paramagnetic resonance. Utilising data from these techniques, we examine the surface structure, substrate-film interface and thin film microstructure, such as sp2/sp3 ratio (graphitic/diamond-like bonding ratio) and sp2 clustering. We explore the variations in parameters describing these characteristics, and relate these to the final device properties such as friction, wear resistance, and diffusion barrier integrity. The material and device characteristics are linked to the initial plasma and substrate conditions.

  11. Sticking non-stick: Surface and Structure control of Diamond-like Carbon in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B J; Nelson, N

    2016-01-01

    This short review article explores the practical use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Using as an example issues relating to the DLC coating of a hand-held surgical device, we draw on previous works using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensiometry and electron paramagnetic resonance. Utilising data from these techniques, we examine the surface structure, substrate-film interface and thin film microstructure, such as sp 2 /sp 3 ratio (graphitic/diamond-like bonding ratio) and sp 2 clustering. We explore the variations in parameters describing these characteristics, and relate these to the final device properties such as friction, wear resistance, and diffusion barrier integrity. The material and device characteristics are linked to the initial plasma and substrate conditions. (paper)

  12. Spectral analysis of the stick-slip phenomenon in "oral" tribological texture evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanahuja, Solange; Upadhyay, Rutuja; Briesen, Heiko; Chen, Jianshe

    2017-08-01

    "Oral" tribology has become a new paradigm in food texture studies to understand complex texture attributes, such as creaminess, oiliness, and astringency, which could not be successfully characterized by traditional texture analysis nor by rheology. Stick-slip effects resulting from intermittent sliding motion during kinetic friction of oral mucosa could constitute an additional determining factor of sensory perception where traditional friction coefficient values and their Stribeck regimes fail in predicting different lubricant (food bolus and saliva) behaviors. It was hypothesized that the observed jagged behavior of most sliding force curves are due to stick-slip effects and depend on test velocity, normal load, surface roughness as well as lubricant type. Therefore, different measurement set-ups were investigated: sliding velocities from 0.01 to 40 mm/s, loads of 0.5 and 2.5 N as well as a smooth and a textured silicone contact surface. Moreover, dry contact measurements were compared to model food systems, such as water, oil, and oil-in-water emulsions. Spectral analysis permitted to extract the distribution of stick-slip magnitudes for specific wave numbers, characterizing the occurrence of jagged force peaks per unit sliding distance, similar to frequencies per unit time. The spectral features were affected by all the above mentioned tested factors. Stick-slip created vibration frequencies in the range of those detected by oral mechanoreceptors (0.3-400 Hz). The study thus provides a new insight into the use of tribology in food psychophysics. Dynamic spectral analysis has been applied for the first time to the force-displacement curves in "oral" tribology. Analyzing the stick-slip phenomenon in the dynamic friction provides new information that is generally overlooked or confused with machine noise and which may help to understand friction-related sensory attributes. This approach allows us to differentiate samples that have similar friction coefficient

  13. Multiple Off-Ice Performance Variables Predict On-Ice Skating Performance in Male and Female Division III Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    effrey M. Janot, Nicholas M. Beltz, Lance D. Dalleck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if off-ice performance variables could predict on-ice skating performance in Division III collegiate hockey players. Both men (n = 15 and women (n = 11 hockey players (age = 20.5 ± 1.4 years participated in the study. The skating tests were agility cornering S-turn, 6.10 m acceleration, 44.80 m speed, modified repeat skate, and 15.20 m full speed. Off-ice variables assessed were years of playing experience, height, weight and percent body fat and off-ice performance variables included vertical jump (VJ, 40-yd dash (36.58m, 1-RM squat, pro-agility, Wingate peak power and peak power percentage drop (% drop, and 1.5 mile (2.4km run. Results indicated that 40-yd dash (36.58m, VJ, 1.5 mile (2.4km run, and % drop were significant predictors of skating performance for repeat skate (slowest, fastest, and average time and 44.80 m speed time, respectively. Four predictive equations were derived from multiple regression analyses: 1 slowest repeat skate time = 2.362 + (1.68 x 40-yd dash time + (0.005 x 1.5 mile run, 2 fastest repeat skate time = 9.762 - (0.089 x VJ - (0.998 x 40-yd dash time, 3 average repeat skate time = 7.770 + (1.041 x 40-yd dash time - (0.63 x VJ + (0.003 x 1.5 mile time, and 4 47.85 m speed test = 7.707 - (0.050 x VJ - (0.01 x % drop. It was concluded that selected off-ice tests could be used to predict on-ice performance regarding speed and recovery ability in Division III male and female hockey players.

  14. Greater circadian disadvantage during evening games for the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL) and National Football League (NFL) teams travelling westward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jonathan; Forest, Geneviève

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the effects of a circadian disadvantage (i.e. playing in a different time zone) on the winning percentages in three major sport leagues in North America: the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and the National Football League. We reviewed 5 years of regular season games in the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and National Football League, and noted the winning percentage of the visiting team depending on the direction of travel (west, east, and same time zone) and game time (day and evening games). T-tests and analysis of variance were performed to evaluate the effects of the circadian disadvantage, its direction, the number of time zones travelled, and the game time on winning percentages in each major league. The results showed an association between the winning percentages and the number of time zones traveled for the away evening games, with a clear disadvantage for the teams travelling westward. There was a significant difference in the teams' winning percentages depending on the travelling direction in the National Basketball Association (F 2,5908  = 16.12, P < 0.0001) and the National Hockey League (F 2,5639  = 4.48, P = 0.011), and a trend was found in the National Football League (F 2,1279  = 2.86, P = 0.058). The effect of the circadian disadvantage transcends the type of sport and needs to be addressed for greater equity among the western and eastern teams in professional sports. These results also highlight the importance of circadian rhythms in sport performance and athletic competitions. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. CATECHOLAMINES AND β2-ADRENOCEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION BEFORE AND AFTER MAXIMAL INCREMENTAL CYCLE TEST IN YOUNG ICE HOCKEY PLAYERS: RELATION TO WORK PERFORMED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Mazurek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations as well as whole blood β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2 expression in young ice hockey players before and immediately after exercise in relation to performed work. Nineteen Youth National Team ice hockey players were subjected to the maximal incremental cycloergometer exercise. The test was done in the pre-competitive phase of training. Among many parameters the plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations and ADRB2 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were determined before and after exercise. The average performed work was 3261.3 ± 558.3 J · kg-1 and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max for all players was 53.85 ± 3.91 mL · kg-1 min-1. The geometric mean of the ADRB2 gene expression was statistically significantly different before and after exercise (P ≤ 0.05, while adrenaline and noradrenaline levels in plasma significantly increased after exercise. In the analysed group of athletes we found that initial level of plasma noradrenaline correlated with the performed work (r = - 0.55, P < 0.014 and normalized ADRB2 expression before the exercise correlated with the work done by them (r = 0.48, P<0.039. However, no statistically significant correlations were found between the plasma adrenaline or noradrenaline concentrations and ADRB2 gene expression in peripheral blood of the players. The performed work in the maximal incremental exercise test of regularly training young ice hockey players depends on the initial levels of noradrenaline in plasma and ADRB2 mRNA in PBMC.

  16. Cold power creates artificial ice for the ice hockey championship. Football arena is used as an ice stadium; Kaeltepower schafft Kunsteis fuer Eishockey-WM. Fussballarena wird zum Eisstadion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Franz

    2010-11-15

    On 7th May 2010, the Veltins arena in Gelsenkirchen (Federal Republic of Germany) became the greatest ice hockey stadium of the world. There, the opening play of the world championship between the host Germany and the USA took place. Germany as a clear outsider won 2:1 against the US-Boys. However, before this historical victory extensive building operations had to be realized 'Auf Schalke' in order to convert the lawn into a complete ice hockey court.

  17. Electrical Potentials Observed During Frictional Stick-Slip - A Semiconductor Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, J.; Scuderi, M.; Marone, C.; Saffer, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena are commonly reported during and after large earthquakes. Various lines of evidence including charring of plant roots, magnetic remnant signatures in pseudotachylite, and visible earthquake lights indicate a strong electrical potential separation during co-seismic rupture. Suggested explanations have included triboelectricity, piezoelectricity, and streaming potentials. The 'semiconductor effect', or migration of electron holes, has been proposed as an alternative explanation and studied extensively in solids. We present evidence of a similar migration effect in a granular material that exhibits repeated frictional stick-slip events under a variety of conditions. Soda-lime glass beads were sheared in a double-direct shear configuration in a biaxial loading frame. Glass beads exhibit consistent, repetitive stick-slip and rate/state friction effects that are similar to rock. Layers of 5 mm thickness were sheared under a constant normal load of 4MPa, at load point velocities of 1, 30, and 100 μm/s. This was done for mono-disperse particle size distributions of 100-150 μm and 420-500 μm. Tests were conducted at room humidity, at 100% humidity, and under submerged conditions. During shearing, the electrical potential of the surface was monitored relative to the system ground with a non-contact electrostatic volt meter (ESVM) manufactured by Trek Incorporated. During stick-slip events, we observe electrical potential anomalies that appear to be related to failure of force chains supporting the shear load. Two distinct types of behavior are delineated by the attainment of steady state frictional sliding. In the pre-steady state phase, as shear stress is increasing, layers are observed to charge during stick-slip and the potential of the entire system rises. When shear stress rises to the level of steady state frictional sliding, the system begins to discharge, with superimposed anomalies characterized by potential drops of several volts that

  18. Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competitive-level female ice hockey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriksson T

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tommy Henriksson,1,2 Jason D Vescovi,3 Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund,4 Kajsa Gilenstam1 1Sport Medicine Unit, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2The National Graduate School of Gender Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 3Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Physiotherapy Unit, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players.Design: Cross-sectional study.Methods: Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15–25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm, with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex. The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables.Results: Regression models (adj R2 for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing

  19. Mass carbon monoxide poisoning at an ice-hockey game: initial approach and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Populaire, Jacques; Desruelles, Didier; Sabbe, Marc B

    2013-12-01

    A mass carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication during an ice-hockey game is described. Two hundred and thirty-five patients were seen in different hospitals, 88 of them the same night at the nearby emergency department. To evaluate long-term implications and to identify relevant indicators, a follow-up study was organized 1 year after the incident. Apart from the file data from the emergency departments, a 1-year follow-up mailing was sent to all patients. One hundred and ninety-one patients returned their questionnaire (86%). The mean age of the patients was 28 years, with 61% men. The mean carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) was 9.9%. COHb levels were significantly higher for individuals on the ice (referee, players and maintenance personnel). There was a significant relationship with the initial presence of dizziness, fatigue and the COHb level. Headache, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting were not significantly related to the COHb levels. The relationship between symptoms and CO level, however, should be interpreted with caution as there was a wide range between exposure and blood tests. 5.2% of patients had residual complaints, all including headache, with a significant higher incidence with high COHb levels. Only two patients had an abnormal neurological control (one slightly disturbed electroencephalography and one persistent encephalopathic complaint). Work incapacity was also significantly related to COHb levels. CO mass poisonings remain a risk in indoor sporting events. Although it causes an acute mass casualty incident, it is limited in time and delayed problems are scarce. Symptomatology is a poor tool for triage. The best prevention is the use of nonmineral energy sources such as for example electricity.

  20. A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part II: how concussions occur in the NHL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2015-04-01

    Concussions in sports are a growing cause of concern, as these injuries can have debilitating short-term effects and little is known about the potential long-term consequences. This work aims to describe how concussions occur in the National Hockey League. Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons. Digital video records were coded and analysed using a standardised protocol. 88% (n=174/197) of concussions involved player-to-opponent contact. 16 diagnosed concussions were a result of fighting. Of the 158 concussions that involved player-to-opponent body contact, the most common mechanisms were direct contact to the head initiated by the shoulder 42% of the time (n=66/158), by the elbow 15% (n=24/158) and by gloves in 5% of cases (n=8/158). When the results of anatomical location are combined with initial contact, almost half of these events (n=74/158) were classified as direct contact to the lateral aspect of the head. The predominant mechanism of concussion was consistently characterised by player-to-opponent contact, typically directed to the head by the shoulder, elbow or gloves. Also, several important characteristics were apparent: (1) contact was often to the lateral aspect of the head; (2) the player who suffered a concussion was often not in possession of the puck and (3) no penalty was called on the play. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Premonitory acoustic emissions and stick-slip in natural and smooth-faulted Westerly granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A stick-slip event was induced in a cylindrical sample of Westerly granite containing a preexisting natural fault by loading at constant confining pressure of 150 MPa. Continuously recorded acoustic emission (AE) data and computer tomography (CT)-generated images of the fault plane were combined to provide a detailed examination of microscale processes operating on the fault. The dynamic stick-slip event, considered to be a laboratory analog of an earthquake, generated an ultrasonic signal that was recorded as a large-amplitude AE event. First arrivals of this event were inverted to determine the nucleation site of slip, which is associated with a geometric asperity on the fault surface. CT images and AE locations suggest that a variety of asperities existed in the sample because of the intersection of branch or splay faults with the main fault. This experiment is compared with a stick-slip experiment on a sample prepared with a smooth, artificial saw-cut fault surface. Nearly a thousand times more AE were observed for the natural fault, which has a higher friction coefficient (0.78 compared to 0.53) and larger shear stress drop (140 compared to 68 MPa). However at the measured resolution, the ultrasonic signal emitted during slip initiation does not vary significantly between the two experiments, suggesting a similar dynamic rupture process. We propose that the natural faulted sample under triaxial compression provides a good laboratory analogue for a field-scale fault system in terms of the presence of asperities, fault surface heterogeneity, and interaction of branching faults. ?? 2009.

  2. Tactile Reflex Development Through Wing Tsun’s “Sticking Hands” Practice, by Jeff Webb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Webb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It was the late Bruce Lee who first demonstrated Wing Tsun gongfu’s “sticking hands” (chi-sau exercise in the US, during the 1964 Long Beach International Karate Championships. Forty-four years later, very few outside of the art truly understand the purpose of chi-sau let alone how it develops tactile reflexes. This article will describe both the fundamental and complex methods of chi-sau training in detail. It will also explain the rationale and theories behind this method as well as discuss a variety of factors that can either improve or retard the acquisition of tactile reflexes.

  3. Clinical use of femoral artery hemostasis sticking after interventional procedure via femoral artery access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhongsheng; Chen Shaoliang; Ye Fei; Zhang Junjie; Zhou Jie; Tian Nailiang; Lin Song; Liu Zhizhong; Xiao Pingxi; Qu Hong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effect of the use of femoral artery hemostasis sticking V+PAD after the interventional procedure via femoral artery access. Methods: By using random permutation list 80 patients, who decided to receive coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, were randomly selected. Of the 80 patients, hemostasis sticking V + PAD was employed in 40 patients with even numbers (trial group), only manual compression was adopted to stop bleeding in another 40 patients with odd numbers (control group). All the patients were informed about this trial and had to sign a consent letter. The pressure time, the treatment method of access site after hemostasis, the posture in bed, the immobilization time, the comfort degree of patients, the complications of access site prior to discharge, etc. were observed and the results were compared between two groups. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups as respect to age, gender ratios,activated clotting time (ACT) value and blood pressure. However, significantly difference in the compression time and bed rest time existed between the two groups. The compression time in trial group and control group was (7.9 ± 0.5) min and (19.8 ± 5.1) min respectively (P<0.01), while the bed rest time in trial group and control group was (6.1 ± 5.0) hours and (23.9 ± 0.2) hours respectively (P<0.01). All patients in trial group was supine in bed with the head side of the bed raised at 30 degree immediately after the procedure, and the head side of the bed was further raised to 90 degree one hour later. The puncture site was bandaged with conventional compression and immobilization was not employed. Patients could lie in bed with free posture and the patient's comfort degree was greatly improved. During hospitalization no complications related to puncture site occurred in all patients except one obese woman in trial group who developed pseudoaneurysm. Conclusion: Femoral

  4. Algorithm for prevention of molten steel sticking onto mold in continous casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažević, D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuous casting steel production a significant loss reduction – in terms of scrap material, time and money – can be achieved by developing an appropriate algorithm for the prevention of molten steel sticking onto mould. The logic of such algorithm should be simple and manageable to ensure its practical implementation on a computer system via the usage of thermo sensors. This suggests that both the algorithm and the automated data collection can be implemented by means of applicative software. Despite its simplicity, the algorithm should accurately trace physical phenomena in molten steel.

  5. Vanishing stick-slip friction in few-layer graphenes: the thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Wang, Hui

    2011-07-15

    We report the thickness dependence of intrinsic friction in few-layer graphenes, adopting molecular dynamics simulations. The friction force drops dramatically with decreasing number of layers and finally approaches zero with two or three layers. The results, which are robust over a wide range of temperature, shear velocity, and pressure are quantitatively explained by a theoretical model with regard to lateral stiffness, slip length, and maximum lateral force, which could provide a new conceptual framework for understanding stick-slip friction. The results reveal the crucial role of the dimensional effect in nanoscale friction, and could be helpful in the design of graphene-based nanodevices.

  6. Muon sticking factor in muon catalyzed fusion and the other aspect of this fusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of resonance nuclear fusion reaction on the initial muon sticking factor is formulated. The analysis shows that it is very sensitive to the resonance parameter, and the factor calculated, using the molecular wave function obtained by the Diffusion Monte Carlo method, is 0.1 +- 0.01 for the presently evaluated resonance parameter. The analysis of the multistep excitation effect on the reactivation factor shows that the effect is not so large, and the analysis of muonic x-ray spectra of μ 3 He from Pμd and dμd fusions is in good agreement with the values measured by Bossy et al

  7. Lifted graphene nanoribbons on gold: from smooth sliding to multiple stick-slip regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Gigli, Lorenzo; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) physisorbed on a Au(111) surface can be picked up, lifted at one end, and made slide by means of the tip of an atomic-force microscope. The dynamical transition from smooth sliding to multiple stick-slip regimes, the pushing/pulling force asymmetry, the presence of pinning, and its origin are real frictional processes in a nutshell, in need of a theoretical description. To this purpose, we conduct classical simulations of frictional manipulations for GNRs up to 30 ...

  8. A Case of endoscopic retrieval of a long bamboo stick from a Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Ko, Minho; Cho, Hyun Kee; Kang, Byung-Jae; Choi, Jung Hoon; Chung, Jin-Young

    2017-02-28

    An eighteen-month-old female Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) that was 50 cm in length and 4.5 kg in weight was presented with anorexia and vomiting. The hematological and blood biochemical profiles revealed no remarkable findings, and no Salmonella, Shigella or Vibrio spp. were isolated from the fecal culture. However, radiographic imaging revealed a long linear foreign body presenting from the lower esophagus to the stomach. To retrieve this foreign body, flexible endoscopic extraction was performed using flexible rat tooth grasping forceps. A long bamboo stick (29 × 1 cm) was removed from the stomach, and the penguin fully recovered.

  9. Neutral Evolution of Duplicated DNA: An Evolutionary Stick-Breaking Process Causes Scale-Invariant Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massip, Florian; Arndt, Peter F.

    2013-04-01

    Recently, an enrichment of identical matching sequences has been found in many eukaryotic genomes. Their length distribution exhibits a power law tail raising the question of what evolutionary mechanism or functional constraints would be able to shape this distribution. Here we introduce a simple and evolutionarily neutral model, which involves only point mutations and segmental duplications, and produces the same statistical features as observed for genomic data. Further, we extend a mathematical model for random stick breaking to analytically show that the exponent of the power law tail is -3 and universal as it does not depend on the microscopic details of the model.

  10. Deodorant effects of a sage extract stick: Antibacterial activity and sensory evaluation of axillary deodorancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Shahtalebi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deodorant products prevent the growth and activity of the degrading apocrine gland bacteria living in the armpit. Common antibacterial agents in the market like triclosan and aluminum salts, in spite of their suitable antibacterial effects, increase the risk of Alzheimer′s disease, breast and prostate cancers or induce contact dermatitis. Therefore, plant extracts possessing antibacterial effects are of interest. The aim of the present study was to verify the in vitro antimicrobial effects of different sage extracts against two major bacteria responsible for axillary odor, and to evaluate the deodorant effect of a silicon-based stick containing sage extracts in different densities in humans. Materials and Methods: Different fractions of methanolic extract of Salvia officinalis (sage were evaluated on a culture of armpit skin surface of volunteers through agar microdilution antimicrobial assay. Then, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial with the best antibacterial fraction was conducted on 45 female healthy volunteers. Participants were treated with a single dose in four groups, each containing 15 individuals: Group 1 (200 μg/mL, 2 (400 μg/mL, 3 (600 μg/mL of dichloromethane sage extract, and placebo (without extract. A standard sensory evaluation method for the evaluation of deodorant efficacy was used before, and two hours, four hours, and eight hours after single application of a deodorant or placebo (ASTM method E 1207-87 Standard Practice for the Sensory Evaluation of Axillary Deodorancy. Results: The data were analyzed with two factors relating to densities and time. In 45 participants with a mean [± standard deviation (SD] age of 61.5±11.8 years, statistically significant within-group differences were observed before and two, four, and eight hours after deodorant treatment for groups 1, 2, and 3. Groups 1, 2, and 3 had a significantly smaller odor score than placebo after two, four, and eight hours

  11. Arterial stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be some throbbing. Why the Test Is Performed Blood transports oxygen, nutrients, waste products, and other materials within ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the blood before any ...

  12. Cultural Adaptation of the Portuguese Version of the "Sniffin' Sticks" Smell Test: Reliability, Validity, and Normative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, João Carlos; Simões, João; Silva, Filipe; Silva, Eduardo D; Hummel, Cornelia; Hummel, Thomas; Paiva, António

    2016-01-01

    The cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Sniffin`Sticks test for the Portuguese population is described. Over 270 people participated in four experiments. In Experiment 1, 67 participants rated the familiarity of presented odors and seven descriptors of the original test were adapted to a Portuguese context. In Experiment 2, the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test was administered to 203 healthy participants. Older age, male gender and active smoking status were confirmed as confounding factors. The third experiment showed the validity of the Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test in discriminating healthy controls from patients with olfactory dysfunction. In Experiment 4, the test-retest reliability for both the composite score (r71 = 0.86) and the identification test (r71 = 0.62) was established (pPortuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test is provided, showing good validity and reliability and effectively distinguishing patients from healthy controls with high sensitivity and specificity. The Portuguese version of Sniffin`Sticks test identification test is a clinically suitable screening tool in routine outpatient Portuguese settings.

  13. CPW-fed Circularly Polarized Slot Antenna with Small Gap and Stick-shaped Shorted Strip for UHF FRID Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Yuan; Su, Chum-Chieh; Yang, Wei-Lin

    2018-04-01

    A new circularly polarized (CP) slot antenna with a small gap and a stick-shaped shorted strip is presented. The proposed antenna has a sufficient bandwidth for ultrahigh frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID) reader applications. The antenna structure consists of a rectangular slot with a small gap, a stick-shaped shorted strip and a 50 Ω coplanar waveguide (CPW) feedline with an asymmetrical ground plane. By using the stick -shaped shorted strip to disturb magnetic current distribution on the slot, the CP radiation can be generated. The measured results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can reach a 10 dB return loss impedance bandwidth of 14.1 % (894-1030 MHz) and a 3 dB axial ratio (AR) bandwidth of 6.4 % (910-970 MHz). The whole antenna size is 80 × 80 × 1.6 mm3.

  14. Reticulate evolution in stick insects: the case of Clonopsis (Insecta Phasmida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Pellecchia, Marco; Scali, Valerio; Passamonti, Marco

    2010-08-25

    Phasmids show noteworthy abilities to overcome species-specific reproductive isolation mechanisms, including hybridization, polyploidy, parthenogenesis, hybridogenesis and androgenesis. From an evolutionary standpoint, such tangled reproductive interactions lead to the complex phyletic relationships known as "reticulate evolution". Moroccan stick insects of the genus Clonopsis include one bisexual (C. felicitatis) and two closely related parthenogenetic forms (C. gallica, C. soumiae), which represent a polyploid series in chromosome number, but with apparent diploid karyotypes. Moreover, two Clonopsis strains of ameiotic males have been described, C. androgenes-35 and C. androgenes-53. As a consequence, Clonopsis stick insects may have experienced complex micro-evolutionary events, which we try to disentangle in this study. Mitochondrial cox2 analysis supports a recent divergence of Clonopsis, while AFLPs evidence genetic differentiation not linked to karyotypes, so that parthenogenetic C. gallica and C. soumiae appear to be a mix of strains of polyphyletic origin rather than single parthenogenetic species. Moreover, an admixed hybrid origin seems to be confirmed for C. androgenes. On the whole, Clonopsis is an intriguing case of reticulate evolution. Actually, complex cladogenetic events should be taken into account to explain the observed genetic structure, including diploidization of polyploid karyotypes, possibly coupled with hybridization and androgenesis. We also proposed a "working hypothesis" to account for the observed data, which deserves further studies, but fits the observed data very well.

  15. Numerical study on the stick-slip motion of contact line moving on heterogeneous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Chen, Xiao-Peng

    2017-08-01

    We present a numerical study of a moving contact line (CL) crossing the intersecting region of hydrophilic and hydrophobic patterns on a solid wall using lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs). To capture the interface between the two phases properly, we applied a phase field model coupled with the LBM. The evolutions of the CL velocity, dynamic contact angle, and apparent contact angle are analyzed for the so-called "stick" and "slip" processes. In the two processes, the evolution of the quantities follows different rules shortly after the initial quick transition, which is probably caused by finite interfacial thickness or non-equilibrium effects. For the stick process, the CL is almost fixed and energy is extracted from the main flow to rebuild the meniscus' profile. The evolution of the meniscus is mainly governed by mass conservation. The CL is depinned after the apparent contact angle surpasses the dynamic one, which implies that the interfacial segment in the vicinity of contact line is bended. For the slip process, the quantities evolve with features of relaxation. In the microscopic scale, the velocity of the CL depends on the balance between unbalanced Young's capillary force and viscous drag. To predict the apparent contact angle evolution, a model following the dynamics of an overdamped spring-mass system is proposed. Our results also show that the capillary flows in a channel with heterogeneous wall can be described generally with the Poiseuille flow superimposed by the above transient one.

  16. Cohesion-Induced Stabilization in Stick-Slip Dynamics of Weakly Wet, Sheared Granular Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorostkar, Omid; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.; Marone, Chris; Carmeliet, Jan

    2018-03-01

    We use three-dimensional discrete element calculations to study stick-slip dynamics in a weakly wet granular layer designed to simulate fault gouge. The granular gouge is constituted by 8,000 spherical particles with a polydisperse size distribution. At very low liquid content, liquids impose cohesive and viscous forces on particles. Our simulations show that by increasing the liquid content, friction increases and granular layer shows higher recurrence time between slip events. We also observe that slip events exhibit larger friction drop and layer compaction in wet system compared to dry. We demonstrate that a small volume of liquid induces cohesive forces between wet particles that are responsible for an increase in coordination number leading to a more stable arrangement of particles. This stabilization is evidenced with 2 orders of magnitude lower particle kinetic energy in wet system during stick phase. Similar to previous experimental studies, we observe enhanced frictional strength for wet granular layers. In experiments, the physicochemical processes are believed to be the main reason for such behavior; we show, however, that at low confining stresses, the hydromechanical effects of induced cohesion are sufficient for observed behavior. Our simulations illuminate the role of particle interactions and demonstrate the conditions under which induced cohesion plays a significant role in fault zone processes, including slip initiation, weakening, and failure.

  17. Colonic, ureteral, and vascular injuries secondary to stick impalement in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Julie; Schoeffler, Gretchen L

    2011-08-01

    To report the surgical repair, case management, and outcome of a dog with sepsis and severe intraabdominal trauma secondary to a penetrating stick injury. A 1.5-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented to the emergency service after incurring a small laceration on the medial aspect of the left pelvic limb while running in the woods. The wound was surgically explored and a primary closure achieved. The patient was discharged the same day with oral antimicrobial therapy. The following morning the dog was represented to the emergency service for acute vomiting. Abdominal radiographs were performed and demonstrated loss of serosal detail and pneumoperitoneum. An emergency celiotomy was performed and revealed distal colonic perforation, left ureteral laceration, and lacerations of the left common iliac vein. Ureteronephrectomy, as well as primary closure of the distal colonic perforation and left common iliac vein lacerations, were performed. The patient recovered and was ultimately discharged from the hospital 5 days later. Follow-up 1 year later revealed no significant physical exam or biochemical abnormalities. A seemingly benign penetrating stick injury initially deemed to be superficial in nature was later demonstrated to have resulted in sepsis following severe intraabdominal trauma that included lacerations of the distal colon, left ureter, and left common iliac vein in a dog. Successful surgical management and intensive care led to a full recovery without any residual impairment noted a year later. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  18. Study on adsorption behavior of radioiodine gas using incense stick aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Shohei; Kokubu, Morinobu

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption of radioactive elemental iodine gas ( 131 I 2 ) on incense stick aerosol particles has been studied to provide basic data for a realistic and precise assessment of dose to the public due to radioiodine released from nuclear facilities. A mixture of iodine gas and aerosol was passed once through a glass vessel to cause the adsorption reaction. The adsorption was studied at different reaction times, initial I 2 gas concentrations and particle number concentrations. The results showed that the adsorption reached an equilibrium in about 2 min at the initial I 2 gas concentration of 10 -10 g/cm 3 . The proportion of iodine adsorbed by the aerosol particles was almost constant, about 25 % at the initial I 2 gas concentrations below 10 -11 g/cm 3 and at the reaction time of 1 min, and decreased with increase of the initial concentration over 10 -11 g/cm 3 . The adsorption isotherm of the aerosol for the gas was obtained from the experimental data. The semi-empirical equations to explain the adsorption reaction were also obtained based on the experimental data and the FUCHS's equation relating to vaporization of a droplet. The sticking probability in the equations was estimated to be 7.6 x 10 -3 . The calculated results using the equations were in good agreement with the experimental ones. (author)

  19. Vessel Enhancement and Segmentation of 4D CT Lung Image Using Stick Tensor Voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Tan; Hao, Yang; Jingli, Shi; Xuan, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Vessel enhancement and segmentation plays a significant role in medical image analysis. This paper proposes a novel vessel enhancement and segmentation method for 4D CT lung image using stick tensor voting algorithm, which focuses on addressing the vessel distortion issue of vessel enhancement diffusion (VED) method. Furthermore, the enhanced results are easily segmented using level-set segmentation. In our method, firstly, vessels are filtered using Frangi's filter to reduce intrapulmonary noises and extract rough blood vessels. Secondly, stick tensor voting algorithm is employed to estimate the correct direction along the vessel. Then the estimated direction along the vessel is used as the anisotropic diffusion direction of vessel in VED algorithm, which makes the intensity diffusion of points locating at the vessel wall be consistent with the directions of vessels and enhance the tubular features of vessels. Finally, vessels can be extracted from the enhanced image by applying level-set segmentation method. A number of experiments results show that our method outperforms traditional VED method in vessel enhancement and results in satisfied segmented vessels.

  20. Stick-Slip Motion of Moving Contact Line on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin; Lei, Siulong; Qian, Tiezheng; Wang, Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    Based on our continuum hydrodynamic model for immiscible two-phase flows at solid surfaces, the stick-slip motion has been predicted for moving contact line at chemically patterned surfaces [Wang et al., J. Fluid Mech., 605 (2008), pp. 59-78]. In this paper we show that the continuum predictions can be quantitatively verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our MD simulations are carried out for two immiscible Lennard-Jones fluids confined by two planar solid walls in Poiseuille flow geometry. In particular, one solid surface is chemically patterned with alternating stripes. For comparison, the continuum model is numerically solved using material parameters directly measured in MD simulations. From oscillatory fluid-fluid interface to intermittent stick-slip motion of moving contact line, we have quantitative agreement between the continuum and MD results. This agreement is attributed to the accurate description down to molecular scale by the generalized Navier boundary condition in our continuum model. Numerical results are also presented for the relaxational dynamics of fluid-fluid interface, in agreement with a theoretical analysis based on the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation. © 2010 Global-Science Press.

  1. Peeling-angle dependence of the stick-slip instability during adhesive tape peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-12-28

    The influence of peeling angle on the dynamics observed during the stick-slip peeling of an adhesive tape has been investigated. This study relies on a new experimental setup for peeling at a constant driving velocity while keeping constant the peeling angle and peeled tape length. The thresholds of the instability are shown to be associated with a subcritical bifurcation and bistability of the system. The velocity onset of the instability is moreover revealed to strongly depend on the peeling angle. This could be the consequence of peeling angle dependance of either the fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint or the effective stiffness at play between the peeling front and the point at which the peeling is enforced. The shape of the peeling front velocity fluctuations is finally shown to progressively change from typical stick-slip relaxation oscillations to nearly sinusoidal oscillations as the peeling angle is increased. We suggest that this transition might be controlled by inertial effects possibly associated with the propagation of the peeling force fluctuations through elongation waves in the peeled tape.

  2. Vitamin D status and V[combining dot above]O2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test in competitive ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, John S; Peterson, Ben J; Warpeha, Joseph M; Wilson, Patrick B; Rhodes, Greg S; Ingraham, Stacy J

    2014-11-01

    Vitamin D status has been associated with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in cross-sectional investigations in the general population. Data characterizing the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration and CRF in athletes are lacking. Junior and collegiate ice hockey players were recruited from the Minneapolis, MN (44.9° N), area during the off-season period (May 16-June 28). The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between 25(OH)D concentration and CRF in a sample population of competitive ice hockey players. Circulating 25(OH)D level was assessed from a capillary blood sample analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test (GXT) was used to assess CRF. Data on both 25(OH)D concentration and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak were available for 52 athletes. Insufficient 25(OH)D concentrations were found in 37.7% of the athletes (skate treadmill GXT.

  3. Implications of basal micro-earthquakes and tremor for ice stream mechanics: Stick-slip basal sliding and till erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcheck, C. Grace; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Schwartz, Susan Y.; Walter, Jacob I.; Winberry, J. Paul

    2018-03-01

    The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) is unique among Antarctic ice streams because it moves by stick-slip. The conditions allowing stick-slip and its importance in controlling ice dynamics remain uncertain. Local basal seismicity previously observed during unstable slip is a clue to the mechanism of ice stream stick-slip and a window into current basal conditions, but the spatial extent and importance of this basal seismicity are unknown. We analyze data from a 2010-2011 ice-plain-wide seismic and GPS network to show that basal micro-seismicity correlates with large-scale patterns in ice stream slip behavior: Basal seismicity is common where the ice moves the least between unstable slip events, with small discrete basal micro-earthquakes happening within 10s of km of the central stick-slip nucleation area and emergent basal tremor occurring downstream of this area. Basal seismicity is largely absent in surrounding areas, where inter-slip creep rates are high. The large seismically active area suggests that a frictional sliding law that can accommodate stick-slip may be appropriate for ice stream beds on regional scales. Variability in seismic behavior over inter-station distances of 1-10 km indicates heterogeneity in local bed conditions and frictional complexity. WIP unstable slips may nucleate when stick-slip basal earthquake patches fail over a large area. We present a conceptual model in which basal seismicity results from slip-weakening frictional failure of over-consolidated till as it is eroded and mobilized into deforming till.

  4. Simple and easy assessment of falling risk in the elderly by functional reach test using elastic stick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Shin-Ichi; Yamada, Takayoshi

    2007-10-01

    Dynamic balance ability related to maintaining postural stability during movement is closely tied to fall risk in the elderly. The functional reach (FR) test has been developed to evaluate their dynamic balance. Although a simple and new FR test using an elastic stick has been proposed by modifying the above original FR test, the abilities related to both FR tests are judged to differ because of the large difference in the testing method. This study aimed to compare center of gravity fluctuation, muscle activity and functional reach distance as measured by the original FR test and the elastic stick FR test. First, reach distance, back/forth and right/left moving distance of the center of gravity, and activity of the lower leg muscles (soleus and tibialis anterior) were compared between both tests based on data obtained from 30 young male adults. All parameters except for the right/left moving distance were significantly larger in the elastic stick FR test. Next, the reach distance was examined in both FR tests using 53 elderly subjects; it was significantly longer in the elastic stick FR test, but showed no significant sex difference. The reach distance in both tests was significantly shorter (about 7 cm) in the elderly than in young adults. In conclusion, the elastic stick FR test involves greater leg muscle strength exertion and forward transferring of the center of gravity as compared with the original FR test. Because the elastic stick FR test relates largely to leg muscle function and equilibrium function, it may be more useful for evaluating the dynamic balance ability of the elderly.

  5. Phytoplankton aggregate formation: observations of patterns and mechanisms of cell sticking and the significance of exopolymeric material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hansen, Jorgen L. S.

    1993-01-01

    are sticky in themselves, and coagulation depends on cell-cell sticking and does not involve mucus. Aggregates are composed solely of cells. Cells of the diatom Chaetoceros affinis, on the other hand, are not in themselves sticky. Transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP), produced by the diatom, cause...... the cells to aggregate and coagulation depends on TEP-cell rather than cell-cell sticking. Aggregates are formed of a mixture of mucus and cells. We found several species of diatoms and one flagellate species to produce copious amounts of TEP. TEP from some species (e.g. Coscinodiscus sp.) is sticky and may...

  6. The influence of testing apparatus stiffness on the source properties of laboratory stick-slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, B. D.; McGarr, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Lockner, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Stick-slip experiments were performed to determine the influence of the testing apparatus stiffness on source properties, to develop methods to relate stick-slip to natural earthquakes, and to examine the hypothesis of McGarr [2012] that the product of unloading stiffness, k, and slip duration, T, is both scale-independent and approximately constant for both laboratory and natural earthquakes. A double-direct shear load frame was used with Sierra White Granite samples at 2 MPa normal stress, and a remote loading rate of 0.2 µm/s. The stiffness of the test apparatus was varied by more than an order of magnitude by inserting disk springs into the shear loading column adjacent to the granite samples. Servo-controlling slip at a point between the forcing ram and the shear force load cell, produced repeatable slip events. Slip and slip duration decrease as k increases, as they do for natural earthquakes. In contrast to earthquakes, stress drop and slip rate decrease with increasing k, and the product kT for these experiments is not constant, but decreases with k. These data, collected over a range of k, do not conform to McGarr's [2012] hypothesis. However, analysis of stick-slip studies from other testing apparatuses is consistent with McGarr's hypothesis; kT is scale-independent, similar to that of earthquakes, equal to the ratio of static stress drop to average slip velocity, and similar to the ratio of shear modulus to wavespeed of rock. These properties result from conducting experiments over a range of sample sizes, using rock samples with the same elastic properties as the Earth, and using testing machines whose stiffnesses decrease, and characteristic periods increase with scale. A consequence of our experiments and analysis is that extrapolation of lab scale earthquake source properties to the Earth is more difficult than previously thought, requiring an accounting for the properties of the testing machines and additional research beyond that reported here.

  7. Characterization of microsatellite loci in the stick insects Bacillus rossius rossius, Bacillus rossius redtenbacheri and Bacillus whitei (Insecta : Phasmatodea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, DH; Pertoldi, C; Loeschcke, V

    2005-01-01

    Five microsatellite markers were obtained from a dinucleotide enriched genomic library of the stick insect Bacillus rossius rossius. The markers were tested in three species of Bacillus. All loci were polymorphic when tested across species. The number of alleles at each locus was low (maximum four...

  8. Improved analysis and visualization of friction loop data: unraveling the energy dissipation of meso-scale stick-slip motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokorian, Jaap; Merlijn van Spengen, W.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new method for analyzing and visualizing friction force measurements of meso-scale stick-slip motion, and introduce a method for extracting two separate dissipative energy components. Using a microelectromechanical system tribometer, we execute 2 million reciprocating sliding cycles, during which we measure the static friction force with a resolution of \

  9. On the formation of limit cycle of the friction-induced stick-slip vibration in oilwell drillstring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the stick-slip vibration in oilwell drillstring is studied. The drilling system is modelled as a lumped-parameter torsional pendulum and the interaction between the drill bit and the rock is treated as Coulomb friction. Equation of motion of the drill bit is established and the dynamic responses of the drill bit are obtained. A drilling system with the drillstring length 3000 m is analysed, in which the system parameters are selected by reference to the actual drilling situation. After the slip vibrations in the initial stage, final state of the drill bit is a stable stick-slip vibration of which the limit cycle is a closed loop. In order to find the stability of the limit cycle corresponds to the periodically stick-slip vibration, different initial conditions for the drill bit are studied. Results show that the drill bit will lead to a periodic motion and the phase trajectories ultimately converge to the same limit cycle corresponds to stable stick-slip vibration.

  10. New non-stick expoxy-silicone water-based coatings part 1: Physical and surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garti, N. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Smith, J. [Decora Manufacturing, Fort Edward, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In search for tomorrow`s technology for water-based coating, Decora Manufacturing and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have initiated an intensive research program for designing, developing and manufacturing new coatings based on cross-linked, room temperature-cured silicone-expoxy resins. The new water-borne coatings have most exciting characteristics such as: non-stick properties, effective release, high lubricity, corrosion protection and abrasion resistance. The coatings are environmentally-friendly and easy to use. These coatings are ideal for marine, agricultural, industrial and maintenance applications. This paper brings quantitative measurements related to the dispersion technology (particle size, stability, shelf-life), to the non-stick properties (deicing, low surface energy, easy-release and non-stick), lubricity, adhesion to substrates, viscosity, dynamic and static friction coefficients and environmental impact (low VOC, non-toxicity, low-leaching). The coating was tested in various industrial coating systems and was found to exhibit excellent non-stick and release properties. Special attention was given to Zebra Mussels, Quagga Mussels and other bacterial and algeal bioforms. The coating proved to be efficient as foul-release coating with very low biofouling adhesion. The low adhesion applied to many other substances in which foul-release means easy-clean and low-wear.

  11. Numerical Application of a Stick-Slip Control and Experimental Analysis using a Test Rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Leonardo D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Part of the process of exploration and development of an oil field consists of the drilling operations for oil and gas wells. Particularly for deep water and ultra deep water wells, the operation requires the control of a very flexible structure which is subjected to complex boundary conditions such as the nonlinear interactions between drill bit and rock formation and between the drill string and borehole wall. Concerning this complexity, the stick-slip phenomenon is a major component related to the torsional vibration and it can excite both axial and lateral vibrations. With these intentions, this paper has the main goal of confronting the torsional vibration problem over a test rig numerical model using a real-time conventional controller. The system contains two discs in which dry friction torques are applied. Therefore, the dynamical behaviour were analysed with and without controlling strategies.

  12. Basics of compounding: Tips and hints: powders, capsules, tablets, suppositories, and sticks, part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Loyd V

    2014-01-01

    No matter the profession, professionals should never stop learning. This is especially true and important in the profession of compounding pharmacy. Compounding pharmacists are continuously faced with the challenge of finding new and inventive ways to assist patients with their individual and specific drug requirements. As compounding pharmacists learn, be it through formal continuing education or experience, they should be willing to share their knowledge with other compounders. In our goal of providing compounding pharmacists with additional knowledge to improve their skills in the art and practice of compounding, this article, which provides tips and hits on compounding with powders, capsules, tablets, suppositories, and sticks, represents the first in a series of articles to assist compounding pharmacists in the preparation of compounded medications.

  13. End of life environmental assessment of micro technologies: the need for the carrot or the stick?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Grave, Arnaud; Gentil, Emmanuel; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the importance of understanding the environmental implications of the end of life of micro technology. A brief overview of different management approaches of micro waste is shown, such as landfill, incineration, recycling, reuse and prevention is given. However, the management...... of waste is subject to a number of directives and regulations (in Europe) or a “stick” forcing the industry to minimise the environmental impacts of micro waste. In contrast, there are strong drivers, the “carrot” that can stimulate the industry to design micro technology following EcoDesign principle....... On one hand the industry is faced with legal sticks to minimise the impacts of waste, on the other hand the industry is offered a number of carrots that could present strong financial and environmental advantages compared to other products providing the same service....

  14. Slip-Stick Mechanism in Training the Superconducting Magnets in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, P P; Todesco, E

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting magnets can exhibit training quenches during successive powering to reaching nominal performance. The slip–stick motion of the conductors is considered to be one of the mechanisms of training. In this paper, we present a simple quantitative model where the training is described as a discrete dynamical system matching the equilibrium between the energy margin of the superconducting cable and the frictional energy released during the conductor motion. The model can be explicitly solved in the linearized case, showing that the short sample limit is reached via a power law. Training phenomena have a large random component. A large set of data of the large hadron collider magnet tests is postprocessed according to previously defined methods to extract an average training curve for dipoles and quadrupoles. These curves show the asymptotic power law predicted by the model. The curves are then fit through the model, which has two free parameters. The model shows good agreement over a large range, bu...

  15. Slip-Stick Mechanism in Training the Superconducting Magnets in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, P P; Lorin, C

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting magnets can exhibit training quenches during successive powering to reaching nominal performance. The slip-stick motion of the conductors is considered to be one of the mechanisms of training. In this paper, we present a simple quantitative model where the training is described as a discrete dynamical system matching the equilibrium between the energy margin of the superconducting cable and the frictional energy released during the conductor motion. The model can be explicitly solved in the linearized case, showing that the short sample limit is reached via a power law. Training phenomena have a large random component. A large set of data of the large hadron collider magnet tests is postprocessed according to previously defined methods to extract an average training curve for dipoles and quadrupoles. These curves show the asymptotic power law predicted by the model. The curves are then fit through the model, which has two free parameters. The model shows good agreement over a large range, but ...

  16. Stick-Slip Analysis of a Drill String Subjected to Deterministic Excitation and Stochastic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyuan Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a finite element model, this paper investigates the torsional vibration of a drill string under combined deterministic excitation and random excitation. The random excitation is caused by the random friction coefficients between the drill bit and the bottom of the hole and assumed as white noise. Simulation shows that the responses under random excitation become random too, and the probabilistic distribution of the responses at each discretized time instant is obtained. The two points, entering and leaving the stick stage, are examined with special attention. The results indicate that the two points become random under random excitation, and the distributions are not normal even when the excitation is assumed as Gaussian white noise.

  17. Risk of needle stick injuries in health care workers - A report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rele M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care workers (HCW are at a risk of occupational acquisition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection, primarily due to accidental exposure to infected blood and body fluids. In our general public hospital, over a period of one year (June 2000 - 2001 a total number of 38 self reported incidences of needlestick injuries and other exposures to patient′s blood and body fluids were reported by HCWs. A greater incidence of occupational exposure was seen in surgery residents as compared to medicine residents. Till date, i.e. in one and a half-year follow up period, no seroconversion was seen in any of the reported accidental injury cases. This data emphasizes, that needle stick injuries present the single greatest risk to medical personnel and the importance of increased awareness and training in universal safety precautions (USP, for prevention of nosocomial infection.

  18. Mobilizing cities towards a low-carbon future: Tambourines, carrots and sticks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Delarue, Erik; Meeus, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    In the transition towards a low-carbon future in Europe, cities' actions are of major importance due to the prominence of urbanization, both in terms of population and in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, we need city authorities to act, by using their competences as policy makers as well as energy users. However, cities are still not moving as fast as one might expect, indicating the need for additional incentives to prompt local action. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present an overview of external incentives that might prompt cities to act and to highlight good practices that could be used in future initiatives. This paper first discusses how to evaluate the climate and energy performance of a city and how local authorities can contribute to its improvements. Moreover, it analyses the disincentives that local governments are confronted with, categorizing them as simple market failures, institutional failures and multi-agent failures. The paper then presents a survey of initiatives at national and EU levels to promote local action towards a low-carbon future; grouping them into tambourines, carrots and sticks. We focus on Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden because they are pioneering countries regarding energy policies for cities. - Highlights: • CO 2 and energy consumption could be used to evaluate the performance of cities. • Simple market, institutional and multi-agent failures are hampering local action. • National and EU actions use mainly tambourines and carrots, rather than sticks. • Covenant of Mayors is one of the most noteworthy tambourine type of instruments. • Carrots notable features are: use of competition and involvement of third-parties

  19. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column as the driving force of stick-slip motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Hirose, T.; Di Toro, G.; Hornby, A.; De Angelis, S.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Hess, K.; Leonhardt, R.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and of thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. A combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of shear bands from Mount St. Helens (MSH) and Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveal evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of andesitic and dacitic material (from SHV and MSH respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) seismicity. Using a source duration calculated from the waveforms at seismic stations around SHV, and slip distance per drumbeat calculated from extrusion rate, frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus can be achieved at small slip distances (HVR experiments which mimic rapid velocity fluctuations in stick-slip behavior demonstrate velocity-weakening behavior of melt, with a tendency for unstable slip. We postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic 'drumbeats', which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes, allowing for a fixed spatial locus and the occurrence of 'families' of similar seismic events. We conclude that, given the ease with which melting is achieved in volcanic rocks, and considering the high ambient temperatures in volcanic conduits, frictional melting is a highly probable consequence of viscous magma ascent.

  20. Interventions to reduce needle stick injuries at a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational exposure to blood/body fluids is associated with risk of infection with blood borne pathogens like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV. Materials and Methods: We carefully document needle stick injuries (NSI and implement post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. We report a four-year continuing surveillance study where 342 healthcare workers (HCWs sustained NSI. PEP was given to HCWs injured from seropositive sources. If the source was HbsAg positive, HCWs were given a hepatitis B immunization booster. If the HCW was antiHBs negative, both hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG and hepatitis B vaccine were administered. For HCWs who sustained injuries from HIV positive sources, antiretroviral therapy was started. Follow-up was done after three and six months of exposure. Recent interventions by the infection control committee at our hospital reduced NSI considerably during intravenous line administration and glucose monitoring. Results and Discussion: Of 342 injuries, 254 were from known sources and 88 from unknown sources. From known sources, 37 were seropositive; 13 for HIV, 15 for HCV, nine for HBV. Sixty six sharp injuries were sustained through garbage bags, 43 during IV line administration, 41 during injection administration, 35 during needle recapping, 32 during blood collection, 27 during blood glucose monitoring, 24 from OT instruments, 17 during needle disposal, 16 while using surgical blade, 7 during suturing and 34 from miscellaneous sources. Conclusion: No case of seroconversion has taken place, so far, as a result of needle stick injuries at our centre.

  1. Multiple Off-Ice Performance Variables Predict On-Ice Skating Performance in Male and Female Division III Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, Jeffrey M; Beltz, Nicholas M; Dalleck, Lance D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if off-ice performance variables could predict on-ice skating performance in Division III collegiate hockey players. Both men (n = 15) and women (n = 11) hockey players (age = 20.5 ± 1.4 years) participated in the study. The skating tests were agility cornering S-turn, 6.10 m acceleration, 44.80 m speed, modified repeat skate, and 15.20 m full speed. Off-ice variables assessed were years of playing experience, height, weight and percent body fat and off-ice performance variables included vertical jump (VJ), 40-yd dash (36.58m), 1-RM squat, pro-agility, Wingate peak power and peak power percentage drop (% drop), and 1.5 mile (2.4km) run. Results indicated that 40-yd dash (36.58m), VJ, 1.5 mile (2.4km) run, and % drop were significant predictors of skating performance for repeat skate (slowest, fastest, and average time) and 44.80 m speed time, respectively. Four predictive equations were derived from multiple regression analyses: 1) slowest repeat skate time = 2.362 + (1.68 x 40-yd dash time) + (0.005 x 1.5 mile run), 2) fastest repeat skate time = 9.762 - (0.089 x VJ) - (0.998 x 40-yd dash time), 3) average repeat skate time = 7.770 + (1.041 x 40-yd dash time) - (0.63 x VJ) + (0.003 x 1.5 mile time), and 4) 47.85 m speed test = 7.707 - (0.050 x VJ) - (0.01 x % drop). It was concluded that selected off-ice tests could be used to predict on-ice performance regarding speed and recovery ability in Division III male and female hockey players. Key pointsThe 40-yd dash (36.58m) and vertical jump tests are significant predictors of on-ice skating performance specific to speed.In addition to 40-yd dash and vertical jump, the 1.5 mile (2.4km) run for time and percent power drop from the Wingate anaerobic power test were also significant predictors of skating performance that incorporates the aspect of recovery from skating activity.Due to the specificity of selected off-ice variables as predictors of on-ice performance, coaches can

  2. The Effect of the "Zero Tolerance for Head Contact" Rule Change on the Risk of Concussions in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolikowski, Maciej P; Black, Amanda M; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Blake, Tracy A; Schneider, Kathryn J; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-02-01

    Ice hockey is a popular winter sport in Canada. Concussions account for the greatest proportion of all injuries in youth ice hockey. In 2011, a policy change enforcing "zero tolerance for head contact" was implemented in all leagues in Canada. To determine if the risk of game-related concussions and more severe concussions (ie, resulting in >10 days of time loss) and the mechanisms of a concussion differed for Pee Wee class (ages 11-12 years) and Bantam class (ages 13-14 years) players after the 2011 "zero tolerance for head contact" policy change compared with players in similar divisions before the policy change. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The retrospective cohort included Pee Wee (most elite 70%, 2007-2008; n = 891) and Bantam (most elite 30%, 2008-2009; n = 378) players before the rule change and Pee Wee (2011-2012; n = 588) and Bantam (2011-2012; n = 242) players in the same levels of play after the policy change. Suspected concussions were identified by a team designate and referred to a sport medicine physician for diagnosis. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated based on multiple Poisson regression analysis, controlling for clustering by team and other important covariates and offset by game-exposure hours. Incidence rates based on the mechanisms of a concussion were estimated based on univariate Poisson regression analysis. The risk of game-related concussions increased after the head contact rule in Pee Wee (IRR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.86) and Bantam (IRR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.17-5.24) players. The risk of more severe concussions increased after the head contact rule in Pee Wee (IRR, 4.12; 95% CI, 2.00-8.50) and Bantam (IRR, 7.91; 95% CI, 3.13-19.94) players. The rates of concussions due to body checking and direct head contact increased after the rule change. The "zero tolerance for head contact" policy change did not reduce the risk of game-related concussions in Pee Wee or Bantam class ice hockey players. Increased concussion awareness and

  3. Influence of movement regime of stick-slip process on the size distribution of accompanying acoustic emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcharashvili, Teimuraz; Chelidze, Tamaz; Zhukova, Natalia; Mepharidze, Ekaterine; Sborshchikov, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Many scientific works on dynamics of earthquake generation are devoted to qualitative and quantitative reproduction of behavior of seismic faults. Number of theoretical, numerical or physical models are already designed for this purpose. Main assumption of these works is that the correct model must be capable to reproduce power law type relation for event sizes with magnitudes greater than or equal to a some threshold value, similar to Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law for the size distribution of earthquakes. To model behavior of a seismic faults in laboratory conditions spring-block experimental systems are often used. They enable to generate stick-slip movement, intermittent behavior occurring when two solids in contact slide relative to each other driven at a constant velocity. Wide interest to such spring-block models is caused by the fact that stick-slip is recognized as a basic process underlying earthquakes generation along pre-existing faults. It is worth to mention, that in stick slip experiments reproduction of power law, in slip events size distribution, with b values close or equal to the one found for natural seismicity is possible. Stick-slip process observed in these experimental models is accompanied by a transient elastic waves propagation generated during the rapid release of stress energy in spring-block system. Oscillations of stress energy can be detected as a characteristic acoustic emission (AE). Accompanying stick slip AE is the subject of intense investigation, but many aspects of this process are still unclear. In the present research we aimed to investigate dynamics of stick slip AE in order to find whether its distributional properties obey power law. Experiments have been carried out on spring-block system consisting of fixed and sliding plates of roughly finished basalt samples. The sliding block was driven with a constant velocity. Experiments have been carried out for five different stiffness of pulling spring. Thus five different regimes

  4. Modificación en la composición corporal de jugadores de Hockey luego del período de preparación

    OpenAIRE

    Perrice, Constanza

    2009-01-01

    El presente estudio tiene como objetivo determinar la relación entre el tipo de alimentación y el cambio en la composición corporal en jugadores de hockey sobre césped masculino que integran el Seleccionado Bonaerense de primera división, luego del período de preparación del año 2009 y si se ve influenciado por el grado de información en el campo de la nutrición deportiva. A través del mismo se establece la variación en el porcentaje de masa magra y masa grasa, mediante medi...

  5. Educational strategies used in increasing fluid intake and enhancing hydration status in field hockey players preparing for competition in a hot and humid environment: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabinett, J A; Reid, K; James, N

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a hydration strategy for use by female English field hockey players at the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Malaysia. An additional aim was to initiate the process of acclimation. Fifteen elite players, mean age (+/-SEM) 24.1 +/- 1.19 years, height 1.67 +/- 0.01 m, and body mass 62.8 +/- 1.76 kg, took part in a 5-day training camp immediately prior to departure for the Games. In order to develop the hydration strategy, training took place under similar environmental conditions to those to be experienced in Malaysia (i.e., 32 degrees C, 80% humidity). Acclimation training consisted of 30-50 min of either continuous, low intensity cycling or high intensity intermittent cycling, which more closely replicated the pattern of activity in field hockey. Body mass measures taken each morning, and pre and post training, together with urine color measures, were used to assess hydration status. Pre-loading with up to 1 L of a 3% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution or water immediately prior to acclimation training, as well as regular drinks throughout, ensured that players avoided significant dehydration, with percent body mass changes ranging from -0.34% to +4.24% post training. Furthermore, the protocol used was sufficient to initiate the process of acclimation as demonstrated by a significant reduction in exercising heart rate and core temperature at all time points by days 4 and 5. In conclusion, although labor intensive and time consuming, the camp was successful in developing a hydration strategy that players were able to utilize once at the Games.

  6. Hip abduction-adduction strength and one-leg hop tests: test-retest reliability and relationship to function in elite ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, J; Kramer, J; Forwell, L; Birmingham, T

    2001-08-01

    Single group, test-retest. To determine: (1) hip abduction and adduction torques during concentric and eccentric muscle actions, (2) medial and lateral one-leg hop distances, (3) the test-retest reliability of these measurements, and (4) the relationship between isokinetic measures of hip muscle strength and hop distances in elite ice hockey players. The skating motion used in ice hockey requires strong contractions of the hip and knee musculature. However, baseline scores for hip strength and hop distances, their test-retest reliability, and measures of the extent to which these tests are related for this population are not available. The dominant leg of 27 men (mean age 20 +/- 3 yrs) was tested on 2 occasions. Hip abduction and adduction movements were completed at 60 degrees.s(-1) angular velocity, with the subject lying on the non-test side and the test leg moving vertically in the subject's coronal plane. One-leg hops requiring jumping from and landing on the same leg without losing balance were completed in the medial and lateral directions. Hip adduction torques were significantly greater than abduction torques during both concentric and eccentric muscle actions, while no significant difference was observed between medial and lateral hop distances. Although hop test scores produced excellent ICCs (> 0.75) when determined using scores on 1 occasion, torques needed to be averaged over 2 test occasions to reach this level. Correlations between the strength and hop tests ranged from slight to low (r = -0.26 to 0.27) and were characterized by wide 95% confidence intervals (-0.54 to 0.61). Isokinetic tests of hip abduction and adduction did not provide a strong indication of performance during sideways hop tests. Although isokinetic tests can provide a measure of muscular strength under specific test conditions, they should not be relied upon as a primary indicator of functional abilities or readiness to return to activity.

  7. Cigarette stick as valuable communicative real estate: a content analysis of cigarettes from 14 low-income and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C Smith, Katherine; Washington, Carmen; Welding, Kevin; Kroart, Laura; Osho, Adami; Cohen, Joanna E

    2016-09-01

    The current cigarette market is heavily focused on low-income and middle-income countries. Branding of tobacco products is key to establishing and maintaining a customer base. Greater restrictions on marketing and advertising of tobacco products create an incentive for companies to focus more on branding via the product itself. We consider how tobacco sticks are used for communicative purposes in 14 low-income and middle-income countries with extensive tobacco markets. In 2013, we collected and coded 3232 cigarette and kretek packs that were purchased from vendors in diverse neighbourhoods in 44 cities across the 14 low-income and middle-income countries with the greatest number of smokers. A single stick from each pack was assessed for branding, decorative and communicative elements using a common coding framework. Stick communication variables included brand name, brand image/logo, brand descriptor, colour and design carried through from pack, 'capsule cigarette' symbol, and embellishment of filter end. Communication and branding on the stick is essentially ubiquitous (99.75%); 97% of sticks include explicit branding (brand name or logo present). Colour is commonly carried through from the pack (95%), and some sticks (13%) include decorative elements matching the pack. Decorative elements can be found anywhere on the stick, including the filter tip (8%), and 'convertible' cigarettes include a symbol to show where to push. Cigarette sticks are clearly valuable 'real estate' that tobacco companies are using for communicative purposes. Across all countries and brands, the stick communicates branding via text, colour and imagery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Deodorant effects of a sage extract stick: Antibacterial activity and sensory evaluation of axillary deodorancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtalebi, Mohammad Ali; Ghanadian, Mustafa; Farzan, Ali; Shiri, Niloufar; Shokri, Dariush; Fatemi, Syed Ali

    2013-10-01

    Deodorant products prevent the growth and activity of the degrading apocrine gland bacteria living in the armpit. Common antibacterial agents in the market like triclosan and aluminum salts, in spite of their suitable antibacterial effects, increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, breast and prostate cancers or induce contact dermatitis. Therefore, plant extracts possessing antibacterial effects are of interest. The aim of the present study was to verify the in vitro antimicrobial effects of different sage extracts against two major bacteria responsible for axillary odor, and to evaluate the deodorant effect of a silicon-based stick containing sage extracts in different densities in humans. Different fractions of methanolic extract of Salvia officinalis (sage) were evaluated on a culture of armpit skin surface of volunteers through agar microdilution antimicrobial assay. Then, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial with the best antibacterial fraction was conducted on 45 female healthy volunteers. Participants were treated with a single dose in four groups, each containing 15 individuals: Group 1 (200 μg/mL), 2 (400 μg/mL), 3 (600 μg/mL) of dichloromethane sage extract, and placebo (without extract). A standard sensory evaluation method for the evaluation of deodorant efficacy was used before, and two hours, four hours, and eight hours after single application of a deodorant or placebo (ASTM method E 1207-87 Standard Practice for the Sensory Evaluation of Axillary Deodorancy). The data were analyzed with two factors relating to densities and time. In 45 participants with a mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age of 61.5±11.8 years, statistically significant within-group differences were observed before and two, four, and eight hours after deodorant treatment for groups 1, 2, and 3. Groups 1, 2, and 3 had a significantly smaller odor score than placebo after two, four, and eight hours (P sage extract sticks (P sage extract of 200, 400, or 600

  9. Prevalence and correlates of needle-stick injuries among active duty police officers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, María Luisa; Beletsky, Leo; Patiño, Efraín; Abramovitz, Daniela; Rocha, Teresita; Arredondo, Jaime; Bañuelos, Arnulfo; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-01-01

    Police officers are at an elevated risk for needle-stick injuries (NSI), which pose a serious and costly occupational health risk for HIV and viral hepatitis. However, research on NSIs among police officers is limited, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the legality of syringe possession in Mexico, half of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana report extrajudicial syringe-related arrests and confiscation by police, which has been associated with needle-sharing and HIV infection. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of NSIs among Tijuana police officers to inform efforts to improve occupational safety and simultaneously reduce HIV risks among police and PWID. Tijuana's Department of Municipal Public Safety (SSPM) is among Mexico's largest. Our binational, multi-sectoral team analyzed de-identified data from SSPM's 2014 anonymous self-administered occupational health survey. The prevalence of NSI and syringe disposal practices was determined. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation via generalized estimating equations identified factors associated with ever having an occupational NSI. Approximately one-quarter of the Tijuana police force was given the occupational health survey (N=503). Respondents were predominantly male (86.5%) and ≤35 years old (42.6%). Nearly one in six officers reported ever having a NSI while working at SSPM (15.3%), of whom 14.3% reported a NSI within the past year. Most participants reported encountering needles/syringes while on duty (n=473, 94%); factors independently associated with elevated odds of NSIs included frequently finding syringes that contain drugs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56-5.67) and breaking used needles (AOR: 2.25; 95% CI: 1.29-3.91), while protective factors included being willing to contact emergency services in case of NSIs (AOR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.22-0.69), and wearing needle-stick resistant gloves (AOR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.19-0.91). Tijuana

  10. Neurons of self-defence: neuronal innervation of the exocrine defence glands in stick insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Konrad; von Bredow, Christoph-Rüdiger; von Bredow, Yvette M; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Trenczek, Tina E; Strauß, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Stick insects (Phasmatodea) use repellent chemical substances (allomones) for defence which are released from so-called defence glands in the prothorax. These glands differ in size between species, and are under neuronal control from the CNS. The detailed neural innervation and possible differences between species are not studied so far. Using axonal tracing, the neuronal innervation is investigated comparing four species. The aim is to document the complexity of defence gland innervation in peripheral nerves and central motoneurons in stick insects. In the species studied here, the defence gland is innervated by the intersegmental nerve complex (ISN) which is formed by three nerves from the prothoracic (T1) and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG), as well as a distinct suboesophageal nerve (Nervus anterior of the suboesophageal ganglion). In Carausius morosus and Sipyloidea sipylus, axonal tracing confirmed an innervation of the defence glands by this N. anterior SOG as well as N. anterior T1 and N. posterior SOG from the intersegmental nerve complex. In Peruphasma schultei, which has rather large defence glands, only the innervation by the N. anterior SOG was documented by axonal tracing. In the central nervous system of all species, 3-4 neuron types are identified by axonal tracing which send axons in the N. anterior SOG likely innervating the defence gland as well as adjacent muscles. These neurons are mainly suboesophageal neurons with one intersegmental neuron located in the prothoracic ganglion. The neuron types are conserved in the species studied, but the combination of neuron types is not identical. In addition, the central nervous system in S. sipylus contains one suboesophageal and one prothoracic neuron type with axons in the intersegmental nerve complex contacting the defence gland. Axonal tracing shows a very complex innervation pattern of the defence glands of Phasmatodea which contains different neurons in different nerves from two adjacent body segments

  11. Fault healing and earthquake spectra from stick slip sequences in the laboratory and on active faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, G. C.; Glaser, S. D.; Thomas, A.; Burgmann, R.

    2011-12-01

    Repeating earthquake sequences (RES) are thought to occur on isolated patches of a fault that fail in repeated stick-slip fashion. RES enable researchers to study the effect of variations in earthquake recurrence time and the relationship between fault healing and earthquake generation. Fault healing is thought to be the physical process responsible for the 'state' variable in widely used rate- and state-dependent friction equations. We analyze RES created in laboratory stick slip experiments on a direct shear apparatus instrumented with an array of very high frequency (1KHz - 1MHz) displacement sensors. Tests are conducted on the model material polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). While frictional properties of this glassy polymer can be characterized with the rate- and state- dependent friction laws, the rate of healing in PMMA is higher than room temperature rock. Our experiments show that in addition to a modest increase in fault strength and stress drop with increasing healing time, there are distinct spectral changes in the recorded laboratory earthquakes. Using the impact of a tiny sphere on the surface of the test specimen as a known source calibration function, we are able to remove the instrument and apparatus response from recorded signals so that the source spectrum of the laboratory earthquakes can be accurately estimated. The rupture of a fault that was allowed to heal produces a laboratory earthquake with increased high frequency content compared to one produced by a fault which has had less time to heal. These laboratory results are supported by observations of RES on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults, which show similar spectral changes when recurrence time is perturbed by a nearby large earthquake. Healing is typically attributed to a creep-like relaxation of the material which causes the true area of contact of interacting asperity populations to increase with time in a quasi-logarithmic way. The increase in high frequency seismicity shown here

  12. Orientation with a Viking sun-compass, a shadow-stick, and two calcite sunstones under various weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernáth, Balázs; Blahó, Miklós; Egri, Adám; Barta, András; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2013-09-01

    It is widely accepted that Vikings used sun-compasses to derive true directions from the cast shadow of a gnomon. It has been hypothesized that when a cast shadow was not formed, Viking navigators relied on crude skylight polarimetry with the aid of dichroic or birefringent crystals, called "sunstones." We demonstrate here that a simple tool, that we call "shadow-stick," could have allowed orientation by a sun-compass with satisfying accuracy when shadows were not formed, but the sun position could have reliably been estimated. In field tests, we performed orientation trials with a set composed of a sun-compass, two calcite sunstones, and a shadow-stick. We show here that such a set could have been an effective orientation tool for Vikings only when clear, blue patches of the sky were visible.

  13. New lumped-mass-stick model based on modal characteristics of structures: development and application to a nuclear containment building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hwasung; Lee, Huseok; Lee, Jong Seh

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a new lumped-mass-stick model (LMSM) is developed based on the modal characteristics of a structure such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The simplified model, named the "frequency adaptive lumped-massstick model," hasonly a small number of stick elements and nodes to provide the same natural frequencies of the structure and is applied to a nuclear containment building. To investigate the numerical performance of the LMSM, a time history analysis is carried out on both the LMSM and the finite element model (FEM) for a nuclear containment building. A comparison of the results shows that the dynamic responses of the LMSM in terms of displacement and acceleration are almost identical to those of the FEM. In addition, the results in terms of fl oor response spectra at certain elevations are also in good agreement.

  14. Effect of anisotropy on the sticking in muon-catalyzed fusion determined by the x-ray method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.; Padial, N.T.

    1989-01-01

    The initial sticking in the 2p/sub m/ states of muonic helium in muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) and the subsequent collisional excitation to these states are shown to have nonstatistical dependences on m that result in spatial anisotropy of the emitted x rays. This anisotropy, I(0 0 )/I(90 0 ), is found to be 0.71 for d-d μCF and 1.12 for d-t μCF in liquid targets, where the angle is between the coincidentally detected x ray and neutron. The effect is predicted to increase the actual Kα x-ray yield and corresponding sticking observed in a recent d-t μCF experiment by 4%. The Doppler broadening of the radiation observed at different angles is also examined

  15. Pyothorax induced by an intrathoracic foreign body in a miniature dachshund: Migration of a popsicle stick from the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yi-Don; Han, Hyun-Jung

    2017-08-10

    A four-year-old dachshund presented with a two-week history of pyrexia, depression, and cough. Four months earlier, the owner observed the dog swallow a whole popsicle stick, but the animal showed no clinical signs at that time. Radiography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography confirmed an intrathoracic linear foreign body and pleural effusion in the right thorax. The pleural fluid was bloody and purulent, and contained inflammatory cells and Escherichia coli. The dog was diagnosed with pyothorax induced by a foreign body, and was treated successfully by surgical removal of the foreign body, partial lung lobectomy, thoracic lavage, and antibiotics. The foreign body was identified as a popsicle stick that the dog had eaten.

  16. Pyothorax induced by an intrathoracic foreign body in a miniature dachshund: Migration of a popsicle stick from the stomach

    OpenAIRE

    CHOI, Yi-Don; HAN, Hyun-Jung

    2017-01-01

    A four-year-old dachshund presented with a two-week history of pyrexia, depression, and cough. Four months earlier, the owner observed the dog swallow a whole popsicle stick, but the animal showed no clinical signs at that time. Radiography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography confirmed an intrathoracic linear foreign body and pleural effusion in the right thorax. The pleural fluid was bloody and purulent, and contained inflammatory cells and Escherichia coli. The dog was diagnosed with ...

  17. Surface free energy of non-stick coatings deposited using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, C.-C.; Lee, S.-C.; Dai, S.-B.; Tien, S.-L.; Chang, C.-C.; Fu, Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor IC packaging molding dies require wear resistance, corrosion resistance and non-sticking (with a low surface free energy). The molding releasing capability and performance are directly associated with the surface free energy between the coating and product material. The serious sticking problem reduces productivity and reliability. Depositing TiN, TiMoS, ZrN, CrC, CrN, NiCr, NiCrN, CrTiAlN and CrNiTiAlN coatings using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating, and characterizing their surface free energy are the main object in developing a non-stick coating system for semiconductor IC molding tools. The contact angle of water, diiodomethane and ethylene glycol on the coated surfaces were measured at temperature in 20 deg. C using a Dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyzer. The surface free energy of the coatings and their components (dispersion and polar) were calculated using the Owens-Wendt geometric mean approach. The surface roughness was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesion force of these coatings was measured using direct tensile pull-off test apparatus. The experimental results showed that NiCrN, CrN and NiCrTiAlN coatings outperformed TiN, ZrN, NiCr, CiTiAlN, CrC and TiMoS coatings in terms of non-sticking, and thus have the potential as working layers for injection molding industrial equipment, especially in semiconductor IC packaging molding applications

  18. The efficacy of mechanical vibration analgesia for relief of heel stick pain in neonates: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Lisa R; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Liu, Jiexin

    2010-01-01

    Hospitalized infants are often exposed to many painful procedures as a result of their illness or disease process. Untreated or poorly treated pain can have deleterious effects on normal nociceptive pain development as well as future development of pain pathways. Mechanical vibration has been found to be efficacious in adult and pediatric populations for the relief of mild-to-moderate acute and chronic pain. However, little is known about the efficacy of this intervention in the neonatal population. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mechanical vibration would be efficacious in the relief of pain associated with heel sticks in neonates. Heel sticks are one of the most common painful procedures during neonatal hospitalization. A random-sequencing crossover design was used with infants acting as their own controls. Newborn infants of 35 weeks' gestation or greater (N = 20) met the inclusion criteria for the study. Pain during heel stick was measured with the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale. The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale is a nonintrusive tool with extensive evidence of its reliability and validity in the neonatal population, when used by trained observers. Mechanical vibration produced an analgesic effect for infants who had previously experienced painful heel sticks that approached statistical significance. The apparent limitations of mechanical vibration as analgesia may be due to the concurrent use of sucrose and pacifier, the effects of order (ie, habituation), or type II error. Because vibration produced the predicted positive effect in some circumstances, further investigation in larger samples within a randomized clinical trial is warranted.

  19. Investigations of a Possible Chemical Effect of Salvadora persica Chewing Sticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Albabtain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvadora persica is commonly used chewing sticks in many parts of the world as an oral hygiene tool. This study measured the amount of benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC released into the mouth and assessed its retention time in saliva. The study also tested if the released amount of BITC could potentially be antibacterial or cytotoxic. Twelve subjects brushed their teeth with fresh Miswak once, twice, and four times. The amount of BITC in the saliva and in the used brushes was quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antibacterial effect of BITC and Miswak essential oil (MEO was tested against Haemophilus influenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cytotoxic effect on gingival fibroblasts and keratinocytes was tested using MTT. The highest amount of the active compounds was detected in saliva after using the Miswak tip for once and immediately. It significantly decreased when the Miswak tip was used more than once and thus after 10 min. The growth of the tested bacteria was inhibited by MEO and BITC in a dose dependent manner, P. gingivalis being the most sensitive. MTT assay showed that BITC and MEO were cytotoxic towards gingival fibroblasts while oral keratinocytes showed resistance. This study suggests that the Miswak tip should be cut before each use to ensure the maximum effect.

  20. Water motion and movement without sticking, weight loss and cross-contaminant in superhydrophobic glass tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Jun; Jin, Ren-Hua

    2010-02-10

    We report that a simple fabrication of a superhydrophobic nanosurface consisted of a grass-like silica thin film on the inner wall of a glass tube and its feature in water motion and water movement. The glass tube with a superhydrophobic inner wall can make the water flow with friction-drag reduction and completely preventing water sticking. Transferring water by this tube did not cause weight loss at all. Therefore, aqueous solutions containing high content metal ions were cross-moved without washing the tube used and no cross-contamination occurred after cross-movement. Furthermore, in an inside diameter of 6.0 mm glass tube where the half-length of the inner surface is covered by superhydrophobic nanograss and the other half is an unmodified hydrophilic surface, the water droplets flowing down from the hydrophilic side can be stopped spontaneously at the hydrophilic-superhydrophobic boundary as if there is an invisible flow-stopping fence built inside the glass tube.

  1. On the stick-slip behaviour of water-lubricated rubber sealings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thörmann, Stefan; Markiewicz, Marian; von Estorff, Otto

    2017-07-01

    The phenomenon of friction-induced vibration is investigated, focussing on the automobile topic of a car door window in sliding contact with the adjacent rubber seal. Within this study, the influencing parameters on the stick-slip motion are explored experimentally and using FE-simulation. A test rig is established to represent the situation at the car door window under defined and repeatable conditions. It consists of a rotating glass disc in sliding contact with a rubber specimen. The frictional properties of the rubber specimen and the glass disc as well as their vibration response and sound radiation are examined. Parameter studies regarding the influence of the relative sliding velocity and the contact normal force on the vibration response and the sound radiation are carried out experimentally and the results are discussed. A finite element model of the test setup is generated and validated with the spectral results of the recorded sound from experiment. With the use of FE-simulation a detailed analysis on the behaviour of friction-induced vibration of rubber specimen and glass disc is carried out. It can be identified, that the main impact on the spectral results of the friction-induced vibration is derived from the underlying frictional properties. Their influence is demonstrated in detail by picturing the motion of the rubber specimen, represented by the limit cycle, for different friction characteristics.

  2. Sticking your neck out and burying the hatchet: What idioms reveal about embodied simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A Kacinik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Idioms are used in conventional language twice as frequently as metaphors, but most research, particularly recent work on embodiment has focused on the latter. However, idioms have the potential to significantly deepen our understanding of embodiment because their meanings cannot be derived from their component words. To determine whether sensorimotor states could activate idiomatic meaning, participants were instructed to engage in postures/actions reflecting various idioms (e.g., sticking your neck out relative to non-idiomatic control postures/actions while reading and responding to statements designed to assess idiomatic meaning. The results showed that statements were generally more strongly endorsed after idiom embodiment than control conditions, indicating that the meaning of idiomatic expressions may not be as disconnected from perceptual and motor experiences than previously thought. These findings are discussed in terms of the mirror neuron system and the necessity of pluralistic contributions from both sensorimotor and amodal linguistic systems to fully account for the representation and processing of idioms and other figurative expressions.

  3. Sticking to the story: outstanding challenges in gecko-inspired adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiarowski, Peter H; Stark, Alyssa Y; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The natural clinging ability of geckos has inspired hundreds of studies seeking design principles that could be applied to creating synthetic adhesives with the same performance capabilities as the gecko: adhesives that use no glue, are self-cleaning and reusable, and are insensitive to a wide range of surface chemistries and roughness. Important progress has been made, and the basic mechanics of how 'hairy' adhesives work have been faithfully reproduced, advancing theory in surface science and portending diverse practical applications. However, after 15 years, no synthetic mimic can yet perform as well as a gecko and simultaneously meet of all the criteria listed above. Moreover, processes for the production of inexpensive and scalable products are still not clearly in view. Here, we discuss our perspective on some of the gaps in understanding that still remain; these gaps in our knowledge should stimulate us to turn to deeper study of the way in which free-ranging geckos stick to the variety of surfaces found in their natural environments and to a more complete analysis of the materials composing the gecko toe pads. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Sticking your neck out and burying the hatchet: what idioms reveal about embodied simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacinik, Natalie A

    2014-01-01

    Idioms are used in conventional language twice as frequently as metaphors, but most research, particularly recent work on embodiment has focused on the latter. However, idioms have the potential to significantly deepen our understanding of embodiment because their meanings cannot be derived from their component words. To determine whether sensorimotor states could activate idiomatic meaning, participants were instructed to engage in postures/actions reflecting various idioms (e.g., sticking your neck out) relative to non-idiomatic control postures/actions while reading and responding to statements designed to assess idiomatic meaning. The results showed that statements were generally more strongly endorsed after idiom embodiment than control conditions, indicating that the meaning of idiomatic expressions may not be as disconnected from perceptual and motor experiences than previously thought. These findings are discussed in terms of the mirror neuron system and the necessity of pluralistic contributions from both sensorimotor and amodal linguistic systems to fully account for the representation and processing of idioms and other figurative expressions.

  5. Effects of acoustic waves on stick-slip in granular media and implications for earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.A.; Savage, H.; Knuth, M.; Gomberg, J.; Marone, Chris

    2008-01-01

    It remains unknown how the small strains induced by seismic waves can trigger earthquakes at large distances, in some cases thousands of kilometres from the triggering earthquake, with failure often occurring long after the waves have passed. Earthquake nucleation is usually observed to take place at depths of 10-20 km, and so static overburden should be large enough to inhibit triggering by seismic-wave stress perturbations. To understand the physics of dynamic triggering better, as well as the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we have conducted laboratory studies of stick-slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic vibration. Glass beads were used to simulate granular fault zone material, sheared under constant normal stress, and subject to transient or continuous perturbation by acoustic waves. Here we show that small-magnitude failure events, corresponding to triggered aftershocks, occur when applied sound-wave amplitudes exceed several microstrain. These events are frequently delayed or occur as part of a cascade of small events. Vibrations also cause large slip events to be disrupted in time relative to those without wave perturbation. The effects are observed for many large-event cycles after vibrations cease, indicating a strain memory in the granular material. Dynamic stressing of tectonic faults may play a similar role in determining the complexity of earthquake recurrence. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. The risk on contact people with different serotypes of sticks the Yersinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimfa Maria Stojek

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Experts are anxious because “American serotype” Yersinia entorocolitica O:8 unexpectedly appeared in Europe in the years 2000 because of its high pathogenicity. The aim of the investigations was to determine people risk contact with different serotypes of Yersinia, based on serological investigations in the years 1997–99 in relation to current epidemiological situation. The study covered 573 sera, from 300 healthy persons and 157 suspicious of yersiniosis, and 116 suspicious of other zoonosis. Tests were performed by passive hemaglutination reaction with antigens viewed as pathogenic to humans Y. enterocolitica O:3, O:5, O:6, O:8, O:9 and Y. pseudotuberculosis group I and III. The most frequently detected antibodies were anti-Y.e. O:5 (41,2% and then anti-Y.e. O:8 (36,6%, anti-Y.e. O;3 (20,1%, anti-Y.e. O;6 (9,2%, anti-Y.e. O:9 (4,6% and anti-Y. pseudotuberculosis I i III (11,8% and 10,3%. The results of investigations show, that already in the years 1997–1999 over 30% of population had contact with Yersinia sticks, including serotypes thought as pathogenic: Y. enterocolitica O:3 (20,1 %, Y. enterocolitica O:9 (4,6 % and particularly with Y. enterocolitica O:8 (36,6 %.

  7. Sticking your neck out and burying the hatchet: what idioms reveal about embodied simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacinik, Natalie A.

    2014-01-01

    Idioms are used in conventional language twice as frequently as metaphors, but most research, particularly recent work on embodiment has focused on the latter. However, idioms have the potential to significantly deepen our understanding of embodiment because their meanings cannot be derived from their component words. To determine whether sensorimotor states could activate idiomatic meaning, participants were instructed to engage in postures/actions reflecting various idioms (e.g., sticking your neck out) relative to non-idiomatic control postures/actions while reading and responding to statements designed to assess idiomatic meaning. The results showed that statements were generally more strongly endorsed after idiom embodiment than control conditions, indicating that the meaning of idiomatic expressions may not be as disconnected from perceptual and motor experiences than previously thought. These findings are discussed in terms of the mirror neuron system and the necessity of pluralistic contributions from both sensorimotor and amodal linguistic systems to fully account for the representation and processing of idioms and other figurative expressions. PMID:25309381

  8. Correlation between fuel rack sticking and unintentional re-starting of EDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Cheol; Chung, Woo geun; Kang, Seung Hee; Kim, Myeong hoon [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) was being tested after overhaul maintenance. While the EDG was running at the rated speed (450 rpm), an operator pressed the manual stop button. But the EDG failed to stop and unintentionally started again. After the unintentional re-start, the EDG maintained running speed of 340 rpm. In the category of a governing system, this paper analyzes the cause of unintentional restart of the EDG that unintentionally re-started and maintained a speed at 340 rpm. The results of the analysis were then verified by a test run. Finally, we identified a correlation between fuel rack sticking and unintentional re-starting of the EDG. An analysis was conducted to confirm the cause of an EDG which was unintentionally restarting and running at 340rpm (rated speed is 450 rpm). Through a test run, it was confirmed that the results of the analysis are correct. The cause of the EDG unintentionally restarting was that it still rotated at 55 rpm over the minimum starting speed at the moment when the shutdown cylinder stopped blocking the fuel, because of a stuck fuel rack at the R7 cylinder. At the same time, the fuel that had been supplied into the cylinders (combustion chamber) by the governing system exploded and the EDG restarted unintentionally.

  9. Critical Velocity for Stick-Slip Motion of an Elastic Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study stick-slip motion of an elastic slider over a rigid substrate covered by a thin film. We study the variation of force with time and the critical velocity vc above which steady sliding is observed as a function of the mass M, size, geometry and stiffness of the slider. The results resolve a controversy over the relationship between vc and M. When the cross-section of the slider is independent of height above the contact, vc becomes independent of M as M increases.^1 However, when the cross-section rises with distance from the contact, as in the Surface Force Apparatus,^2 the stiffness is dominated by regions near the contact. In this case, the slider is effectively rigid and vc decreases as M-1/2 as predicted by Robbins and Thompson.^3 ^1B. N. J. Persson, Sliding Friction: Physical Principles and Applications (Springer, Berlin, 1998). ^2M. L. Gee, P. M. McGuiggan, J. N. Israelachvili and A. M. Homola, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1895 (1990). ^3M. O. Robbins and P. A. Thompson, Science 253, 916 (1991).

  10. Recidivism and rehabilitation of criminal offenders: a carrot and stick evolutionary game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Berenji

    Full Text Available Motivated by recent efforts by the criminal justice system to treat and rehabilitate nonviolent offenders rather than focusing solely on their punishment, we introduce an evolutionary game theoretic model to study the effects of "carrot and stick" intervention programs on criminal recidivism. We use stochastic simulations to study the evolution of a population where individuals may commit crimes depending on their past history, surrounding environment and, in the case of recidivists, on any counseling, educational or training programs available to them after being punished for their previous crimes. These sociological factors are embodied by effective parameters that determine the decision making probabilities. Players may decide to permanently reform or continue engaging in criminal activity, eventually reaching a state where they are considered incorrigible. Depending on parameter choices, the outcome of the game is a society with a majority of virtuous, rehabilitated citizens or incorrigibles. Since total resources may be limited, we constrain the combined punishment and rehabilitation costs per crime to be fixed, so that increasing one effort will necessarily decrease the other. We find that the most successful strategy in reducing crime is to optimally allocate resources so that after being punished, criminals experience impactful intervention programs, especially during the first stages of their return to society. Excessively harsh or lenient punishments are less effective. We also develop a system of coupled ordinary differential equations with memory effects to give a qualitative description of our simulated societal dynamics. We discuss our findings and sociological implications.

  11. Moiré superlattice-level stick-slip instability originated from geometrically corrugated graphene on a strongly interacting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruoyu; Gao, Lei; Lu, Hongliang; Li, Qunyang; Ma, Tian-Bao; Guo, Hui; Du, Shixuan; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yanmin; Cheng, Peng; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Gao, Hong-Jun; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-06-01

    Two dimensional (2D) materials often exhibit novel properties due to various coupling effects with their supporting substrates. Here, using friction force microscopy (FFM), we report an unusual moiré superlattice-level stick-slip instability on monolayer graphene epitaxially grown on Ru(0 0 0 1) substrate. Instead of smooth friction modulation, a significant long-range stick-slip sawtooth modulation emerges with a period coinciding with the moiré superlattice structure, which is robust against high external loads and leads to an additional channel of energy dissipation. In contrast, the long-range stick-slip instability reduces to smooth friction modulation on graphene/Ir(1 1 1) substrate. The moiré superlattice-level slip instability could be attributed to the large sliding energy barrier, which arises from the morphological corrugation of graphene on Ru(0 0 0 1) surface as indicated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The locally steep humps acting as obstacles opposing the tip sliding, originates from the strong interfacial electronic interaction between graphene and Ru(0 0 0 1). This study opens an avenue for modulating friction by tuning the interfacial atomic interaction between 2D materials and their substrates.

  12. Micro transflection on a metallic stick: an innovative approach of reflection infrared spectroscopy for minimally invasive investigation of painting varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Francesca; Legan, Lea; Miliani, Costanza; Ropret, Polonca

    2017-05-01

    A new analytical approach, based on micro-transflection measurements from a diamond-coated metal sampling stick, is presented for the analysis of painting varnishes. Minimally invasive sampling is performed from the varnished surface using the stick, which is directly used as a transflection substrate for micro Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements. With use of a series of varnished model paints, the micro-transflection method has been proved to be a valuable tool for the identification of surface components thanks to the selectivity of the sampling, the enhancement of the absorbance signal, and the easier spectral interpretation because the profiles are similar to transmission mode ones. Driven by these positive outcomes, the method was then tested as tool supporting noninvasive reflection FTIR spectroscopy during the assessment of varnish removal by solvent cleaning on paint models. Finally, the integrated analytical approach based on the two reflection methods was successfully applied for the monitoring of the cleaning of the sixteenth century painting Presentation in the Temple by Vittore Carpaccio. Graphical Abstract Micro-transflection FTIR on a metallic stick for the identification of varnishes during painting cleanings.

  13. Development by extrusion of soyabari snack sticks: a nutritionally improved soya-maize product based on the Nigerian snack (kokoro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omueti, O; Morton, I D

    1996-01-01

    A nutritionally improved local snack compared to existing kokoro has been developed by extrusion cooking of different formulations of maize, soybean and condiments such as pepper, onion, salt, palm oil, plantain and banana. The improved snack was named as the 'soyabari snack stick'. The chemical composition of representative extruded products indicates a high level of crude protein, fat, energy, available lysine and improved in vitro digestibility compared to the usual maize-based products. The level of stachyose and raffinose were greatly reduced in the extruded products compared to raw soya. Formulations using various additives yielded products suitable for different consumers' preferences such as hot, sweet, bland, gritty or crispy and acceptable to taste assessors. Soyabari snack sticks were equally acceptable as Bombay mix, a product on the market in London. Sensory analysis showed no significant differences in the two products but the crude fibre content of Bombay mix was higher while the protein was slightly lower than for soyabari sticks. Local ingredients can produce acceptable extrudates.

  14. Anomalous Coronary Artery From the Opposite Sinus (ACAOS): Technical Challenges During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Razi, Mahmodula; Mahrotra, Anupam; Aggarwal, Puneet; Singh, Anupam; Rekwal, Lokendra; Tripathi, Sunil; Abhishekh, Nishant Kumar; Krishna, Vinay

    2018-04-01

    Anomalies of the coronary arteries are reported in 1-2% of patients among diagnostic angiogram. Ectopic origin of right coronary artery (RCA) from opposite sinus is one of the most common and they are mainly benign, but at times may be malignant. We report a case of a 69-year-old male who underwent early invasive percutaneous coronary intervention for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) where RCA arising from left sinus at the root of left main artery was culprit and various technical challenges were encountered while intervening in form of cannulation to tracking of hardwares. RCA was cannulated with floating wire technique using hockey stick guide catheter and revascularized by deployment of 3.5 × 38 mm Promus Premier Everolimus eluting stent (Boston Scientific, USA). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report of ectopic RCA being revascularized by using hockey stick catheter.

  15. Impact of subject related factors and position of flight control stick on acquisition of simulated flying skills using a flight simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bo-Keun

    Increasing demand on aviation industry calls for more pilots. Thus, pilot training systems and pilot-candidate screening systems are essential for civil and military flying training institutes. Before actual flight training, it is not easy to determine whether a flight trainee will be successful in the training. Due to the high cost of actual flight training, it would be better if there were low cost methods for screening and training candidates prior to the actual flight training. This study intended to determine if subject related factors and flight control stick position have an impact on acquisition of simulated flying skills using a PC-based flight simulator. The experimental model was a factorial design with repeated measures. Sixty-four subjects participated in the experiment and were divided into 8 groups. Experiment consisted of 8 sessions in which performance data, such as heading, altitude and airspeed were collected every 15 seconds. Collected data were analyzed using SAS statistical program. Result of multivariate analysis of variance indicated that the three independent variables: nationality, computer game experience, and flight stick position have significant impact on acquiring simulated flying skill. For nationality, Americans recorded higher scores in general (mean: 81.7) than Koreans (mean: 78.9). The difference in mean scores between Americans and Koreans was 2.8 percent. Regarding computer game experience, the difference between high experience group (82.3) and low experience group (78.3) is significant. For high experience group, American side-stick group recorded the highest (mean: 85.6), and Korean side-stick group (mean: 77.2) scored the lowest. For the low experience group, American center-stick group scored the highest (80.6), and the Korean side-stick group (74.2) scored the lowest points. Therefore, there is a significant difference between high experience group and low experience group. The results also reveal that the center-stick

  16. Needle stick injuries among dental students: risk factors and recommendations for prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballah, Kamis; Warbuton, Dorothy; Sihmbly, Kamal; Renton, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the risk factors of needle stick injuries (NSIs) sustained by undergraduate dental students and nurse students at the King's College London (KCL) Dental Institute. Materials and methods A retrospective study evaluated the incident reports relating to NSIs reported over a period of 2 years. Factors including the dental department, study year, and when the injury took place during administration of local anaesthesia (LA) and recapping conventional syringe or clearing work surface or during disposal. Results This report showed that students are at the highest risk of NSIs at the fourth year of their 5-year BDS course. About one-third of injuries were reported among this group of students followed by year 5 students (25%). Oral surgery clinics were the major source of incident reporting when compared with other specialised dental clinics within the institute. The left hands of the students were the most frequently affected by such injuries and then the right hands of student dental nurses. The attempt of needle recapping of conventional syringes was the least reported mechanism of injuries and constituted only 15% of the total injuries and mainly occurred in third year students. The most frequent injuries among student nurses were during disposal of the needle. Conclusion Less NSIs occur when using safety syringes. A non-recapping policy with immediate disposal of either the conventional or safety syringe systems after injection would prevent all clearance-related NSIs sustained by nurses. To avoid NSIs, education plays a vital role particularly with effective implementation of the change to safety syringes with appropriate training. PMID:22741025

  17. Needle stick injuries among dental students: risk factors and recommendations for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamis Gaballah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the risk factors of needle stick injuries (NSIs sustained by undergraduate dental students and nurse students at the King's College London (KCL Dental Institute. Materials and methods: A retrospective study evaluated the incident reports relating to NSIs reported over a period of 2 years. Factors including the dental department, study year, and when the injury took place during administration of local anaesthesia (LA and recapping conventional syringe or clearing work surface or during disposal. Results: This report showed that students are at the highest risk of NSIs at the fourth year of their 5-year BDS course. About one-third of injuries were reported among this group of students followed by year 5 students (25%. Oral surgery clinics were the major source of incident reporting when compared with other specialised dental clinics within the institute. The left hands of the students were the most frequently affected by such injuries and then the right hands of student dental nurses. The attempt of needle recapping of conventional syringes was the least reported mechanism of injuries and constituted only 15% of the total injuries and mainly occurred in third year students. The most frequent injuries among student nurses were during disposal of the needle. Conclusion: Less NSIs occur when using safety syringes. A non-recapping policy with immediate disposal of either the conventional or safety syringe systems after injection would prevent all clearance-related NSIs sustained by nurses. To avoid NSIs, education plays a vital role particularly with effective implementation of the change to safety syringes with appropriate training.

  18. “La deportista moderna”: género, clase y consumo en el fútbol, running y hockey argentinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Garton

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The advances achieved by the feminist movement since the 1970s have also been reflected in athletics, evidenced by the exponential growth in the participation of women. This change has produced new ideals of the female body –one that is strong, athletic, independent, and at the same time sexually attractive– which have been constructed by Western society and fostered by its mercantilist logic through advertising, social networks and certain messages about caring for your body and leading a “healthy lifestyle” chosen by brands which exploit these ideals. We analyze the image of women in three sports where women have reached unprecedented levels of participation and visibility: field hockey, soccer and running. Our study is based on ethnographic field work, along with the analysis of a series of advertisements, videos and pictures on social networks, where such women are portrayed, or self-represented, as models/examples of the new ideal of the female body. In this way, we hope to throw light on the ideals found in the sports women choose to practice and ask whether individual freedom and agency still exist in these activities. We also wonder if the hegemonic ideals of femininity continue to operate there or if the truth lies somewhere between the two alternatives.

  19. "They all work...when you stick to them": A qualitative investigation of dieting, weight loss, and physical exercise, in obese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kausman Rick

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the extent to which people living with obesity have attempted to lose weight, their attitudes towards dieting, physical exercise and weight loss solutions, why their weight loss attempts have failed, and their opinions about what would be most beneficial to them in their struggle with their weight. Method Qualitative study, using open-ended interviews, of 76 people living with obesity in Victoria, Australia in 2006/7. Individuals with a BMI of 30 or over were recruited using articles in local newspapers, convenience sampling, and at a later stage purposive sampling techniques to diversify the sample. Data analysis was conducted by hand using a constant, comparative method to develop and test analytical categories. Data were interpreted both within team meetings and through providing research participants the chance to comment on the study findings. Results Whilst participants repeatedly turned to commercial diets in their weight loss attempts, few had used, or were motivated to participate in physical activity. Friends or family members had introduced most individuals to weight loss techniques. Those who took part in interventions with members of their social network were more likely to report feeling accepted and supported. Participants blamed themselves for being unable to maintain their weight loss or 'stick' to diets. Whilst diets did not result in sustained weight loss, two thirds of participants felt that dieting was an effective way to lose weight. Conclusion Individuals with obesity receive numerous instructions about what to do to address their weight, but very few are given appropriate long term guidance or support with which to follow through those instructions. Understanding the positive role of social networks may be particularly important in engaging individuals in physical activity. Public health approaches to obesity must engage and consult with those currently living with obesity, if patterns of

  20. Recognition of tennis serve performed by a digital player: comparison among polygon, shadow, and stick-figure models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Ida

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the cognitive effect of human character models on the observer's ability to extract relevant information from computer graphics animation of tennis serve motions. Three digital human models (polygon, shadow, and stick-figure were used to display the computationally simulated serve motions, which were perturbed at the racket-arm by modulating the speed (slower or faster of one of the joint rotations (wrist, elbow, or shoulder. Twenty-one experienced tennis players and 21 novices made discrimination responses about the modulated joint and also specified the perceived swing speeds on a visual analogue scale. The result showed that the discrimination accuracies of the experienced players were both above and below chance level depending on the modulated joint whereas those of the novices mostly remained at chance or guessing levels. As far as the experienced players were concerned, the polygon model decreased the discrimination accuracy as compared with the stick-figure model. This suggests that the complicated pictorial information may have a distracting effect on the recognition of the observed action. On the other hand, the perceived swing speed of the perturbed motion relative to the control was lower for the stick-figure model than for the polygon model regardless of the skill level. This result suggests that the simplified visual information can bias the perception of the motion speed toward slower. It was also shown that the increasing the joint rotation speed increased the perceived swing speed, although the resulting racket velocity had little correlation with this speed sensation. Collectively, observer's recognition of the motion pattern and perception of the motion speed can be affected by the pictorial information of the human model as well as by the perturbation processing applied to the observed motion.

  1. Recognition of tennis serve performed by a digital player: comparison among polygon, shadow, and stick-figure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Kazunobu; Ishii, Motonobu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cognitive effect of human character models on the observer's ability to extract relevant information from computer graphics animation of tennis serve motions. Three digital human models (polygon, shadow, and stick-figure) were used to display the computationally simulated serve motions, which were perturbed at the racket-arm by modulating the speed (slower or faster) of one of the joint rotations (wrist, elbow, or shoulder). Twenty-one experienced tennis players and 21 novices made discrimination responses about the modulated joint and also specified the perceived swing speeds on a visual analogue scale. The result showed that the discrimination accuracies of the experienced players were both above and below chance level depending on the modulated joint whereas those of the novices mostly remained at chance or guessing levels. As far as the experienced players were concerned, the polygon model decreased the discrimination accuracy as compared with the stick-figure model. This suggests that the complicated pictorial information may have a distracting effect on the recognition of the observed action. On the other hand, the perceived swing speed of the perturbed motion relative to the control was lower for the stick-figure model than for the polygon model regardless of the skill level. This result suggests that the simplified visual information can bias the perception of the motion speed toward slower. It was also shown that the increasing the joint rotation speed increased the perceived swing speed, although the resulting racket velocity had little correlation with this speed sensation. Collectively, observer's recognition of the motion pattern and perception of the motion speed can be affected by the pictorial information of the human model as well as by the perturbation processing applied to the observed motion.

  2. Use of Pleurotus sajor-caju in upgrading green jute plants and jute sticks as ruminant feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Mahal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, superfluous jute plants and jute stick were converted into upgraded animal feed by solid state fermentation (SSF using a cellulolytic fungus, Pleurotus sajor-caju. Prior to fermentation, substrates were subjected to several pretreatments such as soaking with water overnight and alkali or lime pretreatment. SSF was carried out with 20 g of substrate in 100 ml conical flask and was incubated at 30C for 8 weeks. In all treatments, the highest amount of reducing sugar, soluble protein as well as the cellulolytic activities of three enzymes viz. cellobiase, carboxymethyl cellulase and avicelase were obtained at 6th week of fermentation. Compared to raw, unsoaked substrates, soaking treatment alone could produce 10% more soluble protein in both substrates whereas reducing sugar increment was 5% and 6% in jute sticks and jute plants, respectively. From all treatments, combination of soaking and lime treatment in green jute plants yielded higher value than jute sticks in terms of reducing sugar, soluble protein and enzymatic activity. The radiation doses at 20, 30 and 40 kGy appeared to have no effect on sugar and protein accretion. During eight weeks of fermentation, relatively higher cellobiase activity was found compared to that of carboxymethyl cellulase and avicelase. The present investigation indicates that fungal conversion with pretreatment can turn these lignocellulosic agro-wastes to a nutritionally enriched animal feed by increasing the crude protein and reducing sugar content. However, further research is necessary to develop strategies for industrial scale production to overcome the crisis of nutritionally improved animal feed.

  3. 3D straight-stick laparoscopy versus 3D robotics for task performance in novice surgeons: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Fevzi; Jan, Haider; Kent, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The advent of three-dimensional passive stereoscopic imaging has led to the development of 3D laparoscopy. In simulation tasks, a reduction in error rate and performance time is seen with 3D compared to two-dimensional (2D) laparoscopy with both novice and expert surgeons. Robotics utilises 3D and instrument articulation through a console interface. Robotic trials have demonstrated that tasks performed in 3D produced fewer errors and quicker performance times compared with those in 2D. It was therefore perceived that the main advantage of robotic surgery was in fact 3D. Our aim was to compare 3D straight-stick laparoscopic task performance (3D) with robotic 3D (Robot), to determine whether robotic surgery confers additional benefit over and above 3D visualisation. We randomised 20 novice surgeons to perform four validated surgical tasks, either with straight-stick 3D laparoscopy followed by 3D robotic surgery or in the reverse order. The trial was conducted in two fully functional operating theatres. The primary outcome of the study was the error rate as defined for each task, and the secondary outcome was the time taken to complete each task. The participants were asked to perform the tasks as quickly and as accurately as possible. Data were analysed using SPSS version 21. The median error rate for completion of all four tasks with the robot was 2.75 and 5.25 for 3D with a P value performance time for completion of all four tasks with the robot was 157.1 and 342.5 s for 3D with a P value 3D robotic systems over 3D straight-stick laparoscopy, in terms of reduced error rate and quicker task performance time.

  4. Comparison of Different Final Impression Techniques for Management of Resorbed Mandibular Ridge: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupender Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory.

  5. Comparison of different final impression techniques for management of resorbed mandibular ridge: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhupender; Jayna, Manisha; Yadav, Harish; Suri, Shrey; Phogat, Shefali; Madan, Reshu

    2014-01-01

    The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory.

  6. InAs/InP(001) quantum dots and quantum sticks grown by MOVPE: shape, anisotropy and formation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michon, A.; Patriarche, G.; Sagnes, I.; Beaudoin, G.; Saint-Girons, G.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a thermodynamical analysis of the formation process of InAs/InP(001) quantum dots (QDs) or quantum sticks (QSs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. This study, based on an analytical model of Tersoff et al. adapted to our QD geometry, describes the origin of QD shape anisotropy and size dispersion. It also explains the shape transition from QDs to QSs under As-poor growth conditions. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Students nurses' knowledge and prevalence of Needle Stick Injury in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Mohammad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Alazzam, Manar; Aloush, Sami; Alsaraireh, Arwa; Alsaraireh, Faris A

    2018-01-01

    Student nurses are at high risk of blood-borne pathogens transmitted via Needle Stick Injury (NSI). Understanding various aspects of NSI is essential if they are to avoid the risks associated with it. The study was conducted to measure student nurses' level of knowledge about NSI and to examine its prevalence and post-exposure measures in Jordan. A cross-sectional and descriptive design was used. A sample of 279 student nurses studying at one private and four government universities distributed throughout Jordan. The study used an online survey composed of 22 questions developed from NSI literature. The questionnaire was divided into three parts: background, to measure students' demographics; knowledge, to measure nurses' understanding of NSI; and prevalence, to measure exposure to NSI and the follow-up measures. Student nurses were recruited through Facebook. The survey was available online for one full semester in 2016/2017. The total number of completed surveys was 279 (response rate=61%). Most of the students were female (n=198; 71%), in their fourth year (n=114; 40.9%). Their mean age was 21years (SD=2.5). The mean score for the knowledge part was 7 out of 10 (SD=1.7). Almost a third of the students had at least one incident of exposure to NSI (n=73; 26.2%). Most of the students who had suffered NSI did not inform their clinical instructors (67.1%) or write an incident report (86.3%). The results showed that there was no significant difference in the knowledge total scores between males and females or between students across different universities. However, a significant difference was found between students in different years of study (F (276, 2)=6.77, p=0.001). Student nurses in Jordan have a moderate understanding of issues regarding NSI. This knowledge improved with seniority. However, exposure to NSI and its under-reporting is a prevalent problem. This study recommends focusing on NSI in the nursing curriculum, and providing more protection and post

  8. Stick-slip Cycles and Tidal Modulation of Ice Stream Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivation of a single dormant Antarctic ice stream would double the continent's mass imbalance. Despite importance of understanding the likelihood of such an event, direct observation of the basal processes that lead to the activation and stagnation of streaming ice are minimal. As the only ice stream undergoing stagnation, the Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) occupies a central role in our understanding of these subglacial processes. Complicating matters is the observation, from GPS records, that the WIP experiences most of its motion during episodes of rapid sliding. These sliding events are tidally modulated and separated by 12 hour periods of quiescence. We conduct numerical simulations of ice stream stick-slip cycles. Our simulations include rate- and state-dependent frictional sliding, tidal forcing, inertia, upstream loading in a cross-stream, thickness-averaged formulation. Our principal finding is that ice stream motion may respond to ocean tidal forcing with one of two end member behaviors. In one limit, tidally modulated slip events have rupture velocities that approach the shear wave speed and slip events have a duration that scales with the ice stream width divided by the shear wave speed. In the other limit, tidal modulation results in ice stream sliding velocities with lower amplitude variation but at much longer timescales, i.e. semi-diurnal and longer. This latter behavior more closely mimics the behavior of several active ice streams (Bindschadler, Rutford). We find that WIP slip events exist between these two end member behaviors: rupture velocities are far below the inertial limit yet sliding occurs only episodically. The continuum of sliding behaviors is governed by a critical ice stream width over which slip event nucleate. When the critical width is much longer than the ice stream width, slip events are unable to nucleate. The critical width depends on the subglacial effective pressure, ice thickness, and frictional and elastic constitutive

  9. The sticking probability for H-2 in presence of CO on some transition metals at a hydrogen pressure of 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Lytken, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2008-01-01

    The sticking probability for H-2 on Ni, Co, Cu, Rh, Ru, Pd, it and Pt metal films supported on graphite has been investigated in a gas mixture consisting of 10 ppm carbon monoxide in hydrogen at a total pressure of 1 bar in the temperature range 40-200 degrees C. Carbon monoxide inhibits the stic......The sticking probability for H-2 on Ni, Co, Cu, Rh, Ru, Pd, it and Pt metal films supported on graphite has been investigated in a gas mixture consisting of 10 ppm carbon monoxide in hydrogen at a total pressure of 1 bar in the temperature range 40-200 degrees C. Carbon monoxide inhibits...... the sticking probability significantly for all the metals, even at 200 degrees C. In the presence of 10 ppm CO, the sticking probability increases in the order It, Pt, Ni, Co, Pd, Rh, Ru, whereas for Cu, it is below the detection limit of the measurement, even in pure H2. The sticking probability for H2...

  10. Waffle production: influence of batter ingredients on sticking of waffles at baking plates-Part II: effect of fat, leavening agent, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Regina; Schoenlechner, Regine

    2017-05-01

    Fresh egg waffles are continuously baked in tunnel baking ovens in industrial scale. Waffles that partly or fully stick to the baking plates cause significant product loss and increased costs. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the effect of different recipe ingredients on the sticking behavior of waffles. In this second part, ingredients investigated were different leavening agents (sodium acid pyrophosphate, ammonium bicarbonate, magnesium hydroxide carbonate, or monocalcium phosphate), different fat sources (rapeseed oil, cocos fat, butter, or margarine), and different water sources (tap water 12°dH and distilled water). Within the different types of fats, solid fats with high amount of short-chain fatty acids (cocos fat or butter) decreased the number of sticking waffles compared to liquid oils (rapeseed oil). Regarding leavening agents, magnesium hydroxide carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate were superior to sodium acid pyrophosphate or monocalcium phosphate. Between the two water sources, effects were small.

  11. Effects of Bufei Yishen Granules Combined with Acupoint Sticking Therapy on Pulmonary Surfactant Proteins in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yange Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of Bufei Yishen granules combined with acupoint sticking therapy (the integrated therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant proteins (SPs, including SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D may be included in pathophysiology of COPD. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of the integrated therapy on SPs. COPD rat models were established. The treatment groups received Bufei Yishen granules or acupoint sticking or their combination. Using aminophylline as a positive control drug. The levels of SPs in serum, BALF, and lung were measured. The results showed that the integrated therapy markedly reduced the levels of SPs in serum and increased these indicators in the lung. The integrated therapy was better than aminophylline in reducing the levels of SPs and was better than Bufei Yishen granules in reducing SP-A, SP-C, and SP-D in serum. The integrated therapy was better than aminophylline and Bufei Yishen granules in increasing SP-A, SP-B, and SP-D mRNA in the lung. SP-A and SP-D in BALF were positively correlated with PEF and EF50. The levels of SPs are associated with airway limitation. The beneficial effects of the integrated therapy may be involved in regulating pulmonary surfactant proteins.

  12. Waffle production: influence of batter ingredients on sticking of fresh egg waffles at baking plates-Part I: effect of starch and sugar components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Regina; Schoenlechner, Regine

    2017-05-01

    Fresh egg waffles are a sweet convenience product typically baked from eggs, water, sugar, flour, fat, leavening agents, emulsifiers, preservatives, and flavors. In industrial production, waffles are baked continuously in high amounts of up to 200 kg raw material per hour. Therefore, it is important that the waffles do not stick onto the baking plates, which can cause significant product loss and increased costs due to interruption of the baking process, required cleaning procedures, and restarting of the energy-consuming start-up phase. Sticking of waffles is greatly influenced not only by baking plate material, release agent, baking temperature, and time, but also by the batter ingredients. In this study, effects of different starches and sugar components were investigated. Within the selected starches, potato starch demonstrated the highest effects on increasing waffle stability and releasing properties compared to wheat and lupine flour (less than 7% sticking waffles). Rice flour performed worst, with almost 50% of sticking waffles. Most of these waffles were broken during take-off, due to their crumbly texture. Within the sugar components, glycerine was better suitable than sorbitol and crystal sugar was superior compared to powdered sugar. They required less take-off force. It could be demonstrated that waffles with increased stability and texture were those that showed the least number of sticking waffles, thus the main aim of batter ingredients was to improve waffle quality. Waffle quality was influenced by batter parameters, significant correlations could be found, for example, a positive correlation between pH- and L-value, negative correlations between pH- and a-value, or density and aw-value. This resulted in significant correlations with take-off-force, which was correlated with L*- and b*-value (negative) and positive to a*-value. Sticking behavior was strongly associated with b*-value (positive) and to a*-value (negative).

  13. Updating the Skating Multistage Aerobic Test and Correction for V[Combining Dot Above]O2max Prediction Using a New Skating Economy Index in Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allisse, Maxime; Bui, Hung Tien; Léger, Luc; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2018-05-07

    Allisse, M, Bui, HT, Léger, L, Comtois, A-S, and Leone, M. Updating the skating multistage aerobic test and correction for V[Combining Dot Above]O2max prediction using a new skating economy index in elite youth ice hockey players. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-A number of field tests, including the skating multistage aerobic test (SMAT), have been developed to predict V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in ice hockey players. The SMAT, like most field tests, assumes that participants who reach a given stage have the same oxygen uptake, which is not usually true. Thus, the objectives of this research are to update the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values during the SMAT using a portable breath-by-breath metabolic analyzer and to propose a simple index of skating economy to improve the prediction of oxygen uptake. Twenty-six elite hockey players (age 15.8 ± 1.3 years) participated in this study. The oxygen uptake was assessed using a portable metabolic analyzer (K4b) during an on-ice maximal shuttle skate test. To develop an index of skating economy called the skating stride index (SSI), the number of skating strides was compiled for each stage of the test. The SMAT enabled the prediction of the V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (ml·kg·min) from the maximal velocity (m·s) and the SSI (skating strides·kg) using the following regression equation: V[Combining Dot Above]O2max = (14.94 × maximal velocity) + (3.68 × SSI) - 24.98 (r = 0.95, SEE = 1.92). This research allowed for the update of the oxygen uptake values of the SMAT and proposed a simple measure of skating efficiency for a more accurate evaluation of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in elite youth hockey players. By comparing the highest and lowest observed SSI scores in our sample, it was noted that the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values can vary by up to 5 ml·kg·min. Our results suggest that skating economy should be included in the prediction of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max to improve prediction accuracy.

  14. Changes of the morphological characteristics in a professional ice hockey player with regard to the eight week intensive fitness training: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmund Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with monitoring the changes of the morphological characteristics in a professional hockey player (NHL aged 22.5 years with regard to the eight weeks intensive fitness training. Fitness training occurred off the ice surface. To determine the body composition, the method of BIA and anthropometric procedure is used (Matiegka, Pařízková. Measurements were carried out in accordance with the recommended national and international standards. An effect size of the differences in the selected individual values measured at different times was assessed using 95% of confidence interval. Significant changes occur primarily at the level of body composition. Overall, the increase in fat free mass was 4 kg to the weight 79.3 kg (BIA. Representation of muscle increased from 51.4% to 54.5% (Matiegka. In absolute terms it is the increase in muscle from 47.1 kg to 49.9 kg. Body fat percentage decreased from 12.9% to 9.7% (Matiegka. This represents a reduction of 2.9 kg. There is no change at the level of skeletal and residual fractions. With regard to the eight week fitness training the major morhpohogical changes (80-90% are experienced during the first half of the training (4 weeks. The survey results are of immediate use in the professional practice of the monitored player. It allows specific modifications to the training of the monitored player as well as other cooperating individuals in the chosen specialization.

  15. Effect of manual therapy versus proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in dynamic balance, mobility and flexibility in field hockey players. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; López-Martínez, Susana; Inglés, Marta; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Marta

    2018-04-22

    To compare the effectiveness of a specific Manual Therapy (MT) protocol applied to field hockey players (FHP), versus a Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) protocol, in the improvement of dynamic balance, active range of movement and lumbar flexibility one-week and four-weeks after the treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Participants were assigned to 2 groups: MT and PNF. 30 min' sessions were performed once a week for three weeks. Three evaluations were performed: basal, one-week and four-weeks post-treatment. University of Valencia (Spain). 22 in MT group and 20 in PNF group. Dynamic Balance, measured with Star Excursion Balance Test; Active Range of Motion (ROM), using a manual goniometer and Lumbar Flexibility, assessed with Fingertip-to-floor test. Both groups significantly improved in lateral and medial dynamic balance one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05); but the improvement in the MT group lasted until the fourth-week after treatment in both reaches (lateral and medial) (p < 0.05). MT group also obtained significant improvements in dorsal flexion of the ankle in the fourth-week post-treatment (p < 0.05) and in lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05). MT and PNF improve dynamic balance one-week post-treatment; however, the improvement obtained through MT is maintained four-weeks later. Only MT improves dorsal flexion of the ankle four-weeks post-treatment and lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PERBEDAAN HASIL BELAJAR SISWA MENGGUNAKAN MODEL PEMBELAJARAN TIPE TALKING STICK DENGAN PEMBELAJARAN KONVENSIONAL PADAMATA PELAJARAN EKONOMI SISWA KELAS X SMAN 1 BONJOL KABUPATEN PASAMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cici Idrus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Riset didasari oleh hasil belajar ekonomi kelas X SMAN 1 Bonjol yang masih rendah, yang masih memakai metode Teacher Center Learning, sehingga para siswa kurang aktifi dan kreatif. Satu usaha untuk meningkatkan hasil pelajaran siswa adalah dengan menerapkan jenis model pelajaran ekonomi Talking Stick. Tujuan Studi ini untuk menentukan perbedaan antara hasil belajar menggunakan metode Talking Stick dan konvensional pada kelas X SMAN 1 Bonjol. Riset ini adalah semacam eksperimen. Populasi Studi adalah suatu para siswa nilai/kelas X Sma Negeri 1 Bonjol, sedangkan kelas X3 menggunakan jenis model pelajaran Talking Stick sebagai kelas eksperimen dan X4 Kelas sebagai kelas yag dikendalikan dengan metode konvensional. Hasil menunjukkan rata-rata hasil belajar kelas eksperimen lebih tinggi( 79.62 dibanding kelas kontrol ( 73.21. Pada hasil pengujian hipotesis yang menggunakan SPSS versi 16. nilai yang diperoleh t= 2.892 dan t tabel= 1.671 maka> ttable kemudian Tolak H0 dan menerima H1. Maka dapat disimpulkan bahwa Ada perbedaan penting pada hasil pelajaran siswa yang menggunakan tipe Talking Stick dan konvensional pada mata pelajaran ekonomi kelas X SMAN 1 Bonjol.

  17. Non-desired transitions and sliding-mode control of a multi-DOF mechanical system with stick-slip oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Lopez, Eva M.; Liceaga-Castro, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Systems with discontinuous elements exhibit a wide variety of complex phenomena which must be considered in the control design process. A dynamical sliding-mode control is used to avoid different bit sticking problems appearing in conventional vertical oilwell drillstrings. The aim of the control system is to drive the rotary velocities of drillstring components to specified values. A discontinuous lumped-parameter torsional model of four degrees of freedom is considered. This model is more generic than those so far reported in the literature. The closed-loop system dynamics have four discontinuity surfaces. One of these surfaces is introduced in order to accomplish the control goal despite variations of key drilling parameters, such as, the weight on the bit, the top-rotary velocity and friction characteristics. Self-excited bit stick-slip oscillations and sticking phenomena are avoided with the controller here proposed. Moreover, an alternative procedure to investigate the stick-slip motion is presented, it is based on the study of the stability characteristics of the different system equilibria and their relationships to different sliding motions.

  18. Commitment with or without a stick of paid work: comparison of paid and unpaid workers in a non-profit organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.; de Jong, Menno D.T.; Seydel, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether nonpaid volunteers have other reasons to be a member of an organization than paid workers. Volunteers are assumed to be hard to manage, because there is no “stick of a paid contract” to keep them in line. Therefore, we studied different dimensions

  19. Innovation That Sticks Case Study Report: Ottawa Catholic School Board. Leading and Learning for Innovation, A Framework for District-Wide Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Education Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    A Canadian Education Association (CEA) Selection Jury chose the Ottawa Catholic School Board (OCSB) out of 35 School District applicants from across Canada to participate in the 2015 "Innovation that Sticks" Case Study Program. From September to December 2015--through an Appreciative Inquiry interview process--the CEA researched how the…

  20. Design and properties of a cryogenic dip-stick scanning tunneling microscope with capacitive coarse approach control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, R; Hänke, T; Baumann, D; Kaiser, M; Nag, P K; Voigtländer, R; Lindackers, D; Büchner, B; Hess, C

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, setup, and operation of a new dip-stick scanning tunneling microscope. Its special design allows measurements in the temperature range from 4.7 K up to room temperature, where cryogenic vacuum conditions are maintained during the measurement. The system fits into every (4)He vessel with a bore of 50 mm, e.g., a transport dewar or a magnet bath cryostat. The microscope is equipped with a cleaving mechanism for cleaving single crystals in the whole temperature range and under cryogenic vacuum conditions. For the tip approach, a capacitive automated coarse approach is implemented. We present test measurements on the charge density wave system 2H-NbSe2 and the superconductor LiFeAs which demonstrate scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy data acquisition with high stability, high spatial resolution at variable temperatures and in high magnetic fields.