WorldWideScience

Sample records for hlw repository development

  1. Development of thermal analysis method for the near field of HLW repository using ABAQUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuh, Jung Eui; Kang, Chul Hyung; Park, Jeong Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    An appropriate tool is needed to evaluate the thermo-mechanical stability of high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this report a thermal analysis methodology for the near field of HLW repository is developed to use ABAQUS which is one of the multi purpose FEM code and has been used for many engineering area. The main contents of this methodology development are the structural and material modelling to simulate a repository, setup of side conditions, e.g., boundary and load conditions, and initial conditions, and the procedure to selection proper material parameters. In addition to these, the interface programs for effective production of input data and effective change of model size for sensitivity analysis for disposal concept development are developed. The results of this work will be apply to evaluate the thermal stability and to use as main input data for mechanical analysis of HLW repository. (author). 20 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Development of gap filling technique in HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Saito, Akira; Ishii, Takashi; Toguri, Satohito; Okihara, Mitsunobu; Iwasa, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    HLW is supposed to be disposed underground at depths more than 300 m in Japan. Buffer is an artificial barrier that controls radionuclides migrating into the groundwater. The buffer would be made of a natural swelling clay, bentonite. Construction technology for the buffer has been studied for many years, but studies for the gaps surrounding the buffer are little. The proper handling of the gaps is important for guaranteeing the functions of the buffer. In this paper, gap filling techniques using bentonite pellets have been developed in order to the gap having the same performance as the buffer. A new method for manufacturing high-density spherical pellets has been developed to fill the gap higher density ever reported. For the bentonite pellets, the filling performance and how to use were determined. And full-scale filling tests provided availability of the bentonite pellets and filling techniques. (author)

  3. Strategy for safety case development: impact of a volunteering approach to siting a japanese HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, K.; Ishiguro, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Tsuchi, H.; Kato, T.; Sakabe, Y.; Wakasugi, K.

    2008-01-01

    NUMO strategy for safety case development is constrained by a staged siting approach, which has been initiated by a call for volunteer municipalities to host the HLW repository. For each site, the safety case is an important factor to be considered at the selection steps which narrow down towards the preferred repository location. This is particularly challenging, however, as every site requires a tailored repository concept, with associated performance assessment and an individual site evaluation programme all of which evolve with gradually increasing understanding of the host environment. In order to maintain flexibility without losing focus, NUMO has developed a formalized tailoring procedure, termed the NUMO Structured Approach (NSA). The NSA guides the interaction of the key site characterisation, repository design and performance assessment groups and is facilitated by tools to help the decision making associated with the tailoring process (e.g. a requirements management system) and with comparison of siting and design options (e.g. multi-attribute analysis). Pragmatically, the post-closure safety case will initially emphasize near-field processes and a robust engineering barrier system, considering the limited geological information at early stages. This will be complemented by a more realistic assessment of total system performance, as needed to compare options. In addition, efforts to rigorously assess operational phase safety and the practicality of assuring quality of the constructed engineered barriers are components of the total safety case which are receiving particular attention now, as they may better discriminate between sites while information is still limited. (authors)

  4. Biosphere Modeling for the Dose Assessment of a HLW Repository: Development of ACBIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2006-01-15

    For the purpose of evaluating a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, a biosphere assessment model and an implemented code, ACBIO, based on the BIOMASS methodology have been developed by utilizing AMBER, a general compartment modeling tool. To demonstrate its practicability and usability as well as to observe the sensitivity of the compartment scheme, the concentration, the activity in the compartments as well as the annual flux between the compartments at their peak values, were calculated and investigated. For each case when changing the structure of the compartments and GBIs as well as varying selected input Kd values, all of which seem very important among the others, the dose rate per nuclide release rate is calculated separately and analyzed. From the maximum dose rates, the flux to dose conversion factors for each nuclide were derived, which are used for converting the nuclide release rate appearing from the geosphere through various GBIs to dose rates (Sv/y) for an individual in a critical group. It has also been observed that the compartment scheme, the identification of a possible exposure group and the GBIs could all be highly sensitive to the final consequences in a biosphere modeling.

  5. Biosphere Modeling for the Dose Assessment of a HLW Repository: Development of ACBIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of evaluating a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, a biosphere assessment model and an implemented code, ACBIO, based on the BIOMASS methodology have been developed by utilizing AMBER, a general compartment modeling tool. To demonstrate its practicability and usability as well as to observe the sensitivity of the compartment scheme, the concentration, the activity in the compartments as well as the annual flux between the compartments at their peak values, were calculated and investigated. For each case when changing the structure of the compartments and GBIs as well as varying selected input Kd values, all of which seem very important among the others, the dose rate per nuclide release rate is calculated separately and analyzed. From the maximum dose rates, the flux to dose conversion factors for each nuclide were derived, which are used for converting the nuclide release rate appearing from the geosphere through various GBIs to dose rates (Sv/y) for an individual in a critical group. It has also been observed that the compartment scheme, the identification of a possible exposure group and the GBIs could all be highly sensitive to the final consequences in a biosphere modeling

  6. Applicability of thermodynamic database of radioactive elements developed for the Japanese performance assessment of HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Mikazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Rai, Dhanpat; Ochs, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) published a second progress report (also known as H12 report) on high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in Japan (JNC 1999). This report helped to develop confidence in the selected HLW disposal system and to establish the implementation body in 2000 for the disposal of HLW. JNC developed an in-house thermodynamic database for radioactive elements for performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (EBS) and the geosphere for H12 report. This paper briefly presents the status of the JNC's thermodynamic database and its applicability to perform realistic analyses of the solubilities of radioactive elements, evolution of solubility-limiting solid phases, predictions of the redox state of Pu in the neutral pH range under reducing conditions, and to estimate solubilities of radioactive elements in cementitious conditions. (author)

  7. Strategic management of HLW repository projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to strategic management of HLW repository projects based on the premise that a primary objective of project activities is resolution of issues. The approach would be implemented by establishing an issues management function with responsibility to define the issues agenda, develop and apply the tools for assessing progress toward issue resolution, and develop the issue resolution criteria. A principal merit of the approach is that it provides a defensible rationale for project plans and activities. It also helps avoid unnecessary costs and schedule delays, and it helps assure coordination between project functions that share responsibilities for issue resolution

  8. Development of database and QA systems for post closure performance assessment on a potential HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    In TSPA of long-term post closure radiological safety on permanent disposal of HLW in Korea, appropriate management of input and output data through QA is necessary. The robust QA system is developed using the T2R3 principles applicable for five major steps in R and D's. The proposed system is implemented in the web-based system so that all participants in TSRA are able to access the system. In addition, the internet based input database for TSPA is developed. Currently data from literature surveys, domestic laboratory and field experiments as well as expert elicitation are applied for TSPA

  9. Development of geological disposal system; localization of element cost data and cost evaluation on the HLW repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Sik; Kim, Kil Jung; Yang, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Chun [KOPEC, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    To estimate Total Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) for Korea HLW Repository through localization of element cost data, we review and re-organize each basic element cost data for reference repository system, localize various element cost and finally estimate TSLCC considering economic parameters. As results of the study, TSLCC is estimated as 17,167,689 million won, which includes costs for site preparation, surface facilities, underground facilities and management/integration. Since HLW repository Project is an early stage of pre-conceptual design at present, the information of design and project information are not enough to perform cost estimate and cost localization for the Project. However, project cost structure is re-organized based on the local condition and Total System Life Cycle Cost is estimated using the previous cost data gathered from construction experience of the local nuclear power plant. Project results can be used as basic reference data to assume total construction cost for the local HLW repository and should be revised to more reliable cost data with incorporating detail project design information into the cost estimate in a future. 20 refs. (Author)

  10. Comparison of risks due to HLW and SURF repositories in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.Y.; Ortiz, N.R.; Wahi, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology was developed for use in the analysis of risks from geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. This methodology is applied to two conceptual nuclear waste repositories in bedded salt containing High-Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Un-Reprocessed Fuel (SURF), respectively. A comparison of the risk estimated from the HLW and SURF repositories is presented

  11. HLW Disposal System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J. W.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, J. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A KRS is suggested through design requirement analysis of the buffer and the canister which are the constituent of disposal system engineered barrier and HLW management plans are proposed. In the aspect of radionuclide retention capacity, the thickness of the buffer is determined 0.5m, the shape to be disc and ring and the dry density to be 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. The maximum temperature of the buffer is below 100 .deg. which meets the design requirement. And bentonite blocks with 5 wt% of graphite showed more than 1.0 W/mK of thermal conductivity without the addition of sand. The result of the thermal analysis for proposed double-layered buffer shows that decrease of 7 .deg. C in maximum temperature of the buffer. For the disposal canister, the copper for the outer shell material and cast iron for the inner structure material is recommended considering the results analyzed in terms of performance of the canisters and manufacturability and the geochemical properties of deep groundwater sampled from the research area with granite, salt water intrusion, and the heavy weight of the canister. The results of safety analysis for the canister shows that the criticality for the normal case including uncertainty is the value of 0.816 which meets subcritical condition. Considering nation's 'Basic Plan for Electric Power Demand and Supply' and based on the scenario of disposing CANDU spent fuels in the first phase, the disposal system that the repository will be excavated in eight phases with the construction of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) beginning in 2020 and commissioning in 2040 until the closure of the repository is proposed. Since there is close correlation between domestic HLW management plans and front-end/back-end fuel cycle plans causing such a great sensitivity of international environment factor, items related to assuring the non-proliferation and observing the international standard are showed to be the influential factor and acceptability

  12. Evaluation of methods and tools to develop safety concepts and to demonstrate safety for an HLW repository in salt. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Doerr, S.; and others

    2017-03-15

    Salt formations have been the preferred option as host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive waste in Germany for more than 40 years. During this period comprehensive geological investigations have been carried out together with a broad spectrum of concept and safety related R and D work. The behaviour of an HLW repository in salt formations, particularly in salt domes, has been analysed in terms of assessment of the total system performance. This was first carried out for concepts of generic waste repositories in salt and, since 1998, for a repository concept with specific boundary conditions, taking the geology of the Gorleben salt dome as an example. Suitable repository concepts and designs were developed, the technical feasibility has been proven and operational and long-term safety evaluated. Numerical modelling is an important input into the development of a comprehensive safety case for a waste repository. Significant progress in the development of numerical tools and their application for long-term safe ty assessment has been made in the last two decades. An integrated approach has been used in which the repository concept and relevant scientific and engineering data are combined with the results from iterative safety assessments to increase the clarity and the traceability of the evaluation. A safety concept that takes full credit of the favourable properties of salt formations was developed in the course of the R and D project ISIBEL, which started in 2005. This concept is based on the safe containment of radioactive waste in a specific part of the host rock formation, termed the containment providing rock zone, which comprises the geological barrier, the geotechnical barriers and the compacted backfill. The future evolution of the repository system will be analysed using a catalogue of Features, Events and Processes (FEP), scenario development and numerical analysis, all of which are adapted to suit the safety concept. Key elements of the

  13. Evaluation of methods and tools to develop safety concepts and to demonstrate safety for an HLW repository in salt. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Doerr, S.

    2017-03-01

    Salt formations have been the preferred option as host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive waste in Germany for more than 40 years. During this period comprehensive geological investigations have been carried out together with a broad spectrum of concept and safety related R and D work. The behaviour of an HLW repository in salt formations, particularly in salt domes, has been analysed in terms of assessment of the total system performance. This was first carried out for concepts of generic waste repositories in salt and, since 1998, for a repository concept with specific boundary conditions, taking the geology of the Gorleben salt dome as an example. Suitable repository concepts and designs were developed, the technical feasibility has been proven and operational and long-term safety evaluated. Numerical modelling is an important input into the development of a comprehensive safety case for a waste repository. Significant progress in the development of numerical tools and their application for long-term safe ty assessment has been made in the last two decades. An integrated approach has been used in which the repository concept and relevant scientific and engineering data are combined with the results from iterative safety assessments to increase the clarity and the traceability of the evaluation. A safety concept that takes full credit of the favourable properties of salt formations was developed in the course of the R and D project ISIBEL, which started in 2005. This concept is based on the safe containment of radioactive waste in a specific part of the host rock formation, termed the containment providing rock zone, which comprises the geological barrier, the geotechnical barriers and the compacted backfill. The future evolution of the repository system will be analysed using a catalogue of Features, Events and Processes (FEP), scenario development and numerical analysis, all of which are adapted to suit the safety concept. Key elements of the

  14. Siting Process for HLW Repository in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, S.; Kitayama, K.; Umeki, H.; Naito, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the year 2000, the geological disposal program for high-level radioactive waste in Japan moved from the phase of generic research and development (R and D) into the phase of implementation. Following legislation entitled the ''Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act'', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established as the implementing organization. The assigned activities of NUMO include selection of the repository site, demonstration of disposal technology at the site, developing relevant licensing applications and construction, operation and closure of the repository. As the first milestone of siting process, NUMO announced to the public an overall procedure for selection of preliminary investigation areas for potential candidate sites on October 29, 2001. The procedure specifies that NUMO will solicit volunteer municipalities for preliminary investigation areas with publishing four documents as an information package. These documents are tentatively entitled ''Instructions for Application'', ''Siting Factors for the Preliminary Investigation Areas'', a ''Repository Concepts'' as well as an ''Site Investigation Community Outreach Scheme''

  15. Management strategy for site characterization at candidate HLW repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for HLW repository site characterization which is aimed at producing an optimal characterization trajectory for site suitability and licensing evaluations. The core feature of the strategy is a matrix of alternative performance targets and alternative information-level targets which can be used to allocate and justify program effort. Strategies for work concerning evaluation of expected and disrupted repository performance are distinguished, and the need for issue closure criteria is discussed

  16. A GoldSim Based Biosphere Assessment Model for a HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the performance of a repository, the dose exposure to a human being due to nuclide releases from a repository should be evaluated and the results compared to the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies. To evaluate a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, biosphere assessment models and their implemented codes such as ACBIO1 and ACBIO2 have been developed with the aid of AMBER during the last few years. BIOMASS methodology has been adopted for a HLW repository currently being considered in Korea, which has a similar concept to the Swedish KBS-3 HLW repository. Recently, not just only for verifying the purpose for biosphere assessment models but also for varying the possible alternatives to assess the consequences in a biosphere due to a HLW repository, another version of the assessment modesl has been newly developed in the frame of development programs for a total system performance assessment modeling tool by utilizing GoldSim. Through a current study, GoldSim approach for a biosphere modeling is introduced. Unlike AMBER by which a compartment scheme can be rather simply constructed with an appropriate transition rate between compartments, GoldSim was designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules by which specific models can be addressed in an additional manner, like solving jig saw puzzles

  17. Active geothermal systems as natural analogs of HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Cohen, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    Geologic analogs of long-lived processes in high-level waste (HLW) repositories have been much studied in recent years. However, most of these occurrences either involve natural processes going on today at 25 degree C, or, if they are concerned with behavior at temperatures similar to the peak temperatures anticipated near HLW canisters, have long since ended. This paper points out the usefulness of studying modern geothermal systems as natural analogs, and to illustrate the concept with a dramatic example, the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS)

  18. Situation concerning the HLW repository in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempert, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Final disposal of radioactive waste has been defined in Germany as: maintenance-free, safe emplacement of radioactive waste, time unlimited and no intention of retrievability. The responsibility for final disposal lies in the hands of the German Federal Government, which has assigned a federal authority to plan, erect and operate the federal facilities for long-term storage of nuclear waste. The federal authority has in lack of industrial experience contracted my company DBE which is responsible for the engineering, erection and operation of all German nuclear waste repositories. (author)

  19. Cesium and strontium fractionation from HLW for thermal-stress reduction in a geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.

    1983-02-01

    Results are described for a study to assess the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic repository thermal stresses. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of a vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum integrity packages at relatively high heat loading. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository for each waste type. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers, potentially, a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or loser costs

  20. Alternative measure for performance of HLW geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joonhang, Ahn; Chambre, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    A repository performance model that can show effects of canister multiplicity and repository configuration has been developed. Masses of a radionuclide in the repository and in the far field are proposed as performance measures. Canister multiplicity has significant effects on the release of long-lived radionuclides from the repository. As more canisters are included in the same water stream, the radionuclide concentration in the stream increases, but becomes independent of the number of canisters for sufficiently many canisters. Effects of reduction of radionuclide mass in the repository on the repository performance are clearly observed if the canister multiplicity is taken into account and the mass-based measures are applied. (author)

  1. 'Practicality' as a key constraint to HLW repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Kazumi; Sakabe, Yasushi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Designs of repositories in Japan for HLW have focused very much on demonstration of post-closure safety. Safety can be assured using very simple assessment techniques, which make many conservative simplifications. Such a situation is reasonable for the early stages of generic concept demonstration, but becomes less appropriate as NUMO moves towards siting, where a number of issues involved with construction and operation of a repository - generally grouped together as 'practicality'. The engineering logistics and conventional safety of repository construction and operation have been relatively little studied and present major challenges. Current designs emphasise a minimum of infrastructure in the emplacement tunnels and remote-handled operation. This would be difficult enough, but such operations need to be carried out to strict quality limits and need to be robust in the event of equipment failure or disruptive events. The paper will first examine how designs can be modified from the viewpoint of logistics. The implications of such modifications on operational robustness and associated safety in case of perturbation scenarios are then considered. (author)

  2. Nuclide release calculation in the near-field of a reference HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2004-01-01

    The HLW-relevant R and D program for disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since early 1997 in order to develop a conceptual Korea Reference Repository System for direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel by the end of 2007. A preliminary reference geologic repository concept considering such established criteria and requirements as waste and generic site characteristics in Korea was roughly envisaged in 2003 focusing on the near-field components of the repository system. According to above basic repository concept, which is similar to that of Swedish KBS-3 repository, the spent fuel is first encapsulated in corrosion resistant canisters, even though the material has not yet been determined, and then emplaced into the deposition holes surrounded by high density bentonite clay in tunnels constructed at a depth of about 500 m in a stable plutonic rock body. Not only to demonstrate how much a reference repository is safe in the generic point of view with several possible scenarios and cases associated with a preliminary repository concept by conducting calculations for nuclide release and transport in the near-field components of the repository, even though enough information has not been available that much yet, but also to show a methodology by which a generic safety assessment could be performed for further development of Korea reference repository concept, nuclide release calculation study strongly seems to be necessary

  3. Status of the safety concept and safety demonstration for an HLW repository in salt. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Filbert, W.; and others

    2013-12-15

    Salt formations have been the preferred option as host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive waste in Germany for more than 40 years. During this period comprehensive geological investigations have been carried out together with a broad spectrum of concept and safety related R and D work. The behaviour of an HLW repository in salt formations, particularly in salt domes, has been analysed in terms of assessment of the total system performance. This was first carried out for concepts of generic waste repositories in salt and, since 1998, for a repository concept with specific boundary conditions, taking the geology of the Gorleben salt dome as an example. Suitable repository concepts and designs were developed, the technical feasibility has been proven and operational and long-term safety evaluated. Numerical modelling is an important input into the development of a comprehensive safety case for a waste repository. Significant progress in the development of numerical tools and their application for long-term safety assessment has been made in the last two decades. An integrated approach has been used in which the repository concept and relevant scientific and engineering data are combined with the results from iterative safety assessments to increase the clarity and the traceability of the evaluation. A safety concept that takes full credit of the favourable properties of salt formations was developed in the course of the R and D project ISIBEL, which started in 2005. This concept is based on the safe containment of radioactive waste in a specific part of the host rock formation, termed the containment providing rock zone, which comprises the geological barrier, the geotechnical barriers and the compacted backfill. The future evolution of the repository system will be analysed using a catalogue of Features, Events and Processes (FEP), scenario development and numerical analysis, all of which are adapted to suit the safety concept. Key elements of the

  4. An Ilustrative Nuclide Release Behavior from an HLW Repository due to an Earthquake Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Won

    2008-01-01

    Program for the evaluation of a high-level waste repository which is conceptually modeled. During the last few years, programs developed with the aid of AMBER and GoldSim by which nuclide transports in the near- and far-field of a repository as well as transport through the biosphere under various normal and disruptive release scenarios could be modeled and evaluated, have been continuously demonstrated. To show its usability, as similarly done for the natural groundwater flow scheme, influence of a possible disruptive event on a nuclide release behavior from an HLW repository system caused naturally due to an earthquake has been investigated and illustrated with the newly developed GoldSim program

  5. Sensitivity of Nuclide Release Behavior to Groundwater Flow in an HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of the dose exposure rate to human being due to long-term nuclide releases from a high-level waste repository (HLW) is of importance to meet the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies in order to ensure the performance of a repository. During the last few years, tools by which such a dose rate to an individual can be evaluated have been developed and implemented for a practical calculation to demonstrate the suitability of an HLW repository, with the aid of commercial tools such as AMBER and GoldSim, both of which are capable of probabilistic and deterministic calculations with their convenient user interface. Recently a migration from AMBER based models to GoldSim based ones has been made in accordance with a better feature of GoldSim, which is designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules to address any specialized programs, similar to solving jig saw puzzles and shows more advantage in a detailed complex modeling over AMBER. Recently a compartment modeling approach both for a geosphere and biosphere has been mainly carried out with AMBER in KAERI, which causes a necessity for a newly devised system performance evaluation model in which geosphere and biosphere models could be coupled organically together with less conservatism in the frame of the development of a total system performance assessment modeling tool, which could be successfully done with the aid of GoldSim. Therefore, through the current study, some probabilistic results of the GoldSim approach for a normal situation that could take place in a typical HLW repository are introduced

  6. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  7. Technical Standards on the Safety Assessment of a HLW Repository in Other Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    The basic function of HLW disposal system is to prevent excessive radio-nuclides being leaked from the repository in a short time. To do this, many technical standards should be developed and established on the components of disposal system. Safety assessment of a repository is considered as one of technical standards, because it produces quantitative results of the future evolution of a repository based on a reasonably simplified model. In this paper, we investigated other countries' regulations related to safely assessment focused on the assessment period, radiation dose limits and uncertainties of the assessment. Especially, in the investigation process of the USA regulations, the USA regulatory bodies' approach to assessment period and peak dose is worth taking into account in case of a conflict between peak dose from safety assessment and limited value in regulation.

  8. Biosphere modelling for a HLW repository - scenario and parameter variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grogan, H.

    1985-03-01

    In Switzerland high-level radioactive wastes have been considered for disposal in deep-lying crystalline formations. The individual doses to man resulting from radionuclides entering the biosphere via groundwater transport are calculated. The main recipient area modelled, which constitutes the base case, is a broad gravel terrace sited along the south bank of the river Rhine. An alternative recipient region, a small valley with a well, is also modelled. A number of parameter variations are performed in order to ascertain their impact on the doses. Finally two scenario changes are modelled somewhat simplistically, these consider different prevailing climates, namely tundra and a warmer climate than present. In the base case negligibly low doses to man in the long term, resulting from the existence of a HLW repository have been calculated. Cs-135 results in the largest dose (8.4E-7 mrem/y at 6.1E+6 y) while Np-237 gives the largest dose from the actinides (3.6E-8 mrem/y). The response of the model to parameter variations cannot be easily predicted due to non-linear coupling of many of the parameters. However, the calculated doses were negligibly low in all cases as were those resulting from the two scenario variations. (author)

  9. Regulatory status on the safety assessment of a HLW repository in other countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2008-12-01

    To construct a HLW repository, it is essential to meet the requirements on the regulation for a deep geological disposal. Even if the construction of a HLW repository is determined positively, technical standards which assert the performance of a repository will be needed. Among various technical standards, safety assessment based on the repository evolution in the future will play an important role in the licensing process. The foreign countries' technical standards on the safety assessment of a HLW repository may be an indicator to carry out the R and D activities on geological disposal effectively. In this report, assessment period, limit of radiation dose and uncertainty related to the safety assessment are investigated and analyzed in detail. Especially, the technical reviews of USA regulation bodies seems to be reasonable in the point of the intrinsic attribute of safety assessment

  10. HLW Long-term Management Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Won; Kang, C. H.; Ko, Y. K.

    2010-02-01

    Permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuels from the power generation is considered to be the unique method for the conservation of human being and nature in the present and future. In spite of spent nuclear fuels produced from power generation, based on the recent trends on the gap between supply and demand of energy, the advance on energy price and reduction of carbon dioxide, nuclear energy is expected to play a role continuously in Korea. It means that a new concept of nuclear fuel cycle is needed to solve problems on spent nuclear fuels. The concept of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle including PYRO processing and SFR was presented at the 255th meeting of the Atomic Energy Commission. According to the concept of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle, actinides and long-term fissile nuclides may go out of existence in SFR. And then it is possible to dispose of short term decay wastes without a great risk bearing. Many efforts had been made to develop the KRS for the direct disposal of spent nuclear fuels in the representative geology of Korea. But in the case of the adoption of Advanced nuclear fuel cycle, the disposal of PYRO wastes should be considered. For this, we carried out the Safety Analysis on HLW Disposal Project with 5 sub-projects such as Development of HLW Disposal System, Radwaste Disposal Safety Analysis, Feasibility study on the deep repository condition, A study on the Nuclide Migration and Retardation Using Natural Barrier, and In-situ Study on the Performance of Engineered Barriers

  11. Cost effects of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal costs of an HLW repository in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides the cost effect results of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal cost for an HLW repository in Korea. In the cost analysis for both of these cost drivers, the price of Cu powder and the bentonite can affect the canister cost and the bentonite cost of the disposal holes as well as backfilling cost of the tunnels, respectively. Finally, we found that the unit cost of Cu and bentonite was the dominant cost drivers for the surface and underground facilities of an HLW repository. Therefore, an optimization of a canister and the layout of a disposal hole and disposal tunnels are essential to decrease the direct disposal cost of spent fuels. The disposal costs can be largely divided into two parts such as a surface facilities' cost and an underground facilities' cost. According to the KRS' cost analysis, the encapsulation material as well as the buffering and backfilling cost were the significant costs. Especially, a canister's cost was approximately estimated to be more than one fourth of the overall disposal costs. So it can be estimated that the unit cost of Cu powder is an important cost diver. Because the outer shell of the canister was made of Cu powder by a cold spray coating method. In addition, the unit cost of bentonite can also affect the buffering and the backfilling costs of the disposal holes and the disposal tunnels. But, these material costs will be highly expensive and unstable due to the modernization of the developing countries. So the studies for a material cost should be continued to identify the actual cost of an HLW repository

  12. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, A M; Esteban, J A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  13. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza, A. M.; Esteban, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  14. Assessment of dose conversion factors in a generic biosphere of a Korea HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Park, J. B.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive species released from a waste repository migrate through engineered and natural barriers and eventually reach the biosphere. Once entered the biosphere, contaminants transport various exposure pathways and finally reach a human. In this study the full RES matrix explaining the key compartments in the biosphere and their interactions is introduced considering the characteristics of the Korean biosphere. Then the three exposure groups are identified based on the compartments of interest. The full exposure pathways and corresponding mathematical expression for mass transfer coefficients and etc are developed and applied to assess the dose conversion factors of nuclides for a specific exposure group. Dose conversion factors assessed in this study will be used for total system performance assessment of a potential Korean HLW repository

  15. Nuclide transport models for HLW repository safety assessment in Finland, Japan, Sweden, and Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Myoung; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Kim, Sung Gi; Koh, Won Il

    1997-10-01

    Disposal and design concepts in such countries as Sweden, Finland, Canada and Japan which have already published safety assessment reports for the HLW repositories have been reviewed mainly in view of nuclide transport models used in their assessment. This kind of review would be very helpful in doing similar research in Korea where research program regarding HLW has been just started. (author). 44 refs., 2 tabs., 30 figs

  16. Natural analogues for containment-providing barriers for a HLW repository in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, J.; Noseck, U.

    2015-06-15

    In 2005, a German research project was started to develop a novel approach to prove safety for a HLW repository in a salt formation, to refine the safety concept, to identify open scientific issues and to define necessary R&D work. This project aimed at identifying the key information for a HLW repository in salt. One important question is how this information may be best fulfilled by natural analogue studies. This question is answered by starting a review of the required key information needs of the safety case (post-closure phase) in order to assess whether or not these requirements can be supported by natural analogues information. In order to structure the review and to address the key elements of the safety concepts, three types of natural analogues are distinguished: (i) natural analogues for the integrity of the geological barrier, (ii) natural analogues for the integrity of the geotechnical barriers and (iii) natural analogues for release scenarios. For the safety case in salt type (i) and (ii) are of highest importance and are treated in this paper. The assessment documented in this paper on the one hand indicates the high potential benefit of natural analogues for a safety case in salt and on the other hand helps to focus the available human and financial resources for the safety case on the most safety-relevant aspects. (authors)

  17. Optimization method for dimensioning a geological HLW waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouvrier, N.; Chaudon, L.; Malherbe, L.

    1990-01-01

    This method was developed by the CEA to optimize the dimensions of a geological repository by taking account of technical and economic parameters. It involves optimizing radioactive waste storage conditions on the basis of economic criteria with allowance for specified thermal constraints. The results are intended to identify trends and guide the choice from among available options: simple and highly flexible models were therefore used in this study, and only nearfield thermal constraints were taken into consideration. Because of the present uncertainty on the physicochemical properties of the repository environment and on the unit cost figures, this study focused on developing a suitable method rather than on obtaining definitive results. The optimum values found for the two media investigated (granite and salt) show that it is advisable to minimize the interim storage time, implying the containers must be separated by buffer material, whereas vertical spacing may not be required after a 30-year interim storage period. Moreover, the boreholes should be as deep as possible, on a close pitch in widely spaced handling drifts. These results depend to a considerable extent on the assumption of high interim storage costs

  18. An analytical overview of the consequences of microbial activity in a Swiss HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.G.; West, J.M.; Grogan, H.A.

    1985-04-01

    Microorganisms are known to be important factors in many geochemical processes and their presence can be assured throughout the envisaged Swiss type C repository for HLW. It is likely that both introduced and resident microbes will colonise the near-field even at times when ambient temperature and radiation fields are relatively high. A simple quantitative model has been developed which indicates that microbial growth in the near-field is limited by the rate of supply of chemical energy from corrosion of the canister. Microbial processes examined include biodegradation of structural and packaging materials, alteration of groundwater chemistry (Eh, pH, organic complexant concentration) and direct nuclide uptake by microorganisms. The most important effects of such organisms are likely to be enhancement of release and mobility of key nuclides due to their complexation by microbial by-product. Resident micro-organisms in the far-field could potentially act as 9 living colloids' thus enhancing nuclide transport. In the case of flow paths through shear zones (kakirites), however, any microbes capable of penetrating the surrounding weathered rock matrix would be extensively retarded. It is concluded that microbial processes are unlikely to be of significance for HLW but will be more important for low/intermediate waste types. As data requirements are similar for all waste types, results from such studies would also resolve the main uncertainties remaining for the HLW case. Key research areas are identified as characterisation of a) nutrient availability in the near-field, b) the bioenergetics of iron corrosion, c) production of organic by-products, d) nuclide sorption by organisms and e) microbial mobility in the near-and far-field

  19. Depth optimization for the Korean HLW repository System within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Seok; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-12-01

    The present study is to evaluate the material properties of the compacted bentonite, backfill material, canister cast iron insert, and the rock mass for the Korean HLW repository system. These material properties are either measured, or taken from other countries, through the evaluation of the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior of a repository. After the evaluation of the material properties, the most appropriate and economical depth as well as the layout of a single layer repository is to be recommended. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and ground water are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  20. Use of Gap-fills in the Buffer and Backfill of an HLW Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Owan; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The buffer and backfill are significant barrier components of the repository. They play the roles of preventing the inflow of groundwater from the surrounding rock, retarding the release of radionuclides from the waste, supporting disposal container against external impacts, and discharging decay heat from the waste. When the buffer and backfill are installed for the HLW repository, there may be gaps between the container and buffer and between the backfill and the wall of disposal tunnels, respectively. These gaps occur because spaces are allowed for ease of the installation of the buffer and backfill in excavated deposition boreholes and disposal tunnels. If the gaps are left without any sealing as they are, however, the buffer and backfill can't accomplish their functions as the barrier components. This paper reviews the gap-fill concepts of the developed foreign countries, and then suggests a gap-fill concept which is applicable for the KRS. The gap-fill is suggested to employ bentonite- based materials with a type of pellet, granule, and pellet-granule mixture. The roller compression method and extrusion-cutting method are applicable for the fabrication of the bentonite pellets which can have the high density and the required amount for use to the buffer and backfill. For the installation of the gap-fill, the pouring and then pressing method and the shotcrete- blowing method are preferable for the gap of the deposition borehole and the gap of the disposal tunnel, respectively.

  1. The interpretation of remote sensing image on the stability of fault zone at HLW repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Linqing; Yu Yunxiang

    1994-01-01

    It is attempted to interpret the buried fault at the preselected HLW repository site in western Gansu province with a remote sensing image. The authors discuss the features of neotectonism of Shule River buried fault zone and its two sides in light of the remote sensing image, geomorphology, stream pattern, type and thickness difference of Quaternary sediments, and structural basin, etc.. The stability of Shule River fault zone is mainly dominated by the neotectonic movement pattern and strength of its two sides. Although there exist normal and differential vertical movements along it, their strengths are small. Therefore, this is a weakly-active passive fault zone. The east Beishan area north to Shule River fault zone is weakliest active and is considered as the target for further pre-selection for HLW repository site

  2. Safety analysis of a sub-seabed repository of HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpf, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    This national safety study of a repository in the Atlantic Ocean uses as much input from German research work as possible. It is based on a computer code IMPONADOR which can be run on a personal computer. It also introduces a new way of presenting information about radionuclide confinement to individual compartments to facilitate the understanding of release processes. The work is part of the international cooperation within the Seabed Working Group of the OECD/NEA

  3. Groundwater impacts of foreseeable human activities on a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, N.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has begun a program of Systematic Regulatory Analysis (SRA) to help ensure that all important technical issues related to the disposal of civilian, high-level nuclear wastes will be identified prior to the receipt of a license application. Large-scale groundwater withdrawals near a repository could have significant impacts on the groundwater flow system. Future large-scale withdrawals of groundwater could occur to support irrigation to growing population centers, such as Las Vegas. Various scenarios of groundwater withdrawals, along with other scenarios of future human activity, will need to be tested before evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site is complete

  4. Thermo-mechanical analysis for multi-level HLW repository concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Ki; Choi, Jong Won

    2004-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the influence of design parameters for the underground high-level nuclear waste repository with multi-level concept. B. Necessity o In order to construct an HLW repository in deep underground, it is required to select a site, which is far from major discontinuities. To dispose the whole spent fuels generated from the Korean nuclear power plants in a repository, the underground area of about 4km 2 is required. This would be a constraints for selecting an adequate repository site. It is recommended to dispose the two different spent fuels, PWR and CANDU, in different areas at the operation efficiency point of view. It is necessary to investigate the influence of parameters, which can affect the stability of multi-level repository. It is also needed to consider the influence of heat generated from the HLW and the high in situ stress in deep location. Therefore, thermo-mechanical coupling analysis should be carried out and the results should be compared with the results from single-level repository concept. Three-dimensional analysis is required to model the disposal tunnel and deposition hole. It is recommended to use the Korean geological condition and actually measured rock properties in Korea in order to achieve reliable modeling results. A FISH routine developed for effective modeling of Thermal-Mechanical coupling was implemented in the modeling using FLAC3D, which is a commercial three-dimensional FDM code. The thermal and mechanical properties of rock and rock mass achieved from Yusung drilling site, were used for the computer modeling. Different parameters such as level distance, waste type disposed on different levels, and time interval between the operation on different levels, were considered in the three-dimensional analysis. From the analysis, it was possible to derive adequate multi-level repository concept. Results and recommendations for application From the thermal-mechanical analysis for the multi-level repository

  5. Proposals of geological sites for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Geological background. Text volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    On April 2008, the Swiss Federal Council approved the conceptual part of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories. The Plan sets out the details of the site selection procedure for geological repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). It specifies that selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages, the first one (the subject of this report) being the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in the later stages of the Sectoral Plan. The geoscientific background is based on the one hand on an evaluation of the geological investigations previously carried out by Nagra on deep geological disposal of HLW and L/ILW in Switzerland (investigation programmes in the crystalline basement and Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland, investigations of L/ILW sites in the Alps, research in rock laboratories in crystalline rock and clay); on the other hand, new geoscientific studies have also been carried out in connection with the site selection process. Formulation of the siting proposals is conducted in five steps: A) In a first step, the waste inventory is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; B) The second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability, reliability of geological findings and engineering suitability; C) In the third step, the large-scale geological-tectonic situation is assessed and large-scale areas that remain under consideration are defined. For the L

  6. Sealing of rock fractures around HLW repositories, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigira, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    During the flow of a silica-saturated hydrothermal solution in rock with negative temperature gradients, the behavior of silica in such solution is controlled by temperature, temperature gradient, pH, flow velocity, and solid surface area/fluid mass ratio (A/M). Such behavior could not be analysed precisely and totally at present state, but 'threshold conditions' have been found experimentally, under which solution keeps in equilibrium with solid silica in a flow field with temperature gradients. Solution keeps in equilibrium with solid silica under the conditions of A/M ratios more than 700 m 2 /kg, temperatures 80 - 120degC, temperature gradients less than 50degC/m, and pH 6 - 9, if mean pore velocities are less than 100 m/y. Under the same A/M ratios, temperature gradients, and pH, mean pore velocities must be less than 5 m/y in order to keep solution in equilibrium with solid silica in a flow field with temperatures 80 - 25degC. These 'threshold conditions' are expected to be satisfied in a near field of a repository of high-level radioactive waste, which suggests that if a groundwater is once saturated with silica under a higher temperature in a near field it would flow with decreasing temperatures in equilibrium with solid silica. In this case, the precipitation rate of amorphous silica along the flow path can be estimated without kinetic consideration. (author) 54 refs

  7. A compartment model for nuclide release calculation in the near-and far-field of a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2004-01-01

    The HLW-relevant R and D program for disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since early 1997, from which a conceptual Korea Reference Repository System for direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel is to be introduced by the end of 2007. A preliminary reference geologic repository concept considering such established criteria and requirements as spent fuel and generic site characteristics in Korea was roughly envisaged in 2003. Not only to demonstrate how much a reference repository is safe in the generic point of view with several possible scenarios and cases associated with a preliminary repository concept by conducting calculations for nuclide release and transport in the near - and far - field components of the repository, even though sufficient information has not been available that much yet, but also to show a appropriate methodology by which both a generic and site - specific safety assessment could be performed for further in - depth development of Korea reference repository concept, nuclide release calculation study for various nuclide release cases is mandatory. To this end a similar study done and yet limited for the near - field release case has been extended to the case including far - field system by introducing some more geosphere compartments. Advective and longitudinal dispersive nuclide transports along the fracture with matrix diffusion as well as several retention mechanisms and nuclide ingrowth has been added

  8. Setting up a safe deep repository for long-lived HLW and ILW in Russia: Current state of the works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, Yu.D.; Porsov, A.Yu.; Beigul, V.P.; Palenov, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of RW disposal in Russia in accordance with the Federal Law 'On Radioactive Waste Management and Amendments to Specific Legal Acts of the Russian Federation' No. 190-FL dated 11 July 2011, is oriented at the ultimate disposal of waste, without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. The law 190-FL has it as follows: - A radioactive waste repository is a radioactive waste storage facility intended for disposal of the radioactive wastes without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. - Disposal of solid long-lived high-level waste and solid long-lived intermediate-level waste is carried out in deep repositories for radioactive waste. - Import into the Russian Federation of radioactive waste for the purpose of its storage, processing and disposal, except for spent sealed sources of ionising radiation originating from the Russian Federation, is prohibited. For safe final disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW, it is planned to construct a deep repository for radioactive waste (DRRW) in a low-pervious monolith rock massif in the Krasnoyarsk region in the production territory of the Mining and Chemical Combine (FSUE 'Gorno-khimicheskiy kombinat'). According to the IAEA recommendations and in line with the international experience in feasibility studies for setting up of HLW and SNF underground disposal facilities, the first mandatory step is the construction of an underground research laboratory. An underground laboratory serves the following purposes: - itemised research into the characteristics of enclosing rock mass, with verification of massive material suitability for safe disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW; - research into and verification of the isolating properties of an engineering barrier system; - development of engineering solutions and transportation and process flow schemes for construction and running of a future RW ultimate isolation facility. (authors)

  9. Time evolution of dissolved oxygen and redox conditions in a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-02-01

    The evolution of oxygen in a HLW repository has been studied using presently available geochemical background information. The important processes affecting oxygen migration in the near-field include diffusion and oxidation of pyrite and dissolved Fe(II). The evaluation of time scales of oxygen decrease is carried out with 1. an analytical approach involving the coupling of diffusion and chemical reaction, 2. a numerical geochemical approach involving the application of a newly developed diffusion-extended version of the STEADYQL code. Both approaches yield consistent rates of oxygen decrease and indicate that oxidation of pyrite impurities in the clay is the dominant process. The results obtained fRom geochemical modelling are interpreted in terms of evolution of redox conditions. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of the major geochemical and physical parameters is performed. These results indicate that the uncertainties associated with reactive pyrite surface area impose the overall uncertainties of prediction of time scales. Thus, the obtained time of decrease to 1% of initial O 2 concentrations range between 7 and 290 years. The elapsed time at which the transition to anoxic conditions occurs is estimated to be within the same time range. Additional experimental information on redox sensitive impurities in the envisioned buffer and backfill material would further constrain the evaluated time scales. 41 refs

  10. Effects of a Capital Investment and a Discount Rate on the Optimal Operational Duration of an HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the effects of a capital investment and a discount rate on the optimal operational duration of an HLW repository. According to the previous researches of the KRS(Korea Reference System) for an HLW repository, the amounts of 7,068,200 C$K and 2,636.2 MEUR are necessary to construct and operate surface and underground facilities. Since these huge costs can be a burden to some national economies, a study for a cost optimization should be performed. So we aim to drive the dominant cost driver for an optimal operational duration. A longer operational duration may be needed to dispose of more spent fuels continuously from a nuclear power plant, or to attain a retrievability of an HLW repository at a depth of 500 m below the ground level in a stable plutonic rock body. In this sense, an extended operational duration for an HLW repository affects the overall disposal costs of a repository. In this paper, only the influence of a capital investment and a discount rate was estimated from the view of optimized economics. Because these effects must be significant factors to minimize the overall disposal costs based on minimizing the sum of operational costs and capital investments

  11. Geological boundary conditions for a safety demonstration and verification concept for a HLW repository in claystone in Germany. AnSichT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, Lena; Bebiolka, Anke; Gerardi, Johannes [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Underground Space for Storage and Economic Use; and others

    2015-07-01

    Within the framework of the R and D project ''AnSichT'', DBE TECHNOLOGY, BGR and GRS are developing a method to demonstrate the safety of a HLW repository in claystone in Germany. The methodological approach basing on a holistic concept, links the legal and geologic boundary conditions, the disposal and closure concept, the demonstration of barrier integrity, and the long-term analysis of the repository evolution as well. The geologic boundary conditions are specified by the description of the geological situation and generic models, the selection of representative parameters and geoscientific long-term predictions. They form a fundament for the system analysis.

  12. The development of safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Meer, K.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, research and development on geological repositories for High Level Waste (HLW) focuses on the short- and long-term safety aspects of the repository. If the repository will also be used for the disposal of spent fuel, safeguards aspects have to be taken into account. Safety and safeguards requirements may be contradictory; the safety of a geological repository is based on the non-intrusion of the geological containment, while safeguards require regular inspections of position and amount of the spent fuel. Examples to reconcile these contradictory requirements are the use of information required for the safety assessment of the geological repository for safeguards purposes and the adaptation of the safeguards approach to use non-intrusive inspection techniques. The principles of an inspection approach for a geological repository are now generally accepted within the IAEA. The practical applicability of the envisaged inspection techniques is still subject to investigation. It is specifically important for the Belgian situation that an inspection technique can be used in clay, the geological medium in which Belgium intends to dispose its HLW and spent fuel. The work reported in this chapter is the result of an international cooperation in the framework of the IAEA, in which SCK-CEN participates

  13. Concept development for HLW disposal research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queon, S. K.; Kim, K. S.; Park, J. H.; Jeo, W. J.; Han, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    In order to dispose high-level radioactive waste in a geological formation, it is necessary to assess the safety of a disposal concept by excavating a research tunnel in the same geological formation as the host rock mass. The design concept of a research tunnel depends on the actual disposal concept, repository geometry, experiments to be carried at the tunnel, and geological conditions. In this study, analysis of the characteristics of the disposal research tunnel, which is planned to be constructed at KAERI site, calculation of the influence of basting impact on neighbor facilities, and computer simuation for mechanical stability analysis using a three-dimensional code, FLAC3D, had been carried out to develop the design concept of the research tunnel

  14. Risk and uncertainty assessment for a potential HLW repository in Korea: TSPA 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.S.; Kang, C.H.

    2004-01-01

    KAERI has worked on the concept development on permanent disposal of HLW and its total system performance assessment since 1997. More than 36 000 MT of spent nuclear fuel from PWR and CANDU reactors is planned to be disposed of in crystalline bed-rocks. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) tools are under development. The KAERI FEP encyclopedia is actively developed to include all potential FEP suitable for Korean geo- and socio conditions. The FEPs are prioritized and then categorized to the intermediate level FEP groups. These groups become elements of the rock engineering system (RES) matrix. Then the sub-scenarios such as a container failure, groundwater migration, solute transport, etc are developed by connecting interactions between diagonal elements of the RES matrix. The full scenarios are developed from the combination of sub-scenarios. For each specific scenario, the assessment contexts and associated assessment method flow charts are developed. All information on these studies is recorded into the web based programme, FEAS (FEP to Assessment through Scenarios.) KAERI applies three basic programmes for the post closure radionuclide transport calculations; MASCOT-K, AMBER, and the new MDPSA under development. The MASCOT-K originally developed by Serco for a LLW repository has been extended extensively by KAERI to simulate release reactions such as congruent and gap releases in spent nuclear fuel. The new MDPSA code is dedicated for the probabilistic assessment of radio-nuclides in multi-dimensions of a fractured porous medium. To acquire input data for TSPA domestic experiment programmes as well as literature survey are performed. The data are stored in the Performance Assessment Input Data system (PAID.) To assure the transparency, traceability, retrievability, reproducibility, and review (T2R3) the web based KAERI QA system is developed. All tasks in TSPA are recorded under the concept of a 'Project' in this web system. Currently, FEAS, PAID

  15. A comparative Study between GoldSim and AMBER Based Biosphere Assessment Models for an HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the performance of a repository, the dose exposure rate to human being due to long-term nuclide releases from a high-level waste repository (HLW) should be evaluated and the results compared to the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies. To evaluate such a dose rate to an individual, biosphere assessment models have been developed and implemented for a practical calculation with the aid of such commercial tools as AMBER and GoldSim, both of which are capable of probabilistic and deterministic calculation. AMBER is a general purpose compartment modeling tool and GoldSim is another multipurpose simulation tool for dynamically modeling complex systems, supporting a higher graphical user interface than AMBER and a postprocessing feature. And also unlike AMBER, any kind of compartment scheme can be rather simply constructed with an appropriate transition rate between compartments, GoldSim is designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules to address any specialized programs, similar to solving jig saw puzzles. During the last couple of years a compartment modeling approach for a biosphere has been mainly carried out with AMBER in KAERI in order to conservatively or rather roughly provide dose conversion factors to get the final exposure rate due to a nuclide flux into biosphere over various geosphere-biosphere interfaces (GBIs) calculated through nuclide transport modules. This caused a necessity for a newly devised biosphere model that could be coupled to a nuclide transport model with less conservatism in the frame of the development of a total system performance assessment modeling tool, which could be successfully done with the aid of GoldSim. Therefore, through the current study, some comparison results of the AMBER and the GoldSim approaches for the same case of a biosphere modeling without any consideration of geosphere transport are introduced by extending a previous study

  16. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of crushed COx argillite used as backfilling material in HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chaosheng; Shi Bin; Cui Yujun; Anh-Minh Tang

    2010-01-01

    At present, the crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite powder is proposed as an alternative backfilling material in France, which will be constructed in the engineering barrier of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this investigation, the compression behavior of two crushed COx argillite powders (coarser one and finer one) was studied by running l-D compression tests with several loading-unloading cycles. After the final dry density 2.0 g/cm 3 was reached, the specimen was flooding with distilled water and the evolution of axial stress was studied during saturation process. The effects of initial axial stress level and grain size distribution (GSD) on hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted specimen were analyzed. The results show that the compression curves are significantly influenced by the GSD of the soils. To obtain the same degree of compaction, the axial stress applied to finer soil is much higher than that of coarser soil. In addition, the compression index of the finer soil is bigger than that of coarser soil. The swelling index at initial water content increases with the dry density and seems to be independent of the GSD. During saturation, the initial lower axial stress causes obvious swelling behavior for both the coarser and finer powder samples and the corresponding axial stress increase gradually. At initial higher axial stress condition, monotone collapse behavior is observed for the coarser powder samples. Whereas the axial stress decrease firstly, then increase and finally decrease again for the finer powder samples. After saturation, the equilibrium axial stresses of finer powder samples are higher than that of coarser powder samples. (authors)

  17. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. I. Laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2013-06-15

    All over the world, clay formations are being investigated as host medium for geologic disposal of radioactive waste because of their favourable properties, such as very low hydraulic conductivity against fluid transport, good sorption capacity for retardation of radionuclides, and high potential of self-sealing of fractures. The construction of a repository, the disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the backfilling and sealing of the remaining voids, however, will inevitably induce mechanical (M), hydraulic (H), thermal (T) and chemical (C) disturbances to the host formation and the engineered barrier system (EBS) over very long periods of time during the operation and post-closure phases of the repository. The responses and resulting property changes of the clay host rock and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repository.

  18. Proposal for geological site selection for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Statement of requirements, procedure and results. Technical report 08-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Important steps in the process of managing radioactive wastes have already been implemented in Switzerland. These include the handing and packaging of the waste, waste characterisation and documentation of waste inventories and interim storage along with associated transport. In terms of preparing for deep geological disposal, the necessary scientific and technical work is well advanced and the feasibility of constructing geological repositories that provide the required long-term safety has been successfully demonstrated for all waste types arising in Switzerland. Sufficient knowledge is available to allow the next steps in the selection of repository sites to be defined. The legal framework is also in place and organisational measures have been provided that will allow the tasks to be performed in the coming years to be implemented efficiently. The selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages. Stage 1 ends with the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in stages 2 and 3. This report documents and justifies the siting proposals prepared by Nagra for the repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). Formulation of these proposals is conducted in five steps: 1) The waste inventory, which includes reserves for future developments, is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; 2) Based on this waste allocation, the second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability

  19. Operational safety and radiation protection considerations in designing an HLW repository in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbert, W.; Kreienmeyer, M.; Poehler, M.; Niehues, N.

    2008-01-01

    In Germany the reference concept for disposal of heat generating radioactive waste considers emplacing canisters with vitrified waste in deep vertical boreholes drilled from the drifts of a repository mine in salt at a depth of 870 m. Spent fuel is to be disposed of in self-shielding POLLUX casks in horizontal drifts. An optimized disposal concept anticipates emplacing unshielded canisters with vitrified HLW and canisters containing the fuel rods of 3 PWR or 9 BWR fuel assemblies in boreholes with a diameter of 60 cm and a depth of up to 300 m.. In all cases the void space between POLLUX cask and drifts and canisters and borehole wall will be backfilled with crushed salt. (1) Operational Safety: Based on a detailed description of all underground disposal operation steps, the possible impacts on the disposal operations were analysed and the need for further studies determined. The disposal operation steps comprise e.g. rail bound transport from the shaft to the emplacement drift and emplacement process itself. As possible impacts the following occurrences were considered: ventilation failure, power supply failure, rock mechanics impact including cross-section convergence, irregular floor uplift and rock fall, brine and natural gas intrusion, derailing of transport carts and finally internal fire. (2) Radiation Protection: According to the German Atomic Energy Act (AtG), the design, construction and operation of a nuclear site like a final repository has to be licensed by the responsible authority. The Radiological Protection Ordinance and further guidelines i.e. concerning the emission and immission of released radioactive nuclides or the risk analysis of possible failure, build the basis for the licensing procedures. To ensure adequate protection against undue radiation exposure the repository is divided into different radiological protection areas. Generally, the handling of shielded waste packages above und under ground (including all the pathway of transport and

  20. Suggestions on selection of clay site as a key alternative of underground repository for HLW geological disposal in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing; Fu Bingjun; Fan Xianhua; Chen Shi; Sun Donghui

    2006-01-01

    Site selection for the underground repository is a vital problem with respect to the HLW geological disposal. Over the past decades, we have been focusing our attention on granite as a priority in China. However, there are some problems have to be discussed on this matter. In this paper, both experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community regarding the site selection are described. And then, after analyzing a lot of some key factors affecting the site selection, some comments and suggestions on selection of clay site as a key alternative before final decision making in China are presented. (authors)

  1. Construction of Basic Evaluation Criteria for Candidate HLW Repository Sites (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Yong Kwon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Geon Young; Park, Kyung Woo; Ji, Sung Hoon; Ryu, Ji Hun

    2009-08-01

    We constructed the preliminary site assessment system for selection of proper site as high level radioactive disposal repository with consideration of Korean geological characteristics and underground environments. And, site assessment factor and standard as a point of geologic aspect were suggested for decision of candidate radioactive disposal site in Korea. The results can be used to develop the geological information system for assessment of candidate disposal site

  2. Microcrack growing and long-term mechanical stability in a HLW deep-borehole repository in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Hahne, K.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term host rock integrity assessment of a deep borehole emplacement for HLW in granite has been addressed with a detailed new constitutive model considering temperature and pressure effects on microscale phenomena (as microcracking) under repository conditions. The results of these finite element calculations have been compared with results obtained using conventional, state-of-the-art constitutive modelling. While the results of conventional modelling did suggest the existence of an important safety margin before failure, the improved calculations with the new model predict a thin but very long region of degradated host rock along the waste canister column. The results obtained up to now may well be considered as safety relevant, because they suggest that the actual long-term granite strength lies well below the conventionally determined failure limits, thus challenging the barrier properties of this host rock if the actual strength is not properly considered in the repository design

  3. A methodology of uncertainty/sensitivity analysis for PA of HLW repository learned from 1996 WIPP performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Kim, S. K.; Hwang, Y. S.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    The WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) is a mined repository constructed by the US DOE for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by activities related to defence of the US since 1970. Its historical disposal operation began in March 1999 following receipt of a final permit from the State of NM after a positive certification decision for the WIPP was issued by the EPA in 1998, as the first licensed facility in the US for the deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The CCA (Compliance Certification Application) for the WIPP that the DOE submitted to the EPA in 1966 was supported by an extensive Performance Assessment (PA) carried out by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with so-called 1996 PA. Even though such PA methodologies could be greatly different from the way we consider for HLW disposal in Korea largely due to quite different geologic formations in which repository are likely to be located, a review on lots of works done through the WIPP PA studies could be the most important lessons that we can learn from in view of current situation in Korea where an initial phase of conceptual studies on HLW disposal has been just started. The objective of this work is an overview of the methodology used in the recent WIPP PA to support the US DOE WIPP CCA ans a proposal for Korean case

  4. Nuclide Release Behavior from a Repository for a Pyro-process HLW and SF due to Variation of the MWCF Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    An assessment program for an optional evaluation of a repository both for disposal of such high-level wastes (HLWs) from various steps of pyro-processes of PWR spent nuclear fuel (SF) and for direct disposal of PWR and CANDU SFs has been developed by utilizing general purpose GoldSim developing tool, by which nuclide transports in the near- and far-field of a repository as well as a transport through a biosphere under various natural and manmade disruptive events affecting a nuclide release could be modeled and evaluated. KAERI has been in charge of modeling and developing assessment tools by which the above mentioned repository system could be assessed in accordance with various features, events, and processes (FEPs) that could happen in and around the repository system. To cope with such various natural and manmade disruptive FEPs as well as normal release scenarios, all the possible cases in view of the Korean circumstances should be modeled and have been evaluated even though we have not yet have any repository. A possible case, among many others, with the variation of such physical properties as the fracture width and the rock matrix diffusion depth, associated with the natural fractures in the geological rock media, along which nuclide could be transported preferentially with the flow of groundwater is considered in the current study. Due to whatever the reason, such as e,g., the earthquake or human intrusion, it is assumed that the physical properties of the major water conducting fault (MWCF) is changed resulting in the size of fracture width and the matrix diffusion depth. For such case another illustration is made for probabilistic evaluation of a hypothetical Korean HLW repository, as similarly done in the previous studies

  5. Design options for HLW repository operation technology. (4) Shotclay technique for seamless construction of EBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ichizo; Fujisawa, Soh; Nakajima, Makoto; Toida, Masaru; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Asano, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    The shotclay method is construction method of the high density bentonite engineered barrier by spraying method. Using this method, the dry density of 1.6 Mg/m 3 , which was considered impossible with the spray method, is achieved. In this study, the applicability of the shotclay method to HLW bentonite-engineered barriers was confirmed experimentally. In the tests, an actual scale vertical-type HLW bentonite-engineered barrier was constructed. This was a bentonite-engineered barrier with a diameter of 2.22 m and a height of 3.13 m. The material used was bentonite with 30% silica sand, and water content was adjusted by mixing chilled bentonite with powdered ice before thawing. Work progress was 11.2 m 3 and the weight was 21.7 Mg. The dry density of the entire buffer was 1.62 Mg/m 3 , and construction time was approximately 8 hours per unit. After the formworks were removed, the core and block of the actual scale HLW bentonite-engineered barrier were sampled to confirm homogeneity. As a result, homogeneity was confirmed, and no gaps were observed between the formwork and the buffer material and between the simulated waste and the buffer material. The applicability to HLW of the shotclay method has been confirmed through this examination. (author)

  6. A comparison of risks due to HLW and SURF repositories in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.Y.; Ortiz, N.R.; Wahi, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology was developed to analyze risks from geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. It was applied to estimate the risk due to spent fuel and high-level waste hypothetical repositories in bedded salt. A number of disruptive scenarios were analyzed for each waste type. A comparison between the spent fuel and high-level waste results is presented. The methodology enables one to identify important radionuclides, parameters, and scenarios in terms of their relative contribution to the overall risk or compliance with the proposed EPA Standard

  7. JSS project phase 4: Experimental and modelling studies of HLW glass dissolution in repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    A goal of the JSS project was to develop a scientific basis for understanding the effects of waste package components, groundwater chemistry, and other repository conditions on glass dissolution behaviour, and to develop and refine a model for the processes governing glass dissolution. The fourth phase of the project, which was performed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, FRG, dealt specifically with model development and application. Phase 4 also adressed whether basaltic glasses could serve as natural analogues for nuclear waste glasses, thus providing a means to test the capability of the model for long-term predictions. Additional experiments were performed in order to complete the data base necessary to model interactions between the glass and bentonite and between glass and steel corrosion products. More data on temperature, S/V, and pH dependence of the glass/water reaction were also collected. In this report, the data acquired during phase 4 are presented and discussed. (orig./DG)

  8. The safety case for a HLW repository in Opalinus clay: aims, methodology, first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuidema, Piet

    2002-01-01

    Piet Zuidema (Nagra, Switzerland) described the development of the safety case for a high level waste repository in Opalinus clay in which canisters would be placed in large vaults. The current phase of work was concerned with demonstrating the feasibility of the disposal concept. The Safety Case is taken to mean a set of arguments to support a statement that the proposed facility will meet relevant safety criteria and will include arguments giving the basis for confidence that those arguments are correct and properly taking account of uncertainties. The safety strategy was concerned both with the inherent robustness of the disposal concept and the adequacy of the assessment capability. As regards the former, the arguments being advanced were primarily qualitative. Key issues in terms of the documentation of the Safety Case were traceability and transparency of information, including how to ensure that key arguments did not become obscured because of the need to make available very large quantities of information

  9. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T

    2003-01-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the

  10. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-01-01

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the

  11. Reduction of HLW repository environmental impact by Na-Cooled FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joonhong; Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    The present study proposes the total toxicity index of radionuclides that have accumulated in the region exterior to the repository as the environmental impact measure. The measure is quantitatively evaluated by a radionuclide transport models that incorporate the effects of canister-array configuration and the initial mass loading in the waste canister. With the measure, it is demonstrated that the environmental impact of the repository can be effectively reduced by reduction of the initial mass loading resulting from FBR deployment and change in the canister-array configuration in the repository. The rate of increase in the environmental impact with the increase in the repository size can be reduced by reducing the initial mass loading of Np and its precursors. (author)

  12. Evaluation of engineering aspects of backfill placement for high level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Kleppe, J.; Gonano, L.

    1984-04-01

    This report includes the identification and subjective evaluation of alternative schemes for backfilling around waste packages and within emplacement rooms. The aspects of backfilling specifically considered in this study include construction and testing; costs have not been considered. However, because construction and testing are simply implementation and verification of design, a design basis for backfill is required. A generic basis has been developed for this study by first identifying qualitative performance objectives for backfill and then weighting each with respect to its potential influence on achieving the repository system performance objectives. Alternative backfill materials and additives have been identified and evaluated with respect to the perceived extent to which each combination can be expected to achieve the backfill design basis. Several distinctly different combinations of materials and additives which are perceived to have the highest potential for achieving the backfill design basis have been selected for further study. These combinations include zeolite/clinoptilolite, bentonite, muck, and muck mixed with bentonite. Feasible alternative construction and testing procedures for each selected combination have been discussed. Recommendations have been made regarding appropriate backfill schemes for hard rock (i.e., basalt at Hanford, Washington, tuff at Nevada Test Site, and generic granite) and salt (i.e., domal salt on the Gulf Coast and generic bedded salt). 27 references, 8 figures, 31 tables

  13. Dating of ground water: an evaluation of its use in the assessment of HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.N.; Bentley, H.W.; Zito, R.

    1984-01-01

    Dating of ground water is potentially useful in the evaluation of the hydrogeologic hazards associated with proposed repositories for high-level radioactive waste in the following ways: (1) identification of areas of static ground water where regional migration of radionuclides should be minimal; (2) help with the calibration of numerical transport models; (3) estimation of water velocities; (4) help with the prediction of future natural changes in the chemistry of ground water; and (5) help with the interpretation of the Pleistocene history of a region which will have a bearing on the development of hazards not related directly to ground water. Methods judged to be most useful for dating water are hydrodynamic calculations, the use of atmospherically derived radionuclides, and the measurement of the accumulated products of the decay of certain radionuclides. Thus far, the most useful atmospherically derived radionuclide is chlorine-36 with a half-life of about 3 x 10 5 years. Iodine-129, with a half-life of 1.6 x 10 7 years, is potentially useful in dating and tracing some waters older than 5 x 10 6 years. Further study is needed, however

  14. Geochemical site-selection criteria for HLW repositories in Europe and North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randolph C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical as well as socio-economic issues associated with the selection of potential sites to host a high-level nuclear waste repository have received considerable attention in repository programs in Europe (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the U.K.) and North America (Canada and the United States). The objective of the present study is to summarize this international experience with particular emphasis on geochemical properties that factor into the adopted site-selection strategies. Results indicate that the geochemical properties of a site play a subordinate role, at best, to other geotechnical properties in the international site-selection approaches. In countries where geochemical properties are acknowledged in the site-selection approach, requirements are stated qualitatively and tend to focus on associated impacts on the stability of the engineered barrier system and on radionuclide transport. Site geochemical properties that are likely to control the long-term stability of geochemical conditions and radionuclide migration behavior are unspecified, however. This non-prescriptive approach may be reasonable for purposes of screening among potential sites, but a better understanding of site properties that are most important in controlling the long-term geochemical evolution of the site over a range of possible scenarios would enable the potential sites to be ranked in terms of their suitability to host a repository. (author)

  15. Modelling of radionuclide migration and heat transport from an High-Level-Radioactive-Waste-repository (HLW) in Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put, M.; Henrion, P.

    1992-01-01

    For the modelling of the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay formation, the analytical code MICOF has been updated with a 3-dimensional analytical solution for discrete sources. the MICOF program is used for the calculation of the release of α and β emitters from the HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES (HLW). A coherent conceptual model is developed which describes all the major physico-chemical phenomena influencing the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay. The concept of the diffusion accessible porosity is introduced and included in the MICOF code. Different types of migration experiments are described with their advantages and disadvantages. The thermal impact of the HLW disposal in the stratified Boom clay formation has been evaluated by a finite element simulation of the coupled heat and mass transport equation. The results of the simulations show that under certain conditions thermal convection cells may form, but the convective heat transfer in the clay formation is negligible. 6 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 5 appendices

  16. The long term geochemical evolution of the nearfield of the HLW repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Berner, U.; Curti, E.; Hummel, W.; Kosakowski, G.; Thoenen, T.

    2014-11-15

    The work presented in this report focuses on the spatial and temporal evolution of the near-field of the high level radioactive waste repository situated in the Opalinus Clay formation. The major components of the near-field of such a repository are spent fuel, vitrified high-level waste, canisters (assumed for the purposes of the present report to be made of carbon steel), compacted bentonite and a concrete liner. Over the one million year time period considered in safety analysis, these components will chemically interact with one another and potentially change their retention characteristics. As a starting reference point the 'initial' (unreacted) states of the Opalinus Clay, bentonite, concrete liner (mineralogies and water chemistries) and the canister are briefly described. The main processes considered to influence the evolution of the repository in time and space, and which often operate over different time scales, are: interactions of the concrete tunnel liner with compacted bentonite and Opalinus Clay, temperature gradients caused by the heat generating high level waste, mineralogical changes to the compacted bentonite through interactions with the corrosion products of the iron canisters, and finally, the dissolution of the spent fuel and vitrified high-level waste. The consequences of these processes (as a function of time) on the long term barrier performance of the near-field have been estimated, particularly with respect to radionuclide solubilities and the sorption, diffusion and swelling characteristics of the bentonite. The main conclusions drawn are as follows: The alteration depth into the bentonite due to the interaction with the concrete liner (assumed to be 15 cm thick) is likely to be much less than 13 cm over a one million year time scale, with the main reaction products being clays (illite), hydroxides, carbonates, calcium silicate hydrates, and aluminosilicates. The swelling pressure and the sorption capacity of the bentonite in

  17. The long term geochemical evolution of the nearfield of the HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Berner, U.; Curti, E.; Hummel, W.; Kosakowski, G.; Thoenen, T.

    2014-11-01

    The work presented in this report focuses on the spatial and temporal evolution of the near-field of the high level radioactive waste repository situated in the Opalinus Clay formation. The major components of the near-field of such a repository are spent fuel, vitrified high-level waste, canisters (assumed for the purposes of the present report to be made of carbon steel), compacted bentonite and a concrete liner. Over the one million year time period considered in safety analysis, these components will chemically interact with one another and potentially change their retention characteristics. As a starting reference point the 'initial' (unreacted) states of the Opalinus Clay, bentonite, concrete liner (mineralogies and water chemistries) and the canister are briefly described. The main processes considered to influence the evolution of the repository in time and space, and which often operate over different time scales, are: interactions of the concrete tunnel liner with compacted bentonite and Opalinus Clay, temperature gradients caused by the heat generating high level waste, mineralogical changes to the compacted bentonite through interactions with the corrosion products of the iron canisters, and finally, the dissolution of the spent fuel and vitrified high-level waste. The consequences of these processes (as a function of time) on the long term barrier performance of the near-field have been estimated, particularly with respect to radionuclide solubilities and the sorption, diffusion and swelling characteristics of the bentonite. The main conclusions drawn are as follows: The alteration depth into the bentonite due to the interaction with the concrete liner (assumed to be 15 cm thick) is likely to be much less than 13 cm over a one million year time scale, with the main reaction products being clays (illite), hydroxides, carbonates, calcium silicate hydrates, and aluminosilicates. The swelling pressure and the sorption capacity of the bentonite in this

  18. Preliminary on-surface experiments for backfilling a HLW repository: the ESDRED project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastiaens, W.

    2007-01-01

    ESDRED is a technological integrated project within the context of the Sixth Framework Program of EURATOM. The project aims to demonstrate the technical feasibility at an industrial scale of specific technologies related to the construction, operation and closure of a deep geological repository for spent fuel and long-lived radioactive waste. The Belgian design for high level waste disposal is based on the so-called Supercontainer concept. Within this concept, the waste is encased in a carbon steel overpack, which is consequently fitted into a 70 cm thick concrete shell, in its turn enveloped by a stainless steel liner. A Supercontainer measures about 2 m in diameter. In the design of the repository, the Supercontainers will be emplaced, one after the other, in disposal galleries. The space between the Supercontainers and the gallery lining needs to be filled up with a solid material. The most essential function of this component, referred to as backfill, is to prevent a collapse of the gallery. A secondary function is to limit the presence of free oxygen, to limit corrosion. In the ESDRED project EIG EURIDICE, together with SCK-CEN and ONDRAF/NIRAS, investigates technologies to apply the backfill. Two options to apply the backfill were investigated within the ESDRED project: fill the gap with a granular material and backfill the gap with a grout. The prime operational target will be to achieve a 100 percent filling of the gap. A wide variety of materials was tested. A number of considerations regarding long-term safety and operational feasibility impose constraints on the backfill component:it should preserve the corrosion-protective environment established by the Supercontainer; it should not act as a thermal isolator; it should not introduce organic materials that can give rise to the formation of migration-enhancing complexes between radionuclides and soluble organic compounds; it should be feasible to construct at a sufficiently high rate; the strength of the

  19. Development Of Glass Matrices For HLW Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc 99 , Cs 137 , and I 129 . Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  1. Coupling diffusion and high-pH precipitation/dissolution in the near field of a HLW repository in clay by means of reactive solute transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, J.; Font, I.; Yang, C.; Montenegro, L.

    2004-12-01

    The reference concept for a HLW repository in clay in Spain includes a 75 cm thick bentonite buffer which surrounds canisters. A concrete sustainment 20 cm thick is foreseen between the bentonite buffer and the clay formation. The long term geochemical evolution of the near field is affected by a high-pH hyperalkaline plume induced by concrete. Numerical models of multicomponent reactive transport have been developped in order to quantify the evolution of the system over 1 Ma. Water flow is negligible once the bentonite buffer is saturated after about 20 years. Therefore, solute transport occurs mainly by diffusion. Models account for aqueous complexation, acid-base and redox reactions, cation exchange, and mineral dissolution precipitation in the bentonite, the concrete and the clay formation. Numerical results obtained witth CORE2D indicate that the high-pH plume causes significant changes in porewater chemistry both in the bentonite buffer and the clay formation. Porosity changes caused by mineral dissolution/precipitation are extremely important. Therefore, coupled modes of diffusion and reactive transport accounting for changes in porosity caused by mineral precipitation are required in order to obtain realistic predictions.

  2. Environmental risk assessment: its contribution to criteria development for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.M.; Little, R.H.; Watkins, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Principles for radioactive waste management have been provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Safety Series No.111-F, which was published in 1995. This has been a major step forward in the process of achieving acceptance for proposals for disposal of radioactive waste, for example, for High Level Waste disposal in deep repositories. However, these principles have still to be interpreted and developed into practical radiation protection criteria. Without prejudicing final judgements on the acceptability of waste proposals, an important aspect is that practical demonstration of compliance (or the opposite) with these criteria must be possible. One of the IAEA principles requires that radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way as to provide an acceptable level of protection of the environment. There has been and continues to be considerable debate as to how to demonstrate compliance with such a principle. This paper briefly reviews the current status and considers how experience in other areas of environmental protection could contribute to criteria development for HLW disposal

  3. SOURCE TERMS FOR HLW GLASS CANISTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.S. Tang

    2000-01-01

    This calculation is prepared by the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Design Section. The objective of this calculation is to determine the source terms that include radionuclide inventory, decay heat, and radiation sources due to gamma rays and neutrons for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from the, West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford Site (HS), and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This calculation also determines the source terms of the canister containing the SRS HLW glass and immobilized plutonium. The scope of this calculation is limited to source terms for a time period out to one million years. The results of this calculation may be used to carry out performance assessment of the potential repository and to evaluate radiation environments surrounding the waste packages (WPs). This calculation was performed in accordance with the Development Plan ''Source Terms for HLW Glass Canisters'' (Ref. 7.24)

  4. Discrete and continuum approaches for the analysis of coupled thermal-mechanical processes in the near field of a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Tomoo; Nakama, Shigeo; Koyama, Tomofumi; Chijimatsu, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the numerical simulations for the analysis of coupled thermal-mechanical processes in the near field of a HLW repository using Finite Element Method (FEM) and Distinct Element Method (DEM). The FEM approach provides quantitative information of the change of stress during excavation and heating process. On the other hand, the DEM approach shows the crack propagation process at the borehole surface, and this result agrees qualitatively well with the experimental observation. By comparing these results obtained from both approaches, quantitative and qualitative insights into various aspects of the processes occurred in the near field can be obtained. (author)

  5. Remaining porosity and permeability of compacted crushed rock salt backfill in a HLW repository. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Mueller, C.; Schirmer, S.

    2015-11-15

    The safe containment of radioactive waste is to be ensured by the geotechnical barriers in combination with the containment-providing rock zone (CRZ). The latter is a key element of the recently developed concept of demonstrating the integrity of the geologic barrier (Krone et al., 2013). As stipulated in the safety requirements of the regulating body the CRZ has to have strong barrier properties, and evidence needs to be provided that it retains its integrity throughout the reference period (BMU, 2010). The underground openings excavated in the rock salt will close over time due to the creep properties of the rock salt. This process causes deformations in the surrounding rock salt, which leads to a change in stress state in the virgin rock and may impair the integrity of the containment-providing rock zone. In order to limit the effects of these processes, all underground openings will be backfilled with crushed salt. Immediately after backfilling, the crushed salt will have an initial porosity of approx. 35%, which - over time - will be reduced to very low values due to the creep properties of the rock salt. The supporting pressure that builds up in the crushed salt with increasing compaction slows down the creeping of the salt. Major influencing factors are the temperature (with higher temperatures accelerating the salt creeping) and the moisture of the salt, which - due to the related decrease in the resistance of the crushed salt - facilitates its compaction. The phenomenology of these processes and dependencies is understood to a wide extent. This project investigated the duration until compaction is completed and when and under what circumstances the crushed salt will have the sealing properties necessary to ensure safe containment. Thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes play a crucial role in determining whether solutions which might enter the mine could reach the radioactive waste. This includes changes in material behaviour due to a partial or complete

  6. Overly Honest Data Repository Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Fallaw

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After a year of development, the library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has launched a repository, called the Illinois Data Bank (https://databank.illinois.edu/, to provide Illinois researchers with a free, self-serve publishing platform that centralizes, preserves, and provides persistent and reliable access to Illinois research data. This article presents a holistic view of development by discussing our overarching technical, policy, and interface strategies. By openly presenting our design decisions, the rationales behind those decisions, and associated challenges this paper aims to contribute to the library community's work to develop repository services that meet growing data preservation and sharing needs.

  7. SIERRA Mechanics, an emerging massively parallel HPC capability, for use in coupled THMC analyses of HLW repositories in clay/shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, J.E.; Sanchez, M.; Arguello, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because, until recently, U.S. efforts had been focused on the volcanic tuff site at Yucca Mountain, radioactive waste disposal in U.S. clay/shale formations has not been considered for many years. However, advances in multi-physics computational modeling and research into clay mineralogy continue to improve the scientific basis for assessing nuclear waste repository performance in such formations. Disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in suitable clay/shale formations is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable and self-sealing, conditions are chemically reducing, and sorption tends to prevent radionuclide transport. Vertically and laterally extensive shale and clay formations exist in multiple locations in the contiguous 48 states. This paper describes an emerging massively parallel (MP) high performance computing (HPC) capability - SIERRA Mechanics - that is applicable to the simulation of coupled-physics processes occurring within a potential clay/shale repository for disposal of HLW within the U.S. The SIERRA Mechanics code development project has been underway at Sandia National Laboratories for approximately the past decade under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) program. SIERRA Mechanics was designed and developed from its inception to run on the latest and most sophisticated massively parallel computing hardware, with the capability to span the hardware range from single workstations to systems with thousands of processors. The foundation of SIERRA Mechanics is the SIERRA tool-kit, which provides finite element application-code services such as: (1) mesh and field data management, both parallel and distributed; (2) transfer operators for mapping field variables from one mechanics application to another; (3) a solution controller for code coupling; and (4) included third party libraries (e.g., solver libraries, communications

  8. Repository development status in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Beceiro, Alvaro; Zuloaga, Pablo [ENRESA (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    The paper describes the status of repository development for the different waste categories. Low and Intermediate Waste Disposal facility of El Cabril was commissioned in 1992 and is in normal operation. The major modifications and activities during the last years are the adaptation to waste streams not initially foreseen such as some decommissioning waste or waste from steel industry, and the improvement of its performance assessment, supported by a R and D and refined models. As part of this facility, a new disposal facility specifically intended for very low activity waste has been constructed and commissioned in July 2008. Its design is based on the European Directive for hazardous waste disposal. National policy for Nuclear Spent Fuel and High-Level waste is focused on the development of a centralized storage facility of the vault type, whose site location would be selected through a volunteering process. Meanwhile, with the aim of solving specific problems, three individual storage facilities are in different status at reactor sites. Research on final solution, including some repository aspects as well as separation and transmutation are being carried out in accordance to ENRESA's R and D program. ENRESA has developed conceptual designs for non site specific repositories, both in granite and clay, and has carried out their corresponding performance assessment exercises. (authors)

  9. An evaluation of environmental effects of the DOE HLW repository siting and characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winsor, M.F.; Ulland, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents highlights of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) environmental investigations in progress on the environmental effects of past and proposed activities of the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Yucca Mountain repository. The environmental investigations refer to those studies specifically related to resource evaluation, impact assessment and mitigation planning for the repository program; it is defined to exclude consideration of technical suitability determinations, socioeconomics and transportation. This paper addresses the question of what are the disturbances created by past and proposed DOE activities related to repository siting and characterization at Yucca Mountain. It discusses considerations in linking disturbance to the potential for significant adverse environmental impacts

  10. Development of methodology to construct a generic conceptual model of river-valley evolution for performance assessment of HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Makoto; Tanikawa, Shin-ichi; Yasue, Ken-ichi; Niizato, Tadafumi

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess the long-term safety of a geological disposal system for high-level radioactive waste (HLW), it is important to consider the impact of uplift and erosion, which cannot be precluded on a timescale in the order of several hundred thousand years for many locations in Japan. Geomorphic evolution, caused by uplift and erosion and coupled to climatic and sea-level changes, will impact the geological disposal system due to resulting spatial and temporal changes in the disposal environment. Degradation of HLW barrier performance will be particularly significant when the remnant repository structures near, and are eventually exposed at, the ground surface. In previous studies, fluvial erosion was densified as the key concern in most settings in Japan. Interpretation of the impact of the phenomena at relevant locations in Japan has led to development of a generic conceptual model which contains the features typical at middle reach of rivers. Here, therefore, we present a methodology for development of a generic conceptual model based on best current understanding of fluvial erosion in Japan, which identifies the simplifications and uncertainties involved and assesses their consequences in the context of repository performance. (author)

  11. Development of a Korean Reference disposal System(A-KRS) for the HLW from Advanced Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, J. W.; Lee, J. Y.

    2010-04-01

    A database program for analyzing the characteristics of spent fuels was developed, and A-SOURCE program for characterizing the source term of HLW from advanced fuel cycles. A new technique for developing a copper canister by introducing a cold spray technique was developed, which could reduce the amount of copper. Also, to enhance the performance of A-KRS, two kinds of properties, thermal performance and iodine adsorption, were studied successfully. A complex geological disposal system which can accommodate all the HLW (CANDU and HANARO spent fuels, HLW from pyro-processing of PWR spent fuels, decommissioning wastes) was developed, and a conceptual design was carried out. Operational safety assessment system was constructed for the long-term management of A-KRS. Three representative accidental cases were analyzed, and the probabilistic safety assessment was adopted as a methodology for the safety evaluation of A-KRS operation. A national program was proposed to support the HLW national policy on the HLW management. A roadmap for HLW management was proposed based on the optimum timing of disposal

  12. Center for Leadership Development (CLD) Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Center for Leadership Development Repository stores various data including policies, procedures, governance, guidance, security, and financial documents of the...

  13. Gas formation in ILW and HLW repositories, evaluation and modelling of the production rates and consequences on the safety of the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnus, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main gas formation mechanisms in deep radioactive waste repositories. Production rates and overall gas volumes were estimated and showed predominance of hydrogen production by anoxic corrosion and radiolysis for French wastes. Gas evolution in the near field has been modeled. First results issued from a sensitivity analysis showed desaturation of the storage cavities for a wide range of parameter values

  14. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2004-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site high level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross flow filter, produces 0.02 gpm/ft2 of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technologies, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media

  15. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2005-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces approximately 0.02 gpm/sq. ft. of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media. Personnel revised the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service

  16. Reactive transport model and apparent Kd of Ni in the near field of a HLW repository in granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuanhe; Samper, Javier; Luis Cormenzana, José; Ma, Hongyun; Montenegro, Luis; Ángel Cuñado, Miguel

    2012-12-01

    Current performance assessment models for radionuclide migration through the near field of high-level radioactive waste repositories often rely on the assumption of a constant Kd for sorption. The validity of such assumption is evaluated here with a reactive transport model for Ni2+ in the near field of a repository in granite. Model results show that Ni2+ sorbs mainly by surface complexation on weak sorption sites. The apparent Kd of Ni2+, Kda, depends on the concentration of dissolved Ni and pH and is constant only when the concentration of dissolved Ni is smaller than 10-6 mol/L. The results of the sensitivity runs show that Kda is sensitive to the water flux at the bentonite-granite interface, the effective diffusion of the bentonite and the concentration of weak sorption sites of the bentonite. The competition of other nuclides such as Cs+ on Ni2+ sorption is not important. Corrosion products, however, affect significantly the sorption of Ni2+ on the bentonite. The model with a constant Kd does not reproduce the release rates of Ni2+ from the bentonite into the granite. A model with a variable Kd which depends on the concentration of dissolved Ni2+ and pH may provide an acceptable surrogate of the multicomponent reactive transport model for the conditions of the repository considered in our model. Simulations using the Kd-approach were performed with GoldSim based on the interpolation in the pH and concentration table, while the reactive transport model simulations were performed with CORE2D which incorporates multisite surface complexation.

  17. The surface mock-up KENTEX: on the thermal-hydro-mechanical behaviors in the buffer of a Korean HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Owan; Cho, Won Jin; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    The concept for a disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) in Korea is based upon a multi barrier system composed of engineered barriers and its surrounding plutonic rock (Kang et. al., 2002). A repository is constructed in a bedrock of several hundred meters in depth below the ground surface. The engineered barrier system (EBS), which is similar to the configuration considered by many other countries, consists of the HLW-encapsulating disposal container, the buffer between the container and the wall of a borehole, and the backfill in the inside space of the emplacement room, to isolate the HLW from the surrounding rock masses. The engineering performance of a HLW repository is dependent, to a large extent, upon the thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) behaviors in the buffer which are complicated by the processes such as the decay heat generated from the HLW, the ground water flowing in from the surrounding host rock, and the swelling pressure exerted by compacted bentonite. For this reason, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), to investigate the THM behaviors in the buffer of the Korean reference disposal system (KRS), planned large-scale tests to be conducted in two stages: a surface mock-up and then a full-scale 'in situ' test. This paper deals with the surface mock-up called as 'KENTEX' and presents the THM behaviors in the buffer which have been investigated from the KENTEX test. The KENTEX is a third scale of the KRS. It consists of five major components: a heating system, a confining cylinder, a hydration tank, bentonite blocks, and sensors and instruments. The heating system measures 0.41 m in diameter and 0.68 m in length, which includes three heating elements in its inside, capable of supplying a thermal power of 1 kW each. The confining cylinder, which plays a role of the wall of a borehole excavated in the host rock, is a steel body with a length of 1.36 m and an inner diameter of 0.75 m, the inside wall of which is lined with layers of geotextile

  18. Identification and applicability of analogues for a safety case for a HLW repository in evaporites: results from a NEA workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseck, U.; Wolf, J. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Brunswick (Germany); Steininger, W. [Project Management Agency Karslruhe Water Technology and Waste Management, PTKA-WTE, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, KIT, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Miller, B. [AMEC, The Renaissance Center, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    A workshop was held in September 2012 in Braunschweig, Germany, to discuss the potential for natural and anthropogenic analogue studies to contribute to safety cases for radioactive waste repositories constructed in salt formations. Presentations were given on many analogue sites and systems from different countries. Discussions at the workshop then addressed the following aspects that are particularly relevant to the safety concept for radioactive waste disposal in salt: (1) the long-term integrity of rock salt formations, (2) the integrity of technical barriers, and (3) microbial, chemical and transport processes. A diverse range of natural systems were discussed as potential analogues for the integrity of rock salt. These included the deformation of anhydrite layers in rock salt; the response of rock salt to mechanical and thermal loads; and the isotopic signatures of syngenetic waters contained in fluid inclusions. Some anthropogenic examples drawn from the oil and gas industries, and from hazardous waste disposal, were proposed as analogues for the integrity of (geo)technical barriers. A broad range of studies on natural and anthropogenic salt-brine systems were identified as potential analogues for the radionuclide sorption and (co)precipitation process that may take place in the repository near and far fields, as well as for understanding the significance of hydrocarbons and microbial processes. It was evident from discussions at the workshop that there are some specific technical issues that may benefit from further analogue study, particularly the compaction of crushed salt backfill, the viability of microbes in the near-field, the stability of plugs and seals, the deformation of anhydrite, and isotope signatures in fluid inclusions. (authors)

  19. EBS modelling for the development of repository concepts tailored to siting environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, K.; Ueda, H.; Wakasugi, K.; Sakabe, Y.; Kitayama, K.; Umeki, H.; Takase, H.

    2007-01-01

    The Japanese siting approach for a HLW repository calls for volunteer host municipalities and thereby places particular emphasis on design flexibility. In particular, the repository concept needs to be tailored to the specific site characteristics. Starting from the H12 repository concept, NUMO has been examining a range of possible repository design options, including the EBS. In this paper. the requirements and strategy for the development of models for performance assessment and process understanding are discussed, taking into account the step-wise, iterative process of developing repository concepts. The areas requiring further development of models and databases in the long-term R and D programme have been identified as a 'wish list' that relates to the evaluation of a range of potential repository concepts, focusing on the near-field for the early stages of the development process. Among the issues on the list, NUMO has started the development of a flexible computer code for modelling three-dimensional mass transport to evaluate the impacts of various design options and components of the EBS. This tool has been applied to the analysis of the barrier effects of the tunnel plugs located in fractured rock. (authors)

  20. Modelling Spent Fuel and HLW Behaviour in Repository Conditions. A review of the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Esparza, A.; Esteban, J. A.; Quinones, J.; Pablo, J. de; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Clarens, F.; Rovira, M.; Merino, J.; Cera, E.; Bruno, J.; Ripoll, S.

    2002-01-01

    The SFS (Spent Fuel Stability) project that is being carried out as part of the European Union's 5th Framework Programme has a dual objective, technical and sociologic. The technical objectives consists of developing a model of the behaviour of irradiated fuel and of the radionuclides contained therein, under the conditions of a deep geological disposal facility, incorporating the experimental part of this and previous. European projects. The sociological objectives is to develop a common scientific and technical opinion throughout the European Union, for consensus to be reached regarding the evolution of a deep geological disposal facility for high level wastes. With a view to achieving this dual objective, and as a project activity, a Seminar was organised in Avila in June 2002 (the presentations made of this Seminar will be the subject of another publication), the aim being to establish the bases for a new spent fuel behaviour model with and ample experimental basis and the consensus of the European countries participating in the project (France, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, Belgium and Spain. (Author)

  1. Evaluation of alternative shaft-sinking techniques for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories. Final report (Task 3), June 1981-July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonano, L.; Findley, D.; Wildanger, W.; Gates, R.; Phillips, S.

    1983-03-01

    This report represents the results of Task 3 of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Contract, Technical Assistance for Repository Design. The purpose of the complete project is to provide NRC with technical assistance for the following reasons: To enable the focused, adequate review by NRC of aspects related to design and construction of an in situ test facility and final geologic repository, as presented in US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Characterization Reports (SRC), To ascertain that the DOE site characterization program will provide, as far as possible, all the information necessary to permit a review to be conducted by NRC of a license application for construction authorization. It is assumed that the Site Characterization Report and License Application will describe the exploratory shaft and concept designs for the repository shafts. This report provides a comparative evaluation of various shaft sinking techniques for production shafts for a repository. The primary comparative evaluation has been conducted for 14-ft internal diameter shafts developed in two composite media using four different methods of sinking/lining. The technical, cost and schedule comparisons draw a major distinction between shafts sunk blind and those which utilize bottom access. Based on the system of ranking introduced to grade the significant attributes of each method and the resulting design, it is concluded that for application to repository access, no one particular method of sinking exhibits a clear overall superiority. When a specific site is made available for a study of the most suitable shaft sinking methods, it will be necessary to establish actual geological conditions and technological capabilities and the comparisons presented herein reviewed accordingly

  2. In-situ test programs related to design and construction of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories. Final report (Task 2), June 1981-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Bauhof, F.; Gonano, L.

    1983-03-01

    The media and sites considered include (1) basalt at Hanford, Washington; (2) tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site; (3) domal salt at specific Gulf Coast sites; (4) bedded salt at an unspecified site; and (5) granite at an unspecified site. A licensing perspective is outlined and a defensible rationale developed and utilized for the test selection process. This rationale essentially consists of: establishing the information needs for construction authorization; assessing the relevant capabilities of available tests; and matching the capabilities of specific tests to the perceived information needs. The information needs at any time consist of the additional information (if any) needed in order to predict satisfactory repository system performance with the required level of confidence, and thus are a function of: the significance of the repository engineered components and site characteristics to system performance; the currently available information, which may be supplemented with time; and the acceptable level of confidence in satisfactory performance for each licensing step. Determination of the acceptable levels of confidence and the significance of repository system components is outside the scope of this report. Suitable assumptions have thus been made regarding the development of information needs for construction authorization by the time of initial site submittals. Tests which are available and respond to the perceived media/site specific information needs, either by simulation or assessment of site characteristics, are identified and their capabilities assessed. Specific in situ tests are investigated and described in detail. Research and development which might be effective in improving test capabilities have been recommended

  3. Development of a computer tool to support scenario analysis for safety assessment of HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hitoshi; Kawamura, Makoto; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Okubo, Hiroo; Takase, Hiroyasu

    2007-02-01

    In 'H12 Project to Establishing Technical Basis for HLW Disposal in Japan' a systematic approach that was based on an international consensus was adopted to develop scenarios to be considered in performance assessment. Adequacy of the approach was, in general term, appreciated through the domestic and international peer review. However it was also suggested that there were issues related to improving transparency and traceability of the procedure. To achieve this, improvement of scenario analysis method has been studied. In this study, based on an improvement method for treatment of FEP interaction a computer tool to support scenario analysis by specialists of performance assessment has been developed. Anticipated effects of this tool are to improve efficiency of complex and time consuming scenario analysis work and to reduce possibility of human errors in this work. This tool also enables to describe interactions among a vast number of FEPs and the related information as interaction matrix, and analysis those interactions from a variety of perspectives. (author)

  4. The status of radioactive waste repository development in the United States - December 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of affairs concerning development in the United States of a permanent repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is, in a word, uncertain. The President of the United States has asserted that he believes licensing and development of the Yucca Mountain repository should be abandoned, while other important parties believe licensing and development should continue. And not surprisingly, there is a disagreement as to what the law requires and whether the licensing process for the Yucca Mountain repository can be terminated at this point, even if the President would like for that to happen. The future of Yucca Mountain, and the future of radioactive waste disposal in the United States generally, currently are pending before the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and eventually the Supreme Court of the United States may decide some of the important legal issues concerning Yucca Mountain's future. The November 2012 US elections also likely will have a significant impact on future radioactive waste repository development

  5. The development of basic glass formulations for solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yaozhong; Tang Baolong; Zhang Baoshan; Zhou Hui

    1995-01-01

    Basic glass formulations 90U/19, 90U/20, 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 applied in electric melting process are developed by using the mathematical model of the viscosity and electric resistance of waste glass. The yellow phase does not occur for basic glass formulations 90U/19 and 90U/20 solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant when the waste loading is 20%. Under the waste loading is 16%, the process and product properties of glass 90U/19 and 90U/20 come up to or surpass the properties of the same kind of foreign waste glasses, and other properties are about the same to them of foreign waste glasses. The process and product properties of basic glass formulations 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 used for the solidification of 'U replaced by Nd' liquid waste are almost similar to them of 90U/19 and 90U/20. These properties fairly meet the requirements of 'joint test' (performed at KfK-INE, Germany). Among these formulations, 90Nd/7 is applied in cold engineering scale electric melting test performed at KfK-INE in Germany. The main process properties of cold test is similar to laboratory results

  6. Licensing information needs for a high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.J.; Greeves, J.T.; Logsdon, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The information needs for licensing findings during the development of a repository for high-level waste (HLW) are described. In particular, attention is given to the information and needs to demonstrate, for construction authorization purposes: repository constructibility, waste retrievability, waste containment, and waste isolation

  7. Status of Equipment Development for a High-Level Waste Repository in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Haverkamp, B.; Filbert, W.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Graf, R.

    2009-01-01

    In Germany, a potential site for a deep geological repository mainly for heat generating high-level waste was selected back on February 22, 1977: a salt dome located near the village of Gorleben, at the shores of the Elbe River in Northern Germany. Concurrent with site exploration from the surface, and later exploration mine construction, a large-scale R and D effort was conducted to have the science and technology needed to license and later operate a repository available when needed. An important part of these efforts was the development and 1:1 scale demonstration of all technologies required to run a repository, which had not been state-of-the-art. Underground exploration of the Gorleben site has come to a moratorium due to political decisions taken by the former Federal Government formed by a coalition between the Social Democrats and the Green Party back in 2000. However, research and development in regard to emplacement techniques and equipment has continued. This paper reflects the consistent, long-term technological effort that has led to having available all advanced technologies required to run a repository for spent fuel and HLW. The paper details previous achievements and points at present optimization work. (authors)

  8. Current Status of Deep Geological Repository Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R J

    2005-01-01

    This talk provided an overview of the current status of deep-geological-repository development worldwide. Its principal observation is that a broad consensus exists internationally that deep-geological disposal is the only long-term solution for disposition of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Also, it is now clear that the institutional and political aspects are as important as the technical aspects in achieving overall progress. Different nations have taken different approaches to overall management of their highly radioactive wastes. Some have begun active programs to develop a deep repository for permanent disposal: the most active such programs are in the United States, Sweden, and Finland. Other countries (including France and Russia) are still deciding on whether to proceed quickly to develop such a repository, while still others (including the UK, China, Japan) have affirmatively decided to delay repository development for a long time, typically for a generation of two. In recent years, a major conclusion has been reached around the world that there is very high confidence that deep repositories can be built, operated, and closed safely and can meet whatever safety requirements are imposed by the regulatory agencies. This confidence, which has emerged in the last few years, is based on extensive work around the world in understanding how repositories behave, including both the engineering aspects and the natural-setting aspects, and how they interact together. The construction of repositories is now understood to be technically feasible, and no major barriers have been identified that would stand in the way of a successful project. Another major conclusion around the world is that the overall cost of a deep repository is not as high as some had predicted or feared. While the actual cost will not be known in detail until the costs are incurred, the general consensus is that the total life-cycle cost will not exceed a few percent of the value of the

  9. An assessment of the impact of the long term evolution of engineered structures on the safety-relevant functions of the bentonite buffer in a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, D.

    2014-07-01

    Bentonite is important as a near-field buffer and backfill for a spent fuel/high level waste (SF/HLW) repository in Opalinus Clay, because of swelling and low solute transport rates. These properties should be preserved in the long-term (up to a million years). A number of processes could perturb them, such as thermal gradients from the decay heat of waste packages and chemical gradients due to thermodynamically unstable materials (steel, concrete). The potential interactions of bentonite with engineered components have been assessed. They are characterized by a complex interplay between fluid transport, clay ion exchange and dissolution, secondary mineral growth, and consequent changes in physical properties (porosity, permeability, swelling pressure). The near-field evolution will be curtailed well within the timeframe of a million years by mass transport constraints (porosity decreasing to zero) or mass balance limitations (reactants completely consumed). For bentonite alteration at 100 ka limited by mass transport constraints, there will be a thin (5 cm thick; 1 vol.-% total bentonite) alteration layer around the canister, derived partly through thermal redistribution of minerals and aqueous solutes, and partly due to interaction of the steel canister with bentonite. This results in a thin zone with zero porosity and zero swelling pressure (montmorillonite totally altered) around the canister, but with an unaltered hydraulic conductivity (potential minor fracturing cancels out the effects of decreased porosity). The mineralogical composition of the thin zone consists of a layer of calcite, gypsum/anhydrite and magnetite on the canister, with montmorillonite in the altered bentonite replaced by Fe-silicates such as cronstedtite, berthierine and chlorite. Beyond this inner alteration zone is an annulus of 68 cm (92 vol.-%) of unaltered bentonite. The potential interaction of metallic engineered structures other than the canister with bentonite is relatively minor

  10. An assessment of the impact of the long term evolution of engineered structures on the safety-relevant functions of the bentonite buffer in a HLW repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.

    2014-07-15

    Bentonite is important as a near-field buffer and backfill for a spent fuel/high level waste (SF/HLW) repository in Opalinus Clay, because of swelling and low solute transport rates. These properties should be preserved in the long-term (up to a million years). A number of processes could perturb them, such as thermal gradients from the decay heat of waste packages and chemical gradients due to thermodynamically unstable materials (steel, concrete). The potential interactions of bentonite with engineered components have been assessed. They are characterized by a complex interplay between fluid transport, clay ion exchange and dissolution, secondary mineral growth, and consequent changes in physical properties (porosity, permeability, swelling pressure). The near-field evolution will be curtailed well within the timeframe of a million years by mass transport constraints (porosity decreasing to zero) or mass balance limitations (reactants completely consumed). For bentonite alteration at 100 ka limited by mass transport constraints, there will be a thin (5 cm thick; 1 vol.-% total bentonite) alteration layer around the canister, derived partly through thermal redistribution of minerals and aqueous solutes, and partly due to interaction of the steel canister with bentonite. This results in a thin zone with zero porosity and zero swelling pressure (montmorillonite totally altered) around the canister, but with an unaltered hydraulic conductivity (potential minor fracturing cancels out the effects of decreased porosity). The mineralogical composition of the thin zone consists of a layer of calcite, gypsum/anhydrite and magnetite on the canister, with montmorillonite in the altered bentonite replaced by Fe-silicates such as cronstedtite, berthierine and chlorite. Beyond this inner alteration zone is an annulus of 68 cm (92 vol.-%) of unaltered bentonite. The potential interaction of metallic engineered structures other than the canister with bentonite is relatively minor

  11. Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A. A.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao; Kot, Wing K.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency

  12. Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency.

  13. Geologic environments for nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleologos Evan K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-level radioactive waste (HLW results from spent reactor fuel and reprocessed nuclear material. Since 1957 the scientific consensus is that deep geologic disposal constitutes the safest means for isolating HLW for long timescales. Nuclear power is becoming significant for the Arab Gulf countries as a way to diversify energy sources and drive economic developments. Hence, it is of interest to the UAE to examine the geologic environments currently considered internationally to guide site selection. Sweden and Finland are proceeding with deep underground repositories mined in bedrock at depths of 500m, and 400m, respectively. Equally, Canada’s proposals are deep burial in the plutonic rock masses of the Canadian Shield. Denmark and Switzerland are considering disposal of their relative small quantities of HLW into crystalline basement rocks through boreholes at depths of 5,000m. In USA, the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada lies at a depth of 300m in unsaturated layers of welded volcanic tuffs. Disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, as well as the German HLW repository favour structurally-sound layered salt stata and domes. Our article provides a comprehensive review of the current concepts regarding HLW disposal together with some preliminary analysis of potentially appropriate geologic environments in the UAE.

  14. A Safety Case Approach for Deep Geologic Disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in Bedded Salt - 13350

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Leigh, Christi D. [Defense Waste Management Programs Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hansen, Frank D. [Geoscience Research and Applications Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and utility of developing a defensible safety case for disposal of United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) high-level waste (HLW) and DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a conceptual deep geologic repository that is assumed to be located in a bedded salt formation of the Delaware Basin [1]. A safety case is a formal compilation of evidence, analyses, and arguments that substantiate and demonstrate the safety of a proposed or conceptual repository. We conclude that a strong initial safety case for potential licensing can be readily compiled by capitalizing on the extensive technical basis that exists from prior work on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), other U.S. repository development programs, and the work published through international efforts in salt repository programs such as in Germany. The potential benefits of developing a safety case include leveraging previous investments in WIPP to reduce future new repository costs, enhancing the ability to effectively plan for a repository and its licensing, and possibly expediting a schedule for a repository. A safety case will provide the necessary structure for organizing and synthesizing existing salt repository science and identifying any issues and gaps pertaining to safe disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in bedded salt. The safety case synthesis will help DOE to plan its future R and D activities for investigating salt disposal using a risk-informed approach that prioritizes test activities that include laboratory, field, and underground investigations. It should be emphasized that the DOE has not made any decisions regarding the disposition of DOE HLW and DOE SNF. Furthermore, the safety case discussed herein is not intended to either site a repository in the Delaware Basin or preclude siting in other media at other locations. Rather, this study simply presents an approach for accelerated development of a safety case for a potential

  15. A Safety Case Approach for Deep Geologic Disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in Bedded Salt - 13350

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevougian, S. David; MacKinnon, Robert J.; Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Frank D.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and utility of developing a defensible safety case for disposal of United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) high-level waste (HLW) and DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a conceptual deep geologic repository that is assumed to be located in a bedded salt formation of the Delaware Basin [1]. A safety case is a formal compilation of evidence, analyses, and arguments that substantiate and demonstrate the safety of a proposed or conceptual repository. We conclude that a strong initial safety case for potential licensing can be readily compiled by capitalizing on the extensive technical basis that exists from prior work on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), other U.S. repository development programs, and the work published through international efforts in salt repository programs such as in Germany. The potential benefits of developing a safety case include leveraging previous investments in WIPP to reduce future new repository costs, enhancing the ability to effectively plan for a repository and its licensing, and possibly expediting a schedule for a repository. A safety case will provide the necessary structure for organizing and synthesizing existing salt repository science and identifying any issues and gaps pertaining to safe disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in bedded salt. The safety case synthesis will help DOE to plan its future R and D activities for investigating salt disposal using a risk-informed approach that prioritizes test activities that include laboratory, field, and underground investigations. It should be emphasized that the DOE has not made any decisions regarding the disposition of DOE HLW and DOE SNF. Furthermore, the safety case discussed herein is not intended to either site a repository in the Delaware Basin or preclude siting in other media at other locations. Rather, this study simply presents an approach for accelerated development of a safety case for a potential

  16. Glass formulation development and testing for the vitrification of DWPF HLW sludge coupled with crystalline silicotitanate (CST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Workman, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    An alternative to the In Tank Precipitation and sodium titanate processes at the Savannah River Site is the removal of cesium, strontium, and plutonium from the tank supernate by ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate (CST). This inorganic material has been shown to effectively and selectively sorb these elements from supernate. The loaded CST could then be immobilized with High-Level Waste (HLW) sludge during vitrification. Initial efforts on the development of a glass formulation for a coupled waste stream indicate that reasonable loadings of both sludge and CST can be achieved in glass

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff development of the license application review plan for a high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Holonich, J.J.; Lee, M.P.; Delligatti, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has recently started a new initiative to develop the License Application Review Plan (LARP) which the staff will use in its reviews of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) license application (LA) for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This paper describes the staff's approach for developing the LARP, the development schedule and current status, the organization and content of the LARP, and the staff's LA review strategy. Therefore, it gives a preview of the draft LARP which will be made available in late 1993. It also describes how the LARP will be used as guidance to the staff in conducting reviews of regulatory and technical issues important to the licensing of a geologic repository. Finally, the benefits to the NRC staff, DOE, and other parties are discussed

  18. Integrated safety case development for deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hideki; McKinley, Ian G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper will illustrate an 'integrated safety case', which involves combining both pre-closure and post-closure safety arguments from the point of view of a repository implementer, who must also ensure that projects are practical, acceptable and economic. The post-closure safety case is based on the performance of a number of barriers, which are established during construction, operation and closure. Such barriers must be confirmed using quality assured methods, supported, as required, by inspection and monitoring. The requirement for integrated assessment means that even the final process to end institutional control and transfer any liabilities from the implementer needs to be considered at present, even though this will undoubtedly be refined and tailored to the site characteristics over the many decades that will pass before this occurs. To illustrate the practical application of this approach, assessment of variants for remote-handled emplacement of the EBS for disposal of HLW in Japan will be discussed. (author)

  19. Deep repositories for waste central to uranium debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannegieter, T.

    1991-01-01

    While no deep repositories for high level wastes (HLW) have yet been constructed it is shown that technology to safely entomb the wastes for tens of thousands of years already exists. The borosilicate glass (vitrification) developed in France has been accepted by all countries who are reprocessing. Meanwhile, the Australian Synroc has not yet been put into service. Synroc developers at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization believe it will be the second generation waste form. The advantages and disadvantages of both technologies are briefly discussed as well as some of the regulatory, political, legal and technical conflicts surrounding the issue of HLW repositories. 1 tab., ills

  20. Towards Content Development For Institutional Digital Repository ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth in Information and Communication Technology has lead to the emergence of Institutional Digital Repository, a digital archive for the preservation and dissemination of institutional research outputs. Institutional Digital Repositories make possible global dissemination of research outputs through the use of the ...

  1. Development of the web-based site investigation flow diagram in repository development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuichi; Yoshimura, Kimitaka; Ohuchi, Jin; Tsuboya, Takao; Ando, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    In siting a repository for high level radioactive wastes (HLW), it is essential for consensus building intelligibly and visually present why and how the area is selected as a suitable site. However 'information asymmetry' exists especially between society and an implementation body because various types of investigation, analysis and assessment are implemented in site characterization on the basis of a wide variety of advanced science and technology. Communication between experts (e.g. surveyors and modelers) is also important for efficient and reliable site investigation/ characterization. The Web-based Site Investigation Flow Diagram (SIFD) has been developed as a tool for information sharing among stake holders and society-jointed decision making. To test applicability of the SIFD, virtual site characterization ('dry run') is performed using the existing site investigation data. It is concluded that the web-based SIFD enhance traceability and transparency of the site investigation/ characterization, and therefore it would be a powerful communication tool among experts for efficient and reliable site investigation/characterization and among stake holders for consensus building

  2. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. II. In-situ-investigations and interpretative modelling. May 2007 to May 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Komischke, Michael; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2014-06-15

    Deep disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in clay formations will inevitably induce thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical disturbances to the host rock and engineered barriers over very long periods of time. The responses and resulting property changes of the natural and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repositories. In accordance with the R and D programme defined by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), GRS has intensively performed site-independent research work on argillaceous rocks during the last decade. Most of the investigations have been carried out on the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite and the Opalinus clay by par-ticipation in international research projects conducted at the underground research laboratories at Bure in France (MHM-URL) and Mont-Terri in Switzerland (MT-URL). The THM-TON project, which was funded by BMWi under contract number 02E10377, in-vestigated the THM behaviours of the clay host rock and clay-based backfill/sealing materials with laboratory tests, in situ experiments and numerical modelling.

  3. Process mining software repositories: do developers work as expected?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poncin, W.; Serebrenik, A.; Brand, van den M.G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Modern software development commonly makes use of a multitude of software repositories. How can these help us to understand the on-going development process? Researchers of Eindhoven University of Technology design new methods revealing how software has been developed.

  4. Development of the SIOPE DIPG network, registry and imaging repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie E M; Baugh, Joshua; Chaney, Brooklyn

    2017-01-01

    was developed, The SIOPE DIPG Registry and Imaging Repository, to centrally collect data of DIPG patients. As for April 2016, clinical data as well as MR-scans of 694 patients have been entered into the SIOPE DIPG Registry/Imaging Repository. The median progression free survival is 6.0 months (95% Confidence...

  5. Developing criteria to establish Trusted Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the drivers, methods, and outcomes of the U.S. Geological Survey’s quest to establish criteria by which to judge its own digital preservation resources as Trusted Digital Repositories. Drivers included recent U.S. legislation focused on data and asset management conducted by federal agencies spending $100M USD or more annually on research activities. The methods entailed seeking existing evaluation criteria from national and international organizations such as International Standards Organization (ISO), U.S. Library of Congress, and Data Seal of Approval upon which to model USGS repository evaluations. Certification, complexity, cost, and usability of existing evaluation models were key considerations. The selected evaluation method was derived to allow the repository evaluation process to be transparent, understandable, and defensible; factors that are critical for judging competing, internal units. Implementing the chosen evaluation criteria involved establishing a cross-agency, multi-disciplinary team that interfaced across the organization. 

  6. Corrosion of carbon steel under anaerobic conditions in a repository for SF and HLW in Opalinus Clay. Technical report 08-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2008-10-01

    Nagra is considering carbon steel as one of the canister material options for the disposal of high level waste and spent fuel in a deep geological repository in Opalinus Clay. Following a brief period of aerobic conditions, the canister will be exposed to an anaerobic environment for much of its service life. Knowledge of the rate of anaerobic corrosion is important not only for estimating the canister lifetime but also for determining the rate of hydrogen generation. This report describes a critical review of the anaerobic corrosion behaviour of carbon steel under environmental conditions similar to those expected in the repository. The aims of the report are: 1. to recommend a (range of) long-term anaerobic corrosion rate(s) for carbon steel canisters, and 2. to justify the use of this rate in safety assessments based on a mechanistic understanding of the structure and properties of the protective corrosion product films. The review is based on selected studies from various national nuclear waste management programs, supplemented where appropriate with studies from other applications and with evidence from archaeological analogues. The corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with time because of the formation of a protective surface film. There are differences in behaviour in bulk solution and in the presence of compacted bentonite. In bulk solution, the corrosion rate decreases to an apparent steady-state rate after a period of approximately six months, with a long-term rate of the order of 0.1 μm·.yr -1 . The surface film comprises a duplex structure, with a magnetite outer layer and a spinel-type inner layer. In compacted clay systems the rate of decrease in corrosion rate is slower, with steady state not being reached after several years of exposure. There is a significant body of evidence from apparently well-conducted experiments that indicate an anaerobic corrosion rate of the order of 1-2 μm·yr -1 in systems containing compacted clay and the

  7. Thermo-hydro-mechanical characterization of the Spanish reference clay material for engineered barrier for granite and clay HLW repository: laboratory and small mock up testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    This report refers to the work carried out by Technic Geologic Division of CIEMAT (CIEMAT.DT.TG) coordinated by SCK/CEN (Belgium), participating besides UPC-DIT and University of Wales on the framework of CEC Contract F12W-CT91-0102 (DOEO). It presents the results obtained. The total results on the project will be published by CE in the EUR series. The role of CIEMAT in this project was to carry out tests in which the conditions of the clay barrier in the repository were simulated. The interaction of heat coming from the wastes and of water coming from the geological medium has been reproduced on compacted clay blocks. For the performance of tests on high density compacted clay blocks (Task 2.1) and for the cementation and chemical-mineralogical transformation studies two different cells were designed and constructed in stainless steel: a thermohydraulic cell and an alteration cell. The experiments performed in these cells have provided us with a better knowledge of the heat source, hydration system and sensors, as well as interesting data on heat and water diffusion. A revision of the experiments performed on the thermohydraulic cell was presented at the ''International Workshop on Thermomechanics of Clays and Clay Barriers'' held in Bergamo in October'93 (Villar et al. 1993)

  8. HLW immobilization in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  9. Simultaneous resolution of reactive radioactive decay, non-isothermal flow, and migration with application to the performance assessment for HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Font, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive decay is an important subject to take into account when studying the thermo-hydro-dynamic behavior of the buffer clay material used in the containment of radioactive waste. The modern concepts for the multibarrier design of a repository of high level waste in deep geologic formations consider that once canisters have failed, the buffer clay material must ensure the retention and/or delay of radionuclides within the time framework given in the assessment studies. Within the clay buffer, different chemical species are retarded/fixed according to several physicochemical processes (ion exchange, surface complexation, precipitation, matrix diffusion,..) but typical approaches do not consider the eventuality that radioactive species change their chemical nature (i.e. phase) thereby affecting their reactive behavior. The radioactive decay of an element takes place independently of the phase (aqueous, solid or gaseous) to which it belongs. This means that, in terms of radionuclide fixation, some geochemical processes will be effective scavengers (for instance mineral precipitation of crystal growth) while others will not (for instance ion exchange and/or sorption). In this contribution we present a reactive radioactive decay model of any number of chemical components including those that belong to decay series. The model, which is named FLOW-DECAY, also takes into account flow and isotopic migration and it has been applied considering a hypothetical model scenario provided by the project ENRESA 2000 and direct comparison with the results generated by the probabilistic code GoldSim. Results indicate that FLOW-DECAY may simulate the decay processes in a similar way that GoldSim, being the differences related to factors associated to code architecture. (orig.)

  10. Benefits Of Vibration Analysis For Development Of Equipment In HLW Tanks - 12341

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely

  11. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely

  12. Progress of the research and development on the geological disposal technology of HLW with aid of the industry/university collaboration system and fixed term researcher system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Fumitaka; Sonobe, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), various systems associated with the collaboration with industries and universities on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and the Postdoctoral Fellow system, etc. are enacted. These systems have been operated considering the needs of JAEA's program, industry and academia, resultantly contributed, for example, to basic research and the project development. The activities under these collaboration systems contain personal exchanges, the publication of the accomplishments and utilization of those, in research and development concerning geological disposal technology of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). These activities have progressed in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), which are the successive predecessors of JAEA, through JAEA. The accomplishments from these systems have been not only published as papers in journals and individual technical reports but also integrated into the project reports, accordingly contributed to the advancement of the national program on the geological disposal of HLW. In this report, the progress of the research and development under these systems was investigated from the beginning of the operation of the systems. The contribution to the research and development on geological disposal technology of HLW was also studied. On the basis of these studies, the future utilization of the systems of the collaboration was also discussed from the view point of the management of research and development program. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  13. Application of QA to R ampersand D support of HLW programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Quality has always been of primary importance in the research and development (R ampersand D) environment. An organization's ability to attract funds for new or continued research is largely dependent on the quality of past performance. However, with the possible exceptions of peer reviews for fund allocation and the referee process prior to publication, past quality assurance (QA) activities were primarily informal good practices. This resulted in standards of acceptable practice that varied from organization to organization. The increasing complexity of R ampersand D projects and the increasing need for project results to be upheld outside the scientific community (i.e., lawsuits and licensing hearings) are encouraging R ampersand D organizations and their clients to adopt more formalized methods for the scientific process and to increase control over support organizations (i.e., suppliers and subcontractors). This has become especially true for R ampersand D organizations involved in the high-level (HLW) projects for a number of years. The PNL began to implement QA program requirements within a few HLW repository preliminary studies in 1978. In 1985, PNL developed a comprehensive QA program for R ampersand D activities in support of two of the proposed repository projects. This QA program was developed by the PNL QA department with a significant amount of support assistance and guidance from PNL upper management, the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), and the Salt Repository Program Office (SPRO). The QA program has been revised to add a three-level feature and is currently being implemented on projects sponsored by the Office of Geologic Repositories (DOE/OGR), Repository Technology Program (DOE-CH), Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project, and other HLW projects

  14. An open repositories network development for medical teaching resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soula, Gérard; Darmoni, Stefan; Le Beux, Pierre; Renard, Jean-Marie; Dahamna, Badisse; Fieschi, Marius

    2010-01-01

    The lack of interoperability between repositories of heterogeneous and geographically widespread data is an obstacle to the diffusion, sharing and reutilization of those data. We present the development of an open repositories network taking into account both the syntactic and semantic interoperability of the different repositories and based on international standards in this field. The network is used by the medical community in France for the diffusion and sharing of digital teaching resources. The syntactic interoperability of the repositories is managed using the OAI-PMH protocol for the exchange of metadata describing the resources. Semantic interoperability is based, on one hand, on the LOM standard for the description of resources and on MESH for the indexing of the latter and, on the other hand, on semantic interoperability management designed to optimize compliance with standards and the quality of the metadata.

  15. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal

  16. Safety case development in the Japanese programme for geological disposal of HLW: Evolution in the generic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Hiroyoshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Fujihara, Hiroshi; Takeda, Seietsu

    2014-01-01

    In the Japanese programme for nuclear power generation, the safe management of the resulting radioactive waste, particularly vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from fuel reprocessing, has been a major concern and a focus of R and D since the late 70's. According to the specifications in a report issued by an advisory committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC, 1997), the Second Progress Report on R and D for the Geological Disposal of HLW (H12 report) (JNC, 2000) was published after two decades of R and D activities and showed that disposal of HLW in Japan is feasible and can be practically implemented at sites which meet certain geological stability requirements. The H12 report supported government decisions that formed the basis of the 'Act on Final Disposal of Specified Radioactive Waste' (Final Disposal Act), which came into force in 2000. The Act specifies deep geological disposal of HLW at depths greater than 300 metres, together with a stepwise site selection process in three stages. Following the Final Disposal Act, the supporting 'Basic Policy for Final Disposal' and the 'Final Disposal Plan' were authorised in the same year. (authors)

  17. Status of Progress Made Toward Safety Analysis and Technical Site Evaluations for DOE Managed HLW and SNF.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gross, Michael B [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frederick, Jennifer M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on generic deep geologic disposal systems (i.e., repositories). This report describes specific activities in FY 2016 associated with the development of a Defense Waste Repository (DWR)a for the permanent disposal of a portion of the HLW and SNF derived from national defense and research and development (R&D) activities of the DOE.

  18. Development of low alkaline cementitious grouting materials for a deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenichiro; Miura, Norihiko; Iriya, Keishiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    In order to reduce uncertainties of long-term safety assessment for a High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) repository system, low alkaline cementitious grouting materials have been studied. The pH of the leachate from the grouting material is targeted to be below 11.0, since the degradation of the bentonite buffer and host rock is limited. The current work focused on the effects of pozzolanic reactions to reduce pH and the development of low alkaline cementitious injection materials in which super-micro ordinary Portland cement (SOPC) was partially replaced by silica fume (SF), micro silica (MS) and fly ash (FA). As it is important to realize how the grouting material will respond to a high injection pressure into the fracture, and in order to understand the penetrability of different low alkaline cement mixes and to observe their flow behavior through the fracture, injection tests were conducted by using a simulated model fracture of 2 m diameter made from parallel plates of acrylic acid resin and stainless steel. Experimental results of the basic properties for selecting suitable materials and that of injecting into a simulated fracture to assess the grouting performance are described

  19. PROCESS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS M. FRANKS AND NORMAN C. HENDERSON

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), specifically the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has been charged by the U.S. Congress, through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), with the responsibility for obtaining a license to develop a geologic repository. The NRC is the licensing authority for geologic disposal, and its regulations pertinent to construction authorization and license application are specified in 10 CFR Part 60, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, (section)60.21ff and (section)60.31ff. This paper discusses the process the Yucca Mountain Site Site Characterization Project (YMP) will use to identify and apply regulatory and industry guidance to development of the license application (LA) for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This guidance will be implemented by the ''Technical Guidance Document for Preparation of the License Application'' (TGD), currently in development

  20. Process for license application development for the geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, D.M.; Henderson, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), specifically the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has been charged by the US Congress, through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), with the responsibility for obtaining a license to develop a geologic repository. The NRC is the licensing authority for geologic disposal, and its regulations pertinent to construction authorization and license application are specified in 10 CFR Part 60, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, section 60.21ff and section 60.31ff. This paper discusses the process the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) will use to identify and apply regulatory and industry guidance to development of the license application (LA) for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This guidance will be implemented by the Technical Guidance Document for Preparation of the License Application (TGD), currently in development

  1. A GoldSim Model and a Sensitivity Study for Safety Assessment of a Repository for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2008-11-01

    An assessment program for the evaluation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository has been developed by utilizing GoldSim, by which nuclide transports in the near- and far-field of a repository as well as a transport through a biosphere under various natural and manmade disruptive events affecting a nuclide release could be modeled and evaluated. To demonstrate its usability, three illustrative cases including the influence of a groundwater flow pattern through canisters associated with a flowing groundwater through fractures, and the possible disruptive events caused by an accidental human intrusion or an earthquake have been investigated and illustrated for a hypothetical Korean HLW repository

  2. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  3. The chemical stockpile intergovernmental consultation program: Lessons for HLW public involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the appropriateness of the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program's (CSDP) Intergovernmental Consultation and Coordination Boards (ICCBs) as models for incorporating public concerns in the future siting of HLW repositories by DOE. ICCB structure, function, and implementation are examined, along with other issues relevant to the HLW context. 27 refs

  4. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    The BWIP Engineered Barrier Program has been developed to provide an integrated approach to the development of site-specific Engineered Barrier assemblages for a repository located in basalt. The goal of this program is to specify engineered and natural barriers which will ensure that nuclear and non-radioactive hazardous materials emplaced in a repository in basalt do not exceed acceptable rates of release to the biosphere. A wide range of analytical and experimental activities related to the basalt repository environment, waste package environment, waste/barrier/rock interactions, and barrier performance assessment provide the basis for selection of systems capable of meeting licensing requirements. Work has concentrated on specifying and testing natural and man-made materials which can be used to plug boreholes in basalt and which can be used as multiple barriers to surround nuclear waste forms and containers. The Engineered Barriers Program is divided into two major activities: multiple barrier studies and borehole plugging. 8 figures, 4 tables

  5. Lithological suitability for HLW repository in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.S.; Bae, D.S.; Kim, K.S.; Koh, Y.K.

    2001-01-01

    Regional geologic conditions of Korea were summarized with emphasis on rock mass and fracture system as a part of the research program for high level radioactive wastes disposal. The eastern margin of the Korea-China platform has been regarded as stable crotonic nature. The Mesozoic tectonic activities followed by igneous intrusion were the most vigorous crustal movement in the entire Korean peninsula. During the Jurassic-Cretaceous orogeny (180-130 Ma Bp), igneous activity resulted in forming a large batholith of Dab granitic rock (Jurassic granite). Rejuvenized igneous activities during the Cretaceous period formed the Bulguksa granite which are associated with felsic volcanic rocks and NE-SW/NNE-SSW geologic structures. The primary host rock is considered to be Daebo granite batholiths intruded in the geologic age of late Triassic to early Jurassic (205±15 Ma). The emplacement depths are in the range of 10-20 km and the crystallization occurs under the geopressure of 3∼7 kb. (author)

  6. Performance assessment development for a LILW repository in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.

    2001-01-01

    Simultaneously with the site selection process for a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository, the preliminary assessment of the influence of the specific disposal concept on the environment and on the population was developed. The performance assessment team, organized in 1997 by ARAO, prepared several basic studies in order to clarify the objectives of the performance and safety assessment (PA/SA) procedure. In 1999 also the first performance assessment of two safety cases (surface and underground) for generic site for a LILW repository was realized. In the year 2000 activities on PA/SA analyses continued. A systematic, generic list was prepared of all possible features, events and processes (FEP list) predictable for surface or underground LILW disposal in Slovenia. Recommended and selected were the most reliable scenarios with conceptual models for LILW disposal in normal and altered evolution conditions. New verification of the obtained results was done with more powerful and accurate models for the surface repository over an aquifer of lower water permeability and an underground repository in a plastic rock. The results for both generic cases under normal evolution scenarios showed that there is a negligible dose influence on members of the critical population due to the migration of radionuclides from the foreseen LILW repository. The results of the already performed work as well as plans for the future activities are presented in the paper.(author)

  7. Terminology development towards harmonizing multiple clinical neuroimaging research repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jessica A; Pasquerello, Danielle; Turner, Matthew D; Keator, David B; Alpert, Kathryn; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Calhoun, Vince D; Potkin, Steven G; Tallis, Marcelo; Ambite, Jose Luis; Wang, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Data sharing and mediation across disparate neuroimaging repositories requires extensive effort to ensure that the different domains of data types are referred to by commonly agreed upon terms. Within the SchizConnect project, which enables querying across decentralized databases of neuroimaging, clinical, and cognitive data from various studies of schizophrenia, we developed a model for each data domain, identified common usable terms that could be agreed upon across the repositories, and linked them to standard ontological terms where possible. We had the goal of facilitating both the current user experience in querying and future automated computations and reasoning regarding the data. We found that existing terminologies are incomplete for these purposes, even with the history of neuroimaging data sharing in the field; and we provide a model for efforts focused on querying multiple clinical neuroimaging repositories.

  8. Development of the Canadian used fuel repository engineered barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, C., E-mail: chatton@nwmo.ca [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for the implementation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the federally-approved plan for the safe long-term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel. Under the APM plan, used nuclear fuel will ultimately be placed within a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. In implementing APM, the NWMO is committed to ensure consistency with international best practices in the development of its repository system, including any advances in technology. In 2012, the NWMO undertook an optimization study to look at both the design and manufacture of its engineered barriers. This study looked at current technologies for the design and manufacture of used fuel containers, placement technologies, repository design, and buffer and sealing systems, while taking into consideration the state of the art worldwide in repository design and acceptance. The result of that study is the current Canadian engineered barrier system, consisting of a 2.7 tonne used fuel container with a carbon-steel core, copper-coated surface and welded spherical heads. The used fuel container is encapsulated in a bentonite buffer box at the surface and then transferred underground. Once underground, the used fuel is placed into a repository room which is cut into the rock using traditional drill-and-blast technologies. This paper explains the logic for the selection of the container and sealing system design and the development of innovative technologies for their manufacture including the use of laser welding, cold spray and pulsed-electrodeposition copper coating for the manufacture of the used fuel container, isostatic presses for the production of the one-piece bentonite blocks, and slip-skid technologies for placement into the repository. (author)

  9. Development of the Canadian used fuel repository engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for the implementation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the federally-approved plan for the safe long-term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel. Under the APM plan, used nuclear fuel will ultimately be placed within a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. In implementing APM, the NWMO is committed to ensure consistency with international best practices in the development of its repository system, including any advances in technology. In 2012, the NWMO undertook an optimization study to look at both the design and manufacture of its engineered barriers. This study looked at current technologies for the design and manufacture of used fuel containers, placement technologies, repository design, and buffer and sealing systems, while taking into consideration the state of the art worldwide in repository design and acceptance. The result of that study is the current Canadian engineered barrier system, consisting of a 2.7 tonne used fuel container with a carbon-steel core, copper-coated surface and welded spherical heads. The used fuel container is encapsulated in a bentonite buffer box at the surface and then transferred underground. Once underground, the used fuel is placed into a repository room which is cut into the rock using traditional drill-and-blast technologies. This paper explains the logic for the selection of the container and sealing system design and the development of innovative technologies for their manufacture including the use of laser welding, cold spray and pulsed-electrodeposition copper coating for the manufacture of the used fuel container, isostatic presses for the production of the one-piece bentonite blocks, and slip-skid technologies for placement into the repository. (author)

  10. Development of a community-ware for social confidence building for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Furuta, Kazuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Performance assessment (PA), as a tool to support decisions associated with geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, requires the facilitation of various views of stakeholders. We believe that the key benefit of using the information technologies in the context of PA lies in the possibility of accelerating knowledge interaction among interested individuals and facilitating a wider spectrum of views into PA, and we propose the 'collaborative' approach using the computer network. We have initiated a voluntary PA community to test validity of such an approach in guiding and supporting discussions and decisions concerning geological disposal. To expedite such activities, we have also developed community-ware', which enables members of the PA network community to grasp relative positions of themselves in an 'opinion space' so that they can find possible partners to collaborate with, and allows newcomers to recapture a summary of the previous discussions. In addition, the history of past discussions together with the results of iterative PA calculations will provide useful insight for understanding and modeling the process of consensus building. A PA network community consisting of around 20 members was formed and a pilot application was carried out which resulted in demonstration of potential advantage of a PA network community in expediting knowledge evolution concerning long term safety of geological disposal. On the other hand it highlighted issues for further research and development. (author)

  11. Development of quality assurance for HLW disposal R and D in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Lee, J. O.; Lee, Y. M.; Kim, S. K.; Kang, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    To assure the credibility of R and D results and to systematically and effectively perform experiments and computations for the performance assessment of high-level radioactive disposal in Korea, the total quality assurance(QA) program is under development. To effectively manage the R and D's and perform decision makings so called WEB based AQ system is proposed based on the U.S.N.R.C. 10CFR50. The current proto-type QA system shall be extended to accommodate functionalities such as QA procedures, forms, and decision-making pathways. In parallel with the QA system, the technical data management (TDM) system is also applied to get probabilistic density functions (PDF's) required for probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). So-called SNL-NRC protocol was applied to construct the PDF for solubility limits of two nuclides

  12. Overview of adaptive phased management repository design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is implementing Adaptive Phased Management, Canada's plan for long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The organization is proceeding with the process for selecting a site in partnership with an informed and willing host community to safely and securely container and isolate used nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. Adaptive Phased Management is the culmination of more than 30 years of research, development and demonstration of repository concepts in Canada. Adaptive Phased Management uses a phased and adaptive step-wise approach to the multi-barrier system which is consistent with the long-term waste management approaches being developed in many other countries with nuclear power programs such as Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and France. The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is examining and developing conceptual designs for a deep geological repository and associated facilities for the placement of used nuclear fuel in long-lived containers. This paper will examine two of these generic conceptual designs which have recently been refined and updated. These conceptual designs will be used to support a pre-project review of repository design and safety by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. (author)

  13. 3D numerical modelling of the thermal state of deep geological nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, Yu. N.

    2017-09-01

    One of the important aspects of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in deep geological repositories is ensuring the integrity of the engineered barriers which is, among other phenomena, considerably influenced by the thermal loads. As the HLW produce significant amount of heat, the design of the repository should maintain the balance between the cost-effectiveness of the construction and the sufficiency of the safety margins, including those imposed on the thermal conditions of the barriers. The 3D finite-element computer code FENIA was developed as a tool for simulation of thermal processes in deep geological repositories. Further the models for mechanical phenomena and groundwater hydraulics will be added resulting in a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) solution. The long-term simulations of the thermal state were performed for two possible layouts of the repository. One was based on the proposed project of Russian repository, and another features larger HLW amount within the same space. The obtained results describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature filed inside the repository and in the surrounding rock for 3500 years. These results show that practically all generated heat was ultimately absorbed by the host rock without any significant temperature increase. Still in the short time span even in case of smaller amount of the HLW the temperature maximum exceeds 100 °C, and for larger amount of the HLW the local temperature remains above 100 °C for considerable time. Thus, the substantiation of the long-term stability of the repository would require an extensive study of the materials properties and behaviour in order to remove the excessive conservatism from the simulations and to reduce the uncertainty of the input data.

  14. The AGP-Project conceptual design for a Spanish HLW final disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Engelmann, H.-J.; Huertas, F.; Ulibarri, A.

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the AGP Project a Conceptual Design for a HLW Final Disposal Facility to be eventually built in an underground salt formation in Spain has been developed. The AGP Project has the character of a system analysis. In the current project phase I several alternatives has been considered for different subsystems and/or components of the repository. The system variants, developed to such extent as to allow a comparison of their advantages and disadvantages, will allow the selection of a reference concept, which will be further developed to technical maturity in subsequent project phases. (author)

  15. Technical and economic optimization study for HLW waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffes, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the technical and economic aspects of high level waste (HLW) management with the objective of optimizing the interim storage duration and the dimensions of the underground repository site. The procedure consisted in optimizing the economic criterion under specified constraints. The results are intended to identify trends and guide the choice from among available options; simple and highly flexible models were therefore used in this study, and only nearfield thermal constraints were taken into consideration. Because of the present uncertainty on the physicochemical properties of the repository environment and on the unit cost figures, this study focused on developing a suitable method rather than on obtaining definitive results. With the physical and economic data bases used for the two media investigated (granite and salt) the optimum values found show that it is advisable to minimize the interim storage time, and that the geological repository should feature a high degree of spatial dilution. These results depend to a considerable extent on the assumption of high interim storage costs

  16. In-situ test programs related to design and construction of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories. Appendices. Final report (Task 2), June 1981-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Bauhof, F.; Gonano, L.

    1983-03-01

    The media and sites considered include: (1) basalt at Hanford, Washington; (2) tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site; (3) domal salt at specific Gulf Coast sites; (4) bedded salt at an unspecified site; and (5) granite at an unspecified site. A licensing perspective is outlined and a defensible rationale developed and utilized for the test selection process. This rationale essentially consists of: establishing the information needs for construction authorization; assessing the relevant capabilities of available tests; and matching the capabilities of specific tests to the perceived information needs. The information needs at any time consist of the additional information (if any) needed in order to predict satisfactory repository system performance with the required level of confidence, and thus are a function of: the significance of the repository engineered components and site characteristics to system performance; the currently available information, which may be supplemented with time; and the acceptable level of confidence in satisfactory performance for each licensing step. Determination of the acceptable levels of confidence and the significance of repository system components is outside the scope of this report. Suitable assumptions have thus been made regarding the development of information needs for construction authorization by the time of initial site characterization reports submittals. Tests which are available and respond to the perceived media/site specific information needs, either by simulation or assessment of site characteristics, are identified and their capabilities assessed. Specific in situ tests are investigated and described in detail. Research and development which might be effective in improving tests capabilities have been recommended

  17. Source term measurements on vitrified HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, A.; Marples, J.A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium concentrations of Tc-99, Np-237, Pu-239/240 and Am-241 have been measured in the presence of materials likely to be present in a vitrified HLW repository: glass, iron, backfill and rock. Results were measured under both oxidising and reducing conditions and at pH values set by the backfill bentonite and cement. Under reducing conditions and with cementitious backfills, the equilibrium concentrations ranged from three to 30 times allowed drinking water levels for the four isotopes. (author)

  18. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-01-01

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry

  19. Office of Crystalline Repository Development FY 83 technical project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The technical plan for FY 83 activities of the Office of Crystalline Repository Development is presented in detail. Crystalline Rock Project objectives are discussed in relation to the National Waste Terminal storage (NWTS) program. The plan is in full compliance with requirements mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Implementation will comply with the requirements and criteria set forth in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations (10 CFR 60) and the Environmental Protection Agency standard (40 CFR 191). Technical approaches and the related milestones and schedules are presented for each of the Level 3 NWTS work Breakdown Structure Tasks. These are: Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Test Facilities and Excavations, Land Acquisition, and Program Management

  20. Development of an integrated software system (Digital Geological Disposal System) for design and evaluation of HLW disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusaeda, Shigeki; Yanagisawa, Ichiro; Imamura, Naoko

    2000-02-01

    In this study, a design study on 'Digital Geological Disposal System' has been carried out in order to define the developmental goal for the first phase (- FY2002) system and to demonstrate the feasibility of the system development. The key conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) As the result of the basic design of the Integrated Analysis Platform (IAP), the representation method for PLAN (Process Linkage Analysis Network), the PLAN objects configuration and definition and the execution control mechanism of PLAN are newly proposed in order to enhance the flexibility of IAP. (2) A prototyping study concerning an optimization problem that includes cavity stability analysis and thermal analysis, showed that the design of IAP is practical one and also has enough flexibility to solve complex problems expected in the repository design processes. (3) The development plan for the Digital Geological Disposal System' has been investigated based on the discussions about the system usage by the potential users such as the regulators, the implementation body and the research institutes, as well as the technical discussions. As a result, short-term (for the first phase) and long-term development plans have been proposed. (author)

  1. Development of an integrated software system (Digital Geological Disposal System) for design and evaluation of HLW disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusaeda, Shigeki; Yanagisawa, Ichiro; Imamura, Naoko

    2000-02-01

    In this study, a design study on 'Digital Geological Disposal System' has been carried out in order to define the developmental goal for the first phase (-FY2002) system and to demonstrate the feasibility of the system development. The key conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) As the result of the basic design of the Integrated Analysis Platform (IAP), the representation method for the procedure of analysis that is called analysis network, the configuration of the object that makes up the analysis network, and the execution control mechanism of the analysis network are newly proposed in order to enhance the flexibility of IAP. (2) A prototyping study concerning an optimization problem that includes cavity stability analysis and thermal analysis, showed that the design of IAP is practical one and also has enough flexibility to solve complex problems expected in the repository design processes. (3) The development plan for the 'Digital Geological Disposal System' has been investigated based on the discussions about the system usage by the potential users such as the regulators, the implementation body and the research institutes, as well as the technical discussions. As a result, short-term (for the first phase) and long-term development plans have been proposed. (author)

  2. Progress towards developing an international repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeme, M.

    2001-01-01

    Pangea Resources was established to develop and promote the concept of international repositories. The concept was based on repositories located in geologically stable, flat, arid environments meeting the 'high isolation' criteria developed by Pangea Resources. The high isolation concept of Pangea Resources can be applied in various regions of the world, and these have been made public. The pilot project chosen for exploring feasibility was for an international repository in Australia. This study was in preparation for public release, when the existence of the proposal was prematurely revealed to the media. The general media and public reaction to the concept was understandably negative. However, there were also some opinion pieces reported suggesting that the concept of an international repository should be thought about seriously, before it is accepted or rejected. In addition, thoughtful reactions were received from the business and scientific communities. In particular a group of very eminent scientists, the Scientific Review Group, undertook to review independently the quality of the work done. Nevertheless, the reaction from the state and federal governments, was also negative. The Australian Government stated its policy not to permit importation or disposal of foreign nuclear waste. During the last two years Pangea Resources has been developing the technical aspects of the concept and has produced and published several scientific reports on transport, storage and disposal of radioactive materials. All the scientific studies of Pangea Resources have been reviewed by the Scientific Review Group. The work has also been presented in scientific conferences, to the media (including a dedicated television documentary) and to the public. The technical work is generic or is based on diverse potential siting areas around the world and the disposal and storage technologies studied are being broadened beyond the specific high-isolation concept. Most importantly, it has

  3. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Overview and implications for repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, Michael J.; Arthur, Randolph C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikazu; Iwatsuki, Teruki

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a survey and review on oxidation-reduction ('redox') reactions, with particular emphasis on implications for disposal of high-level waste (HLW) in deep geological formations. As an overview, the focus is on basic principles, problems, and proposed research related specifically to the assessment of redox for a HLW repository in Japan. For a more comprehensive treatment of redox and the myriad associated issues, the reader is directed to the cited textbooks used as primary references in this report. Low redox conditions in deep geological formations is a key assumption in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan' (hereafter called H12'). The release behavior of multi-valent radioelements (e.g., Tc, Se, U, Pu, Np), as well as daughter radioelements of these radioelements, from a deep geological repository are sensitively related to redox conditions. Furthermore, the performance of certain barrier materials, such as overpack and buffer, may be impacted by redox conditions. Given this importance, this report summarizes some key topics for future technical studies supporting site characterization and repository performance as follows: To fully test the conceptual models for system Eh, it will be necessary to measure and evaluate trace element and isotopic information of both coexisting groundwater and reactive minerals of candidate rocks. Because of importance of volatile species (e.g., O 2 , H 2 etc.) in redox reactions, and given the high total pressure of a repository located 500 to 1000 meter deep, laboratory investigations of redox will necessarily require use of pressurized test devices that can fully simulate repository conditions. The stability (redox capacity) of the repository system with respect to potential changes in redox boundary condition induced by oxidizing waters intrusion should be established experimentally. An overall conceptual model that unifies

  4. Repository seal materials performance for a SALT Repository Project 5-year code/model development plan: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This document describes an integrated laboratory testing and model development effort for the seal system for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The testing and modeling efforts are designed to determine seal material response in the repository environment, to provide models of seal system components for performance assessment, and to assist in the development of seal system designs. A code/model development and performance analysis program will be performed to predict the short- and long-term response of seal materials and seal components. The results from these analyses will be used to support the material testing activities on this contract and to support performance assessment activities that are conducted in other parts of the Salt Repository Project (SRP). 48 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Industrial complementarities between interim storage and reversible geological repository - 59237

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoorelbeke, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The French Act voted in 2006 made the choice of deep geological disposal as the reference option for the long term management of high level (HLW) and intermediate level long-lived waste. The CIGEO repository project aims at avoiding or limiting burden to future generations, which could not be achieved by the extension in time of interim storage. The reversibility as provided by the Act will maintain a liberty of choice for waste management on a duration which is comparable to new storage facility. Interim storage is required to accommodate waste as long as the repository is not available. The commissioning of the repository in 2025 will not suppress needs for interim storage. The paper describes the complementarities between existing and future interim storage facilities and the repository project: repository operational issues and planning, HLW thermal decay, support for the reversibility, etc. It shows opportunities to prepare a global optimization of waste management including the utilization at best of storage capacities and the planning of waste emplacement in the repository in such a way to facilitate operational conditions and to limit cost. Preliminary simulations of storage-disposal scenarios are presented. Thanks to an optimal use of the waste management system, provision can be made for a progressive increase of waste emplacement flow during the first operation phase of the repository. It is then possible to stabilize the industrial activity level of the repository site. An optimal utilization of interim storage can also limit the diversity of waste packages emplaced simultaneously, which facilitates the operation of the repository. 60 years minimum interim storage duration is generally required with respect to HLW thermal output. Extending this interim storage period may reduce the underground footprint of the repository. Regarding reversibility, the capability to manage waste packages potentially retrieved from the repository should be analyzed. The

  6. Salt repository sealing materials development program: 5-year work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.

    1986-06-01

    This plan covers 5 years (fiscal years 1986 through 1990) of work in the repository sealing materials program to support design decisions and licensing activities for a salt repository. The plan covers a development activity, not a research activity. There are firm deliverables as the end points of each part of the work. The major deliverables are: development plans for code development and materials testing; seal system components models; seal system performance specifications; seal materials specifications; and seal materials properties ''handbook.'' The work described in this plan is divided into three general tasks as follows: mathematical modeling; materials studies (salt, cementitious materials, and earthen materials); and large-scale testing. Each of the sections presents an overview, status, planned activities, and summary of program milestones. This plan will be the starting point for preparing the development plans described above, but is subject to change if preparation of the work plan indicates that a different approach or sequence is preferable to achieve the ultimate goal, i.e., support of design and licensing

  7. Impacts of new developments in partitioning and transmutation on the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.D.; Jor-Shan Choi; Halsey, W.; Pasternak, A.; Cotton, T.; Burns, J.; McCabe, A.; Colglazier, W.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1992-03-01

    During the 1970s, the United States and other countries thoroughly evaluated the options for the safe and final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). The worldwide scientific community concluded that deep geologic disposal was clearly the most technically feasible alternative. They also ranked the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of radionuclides among the least favored options. A 1982 report by the International Atomic Energy Agency summarized the key reasons for that ranking: ''Since the long-term hazards are already low, there is little incentive to reduce them further by P-T. Indeed the incremental costs of introducing P-T appear to be unduly high in relation to the prospective benefits.'' Recently, the delays encountered by the US geologic disposal program for HLW, along with advanced in the development of P-T concepts, have led some to propose P-T as a means of reducing the long-term risks from the radioactive wastes that require disposal and thus making it easier to site, license, and build a geologic repository. This study examines and evaluates the effects that introducing P-T would have on the US geologic disposal program

  8. Safety assessment of HLW geological disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Morimasa

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with the Japanese nuclear program, the liquid waste with a high level of radioactivity arising from reprocessing is solidified in a stable glass matrix (vitrification) in stainless steel fabrication containers. The vitrified waste is referred to as high-level radioactive waste (HLW), and is characterized by very high initial radioactivity which, even though it decreases with time, presents a potential long-term risk. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly manage HLW from human and his environment. After vitrification, HLW is stored for a period of 30 to 50 years to allow cooling, and finally disposed of in a stable geological environment at depths greater than 300 m below surface. The deep underground environment, in general, is considered to be stable over geological timescales compared with surface environment. By selecting an appropriate disposal site, therefore, it is considered to be feasible to isolate the waste in the repository from man and his environment until such time as radioactivity levels have decayed to insignificance. The concept of geological disposal in Japan is similar to that in other countries, being based on a multibarrier system which combines the natural geological environment with engineered barriers. It should be noted that geological disposal concept is based on a passive safety system that does not require any institutional control for assuring long term environmental safety. To demonstrate feasibility of safe HLW repository concept in Japan, following technical steps are essential. Selection of a geological environment which is sufficiently stable for disposal (site selection). Design and installation of the engineered barrier system in a stable geological environment (engineering measures). Confirmation of the safety of the constructed geological disposal system (safety assessment). For site selection, particular consideration is given to the long-term stability of the geological environment taking into account the fact

  9. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule

  10. Safety of HLW shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The third shipment back to Japan of vitrified high-level radioactive waste (HLW) produced through reprocessing in France is scheduled to take place in early 1998. A consignment last March drew protest from interest groups and countries along the shipping route. Requirements governing the shipment of cargoes of this type and concerns raised by Greenpeace that were assessed by an international expert group, were examined in a previous article. A further report prepared on behalf of Greenpeace Pacific has been released. The paper: Transportation accident of a ship carrying vitrified high-level radioactive waste, Part 1 Impact on the Federated States of Micronesia by Resnikoff and Champion, is dated 31 July 1997. A considerable section of the report is given over to discussion of the economic situation of the Federated Statess of Micronesia, and lifestyle and dietary factors which would influence radiation doses arising from a release. It postulates a worst case accident scenario of a collision between the HLW transport ship and an oil tanker 1 km off Pohnpei with the wind in precisely the direction to result in maximum population exposure, and attempts to assess the consequences. In summary, the report postulates accident and exposure scenarios which are conceivable but not credible. It combines a series of worst case scenarios and attempts to evaluate the consequences. Both the combined scenario and consequences have probabilities of occurrence which are negligible. The shipment carried by the 'Pacific Swan' left Cherbourgon 21 January 1998 and comprised 30 tonnes of reprocessed vitrified waste in 60 stainless steel canisters loaded into three shipping casks. (author)

  11. NRC iterative performance assessment Phase 2. Development of capabilities for review of a performance assessment for a high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wescott, R.G.; Lee, M.P.; Eisenberg, N.A.; Baca, R.G.

    1995-10-01

    In order to better review a potential license application to construct and operate a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff (and its contractor) has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents the demonstration of the second phase of this capability. The demonstration made use of the scenario selection procedure developed by Sandia National Laboratories to provide a set of scenarios, with corresponding probabilities, for use in the consequence analysis of a potential HLW disposal site in unsaturated tuff. Models of release of radionuclides from the waste form and transport in ground water, air and by direct pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year period. The input values of parameters necessary for the consequence models were sampled numerous times using Latin Hypercube Sampling from assumed probability distributions. The results from the consequence models were then used to generate Complementary Cumulative Distribution Functions (CCDFs) for either release to the accessible environment or effective dose equivalents to a target population. CCDFs were calculated for probabilistically significant combinations (scenarios) of four disruptive events; drilling, pluvial climate, seismicity and magmatism. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the calculated releases and effective dose equivalents were also used to determine the importance of the parameters. Because of the preliminary nature of the analysis and the lack of an adequate data base, the results and conclusions presented in this report should be carefully interpreted. They should not be misconstrued to represent the actual performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository nor serve as an endorsement of the methods used

  12. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmelin, Ann; Brantberger, Martin; Eriksson, Magnus; Gustafson, Gunnar; St ille, Haakan

    2007-06-01

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and practice on the

  13. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmelin, Ann (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Brantberger, Martin (Ramboell (SE)); Eriksson, Magnus (Vattenfall Power Consultant (SE)); Gustafson, Gunnar (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)); Stille, Haakan (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-06-15

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and

  14. Formulation of Japanese consensus-building model for HLW geological disposal site determination. 2. Development of game for enhancement of social acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Kenji; Oya, Yasuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Present project consists of two parts, model for institution design and education program. For the education program for public citizen, we have developed a game running on iPod touch based on Erehwon repository project proposed by Swiss ITC under OBRA project. (author)

  15. Challenges in Developing XML-Based Learning Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auksztol, Jerzy; Przechlewski, Tomasz

    There is no doubt that modular design has many advantages, including the most important ones: reusability and cost-effectiveness. In an e-leaming community parlance the modules are determined as Learning Objects (LOs) [11]. An increasing amount of learning objects have been created and published online, several standards has been established and multiple repositories developed for them. For example Cisco Systems, Inc., "recognizes a need to move from creating and delivering large inflexible training courses, to database-driven objects that can be reused, searched, and modified independent of their delivery media" [6]. The learning object paradigm of education resources authoring is promoted mainly to reduce the cost of the content development and to increase its quality. A frequently used metaphor of Learning Objects paradigm compares them to Lego Logs or objects in Object-Oriented program design [25]. However a metaphor is only an abstract idea, which should be turned to something more concrete to be usable. The problem is that many papers on LOs end up solely in metaphors. In our opinion Lego or OO metaphors are gross oversimplificatation of the problem as there is much easier to develop Lego set or design objects in OO program than develop truly interoperable, context-free learning content1.

  16. Industrial scale-plant for HLW partitioning in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Glagolenko, Y.V.; Drojko, E.G.; Kurochkin, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    Radiochemical plant of PA > at Ozersk, which was come on line in December 1948 originally for weapon plutonium production and reoriented on the reprocessing of spent fuel, till now keeps on storage HLW of the military program. Application of the vitrification method since 1986 has not essentially reduced HLW volumes. So, as of September 1, 1995 vitrification installations had been processed 9590 m 3 HLW and 235 MCi of radionuclides was included in glass. However only 1100 m 3 and 20.5 MCi is part of waste of the military program. The reason is the fact, that the technology and equipment of vitrification were developed for current waste of Purex-process, for which low contents of corrosion-dangerous impurity to materials of vitrification installation is characteristic of. With reference to HLW, which are growing at PA > in the course of weapon plutonium production, the program of Science-Research Works includes the following main directions of work. Development of technology and equipment of installations for immobilising HLW with high contents of impurity into a solid form at induction melter. Application of High-temperature Adsorption Method for sorption of radionuclides from HLW on silica gel. Application of Partitioning Method of radionuclides from HLW, based on extraction cesium and strontium into cobalt dicarbollyde or crown-ethers, but also on recovery of cesium radionuclides by sorption on inorganic sorbents. In this paper the results of work on creation of first industrial scale-plant for partitioning HLW by the extraction and sorption methods are reported

  17. A Nuclide Release Model for a Deep Well Scenario near a Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Choi, Jong Won

    2010-01-01

    Recently several template programs ready for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste repository (HLW) and a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste repository (LILW) systems, that are conceptually modeled, have been developed by utilizing GoldSim and AMBER at KAERI. During the last few years, such template programs have been utilized for the evaluation of nuclide transports in the nearand far-field of a repository as well as transport through the biosphere under various normal and disruptive release scenarios with assumed data. The GoldSim program, another template program by which influence due to a well located very near to the repository has been modeled and evaluated for an assumed case in order to simulate the worst exposure scenario. This seems very useful to evaluate an accidental event a long time after closure of the repository has been developed and illustrated

  18. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Joseph, I.; Bowman, B.W.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L

    2009-01-01

    The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al 2 O 3 concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the

  19. Alternative biosphere modeling for safety assessment of HLW disposal taking account of geosphere-biosphere interface of marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Naito, Morimasa; Ikeda, Takao; Little, Richard

    2001-03-01

    In the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system, it is required to estimate radiological impacts on future human beings arising from potential radionuclide releases from a deep repository into the surface environment. In order to estimated the impacts, a biosphere model is developed by reasonably assuming radionuclide migration processes in the surface environment and relevant human lifestyles. It is important to modify the present biosphere models or to develop alternative biosphere models applying the biosphere models according to quality and quantify of the information acquired through the siting process for constructing the repository. In this study, alternative biosphere models were developed taking geosphere-biosphere interface of marine environment into account. Moreover, the flux to dose conversion factors calculated by these alternative biosphere models was compared with those by the present basic biosphere models. (author)

  20. The Efficacy of Institutional Repositories: Reflections on the Development of a Personalised Collection on UPSpace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Elsabe

    2007-01-01

    There is much speculation that the development of institutional repositories will impact on or even change the traditional scholarly communication process. The purpose of this conversation is to introduce the reader to the use of and response to institutional repositories which were initiated by the Open Access Initiative. The concept of…

  1. Developing of Radioactive Wastes Management Safety at Baldone Repository Radons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.; Abramenkova, G.; Klavins, M.

    2008-01-01

    The near surface radioactive wastes repository Radons near the Baldone city was put in operation in 1962. The safety assessment of repository was performed during 2000-2001 under the PHARE project to evaluate the recommended upgrades of repository. The outline design for new vaults and interim storage for long lived radioactive wastes was elaborated during 2003-2004 years. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for upgrade of Baldone repository was performed during 2004-2005 years. Additional evaluations of radioactive wastes management safety were performed during 2006 year by the experts of ENRESA, Spain. It was shown, that the additional efforts were spent for improving of radioactive wastes cementation in concrete containers. The results of tritium and Cs 137 leaching studies are presented and discussed. It was shown, that additives can significantly reduce the migration of radionuclides in ground water. The leaching coefficients for tritium and Cs 137 were determined to supply with the necessary data the risk assessment calculations for operation of Baldone repository R adons

  2. Development of a National Repository of Digital Forensic Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Weiser

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Many people do all of their banking online, we and our children communicate with peers through computer systems, and there are many jobs that require near continuous interaction with computer systems. Criminals, however, are also “connected”, and our online interaction provides them a conduit into our information like never before. Our credit card numbers and other fiscal information are at risk, our children's personal information is exposed to the world, and our professional reputations are on the line.The discipline of Digital Forensics in law enforcement agencies around the nation and world has grown to match the increased risk and potential for cyber crimes. Even crimes that are not themselves computer-based, may be solved or prosecuted based on digital evidence left behind by the perpetrator. However, no widely accepted mechanism to facilitate sharing of ideas and methodologies has emerged. Different agencies re-develop approaches that have been tested in other jurisdictions. Even within a single agency, there is often significant redundant work. There is great potential efficiency gain in sharing information from digital forensic investigations.This paper describes an on-going design and development project between Oklahoma State University’s Center for Telecommunications and Network Security and the Defense Cyber Crimes Center to develop a Repository of Digital Forensic Knowledge. In its full implementation, the system has potential to provide exceptional gains in efficiency for examiners and investigators. It provides a better conduit to share relevant information between agencies and a structure through which cases can be cross-referenced to have the most impact on a current investigation.

  3. Korean Reference HLW Disposal System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report outlines the results related to the development of Korean Reference Disposal System for High-level radioactive wastes. The research has been supported around for 10 years through a long-term research plan by MOST. The reference disposal method was selected via the first stage of the research during which the technical guidelines for the geological disposal of HLW were determined too. At the second stage of the research, the conceptual design of the reference disposal system was made. For this purpose the characteristics of the reference spent fuels from PWR and CANDU reactors were specified, and the material and specifications of the canisters were determined in term of structural analysis and manufacturing capability in Korea. Also, the mechanical and chemical characteristics of the domestic Ca-bentonite were analyzed in order to supply the basic design parameters of the buffer. Based on these parameters the thermal and mechanical analysis of the near-field was carried out. Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical behavior of the disposal system was analyzed. The reference disposal system was proposed through the second year research. At the final third stage of the research, the Korean Reference disposal System including the engineered barrier, surface facilities, and underground facilities was proposed through the performance analysis of the disposal system.

  4. Development and application of a quality assurance system for waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmerhagen, I.; Berg, H.P.

    1996-01-01

    A large set of requirements are developed for the structures, systems and components of a waste repository. These requirements cover different regulations concerning planning, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of a waste repository as well as nuclear-specific requirements on the design of the plant. The implementation of a quality assurance (QA) system is an essential task in order to ensure that the requirements are fulfilled by systematic means. The QA system for the German repositories for radioactive waste is built up as a hierarchic system and described in more detail in particular covering aspects like maintenance of QA relevant systems, structures and components as well as the procedure in case of changes. For the operational phase of a repository a separate site-specific manual had to be developed. Such a manual has been elaborated for the operation of the Morsleben repository; main topics of this manual are presented

  5. Development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository for Lawrence Livermore Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Results of our mining, geological and geotechnical studies provided in support of the development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository are presented. The primary purpose of the work was the identification and development of appropriate geotechnical descriptors and coefficients required for the Site Suitability Repository Model. This model was developed by The Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC) of Reading, Massachusetts and is not described in this report

  6. Development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository for Lawrence Livermore Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    Results of our mining, geological and geotechnical studies provided in support of the development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository are presented. The primary purpose of the work was the identification and development of appropriate geotechnical descriptors and coefficients required for the Site Suitability Repository Model. This model was developed by The Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC) of Reading, Massachusetts and is not described in this report.

  7. Learning Object Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This chapter looks at the development and nature of learning objects, meta-tagging standards and taxonomies, learning object repositories, learning object repository characteristics, and types of learning object repositories, with type examples. (Contains 1 table.)

  8. Development of database systems for safety of repositories for disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeong Hun; Han, Jeong Sang; Shin, Hyeon Jun; Ham, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Seong [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    In the study, GSIS os developed for the maximizing effectiveness of the database system. For this purpose, the spatial relation of data from various fields that are constructed in the database which was developed for the site selection and management of repository for radioactive waste disposal. By constructing the integration system that can link attribute and spatial data, it is possible to evaluate the safety of repository effectively and economically. The suitability of integrating database and GSIS is examined by constructing the database in the test district where the site characteristics are similar to that of repository for radioactive waste disposal.

  9. Digital platforms for research collaboration: using design science in developing a South African open knowledge repository

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Biljon, J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ) enabled collaboration through the design and development of a sustainable open knowledge repository (OKR) according to the design science research (DSR) paradigm. OKRs are tools used to support knowledge sharing and collaboration. The theoretical...

  10. HLW Tank Space Management, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessions, J.

    1999-01-01

    The HLW Tank Space Management Team (SM Team) was chartered to select and recommend an HLW Tank Space Management Strategy (Strategy) for the HLW Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) until an alternative salt disposition process is operational. Because the alternative salt disposition process will not be available to remove soluble radionuclides in HLW until 2009, the selected Strategy must assure that it safely receives and stores HLW at least until 2009 while continuing to supply sludge slurry to the DWPF vitrification process

  11. Technology for the long-term management of defense HLW at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Berreth, J.R.; Knecht, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Defense Waste Management Plan of June 1983 includes a reference plan for the long-term management of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) high-level waste (HLW), with a goal of disposing of the annual output in 500 canisters a year by FY-2008. Based on the current vitrification technology, the ICPP base-glass case would produce 1700 canisters per year after FY-2007. Thus, to meet the DWMP goal processing steps including fuel dissolution, waste treatment, and waste immobilization are being studied as areas where potential modifications could result in HLW volume reductions for repository disposal. It has been demonstrated that ICPP calcined wastes can be densified by hot isostatic pressing to multiphase ceramic forms of high loading and density. Conversion of waste by hot isostatic pressing to these forms has the potential of reducing the annual ICPP waste production to volumes near those of the goal of the DWMP. This report summarizes the laboratory-scale information currently available on the development of these forms

  12. HLW disposal dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Glodeanu, F.

    2003-01-01

    The radioactive waste is an inevitable residue from the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine, and from the operation of generating electricity nuclear power stations. The management and disposal of such waste is therefore an issue relevant to almost all countries. Undoubtedly the biggest issue concerning radioactive waste management is that of high level waste. The long-lived nature of some types of radioactive wastes and the associated safety implications of disposal plans have raised concern amongst those who may be affected by such facilities. For these reasons the subject of radioactive waste management has taken on a high profile in many countries. Not one Member State in the European Union can say that their high level waste will be disposed of at a specific site. Nobody can say 'that is where it is going to go'. Now, there is a very broad consensus on the concept of geological disposal. The experts have little, if any doubt that we could safely dispose of the high level wastes. Large sectors of the public continue to oppose to most proposals concerning the siting of repositories. Given this, it is increasingly difficult to get political support, or even political decisions, on such sites. The failure to advance to the next step in the waste management process reinforces the public's initial suspicion and resistance. In turn, this makes the political decisions even harder. In turn, this makes the political decisions even harder. The management of spent fuel from nuclear power plant became a crucial issue, as the cooling pond of the Romanian NPP is reaching saturation. During the autumn of 2000, the plant owner proceeded with an international tendering process for the supply of a dry storage system to be implemented at the Cernavoda station to store the spent fuel from Unit 1 and eventually from Unit 2 for a minimum period of 50 years. The facility is now in operation. As concern the disposal of the spent fuel, the 'wait and see

  13. Simulation of ultra-long term behavior in HLW near-field by centrifugal model test. Part 1. Development of centrifugal equipment and centrifuge model test method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Soshi; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a centrifugal equipment which can continuously be run for a long time and a model test method in order to evaluate a long term behavior which is a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the high level wastes geological disposal repository and the neighborhood (called 'near-field'). The centrifugal equipment of CRIEPI, 'CENTURY5000-THM', developed in the present study is able to run continuously up to six months. Therefore, a long term behavior in the near-field can be simulated in a short term, for instance, the behavior for 5000 equivalent years can be simulated in six months by centrifugalizing 100 G using a 1/100 size model. We carried out a test using a nylon specimen in a centrifugal force field of 30 G and confirmed the operations of CENTURY5000-THM, control and measurement for 11 days. As the results, it was able to control the stress in the pressure vessel and measure the values of strain, temperature and pressure. And, as a result of scanning the small model of near-field including the metal overpack, bentonite buffer and rock by a medical X-rays CT scanner, the internal structure of the model was able to be evaluated when the metal artifact was reduced. From these results, the evaluation for a long term behavior of a disposal repository by the method of centrifugal model test became possible. (author)

  14. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  15. The RAGE Game Software Components Repository for Supporting Applied Game Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krassen Stefanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of the RAGE repository, which is a unique and dedicated infrastructure that provides access to a wide variety of advanced technology components for applied game development. The RAGE project, which is the principal Horizon2020 research and innovation project on applied gaming, develops up to three dozens of software components (RAGE software assets that are reusable across a wide diversity of game engines, game platforms and programming languages. The RAGE repository provides storage space for assets and their artefacts and is designed as an asset life-cycle management system for defining, publishing, updating, searching and packaging for distribution of these assets. It will be embedded in a social platform for asset developers and other users. A dedicated Asset Repository Manager provides the main functionality of the repository and its integration with other systems. Tools supporting the Asset Manager are presented and discussed. When the RAGE repository is in full operation, applied game developers will be able to easily enhance the quality of their games by including selected advanced game software assets. Making available the RAGE repository system and its variety of software assets aims to enhance the coherence and decisiveness of the applied game industry.

  16. R and D on HLW Partitioning in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaperskaya, A.; Babain, V.; Alyapyshev, M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of more than thirty years investigations on high level radioactive waste (HLW) partitioning in Russia are described. The objectives of research and development is to assess HLW partitioning technical feasibility and its advantages compared to direct vitrification of long-lived radionuclides. Many technological flowsheets for long-lived nuclides (cesium, strontium and minor actinides) separation were developed and tested with simulated and actual HLW. Different classes of extractants, including carbamoyl-phosphine oxides, dialkyl-phosphoric acids, crown ethers and diamides of heterocyclic acids were studied. Some of these processes were tested at PA 'Mayak' and MCC. Many extraction systems based on chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD), including UNEX-extractant and its modifications, were also observed. Diamides of diglycolic acid and diamides of heterocyclic acids in polar diluents have shown promising properties for minor actinide-lanthanide extraction and separation. Comparison of different solvents and possible ways of implementing new flowsheets in radiochemical technology are also discussed. (authors)

  17. Socioeconomic impacts of large-scale developments: implications for high-level nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdock, S.H.; Leistritz, F.L.; Hamm, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste repositories will likely be located in sparsely settled rural areas in the US. These projects will significantly affect the economic, demographic, public service, fiscal, and social (the socioeconomic) dimensions of those rural areas. The impacts and means of mitigating them thus require careful analysis. This paper examines some of the potential socioeconomic impacts likely to occur in rural areas as a result of repository siting and development, and it describes some of the characteristics of mitigation programs that are likely to be necessary, if the impacts are to be addressed. Both (1) standard impacts, those resulting from the fact that, like many other large-scale developments, repositories will involve a substantial number of new workers and residents (relative to the size of existing communities), and (2) special impacts, those resulting from the fact that repositories store radioactive materials, are examined. The discussion indicates that economic, demographic, public service, fiscal, and social impacts (standard and special) of these repositories will be substantial and problematic in many cases. Unless the impacts are effectively addressed with carefully planned and well financed mitigation efforts that insure that high-quality planning information is provided to local residents, and that local residents are involved in impact planning and management throughout the siting and development process, repository siting is unlikely to be effectively and equitably achieved. 44 references

  18. Cooling and cracking of technical HLW glass products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, B.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses various cooling procedures applied to canisters filled with inactive simulated HLW glass and the measured temperature distributions compared with numerically computed data. Stress computations of the cooling process were carried out with a finite element method. Only those volume elements having temperatures below the transformation temperature Tg were assumed to contribute thermoelastically to the developing stresses. Model calculations were extended to include real HLW glass canisters with inherent thermal power. The development of stress as a function of variations of heat flow conditions and of the radioactive decay was studied

  19. Development of the design and reliability analysis of a seabed repository system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This study examines the seabed repository scheme proposed in 1979 for the long term disposal of heat generating radio-active waste and develops it to a standard sufficient to compare its reliability with the drilled emplacement and penetrator schemes. The reinforced concrete repositories contain 324 waste canisters and weigh 982 tonnes fully loaded in water. The repositories are transported up to 6000 km to the disposal area by a special purpose ship and lowered 5.5 km to the seabed on six braided nylon ropes by traction winches. Reliability of the seabed repository system, measured in terms of accidents per year involving loss of one or more canisters, was comparable with the other systems. (author)

  20. Development of an object-oriented simulation code for repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Keiichi; Ahn, J.

    1999-01-01

    As understanding for mechanisms of radioactivity confinement by a deep geologic repository improves at the individual process level, it has become imperative to evaluate consequences of individual processes to the performance of the whole repository system. For this goal, the authors have developed a model for radionuclide transport in, and release from, the repository region by incorporating multiple-member decay chains and multiple waste canisters. A computer code has been developed with C++, an object-oriented language. By utilizing the feature that a geologic repository consists of thousands of objects of the same kind, such as the waste canister, the repository region is divided into multiple compartments and objects for simulation of radionuclide transport. Massive computational tasks are distributed over, and executed by, multiple networked workstations, with the help of parallel virtual machine (PVM) technology. Temporal change of the mass distribution of 28 radionuclides in the repository region for the time period of 100 million yr has been successfully obtained by the code

  1. Development of an international safeguards approach to the final disposal of spent fuel in geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphey, W.M.; Moran, B.W.; Fattah, A.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is currently pursuing development of an international safeguards approach for the final disposal of spent fuel in geological repositories through consultants meetings and through the Program for Development of Safeguards for Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geological Repositories (SAGOR). The consultants meetings provide policy guidance to IAEA; SAGOR recommends effective approaches that can be efficiently implemented by IAEA. The SAGOR program, which is a collaboration of eight Member State Support Programs (MSSPs), was initiated in July 1994 and has identified 15 activities in each of three areas (i.e. conditioning facilities, active repositories, and closed repositories) that must be performed to ensure an efficient, yet effective safeguards approach. Two consultants meetings have been held: the first in May 1991 and the last in November 1995. For nuclear materials emplaced in a geological repository, the safeguards objectives were defined to be (1) to detect the diversion of spent fuel, whether concealed or unconcealed, from the repository and (2) to detect undeclared activities of safeguards concern (e.g., tunneling, underground reprocessing, or substitution in containers)

  2. Developing multinational radioactive waste repositories: Infrastructural framework and scenarios of cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Currently the management of radioactive wastes centres on national strategies for collection, treatment, interim storage and disposal. This tendency to focus exclusively on national strategies reflects the fact that radioactive waste is a sensitive political issue, making cooperation among countries difficult. It is consistent with the accepted principle that a country that enjoys the benefit of nuclear energy, or the utilization of nuclear technology, should also take full responsibility for managing the generated radioactive waste. However, there are countries whose radioactive waste volumes do not easily justify a national repository, and/or countries that do not have the resources or favourable natural conditions for waste disposal to dedicate to a national repository project or would prefer to collaborate in shared initiatives because of their economic advantages. In such cases it may be appropriate for these countries to engage in a multinational collaborative effort to ensure that they have access to a common repository, in order that they can fulfil their responsibilities for their managing wastes safely. In response to requests from several Member States expressing an interest in multinational disposal options, the IAEA produced in 1998 a TECDOC outlining the important factors to be taken into account in the process of realizing such options. These factors include for example, technical (safety), institutional (legal, safeguards), economic (financial) socio-political (public acceptance) and ethical considerations. The present report reviews the work done in the previous study, taking into account developments since its publication as well as current activities in the field of multinational repositories. The report attempts to define the concepts involved in the creation of multinational repositories, to explore the likely scenarios, to examine the conditions for successful implementation, and to point out the benefits and challenges inherent to

  3. HLW Canister and Can-In-Canister Drop Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. Marr

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the HLW canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (''can-in-canister'' throughout this document) to the drop event during the handling operation. The objective of the calculation is to provide the structure parameter information to support the canister design and the waste handling facility design. Finite element solution is performed using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. Two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element representations for the standard HLW canister and the can-in-canister are developed and analyzed using the dynamic solver

  4. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers: behaviour under realistic disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners, London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste (HLW) forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. In this final stage of the project, analysis of an HLW overpack of realistic design is performed to predict its behaviour when subjected to likely repository loads. This analysis work is undertaken with the benefit of experience gained in previous phases of the project in which the ability to accurately predict overpack behaviour, when subjected to a uniform external pressure, was demonstrated. Burial in clay, granite and salt environments has been considered and two distinct loading arrangements identified, in an attempt to represent the worst conditions that could be imposed by such media. The analysis successfully demonstrates the ability of the containers to withstand extreme, yet credible, repository loads

  5. Stress analysis of HLW containers. Compas project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This document reports the work carried out for the Compas project which looked at the performance of various computer codes in a selected benchmark exercise. This exercise consisted of several analyses on simplified models which have features typical of HLW containers. These analyses comprise two groups; one related to thick walled, stressed shell overpacks, the other related to thin walled, supported shell overpacks with a lead filler. The first set of analyses looked at an elastic-plastic behaviour and large deformation of a cylinder representative of the main body of thick walled containers). The second set looked at creep behaviour of the lead filler, and the shape the base of thin walled containers will take up, after hundreds of years in the repository. On the thick walled analyses with the cylinder subject to an external pressure all the codes gave consistent results in the elastic region and there is good agreement in the yield pressures. Once in the plastic region there is more divergence in the results although a consistent trend is predicted. One of the analyses predicted a non-axisymmetric mode of deformation as would be expected in reality. Fewer results were received for the creep analysis, however the transient creep results showed consistency, and were bounded by the final-state results

  6. Long-term storage or disposal of HLW-dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M. M.; Raicevic, J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a new concept approach to HLW management founded on deterministic safety philosophy - i.e. long-term storage with final objective of destroying was justified and proposed instead of multi barrier concept with final disposal in extra stable environmental conditions, which are founded on probabilistic safety approach model. As a support to this new concept some methods for destruction of waste which are now accessible, on scientific stage only, as transmutation in fast reactors and accelerators of heavy ions were briefly discussed . It is justified to believe that industrial technology for destruction of HLW would be developed in not so far future. (author).

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in situ experimental program for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be a facility to demonstrate the environmental and operational safety of storing radioactive wastes in a deep geologic bedded salt facility. The WIPP will be located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 30 miles east of the city of Carlsbad. The major focus of the pilot plant operation involves ERDA defense related low and intermediate-level transuranic wastes. The scope of the project also specifically includes experimentation utilizing commercially generated high-level wastes, or alternatively, spent unreprocessed fuel elements. WIPP HLW experiments are being conducted in an inter-related laboratory, bench-scale, and in situ mode. This presentation focuses on the planned in situ experiments which, depending on the availability of commercially reprocessed waste plus delays in the construction schedule of the WIPP, will begin in approximately 1985. Such experiments are necessary to validate preceding laboratory results and to provide actual, total conditions of geologic storage which cannot be adequately simulated. One set of planned experiments involves emplacing bare HLW fragments into direct contact with the bedded salt environment. A second set utilizes full-size canisters of waste emplaced in the salt in the same manner as planned for a future HLW repository. The bare waste experiments will study in an accelerated manner waste-salt bed-brine interactions including matrix integrity/degradation, brine leaching, system chemistry, and potential radionuclide migration through the salt bed. Utilization of full-size canisters of HLW in situ permits us to demonstrate operational effectiveness and safety. Experiments will evaluate corrosion and compatibility interactions between the waste matrix, canister and overpack materials, getter materials, stored energy, waste buoyancy, etc. Using full size canisters also allows us to demonstrate engineered retrievability of wastes, if necessary, at the end of experimentation

  8. Development Support Environment of Business ApplicationsBased on a Multi-Grain-Size Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Koichi; Izumi, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Takahira

    In order to build the Web-based application as a shopping site on the Web, various ideas from the different viewpoints are required, such as enterprise modeling, workflow modeling, software development, and so on. From the above standpoint, this paper proposes an integrated environment to support the whole development process of analysis, design and implementation of business application. In order to reuse know-hows of various ideas in the business application development, we device a multi-grain-size repository, which consists of coarse-, middle-, and fine-grain-size repositories that correspond to the enterprise models, workflow models, and software models, respectively. We also provide a methodology that rebuilds heterogeneous information resources required for the business applications development into a multi-grain-size repository based on ontologies. The contents of the repositories are modeled by the is-a, has-a, and E-R relations, and described by the XML language. We have implemented Java-based prototype environment with the tools dealing with the multi-layered repository and confirmed that it supports us in various phases of business application development including business model manifestation, detailed business model definition and an implementation of business software applications.

  9. Cavern disposal concepts for HLW/SF: assuring operational practicality and safety with maximum programme flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, Ian G.; Apted, Mick; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Most conventional engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for HLW/SF repositories are based on concepts developed in the 1970s and 1980s that assured feasibility with high margins of safety, in order to convince national decision makers to proceed with geological disposal despite technological uncertainties. In the interval since the advent of such 'feasibility designs', significant progress has been made in reducing technological uncertainties, which has lead to a growing awareness of other, equally important uncertainties in operational implementation and challenges regarding social acceptance in many new, emerging national repository programs. As indicated by the NUMO repository concept catalogue study (NUMO, 2004), there are advantages in reassessing how previous designs can be modified and optimised in the light of improved system understanding, allowing a robust EBS to be flexibly implemented to meet nation-specific and site-specific conditions. Full-scale emplacement demonstrations, particularly those carried out underground, have highlighted many of the practical issues to be addressed; e.g., handling of compacted bentonite in humid conditions, use of concrete for support infrastructure, remote handling of heavy radioactive packages in confined conditions, quality inspection, monitoring / ease of retrieval of emplaced packages and institutional control. The CAvern REtrievable (CARE) concept reduces or avoids such issues by emplacement of HLW or SF within multi-purpose transportation / storage / disposal casks in large ventilated caverns at a depth of several hundred metres. The facility allows the caverns to serve as inspectable stores for an extended period of time (up to a few hundred years) until a decision is made to close them. At this point the caverns are backfilled and sealed as a final repository, effectively with the same safety case components as conventional 'feasibility designs'. In terms of operational practicality an d safety, the CARE

  10. Repositories; Repositorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Carolina Braccini; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: cbf@cdtn.br; tellocc@cdtn.br

    2007-11-15

    The use of the nuclear energy is increasing in all areas. Then the radioactive waste management is in continuous development to comply the national and international established requirements. The final objective is to assure that it will not have any contamination of the public or the environmental, and that the exposition doses will be lower than the radiological protection limits. The multi barrier concept for the repository is internationally recognized. Among the repository types, the most used are: near surface, geological formations and of deposition in rock cavities. This article explains the concept and the types of repository and gives some examples of them. (author)

  11. Salt Repository Project Waste Package Program Plan: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.A.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Under the direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created within the DOE by direction of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), the mission of the Salt Repository Project (SRP) is to provide for the development of a candidate salt repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent reactor fuel in a manner that fully protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. In consideration of the program needs and requirements discussed above, the SRP has decided to develop and issue this SRP Waste Package Program Plan. This document is intended to outline how the SRP plans to develop the waste package design and to show, with reasonable assurance, that the developed design will satisfy applicable requirements/performance objectives. 44 refs., 16 figs., 16 tabs

  12. Quality assurance records system for research and development activities in support of geologic repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.; Ryder, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy, is conducting site-specific research for all three candidate sites for the first geologic high-level waste repository, as well as generic research for the second repository. In conjunction with this effort, PNL has developed a quality assurance (QA) program that is applicable to all organizations that are performing research and development (R and D) activities in support of the repository programs. This QA program meets the basic and supplemental requirements of ANSI/ASME NQA-1-1983 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Review Plan for QA Programs for Site Characterization of High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A key part of this program is the handling of QA records that may ultimately support the licensing process for the repository. This paper describes a QA records system that is flexible enough to accommodate several types of research, such as paper studies, test method development, site characterization studies, software development, and hardware design. In addition, the QA records system is acceptable to a variety of sponsors who have licensing concerns. The QA procedures and their relation to the requirements are described. Most important is the discussion on the approaches used to assure that the records are organized such that the user can readily recreate or defend data, conclusions, and recommendations resulting from the research

  13. Development of the Internet Library for the Second Progress Report on R and D for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotsuki, Masao; Ishikawa, Hirohisa

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet Library, the goal of which is to improve the quality assurance of the technical content of the Second Progress Report on R and D into the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. The Internet Library is used to centralize information management for the Second Progress Report. It uses a database system which stores a large quantity of technical memoranda and numeric data which provide the technical basis for the report. Members of the public and specialists are allowed access the data held on the system and may communicate their opinions and expert reviews, through the Internet. (author)

  14. Towards a Comprehensive and Up-To-Date Institutional Repository: Development of a Publications Tracking Process

    KAUST Repository

    Baessa, Mohamed

    2016-06-15

    As our repository matured we found that a concerted effort was needed to establish it as a resource that institutional stakeholders knew they could turn to for reliable information about the research outputs produced by researchers affiliated with or funded by our institution. The initial impetus for this project was the adoption of an institutional open access policy, which necessitated a process to track the publications of institutional authors, deposit items with applicable open access licenses, and notify authors when an accepted manuscript was needed. To support this process we developed a local publications tracking system independent of our hosted DSpace repository that regularly queries publisher and indexer APIs for new publications, checks for relevant permissions policies, identifies institutional authors and helps us send manuscript request emails. We also harvested records for past items and modified our repository to accommodate metadata-only records. The success of these tracking and harvesting services in making our repository comprehensive and up-to-date has allowed us to rely on our repository as the key source of publications information for additional integrations that update ORCID records with publication information, populate a PlumX metrics dashboard and, most recently, support the implementation of a current research information system (CRIS).

  15. Towards a Comprehensive and Up-To-Date Institutional Repository: Development of a Publications Tracking Process

    KAUST Repository

    Baessa, Mohamed A.; Grenz, Daryl M.; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    As our repository matured we found that a concerted effort was needed to establish it as a resource that institutional stakeholders knew they could turn to for reliable information about the research outputs produced by researchers affiliated with or funded by our institution. The initial impetus for this project was the adoption of an institutional open access policy, which necessitated a process to track the publications of institutional authors, deposit items with applicable open access licenses, and notify authors when an accepted manuscript was needed. To support this process we developed a local publications tracking system independent of our hosted DSpace repository that regularly queries publisher and indexer APIs for new publications, checks for relevant permissions policies, identifies institutional authors and helps us send manuscript request emails. We also harvested records for past items and modified our repository to accommodate metadata-only records. The success of these tracking and harvesting services in making our repository comprehensive and up-to-date has allowed us to rely on our repository as the key source of publications information for additional integrations that update ORCID records with publication information, populate a PlumX metrics dashboard and, most recently, support the implementation of a current research information system (CRIS).

  16. Considerations for developing seismic design criteria for nuclear waste storage repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, G.N.; Yanev, P.I.; Scholl, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The function of seismic design criteria is to reduce the potential for hazards that may arise during various stages of the repository life. During the operational phase, the major concern is with the possible effects of earthquakes on surface facilities, underground facilities, and equipment. During the decommissioned phase, the major concern is with the potential effects of earthquakes on the geologic formation, which may result in a reduction in isolation capacity. Existing standards and guides or criteria used for the static and seismic design of licensed nuclear facilities were reviewed and evaluated for their applicability to repository design. This report is directed mainly toward the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories. An initial step in the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories is the development of performance criteria, or minimum standards of acceptable behavior. A number of possible damage modes are identified for the operating phase of the repository; however, no damage modes are foreseen that would perturb the long-term function of the repository, except for the possibility of increased permeability within the rock mass. Subsequent steps in formulating acceptable seismic design criteria for the underground structures involve the quantification of the design process. The report discusses the necessity of specifying the form of ground motion that would be needed for seismic analysis and the procedures that may be used for making ground motion predictions. Further discussions outline what is needed for analysis, including rock properties, failure criteria, modeling techniques, seismic hardening criteria for the host rock mass, and probabilistic considerations

  17. Ambient air monitoring to support HLW repository site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransioli, P.M.; Dixon, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    Site characterization at the Yucca Mountain site includes an ambient air quality and meteorological monitoring program to provide information for environmental and site characterization issues. The program is designed to provide data for four basic purposes: Atmospheric dispersion calculations to estimate impacts of possible airborne releases of radiological material; Engineering design and extreme weather event characterization; Local climate studies for environmental impact analyses and climate characterization; and, Air quality permits required for site characterization work. The program is compiling a database that will provide the basis for analyses and reporting related to the purposes of the program. Except for reporting particulate matter and limited meteorological data to the State of Nevada for an air quality permit condition, the data have yet to be formally analyzed and reported

  18. Conceptualization of a hypothetical high-level nuclear waste repository site in unsaturated, fractured tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.M.; Olague, N.E.; Gallegos, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a performance assessment methodology for the analysis of long-term disposal and isolation of high-level nuclear wastes (HLW) in alternative geologic media. As part of this exercise, SNL created a conceptualization of ground-water flow and radionuclide transport in the far field of a hypothetical HLW repository site located in unsaturated, fractured tuff formations. This study provides a foundation for the development of conceptual mathematical, and numerical models to be used in this performance assessment methodology. This conceptualization is site specific in terms of geometry, the regional ground-water flow system, stratigraphy, and structure in that these are based on information from Yucca Mountain located on the Nevada Test Site. However, in terms of processes in unsaturated, fractured, porous media, the model is generic. This report also provides a review and evaluation of previously proposed conceptual models of unsaturated and saturated flow and solute transport. This report provides a qualitative description of a hypothetical HLW repository site in fractured tuff. However, evaluation of the current knowledge of flow and transport at Yucca Mountain does not yield a single conceptual model. Instead, multiple conceptual models are possible given the existing information

  19. Conceptualization of a hypothetical high-level nuclear waste repository site in unsaturated, fractured tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, A.M.; Olague, N.E.; Gallegos, D.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1991-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a performance assessment methodology for the analysis of long-term disposal and isolation of high-level nuclear wastes (HLW) in alternative geologic media. As part of this exercise, SNL created a conceptualization of ground-water flow and radionuclide transport in the far field of a hypothetical HLW repository site located in unsaturated, fractured tuff formations. This study provides a foundation for the development of conceptual mathematical, and numerical models to be used in this performance assessment methodology. This conceptualization is site specific in terms of geometry, the regional ground-water flow system, stratigraphy, and structure in that these are based on information from Yucca Mountain located on the Nevada Test Site. However, in terms of processes in unsaturated, fractured, porous media, the model is generic. This report also provides a review and evaluation of previously proposed conceptual models of unsaturated and saturated flow and solute transport. This report provides a qualitative description of a hypothetical HLW repository site in fractured tuff. However, evaluation of the current knowledge of flow and transport at Yucca Mountain does not yield a single conceptual model. Instead, multiple conceptual models are possible given the existing information.

  20. Safety studies of HLW-disposal in the Mors salt dome - Support to the salt option of the Pagis project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem Jensen, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The study, which is a support to the Pagis project, covers three tasks concerning the evaluation of the Danish salt dome Mors (variant disposal site): evaluation of the human intrusion scenario where a cavern is excavated near the HLW-repository by solution mining technique. The waste is supposed to be leached during the operation period until the abandoned cavern is closed by convergence and the contaminated brine is pressed up into the overburden. Evaluation of the brine intrusion scenario, where the HLW-repository is inadvertently located close to a major brine pocket which subsequently releases its brine content through defects in the repository to the discharge stream for the catchment area. Collection and description of hydrological data of surface and deep layers (down to circa 700 metres) in the repository region. The data will be used by GSF to calculate the radionuclide migration in the geosphere

  1. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  2. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules

  3. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  4. Communicating the Value of an Institutional Repository: Experiences at Ghana's University for Development Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Edwin S.; Akeriwe, Miriam Linda; Aikins, Angela Achia

    2016-01-01

    The quality of research depends greatly on access to existing information. Institutional repositories (IRs) have the potential to enhance and promote the dissemination of knowledge and research. This may lead to discoveries and innovation alongside maximizing return on investment in research and development. Following some background information,…

  5. The RAGE Advanced Game Technologies Repository for Supporting Applied Game Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiev, Atanas; Grigorov, Alexander; Bontchev, Boyan; Boytchev, Pavel; Stefanov, Krassen; Westera, Wim; Prada, Rui; Hollins, Paul; Moreno Ger, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the structural architecture of the RAGE repository, which is a unique and dedicated infrastructure that provides access to a wide variety of advanced technologies (RAGE software assets) for applied game development. These software assets are reusable across a wide diversity of

  6. COMSOL Multiphysics Model for HLW Canister Filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesterson, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. Wastes containing high concentrations of Al2O3 and Na2O can contribute to nepheline (generally NaAlSiO4) crystallization, which can sharply reduce the chemical durability of high level waste (HLW) glass. Nepheline crystallization can occur during slow cooling of the glass within the stainless steel canister. The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in a WTP HLW canister during filling and cooling. The intent of the model is to support scoping work in the laboratory. It is not intended to provide precise predictions of temperature profiles, but rather to provide a simplified representation of glass cooling profiles within a full scale, WTP HLW canister under various glass pouring rates. These data will be used to support laboratory studies for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of nepheline crystallization. The model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercially available software. The model results were compared to available experimental data, TRR-PLT-080, and were found to yield sufficient results for the scoping nature of the study. The simulated temperatures were within 60 ºC for the centerline, 0.0762m (3 inch) from centerline, and 0.2286m (9 inch) from centerline thermocouples once the thermocouples were covered with glass. The temperature difference between the experimental and simulated values reduced to 40 ºC, 4 hours after the thermocouple was covered, and down to 20 ºC, 6 hours after the thermocouple was covered

  7. Confidence in the long-term safety of deep geological repositories. Its development and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The technical aspects of confidence have been the subject of considerable debate, especially the concept of model validation. The safety case that is provided at a particular stage in the planning, construction, operation or closure of a deep geological repository is a part of a broader decision basis that guides the repository-development process. The basic steps for deriving the safety case at various stages of repository development involve: a safety assessment; and the documentation of the safety assessment, a statement of confidence in the safety indicated by the assessment, and the confirmation of the appropriateness of the safety strategy. The approaches to establish confidence in the evaluation of safety should aim to ensure that the decisions taken within the incremental process of repository development are well-founded. Various aspects of confidence in the evaluation of safety, and their integration within a safety case, are presented in detail in the present report. When communicating confidence in the findings of a safety assessment, clarity in the communication of concepts is always required. Consistent with this requirement, key concepts are specifically defined in the main text of the report. (R.P.)

  8. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Luo Taian; Zhu Guoping; Chen Qingchun

    2007-12-01

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  9. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaodong, Liu [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China); [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Resources and Environment of Ministry of Education, Fuzhou (China); Taian, Luo; Guoping, Zhu; Qingchun, Chen [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China)

    2007-12-15

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  10. Development of repository-wide radionuclide transport model considering the effects of multiple sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Koichiro; Watari, Shingo; Ijiri, Yuji

    1999-11-01

    Safety assessment of the geological isolation system according to the groundwater scenario has traditionally been conducted based on the signal canister configuration and then the safety of total system has been evaluated based on the dose rates which were obtained by multiplying the migration rates released from the engineered barrier and/or the natural barrier by dose conversion factors and total number of canisters disposed in the repository. The dose conversion factors can be obtained from the biosphere analysis. In this study, we focused on the effect of multiple sources due to the disposal of canisters at different positions in the repository. By taking the effect of multiple sources into consideration, concentration interference in the repository region is possible to take place. Therefore, radionuclide transport model/code considering the effect of concentration interference due to the multiple sources was developed to make assessments of the effect quantitatively. The newly developed model/code was verified through the comparison analysis with the existing radionuclide transport analysis code used in the second progress report. In addition, the effect of the concentration interference was evaluated by setting a simple problem using the newly developed analysis code. This results shows that the maximum park value of the migration rates from the repository was about two orders of magnitude lower than that based on single canister configuration. Since the analysis code was developed by assuming that all canisters disposed of along the one-dimensional groundwater flow contribute to the concentration interference in the repository region, the assumption should be verified by conducting two or three-dimensional analysis considering heterogeneous geological structure as a future work. (author)

  11. Developing an Automatic Crawling System for Populating a Digital Repository of Professional Development Resources: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-ran; Yang, Chris; Tosaka, Yuji; Ping, Qing; Mimouni, Houda El

    2016-01-01

    This study is a part of the larger project that develops a sustainable digital repository of professional development resources on emerging data standards and technologies for data organization and management in libraries. Toward that end, the project team developed an automated workflow to crawl for, monitor, and classify relevant web objects…

  12. Third report, development of site suitability and design performance data base for a high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This report presents the results of mining and geotechnical studies provided as support for the development of a technical data base suitable for the generation of a regulatory framework governing high-level nuclear waste disposal: flow path models for basalts, salt domes, and crystalline rocks; simplistic model evaluations; loss of administrative control; repository conceptual designs; repository design considerations; and design performance criteria

  13. Process mining software repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poncin, W.; Serebrenik, A.; Brand, van den M.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Software developers' activities are in general recorded in software repositories such as version control systems, bug trackers and mail archives. While abundant information is usually present in such repositories, successful information extraction is often challenged by the necessity to

  14. Dynamic use of geoscience information to develop scientific understanding for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and safety evaluation of a nuclear waste geologic repository. Scientific understanding dependent upon information from a number of geoscience disciplines is described. A discussion is given on the dynamic use of the information through the different stages. The authors point out the need for abstracting, deriving and updating a quantitative spatial and process model (QSPM) to develop a scientific understanding of site responses as a crucial element in the dynamic procedure

  15. OntoMaven: Maven-based Ontology Development and Management of Distributed Ontology Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Paschke, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    In collaborative agile ontology development projects support for modular reuse of ontologies from large existing remote repositories, ontology project life cycle management, and transitive dependency management are important needs. The Apache Maven approach has proven its success in distributed collaborative Software Engineering by its widespread adoption. The contribution of this paper is a new design artifact called OntoMaven. OntoMaven adopts the Maven-based development methodology and ada...

  16. Use of virtual reality for the development of a nuclear waste repository for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avellar, Ricardo Fernandes de; Mól, Antônio Carlos A.; Machado, Daniel Mol; Santo, André Cotelli do E.; Legey, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    In Brazil the highest amount of waste generated is low and medium level of radiation. Its management and final destination is important for society and the solution, proposed by the government, involves the construction of a National Repository for Radioactive Waste. Using Virtual Reality (VR), this article aims to develop an interactive virtual model of the repository to assist in the study, evaluation, training of personnel and planning of the installation to be implemented. The method was divided into four steps. The first, called 'Requirements Specification and Survey', aimed at acquiring information about the terrain and future buildings of the installation in the real world. The next step, known as 'Modeling the Environment' is the construction of the virtual environment itself according to the specifications of the previous method. The third, called 'Functionality Implementation' consists of inserting functionalities into the system, such as performing some tasks present in the repository. Finally, the last step is the interactive virtual model of the national repository for radioactive waste, with this tool users can study, evaluate and train conditions/situations of the installation. In conclusion, the results have shown that the tool presented in this work is a possible application of the VR for dissemination and training in nuclear installations. Using this tool, users can visualize and plan strategies to be carried out in a repository, without interrupting the operation of the installation. It can be used for training and operations simulations, aiming to improve the processes without exposing the operators to the radiation. (author)

  17. Use of virtual reality for the development of a nuclear waste repository for training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avellar, Ricardo Fernandes de; Mól, Antônio Carlos A.; Machado, Daniel Mol, E-mail: ricardo.arq2017@gmail.com, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: machado.mol@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santo, André Cotelli do E.; Legey, Ana Paula, E-mail: cotelli.andre@gmail.com [Centro Universitário Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In Brazil the highest amount of waste generated is low and medium level of radiation. Its management and final destination is important for society and the solution, proposed by the government, involves the construction of a National Repository for Radioactive Waste. Using Virtual Reality (VR), this article aims to develop an interactive virtual model of the repository to assist in the study, evaluation, training of personnel and planning of the installation to be implemented. The method was divided into four steps. The first, called 'Requirements Specification and Survey', aimed at acquiring information about the terrain and future buildings of the installation in the real world. The next step, known as 'Modeling the Environment' is the construction of the virtual environment itself according to the specifications of the previous method. The third, called 'Functionality Implementation' consists of inserting functionalities into the system, such as performing some tasks present in the repository. Finally, the last step is the interactive virtual model of the national repository for radioactive waste, with this tool users can study, evaluate and train conditions/situations of the installation. In conclusion, the results have shown that the tool presented in this work is a possible application of the VR for dissemination and training in nuclear installations. Using this tool, users can visualize and plan strategies to be carried out in a repository, without interrupting the operation of the installation. It can be used for training and operations simulations, aiming to improve the processes without exposing the operators to the radiation. (author)

  18. THE DECISION TO RECOMMEND YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND THE NEXT STEPS TOWARD LICENSED REPOSITORY DEVELOPMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    After more than 20 years of carefully planned and reviewed scientific field work by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, and numerous other organizations, Secretary of Energy Abraham concluded in January that the Yucca Mountain site is suitable, within the meaning of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, for development as a permanent nuclear waste and spent fuel repository. In February, the Secretary recommended to the President that the site be developed for licensed disposal of these wastes, and the President transmitted this recommendation to Congress. This paper summarizes key technical and national interest considerations that provided the basis for the recommendation. It also discusses the program's near-term plans for repository development if Congress designates the site

  19. Thermal analysis of the vertical disposal for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Honggang; Wang Ju; Liu Yuemiao; Su Rui

    2013-01-01

    The temperature on the canister surface is set to be no more than 100℃ in the high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository, it is a criterion to dictate the thermal dimension of the repository. The factors that affect the temperature on the canister surface include the initial power of the canister, the thermal properties of material as the engineered barrier system (EBS), the gaps around the canister in the EBS, the initial ground temperature and thermal properties of the host rock, the repository layout, etc. This article examines the thermal properties of the material in host rock and the EBS, the thermal conductivity properties of the different gaps in the EBS, the temperature evolution around the single canister by using the analysis method and the numerical method. The findings are as follows: 1) The most important and the sensitive parameter is the initial disposal power of the canister; 2) The two key factors that affect the highest temperature on the canister surface are the parameter of uncertainty and nature variability of material as the host rock and the EBS, and the gaps around the canister in the EBS; 3) The temperature difference between the canister and bentonite is no more than 10℃ , and the bigger the inner gaps are, the bigger the temperature difference will be; when the gap between the bentonite and the host rock is filled with water, the temperature difference becomes small, but it will be 1∼3℃ higher than the gaps filled will air. (authors)

  20. Final Report - Glass Formulation Development and Testing for DWPF High AI2O3 HLW Sludges, VSL-10R1670-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/20/10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work described in this Final Report is to develop and identify glass frit compositions for a specified DWPF high-aluminum based sludge waste stream that maximizes waste loading while maintaining high production rate for the waste composition provided by ORP/SRS. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale, vertical gradient furnace, and confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system. The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests. The DM100-BL was used for previous tests on HLW glass compositions that were used to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter. It was also used to process compositions with waste loadings limited by aluminum, bismuth, and chromium, to investigate the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition, to process glass formulations at compositional and property extremes, and to investigate crystal settling on a composition that exhibited one percent crystals at 963{degrees}C (i.e., close to the WTP limit). The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. The tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Specific objectives for the melter tests are as follows: Determine maximum glass production rates without bubbling for a simulated SRS Sludge Batch 19 (SB19). Demonstrate a feed rate equivalent to 1125 kg/m{sup 2}/day glass production using melt pool bubbling. Process a high waste loading glass composition with the simulated SRS SB19 waste and measure the quality of the glass product. Determine the effect of argon as a bubbling gas on waste processing and the glass product including feed processing rate, glass redox, melter emissions, etc.. Determine differences in feed processing and glass characteristics for SRS SB19 waste simulated by the co-precipitated and direct

  1. Implementation of a geological disposal facility (GDF) in the UK by the NDA Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD): the potential for interaction between the co-located ILW/LLW and HLW/SF components of a GDF - 16306

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, George; Hicks, Tim; Watson, Sarah; Norris, Simon

    2009-01-01

    for ILW/LLW and HLW/SF modules to be co-located without compromising key safety functions of different barrier components, and this reflects international precedents, e.g. the Andra and Nagra repository designs. There are two key technical issues that need to be managed in designing the geometry of the co-located GDF: (i) the heat flux from the HLW/SF module interacting with the ILW/LLW module, and (ii) the potential for development of an alkaline plume from the ILW/LLW module interacting with the HLW/SF module; particularly within fractured host rocks. (authors)

  2. Buffer development in KBS-3H repository design variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, T.; Boergesson, L.; Autio, J.; Oehberg, A.; Anttila, P.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. KBS-3H project is a joint project between Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB) in Sweden and Posiva Oy in Finland. The overall objectives of the project phase are to demonstrate that the horizontal deposition alternative is technically feasible and to demonstrate that it fulfils the same long-term safety requirements as the reference design KBS-3V, which calls for vertical emplacement of the canisters in individual deposition holes. KBS-3H and KBS-3V are the two variants of the KBS-3 method. In KBS-3H each spent fuel canister, with a surrounding layer of bentonite clay, is placed in a perforated steel cylinder prior to disposal; the entire assembly is called the supercontainer. Several super-containers are positioned along up to 300 m long approximately horizontal deposition drifts. The drifts will be excavated at the depth of about 420 m in bedrock. Bentonite distance blocks separate the super-containers, one from another, along the drift. The bentonite inside the super-containers and the bentonite distance blocks are jointly termed the buffer. There are two KBS-3H design alternatives; a design based on Drainage, Artificial Watering and air Evacuation (DAWE) and a less mature alternative called Semi Tight Compartments design (STC). Significant effort has been made in the KBS-3H project to solve the functional uncertainties related to buffer behaviour, which could e.g. cause piping, erosion, displacement and rupture of distance blocks. Some of the issues were prioritised as being important if there was clear uncertainty regarding the ability of the buffer to fulfil the specified requirements with respect to this issue. The design components in KBS-3H design alternatives include currently significant amounts of iron and titanium as possible alternative material to iron. Therefore the buffer development work has also included studies on the Fe-bentonite and Ti-bentonite interaction. The work has included testing in

  3. Dynamic use of geoscience information to develop scientific understanding for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    The development and safety evaluation of a nuclear waste geologic repository require a proper scientific understanding of the site response. Such scientific understanding depends on information from a number of geoscience disciplines, including geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics and hydrogeology. The information comes in four stages: (1) general regional survey data base, (2) surface-based testing, (3) exploratory shaft testing, and (4) repository construction and evaluation. A discussion is given on the dynamic use of the information through the different stages. We point out the need for abstracting, deriving and updating a quantitative spatial and process model (QSPM) to develop a scientific understanding of site responses as a crucial element in the dynamic procedure. 2 figs

  4. The general situation of clay site for high-level waste geological disposal repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changxuan; Liu Xiaodong; Liu Pinghui

    2008-01-01

    Host medium is vitally important for safety of high-level radiaoactive waste (HLW) geological disposal. Clay, as host media of geological repository of HLW, has received greater attention for its inherent advantages. This paper summarizes IAEA and OECD/NEA's some safety guides on site selection and briefly introduces the process of the site selection, their studies and the characteristics of the clay formations in Switz-erland, France and Belgian. Based on these analyses, some suggestions are made to China's HLW repository clay site selection. (authors)

  5. Comparing technical concepts for disposal of Belgian vitrified HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel, J.; Bock, C. de; Boyazis, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The choice of a suitable repository design for different categories of radioactive waste is an important element in the decisional process that will eventually lead to the waste disposal in geological ground layers during the next decades. Most countries are in the process of elaborating different technical solutions for their EBS '. Considering possible design alternatives offers more flexibility to cope with remaining uncertainties and allows optimizing some elements of the EBS in the future. However, it is not feasible to continue carrying out detailed studies for a large number of alternative design options. At different stages in the decisional process, choices, even preliminary ones, have to be made. Although the impact of different stakeholders (regulator, waste agencies, waste producers, research centers,...) in making these design choices can differ from one country to another, the choices should be based on sound, objective, clear and unambiguous justification grounds. Moreover, the arguments should be carefully reported and easy to understand by the decision makers. ONDRAF/NIRAS recently elaborated three alternative designs for the disposal of vitrified HLW. These three designs are briefly described in the next section. A first series of technological studies pointed out that the three options are feasible. It would however be unreasonable to continue R and D work on all three alternatives in parallel. It is therefore planned to make a preliminary choice of a reference design for the vitrified HLW in 2003. This selection will depend on the way the alternative design options can be evaluated against a number of criteria, mainly derived from general repository design requirements. The technique of multi-criteria analysis (MCA) will be applied as a tool for making the optimum selection, considering all selection criteria and considering different strategic approaches. This paper describes the used methodology. The decision on the actual selection will be

  6. Configuration management plan. System definition and project development. Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This is the configuration management Plan for the AdaNet Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) contract. This document establishes the requirements and activities needed to ensure that the products developed for the AdaNet RBSE contract are accurately identified, that proposed changes to the product are systematically evaluated and controlled, that the status of all change activity is known at all times, and that the product achieves its functional performance requirements and is accurately documented.

  7. A dose of HLW reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, J.

    1993-01-01

    What many people were sure they knew, and some others were fairly confident they knew, was acknowledged by the US Department of Energy in December: A monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility will not be ready to accept spent fuel by January 31, 1998. A dose of reality has thus been added to the US high-level radioactive waste scene. Perhaps as important as the new reality is the practical, businesslike nature of the DOE's plan. The Department's proposal has the quality of a plan aimed at genuinely solving a problem rather just going through the motions. (In contrast, some readers are familiar with New York State's procedures for siting and licensing a low-level waste facility - procedures so labyrinthine that they are much more likely to protect political careers in that state than they are to achieve an LLW site). The DOE has received a lot of criticism - some justified, some not - about its handling of the HLW program. In this instance, it is proposing what many in the industry might have recommended: Make available storage capacity for spent nuclear fuel at existing federal government sites

  8. Regional Geologic Evaluations for Disposal of HLW and SNF: The Pierre Shale of the Northern Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-14

    The DOE Spent Fuel and Waste Technology (SWFT) R&D Campaign is supporting research on crystalline rock, shale (argillite) and salt as potential host rocks for disposal of HLW and SNF in a mined geologic repository. The distribution of these three potential repository host rocks is limited to specific regions of the US and to different geologic and hydrologic environments (Perry et al., 2014), many of which may be technically suitable as a site for mined geologic disposal. This report documents a regional geologic evaluation of the Pierre Shale, as an example of evaluating a potentially suitable shale for siting a geologic HLW repository. This report follows a similar report competed in 2016 on a regional evaluation of crystalline rock that focused on the Superior Province of the north-central US (Perry et al., 2016).

  9. VerSi - A Methodology for a Comparison of Potential Repository Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hund, Wilhelm

    2010-09-01

    In the year 2000 the moratorium on the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome as a potential repository for all kinds of radioactive waste became effective as a result of the consensus agreement between the Federal Government and the utilities about phasing out nuclear energy in Germany. All exploration activities were interrupted for at maximum ten years to clarify conceptual and safety relevant questions. A new set of safety requirements for the final disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in deep geological formations was established in July 2009 by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU). As the BMU intended to carry out a comparison of potential repository sites it was necessary to initiate the development of a methodology for the identification of the site with the highest level of safety. A comparison of different repository sites requires a tool ensuring most confident and objective criteria for the comparison, whereas up to present long-term safety analyses were focused on confirming the suitability of sites by meeting the protection objectives by the measures of dose and risk. Within the 2006 established project VerSi a methodology for comparing different sites in different host rocks will be developed on the basis of long-term safety analyses taking into account geoscientific databases, inventory of radioactive waste, waste containers, corresponding disposal concepts and the feasibility of appropriate backfilling and closure concepts. The development of the method is aiming at providing measures other than dose and risk for the evaluation of the level of safety. For testing the tools a HLW-repository hosted in a salt dome (Gorleben) will be compared with a generic HLW-repository in consolidated clay as a host rock. As until now in Germany no clay stone site has been investigated for hosting a HLW repository, the required data are transferred from international research projects and repository concepts

  10. Waste-rock interactions in the immediate repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.

    1977-01-01

    The high level wastes (HLW's) to be placed underground in rock formations will contain significant amounts of radioactive decay heat for the first hundred-or-so years of isolation. Several physical-chemical changes analogous to natural geochemical processes can occur during this ''thermal period.'' The waste canister can act as a heat source and cause changes in the mineralogy and properties of the surrounding rocks. Geochemically, this is ''contact metamorphism.'' In the event that the canister is corroded and breached, chemical reactions can occur between the HLW, the surrounding rock and possibly the remains of the canister. In a dry repository which has not been backfilled (and thus pressurized) these interactions could be slow at best and with rates decreasing rapidly as the HLW cools. However, significant interactions can occur in years, months or even days under hydrothermal conditions. These conditions could be created by the combination of HLW heat, overburden pressure and water mobilized from the rocks or derived from groundwater intrusion. At the end of the thermal period these interaction products would constitute the actual HLW form (or ''source term'') subject to the low temperature leaching and migration processes under investigation in other laboratories. It is quite possible that these interaction product waste forms will have superior properties compared to the original HLW. Experimental programs initiated at Penn State during the last year aim at determining the nature of any chemical or mineralogical changes in, or interactions between, HLW solids and host rocks under various repository ambients. The accompanying figures describe the simulated HLW forms and the experimental approach and techniques. Studies with basalts as the repository rock are supported by Rockwell Hanford Operations and with shales by the Office of Waste Isolation

  11. Biosphere conceptual model development in the frame of Baita Bihor repository safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunescu, N.; Margineanu, R.; Ene, D.

    2002-01-01

    The topic of this paper is the development of the biosphere model in the frame of the preliminary performance assessment of the Romanian National L and ILW repository, Baita-Bihor. The work presents the actual understanding of the radionuclide pathways through the repository adjacent area and their conceptualization, collection of required data, implementation of model and preliminary calculation results. The model takes into consideration a leaching scenario from the near field and the transport of radionuclides by river water. The critical group is a small community of inhabitants relying on the local resources, which constitutes an agriculture community 'small farm system'. On the basis of the defined specifications (biosphere equations and data), application of model and dose rate estimates were performed by the ABRICOT code. (author)

  12. Design and Development of a Web Based Digital Repository for Scholarly Communication: A Case of NM‐AIST Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasiwasi J. Mgonzo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Institutional repositories are essential research infrastructures for research ‐based universities. A properly dimensioned institutional repository has the potential to increase research impact and enhance the visibility of an institution through its scholarly outputs. The aim of the study reported in this paper was to design and develop a web‐based digital repository for scholarly communications using NM‐AIST as a case study. The system was developed using open source software. Findings obtained from system validation tests show that the system is a viable solution to the major challenges encountered in the management and sharing of scholarly information at the institution.

  13. R and D programme for HLW disposal in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboya, Takao

    1997-01-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has been active in developing an R and D programme for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in accordance with the overall HLW management programme defined by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) of Japan. The aim of the R and D activities at the current stage is to provide a scientific and technical basis for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan, which is turn promotes understanding of the safety concept not only in the scientific and technical community but also by the general public. As a major milestone in the R and D programme, PNC submitted a first progress report, referred to as H3, in September 1992. H3 summarised the results of R and D activities up to March 1992 and identified priority issues for further study. The second progress report, scheduled to be submitted around 2000, and should demonstrated more rigorously and transparently the feasibility of the specified disposal concept. It should also provide input for the siting and regulatory processes, which will be set in motion after the year 2000. (author). 10 refs., 4 figs

  14. Framework and Challenges for Initiating Multinational Cooperation for the Development of a Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication is concerned with radioactive waste that requires geological disposal. It discusses the partnership arrangements necessary for the development of a multinational repository for disposal of this waste, but it also emphasizes that countries should not rely solely on a multinational solution and should in addition have coherent national plans for disposal (a dual track strategy). The publication focuses on multinational approaches based on the IAEA scenario for cooperation among countries in joint projects for the establishment of a shared geological repository. It describes the phased approach that would be needed, indicating the decision processes to be undertaken by partners in the multinational project, both within a national context and in the scope of the joint endeavour. It highlights a wide range of legal and institutional aspects, including the contractual obligations among partners, the economic and financial arrangements, liabilities, nuclear security, regulatory and legislative aspects, waste transportation arrangements, and social issues. It also addresses the uncertainties and risks involved in the implementation of a multinational repository

  15. Nuclear waste repository in basalt: preconceptual design guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    The development of the basalt waste isolation program parallels the growing need for permanent, environmentally safe, and secure means to store nuclear wastes. The repository will be located within the Columbia Plateau basalt formations where these ends can be met and radiological waste can be stored. These wastes will be stored such that the wastes may be retrieved from storage for a period after placement. After the retrieval period, the storage locations will be prepared for terminal storage. The terminal storage requirements will include decommissioning provisions. The facility boundaries will encompass no more than several square miles of land which will be above a subsurface area where the geologic makeup is primarily deep basaltic rock. The repository will receive, from an encapsulation site(s), nuclear waste in the form of canisters (not more than 18.5 feet x 16 inches in diameter) and containers (55-gallon drums). Canisters will contain spent fuel (after an interim 5-year storage period), solidified high-level wastes (HLW), or intermediate-level wastes (ILW). The containers (drums) will package the low-level transuranic wastes (LL-TRU). The storage capacity of the repository will be expanded in a time-phased program which will require that subsurface development (repository expansion) be conducted concurrently with waste storage operations. The repository will be designed to store the nuclear waste generated within the predictable future and to allow for reasonable expansion. The development and assurance of safe waste isolation is of paramount importance. All activities will be dedicated to the protection of public health and the environment. The repository will be licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Extensive efforts will be made to assure selection of a suitable site which will provide adequate isolation

  16. Nuclear waste repository in basalt: preconceptual design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The development of the basalt waste isolation program parallels the growing need for permanent, environmentally safe, and secure means to store nuclear wastes. The repository will be located within the Columbia Plateau basalt formations where these ends can be met and radiological waste can be stored. These wastes will be stored such that the wastes may be retrieved from storage for a period after placement. After the retrieval period, the storage locations will be prepared for terminal storage. The terminal storage requirements will include decommissioning provisions. The facility boundaries will encompass no more than several square miles of land which will be above a subsurface area where the geologic makeup is primarily deep basaltic rock. The repository will receive, from an encapsulation site(s), nuclear waste in the form of canisters (not more than 18.5 feet x 16 inches in diameter) and containers (55-gallon drums). Canisters will contain spent fuel (after an interim 5-year storage period), solidified high-level wastes (HLW), or intermediate-level wastes (ILW). The containers (drums) will package the low-level transuranic wastes (LL-TRU). The storage capacity of the repository will be expanded in a time-phased program which will require that subsurface development (repository expansion) be conducted concurrently with waste storage operations. The repository will be designed to store the nuclear waste generated within the predictable future and to allow for reasonable expansion. The development and assurance of safe waste isolation is of paramount importance. All activities will be dedicated to the protection of public health and the environment. The repository will be licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Extensive efforts will be made to assure selection of a suitable site which will provide adequate isolation.

  17. Development of a central final repository management for the coordination of the waste for Schacht Konrad from public authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graffunder, Iris; Dominke-Bendix, Carola; Waldek, Achim

    2012-01-01

    The central final repository management is supposed to fulfill the following tasks: active collaboration of Konrad contract draft, signing of internal contracts and agreements, cooperation contract with GNS, cooperation with coordination authorities, inventory taking of wastes (existing inventory and prognosis) and interim storage capacities of public authorities, development of planning and management software, optimization of the final repository documentation, container management, logistics concept, long-term disposal planning and prognosis, planning and coordination of the annual waste amount, management and documentation of disposed waste allocation, coordination of transport schedules, consulting service for waste obligations (final repository requirements, product control, documentation).

  18. WORKSHOP ON DEVELOPMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE GETTERS FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN WASTE REPOSITORY: PROCEEDINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.C. Holt

    2006-01-01

    One of the important that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently undertaking is the development of a high-level nuclear waste repository to be located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concern is generated by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is due to potential releases as groundwater contamination, as described in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The dose to an off-site individual using this groundwater for drinking and irrigation is dominated by four radionuclides: Tc-99, I-127, Np-237, and U-238. Ideally, this dose would be limited to a single radionuclide, U-238; in other words, YMP would resemble a uranium ore body, a common geologic feature in the Western U.S. For this reason and because of uncertainties in the behavior of Tc-99, I-127, and Np-237, it would be helpful to limit the amount of Tc, I, and Np leaving the repository, which would greatly increase the confidence in the long-term performance of YMP. An approach to limiting the migration of Tc, I, and Np that is complementary to the existing YMP repository design plans is to employ sequestering agents or ''getters'' for these radionuclides such that their migration is greatly hindered, thus decreasing the amount of radionuclide leaving the repository. Development of such getters presents a number of significant challenges. The getter must have a high affinity and high selectivity for the radionuclide in question since there is approximately a 20- to 50-fold excess of other fission products and a 1000-fold excess of uranium in addition to the ions present in the groundwater. An even greater challenge is that the getters must function over a period greater than the half-life of the radionuclide (greater than 5 half-lives would be ideal). Typically, materials with a high affinity for Tc, I, or Np are not sufficiently durable. For example, strong-base ion exchange resins have a very high affinity for TcO 4 - but are not expected to be durable. On the other hand, durable materials, such as

  19. WORKSHOP ON DEVELOPMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE GETTERS FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN WASTE REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Holt

    2006-03-13

    One of the important that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently undertaking is the development of a high-level nuclear waste repository to be located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concern is generated by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is due to potential releases as groundwater contamination, as described in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The dose to an off-site individual using this groundwater for drinking and irrigation is dominated by four radionuclides: Tc-99, I-127, Np-237, and U-238. Ideally, this dose would be limited to a single radionuclide, U-238; in other words, YMP would resemble a uranium ore body, a common geologic feature in the Western U.S. For this reason and because of uncertainties in the behavior of Tc-99, I-127, and Np-237, it would be helpful to limit the amount of Tc, I, and Np leaving the repository, which would greatly increase the confidence in the long-term performance of YMP. An approach to limiting the migration of Tc, I, and Np that is complementary to the existing YMP repository design plans is to employ sequestering agents or ''getters'' for these radionuclides such that their migration is greatly hindered, thus decreasing the amount of radionuclide leaving the repository. Development of such getters presents a number of significant challenges. The getter must have a high affinity and high selectivity for the radionuclide in question since there is approximately a 20- to 50-fold excess of other fission products and a 1000-fold excess of uranium in addition to the ions present in the groundwater. An even greater challenge is that the getters must function over a period greater than the half-life of the radionuclide (greater than 5 half-lives would be ideal). Typically, materials with a high affinity for Tc, I, or Np are not sufficiently durable. For example, strong-base ion exchange resins have a very high affinity for TcO{sub 4}{sup -} but are not expected to be durable. On the other

  20. Threshold Assessment: Definition of Acceptable Sites as Part of Site Selection for the Japanese HLW Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, S.A.; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Webb, E.K.; Makino, Hitoshi; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Baba, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Umeki, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    For the last ten years, the Japanese High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) repository program has focused on assessing the feasibility of a basic repository concept, which resulted in the recently published H12 Report. As Japan enters the implementation phase, a new organization must identify, screen and choose potential repository sites. Thus, a rapid mechanism for determining the likelihood of site suitability is critical. The threshold approach, described here, is a simple mechanism for defining the likelihood that a site is suitable given estimates of several critical parameters. We rely on the results of a companion paper, which described a probabilistic performance assessment simulation of the HLW reference case in the H12 report. The most critical two or three input parameters are plotted against each other and treated as spatial variables. Geostatistics is used to interpret the spatial correlation, which in turn is used to simulate multiple realizations of the parameter value maps. By combining an array of realizations, we can look at the probability that a given site, as represented by estimates of this combination of parameters, would be good host for a repository site

  1. Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab

  2. Development of Spherical Near Field Model for Geological Radioactive Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Lee, K. J.; Chang, S. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. J.; Chang, S. H. [Khalifa Univ. of Science/Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2012-03-15

    Modeling for geological radioactive waste repository can be divided into 3 parts. They are near field modeling related to engineered barrier, far field modeling related to natural barrier and biosphere modeling. In order to make the general application for safety assessment of geological waste repository, spherical geometry near field model has been developed. This model can be used quite extensively when users calculate equivalent spherical geometry for specific engineered barrier like equivalent waste radius, equivalent barrier radius and etc. Only diffusion was considered for general purpose but advection part can be updated. Goldsim and Goldsim Radionuclide Transport (RT) module were chosen and used as developing tool for the flexible modeling. Developer can freely make their own model with developer friendly graphic interface by using Goldsim. Furthermore, model with user friendly graphic interface can be developed by using Goldsim Dashboard Authoring module. The model has been validated by comparing the result with that of another model, inserting similar inputs and conditions. The model has been proved to be reasonably operating from the comparison result by validation process. Cylindrical model can be developed as a further work based on the knowledge and experience from this research.

  3. Development of Spherical Near Field Model for Geological Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Lee, K. J.; Chang, S. H.; Lee, K. J.; Chang, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling for geological radioactive waste repository can be divided into 3 parts. They are near field modeling related to engineered barrier, far field modeling related to natural barrier and biosphere modeling. In order to make the general application for safety assessment of geological waste repository, spherical geometry near field model has been developed. This model can be used quite extensively when users calculate equivalent spherical geometry for specific engineered barrier like equivalent waste radius, equivalent barrier radius and etc. Only diffusion was considered for general purpose but advection part can be updated. Goldsim and Goldsim Radionuclide Transport (RT) module were chosen and used as developing tool for the flexible modeling. Developer can freely make their own model with developer friendly graphic interface by using Goldsim. Furthermore, model with user friendly graphic interface can be developed by using Goldsim Dashboard Authoring module. The model has been validated by comparing the result with that of another model, inserting similar inputs and conditions. The model has been proved to be reasonably operating from the comparison result by validation process. Cylindrical model can be developed as a further work based on the knowledge and experience from this research

  4. Managing and Evaluating Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccala, Alesia; Oppenheim, Charles; Dhiensa, Rajveen

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: We examine the role of the digital repository manager, discuss the future of repository management and evaluation and suggest that library and information science schools develop new repository management curricula. Method: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with managers of five different types of repositories and a Web-based…

  5. Preliminary formulation studies for a ''hydroceramic'' alternative waste form for INEEL HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemer, D.D.; Gougar, M.L.D.; Grutzeck, M.W.; Scheetz, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    Herein the authors discuss scoping studies performed to develop an efficient way to prepare the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) nominally high-level (∼40 W/m 3 ) calcined radioactive waste (HLW) and liquid metal (sodium) reactor coolants for disposal. The investigated approach implements the chemistry of Hanford's cancrinite-making clay reaction process via Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) formed-under-elevated-temperatures-and-pressures concrete monolith-making technology to make hydroceramics (HCs). The HCs differ from conventional Portland cement/blast furnace slag (PC/BFS) grouts in that the binder minerals formed during the curing process are hydrated alkali-aluminosilicates (feldspathoids-sodalites, cancrinites, and zeolites) rather than hydrated calcium silicates (CSH). This is desirable because (a) US defense-type radioactive wastes generally contain much more sodium and aluminum than calcium; (b) sodalites/cancrinites do a much better job of retaining the anionic components of real radioactive waste (e.g., nitrate) than do calcium silicates; (c) natural feldspathoids form from glasses (and therefore are more stable) in that region of the United States where a repository for this sort of waste could be sited; and (d) if eventually deemed necessary, feldspathoid-type concrete wasteforms could be hot-isostatically-pressed into even more durable materials without removing them from their original canisters

  6. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Collaborative Development of Linked Data for Oceanographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, Robert; Chandler, Cynthia; Stocks, Karen; Smith, Shawn; Clark, Paul; Shepherd, Adam; Moore, Carla; Beaulieu, Stace

    2013-04-01

    The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program is developing infrastructure to ensure the underway sensor data from U.S. academic oceanographic research vessels are routinely and consistently documented, preserved in long-term archives, and disseminated to the science community. The entire R2R Catalog is published online as a Linked Data collection, making it easily accessible to encourage discovery and integration with data at other repositories. We are developing the R2R Linked Data collection with specific goals in mind: 1.) We facilitate data access and reuse by publishing the richest possible collection of resources to describe vessels, cruises, instruments, and datasets from the U.S. academic fleet, including data quality assessment results and clean trackline navigation; 2.) We facilitate data citation through the entire lifecycle from field acquisition to shoreside archiving to journal articles and global syntheses, by publishing Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for datasets and encoding them directly into our Linked Data resources; and 3.) We facilitate federation with other repositories such as the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO), InterRidge Vents Database, and Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS), by reciprocal linking between RDF resources and supporting the RDF Query Language. R2R participates in the Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP), a joint European-U.S.-Australian partnership to facilitate the sharing of data and documentation across international borders. We publish our controlled vocabularies as a Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) concept collection, and are working toward alignment with SeaDataNet and other community-standard terms using the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). http://rvdata.us/

  7. Long-term stability of the near-field about high-level radioactive waste repository in thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling action condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuemiao; Wang Ju; Ke Dan; Cai Meifeng

    2008-01-01

    It is a long-term process for the high-level radioactive waste repository, from opening, construction to end of its service. The long-term stability of the near-field is the key issue for the design of HLW repository because the opening and heat generated from the HLW. Through a nationwide investigation, Beishan area, a Gobi desert in Gansu province, is considered as a suitable candidate and GMZ bentonite deposit which located in Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia has been proposed for the supplier of buffer/backfill material for HLW geological repository in China. According to the R and D guide of high-level radioactive waste disposal in China, the 3D model of HLW repository with high-level radioactive waste, canister and buffer/backfill material is established using FLAC3D. To take into account in situ stress, geothermal gradient, groundwater, thermal relief of HLW and swelling pressure of buffer/backfill material, the evolution of temperature, stress and displacement of HLW repository under thermo-mechanical coupling, hydro-mechanical coupling and thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling conditions was analyzed respectively. The long-term stability of HLW repository in Beishan area was studied. (authors)

  8. Effects of repository conditions on environmental impact reduction by recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joonhong

    2010-01-01

    The environmental impacts (EI) of high-level wastes (HLW) disposed of in a water-saturated repository (WSR) and in the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) for various fuel cycle cases have been evaluated and compared to observe the difference in the recycling effects for differing repository conditions. With the impacts of direct spent fuel disposal in each repository as the reference level, separation of actinides by Urex+ and borosilicate vitrification clearly reduces the environmental impacts of YMR, while separation by Purex and borosilicate vitrification would not necessarily reduce the environmental impact of WSR. (authors)

  9. Integrated management data system for radioactive waste repositories (SGI3R) - development of the inventory module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fabio; Tello, Cledola Cassia O. de

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil, CNEN is responsible for the intermediate and final storage of radioactive waste generated in the country. The CDTN/CNEN coordinates the RBMN Project for the implementation of the National Repository for disposal radioactive waste of low- and intermediate-level. The results of this Project should be presented so that all data being easily retrievable and useful for all institutions involved, including the regulators. To achieve this goal it was developed at the Waste Management Department - SEGRE/CDTN - a management database system, called 'Integrated Management System for the Management of Repository for Radioactive Waste' (SGI3R). The System consists of relational tables, forms and reports, preserving all available information, avoiding duplication of efforts, additional costs, and it will additionally give support to improve the management of RBMN Project. This paper presents a summary of this development with emphasis on the INVENTORY Module. The data from the inventory of disused sealed sources, which are stored in CDTN, were used to test the functionality of this module and of the SGI3R. These sources were categorized according to guidelines of the IAEA, and it was also presented how they should be safely managed over time. (author)

  10. Symposium on the development of nuclear waste policy: Siting the high-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijawka, K.D.; Mushkatel, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) attempted to formulate a viable national policy for managing the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The NWPA authorized the selection of two repository sites: the first to be constructed in the West and a second site developed in the eastern United States. A detailed process for site selection was outlined in the NWPA. In addition, the NWPA authorized open-quotes the development of a waste transportation system; required the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit a proposal to construct a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) after conducting a study of the need for, and feasibility of such a facility; and required the President to evaluate the use of the repositories ... for the disposal of high-level waste resulting from defense activitiesclose quotes (DOE, 1988, p. 1). A series of provisions granting oversight participation to states and Indian tribes, as well as a compensation package for the ultimate host state were also included. Responsibility for implementing the NWPA was assigned to DOE

  11. Implementation of technical conservatism in the development of nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) waste management program is committed to assuring the safe disposal of radioactive waste. It is recognized that long-term disposal concepts will contain inherent uncertainties in predictive techniques and scientific information. Accordingly, conservative approaches ae being followed to enhance levels of confidence that the disposal system will perform in such a manner that the established performance requirements will be met. Limiting values of critical parameters will be established for each site based on its inherent characteristics prior to beginning site development. The performance limits will be established for each geometric region of the repository system and be applied simultaneously to assure that no single limit is violated over the repository life cycle. A site-specific set of specifications will be determined when the site is fully characterized, establishing a conservative design basis to increase confidence in safe system performance. The implementation of the NWTS program policy on technical conservatism, as discussed in this document, takes two forms--(1) conservatism in the conduct of the program and (2) conservatism in the performance of the disposal system. The first is achieved by a stepwise approach to system development and operation, the systems viewpoint, the retrievability requirement, and the extensive use of peer reviews throughout the conduct of the program. The second is achieved by the proper selection and application of conservative design and operational limits

  12. Economic and fiscal impacts of large-scale development projects: implications for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leistritz, F.L.; Murdock, S.H.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station)

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the local economic and fiscal implications of siting high-level nuclear waste repositories in rural areas. The economic and fiscal effects of repository development fall into two categories: (1) standard impacts similar to those that would be associated with developing any large-scale industrial facility in an isolated area; (2) special impacts that result from the hazardous nature of the nuclear materials stored and from federal ownership of the facility. Standard economic and fiscal impacts include employment effects (direct and secondary), local income changes, alterations in community price structures, effects on community services, and changes in revenues and costs for local jurisdictions. Special impacts include the possibility of diminished activity in other basic economic sectors, negative effects on the area's long-term growth prospects and a consequent dampening of investment in the local trade an service sectors, additional costs for local jurisdictions (e.g., for preparing evacuation plans), and limited local tax revenues resulting from the tax-exempt status of the facility. These special effects are difficult to quantify and require additional analysis. 47 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  13. The cathedral and the bazaar of e-repository development: encouraging community engagement with moving pictures and sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Wong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers an insight into the development, use and governance of e-repositories for learning and teaching, illustrated by Eric Raymond's bazaar and cathedral analogies and by a comparison of collection strategies that focus on content coverage or on the needs of users. It addresses in particular the processes that encourage and achieve community engagement. This insight is illustrated by one particular e-repository, the Education Media On-Line (EMOL service. This paper draws analogies between the bazaar approach for open source software development and its possibilities for developing e-repositories for learning and teaching. It suggests in particular that the development, use and evaluation of online moving pictures and sound objects for learning and teaching can benefit greatly from the community engagement lessons provided by the development, use and evaluation of open source software. Such lessons can be underpinned by experience in the area of learning resource collections, where repositories have been classified as ‘collections-based' or ‘user-based'. Lessons from the open source movement may inform the development of e-repositories such as EMOL in the future.

  14. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  15. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  16. Modelling of gas generation in deep geological repositories after closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poller, A.; Mayer, G.; Darcis M; Smith, P.

    2016-12-01

    In deep geological repositories for radioactive waste, significant quantities of gases will be generated in the long term as a result of various processes, notably the anaerobic corrosion of metals and the degradation of organic materials. Therefore, the impact of gas production on post-closure safety of the repositories needs to be assessed as part of a safety case. The present report provides a comprehensive description of the quantitative modelling of gas generation and associated water consumption during the post-closure phase of deep geological repositories in Opalinus Clay based on current scientific knowledge and on current preliminary repository designs. This includes a presentation of the modelling basis, namely the conceptual and mathematical models, the input data used, the computer tools developed, the relevant uncertainties and principal programme / design options, as well as the derivation, analysis and discussion of specific assessment cases. The modelling is carried out separately for the two main sources of gas, which are the emplaced waste including the disposal containers; and the construction materials. The contribution of construction materials to gas generation rates in emplacement tunnels for spent fuel (SF) and vitrified high-level waste (HLW) is significant during several thousand years after closure. In the long term, however, the corrosion of the disposal canisters, which are in the reference case assumed to be fabricated of carbon steel, accounts for the vast majority of the total gas produced in these tunnels. The contribution of construction materials in emplacement caverns for long lived intermediate-level waste (ILW) and low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) to gas generation is generally small. In ILW emplacement caverns, gas generation is generally dominated by hydrogen generation from the corrosion of cast iron Mosaik-II waste containers for PWR internals and from the corrosion of aluminium in operational waste from the

  17. Modelling of gas generation in deep geological repositories after closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poller, A. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Mayer, G.; Darcis M [AF-Consult Switzerland Ltd, Baden-Dättwil, (Switzerland); Smith, P. [Safety Assessment Management Ltd, Henley-On-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    In deep geological repositories for radioactive waste, significant quantities of gases will be generated in the long term as a result of various processes, notably the anaerobic corrosion of metals and the degradation of organic materials. Therefore, the impact of gas production on post-closure safety of the repositories needs to be assessed as part of a safety case. The present report provides a comprehensive description of the quantitative modelling of gas generation and associated water consumption during the post-closure phase of deep geological repositories in Opalinus Clay based on current scientific knowledge and on current preliminary repository designs. This includes a presentation of the modelling basis, namely the conceptual and mathematical models, the input data used, the computer tools developed, the relevant uncertainties and principal programme / design options, as well as the derivation, analysis and discussion of specific assessment cases. The modelling is carried out separately for the two main sources of gas, which are the emplaced waste including the disposal containers; and the construction materials. The contribution of construction materials to gas generation rates in emplacement tunnels for spent fuel (SF) and vitrified high-level waste (HLW) is significant during several thousand years after closure. In the long term, however, the corrosion of the disposal canisters, which are in the reference case assumed to be fabricated of carbon steel, accounts for the vast majority of the total gas produced in these tunnels. The contribution of construction materials in emplacement caverns for long lived intermediate-level waste (ILW) and low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) to gas generation is generally small. In ILW emplacement caverns, gas generation is generally dominated by hydrogen generation from the corrosion of cast iron Mosaik-II waste containers for PWR internals and from the corrosion of aluminium in operational waste from the

  18. New developments in measurements technology relevant to the studies of deep geological repositories in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, N.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents new developments in measurement technology relevant to the studies of deep geological repositories for nuclear waste disposal during all phases of development, i.e., site selection, site characterization, construction, operation, and decommission. Emphasis has been placed on geophysics and geotechnics with special attention to those techniques applicable to bedded salt. The techniques are grouped into sections as follows: tectonic environment, state of stress, subsurface structures, fractures, stress changes, deformation, thermal properties, fluid transport properties, and other approaches. Several areas that merit further research and developments are identified. These areas are: in situ thermal measurement techniques, fracture detection and characterization, in situ stress measurements, and creep behavior. The available instrumentations should generally be improved to have better resolution and accuracy, enhanced instrument survivability, and reliability for extended time periods in a hostile environment

  19. New developments in measurements technology relevant to the studies of deep geological repositories in bedded salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, N. H.; Ramirez, A. L.

    1980-10-01

    Developments in measurement technology are presented which are relevant to the studies of deep geological repositories for nuclear waste disposal during all phases of development, i.e., site selection, site characterization, construction, operation, and decommission. Emphasis was placed on geophysics and geotechnics with special attention to those techniques applicable to bedded salt. The techniques are grouped into sections as follows: tectonic environment, state of stress, subsurface structures, fractures, stress changes, deformation, thermal properties, fluid transport properties, and other approaches. Several areas that merit further research and developments are identified. These areas are: in situ thermal measurement techniques, fracture detection and characterization, in situ stress measurements, and creep behavior. The available instrumentations should generally be improved to have better resolution and accuracy, enhanced instrument survivability, and reliability for extended time periods in a hostile environment.

  20. Design criteria development for the structural stability of nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, C H [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, T S [Daewoo Engineering Company, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ko, H M [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-11-15

    The objective of the present project is to develop design criteria for the structural stability of rock cavity for the underground repository are defined, according to which detailed descriptions for design methodologies, design stages and stability analysis of the cavity are made. The proposed criteria can be used as a guide for the preparation of design codes which are to be established as the site condition and technical emplacement procedure are fixed. The present report first reviews basic safety requirements and criteria of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes for the establishment of design concepts and stability analysis of the rock cavity. Important factors for the design are also described by considering characteristics of the wastes and underground facilities. The present project has investigated technical aspects on the design of underground structures based on the currently established underground construction technologies, and presented a proposal for design criteria for the structural stability of the nuclear waste repository. The proposed criteria consist of general provisions, geological exploration, rock classification, design process and methods, supporting system, analyses and instrumentation.

  1. New developments in measurement technology relevant to the studies of deep geological repositories in domed salt and basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Mao, N.H.

    1980-01-01

    This report briefly describes recent geophysical and geotechnical instrumentation developments relevant to the studies of deep geologic repositories. Special emphasis has been placed on techniques that appear to minimize measurement problems associated with repositories constructed in basalt or domed salt. Included in the listing are existing measurement capabilities and deficiencies that have been identified by a few authors and instrumentation workshops that have assessed the capabilities of existing instrumentation with respect to repository applications. These deficiencies have been compared with the reported advantages and limitations of the new developments described. Based on these comparisons, areas that merit further research and development have been identified. The report is based on a thorough literature review and on discussions with several instrumentation specialists involved in instrumentation development

  2. System studies in PA: Development of process influence diagram (PID) for SFR-1 repository near-field + far-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenhouse, M.J.; Miller, W.M.; Chapman, N.A.

    2001-05-01

    Scenario development is a key component of the performance assessment (PA) process for radioactive waste disposal, the primary objective being to ensure that all relevant factors associated with the future evolution of the repository system are properly considered in PA. As part of scenario development, a list of features, events and processes (FEPs) are identified and assembled, representing the Process System, with interactions/influences between FEPs incorporated in a Process Influence Diagram (PID). This report documents the technical work conducted between 1997 and the end of 1999 under the Systems Studies Project. The overall objective of this project has been the construction of a PID for the SFR-1 repository (final repository for reactor waste), this PID being the first stage in the identification of scenarios to describe future evolution of this repository. The PIDs discussed in this report have been created using two software applications: existing commercial software (Business Modeller, Infotool AB. Stockholm, Sweden) and, more recently, a newly developed software tool SPARTA (Enviros QuantiSci, Henley, U.K.). Although the focus of this report is on the application of SPARTA to PID development, it is important to document the work carried out prior to SPARTA being available, in order to provide a complete record of the entire SFR-1 PID development effort as well as preserving the context of the multi-year project. Following a description of the different disposal sections of the SFR-1 and the various near-field barriers, the sequential development (i.e. near-field of Silo, BMA, BLA, BTF sections; far-field; integrated near-field + far-field) of the PID for SFR-1 repository system using Business Modeller is described. Owing to the complexity of the repository, in terms of number of both different disposal sections (Silo, BLA, BMA, BTF) and barriers associated with each section, the two-dimensional (2D) PID created for SFR-1 using Business Modeller is

  3. System studies in PA: Development of process influence diagram (PID) for SFR-1 repository near-field + far-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenhouse, M.J. [Monitor Scientific, LLC, Denver, CO (United States); Miller, W.M.; Chapman, N.A. [QuantiSci Ltd., Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    2001-05-01

    Scenario development is a key component of the performance assessment (PA) process for radioactive waste disposal, the primary objective being to ensure that all relevant factors associated with the future evolution of the repository system are properly considered in PA. As part of scenario development, a list of features, events and processes (FEPs) are identified and assembled, representing the Process System, with interactions/influences between FEPs incorporated in a Process Influence Diagram (PID). This report documents the technical work conducted between 1997 and the end of 1999 under the Systems Studies Project. The overall objective of this project has been the construction of a PID for the SFR-1 repository (final repository for reactor waste), this PID being the first stage in the identification of scenarios to describe future evolution of this repository. The PIDs discussed in this report have been created using two software applications: existing commercial software (Business Modeller, Infotool AB. Stockholm, Sweden) and, more recently, a newly developed software tool SPARTA (Enviros QuantiSci, Henley, U.K.). Although the focus of this report is on the application of SPARTA to PID development, it is important to document the work carried out prior to SPARTA being available, in order to provide a complete record of the entire SFR-1 PID development effort as well as preserving the context of the multi-year project. Following a description of the different disposal sections of the SFR-1 and the various near-field barriers, the sequential development (i.e. near-field of Silo, BMA, BLA, BTF sections; far-field; integrated near-field + far-field) of the PID for SFR-1 repository system using Business Modeller is described. Owing to the complexity of the repository, in terms of number of both different disposal sections (Silo, BLA, BMA, BTF) and barriers associated with each section, the two-dimensional (2D) PID created for SFR-1 using Business Modeller is

  4. Natural analogue of redox front formation in near-field environment at post-closure phase of HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Koushi; Amano, Yuki

    2005-01-01

    Redox fronts are created in the near field of rocks, in a range of oxidation environments, by microbial activity in rock groundwater. Such fronts, and the associated oxide formation, are usually unavoidable around high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories, whatever their design. The long term behaviour of these oxides after repositories have been closed is however little known. Here we introduce an analogue of redox front formation, such as 'iron oxide' deposits, known as takashikozo forming cylindrical nodules, and the long term behaviour of secondarily formed iron oxyhydroxide in subsequent geological environments. (author)

  5. Repository Rodeo Redux

    CERN Document Server

    Anez, Melissa; Donohue, Tim; Fyson, Will; Simko, Tibor; Wilcox, David

    2017-01-01

    You’ve got more repository questions and we’ve got more answers! Last year’s Repository Rodeo panel was a huge success, so we’re taking the show on the road to Brisbane for OR2017. Join representatives from the DSpace, Eprints, Fedora, Hydra, and Islandora communities as we (briefly) explain what each of our repositories actually does. We'll also talk about the directions of our respective technical and community developments, and related to the conference theme of Open: Innovation Knowledge Repositories, offer brief observations about the latest, most promising and/or most surprising innovations in our space. This panel will be a great opportunity for newcomers to Open Repositories to get a crash course on the major repository options and meet representatives from each of their communities. After a brief presentation from each representative, we'll open the session up for questions from the audience.

  6. Societal and Political Issues of Site Selection Process Development for the LILW Repository in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polic, Marko; KoS, Drago [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zeleznik, Nadja [ARAO, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-09-15

    The siting of the radioactive waste repository, even the low and intermediate level radioactivity waste (LILW), presents a great problem in almost every country that produces these materials. Attempts to locate a disposal facility in Slovenia have until now proven unsuccessful. After the failure of the first 'technocratic' approach it became evident that the main problem was not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the public acceptability of any radioactive waste disposal facility (RWD). In general people strongly oppose to any kind of such a facility in their vicinity and exhibit a 'Not in my Backyard' (NIMBY) attitude even if they are aware of its necessity. However there are slight signs of changes especially in argumentation supporting the public denial of LIL RWD. The main LILW producer in Slovenia is nuclear power plant in Krsko (NEK). The project for the construction of this plant did not include consideration of the LIL RWD while at that time plans for new NPP's in Yugoslavia with a centralized LILW repository were present. The search for possible locations of LILW repository started only after the beginning of its commercial operation in 1983. The general development of radioactive waste management (RWM) issue in Slovenia was similar to the development in other developed countries, while its details and context differ in smaller or greater degree due to different cultural, political, social and economic backgrounds. The RWM process was following the same general course: technological approach neglecting public issues - public reactance - move toward public involvement. All this was accompanied by the relevant public attitudes: neutrality - rejection - eventual conditional public acceptance. The procedure to find a LILW repository is proposed and established, but the processes leading to final solution are going on without being completely foreseen yet. The general underlying view is connected to the fear of

  7. Societal and Political Issues of Site Selection Process Development for the LILW Repository in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polic, Marko; KoS, Drago; Zeleznik, Nadja

    2006-01-01

    The siting of the radioactive waste repository, even the low and intermediate level radioactivity waste (LILW), presents a great problem in almost every country that produces these materials. Attempts to locate a disposal facility in Slovenia have until now proven unsuccessful. After the failure of the first 'technocratic' approach it became evident that the main problem was not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the public acceptability of any radioactive waste disposal facility (RWD). In general people strongly oppose to any kind of such a facility in their vicinity and exhibit a 'Not in my Backyard' (NIMBY) attitude even if they are aware of its necessity. However there are slight signs of changes especially in argumentation supporting the public denial of LIL RWD. The main LILW producer in Slovenia is nuclear power plant in Krsko (NEK). The project for the construction of this plant did not include consideration of the LIL RWD while at that time plans for new NPP's in Yugoslavia with a centralized LILW repository were present. The search for possible locations of LILW repository started only after the beginning of its commercial operation in 1983. The general development of radioactive waste management (RWM) issue in Slovenia was similar to the development in other developed countries, while its details and context differ in smaller or greater degree due to different cultural, political, social and economic backgrounds. The RWM process was following the same general course: technological approach neglecting public issues - public reactance - move toward public involvement. All this was accompanied by the relevant public attitudes: neutrality - rejection - eventual conditional public acceptance. The procedure to find a LILW repository is proposed and established, but the processes leading to final solution are going on without being completely foreseen yet. The general underlying view is connected to the fear of radioactivity and general negative

  8. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, A.

    2009-09-01

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes

  9. Role of the Bulgarian nuclear regulatory body on the development of the Novi Han repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.

    2000-01-01

    The state control over the safe atomic energy utilisation and nuclear material accounting, storage and transportation is carried out by the Committee on the Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes, through the Inspectorate on Safe Use of Atomic Energy. The main responsibilities of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority in the field of radioactive waste management as: state policy; development of concept and programmes; co-ordination and financing of research studies; definition of requirements on the safe use of atomic energy; collection and provision of information on events, related to the radiation protection and nuclear safety; co-ordination of the control over the use of atomic energy; definition of measurements and leading remediation actions are described. The main achievements and the future challenges related to the Novi Han repository are also given

  10. Development of ACBIO: A Biosphere Template Using AMBER for a Potential Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2005-01-01

    Nuclides in radioactive wastes are assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater and probably discharged into the biosphere. Quantitative evaluation of doses to human beings due to nuclide transport in the geosphere and through the various pathways in the biosphere is the final step of safety assessment of the radioactive waste repository. To calculate the flux to dose conversion factors (DCFs) for nuclides appearing at GBIs with their decay chains, a template ACBIO which is an AMBER case file based on mathematical model for the mass transfer coefficients between the compartments has been developed considering material balance among the compartments in biosphere and then implementing to AMBER, a general and flexible software tool that allows to build dynamic compartment models. An illustrative calculation with ACBIO is shown.

  11. The development of a deep repository-progress in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, H.; Mogg, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Ltd, a company jointly owned by the major partners in the UK nuclear industry, is responsible for developing a deep disposal facility for low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. In July 1991 Nirex announced its intention to concentrate geological investigations at Sellafield, where BNFL's existing operations give rise to approximately 60% of the wastes destined for a repository. The main features of the Nirex design process, from early considerations through the main features of a preferred conceptual design and its advantages, are described. Subject to Nirex obtaining planning permission, following a Public Inquiry, the proposed program would allow the UK nuclear industry to fulfill its responsibilities with respect to declared Government policy by providing a safe deep geological disposal facility early in the next century. (author)

  12. Fabrication and closure development of nuclear waste containers for storage at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, E.W.; Nelson, T.A.; Domian, H.A.; LaCount, D.F.; Robitz, E.S.; Stein, K.O.

    1989-04-01

    US Congress and the President have determined that the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is to be characterized to determine its suitability for construction of the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Work in connection with this site is carried out within the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for designing, developing, and projecting the performance of the waste package for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste. Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W) is involved with the YMP as a subcontractor to LLNL. B ampersand W's role is to recommend and demonstrate a method for fabricating the metallic waste container and a method for performing the final closure of the container after it has been filled with waste. Various fabrication and closure methods are under consideration for the production of containers. This paper presents progress to date in identifying and evaluating the candidate manufacturing processes. 2 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  13. Development of models for use in the assessment of waste repository performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, A.G.; Weare, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Any repository suitable for the disposal of radioactive waste comprises a combination of various man-made and natural barriers which aim to prevent transfer of the radionuclides from the canister to the external environment. Our group has developed the techniques needed to model the equilibrium chemistry of complex multicomponent rock/water systems over a range of ionic strengths and temperatures. These models, show remarkable agreement with field measurements when applied to natural systems. They have been applied successfully to interpret a variety of geochemical processes: studies of ancient and modern marine evaporite systems, studies of the solar evaporation of seawater studies of mineral formation in lakes and in fluid inclusions. At present our models are limited to the components of the seawater system (Na + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , H + , SO 4 2- , HCO 3 - , CO 3 2- , CO 2 ), together with the borate species and SiO 2 . 2 tabs

  14. Development of technical design for waste processing and storage facilities for Novi Han repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, J.; Benitez, J.C.; Asuar, O.; Yordanova, O.; Demireva, E.; Stefanova, I.

    2005-01-01

    Empresarion Agrupados Internacional S.A. (Spain) and ENPRO Consult Ltd. (Bulgaria) were awarded a contract by the Central Finance and Contracts Unit to develop the technical design of the waste processing and storage facilities at the Novi Han repository. At present conceptual design phase is finished. This conceptual design covers the definition of the basic design requirements to be applied to the installations defined above, following both European and Bulgarian legislation. In this paper the following items are considered: 1) Basic criteria for the layout and sizing of buildings; 2) Processing of radioactive waste, including: treatment and conditioning of disused sealed sources; treatment of liquid radioactive wastes; treatment of solid radioactive waste; conditioning of liquid and solid radioactive waste; 3) Control of waste packages and 4) Storage of radioactive waste, including storage facility and waste packages. An analysis of inventories of stored and estimated future wastes and its subsequent processes is also presented and the waste streams are illustrated

  15. Considerations in the development of near surface repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The report presents an integrated, stepwise approach for the development (includes pre-operational, operational and post-closure phases) of near surface disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. It has been developed in light of the considerable experience that has accumulated on the development of such disposal systems and is consistent with the current international requirements, principles, standards and guidance for the disposal of radioactive waste. It is considered that the systematic application of the various steps of the approach can contribute to the successful development of a repository programme. The approach is designed to be generic, integrating the various technical and nontechnical factors, and flexible enough to be suitable for use in the various Member States, ranging from countries that have nuclear power plants to countries that have small inventories of radioactive waste from nuclear applications. It is anticipated that this report will be particularly useful and of direct relevance to Member States that are currently developing, or have plans to develop, disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in the near future. The report is intended to respond to the disposal needs of the various Member States, ranging from countries with nuclear power plants to countries having small inventories of radioactive waste from nuclear applications. It was developed with the help of consultants and through an Advisory Group Meeting held in November 2001

  16. Study on evaluation method for potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Makoto; Makino, Hitoshi; Umeda, Koji; Osawa, Hideaki; Seo, Toshihiro; Ishimaru, Tsuneaki

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation for the potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system is an important issue in safety assessment. A scenario construction method for the effects on a HLW disposal system condition and performance has been developed for two purposes: the first being effective elicitation and organization of information from investigators of natural phenomena and performance assessor and the second being, maintenance of traceability of scenario construction processes with suitable records. In this method, a series of works to construct scenarios is divided into pieces to facilitate and to elicit the features of potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system and is organized to create reasonable scenarios with consistency, traceability and adequate conservativeness within realistic view. (author)

  17. The Use of Underground Research Laboratories to Support Repository Development Programs. A Roadmap for the Underground Research Facilities Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKinnon, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), nationally developed underground research laboratories (URLs) and associated research institutions are being offered for use by other nations. These facilities form an Underground Research Facilities (URF) Network for training in and demonstration of waste disposal technologies and the sharing of knowledge and experience related to geologic repository development, research, and engineering. In order to achieve its objectives, the URF Network regularly sponsors workshops and training events related to the knowledge base that is transferable between existing URL programs and to nations with an interest in developing a new URL. This report describes the role of URLs in the context of a general timeline for repository development. This description includes identification of key phases and activities that contribute to repository development as a repository program evolves from an early research and development phase to later phases such as construction, operations, and closure. This information is cast in the form of a matrix with the entries in this matrix forming the basis of the URF Network roadmap that will be used to identify and plan future workshops and training events.

  18. Development of models for use in the assessment of waste repository performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, A.G.; Weare, J.H.

    1989-09-01

    The work outlined in this proposal is intended both to provide thermodynamic data that is needed to assist in the assessment of waste repository performance and the modeling necessary to ascertain to what extent the data produced is consistent, both with itself and with other published data on related systems. During this stage of the research we shall endeavor to develop a model of the chemistry of aluminum in aqueous solution which is consistent with a wide variety of experimental data including data generated as part of this project together with data that has been published previously in the research literature. We propose a program of research designed to enable us to model the interaction of canister materials (e.g. copper and iron) with natural waters. Both experimental work and a modeling program are outlined. In the experimental program e.m.f. measurements and spectroscopic measurements will be made so as to determine the various association equilibria of iron and copper with the anions OH-, HCO 3 - , and CO 3 2- . The initial stages of the modeling program will concentrate on the identification and use of existing experimental data to produce a preliminary model. This will allow us to identify those areas where special emphasis should be placed to meet the needs of the waste disposal program objectives. The objective of this research is to produce thermodynamic data for use in the assessment of waste repository performance that has been measured using experimental procedures performed in accord with the Level 1 quality assurance requirements detailed in the L.L.N.L. Yucca Mountain Project Quality Procedures Manual. The modeling approach used in experimental planning and data assessment is a Level 3 activity. In addition to the establishment of the thermodynamic data base proposed here, results should lead to improved consistency in the overall modeling effort. 29 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Developing institutional repository at National Institute for Materials Science : Researchers directory service “SAMURAI” and Research Collection Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Masao; Tanifuji, Mikiko

    National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) has developed an institutional repository “NIMS eSciDoc” since 2008. eSciDoc is an open source repository software made in Germany, and provides E-Science infrastructures through its flexible data model and rich Web APIs. NIMS eScidoc makes use of eSciDoc functions to benefit for NIMS situations. This article also focuses on researchers directory service “SAMURAI” in addition to NIMS eSciDoc. Successfully launched in October 2010, SAMURAI provides approximately 500 researchers' profile and publication information.

  20. Stress analysis of HLW containers advanced test work Compas project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. This document describes the activities performed between June and August 1989 forming the advanced test work phase of this project. This is the culmination of two years' analysis and test work to demonstrate whether the analytical ability exists to model containers subjected to realistic loads. Three mild steel containers were designed and manufactured to be one-third scale models of a realistic HLW container, modified to represent the effect of anisotropic loading and to facilitate testing. The containers were tested under a uniform external pressure and all failed by buckling in the mid-body region. The outer surface of each container was comprehensively strain-gauged to provide strain history data at all positions of interest. In parallel with the test work, Compas project partners, from five different European countries, independently modelled the behaviour of each of the containers using their computer codes to predict the failure pressure and produce strain history data at a number of specified locations. The first axisymmetric container was well modelled but predictions for the remaining two non-axisymmetric containers were much more varied, with differences of up to 50% occurring between failure predictions and test data

  1. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers intermediate testwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. This document describes the series of experiments and associated calculations performed in the Intermediate testwork phase of this project. Seven mild steel, one-third scale simplified models of HLW containers were manufactured in a variety of configurations of geometry and weld type. The effects of reducing the wall thickness, corroding the external surface of the container, and using different welding methods were all investigated. The containers were tested under the action of a uniform external pressure up to their respective failure points. All containers failed by buckling at pressures of between 42 and 87 MPa dependent upon the particular geometric and weld configuration. The outer surface of each container was comprehensively strain-gauged in order to provide strain histories at positions of interest. The Compas project partners, from five different European countries, independently modelled the behaviour of three of the five different containers. Test results and computer predictions were compared and an assessment of the overall performance of the codes demonstrated good agreement in the initial loading of each container. However once stresses exceeded the material yield point there was a considerable spread in the predicted container behaviour

  2. Coupled Multi-physical Simulations for the Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repository Concepts: Modeling, Software Development and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, J.; Nagel, T.; Bilke, L.; Böttcher, N.; Heusermann, S.; Fischer, T.; Kumar, V.; Schäfers, A.; Shao, H.; Vogel, P.; Wang, W.; Watanabe, N.; Ziefle, G.; Kolditz, O.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the German site selection process for a high-level nuclear waste repository, different repository concepts in the geological candidate formations rock salt, clay stone and crystalline rock are being discussed. An open assessment of these concepts using numerical simulations requires physical models capturing the individual particularities of each rock type and associated geotechnical barrier concept to a comparable level of sophistication. In a joint work group of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), scientists of the UFZ are developing and implementing multiphysical process models while BGR scientists apply them to large scale analyses. The advances in simulation methods for waste repositories are incorporated into the open-source code OpenGeoSys. Here, recent application-driven progress in this context is highlighted. A robust implementation of visco-plasticity with temperature-dependent properties into a framework for the thermo-mechanical analysis of rock salt will be shown. The model enables the simulation of heat transport along with its consequences on the elastic response as well as on primary and secondary creep or the occurrence of dilatancy in the repository near field. Transverse isotropy, non-isothermal hydraulic processes and their coupling to mechanical stresses are taken into account for the analysis of repositories in clay stone. These processes are also considered in the near field analyses of engineered barrier systems, including the swelling/shrinkage of the bentonite material. The temperature-dependent saturation evolution around the heat-emitting waste container is described by different multiphase flow formulations. For all mentioned applications, we illustrate the workflow from model development and implementation, over verification and validation, to repository-scale application simulations using methods of high performance computing.

  3. Using process instrumentation to obviate destructive examination of canisters of HLW glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.; Slate, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    An important concern of a manufacturer of packages of solidified high-level waste (HLW) is quality assurance of the waste form. The vitrification of HLW as a borosilicate glass is considered, and, based on a reference vitrification process, it is proposed that information from process instrumentation may be used to assure quality without the need for additional information obtained by destructive examining (core drilling) canisters of glass. This follows mainly because models of product performance and process behavior must be previously established in order to confidently select the desired glass formulation, and to have confidence that the process is well enough developed to be installed and operated in a nuclear facility

  4. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE AND ONE PERCENT CRYSTAL CONTENT MODELS FOR INITIAL HANFORD HLW GLASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, John D.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Peeler, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary models for liquidus temperature (TL) and temperature at 1 vol% crystal (T01) applicable to WTP HLW glasses in the spinel primary phase field were developed. A series of literature model forms were evaluated using consistent sets of data form model fitting and validation. For TL, the ion potential and linear mixture models performed best, while for T01 the linear mixture model out performed all other model forms. TL models were able to predict with smaller uncertainty. However, the lower T01 values (even with higher prediction uncertainties) were found to allow for a much broader processing envelope for WTP HLW glasses

  5. NPP Krsko: LILW Repository or Long Term Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokner, V.; Subasic, D.; Levanat, I.

    2008-01-01

    Construction of the facilities for LILW and SF management, as planned in Decommissioning and LILW and SF management program for NPP Krsko, would be a rather expensive and challenging project for such a small nuclear program. In order to accommodate waste arising from a single nuclear power plant, one LILW repository should be constructed before the end of the NPP operation, then one SF dry storage, and finally one geological repository. This requires relatively urgent identification within Slovenian/Croatian territory of three locations that meet the criteria for establishment of such facilities and are acceptable to the local communities. There are very few such potential locations. The siting process for the first of the three facilities is well under way in Slovenia, because the country wants to have its LILW repository in operation by the year 2013. In order to facilitate public acceptance, Slovenian government has introduced financial incentives to local communities for the repository construction and operation. These 'compensations for limited land use' may significantly increase the overall costs of disposal if the repository is in operation for a long period. In the recent years, however, a possibility of long term storage (LTS) is gaining an increased attention in the waste management community, and has already been introduced e.g. in the Netherlands. It is a particularly viable option for limited waste quantities. Disposal remains the final solution, but present technologies have made possible a relatively inexpensive storage up to about hundred years, which can accommodate LILW, HLW and SF from nuclear programs as well as research reactor waste and NORM. Such storage would be a safe and simple temporary solution, encompassing all immediate and near future waste management needs. In addition, it would increase flexibility and reduce financing requirements for the final waste disposal: providing additional time for reduction of radiation emission and heat

  6. Technical, institutional and economic factors important for developing a multinational radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    Countries planning and implementing nuclear energy programmes should assume responsibility for the safe management and final disposal of radioactive waste from their programmes. However, there are countries whose radioactive waste volumes do not easily justify a national repository, and/or countries which do not have the resources or favorable natural conditions for waste disposal to dedicate to a national repository project. These countries would benefit from multinational co-operation for the disposal. Interest in the concept of a multinational repository for radioactive waste has been expressed by several Member States and the waste management community in the light of the potential benefit to the partner countries from the safety, technical and economic standpoints. However, such an approach involves many political and public acceptance issues and therefore a consensus among countries or regions concerned is a prerequisite. In this context, it was deemed appropriate that the IAEA access the technical, institutional, ethical and economic factors to be taken into account in the process of such consensus building. This report is intended to provide an assessment which can serve as a general basis for establishing a waste management policy and/or further assessing specific issues such as ownership and liability, institutional aspects and problems related to long term commitments. This report is divided into five sections where the first section gives background, objectives, scope and structure of the report. Section 2 discusses multinational repository concept in terms of needs and the role of a multinational repository, interaction between host and partner countries and formulation of a multinational repository. Section 3 identifies basic issues to be considered for establishing a multinational repository, and some specific issues relating to specific waste categories. Section 4 analyses potential benefits and challenges to be addresses in establishing a

  7. Melter Throughput Enhancements for High-Iron HLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gan, Hoa [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Chaudhuri, Malabika [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-26

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations in order to increase glass melting rates in high waste loading glass formulations for HLW with high concentrations of iron. Testing was designed to identify glass and melter feed formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts to assess melt rate using a vertical gradient furnace system and to develop new formulations with enhanced melt rate. Testing evaluated the effects of waste loading on glass properties and the maximum waste loading that can be achieved. The results from crucible-scale testing supported subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass and feed formulations on waste processing rate and product quality. The DM100 was selected as the platform for these tests due to its extensive previous use in processing rate determination for various HLW streams and glass compositions.

  8. The Cathedral and the Bazaar of E-Repository Development: Encouraging Community Engagement with Moving Pictures and Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Denis; Shephard, Kerry L.; Phillips, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers an insight into the development, use and governance of e-repositories for learning and teaching, illustrated by Eric Raymond's bazaar and cathedral analogies and by a comparison of collection strategies that focus on content coverage or on the needs of users. It addresses in particular the processes that encourage and achieve…

  9. Support for HLW Direct Feed - Phase 2, VSL-15R3440-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlack, K. S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, I. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, I. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, MD (United States); Kot, W. K. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations originating from a potential flow-sheet for the direct vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) with minimal or no pretreatment. In the HLW direct feed option that is under consideration for early operations at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the pretreatment facility would be bypassed in order to support an earlier start-up of the vitrification facility. For HLW, this would mean that the ultrafiltration and caustic leaching operations that would otherwise have been performed in the pretreatment facility would either not be performed or would be replaced by an interim pretreatment function (in-tank leaching and settling, for example). These changes would likely affect glass formulations and waste loadings and have impacts on the downstream vitrification operations. Modification of the pretreatment process may result in: (i) Higher aluminum contents if caustic leaching is not performed; (ii) Higher chromium contents if oxidative leaching is not performed; (iii) A higher fraction of supernate in the HLW feed resulting from the lower efficiency of in-tank washing; and (iv) A higher water content due to the likely lower effectiveness of in-tank settling compared to ultrafiltration. The HLW direct feed option has also been proposed as a potential route for treating HLW streams that contain the highest concentrations of fast-settling plutoniumcontaining particles, thereby avoiding some of the potential issues associated with such particles in the WTP Pretreatment facility [1]. In response, the work presented herein focuses on the impacts of increased supernate and water content on wastes from one of the candidate source tanks for the direct feed option that is high in plutonium.

  10. Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-06-01

    This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. Volume II contains appendices for: (1) thermal analysis supplement; (2) fractionation process experimental results supplement; (3) cost analysis supplement; and (4) radiological risk analysis supplement

  11. Developing design premises for a KBS-3V repository based on results from the safety assessment - 16027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Hedin, Allan

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the planned license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), has developed design premises from a long term safety aspect of a KBS-3V repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purpose is to provide requirements from a long term safety aspect, to form the basis for the development of the reference design of the repository and to justify that design. Design premises typically concern specification on what mechanical loads the barriers must withstand, restrictions on the composition of barrier materials or acceptance criteria for the various underground excavations. These design constraints, if all fulfilled by the actual design, should form a good basis for demonstrating repository safety. The justification for these design premises is derived from SKB's most recent safety assessment SR-Can complemented by a few additional analyses. Some of the design premises may be modified in future stages of SKB's program, as a result of analyses based on more detailed site data and a more developed understanding of processes of importance for long-term safety. (authors)

  12. Experience from developed and licensing an underground repository for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, K.; Richter, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the German Democratic Republic an abandoned salt mine was selected and reconstructed to serve as a central repository for low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants and radioisotope production and application from all over the country. The decision to establish such a repository was based on safety and technical-economic studies performed in the 1960s. The repository is owned by the main waste producer, the nuclear plant utility. It was designed, constructed and commissioned during 1972-1978. The licensing steps included a site licence (1972), a construction licence (1974), a comissioning licence and a continuous operation licence (1979). The paper reviews the overall choice of the disposal option, the responsibilities in radioactive waste management, the licensing and surveillance activities, the methods for transport and disposal, and the waste acceptance criteria established for the repository. (author)

  13. Conceptualization and software development of a simulation environment for probalistic safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghofrani, Javad

    2016-05-26

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of complex simulation models are prominent issues, both in scientific research and education. ReSUS (Repository Simulation, Uncertainty propagation and Sensitivity analysis) is an integrated platform to perform such analysis with numerical models that simulate the THMC (Thermal Hydraulical Mechanical and Chemical) coupled processes via different programs, in particular in the context of safety assessments for radioactive waste repositories. This thesis presents the idea behind the software platform ReSUS and its working mechanisms. Apart from the idea and the working mechanisms, the thesis describes applications related to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In this thesis, previous simulation tools (including the preceding version of ReSUS) are analyzed in order to provide a comprehensive view of the state of the art. In comparison to this state, a more sophisticated software tool is developed here, which provides features which are not offered by previous simulation tools. To achieve this objective, the software platform ReSUS provides a framework for handling probabilistic data uncertainties using deterministic external simulation tools, thus enhancing uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. This platform performs probabilistic simulations of various models, in particular THMC coupled processes, using stand-alone deterministic simulation software tools. The complete software development process of the ReSUS Platform is discussed in this thesis. ReSUS components are developed as libraries, which are capable of being linked to other code implementations. In addition, ASCII template files are used as means for uncertainty propagation into the input files of deterministic simulation tools. The embedded input sampler and analysis tools allow for sensitivity analysis in several kinds of simulation designs. The novelty of the ReSUS platform consists in the flexibility to assign external stand-alone software

  14. Conceptualization and software development of a simulation environment for probalistic safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghofrani, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of complex simulation models are prominent issues, both in scientific research and education. ReSUS (Repository Simulation, Uncertainty propagation and Sensitivity analysis) is an integrated platform to perform such analysis with numerical models that simulate the THMC (Thermal Hydraulical Mechanical and Chemical) coupled processes via different programs, in particular in the context of safety assessments for radioactive waste repositories. This thesis presents the idea behind the software platform ReSUS and its working mechanisms. Apart from the idea and the working mechanisms, the thesis describes applications related to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In this thesis, previous simulation tools (including the preceding version of ReSUS) are analyzed in order to provide a comprehensive view of the state of the art. In comparison to this state, a more sophisticated software tool is developed here, which provides features which are not offered by previous simulation tools. To achieve this objective, the software platform ReSUS provides a framework for handling probabilistic data uncertainties using deterministic external simulation tools, thus enhancing uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. This platform performs probabilistic simulations of various models, in particular THMC coupled processes, using stand-alone deterministic simulation software tools. The complete software development process of the ReSUS Platform is discussed in this thesis. ReSUS components are developed as libraries, which are capable of being linked to other code implementations. In addition, ASCII template files are used as means for uncertainty propagation into the input files of deterministic simulation tools. The embedded input sampler and analysis tools allow for sensitivity analysis in several kinds of simulation designs. The novelty of the ReSUS platform consists in the flexibility to assign external stand-alone software

  15. Spent fuel and HLW transportation the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    With 53 nuclear power plants in operation at EDF and a fuel cycle with recycling policy of the valuable materials, COGEMA is faced with the transport of a wide range of radioactive materials. In this framework, the transport activity is a key link in closing the fuel cycle. COGEMA has developed a comprehensive Transport Organization System dealing with all the sectors of the fuel cycle. The paper will describe the status of transportation of spent fuel and HLW in France and the experience gathered. The Transport Organization System clearly defines the role of all actors where COGEMA, acting as the general coordinator, specifies the tasks to be performed and brings technical and commercial support to its various subcontractors: TRANSNUCLEAIRE, specialized in casks engineering and transport operations, supplies packaging and performs transport operations, LEMARECHAL and CELESTIN operate transport by truck in the Vicinity of the nuclear sites while French Railways are in charge of spent fuel transport by train. HLW issued from the French nuclear program is stored for 30 years in an intermediate storage installation located at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Ultimately, these canisters will be transported to the disposal site. COGEMA has set up a comprehensive transport organization covering all operational aspects including adapted procedures, maintenance programs and personnel qualification

  16. GRS/ISTec strategy for the treatment of gas-related issues for repositories located in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller-Lyda, I.; Javeri, V.; Muller, W.

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of gas-related issues for repositories located in rock salt by GRS and ISTec has followed a strategy which has been developed with increasing complexity and degree of detail in the past. The strategy today clearly indicates the direction to establish a comprehensive safety case and the work that remains to be done. For gas generation mainly long-term aspects are an issue to increase accuracy of predictions. Physical modelling especially for HLW is still incomplete with regard to the coupling of fluid flow with geomechanics, solution/precipitation effects and geochemistry. The appropriate tools to transform the physical models into numerical solutions are at hand in principle but have to be further developed collaterally to the physical modelling. The first full-scale demonstration of safety regarding gas issues in rock salt will have to be provided for the licensing of the Morsleben repository shut-down in the near future. (authors)

  17. Review of important rock mechanics studies required for underground high level nuclear waste repository program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J

    2007-01-15

    Disposal concept adapting room and pillar method, which is a confirmed technique in mining and tunnel construction for long time, has advantages at cost, safety, technical feasibility, flexibility, and international cooperation point of views. Then the important rock mechanics principals and in situ and laboratory tests for understanding the behavior of rock, buffer, and backfill as well as their interactions will be reviewed. The accurate understanding of them is important for developing a safe disposal concept and successful operation of underground repository for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes. First of all, In this study, current status of rock mechanics studies for HLW disposal in foreign countries such as Sweden, USA, Canada, Finland, Japan, and France were reviewed. After then the in situ and laboratory tests for site characterization were summarized. Furthermore, rock mechanics studies required during the whole procedure for the disposal project from repository design to the final closure will be reviewed systematically. This study will help for developing a disposal system including site selection, repository design, operation, maintenance, and closure of a repository in deep underground rock. By introducing the required rock mechanics tests at different stages, it would be helpful from the planning stage to the operation stage of a radioactive waste disposal project.

  18. Review of important rock mechanics studies required for underground high level nuclear waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Disposal concept adapting room and pillar method, which is a confirmed technique in mining and tunnel construction for long time, has advantages at cost, safety, technical feasibility, flexibility, and international cooperation point of views. Then the important rock mechanics principals and in situ and laboratory tests for understanding the behavior of rock, buffer, and backfill as well as their interactions will be reviewed. The accurate understanding of them is important for developing a safe disposal concept and successful operation of underground repository for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes. First of all, In this study, current status of rock mechanics studies for HLW disposal in foreign countries such as Sweden, USA, Canada, Finland, Japan, and France were reviewed. After then the in situ and laboratory tests for site characterization were summarized. Furthermore, rock mechanics studies required during the whole procedure for the disposal project from repository design to the final closure will be reviewed systematically. This study will help for developing a disposal system including site selection, repository design, operation, maintenance, and closure of a repository in deep underground rock. By introducing the required rock mechanics tests at different stages, it would be helpful from the planning stage to the operation stage of a radioactive waste disposal project

  19. Consortial routes to effective repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Moyle, M.; Proudfoot, R.

    2009-01-01

    A consortial approach to the establishment of repository services can help a group of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to share costs, share technology and share expertise. Consortial repository work can tap into existing structures, or it can involve new groupings of institutions with a common interest in exploring repository development. This Briefing Paper outlines some of the potential benefits of collaborative repository activity, and highlights some of the technical and organisation...

  20. Closure development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robitz, E.S. Jr.; McAninch, M.D. Jr.; Edmonds, D.P.; Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes Phase 1 activities for closure development of the high-level nuclear waste package task for the tuff repository. Work was conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract 9172105, administered through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), funded through the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The goal of this phase was to select five closure processes for further evaluation in later phases of the program. A decision tree methodology was utilized to perform an objective evaluation of 15 potential closure processes. Information was gathered via a literature survey, industrial contacts, and discussions with project team members, other experts in the field, and the LLNL waste package task staff. The five processes selected were friction welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and plasma arc welding. These are felt to represent the best combination of weldment material properties and process performance in a remote, radioactive environment. Conceptual designs have been generated for these processes to illustrate how they would be implemented in practice. Homopolar resistance welding was included in the Phase 1 analysis, and developments in this process will be monitored via literature in Phases 2 and 3. Work was conducted in accordance with the YMP Quality Assurance Program. 223 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  1. Simulation of HTM processes in buffer-rock barriers based on the French HLW disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoshuo; Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Zhang, Chunliang

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The main objectives of this paper are to gain experience with modelling and analysis of HTM processes in clay rock and bentonite buffer surrounding heat-generating radioactive waste. The French concept for HLW disposal in drifts with backfilled bentonite buffer considered in numerical calculations which are carried out by using the computer code CODE-BRIGHT developed by the Technical University of Catalonia in Barcelona. The French repository designed by ANDRA is located in the middle of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation (COX) of 250 m thickness at a depth of 500 to 630 m below the surface. The French concept has been simplified at this simulation work. A drift is considered to be excavated at a depth of 500 m below the surface. It has a diameter of 2.2 m and a length of 20 m. A large volume of the rock mass around the drift is taken into account by an axisymmetric model of 100 m radius and 100 m length. In fact, this model represents a cylindrical rock-buffer-system with the central axis of the containers, as shown in Figure 1. Some points are selected in the buffer and the rock along the radial line (dash yellow line) in the middle of the drift for recording HTM parameters with time. The display and analysis of the results at this paper are chiefly along this line. The simulation work has been divided to two time steps. At the first step, the drift excavation and ventilation is simulated by reducing the stress normal to the drift wall down to zero and circulating gas along the drift wall with relative humidity of 85 %. Following the drift excavation and ventilation, the HLW containers and the bentonite are emplaced in the drift as the second step of the simulation. This is simulated by simultaneously applying the initial conditions of the buffer and the decayed heat emitting from the waste containers as thermal boundary conditions. Two materials (Clay rock and bentonite buffer) are taken into account

  2. Counter current decantation washing of HLW sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooke, J.N.; Peterson, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 51 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks with typical dimensions 25.9 meters (85 feet) diameter and 10 meters (33 feet) high. Nearly 114 million liters (30 M gallons) of HLW waste is stored in these tanks in the form of insoluble solids called sludge, crystallized salt called salt cake, and salt solutions. This waste is being converted to waste forms stable for long term storage. In one of the processes, soluble salts are washed from HLW sludge in preparation for vitrification. At present, sludge is batch washed in a waste tank with one or no reuse of the wash water. Sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the wash water for tank corrosion protection; the large volumes of spent wash water are recycled to the evaporator system; additional salt cake is produced; and sodium carbonate is formed in the washed sludge during storage by reaction with CO 2 from the air. High costs and operational concerns with the current washing process prompts DOE and WSRC to seek an improved washing method. A new method should take full advantage of the physical/chemical properties of sludge, experience from other technical disciplines, processing rate requirements, inherent process safety, and use of proven processes and equipment. Counter current solids washing is a common process in the minerals processing and chemical industries. Washing circuits can be designed using thickeners, filters or centrifuges. Realizing the special needs of nuclear work and the low processing rates required, a Counter Current Decantation (CCD) circuit is proposed using small thickeners and fluidic pumps

  3. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable

  4. Design and validation of the THMC China-Mock-Up test on buffer material for HLW disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuemiao Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the preliminary concept of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW repository in China, a large-scale mock-up facility, named China-Mock-Up was constructed in the laboratory of Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (BRIUG. A heater, which simulates a container of radioactive waste, is placed inside the compacted Gaomiaozi (GMZ-Na-bentonite blocks and pellets. Water inflow through the barrier from its outer surface is used to simulate the intake of groundwater. The numbers of water injection pipes, injection pressure and the insulation layer were determined based on the numerical modeling simulations. The current experimental data of the facility are herein analyzed. The experiment is intended to evaluate the thermo-hydro-mechano-chemical (THMC processes occurring in the compacted bentonite-buffer during the early stage of HLW disposal and to provide a reliable database for numerical modeling and further investigation of engineered barrier system (EBS, and the design of HLW repository.

  5. Historical fuel reprocessing and HLW management in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Staiger, M.D.; Christian, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article review some of the key decision points in the historical development of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management practices at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that have helped ICPP to successfully accomplish its mission safely and with minimal impact on the environment. Topics include ICPP reprocessing development; batch aluminum-uranium dissolution; continuous aluminum uranium dissolution; batch zirconium dissolution; batch stainless steel dissolution; semicontinuous zirconium dissolution with soluble poison; electrolytic dissolution of stainless steel-clad fuel; graphite-based rover fuel processing; fluorinel fuel processing; ICPP waste management consideration and design decisions; calcination technology development; ICPP calcination demonstration and hot operations; NWCF design, construction, and operation; HLW immobilization technology development. 80 refs., 4 figs

  6. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders in the development of a deep geological repository in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumberova, Vera

    2004-01-01

    The mission of the Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA) is to ensure the safe disposal of all existing and future radioactive waste. In order to fulfil this task RAWRA, in addition to the operation of radioactive waste repositories in the Czech Republic, coordinates all those activities relating to the construction of a deep geological repository. This long-term goal implies first creating and then building upon the public's confidence in the decision making process and the project as a whole as well as in RAWRA as a competent and efficient implementer since clearly public acceptance is an essential condition for a successful final outcome. Since its establishment in 1997 RAWRA has been looking for ways in which to inform the public about its activities and how to involve the various stakeholders in the development process. The communication tools employed to achieve this goal have, to date, depended on the specific stage of the process but RAWRA has aimed at a continuous improvement in its activities; consequently a large number of changes have been made to RAWRA's policy and approach in recent years. This paper, which aims to describe RAWRA's dialogue with stakeholders (mainly local communities), provides examples of the way in which issues raised by stakeholders concerning a repository are reflected in RAWRA's approach. (author)

  7. How many geologic repositories will be needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.J.; Halstead, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    DOE's postponement of site-specific work on the second repository program had rekindled debate over the number of geologic repositories needed for disposal of high level radioactive waste. The multiple repository approach grew out of the March, 1979 IRG report, which recommended co-disposal of civilian and defense HLW in a system of regional repositories. The multiple repository approach was adopted by DOE, and incorporated in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act passed by Congress in December, 1982. Since the late 1970's, the slower than anticipated growth of the nuclear power industry has substantially reduced earlier estimates of the amount of civilian spent fuel which will require geologic disposal. Reactors currently in operation (78.5 GWe) and reactors in the construction pipeline (28 GWe) are expected to discharge about 103,200 MTU of spent fuel by the year 2036, assuming no increase in fuel burnup rate. By the year 2020, defense high level radioactive wastes equivalent to as much as 27,000 MTU could require geologic disposal. Small amounts of high level waste from other sources will also require geologic disposal. Total disposal requirements appear to be less than 140,000 MTU. The five sites nominated for the first repository, as well as hypothetical sites in granite, the host rock under primary consideration for the second repository, all appear capable of accommodating up to 140,000 MTU

  8. Confidence building on the total system performance assessment code, MASCOT-K for permanent disposal of HLW in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H

    2002-12-01

    To perform Total System Performance Assessment(TSPA) of a potential HLW repository, it is necessary to develop the TSPA code. KAERI has developed the one-dimensional PSA code MASCOT-K since 1997 and verified special modules dedicated for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. In the second R and D phase, MASCOT-K is once again verified as a part of the confidence building for TSPA. The AMBER code based on the totally different mathematical approach, compartment theory is used together with MASCOT-K to assess the annual individual doses for given K- and Q- scenarios. Results indicate that both AMBER and MASCOT-K simulate the annual individual doses to a potential biosphere. And the MASCOT-K is more flexible to describe the natural barrier such as a fracture for sensitivity studies. In the third R and D phase, MASCOT-K will be actively used to check whether the proposed KAERI reference disposal concept is solid or not.

  9. Confidence building on the total system performance assessment code, MASCOT-K for permanent disposal of HLW in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-12-01

    To perform Total System Performance Assessment(TSPA) of a potential HLW repository, it is necessary to develop the TSPA code. KAERI has developed the one-dimensional PSA code MASCOT-K since 1997 and verified special modules dedicated for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. In the second R and D phase, MASCOT-K is once again verified as a part of the confidence building for TSPA. The AMBER code based on the totally different mathematical approach, compartment theory is used together with MASCOT-K to assess the annual individual doses for given K- and Q- scenarios. Results indicate that both AMBER and MASCOT-K simulate the annual individual doses to a potential biosphere. And the MASCOT-K is more flexible to describe the natural barrier such as a fracture for sensitivity studies. In the third R and D phase, MASCOT-K will be actively used to check whether the proposed KAERI reference disposal concept is solid or not

  10. The feasibility of Backfilling a Repository of Spent Fuel: An Assessment of Recent Developments by SKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, David (TerraSalus Limited, Rutland (United Kingdom))

    2010-12-15

    In the Review Statement and Evaluation of SKB's RDandD programme 2007 (SKI Report 2008:48E), the former Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) commented that considerable work remained to be done for knowledge of both practical management issues on backfilling and analysis of long-term backfill evolution to reach the same level as for the canister and the buffer. SKI considered that the backfill material had not been thoroughly reported in the RDandD programme. More concrete plans were also needed relating to large-scale demonstration experiments to investigate the performance of the backfill in as realistic conditions as possible. In the spring of 2009, noting that SKB had changed its concept for backfilling several times over the last few years, and after having visited SKB's most recent backfilling trials at Aespoe, both SSM and SSM's expert group BRITE had strong concerns regarding SKB's programme for backfilling the repository tunnels. Although the BRITE expert group has been keeping a watching brief over SKB's development work on backfilling, SSM has not undertaken a systematic assessment of SKB's work in this area since the SR-Can Safety Report was reviewed in 2006. Dr David Bennett, a member and secretary of the BRITE expert group, was asked to do such an assessment. This report describes the assessment results

  11. The feasibility of Backfilling a Repository of Spent Fuel: An Assessment of Recent Developments by SKB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, David

    2010-12-01

    In the Review Statement and Evaluation of SKB's RDandD programme 2007 (SKI Report 2008:48E), the former Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) commented that considerable work remained to be done for knowledge of both practical management issues on backfilling and analysis of long-term backfill evolution to reach the same level as for the canister and the buffer. SKI considered that the backfill material had not been thoroughly reported in the RDandD programme. More concrete plans were also needed relating to large-scale demonstration experiments to investigate the performance of the backfill in as realistic conditions as possible. In the spring of 2009, noting that SKB had changed its concept for backfilling several times over the last few years, and after having visited SKB's most recent backfilling trials at Aespoe, both SSM and SSM's expert group BRITE had strong concerns regarding SKB's programme for backfilling the repository tunnels. Although the BRITE expert group has been keeping a watching brief over SKB's development work on backfilling, SSM has not undertaken a systematic assessment of SKB's work in this area since the SR-Can Safety Report was reviewed in 2006. Dr David Bennett, a member and secretary of the BRITE expert group, was asked to do such an assessment. This report describes the assessment results

  12. Regulation of waste packaging in the absence of a repository development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.; Williams, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The UK has a wide range of intermediate level wastes stored at a number of locations. There are various projects in place, or envisaged by operators, to retrieve, treat and condition these wastes for interim storage and eventual disposal. Currently UK government policy for the long-term management of intermediate level wastes (ILW) is under review following the rejection, in 1997, of a planning application for the establishment of an underground rock characterisation facility. Consequently there is currently considerable uncertainty on the future fate of these wastes - a position that will not change for several years. The recent loss of a repository development programme and consequent uncertainty on the timing and requirements for long term disposal is causing particular difficulties where operators are looking to make decisions in the short term on conditioned wasteforms. This paper discusses the problems caused by these uncertainties and the steps being taken by the Environment Agency to ensure so far as is practicable, having regard to the requirements for safe long-term storage, that future disposability of wastes is not jeopardised by actions taken in the short term. (author)

  13. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongyoul; Choi, Heuijoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Geonyoung; Kim, Kyeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system

  14. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jongyoul; Choi, Heuijoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Geonyoung; Kim, Kyeongsoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system.

  15. Time-frames and the demonstration of safety for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, B.; Kessler, J.

    1999-01-01

    An important principle which is often embodied in the criteria for the safe disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes is that a similar level of radiation protection should be provided to future generations as that provided for those alive today. This has resulted in the development of performance assessment methodologies to evaluate the potential long term impacts of HLW disposal on humans, usually in terms of individual dose or risk. However, the actual periods of time over which it is expected that there will be full control over high level waste disposals are extremely short in comparison with the times over which radionuclides in the wastes could potentially move from the deep repository and emerge into the surface environment. This leads to problems in setting quantitative dose or risk based standard appropriate for the short and long term, and in setting the time-frames for which calculations should be carried out. This is especially difficult in view of the uncertainty in predicting changes in human behaviour and changes in the biosphere and geosphere over the time-scales involved. Different assessment time-frames and approaches proposed by IAEA, Nordic countries, Britain and US guidance documents are briefly reviewed. Whilst accepting the basic radiation protection objective of protecting future generations, no international consensus bas been agreed on what time-frames should be used in performance assessments. It is recommended that different time-frames should be associated with different quantitative or qualitative performance measures. As a result, a range of indicators of safety may be appropriate in demonstrating compliance with regulatory performance criteria and the consequent overall assessment context. It is argued that what is required is a simple, robust yet defensible approach to time-frames and performance indicators which can be accepted by the public, regulators and the nuclear industry

  16. Methodology of fuel cycles long-term safety assessment of SNF/HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritrsky, J.

    2008-02-01

    Methodology for the long-term safety assessment of nuclear fuel cycles is given in the presented doctoral thesis. The aim of work was to develop a geological repository model for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) using an appropriate software code able to calculate the influence of partitioning and transmutation in advanced fuel cycles. The first step in this process was specifying of indicators which can be used to quantify the radiological impact of each fuel cycle. Indicators such as annual effective dose and radiotoxicity of inventory have been quantitatively analysed to determine the potential risk and radiological consequences associated with production of SNF/HLW. Advanced fuel types bring a number of advantages in comparison to uranium oxide fuel UO 2 used worldwide nowadays in terms of safety improvement due to minor actinides transmutation and non-proliferation aspects as well. Within the scope of work, three different fuel cycles are compared from the point of view of long-term safety of deep geological repository. The first considered fuel cycle is the currently used open fuel cycle (UOX) which uses only U-FA (Uranium Fuel Assembly). The second assessed cycle is a closed fuel cycle (MOX) with MOX-FA (Mixed OXides Fuel Assembly) and the third considered one is a partially closed fuel cycle (IMF) with IMC-FA (Inert Matrix Combined Fuel Assembly). Description and input data of advanced fuel cycles have been gained by participation in the EC project RED-IMPACT. Results were calculated using code AMBER, which is a flexible software tool that allows building dynamic compartmental models to represent the migration and fate of contaminants in a system, for example in the surface and sub-surface environment. Contaminants in solid, liquid and gaseous phases can be considered. AMBER gives the user the flexibility to define any number of compartments; any number of contaminants and associated decays; deterministic, probabilistic and

  17. Methodology of fuel cycles long-term safety assessment of SNF/HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritrsky, J.

    2008-01-01

    Methodology for the long-term safety assessment of nuclear fuel cycles is given in the presented doctoral thesis. The aim of work was to develop a geological repository model for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) using an appropriate software code able to calculate the influence of partitioning and transmutation in advanced fuel cycles. The first step in this process was specifying of indicators which can be used to quantify the radiological impact of each fuel cycle. Indicators such as annual effective dose and radiotoxicity of inventory have been quantitatively analysed to determine the potential risk and radiological consequences associated with production of SNF/HLW. Advanced fuel types bring a number of advantages in comparison to uranium oxide fuel UO 2 used worldwide nowadays in terms of safety improvement due to minor actinides transmutation and non-proliferation aspects as well. Within the scope of work, three different fuel cycles are compared from the point of view of long-term safety of deep geological repository. The first considered fuel cycle is the currently used open fuel cycle (UOX) which uses only U-FA (Uranium Fuel Assembly). The second assessed cycle is a closed fuel cycle (MOX) with MOX-FA (Mixed OXides Fuel Assembly) and the third considered one is a partially closed fuel cycle (IMF) with IMC-FA (Inert Matrix Combined Fuel Assembly). Description and input data of advanced fuel cycles have been gained by participation in the EC project RED-IMPACT. Results were calculated using code AMBER, which is a flexible software tool that allows building dynamic compartmental models to represent the migration and fate of contaminants in a system, for example in the surface and sub-surface environment. Contaminants in solid, liquid and gaseous phases can be considered. AMBER gives the user the flexibility to define any number of compartments; any number of contaminants and associated decays; deterministic, probabilistic and

  18. Self-sealing of rock fractures. A possibility around the repositories of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Nakata, Eiji

    1995-01-01

    To the goal of the safe geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), we must provide long-term confidence for the isolation of HLW in various ways. In particular, groundwater flow, the most likely transport media of radioactive nuclides from HLW, must be restricted around a repository for long time. For that purpose, grouting techniques using cement, bentonite, or other materials have been studied in many countries. In this paper we report the results of a series of experiments on silica precipitation behavior in a flow path with negative temperature gradients in granite and also describe a natural example of hydrothermal alteration of diatomite intruded by andesite. Based on these, we will discuss the possibility of self-sealing around HLW repository. (J.P.N.)

  19. Source-book of International Activities Related to the Development of Safety Cases for Deep Geological Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    All national radioactive waste management authorities recognise today that a robust safety case is essential in developing disposal facilities for radioactive waste. To improve the robustness of the safety case for the development of a deep geological repository, a wide variety of activities have been carried out by national programs and international organisations over the past years. The Nuclear Energy Agency, since first introducing the modern concept of the 'safety case', has continued to monitor major developments in safety case activities at the international level. This Source-book summarises the activities being undertaken by the Nuclear Energy Agency, the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning the safety case for the operational and post-closure phases of geological repositories for radioactive waste that ranges from low-level to high-level waste and for spent fuel. In doing so, it highlights important differences in focus among the three organisations

  20. Morsleben repository - Interdependence of technical feasibility and functionality of geotechnical barriers and safety case development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollrath, Juergen; Mauke, Ralf; Mohlfeld, Matthias; Niemeyer, Matthias; Becker, Dirk-Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Based on a selection procedure whereby ten existing mines had been taken into consideration, the Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM) was built in a former mine for potash and rock salt production. The specific concerns and objectives of a repository for radioactive waste could not be taken into account when the mine was built at the beginning of the last century. Irrespective of this, altogether about 37 000 m 3 of low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste was stored in several areas of the mine between 1971 and 1991 and from 1994 to 1998. In the scope of the ongoing licensing procedure, the safety of the 'historically grown' repository needs to be demonstrated for the phase after it has been sealed. (authors)

  1. Workshop on development of radionuclide getters for the Yucca Mountain waste repository: proceedings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Lukens, Wayne W. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

    2006-03-01

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository, located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility for permanent disposal of spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analysis has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are technetium, iodine, and neptunium, all of which are highly mobile in the environment. Containment of these radionuclides within the repository is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). These proceedings review current research and technology efforts for sequestration of the radionuclides with a focus on technetium, iodine, and neptunium. This workshop also covered issues concerning the Yucca Mountain environment and getter characteristics required for potential placement into the repository.

  2. Development of site selection process for an LILW repository in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Kralj, M.; Mele, I.; Veselic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The activities regarding the LILW repository site selection in Slovenia are planned to meet the requirements of the Act on Ionising Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, especially the requirement that the site for a repository should be selected by 2008 and the repository should be in operation by 2013. In November 2004, the official administrative procedure for the siting of the repository started with the first spatial public conference on spatial planning procedure. It was carried out by the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning and ARAO. Immediately after the conference the Program for the preparation of the detailed plan of national importance for the LILW repository was accepted by the Ministry. At the beginning of December 2004, ARAO invited all Slovenian local communities to participate in the site selection process and volunteer a site or area in their local community for further investigation. At the beginning of April 2005 the first phase of the bidding process was concluded. ARAO received applications from eight local communities. A pre-feasibility study to define three of the most promising locations was conducted because only three locations are foreseen by the Program for the preparation of the detailed plan of national importance. Methodologies were prepared for assessment of different parameters of technical, financial, environmental and spatial suitability as well as public acceptability. Comparative, preferential and also exclusion criteria for the respective parameters were defined. The results of the cabinet and fieldwork research were compared and further assessed in order to obtain maximum three local communities with three potential sites in which the probability of siting the LILW repository seems to be the highest. Detailed plans of national importance will be prepared for these sites. (author)

  3. Efficiency analyses of the CANDU spent fuel repository using modified disposal canisters for a deep geological disposal system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho, D.K.; Lee, M.S.; Kook, D.H.; Choi, H.J.; Choi, J.W.; Wang, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A reference disposal concept for spent nuclear fuels in Korea has been reviewed. ► To enhance the disposal efficiency, alternative disposal concepts were developed. ► Thermal analyses for alternative disposal concepts were performed. ► From the result of the analyses, the disposal efficiency of the concepts was reviewed. ► The most effective concept was suggested. - Abstract: Deep geological disposal concept is considered to be the most preferable for isolating high-level radioactive waste (HLW), including nuclear spent fuels, from the biosphere in a safe manner. The purpose of deep geological disposal of HLW is to isolate radioactive waste and to inhibit its release of for a long time, so that its toxicity does not affect the human beings and the biosphere. One of the most important requirements of HLW repository design for a deep geological disposal system is to keep the buffer temperature below 100 °C in order to maintain the integrity of the engineered barrier system. In this study, a reference disposal concept for spent nuclear fuels in Korea has been reviewed, and based on this concept, efficient alternative concepts that consider modified CANDU spent fuels disposal canister, were developed. To meet the thermal requirement of the disposal system, the spacing of the disposal tunnels and that of the disposal pits for each alternative concept, were drawn following heat transfer analyses. From the result of the thermal analyses, the disposal efficiency of the alternative concepts was reviewed and the most effective concept suggested. The results of these analyses can be used for a deep geological repository design and detailed analyses, based on exact site characteristics data, will reduce the uncertainty of the results.

  4. MAJOR REPOSITORY DESIGN ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JACK N. BAILEY, DWAYNE CHESTNUT, JAMES COMPTON AND RICHARD D. SNELL

    1997-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is focused on producing a four-part viability assessment in late FY98. Its four components (design, performance assessment, cost estimate, and licensing development plan) must be consistent. As a tool to compare design and performance assessment options, a series of repository pictures were developed for the sequential time phases of a repository. The boundaries of the time phases correspond to evolution in the engineered barrier system (EBS)

  5. Radioactive waste repository of high ecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.; Barinov, A.; Prozorov, L.

    2000-01-01

    With the purpose to construct a radioactive waste repository of high ecological safety and reliable containment, MosNPO 'Radon' specialists have developed an advanced type repository - large diameter well (LBD) one. A project is started for the development of a technology for LDW repository construction and pilot operation of the new repository for 25-30 years. The 2 LDW repositories constructed at the 'Radon' site and the developed monitoring system are described

  6. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  7. Modern Project: monitoring developments for safe repository operation and staged closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, S.; Ouchhi, S.; Verstricht, J.; Maurer, H.; Breen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In a first part, the overall objectives of the MoDeRn project (Monitoring Developments for safe Repository operation and stage closure project) are presented. MoDeRn is a four year (2009-2013) collaborative project co-funded under the 7. Framework Program for Nuclear Research and Training (EURATOM). It involves 17 organizations responsible for research into radioactive waste management in the European Union, United States, Japan and Switzerland, with partners with extensive experience in monitoring activities in underground research laboratories (URL); as well as research institutes and universities with substantial experience in research on socio-technical interactions and public and stakeholder engagement. An overview of the project work packages and of their interdependencies is given. The successful implementation of a repository program for radioactive waste relies on both the technical aspects of a sound safety strategy and scientific and engineering excellence as well as on social aspects such as stakeholder acceptance and confidence. Monitoring is considered key in serving both technical and social objectives. It is not only essential to underpin the technical safety strategy and quality of the engineering, but it can also be an important tool for public communication, contributing to public understanding of and confidence in the repository behaviour. By inclusion of specific national contexts of waste management programs in different countries, the MoDeRn project aims at providing a reference framework for development and implementation of monitoring activities. This will be achieved by stakeholder engagement during all identifiable phases of the radioactive waste disposal process. Thus, site characterisation, construction, operation and staged closure, as well as post-closure institutional control phases have to be addressed. MoDeRn considers different host rock types, such as salt, tuff, crystalline rock

  8. Engineering materials for high level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhijian

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive wastes can arise from a wide range of human activities and have different physical and chemical forms with various radioactivity. The high level radioactive wastes (HLW)are characterized by nuclides of very high initial radioactivity, large thermal emissivity and the long life-term. The HLW disposal is highly concerned by the scientists and the public in the world. At present, the deep geological disposal is regarded as the most reasonable and effective way to safely dispose high-level radioactive wastes in the world. The conceptual model of HLW geological disposal in China is based on a multi-barrier system that combines an isolating geological environment with an engineering barrier system(EBS). The engineering materials in EBS include the vitrified HLW, canister, overpack, buffer materials and backfill materials. Referring to progress in the world, this paper presents the function, the requirement for material selection and design, and main scientific projects of R and D of engineering materials in HLW repository. (authors)

  9. Development of SKI's Regulatory Approach to the Siting of a Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerlind, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, is actively working with the siting of a spent nuclear fuel repository. Feasibility studies have been completed in a total of eight municipalities, and in December 2000 three municipalities (Oskarshamn, Tierp and Oesthammar) were proposed for further investigations. These site investigations include surface based site characterisation from deep bore holes but also further studies of infrastructure, land use, transportation etc. SKB's proposal was reviewed by SKI and about 60 other organisations, including municipalities, NGOs, government agencies etc. during the winter/spring 2000/2001. In June 2001 SKI reported the review findings to the Government. In parallel with SKI also the Swedish Council for Nuclear Waste (KASAM) reviewed SKB's proposal and reported to the Government. In its decision in November 2001 the Government supported SKB's proposal to continue with site investigations. Based on SKB's material, the reviews and the Government's decision the municipalities of Oesthammar and Oskarshamn have agreed to site investigations while Tierp have decided no to continue. The site investigations in Oesthammar and Oskarshamn started during 2002. The siting process has meant that several new actors have been engaged in nuclear waste management in general and disposal of spent nuclear fuel in particular. This has meant that 'old' actors, particularly SKB, the regulators (the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SSI) have had to evaluate, develop and clarify their roles and strategies for dialogue. This paper presents reflections on the impacts on some of SKI's regulatory activities

  10. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 ceramics

  11. Development of waste package designs for disposal in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmert, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Three package design concepts were developed for CHLW and DHLW forms and spent fuel rods: (1) carbon steel overpack, borehole emplacement, (2) titanium clad, carbon steel reinforced overpack, borehole emplacement, and (3) carbon steel (self-shield) overpack, tunnel emplacement. For a DHLW canister with titanium clad overpack, the concept features a 9.5-cm-thick carbon steel overpack reinforcement supporting a 0.25-cm-thick titanium shell. The overall package dimensions are 84 cm diameter x 340 cm long weighing about 8.8 mtons. By contrast, a monolithic DHLW borehole package has a carbon steel overpack that is 10.4 cm thick, weighing about 9.3 mtons. The titanium clad/carbon steel reinforced borehole package is intended for remote emplacement in a vertical borehole in salt. The carbon steel overpack reinforcement provides structural integrity, primarily to resist external pressure, while the titanium overpack provides the necessary corrosion resistance to meet containment requirements. The carbon steel borehole package concept provides containment integrity for both external pressure and corrosion environments with a thicker carbon steel overpack in place of the titanium/carbon steel concept. A third concept utilizes an even greater thickness of cast steel or iron to resist external pressure and corrosion as well as reduce external shielding requirements. For example, a cast steel DHLW package would have overall dimensions of 125 cm diameter x 390 cm long, weighing 31 mtons. The purpose of this self-shield concept is to minimize handling and emplacement operations by reducing the package surface radiation dose to about 100 mrem/hr. In addition, it may serve as a shipping cask, thereby eliminating the need for a shielded hot cell at the repository for waste package assembly operations. 7 figures

  12. Development of local partnership for siting of LILW repository in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, Metka; Zeleznik, Nadja

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Slovenia has only temporary storage facilities for radioactive waste. According to the legislation, a permanent LILW repository site should be authorized by 2008, and the repository has to acquire the operating licence by 2013. In 2006, ARAO, the general public and three municipalities established local partnerships in order to increase public acceptability of the LILW repository. Civil initiative groups opposed to the siting appeared in all three local communities. In one case they forced the municipality to withdraw, in one case they changed the siting location, and in one case they were integrated to local partnership. In the municipality of Krsko, the program of local partnership was publicly discussed. There is an NPP in Krsko, so the local partnership also demanded to discuss the power plant issues. Thematic committees were established that worked separately. They also discussed the issues of the spatial plan for the repository. In the municipality of Brezice, a steering committee was established to promote local partnership activities and organization of thematic committees. There was only one active thematic committee, but many activities for the general public were organised. In the municipality of Sevnica, the local partnership was soon cancelled. (authors)

  13. Demonstration of pyrometallurgical processing for metal fuel and HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadafumi, Koyama; Kensuke, Kinoshita; Takatoshi, Hizikata; Tadashi, Inoue; Ougier, M.; Rikard, Malmbeck; Glatz, J.P.; Lothar, Koch

    2001-01-01

    CRIEPI and JRC-ITU have started a joint study on pyrometallurgical processing to demonstrate the capability of this type of process for separating actinide elements from spent fuel and HLW. The equipment dedicated for this experiments has been developed and installed in JRC-ITU. The stainless steel box equipped with tele-manipulators is operated under pure Ar atmosphere, and prepared for later installation in a hot cell. Experiments on pyro-processing of un-irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal alloy fuel by molten salt electrorefining has been carried out. Recovery of U and Pu from this type alloy fuel was first demonstrated with using solid iron cathode and liquid Cd cathode, respectively. (author)

  14. Hydrogen modelling for vitrified wastes repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinis, S.; Breton, J.

    1992-01-01

    Safety assessments for High Level Wastes (HLW) have led ANDRA (Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Dechets Radioactifs) to study the occurrence of a gas production rate in a repository. This paper deals with the description of an analytical model used for the gas production rate assessment and brings us the first results. The geometry used is restrained to a single borehole associated with a drift in a crystalline formation. Different concepts were studied in this assessment. First results have been obtained. For example, in the case of a permeable plug, the saturation time of the borehole is about 300 years. 5 refs., 5 figs

  15. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles - 12477

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 0736, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Howard, Robert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Used Fuel Disposition campaign. Reference concepts are identified for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. These were analyzed for waste inventory cases representing a range of waste types that could be produced by advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress. All of these disposal concepts are enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. Enclosed modes have less capacity to dissipate heat than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Thermal analysis has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature limits for different disposal concepts. For the crystalline rock and clay/shale repository concepts, a waste package surface temperature limit of 100 deg. C was assumed to prevent changes in clay-based buffer material or clay-rich host rock. Surface decay storage of 50 to 100 years is needed for disposal of high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, or disposal of HLW glass from reprocessing LWR uranium oxide (UOX) fuel. High-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of metal fuel used in a fast reactor could be disposed after decay storage of 50 years or less. For disposal in salt the rock thermal conductivity is significantly greater, and higher temperatures (200 deg. C) can be tolerated at the waste package surface. Decay storage of 10 years or less is needed for high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR

  16. Repository operational criteria analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the ''Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies'' (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations, considering the interfaces and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The study addresses regulatory criteria related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. The study task developed regulatory concepts or potential repository operational criteria (PROC) based on analysis of a repository's safety functions and other regulations for similar facilities. These regulatory concepts or PROC were used as a basis to assess the sufficiency and adequacy of the current criteria in 10 CFR Part 60. Where the regulatory concepts were same as current operational criteria, these criteria were referenced. The operations criteria referenced or the PROC developed are given in this report. Detailed analyses used to develop the regulatory concepts and any necessary PROC for those regulations that may require a minor change are also presented. The results of the ROC task showed a need for further analysis and possible major rule change related to the design bases of a geologic repository operations area, siting, and radiological emergency planning

  17. HLW disposal in Germany - R and D achievements and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steininger, W.

    2006-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of the status of R and D on HLW disposal. Shortly addressed is the current nuclear policy. After describing the responsibilities regarding R and D for disposing of heat-generating high-level (HLW) waste (vitrified waste and spent fuel), selected projects are mentioned to illustrate the state of knowledge in disposing of waste in rock salt. Participation in international projects and programs is described to illustrate the value for the German concepts and ideas for HLW disposal in different rock types. Finally, a condensed outlook on future activities is given. (author)

  18. Methods for assessing the socioeconomic impacts of large-scale resource developments: implications for nuclear repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdock, S.H.; Leistritz, F.L.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the major methods presently available for assessing the socioeconomic impacts of large-scale resource developments and includes discussion of the implications and applications of such methods for nuclear-waste-repository siting are provided. The report: (1) summarizes conceptual approaches underlying, and methodological alternatives for, the conduct of impact assessments in each substantive area, and then enumerates advantages and disadvantages of each alternative; (2) describes factors related to the impact-assessment process, impact events, and the characteristics of rural areas that affect the magnitude and distribution of impacts and the assessment of impacts in each area; (3) provides a detailed review of those methodologies actually used in impact assessment for each area, describes advantages and problems encountered in the use of each method, and identifies the frequency of use and the general level of acceptance of each technique; and (4) summarizes the implications of each area of projection for the repository-siting process, the applicability of the methods for each area to the special and standard features of repositories, and makes general recommendations concerning specific methods and procedures that should be incorporated in assessments for siting areas

  19. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed

  20. Development of low-pH cementitious materials for HLRW repositories. Resistance against ground waters aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Calvo, Jose Luis; Hidalgo, A.; Fernandez Luco, L.; Alonso Alonso, Maria Cruz

    2010-01-01

    One of the most accepted engineering construction concepts of underground repositories for high radioactive waste considers the use of low-pH cementitious materials. This paper deals with the design of those based on Ordinary Portland Cements with high contents of silica fume and/or fly ashes that modify most of the concrete “standard” properties, the pore fluid composition and the microstructure of the hydrated products. Their resistance to long-term groundwater aggression is also evaluated....

  1. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

  2. The role of natural analogs in the repository licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of a permanent geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste (NLW) is implicitly based on analogy to natural systems that have been stable for millions or billions of years. The time of radioactive and chemical toxicity of HLW exceeds the duration of human civilization, and it is impossible to demonstrate the accuracy of predictions of the behavior of engineered or social systems over such long periods

  3. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.; Robinson, C.

    2006-12-01

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with

  4. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K. [Carol Robinson Enviros Consulting Ltd, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with

  5. Assessing the performance of the Nagra HLW disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.; Zuidema, P.; McKinley, I.G.

    1995-01-01

    This article outlines the procedures used in safety assessment and illustrates their application in evaluating the performance of a high-level waste repository. Nagra's general safety assessment methodology has five main components: formulating the aims of the analysis, defining the safety concept, scenario development, consequence analysis and interpretation of results. A safety analysis based on conservative assumptions shows that the engineered barriers of the high-level waste repository are very effective in preventing release of radionuclides; this alone is sufficient to ensure that regulatory requirements can be met. The function of the host rock is to provide a favourable environment for the engineered barrier system. (author) 8 figs

  6. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This document, and its associated appendices and microcomputer (PC) data bases, constitutes the reference OCRWM data base of physical and radiological characteristics data of radioactive wastes. This Characteristics Data Base (CDB) system includes data on spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste (HLW), which clearly require geologic disposal, and other wastes which may require long-term isolation, such as sealed radioisotope sources. The data base system was developed for OCRWM by the CDB Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various principal or official sources of these data provided primary information to the CDB Project which then used the ORIGEN2 computer code to calculate radiological properties. The data have been qualified by an OCRWM-sponsored peer review as suitable for quality-affecting work meeting the requirements of OCRWM's Quality Assurance Program. The wastes characterized in this report include: light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized HLW

  7. Repository simulation model: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report documents the application of computer simulation for the design analysis of the nuclear waste repository's waste handling and packaging operations. The Salt Repository Simulation Model was used to evaluate design alternatives during the conceptual design phase of the Salt Repository Project. Code development and verification was performed by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWL). The focus of this report is to relate the experience gained during the development and application of the Salt Repository Simulation Model to future repository design phases. Design of the repository's waste handling and packaging systems will require sophisticated analysis tools to evaluate complex operational and logistical design alternatives. Selection of these design alternatives in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) and License Application Design (LAD) phases must be supported by analysis to demonstrate that the repository design will cost effectively meet DOE's mandated emplacement schedule and that uncertainties in the performance of the repository's systems have been objectively evaluated. Computer simulation of repository operations will provide future repository designers with data and insights that no other analytical form of analysis can provide. 6 refs., 10 figs

  8. Repository design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C M

    1982-01-01

    Various technical issues of radioactive waste design are addressed in this paper. Two approaches to repository design considered herein are: (1) design to minimize the disturbance of the hot rock; and (2) designs that intentionally modify the hot rock to insure better containment of the wastes. The latter designs range from construction of a highly impermeable barrier around a spherical cavern to creating a matrix of tunnels and boreholes to form a cage within which the hydraulic pressure is nearly constant. Examples of these design alternatives are described in some detail. It is concluded that proposed designs for repositories illustrate that performance criteria considered acceptable for such facilities can be met by appropriate site selection and repository engineering. With these technically feasible design concepts, it is also felt that socioeconomic and institutional issues can be better resolved. (BLM)

  9. Repository simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The repository simulation experiments described in this paper are designed to assess the performance of SRP waste glass under the most realistic repository conditions that can be obtained in the laboratory. These tests simulate the repository environment as closely as possible and introduce systematically the variability of the geology, groundwater chemistry, and waste package components during the leaching of the waste glass. The tests evaluate waste form performance under site-specific conditions, which differ for each of the geologic repositories under consideration. Data from these experiments will aid in the development of a realistic source term that can describe the release of radionuclides from SRP waste glass as a component of proposed waste packages. Hence, this information can be useful to optimize waste package design for SRP waste glass and to provide data for predicting long-term performance and subsequent conformance to regulations. The repository simulation tests also help to bridge the gap in interpreting results derived from tests performed under the control of the laboratory to the uncertainity and variability of field tests. In these experiments, site-specific repository components and conditions are emphasized and only the site specific materials contact the waste forms. An important feature of these tests is that both actual and simulated waste glasses are tested identically. 7 figures, 2 tables

  10. Evaluation of site-generated radioactive waste treatment and disposal methods for the Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Jardine, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies the sources of radioactive wastes that may be generated at the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, estimates the waste quantities and characteristics, compares technologies available for waste treatment and disposal, and develops recommended concepts for site-generated waste treatment and disposal. The scope of this study is limited to operations during the emplacement phase, in which 70,000 MTU of high-level waste will be received and emplaced at the proposed repository. The evaluations consider all radioactive wastes generated during normal operations in surface and underground facilities. Wastes generated as a result of accidents are not addressed; accidents that could result in large quantities of radioactive waste are expected to occur very infrequently and temporary, portable systems could be used for any necessary cleanup. The results of this study can be used to develop more definitive plans for managing the site-generated wastes and as a basis for the design of associated facilities at the proposed repository

  11. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  12. Current status and future plans of R and D on geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Noriaki

    1994-01-01

    As to the final disposal of HLW, it is considered highly important to provide a clear distinction between implementation of disposal and the research and development as independent processes, and to increase the transparency of the overall disposal program by defining concrete schedules and the roles and responsibilities of the organizations involved. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has being conducted research and development on the geological disposal of HLW, as the leading organization. The responsibility of PNC is to ensure smooth progress of research and development project and to carry out studies of geological environment. The role of the Japanese government is to take overall responsibilities for appropriate and steady implementations of the program, as well as enacting any laws or policies required. On the other hand, electricity supply utilities are responsible to secure necessary funds for disposal, and in accordance with their role as waste producers, they are expected to cooperate even at the stage of research and development. Fundamental features of research and development of PNC carried out at this stage are as follows; (1) Generic research and development, (2) To establish scientific and technical bases of geological isolation of HLW in Japan, (3) About 15 years program from 1989 with documentation of progress reports, (4) Approach from near-field to far-field. PNC summarized the findings obtained by 1991, and submitted a document (H3 Report) in September 1992 as the first progress report. H3 Report is the first and comprehensive technical report on geological disposal of HLW in Japan, and provides information for the public to find out the current status of the research and development. This paper reviews the conclusions of H3 Report, overall procedures and schedule for implementing geological disposal, and future plans of R and D in PNC. (J.P.N.)

  13. Mechanical stability of repository tunnels and factors to be considered for determining tunnel spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kunifumi

    1994-01-01

    Kristallin-1 organized by Nagra is currently advanced as a synthetic project regarding a high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository in Switzerland. Its host rock is granitic rocks, and the potential siting area is located in northern Switzerland. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the long term safety of a HLW repository under more site-specific conditions than before. As the detailed geological data were investigated, the average size of undisturbed crystalline rock blocks is limited horizontally to about several hundred meter, therefore, the HLW repository area must be divided into several panels to avoid fracture zones. It is necessary to make tunnel spacing as small as possible for the purpose of reasonably designing the entire layout of repository tunnels. The main factors to be considered for determining repository tunnel spacing are listed. Rock mass modeling, rock mass material properties, the analysis model and parameters, the numerical analysis of repository tunnel stability and its main conclusion are reported. The numerical analysis of the temperature distribution in near field was carried out. Tunnel spacing should be set more than 20 m in view of the maximum temperature. (K.I.)

  14. Technology overview of mined repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimera, R.; Thirumalai, K.

    1982-01-01

    Mined repositories present an environmentally viable option for permanent disposal of nuclear waste. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art mining technologies and identifies technological issues and developments necessary to mine a repository in basalt. The thermal loading, isolation, and retrieval requirements of a repository present unique technological challenges unknown to conventional mining practice. The technology issues and developments required in the areas of excavation, roof and ground support, equipment development, instrumentation development, and sealing are presented. Performance assessment methods must be developed to evaluate the adequacies of technologies developed to design, construct, operate, and decommission a repository. A stepwise test-and-development approach is used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to develop cost-effective technologies for a repository

  15. Status and development of deep geological repository in Slovak republic from geological point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Franzen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the operation of Slovak NPPs, production of approximately 2,300 metric tons of spent fuel expressed as heavy metal (18,654 spent fuel assemblies is expected. In addition, about 5000 metric tons of radioactive waste unfit for near surface repository at Mochovce and destined for a deep geological disposal. The safe and long-term solution of back-end fuel cycle is so highly required.One of the most favorable solutions is Deep Geological Repository (DGR. The site for a DGR, along with repository design and the engineered barrier system must ensure long-term safety of the disposal system.A preliminary set of site-selection criteria for a DGR was proposed in Slovakia, based on worldwide experience and consistent with IAEA recommendations. Main groups of criteria are: 1 geological and tectonic stability of prospective sites; 2 appropriate characteristics of host rock (lithological homogeneity, suitable hydrogeological and geochemical conditions, favourable geotechnical setting, absence of mineral resources, etc.; 3 conflict of interests (natural resources, natural and cultural heritage, protected resources of thermal waters, etc..Based on the previous geological investigations, three distinct areas (five localities were determined as the most prospective sites for construction of a DGR so far. Three of them are built by granitoids rock (Tribeč Mts., Veporske vrchy Mts. and Stolicke vrchy Mts., other consist of sedimentary rock formations (Cerova vrchovina Upland and Rimavska kotlina Basin. Objective for the next investigation stage is to perform more detailed geological characterization of the prospective sites.

  16. Economic appraisal of deployment schedules for high-level radioactive waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doan Phuong Hoai Linh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep geological repository (DGR is considered as the definitive management solution for high-level waste (HLW. Countries defined different DGR implementation schedules, depending on their national context and political choices. We raise the question of the economic grounds of such political decisions by providing an economic analysis of different DGR schedules. We investigate the optimal timing for DGR commissioning based on available Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA data (2013. Two scenarios are considered: (1 rescheduling the deployment of a DGR with the same initial operational period, and (2 rescheduling the deployment of a DGR with a shorter operational period, i.e. initial closure date. Given the long timescales of such projects, we also take into account the discounting effect. The first finding is that it appears more economically favorable to extend the interim storage than to dispose of the HLW immediately. Countries which chose “immediate” disposal are willing to accept higher costs to quickly solve the problem. Another interesting result is that there is an optimal solution with respect to the length of DGR operational period and the waste flow for disposal. Based on data provided by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA, we find an optimal operating period of about 15 years with a flow of 2000 tHM/year.

  17. Economic appraisal of deployment schedules for high-level radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoai Linh Doan, Phuong; Duquesnoy, T.; Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    The deep geological repository (DGR) is considered as the definitive management solution for high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Countries defined different DGR implementation schedules, depending on their national context and political choices. We raise the question of the economic grounds of such political decisions by providing an economic analysis of different DGR schedules. We investigate the optimal timing for DGR commissioning based on available Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) data (2013). Two scenarios are considered: -1) rescheduling the deployment of a DGR with the same initial operational period, and -2) rescheduling the deployment of a DGR with a shorter operational period, i.e. initial closure date. Given the long timescales of such projects, we also take into account the discounting effect. The first finding is that it appears more economically favorable to extend the interim storage than to dispose of the HLW immediately. Countries which chose 'immediate' disposal are willing to accept higher costs to quickly solve the problem. Another interesting result is that there is an optimal solution with respect to the length of DGR operational period and the waste flow for disposal. Based on data provided by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), we find an optimal operating period of about 15 years with a flow of 2000 tHM/year. (authors)

  18. Compliance with NRC subsystem requirements in the repository licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minwalla, H.

    1994-01-01

    Section 121 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Commission) to issue technical requirements and criteria, for the use of a system of multiple barriers in the design of the repository, that are not inconsistent with any comparable standard promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Administrator of the EPA is required to promulgate generally applicable standards for protection of the general environment from offsite releases from radioactive material in repositories. The Commission's regulations pertaining to geologic repositories are provided in 10 CFR part 60. The Commission has provided in 10 CFR 60.112 the overall post-closure system performance objective which is used to demonstrate compliance with the EPA high-level waste (HLW) disposal standard. In addition, the Commission has provided, in 10 CFR 60.113, subsystem performance requirements for substantially complete containment, fractional release rate, and groundwater travel time; however, none of these subsystem performance requirements have a causal technical nexus with the EPA HLW disposal standard. This paper examines the issue of compliance with the conflicting dual regulatory role of subsystem performance requirements in the repository licensing process and recommends several approaches that would appropriately define the role of subsystem performance requirements in the repository licensing process

  19. Repository exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentz, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses exploration objectives and requirements for a nuclear repository in the U.S.A. The importance of designing the exploration program to meet the system performance objectives is emphasized and some examples of the extent of exploration required before the License Application for Construction Authorization is granted are also discussed

  20. Integrated HLW Conceptual Process Flowsheet(s) for the Crystalline Silicotitanate Process SRDF-98-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Strategic Research and Development Fund (SRDF) provided funds to develop integrated conceptual flowsheets and material balances for a CST process as a potential replacement for, or second generation to, the ITP process. This task directly supports another SRDF task: Glass Form for HLW Sludge with CST, SRDF-98-01, by M. K. Andrews which seeks to further develop sludge/CST glasses that could be used if the ITP process were replaced by CST ion exchange. The objective of the proposal was to provide flowsheet support for development and evaluation of a High Level Waste Division process to replace ITP. The flowsheets would provide a conceptual integrated material balance showing the impact on the HLW division. The evaluation would incorporate information to be developed by Andrews and Harbour on CST/DWPF glass formulations and provide the bases for evaluating the economic impact of the proposed replacement process. Coincident with this study, the Salt Disposition Team began its evaluation of alternatives for disposition of the HLW salts in the SRS waste tanks. During that time, the CST IX process was selected as one of four alternatives (of eighteen Phase II alternatives) for further evaluation during Phase III

  1. Concept of grouping in partitioning of HLW for self-consistent fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    A concept of grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to examine the possibility of a self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). Group B is difficult to be transmuted by neutron reaction, so a radiation application in an industrial scale should be developed in the future. Group A and Group MA1 can be burned by a thermal reactor, on the other hand Group MA2 should be burned by a fast reactor. P-T treatment can be optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively

  2. Field instrumentation and testing needs for a high level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, J.; Maini, T.

    1981-03-01

    A review has been conducted of the testing and measurement needs posed by a deep geologic High Level Waste (HLW) repository in crystalline or argillaceous rocks. Siting, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of the repository have been covered, together with the planning of a Test and Demonstration Facility. Instruments and methods available have been critically assessed in their ability to fulfil the aforementioned testing and monitoring programmes. Special attention has been paid to the relation of measurements to the data needs and to the tests likely to generate such data. This assessment has concentrated on measurements of absolute rock stresses, monitoring of changes in rock stress, evaluation of the rock mass deformability, measurement of relative displacements and determination of the hydrogeologic parameters of the rock mass. Other measurements have been studied with a lesser degree of attention. The overall conclusion is that, from the instrumentation and testing points of view, present plans for a test and demonstration facility in the early nineties and a repository soon after 2000 are indeed feasible. Specific conclusions on the state-of-the-art and development needs are presented in the report. (author)

  3. SNF/HLW Transfer System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. Holt

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF)/high-level radioactive waste (HLW) transfer system and associated bases, which will allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This SDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD is an engineering tool for design control. Accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This SDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flowdown of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The SDD follows the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in this SDD reflects the current results of the design process

  4. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  5. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  6. Development of emergency arrangements for the transport of radioactive waste to a deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Hutchinson, D.L.; Burgess, M.H.; Higson, J.; Randall, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of the studies and discussions which have led to the recommendation that Nirex should adopt NIREP as the Emergency Plan for the proposed transport arrangements of radioactive waste to the proposed UK deep repository for the disposal of low level and intermediate level waste. Although NIREP is currently specific to the road transport of radioactive materials, it is in the process of being extended to cover their transport by rail. An extended version of NIREP, covering both road and rail transport, could be operational by the end of 1992. NIREP is an established plan which meets all the current legal requirements and is flexible enough to accommodate any likely changes in legislation in the future. It is compatible with the Planning Basis and meets the requirements of the Emergency Plan Specification. The extended version of NIREP will be subject to an annual full-scale exercise and the Plan should be well-proven by the time that transport of waste packages to the repository commences. (J.P.N.)

  7. Development of rail access to the proposed repository site at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standish, P.N.; Seidler, P.E.; Andrews, W.B.; Shearin, G.

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendment Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the initial site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is considered desirable by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce (1) costs and (2) number of shipments, relative to highway transportation. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct a study to determine (1) that there are alignments for a potential rail line from existing mainline railroads to Yucca Mountain and (2) that these are consistent with present rail design standards and are acceptable relative to environmental and land access considerations

  8. Further development of public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a final repository in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Regine; Kallenbach-Herbert, Beate [OeEo-Institute e.V., Inst. for Applied Ecology, Darmstadt (Germany); Arens, Georg [Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    This paper reflects the first findings of a current research project funded by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection and conducted by an interdisciplinary working group of the OEko-Institute. One focus of this project is the systematic analysis of past and existing participatory processes in different nuclear and non-nuclear projects. On the basis of this analysis and a literature review a specific concept for public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a repository for high radioactive waste (HAW repository) in Germany will be derived. The concept shall foster transparency and acceptance. The working group of the OEko-Institute combines long standing research experience and an intimate knowledge of radioactive waste management including political, technical, management and social problems of final disposal on the one hand. On the other hand members play an active role in stakeholder processes of different non-nuclear projects as well as experience with a wide range of participative measures and their impact. This allows an approach which integrates the specific features of radioactive waste disposal with a wider perspective on the demands and opportunities of stakeholder processes. The procedure of site selection for a HAW repository in Germany still has to be specified. The procedure introduced by the 'Committee on a Site Selection Procedure for Repository Sites' (Arbeitskreis Auswahlverfahren Endlagerstandorte - AkEnd) has not been adopted. The Committee had suggested installing a negotiation group to discuss the AkEnd proposals in the so called 'Phase II'. This suggestion could not be followed because not all relevant stakeholders were willing to participate. An internal draft for a federal law implementing main elements of the AkEnd findings was developed by the Ministry for Environment in 2005, but has never been brought to the cabinet. Due to the change of Government in Germany, the next steps still are

  9. Further development of public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a final repository in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, Regine; Kallenbach-Herbert, Beate; Arens, Georg

    2006-01-01

    This paper reflects the first findings of a current research project funded by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection and conducted by an interdisciplinary working group of the OEko-Institute. One focus of this project is the systematic analysis of past and existing participatory processes in different nuclear and non-nuclear projects. On the basis of this analysis and a literature review a specific concept for public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a repository for high radioactive waste (HAW repository) in Germany will be derived. The concept shall foster transparency and acceptance. The working group of the OEko-Institute combines long standing research experience and an intimate knowledge of radioactive waste management including political, technical, management and social problems of final disposal on the one hand. On the other hand members play an active role in stakeholder processes of different non-nuclear projects as well as experience with a wide range of participative measures and their impact. This allows an approach which integrates the specific features of radioactive waste disposal with a wider perspective on the demands and opportunities of stakeholder processes. The procedure of site selection for a HAW repository in Germany still has to be specified. The procedure introduced by the 'Committee on a Site Selection Procedure for Repository Sites' (Arbeitskreis Auswahlverfahren Endlagerstandorte - AkEnd) has not been adopted. The Committee had suggested installing a negotiation group to discuss the AkEnd proposals in the so called 'Phase II'. This suggestion could not be followed because not all relevant stakeholders were willing to participate. An internal draft for a federal law implementing main elements of the AkEnd findings was developed by the Ministry for Environment in 2005, but has never been brought to the cabinet. Due to the change of Government in Germany, the next steps still are under consideration

  10. Sellafield repository design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Between 1989 and 1997, UK Nirex Ltd carried out a programme of investigations to evaluate the potential of a site adjacent to the BNFL Sellafield works to host a deep repository for the United Kingdom's intermediate-level and certain low-level radioactive waste. The programme of investigations was wound down following the decision in March 1997 to uphold the rejection of the Company's planning application for the Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF), an underground laboratory which would have allowed further investigations to confirm whether or not the site would be suitable. Since that time, the Company's efforts in relation to the Sellafield site have been directed towards documenting and publishing the work carried out. The design concept for a repository at Sellafield was developed in parallel with the site investigations through an iterative process as knowledge of the site and understanding of the repository system performance increased. This report documents the Sellafield repository design concept as it had been developed, from initial design considerations in 1991 up to the point when the RCF planning application was rejected. It shows, from the context of a project at that particular site, how much information and experience has been gained that will be applicable to the development of a deep waste repository at other potential sites

  11. Safety analysis in subsurface repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The development of mathematical models to represent the repository-geosphere-biosphere system, and the development of a structure for data acquisition, processing, and use to analyse the safety of subsurface repositories, are presented. To study the behavior of radionuclides in geosphere a laboratory to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient was constructed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the spent fuels and other wastes that will be disposed of in a geologic repository. The two major sources of these materials are commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized high-level waste (HLW). Other wastes that may require long-term isolation include non-LWR spent fuels and miscellaneous sources such as activated metals. Detailed characterizations are required for all of these potential repository wastes. These characterizations include physical, chemical, and radiological properties. The latter must take into account decay as a function of time. This information has been extracted from primary data sources, evaluated, and assembled in a Characteristics Data Base which provides data in four formats: hard copy standard reports, menu-driven personal computer (PC) data bases, program-level PC data bases, and mainframe computer files. The Characteristics Data Base provides a standard set of self-consistent data to the various areas of responsibility including systems integration and waste stream analysis, storage, transportation, and geologic disposal. The data will be used for design studies, evaluation of alternatives, and system optimization by OCRWM and supporting contractors. 7 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Capacity of burning and transmutation reactor and grouping in partitioning of HLW in self-consistent fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    The concept of capacity of B/T reactor and grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to perform self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Te, 129 I, and 135 Cs), Group B ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). In this study P-T treatment were optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs

  14. Enhanced sludge processing of HLW: Hydrothermal oxidation of chromium, technetium, and complexants by nitrate. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, S.J.; Robinson, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for hydrothermal separation of chromium from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges. The worked is aimed at attaining a fundamental understanding of chromium speciation, oxidation/reduction and dissolution kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and transport properties under hydrothermal conditions in both simple and complex salt solutions that will ultimately lead to an efficient chromium leaching process. This report summarizes the research over the first 1.5 years of a 3 year project. The authors have examined the dissolution of chromium hydroxide using different oxidants as a function of temperature and alkalinity. The results and possible applications to HLW sludges are discussed'

  15. Development of vault model 'VERMIN' for post closure behaviour of repositories for non-heat generating radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The computer model VERMIN has been developed to simulate the post closure time dependent behaviour of the vault section of a Land 3 and a Land 2 type repository. Development was carried out within the constraints of the computer code SYVAC. Output from the new model, in terms of radionuclide fluxes versus time, provides the source term for that code. A number of conceptual designs for different geological conditions were produced and used to develop the model. Unlike SYVAC, the boundary of the vault was considered to be at the interface between the damaged rock zone and the undamaged host rock. VERMIN treats the vault as a series of engineered barriers namely: waste matrix, waste package, backfill material liner and the damaged rock zone. For the Land 3 repository, the vault was considered to be fully saturated and consequently corrosion, leading to eventual package failure, will occur. VERMIN allows for package failure and subsequent leaching and then calculates the migration of nuclides from within the vault out to its boundary. One dimensional advection and two dimensional diffusion/dispersion are modelled allowing for retardation due to sorption radionuclide saturation and radionuclide decay. Radioactive decay chains up to eight members can be modelled by VERMIN. (author)

  16. Safety case for license application for a final repository: The French example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissier, Fabrice; Voinis, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The reversible repository in a deep geological formation is the French reference solution for the long-term management of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste (HLW and ILW). Twenty years of R and D work and conceptual and basic studies since the first French Act of 1991 led, in particular, to a feasibility demonstration in 2005. According to the French Act on Radioactive Waste of 28 of June 2006, Andra shall design a reversible repository in order to apply for license in 2015. In response to this demand, Andra developed the industrial project known as 'Cigeo', a reversible geological disposal facility for HLW and ILW located in Meuse/Haute-Marne. Two years before applying for authorisation, Andra's project is now focusing on three main targets: developing Cigeo's industrial design, preparing the authorisation process through increased exchanges with stakeholders and the preparation of a safety case to support authorisation application. The latter draws on the previous safety cases of 2005 and 2009, which give a sound basis to assess Cigeo's safety, both for the operational and post-closure periods. In this new stage of the project, the challenging issues for the preparation of the safety case are the following: - to identify the various regulatory frameworks (nuclear and non-nuclear) and guides applicable to the facility; - to ensure that the industrial design complies in particular with the safety requirements as presented in the safety case and its supporting safety assessment; - to identify crucial inputs (R and D, tests,...) needed to support the authorisation application, in particular, to bring convincing arguments to assess the technical feasibility of the design and when appropriate its ability to meet the safety requirements; - to ensure that all the requirements from previous regulatory and peer reviews (national and international?) are taken into account. (authors)

  17. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?; Standortgebiete fuer geologische Tiefenlager. Warum gerade hier?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieser, A

    2009-09-15

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes.

  18. Final Report Tests On The Duramelter 1200 HLW Pilot Melter System Using AZ-101 HLW Simulants VSL-02R0100-2, Rev. 1, 2/17/03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Bardakci, T.; Gong, W.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Schatz, T.R.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter(trademark) 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 (1). Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m 2 ) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m 2 /d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system (1) concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger

  19. FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D' ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the

  20. Final Report - Testing of Optimized Bubbler Configuration for HLW Melter VSL-13R2950-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/12/2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Callow, R. A.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W. K.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of this work was to determine the glass production rate increase and ancillary effects of adding more bubbler outlets to the current WTP HLW melter baseline. This was accomplished through testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) at VSL. The DM1200 unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with several HLW waste streams including the four tank wastes proposed for initial processing at Hanford. This melter system was also used for the development and optimization of the present baseline WTP HLW bubbler configuration for the WTP HLW melter, as well as for MACT testing for both HLW and LAW. Specific objectives of these tests were to: Conduct DM1200 melter testing with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Conduct DM1200 melter testing to differentiate the effects of total bubbler air flow and bubbler distribution on glass production rate and cold cap formation. Collect melter operating data including processing rate, temperatures at a variety of locations within the melter plenum space, melt pool temperature, glass melt density, and melter pressure with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Collect melter exhaust samples to compare particulate carryover for different bubbler configurations. Analyze all collected data to determine the effects of adding more bubblers to the WTP HLW melter to inform decisions regarding future lid re-designs. The work used a high aluminum HLW stream composition defined by ORP, for which an appropriate simulant and high waste loading glass formulation were developed and have been previously processed on the DM1200.

  1. Socioeconomic impacts of repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.K.; Hamm, R.R.; Murdock, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Federal and state decision makers, community leaders, and residents must know how communities will be changed by the impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This chapter identifies the factors affecting an assessment of socioeconomic impacts and the types of impacts (economic, demographic, fiscal, community service, and social) likely to occur as a result of repository development. Each of these types can be divided into standard (those which typically results from any large-scale development) and special impact categories (those which result from the fact that radioactive materials will be handled). 3 tables

  2. Tc Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy S.; Conradsen, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    Tc complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that long-term consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges we are conducting a research program to study to develop thermodynamic data on Tc-organic complexation over a wide range of chemical conditions. We will attempt to characterize Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques to validate our model. On the basis of such studies we will develop credible model of Tc chemistry in HLW that will allow prediction of Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  3. Cryopreservation in fish: current status and pathways to quality assurance and quality control in repository development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia; Hu, E; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2016-01-07

    Cryopreservation in aquatic species in general has been constrained to research activities for more than 60 years. Although the need for application and commercialisation pathways has become clear, the lack of comprehensive quality assurance and quality control programs has impeded the progress of the field, delaying the establishment of germplasm repositories and commercial-scale applications. In this review we focus on the opportunities for standardisation in the practices involved in the four main stages of the cryopreservation process: (1) source, housing and conditioning of fish; (2) sample collection and preparation; (3) freezing and cryogenic storage of samples; and (4) egg collection and use of thawed sperm samples. In addition, we introduce some key factors that would assist the transition to commercial-scale, high-throughput application.

  4. Development of low-pH cementitious materials for HLRW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calvo, J.L.; Hidalgo, A.; Alonso, C.; Fernandez Luco, L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most accepted engineering construction concepts of underground repositories for high radioactive waste considers the use of low-pH cementitious materials. This paper deals with the design of those based on Ordinary Portland Cements with high contents of silica fume and/or fly ashes that modify most of the concrete 'standard' properties, the pore fluid composition and the microstructure of the hydrated products. Their resistance to long-term groundwater aggression is also evaluated. The results show that the use of OPC cement binders with high silica content produces low-pH pore waters and the microstructure of these cement pastes is different from the conventional OPC ones, generating C-S-H gels with lower CaO/SiO 2 ratios that possibly bind alkali ions. Leaching tests show a good resistance of low-pH concretes against groundwater aggression although an altered front can be observed.

  5. Spent fuel and high level waste: Chemical durability and performance under simulated repository conditions. Results of a coordinated research project 1998-2004. Part 2: Results of a previously unpublished CRP: Performance of high level waste forms and packages under repository conditions. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1991-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the CRP (Coordinated Research Projekt) on the 'Performance of High Level Waste Forms and Packages under Repository Conditions' was to contribute to the development and implementation of proper and sound technologies for HLW and spent fuel management. Special emphasis was given to the identification of various waste form properties and the study of their long term durability in simulated repository conditions. Another objective was to promote the co-operation and exchange of information between Member States on experimental concerning behaviour of the waste form. The CRP was composed of research contracts and agreements with Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, India, Japan, Russia, and the United States of America. The publication includes 14 individual contributions of the participants to the CRP, which are indexed separately.

  6. Grouping in partitioning of HLW for burning and/or transmutation with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, Asashi; Mulyanto.

    1995-01-01

    A basic concept on partitioning and transmutation treatment by neutron reaction was developed in order to improve the waste management and the disposal scenario of high level waste (HLW). The grouping in partitioning was important factor and closely linked with the characteristics of B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment. The selecting and grouping concept in partitioning of HLW was proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (Np, Am, and unrecovered U and Pu), Group MA2 (Cm, Cf etc.), Group A (Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW), judging from the three criteria for B/T treatment proposed in this study, which is related to (1) the value of hazard index for long-term tendency based on ALI, (2) the relative dose factor related to the mobility or retardation in ground water penetrated through geologic layer, and (3) burning and/or transmutation characteristics for recycle B/T treatment and the decay acceleration ratio by neutron reaction. Group MA1 and Group A could be burned effectively by thermal B/T reactor. Group MA2 could be burned effectively by fast B/T reactor. Transmutation of Group B by neutron reaction is difficult, therefore the development of radiation application of Group B (Cs and Sr) in industrial scale may be an interesting option in the future. Group R, i.e. the partitioned remains of HLW, and also a part of Group B should be immobilized and solidified by the glass matrix. HI ALI , the hazard index based on ALI, due to radiotoxicity of Group R can be lower than HI ALI due to standard mill tailing (smt) or uranium ore after about 300 years. (author)

  7. The senate working party on HLW management in Spain - historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang-Lenton, J.

    2007-01-01

    As the first case history Jorge Lang Lenton, Corporate Director of ENRESA, recounted the failed attempt to establish an underground disposal facility for HLW. The site selection process, which was planned by ENRESA in the 1980's, was aimed at finding the 'technically best' site. The process was conducted by technical experts without public involvement. When 40 candidate siting areas were identified in the mid-1990's, information leaked out, creating vigorous public opposition in all of these locations. In 1998 the siting process was halted. The Senate proposed to continue R and D on geological disposal and on P and T, to reduce waste production, and to develop an energy policy that relies more on renewable energy sources. They also suggested that public participation be promoted. The 5. General Radioactive Waste Management Plan, which was developed in 1999, took these proposals into consideration. Regarding underground disposal, the government postponed any decision until 2010. At the end of 2004 a decision was made by Parliament to establish a centralized storage facility for HLW. Mr. Lang-Lenton highlighted the main lessons of the failed siting attempt. First, it has to be acknowledged that HLW management is a societal rather than a technical problem. Second, for any radioactive waste management facility a socially feasible rather than a technically optimal site should be selected, i.e., 'the best site is the possible site'. Finally, transparency and openness are needed for building confidence in the decision-making process. (author)

  8. HLW Flexible jumper materials compatibility evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-13

    H-Tank Farm Engineering tasked SRNL/Materials Science & Technology (MS&T) to evaluate the compatibility of Goodyear Viper® chemical transfer hose with HLW solutions. The hose is proposed as a flexible Safety Class jumper for up to six months service. SRNL/MS&T performed various tests to evaluate the effects of radiation, high pH chemistry and elevated temperature on the hose, particularly the inner liner. Test results suggest an upper dose limit of 50 Mrad for the hose. Room temperature burst pressure values at 50 Mrad are estimated at 600- 800 psi, providing a safety factor of 4.0-5.3X over the anticipated operating pressure of 150 psi and a safety factor of 3.0-4.0X over the working pressure of the hose (200 psi), independent of temperature effects. Radiation effects are minimal at doses less than 10 Mrad. Doses greater than 50 Mrad may be allowed, depending on operating conditions and required safety factors, but cannot be recommended at this time. At 250 Mrad, burst pressure values are reduced to the hose working pressure. At 300 Mrad, burst pressures are below 150 psi. At a bounding continuous dose rate of 57,870 rad/hr, the 50 Mrad dose limit is reached within 1.2 months. Actual dose rates may be lower, particularly during non-transfer periods. Refined dose calculations are therefore recommended to justify longer service. This report details the tests performed and interpretation of the results. Recommendations for shelf-life/storage, component quality verification, and post-service examination are provided.

  9. 臺灣機構典藏發展芻議 On Developing Digital Institutional Repositories in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieh Hsiang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available 機構典藏是一個用來保存並使用機構研究產出的機制,主要發展來自於大學自覺希望能夠有一個完整保存學校研究產出的學術交流平台。本文對數位化機構典藏發展因素、機構典藏重要的核心價值、建置機構典藏的好處、以及為何臺灣各大學及研究機構必須建置機構典藏提出論述,並對臺灣的研究機構如何開始著手規劃建置機構典藏提出一些建議。Institutional repositories are digital collections that contain the intellectual output of universities or research institutes. They emerged from the awareness and need of universities to create a uniform platform for collecting, maintaining, preserving, presenting, and utilizing their digital assets, including research outputs. In this paper we discuss the development, the core value, and the urgency of building such repositories,and propose a guideline for Taiwanese universities to build their own

  10. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank; Bellodi, G; Benedetto, E; Dorda, U; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Papaphilippou, Y; Pieloni, T; Ruggiero, F; Rumolo, G; Schmidt, F; Todesco, E; Zotter, Bruno W; Payet, J; Bartolini, R; Farvacque, L; Sen, T; Chin, Y H; Ohmi, K; Oide, K; Furman, M; Qiang, J; Sabbi, G L; Seidl, P A; Vay, J L; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Cousineau, S M; Danilov, V; Holmes, J A; Shishlo, A; Kim, E S; Cai, Y; Pivi, M; Kaltchev, D I; Abell, D T; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Boine-Frankenheim, O; Franchetti, G; Hofmann, I; Machida, S; Wei, J

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic acceleratorphysics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  11. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  12. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories.

  13. Coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of granite for high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wengang; Wang Ju; Zhou Hongwei; Jiang Pengfei; Yang Chunhe

    2008-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes (HLW) repository is a special deep underground engineering, and in the stages of site selection, designing, constructing ,the stability evaluation, lots of important rock mechanics problems need to be resolved. During the decay of nuclear waste, enormous thermal energy was released and temperature variation caused dynamic distribution of stress and deformation field of surrounding rock of repository. BeiShan region of Gansu province was selected to be the repository field in the future, it is of practical significance to do research on granite in this region. Based on the concept model of HLW repository, this thesis calculates temperature field, stress field and deformation field of HLW repository surrounding rock under the condition of TM coupled with applying the finite difference FLAC 3D . From this study, thermo-mechanical characteristic of granite is obtained primarily under given canister heat source and given decay law function. And these results show that the reasonable space between disposal hole is 8 m-12 m, and the peak temperature of the canister surface is 130 ℃, the centerline temperature between pits is about 40 ℃ which is maintained for about hundreds of years under given heating output at -500 m depth. (authors)

  14. Radionuclide release from high level waste forms under repository conditions in clay or granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Lanza, F.

    1990-01-01

    The behaviour of both fully active and simulated vitrified high level waste (HLW) has been studied under conditions that are likely to occur in future repositories in clay and granite. The simulated HLW was doped with Cs, Sr, Tc and the actinides and the leaching of these elements from the glass has been measured together with their concentrations in the water of the near-field and their distribution between the various components of the repository. The diffusion coefficients of several elements in Boom clay has also been measured. The results show that the concentrations of Tc and the actinides in the near-field of a repository will be very low and that the actinides will only diffuse very slowly away from the vicinity of the glass. 24 refs., 1 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, A.

    2000-01-01

    Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories is a recognised option for closing nuclear fuel cycles. Geological repositories are at present in stages of development in a number of countries and are expected to be built and operated early next century. A State usually has an obligation to safely store any nuclear material, which is considered unsuitable to re-enter the nuclear fuel cycle, isolated from the biosphere. In conjunction with this, physical protection has to be accounted for to prevent inadvertent access to such material. In addition to these two criteria - which are fully under the State's jurisdiction - a third criterion reflecting international non-proliferation commitments needs to be addressed. Under comprehensive safeguards agreements a State concedes verification of nuclear material for safeguards purposes to the IAEA. The Agency can thus provide assurance to the international community that such nuclear material has been used for peaceful purposes only as declared by the State. It must be emphasised that all three criteria mentioned constitute a 'unit'. None can be sacrificed for the sake of the other, but compromises may have to be sought in order to make their combination as effective as possible. Based on comprehensive safeguards agreements signed and ratified by the State, safeguards can be terminated only when the material has been consumed or diluted in such a way that it can no longer be utilised for any nuclear activities or has become practicably irrecoverable. As such safeguards for nuclear material in geological repositories have to be continued even after the repository has been back-filled and sealed. The effective application of safeguards must assure continuity-of-knowledge that the nuclear material in the repository has not been diverted for an unknown purpose. The nuclear material disposed in a geological repository may eventually have a higher and long term proliferation risk because the inventory is

  16. Researches on tectonic uplift and denudation with relation to geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Sanga, Tomoji; Moriya, Toshifumi

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the present state of researches on tectonic uplift and denudation, and shows perspective goals and direction of future researches from the viewpoint of geological disposal of HLW in Japan. Detailed history of tectonics and denudation in geologic time scale, including the rates, temporal and spatial distributions and processes, reconstructed from geologic and geomorphologic evidences will enable us to make the geological predictions. Improvements of the analytic methods for the geological histories, e.g. identification of the tectonic and denudational imprints and age determinations, are indispensable for the accurate prediction. Developments of the tools and methodologies for assessments of the degree and extension of influences by the tectonic uplift, subsidence and denudation on the geological environments such as ground water flows are also fundamental problem in the study field of the geological disposal of HLW. Collaboration of scientific researches using the geological and geomorphological methods and applied technology, such as numerical simulations of ground water flows, is important in improving the safety and accuracy of the geological disposal of HLW. (author)

  17. Development of a methodology for post closure radiological risk analysis of underground waste repositories. Illustrative assessment of the Harwell site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralewski, Z.A.; Kane, P.; Nicholls, D.B.

    1987-06-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis (pra) is demonstrated for a number of ground water mediated release scenarios at the Harwell Site for a hypothetical repository at a depth of about 150 metres. This is the second stage of development of an overall risk assessment methodology. A procedure for carrying out multi-scenario assessment using available probabilistic risk assessment (pra) models is presented and a general methodology for combining risk contributions is outlined. Appropriate levels of model complexity in pra are discussed. Modelling requirements for the treatment of multiple simultaneous pathways and of site evolution are outlined. Further developments of pra systems are required to increase the realism of both the models and their mode of application, and hence to improve estimates of risk. (author)

  18. Challenges in Development of Sperm Repositories for Biomedical Fishes: Quality Control in Small-Bodied Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia; Liu, Yue; Guitreau, Amy; Yang, Huiping; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2017-12-01

    Quality control (QC) is essential for reproducible and efficient functioning of germplasm repositories. However, many biomedical fish models present significant QC challenges due to small body sizes (<5 cm) and miniscule sperm volumes (<5 μL). Using minimal volumes of sperm, we used Zebrafish to evaluate common QC endpoints as surrogates for fertilization success along sequential steps of cryopreservation. First, concentrations of calibration bead suspensions were evaluated with a Makler ® counting chamber by using different sample volumes and mixing methods. For sperm analysis, samples were initially diluted at a 1:30 ratio with Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS). Motility was evaluated by using different ratios of sperm and activation medium, and membrane integrity was analyzed with flow cytometry at different concentrations. Concentration and sperm motility could be confidently estimated by using volumes as small as 1 μL, whereas membrane integrity required a minimum of 2 μL (at 1 × 10 6 cells/mL). Thus, <5 μL of sperm suspension (after dilution to 30-150 μL with HBSS) was required to evaluate sperm quality by using three endpoints. Sperm quality assessment using a combination of complementary endpoints enhances QC efforts during cryopreservation, increasing reliability and reproducibility, and reducing waste of time and resources.

  19. Development of the Korean Reference Vertical Disposal System Concept for Spent Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho, D.K.; Kim, S.G.; Choi, H.J.; Choi, J.W.; Hahn, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a deep geologic disposal system for the spent fuel from nuclear power plants has been carried out since this program was launched at 1997 in Korea. In ' this paper, a pre-conceptual design of the Korean Reference HLW Vertical disposal System (KRS-V1) is presented. Though no site for the underground repository has yet been specified in Korea, a generic site with granitic rock is considered for reference HLW repository design. Depth of the repository is assumed to be 500 meters. The repository consists of the disposal area, technical rooms with four shafts to connect them to the ground level in the controlled area and technical rooms with an access tunnel and three shafts to connect them to the ground level in the uncontrolled area. Disposal area consists of disposal tunnels, panel tunnels and a central tunnel. The repository will be excavated, operated and backfilled in several phases including an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) phase. The result of this preliminary conceptual design will be used for an evaluation of the feasibility, analyses of the long term safety, information for public communication and a cost estimation etc. (authors)

  20. Fabrication and closure development of corrosion resistant containers for Nevada's Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, E.W.; Nelson, T.A.; Domian, H.A.; LaCount, D.F.; Robitz, E.S.; Stein, K.O.

    1989-11-01

    US Congress and the President have determined that the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is to be characterized to determine its suitability for construction of the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Work in connection with this site is carried out within the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for designing, developing, and projecting the performance of the waste package for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste. Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W) is involved with the YMP as a subcontractor to LLNL. B ampersand W's role is to recommend and demonstrate a method for fabricating the metallic waste container and a method for performing the final closure of the container after it has been filled with waste. Various fabrication and closure methods are under consideration for the production of containers. This paper presents progress to date in identifying and evaluating the candidate manufacturing processes. 2 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work reported here was to develop and identify HLW glass compositions that maximize waste processing rates for the aluminum limted waste composition specified by ORP while maintaining high waste loadings and acceptable glass properties. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system, and demonstration at pilot scale (DM1200). The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with the HLW waste streams evaluated in this study, was used for tests on HLW glass compositions to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter, conduct tests to determine the effect of various glass properties (viscosity and conductivity) and oxide concentrations on glass production rates with HLW feed streams, and to assess the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition. The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. These tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Once DM100 tests were completed, one of the compositions was selected for further testing on the DM1200; the DM1200 system has been used for processing a variety of simulated Hanford waste streams. Tests on the larger melter provide processing data at one third of the scale of the actual WTP HLW melter and, therefore, provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of production rates and potential processing issues. The work focused on maximizing waste processing rates for high aluminum HLW compositions. In view of the diversity of forms of aluminum in the Hanford tanks, tests were also conducted on the DM100 to determine the effect of changes in the form of aluminum on feed properties and production rate. In addition, the work evaluated the effect on production rate of modest increases

  2. Putting HLW performance assessment results in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neall, F.; Smith, P.; Sumerling, T.; Umeki, H.

    1995-01-01

    According to performance assessment results for the different disposal concepts investigated, the maximum radiation doses to the population lie well below the limit set in the official Swiss Protection Objective and below the level of present-day natural background radiation. A comparison of different performance assessments has shown that the following key factors determine radionuclide release from a repository: radionuclide inventory, canister material and failure mode, nuclide solubility limits, the permeability of the buffer material, retardation during transport through the near-field, the presence of an excavation disturbed zone in the rock, the distance to the nearest major water-bearing fracture zone, the conceptual model for transport in fractured rock and near-surface dilution and dose factors. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Repository site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, J.W.; Pentz, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The characterization of candidate repository sites has a number of programmatic objectives. Principal among these is the acquisition of data: a) to determine the suitability of a site relative to the DOE repository siting guidelines, b) to support model development and calculations to determine the suitability of a site relative to the post closure criteria of the NRC and EPA, c) to support the design of a disposal system, including the waste package and the engineered barrier system, as well as the shafts and underground openings of the repository. In meeting the gaols of site characterization, the authors have an obligation to conduct their investigations within an appropriate budget and schedule. This mandates that a well-constructed and systematic plan for field investigations be developed. Such a plan must fully account for the mechanisms which will control the radiologic performance in the repository. The plan must also flexibly and dynamically respond to the results of each step of field investigation, responding to the spatial variability of earth as well as to enhanced understandings of the performance of the disposal system. Such a plan must ensure that sufficient data are available to support the necessary probabilistic calculations of performance. This paper explores the planning for field data acquisition with specific reference to requirements for demonstrations of the acceptable performance for disposal systems

  4. Study of nuclear waste storage capacity at Yucca mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Apted, M.; Kessler, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain repository is applying license for storing 70000 MTHM nuclear waste including commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The 70000 MTHM is a legal not the technical limit. To study the technical limit, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) carried out a systematic study to explore the potential impact if the repository will accept more waste. This paper describes the model and results for evaluating the spent-fuel disposal capacity for a repository at Yucca Mountain from the thermal and hydrological point of view. Two proposed alternative repository designs are analyzed, both of which would fit into the currently well-characterized site and, therefore, not necessitating any additional site characterization at Yucca Mountain. The two- and three-dimensional models for coupled thermo-hydrological analysis extends from the surface to the water table, covering all the major and subgroup rock layers of the planned repository, as well as formations above and below the repository horizon. A dual-porosity and dual-permeability approach is used to model coupled heat and mass transfer through fracture formations. The waste package heating and ventilation are all assumed to follow those of the current design. The results show that the repository is able to accommodate three times the amount of spent fuel compared to the current design, without extra spatial expansion or exceeding current thermal and hydrological constraints. (authors)

  5. Study on systematic integration technology of design and safety assessment for HLW geological disposal. 2. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Fukui, Hiroshi; Sagawa, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kenichi; Ito, Takaya; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kuwayama, Yuki

    2003-02-01

    The present study was carried out relating to basic design of the Geological Disposal Technology Integration System' that will be systematized as knowledge base for design analysis and safety assessment of HLW geological disposal system by integrating organically and hierarchically various technical information in three study field. The key conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) As referring to the current performance assessment report, the technical information for R and D program of HLW geological disposal system was systematized hierarchically based on summarized information in a suitable form between the work flow (work item) and processes/characteristic flow (process item). (2) As the result of the systematized technical information, database structure and system functions necessary for development and construction to the computer system were clarified in order to secure the relation between technical information and data set for assessment of HLW geological disposal system. (3) The control procedure for execution of various analysis code used by design and safety assessment in HLW geological disposal study was arranged possibility in construction of 'Geological Disposal Technology Integration System' after investigating the distributed computing technology. (author)

  6. Analysis of the processes defining radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazauskaite, A.; Poskas, P.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the danger of exposure arising from long-lived radionuclides to humans and environment, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are not allowed to be disposed of in near surface repositories. There exists an international consensus that such high level and long-lived radioactive wastes are best disposed of in geological repositories using a system of engineered and natural barriers. At present, the geological repository of SNF and HLW has not been realized yet in any country but there is a lot of experience in the assessment of radionuclide migration from deep repositories, investigations of different processes related to the safety of a disposal system. The aim of this study was to analyze the processes related to the radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium such as SNF matrix dissolution, release mechanism of radionuclides from SNF matrix, radionuclide solubility, sorption, diffusive, advective transport of radionuclides from the canister and through the engineered and natural barriers. It has been indicated that SNF matrix dissolution, radionuclide solubility and sorption are sensitive to ambient conditions prevailing in the repository. The approaches that could be used for modeling the radionuclide migration from deep repositories in porous medium are also presented. (author)

  7. Corrosion of container and infrastructure materials under clay repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debruyn, W.; Dresselaers, J.; Vermeiren, P.; Kelchtermans, J.; Tas, H.

    1991-01-01

    With regard to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste, it was recommended in a IAEA Technical Committee meeting to perform tests in realistic environments corresponding with normal and accidental conditions, to qualify and apply corrosion monitoring techniques for corrosion evaluation under real repository conditions and to develop corrosion and near-field evolution models. The actual Belgian experimental programme for the qualification of a container for long-term HLW storage in clay formations complies with these recommendations. The emphasis in the programme is indeed on in situ corrosion testing and monitoring and on in situ control of the near-field chemistry. Initial field experiments were performed in a near-surface clay quarry at Terhaegen. Based on a broad laboratory material screening programme and in agreement with the Commission of the European Communities, three reference materials were chosen for extensive in situ overpack testing. Ti/0.2 Pd and Hastelloy C-4 were chosen as reference corrosion resistant materials and a low-carbon steel as corrosion allowance reference material. This report summarizes progress made in the material qualification programme since the CEC contract of 1983-84. 57 Figs.; 15 Tabs.; 18 Refs

  8. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat

  9. HLW immobilization in glass: industrial operation and product quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Leroy, P.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    This extended summary discusses the immobilization of high level wastes from the viewpoint of the quality of the final product, i.e. the HLW glass. The R and D studies comprise 3 steps: glass formulation, glass characterization and long term behaviour studies

  10. A new approach to performance assessment of barriers in a repository. Executive summary, draft, technical appendices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Hoeppe, N.; Krone, J.; Niehues, N.; Poehler, M.; Raitz von Frentz, R.; Gauglitz, R.

    1999-06-01

    Multi-barrier systems are accepted as the basic approach for long term environmental safe isolation of radioactive waste in geological repositories. Assessing the performance of natural and engineered barriers is one of the major difficulties in producing evidence of environmental safety for any radioactive waste disposal facility, due to the enormous complexity of scenarios and uncertainties to be considered. This report outlines a new methodological approach originally developed basically for a repository in salt, but that can be transferred with minor modifications to any other host rock formation. The approach is based on the integration of following elements: (1) Implementation of a simple method and efficient criteria to assess and prove the tightness of geological and engineered barriers; (2) Using the method of Partial Safety Factors in order to assess barrier performance at certain reasonable level of confidence; (3) Integration of a diverse geochemical barrier in the near field of waste emplacement limiting systematically the radiological consequences from any radionuclide release in safety investigations and (4) Risk based approach for the assessment of radionuclide releases. Indicative calculations performed with extremely conservative assumptions allow to exclude any radiological health consequences from a HLW repository in salt to a reference person with a safety level of 99,9999% per year. (orig.)

  11. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet U.S. DOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services

  12. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a US Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet USDOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services. 2 refs., 1 fig

  13. Methodology for the biosphere analysis in the evaluation of deep geological repositories for high radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Pinedo, P.; Aguero, A.; Simon, I.; Torres, C.; Robles, B.; Smith, G.M.; Little, R.; Watkings, B.; Brice, A.; Jaen, J.A.; Coronado, S.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done and the achievements reached within the R and D Project that IMA/CIEMAT has had with ENRESA during 1993-1995. The overal R and D Project has a wide radiological protection context, but the work reported here relates only to the development of a Methodology for considering the Biosphere sub-system in the assessments of deep geological repositories for high radioactive wastes (HLW). The main areas concerned within the Methodology have to do with Biosphere structure and morphology in the long-term relevant to deep disposal of HLW: in the contexts of the assessment of these systems, and appropiate modelling of the behaviour of radionuclides released to the biosphere system and with the associated human exposure. This document first provides a review of the past and present international and national concerns about the biosphere modelling and its importance in relation to the definition of safety criteria. A joint ENRESA/ANDRA/IPSN/CIEMAT study about the definition and proactical descriptions of the biosphere systems under different climatic states is then summarized. The Methodology developed by IMA/CIEMAT is outlined with an illustration of the way it works. Different steps and procedures are included for a better proactical understanding of the software tools developed within the project to support the application of the Methologoy. This Methodology is widely based on an international working group on Reference Biospheres part national work for ENRESA has been supported under a collaborative agreement with QuantiSci Ltd. Specific software development have been carried out in collaboration with QuantiSci Ltd and with the Polytechnical University of Madrid. Most of the items included within the Methodology and moreover the Methodology as a whole, follows a continuos progressive development. It is increasinaly recognized that assessment capabilities, establisment of safety criteria and regulatory framework and the steps in a

  14. New wireless data transmission system based on high frequency radio communication: design, development and testing results under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sineriz, J.L.; Barcena, I.; Espada, F.; Rodriguez, A.; Mayor, J.C.; Barnichon, J.D.; Dick, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. According to the starting basis of the MoDeRn project (FP7 232598), the design and development of a system capable of transmitting the evolution of the physical parameters inside a repository will be a challenging task due to the harsh working conditions imposed by both the element itself to be monitored (for instance the canister enclosing radioactive waste), the engineered barriers into which they will be embedded and the host rock that contains everything. The measuring devices will work exposed to high pressures, high temperatures, high humidity degrees, presence of radiation, etc., during an expected lifetime of several decades without any possibility of either being powered from any external source or being replaced in case of malfunction, as the operating area will be sealed and inaccessible. Therefore, a main objective of AITEMIN and ENRESA contribution to MoDeRn was focused on the design, development and test under 'real conditions' of a new wireless system, based on high frequency radio transmission (HF), capable of monitoring the physical parameters inside a repository cell independently of the host rock type. In order to achieve the aforementioned objectives and to obtain a suitable monitoring system for the target application, the following key points have been addressed: 1. Data transmission technology (transmission media); 2. Communication protocols; 3. Available power sources; 4. Expected environmental conditions; 5. Suitable sensors. The activities carried out for the development of the HF wireless system were structured in three steps: 1. Laboratory work, to select the best solutions under controlled environment. 2. Field testing, to validate under more realistic conditions the solutions selected at lab. 3. Demonstration: long-term evaluation of the real performance of the solutions proved to be applicable during the field testing Obtained results were as follows: 1. A suitable radio communication

  15. Biosphere modeling for HLW disposal in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Morimasa

    2001-01-01

    Concept of Reference Biosphere is defined by 'the set of assumptions and hypotheses that is necessary to provide a consistent basis for calculations of the radiological impact arising from long-term releases of repository-derived radionuclides into the biosphere'. Geological environment and biosphere interface (GBI) is the place having the high probability of introduction of radioactive nuclides to biosphere by groundwater. Reference biosphere methodology, GBI, basic models, assessment context, assumptions concerning the surface environment for the biosphere assessment, nuclides migration process, interaction matrix showing radionuclide transport pathways for biosphere modeling, conceptual model for exposure modes and pathways for each exposure group in the biosphere assessment are explained. Response of the biosphere assessment model is steady, unit flux input (1 Bq/y) of different nuclides (farming exposure group). The dose per unit input of agriculture group is 1 to 3 figures larger than that of other two fisheries groups in the case of river and coastal environment except Po-210. We can calculate easily the dose by determining the dose conversion factors derived from different GBI models. Comparison of flux to dose conversion factors derived from different GBI models is effective to know the properties of each model, process and importance of data. (S.Y.)

  16. Geochemical evaluation of the near-field for future HLW repository at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idiart, A.; Maia, F.; Arcos, D.

    2013-10-01

    The concept for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland considers an engineered and natural (crystalline rock) multi-barrier system surrounding the spent fuel. This work aims at predicting and making a quantitative assessment of the geochemical evolution of the near-field (canister, buffer, backfill and adjacent fractured bedrock) during the unsaturated thermal period and in the long-term, after saturation has been completed. The groundwater/bentonite buffer interaction during the unsaturated thermal period is tackled through a two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric scheme using the thermo-hydro-geochemical code TOUGHREACT. In turn, the long-term interaction of the fully water-saturated buffer and backfill with groundwater is assessed through 3D numerical models using the reactive transport code PHAST under isothermal conditions. A set of base cases have been set up based on the most plausible set of input data. In addition, a limited number of sensitivity cases have been conducted to analyse the influence of key parameters controlling the system and reduce uncertainty. Predicted mineralogical changes of accessory minerals in the bentonite for the thermal period are controlled by the dependence of mineral solubilities on temperature and on the solute transport by advection during the saturation process, and diffusion during the whole period. The results of the thermal period indicate that a small amount of the primary amorphous silica is redistributed in the buffer: dissolution close to the canister and precipitation close to the buffer - rock interface. Primary calcite dissolution/precipitation is minimal, remaining stable throughout the simulation time in all cases. Anhydrite precipitates near the canister due to the elevated temperature, while it dissolves from the outside of the buffer. The results indicate that there is no significant evaporation of water near the copper canister and thus no chloride salt reaches saturation. The geochemical changes of the buffer in the long-term are also limited. Complete dissolution of gypsum from the buffer is predicted in some cases. The changes in the montmorillonite exchanger are significant, with a high replacement of sodium and magnesium by calcium. The inflow of Olkiluoto groundwater leads to relatively small changes on the pH of the near-field. Overall, the models indicate that the buffer will remain geochemically stable throughout the simulation time for the conditions considered in this work. (orig.)

  17. Tools for Managing Repository Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Banker, Rajiv D.; Isakowitz, Tomas; Kauffman, Robert J.; Kumar, Rachna; Zweig, Dani

    1993-01-01

    working Paper Series: STERN IS-93-46 The past few years have seen the introduction of repository-based computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools which may finally enable us to develop software which is reliable and affordable. With the new tools come new challenges for management: Repository-based CASE changes software development to such an extent that traditional approaches to estimation, performance, and productivity assessment may no longer suffice - if they ever...

  18. The Nagra Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) plan for the disposal of radioactive waste in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    NAGRA's mission is to develop safe geological repositories for all radioactive wastes arising in Switzerland. Two types of repositories are foreseen, one for low and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) and one for spent fuel, vitrified high level waste and long-lived ILW (SF/HLW/ILW). Repository implementation involves a stepwise process that takes several decades, which is presented in the RD and D (research, development and demonstration) plan). The main objective of the RD and D Plan is to establish the purpose, scope, nature and timing of future RD and D activities. Chapter 1 presents the overall objectives of the report and a brief history of the steps leading to the present situation. NAGRA had shown in the project 'Entsorgungsnachweis' (disposal feasibility) that safe disposal of SF/HLW/ILW in Switzerland is technically feasible. Based on this result, the Federal Government initiated the Sectoral Plan for Geological Repositories. This Plan provides a framework within which specific objectives must be met for selecting suitable sites for disposal of both L/ILW and SF/HLW/ILW for which general licence applications are to be made. Stage 1 of the Sectoral Plan results in the selection of geologically suitable siting regions. Chapter 2 presents the overall planning premises for implementation of repositories for L/ ILW and SF/HLW/ILW including the assumed schedule, the waste types and quantities and the safety strategy for the repositories. The time plan includes the general licence procedure, construction and operation of Underground Research Laboratories at the sites, construction licence procedure and the operating licence procedure. It is expected that emplacement of L/ILW could begin in about 2035, whereas SF/HLW emplacement would begin about 2050. Waste emplacement is followed by a monitoring period (planning assumption of 50 years), at the end of which an application would be made for closure. The various waste types and quantities produced by nuclear power

  19. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The LWR spent fuels discussed in Volume 1 of this report comprise about 99% of all domestic non-reprocessed spent fuel. In this report we discuss other types of spent fuels which, although small in relative quantity, consist of a number of diverse types, sizes, and compositions. Many of these fuels are candidates for repository disposal. Some non-LWR spent fuels are currently reprocessed or are scheduled for reprocessing in DOE facilities at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It appears likely that the reprocessing of fuels that have been reprocessed in the past will continue and that the resulting high-level wastes will become part of defense HLW. However, it is not entirely clear in some cases whether a given fuel will be reprocessed, especially in cases where pretreatment may be needed before reprocessing, or where the enrichment is not high enough to make reprocessing attractive. Some fuels may be canistered, while others may require special means of disposal. The major categories covered in this chapter include HTGR spent fuel from the Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom-1 reactors, research and test reactor fuels, and miscellaneous fuels, and wastes generated from the decommissioning of facilities

  20. Rock support for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, L.W.; Schmidt, B.

    1984-01-01

    The design of rock support for underground nuclear waste repositories requires consideration of special construction and operation requirements, and of the adverse environmental conditions in which some of the support is placed. While repository layouts resemble mines, design, construction and operation are subject to quality assurance and public scrutiny similar to what is experienced for nuclear power plants. Exploration, design, construction and operation go through phases of review and licensing by government agencies as repositories evolve. This paper discusses (1) the various stages of repository development; (2) the environment that supports must be designed for; (3) the environmental effects on support materials; and (4) alternative types of repository rock support

  1. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Bowan, B.W.; Joseph, I.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.K.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m 2 and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m 2 . The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al 2 O 3 concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m 2 .day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m 2 .day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m 2 .day).

  2. Preliminary report on longevity of montmorillonite clay under repository-related conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Karnland, O.

    1990-12-01

    This report summarizes current work on developing complete models for predicting the chemical stability of montmorillonitic bentonite buffer materials in HLW repositories. The major degrading mechanism is the conversion of montmorillonite to hydrous mica ('illite'), the basis of the derivation of tentative models being offered by ongoing systematic hydrothermal tests, which indicate that such conversion takes place by dissolution, yielding very mobile silica, and aluminium that tends to stay in the clay voids. The key mechanism in the transformation to hydrous mica at temperatures below about 130 degrees C is concluded to be neoformation of the latter mineral, the controlling parameter being the access to potassium. For temperatures ranging between 130 and 200 degrees C, excess silica is released by beidellitization and this yields I/S mixed layer minerals on uptake of potassium, and precipitation of cementing silica in the form of amorphous silica and cristobalite. The rate of transformation of montmorillonite to hydrous mica is still controlled by the access to potassium, i.e. by the rate at which potassium enters the clay. 10 Aa minerals that can be mistaken for hydrous mica can be formed by cementing collapsed stacks together. The models appear to give montmorillonite transformation rates that are in agreement with lab results and geological examples but further calibration, primarily by using the results of ongoing hydrothermal tests in the Stripa study, are required to make them applicable to repository conditions. (au)

  3. Sandia studies of high-level waste canisters and overpacks applicable for a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Schaefer, D.W.; Glass, R.S.; Ruppen, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental program to develop candidate materials for use as high-level waste (HLW) overpacks or canisters in a salt repository has been in progress at Sandia National Laboratories since 1976. The main objective of this program is to provide a waste package barrier having a long lifetime in the chemical and physical environment of a repository. This paper summarizes the recent corrosion and metallurgical study results for the prime overpack material, TiCode-12, in the areas of uniform corrosion (extremely low rate and extent); local attack, e.g., pits and crevices (none were found); stress corrosion cracking susceptibility (no significant changes in macroscopic tensile properties were detected); hydrogen sorption-embrittlement effects; effects of gamma irradiation in solution; and sensitization effects (testing is still in process in the last three areas). Previous candidate screening analyses on other alloys and recent work on alternate overpack alloys are reviewed. All phases of these interrelated laboratory, hot-cell, and field experimental studies are described. 16 references, 8 figures, 4 tables

  4. Distributed Web Service Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Nawrocki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability and popularity of computer systems has resulted in a demand for new, language- and platform-independent ways of data exchange. That demand has in turn led to a significant growth in the importance of systems based on Web services. Alongside the growing number of systems accessible via Web services came the need for specialized data repositories that could offer effective means of searching of available services. The development of mobile systems and wireless data transmission technologies has allowed the use of distributed devices and computer systems on a greater scale. The accelerating growth of distributed systems might be a good reason to consider the development of distributed Web service repositories with built-in mechanisms for data migration and synchronization.

  5. Waste package transfer, emplacement and retrievability in the French deep geological repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roulet, Alain; Delort, Daniel; Herve, Jean Francois; Bosgiraud, Jean Michel; Guenin, Jean Jacques [Technical Department ANDRA (France)

    2009-06-15

    Safe, reliable and reversible handling of waste is a significant issue related to the design and safety assessment of deep geological repository in France. The first step taken was to study various waste handling solutions. ANDRA also decided to fabricate and demonstrate industrial scale handling equipment for HLW (since 2003) and for ILW-LL wastes (since 2008). We will review the main equipment developed for the transfer process in the repository, for both types of waste, and underline the benefits of developing industrial demonstrators within the framework of international cooperation agreements. Waste retrieval capability will be simultaneously examined. Two types of waste have to be handled underground in Andra's repository. The HLW disposal package for vitrified waste is a 2 ton carbon steel cylindrical canister with a diameter of 600 mm. The weight of ILW-LL concrete disposal packages range from a minimum of 6 tonnes to over 20 tonnes, and their volume from approximately 5 to 10 m3. The underground transfer to the disposal drift requires moving the disposal package within a shielded transfer cask placed on a trailer. Transfer cask design has evolved since 2005, due to optimisation studies and as a result of industrial feedback from SKB. For HLW handling equipment two design options have been studied. In the first solution (Andra's Dossier 2005), the waste package are emplaced, one at a time, in the disposal drift by a pushing robot. Successive steps in design and proto-typing have lead to improve the design of the equipment and to gain confidence. Recently a fully integrated process has been successfully demonstrated, at full scale, (in a 100 m long mock up drift) as part of the EC funded ESDRED Project. This demonstrator is now on display in Andra's Technology Centre at Saudron, near the Bure Underground Laboratory. The second disposal option which has been investigated is based on a concept of utilising an external apparatus to push a row of

  6. Monitoring in the post-closure phase. Development of wireless techniques for data transmission from the repository to the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, Thomas J.; Rosca-Bocancea, Ecaterina; Hart, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    When the in-situ monitoring in a geological disposal facility is continued during the post-closure phase, monitoring data need to be transmitted wirelessly from the repository to the surface. Wireless data transmission is used today in many applications, but the large attenuation by the geologic medium between the disposal facility and the surface makes the application of high-frequency based techniques impractical. As part of the EURATOM FP-7 project MoDeRn (Monitoring Developments for safe Repository operation and staged closure), NRG has investigated the feasibility of wireless data transmission through an argillaceous host rock (Boom Clay), making use of low frequency magnetic fields. The main focus of the contribution was to analyze and optimize the energy efficiency of this technique. Therefore, a mathematical model description has been developed that allows to estimate the expected signal strength on the earth's surface on basis of the most relevant characteristics of transmitter, receiver and transmission path. The model is used to analyze the complex interactions of different system parameters, and is applied to design an optimized set-up for through-the-earth data transmission and to estimate minimum energy demands for signal transmission. To demonstrate the potentials of this technique, experiments were performed in the 225 m deep underground research facility HADES in Mol, Belgium. Signal propagation and attenuation by the geologic medium between the HADES and the surface has been measured, and the site-specific magnetic background noise at the surface in Mol has been characterized. Based on the results, optimum conditions for signal transmission have been derived and data transmission experiments have been performed. Results show that despite large local interferences on the surface in Mol, wireless data transmission through 225 m of a geological medium is possible. Data transmission rates up to 100 bit/s has been successfully tested. The

  7. Monitoring in the post-closure phase. Development of wireless techniques for data transmission from the repository to the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Thomas J.; Rosca-Bocancea, Ecaterina; Hart, Jaap [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    When the in-situ monitoring in a geological disposal facility is continued during the post-closure phase, monitoring data need to be transmitted wirelessly from the repository to the surface. Wireless data transmission is used today in many applications, but the large attenuation by the geologic medium between the disposal facility and the surface makes the application of high-frequency based techniques impractical. As part of the EURATOM FP-7 project MoDeRn (Monitoring Developments for safe Repository operation and staged closure), NRG has investigated the feasibility of wireless data transmission through an argillaceous host rock (Boom Clay), making use of low frequency magnetic fields. The main focus of the contribution was to analyze and optimize the energy efficiency of this technique. Therefore, a mathematical model description has been developed that allows to estimate the expected signal strength on the earth's surface on basis of the most relevant characteristics of transmitter, receiver and transmission path. The model is used to analyze the complex interactions of different system parameters, and is applied to design an optimized set-up for through-the-earth data transmission and to estimate minimum energy demands for signal transmission. To demonstrate the potentials of this technique, experiments were performed in the 225 m deep underground research facility HADES in Mol, Belgium. Signal propagation and attenuation by the geologic medium between the HADES and the surface has been measured, and the site-specific magnetic background noise at the surface in Mol has been characterized. Based on the results, optimum conditions for signal transmission have been derived and data transmission experiments have been performed. Results show that despite large local interferences on the surface in Mol, wireless data transmission through 225 m of a geological medium is possible. Data transmission rates up to 100 bit/s has been successfully tested. The

  8. Final draft position on geotechnical instrumentation in a salt repository environment: Requirements, performance, recommendations, and development needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the present status of geotechnical instrumentation with respect to potential use in an underground test facility at a candidate nuclear waste repository site in salt. Programmatic factors that have a general impact on the success of underground instrumentation are discussed. Performance requirements relating to accuracy, temperature range, longevity, and capability for automation are established on the basis of criteria proposed for other rock types, perceived needs of the Site Characterization Program, and the authors' experience and judgment. Test site conditions are discussed including underground logistics, corrosion, and other factors that affect instrument reliability. The status of existing instrumentation for measuring deformation, stress, temperature, fluid pressure, acoustic emission, and other less critical parameters is presented. For each instrument not presently capable of satisfying its associated performance requirements, specific development needs and possible approaches are identified, and necessary testing is describe to a conceptual level of detail. A brief discussion of instrument considerations relating to automatic data acquisition is also included. The position of instrument development as a key activity on the critical path under current schedules for the Site Characterization Program is discussed. Annotated references and reports on site visits and meetings used as the data base in evaluating present instrument status are appended to this report. 110 refs., 14 figs., 26 tabs

  9. Closure development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository; Phase 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robitz, E.S. Jr.; McAninch, M.D. Jr.; Edmonds, D.P. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (USA). Nuclear Power Div.]|[Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (USA). Research and Development Div.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes Phase 1 activities for closure development of the high-level nuclear waste package task for the tuff repository. Work was conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract 9172105, administered through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), funded through the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The goal of this phase was to select five closure processes for further evaluation in later phases of the program. A decision tree methodology was utilized to perform an objective evaluation of 15 potential closure processes. Information was gathered via a literature survey, industrial contacts, and discussions with project team members, other experts in the field, and the LLNL waste package task staff. The five processes selected were friction welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and plasma arc welding. These are felt to represent the best combination of weldment material properties and process performance in a remote, radioactive environment. Conceptual designs have been generated for these processes to illustrate how they would be implemented in practice. Homopolar resistance welding was included in the Phase 1 analysis, and developments in this process will be monitored via literature in Phases 2 and 3. Work was conducted in accordance with the YMP Quality Assurance Program. 223 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Studies on the long-term characteristics of HLW glass under ultimate storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roggendorf, H.; Conradt, R.; Ostertag, R.

    1987-01-01

    This interim report deals with first results of corrosion investigations of HLW simulation glass (COGEMA glass SON 68) in quinary salt solutions of different concentrations; the aim of these investigations was to find out about the corrosion mechanism at the surface of the glass and the quantitative registration of the corrosion products. It became obvious that the surface layers developed can be easily removed and that a determination of weight losses becomes possible thereby. The corrosion rates for a test period of 30 days were determined. (RB) [de

  11. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Case, F.I.; Land, J.F.

    1989-08-01

    Information that is being developed by projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) pertinent to the potential geochemical behavior of radionuclides at candidate sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). During this report period, all experiments were conducted with tuff from the proposed high-level nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The principal emphasis in this report period was on column studies of migration of uranium and technetium in water from well J-13 at the Yucca Mountain site. Columns 1 cm in diameter and about 5 cm long were constructed and carefully packed with ground tuff. The characteristics of the columns were tested by determination of elution curves of tritium and TcO 4 - . Elution peaks obtained in past studies with uranium were asymmetrical and the shapes were often complex, observations that suggested irreversibilities in the sorption reaction. To try to understand these observations, the effects of flow rate and temperature on uranium migration were studied in detail. Sorption ratios calculated from the elution peaks became larger as the flow rate decreased and as the temperature increased. These observations support the conclusion that the sorption of uranium is kinetically hindered. To confirm this, batch sorption ratio experiments were completed for uranium as a function of time for a variety of conditions

  12. Sample performance assessment of a high-level radioactive waste repository: sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is the USA's first attempt at long-term storage of High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW). In theory, the reasoning for such a repository seems sound. In practice, there are many scenarios and cases to be considered while putting such a project into effect. Since a goal of YMP is to minimize dangers associated with long-term storage of HLW, it is important to estimate the dose rate to which current and future generations will be subjected. The lifetime of the repository is simulated to indicate the radiation dose rate to the maximally exposed individual; it is assumed that if the maximally exposed individual would not be harmed by the annual dose, the remaining population will be at even smaller risk. The determination of what levels of exposure can be deemed harmless is a concern, and the results from the simulations as compared against various regulations are discussed. (author)

  13. Elicitation and use of expert judgment in performance assessment for high-level radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonano, E.J.; Hora, S.C.; Keeney, R.L.; von Winterfeldt, D.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents the concept of formalizing the elicitation and use of expert judgment in the performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories in deep geologic formations. The report begins with a discussion of characteristics (advantages and disadvantages) of formalizing expert judgment examples of previous uses of expert judgment in radioactive waste programs, criteria that can assist in deciding when to formalize expert judgment, and the relationship of formal use of expert judgment to data collection and modeling. The current state of the art with respect to the elicitation, use, and communication of formal expert judgment is presented. The report concludes with a discussion on potential applications of formal expert judgment in performance assessment of HLW repositories. 93 refs

  14. Sample performance assessment of a high-level radioactive waste repository: sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkaczyk, A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is the USA's first attempt at long-term storage of High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW). In theory, the reasoning for such a repository seems sound. In practice, there are many scenarios and cases to be considered while putting such a project into effect. Since a goal of YMP is to minimize dangers associated with long-term storage of HLW, it is important to estimate the dose rate to which current and future generations will be subjected. The lifetime of the repository is simulated to indicate the radiation dose rate to the maximally exposed individual; it is assumed that if the maximally exposed individual would not be harmed by the annual dose, the remaining population will be at even smaller risk. The determination of what levels of exposure can be deemed harmless is a concern, and the results from the simulations as compared against various regulations are discussed. (author)

  15. IAEA safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    In September. 1988, the IAEA held its first formal meeting on the safeguards requirements for the final disposal of spent fuel and nuclear material-bearing waste. The consensus recommendation of the 43 participants from 18 countries at this Advisory Group Meeting was that safeguards should not terminate of spent fuel even after emplacement in, and closure of, a geologic repository.' As a result of this recommendation, the IAEA initiated a series of consultants' meetings and the SAGOR Programme (Programme for the Development of Safeguards for the Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geologic Repositories) to develop an approach that would permit IAEA safeguards to verify the non-diversion of spent fuel from a geologic repository. At the end of this process, in December 1997, a second Advisory Group Meeting, endorsed the generic safeguards approach developed by the SAGOR Programme. Using the SAGOR Programme results and consultants' meeting recommendations, the IAEA Department of Safeguards issued a safeguards policy paper stating the requirements for IAEA safeguards at geologic repositories. Following approval of the safeguards policy and the generic safeguards approach, the Geologic Repository Safeguards Experts Group was established to make recommendations on implementing the safeguards approach. This experts' group is currently making recommendations to the IAEA regarding the safeguards activities to be conducted with respect to Finland's repository programme. (author)

  16. Geologic repository work breakdown structure and dictionary---Development and evaluation phase (PE-02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    Revision 2 of the OGR Work Breakdown Structure and Dictionary -- Development and Evaluation Phase (PE-02) supersedes Revision 1, August 1989, in its entirety. The revision is to delete the ''Exploratory Shaft Facility'' work scape and replace it with ''Exploratory Studies Facility'' work scape

  17. Development and implementation of an institutional repository within a Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, Adèle

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available -based searches. The scholarly federated search engine of Google (http://scholar.google.com) has been used extensively but not exclusively. Subscription databases such as ISI’s Web of Knowledge were also used. An analysis of the exiting proprietary database... internal controls to prevent unauthorized changes. • Registration of the IR with search engines and service providers such as Google, OAIster and DOAR demands that the IR manager keep abreast with developments in terms of suitable search engines...

  18. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  19. Status and future developments of risk analysis for repositories of radioactive wastes in salt formations in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proske, R.

    1977-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a hypothetical repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste in a salt formation was taken as basis for a first attempt to use the methodology of risk analysis in order to get statements on the safety of such a geologic and mining system. Several institutions were engaged in drawing up fault trees, development of release models and calculation of the risk. A lot of R+D-work is scheduled to be carried out in future which includes optimization of the application of risk analysis methodology to geologic and mining systems, further development of release models, development of a model describing the migration of radionuclides in typical geologic strata and soils of the Federal Republic of Germany and application of risk analysis methodology to different repositories and disposal technologies

  20. Development of an administrative record system and information repository system to support environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, B.S.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an administrative record (AR) file system for the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This paper will focus on the background of the AR system and its implementation at the Hanford Site; the types of documents to be included in an AR file; the management system used to develop and implement the AR system; the unique characteristics of the AR system and the role of the information repositories. The objective of this session is to present the methodology used in developing an AR and information repository system so that common hurdles from various sites can be addressed and resolved similarly. Therefore unnecessary effort does not have to be put forth to resolve the same issues over and over again. The concepts described can be applied to all federal facility sites with a minimum amount of modification and revision. 9 refs

  1. Nirex 97 an assessment of the post-closure performance of a deep waste repository at Sellafield. Volume 1: hydrogeological model development - conceptual basis and data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, P.; Littleboy, A.

    1997-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Limited ('Nirex') is responsible for providing and managing facilities for the safe disposal of intermediate and certain low-level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW respectively). Government policy is that the preferred disposal route for such wastes is a deep geological repository. The repository concept aims to use a combination of natural and engineered barriers to achieve the necessary degree of long-term isolation and containment of the radioactive wastes. Since 1987, Nirex has carried out an extensive technical programme directed at the science of safe disposal. The work comprises a research programme into the long-term performance of waste forms and the engineered and natural barriers, including the characterisation of candidate geological settings to assess their suitability to host a deep waste repository ('DWR'). Between mid-1991 and March 1997 the geological characterisation programme was concentrated on establishing the suitability, or otherwise, of a candidate site at Sellafield, West Cumbria. In July 1994, as part of a detailed site investigation programme, Nirex applied for planning permission to develop an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at Longlands Farm near Sellafield. This application was rejected by the planning authority and Nirex's appeal against that decision led to a local planning inquiry which ran from September 1995 until February 1996. In line with the Inspector's Report, in March 1997 the Nirex appeal was dismissed by the Secretary of State for the Environment. The Company's response to that decision, and its readiness to contribute to the new government's review of the way forward, are described in the Nirex Annual Report for 1996-97. This report - Nirex 97 - is founded on the understanding developed through the Nirex technical programme. It reports the outcome of an assessment of the post-closure safety performance, over hundreds of thousands of years, of a repository system located in a potential

  2. Current status of system development to provide databases of nuclides migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yasushi; Isogai, Takeshi; Suyama, Tadahiro; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu; Jintoku, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    JNC has developed databases of nuclides migration for safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository, and they have been used in the second progress report to present the technical reliability of HLW geological disposal system in Japan. The technical level and applicability of databases have been highly evaluated even overseas. To provide the databases broadly over the world and to promote the use of the databases, we have performed the followings: 1) development of tools to convert the database format from geochemical code PHREEQE to PHREEQC, GWB and EQ3/6 and 2) set up a web site (http://migrationdb.jnc.go.jp) which enables the public to access to the databases. As a result, the number of database users has significantly increased. Additionally, a number of useful comments from the users can be applied to modification and/or update of databases. (author)

  3. Massachusetts' participation in the US Department of Energy's Crystalline Repository Project: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukakis, M.S.; Johnston, P.W.; Walker, B. Jr.

    1986-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to review activities of the Crystalline Rock Project (CRP) in Massachusetts, the context in which it arose, and the implications and possibilities of future federal policy decisions on the siting of a HLW repository in a crystalline rock body. Although Massachusetts has been eliminated from consideration, there are still issues of concern to be resolved regarding the potential impacts upon Massachusetts if a site were ever to be chosen in New England

  4. The development of the Holtec International storage, transport, and repository (HI-STAR) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    In late 1993, Holtec decided to evaluate seriously the development of a dry spent fuel storage product area to accomplish a quasi-horizontal integration of their wet storage product area with dry storage. This would then form a spent fuel storage technology business area. Such an approach would allow them to serve the continuum of utility customers for spent fuel storage and to include the DOE's OCRWM as a potential customer. The authors would no longer be selling wet storage vs. dry storage, but would offer integrated storage with the best economics and the greatest flexibility to address future contingencies. Following the issuance of the DOE Preliminary Draft Statement of Work and Design Specifications for multi-purpose canister (MPC) Systems on November 5, 1993, the authors set about applying several design concepts previously conceived to these draft specifications, as constrained by the capacity and cost criteria above. While the design went through several iterations, a brief summary of the endpoint designs is presented below and is followed by separate discussions of certain key design features and the development efforts to assure their successful incorporation

  5. Recommendations: Procedure to develop a preliminary safety report as part of the radioactive waste repository construction licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The structure of a preliminary safety report for the title purpose should be as follows: A. Textual part: 1. General (Introduction, Basic information about the construction, Timetable); 2. Site information (Siting, Geography and demography, Meteorology and climatic situation, Hydrology, Geology and hydrogeology); 3. Repository design description (Basic function and performance requirements, Design, Auxiliary systems, Fire prevention/protection, Emergency plans); 4. Operation of the repository (Waste acceptance and inspection, Waste handling and interim storage, Waste disposal, Operating monitoring), 5. Health and environmental impact assessment (Radionuclide inventory, Radionuclide transport paths and mechanisms of release into the environment, Radionuclide release in normal and emergency situations, Radiation protection - health impact assessment and regulatory compliance, Draft operating limits and conditions, Proposed ways of assuring physical protection, Uncertainty assessment), 6. Safe repository shutdown/decommissioning concept, 7 Quality assurance assessment, 8. List of selected equipment. B. Annexes: Maps, Drawings, Diagrams, Miscellaneous; C. Documentation: Previous safety report amendments, Protocols, Miscellaneous. (P.A.)

  6. Repository performance confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the

  7. Implementation of technical conservatism in the development of nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbiener, W.A.; Hall, R.J.; Matthews, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Implementation of the Department of Energy program policy on technical conservatism takes two forms - conservatism in the conduct of the program, and conservatism in the performance of the disposal system. The first is achieved by a stepwise approach to system development and operation, the systems (multibarrier) viewpoint, the retrievability requirement, and the extensive use of peer reviews throughout the conduct of the program. The second is achieved by the proper selection and application of conservative design and operational limits. This paper discusses each approach individually. The inherent uncertainties associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste dictate that conservatism be prudently applied in the conduct of the program, in the disposal system design, analysis, and performance, and in applying current mining technology to waste disposal. An example is presented to illustrate an approach to establishing design margins

  8. Nirex 97 an assessment of the post-closure performance of a deep waste repository at Sellafield. Volume 2; hydrogeological conceptual model development - effective parameters and calibration appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.; Watson, S.

    1997-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Limited ('Nirex') is responsible for providing and managing facilities for the safe disposal of intermediate and certain low-level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW respectively). Government policy is that the preferred disposal route for such wastes is a deep geological repository. The repository concept aims to use a combination of natural and engineered barriers to achieve the necessary degree of long-term isolation and containment of the radioactive wastes. Since 1987, Nirex has carried out an extensive technical programme directed at the science of safe disposal. The work comprises a research programme into the long-term performance of waste forms and the engineered and natural barriers, including the characterisation of candidate geological settings to assess their suitability to host a deep waste repository ('DWR'). Between mid-1991 and March 1997 the geological characterisation programme was concentrated on establishing the suitability, or otherwise, of a candidate site at Sellafield, West Cumbria. In July 1994, as part of a detailed site investigation programme, Nirex applied for planning permission to develop an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at Longlands Farm near Sellafield. This application was rejected by the planning authority and Nirex's appeal against that decision led to a local planning inquiry which ran from September 1995 until February 1996. In line with the Inspector's Report, in March 1997 the Nirex appeal was dismissed by the Secretary of State for the Environment. The Company's response to that decision, and its readiness to contribute to the new government's review of the way forward, are described in the Nirex Annual Report for 1996-97. This report - Nirex 97 - is founded on the understanding developed through the Nirex technical programme. It reports the outcome of an assessment of the post-closure safety performance, over hundreds of thousands of years, of a repository system located in a potential

  9. Nirex 97 an assessment of the post-closure performance of a deep waste repository at Sellafield. Volume 2; hydrogeological conceptual model development - effective parameters and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.; Watson, S.

    1997-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Limited ('Nirex') is responsible for providing and managing facilities for the safe disposal of intermediate and certain low-level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW respectively). Government policy is that the preferred disposal route for such wastes is a deep geological repository. The repository concept aims to use a combination of natural and engineered barriers to achieve the necessary degree of long-term isolation and containment of the radioactive wastes. Since 1987, Nirex has carried out an extensive technical programme directed at the science of safe disposal. The work comprises a research programme into the long-term performance of waste forms and the engineered and natural barriers, including the characterisation of candidate geological settings to assess their suitability to host a deep waste repository ('DWR'). Between mid-1991 and March 1997 the geological characterisation programme was concentrated on establishing the suitability, or otherwise, of a candidate site at Sellafield, West Cumbria. In July 1994, as part of a detailed site investigation programme, Nirex applied for planning permission to develop an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at Longlands Farm near Sellafield. This application was rejected by the planning authority and Nirex's appeal against that decision led to a local planning inquiry which ran from September 1995 until February 1996. In line with the Inspector's Report, in March 1997 the Nirex appeal was dismissed by the Secretary of State for the Environment. The Company's response to that decision, and its readiness to contribute to the new government's review of the way forward, are described in the Nirex Annual Report for 1996-97. This report - Nirex 97 - is founded on the understanding developed through the Nirex technical programme. It reports the outcome of an assessment of the post-closure safety performance, over hundreds of thousands of years, of a repository system located in a potential

  10. Study on a Preliminary Survey and Analysis of HLW Management Technology Suitable for Nuclear Industrial Environment in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ka; Suh, In Suk; Ro, Seong Gy; Yoo, Kun Joong; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Cho, Sung Soo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to suggest development direction of related technologies to analyze patented technology filed as a leading technology and to identify the technology trend for developing HLW management technology suitable for atomic industrial environment in Korea. For patent analysis of HLW management technology, international patent data were collected. And international application number, patent share of applicant and nationality, annual number of applications, application trends of assignees and detail technology, and frequency of patent citations / citations-to were analyzed by statistical analysis. Technical level and competitiveness through quantitative analysis by indicators of patent analysis were confirmed. And technology developments of blank technology, similarity analysis, the point of the main patent and a range of patent rights were analyzed through in-depth analysis. Trends of the patented technology of our country and world patent technology in such results have been identified, and statistical data on patents were secured. Especially in HLW management technology, patent application in Korea compared ti United States, Japan and European Union was began much later for the '90s, and are showing the annual increase on trend of patent application. Patent trend in Korea corresponds to development generation, while declining in foreign patent. The result of this study will be usefully applied to setting a development direction and blank technology of patent technology to pursue future in Korea

  11. Initial demonstration of the NRC`s capability to conduct a performance assessment for a High-Level Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codell, R.; Eisenberg, N.; Fehringer, D.; Ford, W.; Margulies, T.; McCartin, T.; Park, J.; Randall, J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express results as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.

  12. Fabrication development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domian, H.A.; Holbrook, R.L.; LaCount, D.F.; Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH

    1990-09-01

    This final report completes Phase 1 of an engineering study of potential manufacturing processes for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of nuclear waste. An extensive literature and industry review was conducted to identify and characterize various processes. A technical specification was prepared using the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler ampersand Pressure Vessel Code (ASME BPVC) to develop the requirements. A complex weighting and evaluation system was devised as a preliminary method to assess the processes. The system takes into account the likelihood and severity of each possible failure mechanism in service and the effects of various processes on the microstructural features. It is concluded that an integral, seamless lower unit of the container made by back extrusion has potential performance advantages but is also very high in cost. A welded construction offers lower cost and may be adequate for the application. Recommendations are made for the processes to be further evaluated in the next phase when mock-up trials will be conducted to address key concerns with various processes and materials before selecting a primary manufacturing process. 43 refs., 26 figs., 34 tabs

  13. Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the