WorldWideScience

Sample records for hlw management alternatives

  1. HLW Tank Space Management, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessions, J.

    1999-01-01

    The HLW Tank Space Management Team (SM Team) was chartered to select and recommend an HLW Tank Space Management Strategy (Strategy) for the HLW Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) until an alternative salt disposition process is operational. Because the alternative salt disposition process will not be available to remove soluble radionuclides in HLW until 2009, the selected Strategy must assure that it safely receives and stores HLW at least until 2009 while continuing to supply sludge slurry to the DWPF vitrification process

  2. Management strategy for site characterization at candidate HLW repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for HLW repository site characterization which is aimed at producing an optimal characterization trajectory for site suitability and licensing evaluations. The core feature of the strategy is a matrix of alternative performance targets and alternative information-level targets which can be used to allocate and justify program effort. Strategies for work concerning evaluation of expected and disrupted repository performance are distinguished, and the need for issue closure criteria is discussed

  3. Strategic management of HLW repository projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to strategic management of HLW repository projects based on the premise that a primary objective of project activities is resolution of issues. The approach would be implemented by establishing an issues management function with responsibility to define the issues agenda, develop and apply the tools for assessing progress toward issue resolution, and develop the issue resolution criteria. A principal merit of the approach is that it provides a defensible rationale for project plans and activities. It also helps avoid unnecessary costs and schedule delays, and it helps assure coordination between project functions that share responsibilities for issue resolution

  4. HLW Long-term Management Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Won; Kang, C. H.; Ko, Y. K.

    2010-02-01

    Permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuels from the power generation is considered to be the unique method for the conservation of human being and nature in the present and future. In spite of spent nuclear fuels produced from power generation, based on the recent trends on the gap between supply and demand of energy, the advance on energy price and reduction of carbon dioxide, nuclear energy is expected to play a role continuously in Korea. It means that a new concept of nuclear fuel cycle is needed to solve problems on spent nuclear fuels. The concept of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle including PYRO processing and SFR was presented at the 255th meeting of the Atomic Energy Commission. According to the concept of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle, actinides and long-term fissile nuclides may go out of existence in SFR. And then it is possible to dispose of short term decay wastes without a great risk bearing. Many efforts had been made to develop the KRS for the direct disposal of spent nuclear fuels in the representative geology of Korea. But in the case of the adoption of Advanced nuclear fuel cycle, the disposal of PYRO wastes should be considered. For this, we carried out the Safety Analysis on HLW Disposal Project with 5 sub-projects such as Development of HLW Disposal System, Radwaste Disposal Safety Analysis, Feasibility study on the deep repository condition, A study on the Nuclide Migration and Retardation Using Natural Barrier, and In-situ Study on the Performance of Engineered Barriers

  5. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable

  6. Historical fuel reprocessing and HLW management in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Staiger, M.D.; Christian, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article review some of the key decision points in the historical development of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management practices at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that have helped ICPP to successfully accomplish its mission safely and with minimal impact on the environment. Topics include ICPP reprocessing development; batch aluminum-uranium dissolution; continuous aluminum uranium dissolution; batch zirconium dissolution; batch stainless steel dissolution; semicontinuous zirconium dissolution with soluble poison; electrolytic dissolution of stainless steel-clad fuel; graphite-based rover fuel processing; fluorinel fuel processing; ICPP waste management consideration and design decisions; calcination technology development; ICPP calcination demonstration and hot operations; NWCF design, construction, and operation; HLW immobilization technology development. 80 refs., 4 figs

  7. Technical and economic optimization study for HLW waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffes, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the technical and economic aspects of high level waste (HLW) management with the objective of optimizing the interim storage duration and the dimensions of the underground repository site. The procedure consisted in optimizing the economic criterion under specified constraints. The results are intended to identify trends and guide the choice from among available options; simple and highly flexible models were therefore used in this study, and only nearfield thermal constraints were taken into consideration. Because of the present uncertainty on the physicochemical properties of the repository environment and on the unit cost figures, this study focused on developing a suitable method rather than on obtaining definitive results. With the physical and economic data bases used for the two media investigated (granite and salt) the optimum values found show that it is advisable to minimize the interim storage time, and that the geological repository should feature a high degree of spatial dilution. These results depend to a considerable extent on the assumption of high interim storage costs

  8. The senate working party on HLW management in Spain - historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang-Lenton, J.

    2007-01-01

    As the first case history Jorge Lang Lenton, Corporate Director of ENRESA, recounted the failed attempt to establish an underground disposal facility for HLW. The site selection process, which was planned by ENRESA in the 1980's, was aimed at finding the 'technically best' site. The process was conducted by technical experts without public involvement. When 40 candidate siting areas were identified in the mid-1990's, information leaked out, creating vigorous public opposition in all of these locations. In 1998 the siting process was halted. The Senate proposed to continue R and D on geological disposal and on P and T, to reduce waste production, and to develop an energy policy that relies more on renewable energy sources. They also suggested that public participation be promoted. The 5. General Radioactive Waste Management Plan, which was developed in 1999, took these proposals into consideration. Regarding underground disposal, the government postponed any decision until 2010. At the end of 2004 a decision was made by Parliament to establish a centralized storage facility for HLW. Mr. Lang-Lenton highlighted the main lessons of the failed siting attempt. First, it has to be acknowledged that HLW management is a societal rather than a technical problem. Second, for any radioactive waste management facility a socially feasible rather than a technically optimal site should be selected, i.e., 'the best site is the possible site'. Finally, transparency and openness are needed for building confidence in the decision-making process. (author)

  9. Collaboration, Automation, and Information Management at Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurah, Mirwaise Y.; Roberts, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), operator of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms at the Hanford Site, is taking an over 20-year leap in technology, replacing systems that were monitored with clipboards and obsolete computer systems, as well as solving major operations and maintenance hurdles in the area of process automation and information management. While WRPS is fully compliant with procedures and regulations, the current systems are not integrated and do not share data efficiently, hampering how information is obtained and managed

  10. Public and political issues in HLW management: The Spanish approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, V.; Molina, M.

    1993-01-01

    ENRESA (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A.), is a State-owned company, founded in 1985 and is responsible for radioactive waste management in Spain. ENRESA's activities are carried out in accordance with a General Radioactive Waste Plant approved by the Spanish Government. In Spain, as in most countries, the public is concerned about many of the activities involving radioactive or rad-waste management; this concern arises for different reasons, but mainly due to lack of information on the matter. This situation leads to the information available being misused by certain politicians, green groups and media, which serves to increase the distrust with which the public sometimes views responsible companies and institutions. At the root of both these problems is a lack of political consensus regarding development of the activity. To gain public acceptance, it would be necessary to develop a long-term information policy, since in the field of communications results are only ever achieved in the long term. ENRESA is carrying out an on-going Communication Plan (CP), implemented successfully in the areas surrounding a low- and intermediate-level waste disposal site and a disused uranium mill in which remedial actions are currently being performed. Implementation of this plan at national level is being accomplished stepwise. This document deals with the most relevant issues relating to the radioactive waste situation in Spain and with the efforts made in communications

  11. Suggestions on selection of clay site as a key alternative of underground repository for HLW geological disposal in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing; Fu Bingjun; Fan Xianhua; Chen Shi; Sun Donghui

    2006-01-01

    Site selection for the underground repository is a vital problem with respect to the HLW geological disposal. Over the past decades, we have been focusing our attention on granite as a priority in China. However, there are some problems have to be discussed on this matter. In this paper, both experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community regarding the site selection are described. And then, after analyzing a lot of some key factors affecting the site selection, some comments and suggestions on selection of clay site as a key alternative before final decision making in China are presented. (authors)

  12. Alternative biosphere modeling for safety assessment of HLW disposal taking account of geosphere-biosphere interface of marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Naito, Morimasa; Ikeda, Takao; Little, Richard

    2001-03-01

    In the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system, it is required to estimate radiological impacts on future human beings arising from potential radionuclide releases from a deep repository into the surface environment. In order to estimated the impacts, a biosphere model is developed by reasonably assuming radionuclide migration processes in the surface environment and relevant human lifestyles. It is important to modify the present biosphere models or to develop alternative biosphere models applying the biosphere models according to quality and quantify of the information acquired through the siting process for constructing the repository. In this study, alternative biosphere models were developed taking geosphere-biosphere interface of marine environment into account. Moreover, the flux to dose conversion factors calculated by these alternative biosphere models was compared with those by the present basic biosphere models. (author)

  13. Economic analysis of waste management alternatives for reprocessing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Clark, L.L.; Daling, P.M.; Nesbitt, J.F.; Swanson, J.L.

    1984-02-01

    This study describes the results of a cost analysis of a broad range of alternatives for management of reprocessing wastes that would require geologic repository disposal. The intent was to identify cost-effective alternatives and the costs of potential repository performance requirements. Four integrated treatment facility alternatives for transuranic (TRU) wastes are described and compared. These include no treatment, compaction, incineration, and hulls melting. The advantages of reducing high-level wastes (HLW) volume are also evaluated as are waste transportation alternatives and several performance-related alternatives for emplacing waste in a basalt repository. Results show (1) that system costs for disposal of reprocessing waste are likely to be higher than those for disposal of spent fuel; (2) that volume reduction is cost-effective for both remote-handled (RH) TRU wastes and HLW, and that rail transport for HLW is more cost-effective than truck transport; (3) that coemplacement of RH-TRU wastes with HLW does not have a large cost advantage in a basalt repository; and (4) that, relative to performance requirements, the cost impact for elimination of combustibles is about 5%, long-lived containers for RH-TRU wastes can increase repository costs 10% to 20%, and immediate backfill compared to delayed backfill (bentonite/basalt) around the HLW canisters would increase repository costs up to 10% or overall system costs up to about 5%. 13 references, 4 figures, 12 tables

  14. Technology for the long-term management of defense HLW at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Berreth, J.R.; Knecht, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Defense Waste Management Plan of June 1983 includes a reference plan for the long-term management of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) high-level waste (HLW), with a goal of disposing of the annual output in 500 canisters a year by FY-2008. Based on the current vitrification technology, the ICPP base-glass case would produce 1700 canisters per year after FY-2007. Thus, to meet the DWMP goal processing steps including fuel dissolution, waste treatment, and waste immobilization are being studied as areas where potential modifications could result in HLW volume reductions for repository disposal. It has been demonstrated that ICPP calcined wastes can be densified by hot isostatic pressing to multiphase ceramic forms of high loading and density. Conversion of waste by hot isostatic pressing to these forms has the potential of reducing the annual ICPP waste production to volumes near those of the goal of the DWMP. This report summarizes the laboratory-scale information currently available on the development of these forms

  15. Preliminary formulation studies for a ''hydroceramic'' alternative waste form for INEEL HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemer, D.D.; Gougar, M.L.D.; Grutzeck, M.W.; Scheetz, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    Herein the authors discuss scoping studies performed to develop an efficient way to prepare the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) nominally high-level (∼40 W/m 3 ) calcined radioactive waste (HLW) and liquid metal (sodium) reactor coolants for disposal. The investigated approach implements the chemistry of Hanford's cancrinite-making clay reaction process via Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) formed-under-elevated-temperatures-and-pressures concrete monolith-making technology to make hydroceramics (HCs). The HCs differ from conventional Portland cement/blast furnace slag (PC/BFS) grouts in that the binder minerals formed during the curing process are hydrated alkali-aluminosilicates (feldspathoids-sodalites, cancrinites, and zeolites) rather than hydrated calcium silicates (CSH). This is desirable because (a) US defense-type radioactive wastes generally contain much more sodium and aluminum than calcium; (b) sodalites/cancrinites do a much better job of retaining the anionic components of real radioactive waste (e.g., nitrate) than do calcium silicates; (c) natural feldspathoids form from glasses (and therefore are more stable) in that region of the United States where a repository for this sort of waste could be sited; and (d) if eventually deemed necessary, feldspathoid-type concrete wasteforms could be hot-isostatically-pressed into even more durable materials without removing them from their original canisters

  16. Study on a Preliminary Survey and Analysis of HLW Management Technology Suitable for Nuclear Industrial Environment in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ka; Suh, In Suk; Ro, Seong Gy; Yoo, Kun Joong; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Cho, Sung Soo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to suggest development direction of related technologies to analyze patented technology filed as a leading technology and to identify the technology trend for developing HLW management technology suitable for atomic industrial environment in Korea. For patent analysis of HLW management technology, international patent data were collected. And international application number, patent share of applicant and nationality, annual number of applications, application trends of assignees and detail technology, and frequency of patent citations / citations-to were analyzed by statistical analysis. Technical level and competitiveness through quantitative analysis by indicators of patent analysis were confirmed. And technology developments of blank technology, similarity analysis, the point of the main patent and a range of patent rights were analyzed through in-depth analysis. Trends of the patented technology of our country and world patent technology in such results have been identified, and statistical data on patents were secured. Especially in HLW management technology, patent application in Korea compared ti United States, Japan and European Union was began much later for the '90s, and are showing the annual increase on trend of patent application. Patent trend in Korea corresponds to development generation, while declining in foreign patent. The result of this study will be usefully applied to setting a development direction and blank technology of patent technology to pursue future in Korea

  17. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  18. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  19. Radioactive waste management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowski, F.P.

    1976-01-01

    The information in the US ERDA ''Technical Alternatives Document'' is summarized. The first two points show that waste treatment, interim storage and transportation technologies for all wastes are currently available. Third, an assessment of integrated waste management systems is needed. One such assessment will be provided in our expanded waste management environmental statement currently planned for release in about one year. Fourth, geologies expected to be suitable for final geologic storage are known. Fifth, repository system assessment methods, that is a means to determine and assess the acceptability of a terminal storage facility for nonretrievable storage, must and will be prepared. Sixth, alternatives to geologic storage are not now available. Seventh, waste quantities and characteristics are sensitive to technologies and fuel-cycle modes, and therefore an assessment of these technologies and modes is important. Eighth, and most important, it is felt that the LWR fuel cycle can be closed with current technologies

  20. HLW Disposal System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J. W.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, J. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A KRS is suggested through design requirement analysis of the buffer and the canister which are the constituent of disposal system engineered barrier and HLW management plans are proposed. In the aspect of radionuclide retention capacity, the thickness of the buffer is determined 0.5m, the shape to be disc and ring and the dry density to be 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. The maximum temperature of the buffer is below 100 .deg. which meets the design requirement. And bentonite blocks with 5 wt% of graphite showed more than 1.0 W/mK of thermal conductivity without the addition of sand. The result of the thermal analysis for proposed double-layered buffer shows that decrease of 7 .deg. C in maximum temperature of the buffer. For the disposal canister, the copper for the outer shell material and cast iron for the inner structure material is recommended considering the results analyzed in terms of performance of the canisters and manufacturability and the geochemical properties of deep groundwater sampled from the research area with granite, salt water intrusion, and the heavy weight of the canister. The results of safety analysis for the canister shows that the criticality for the normal case including uncertainty is the value of 0.816 which meets subcritical condition. Considering nation's 'Basic Plan for Electric Power Demand and Supply' and based on the scenario of disposing CANDU spent fuels in the first phase, the disposal system that the repository will be excavated in eight phases with the construction of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) beginning in 2020 and commissioning in 2040 until the closure of the repository is proposed. Since there is close correlation between domestic HLW management plans and front-end/back-end fuel cycle plans causing such a great sensitivity of international environment factor, items related to assuring the non-proliferation and observing the international standard are showed to be the influential factor and acceptability

  1. Bases, assumptions, and results of the flowsheet calculations for the decision phase salt disposition alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    The High Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, under the sponsorship of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company High Level Waste (HLW) Vice President and General Manager. The Team is chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted waste form

  2. Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.

    1986-09-01

    This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases

  3. Immobilized High-Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report - second Generation Implementing Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document

  4. The role and interest of local actors in HLW management decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farin, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the mid-1990's, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) has been present on a site in Eastern France, which straddles two districts, the Meuse and the Haute-Marne, and two regions, the Lorraine and the Champagne-Ardenne. In that sector of the Paris Basin, the Agency is also conducting various studies on the geological and reversible disposal of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived waste resulting mainly from nuclear power plants. In the pursuit of its activities, Andra has already excavated and fitted an underground laboratory at a depth of 490 m in a clay formation at Bure, and built a public exhibition space at nearby Saudron to display its demonstrators and prototypes. Geological disposal forms an integral part of the French national management policy for all radioactive waste generated in France. It constitutes a broad national project, including legislation, national debates, etc. On the other hand, local actors, such as elected officials, consular chambers, etc., are also involved in the evolution of the project, as demonstrated by their participation in the debate on the reversibility of waste repositories. In general, all scientific, technical, environmental or socio-economic issues concern them very directly. At this stage in time, the project is entering into a more concrete phase, and local actors are likely to get involved even more, especially with regard to the location of surface installations or to potential land development incentives in relation to the implementation of the waste repository. The proposal for a more restricted zone in late 2009 in preparation for the implementation of the facility and of the public debate to be held in 2013, but before which Andra is required to propose an implementation site, should emphasise the implication of all stakeholders. Due to the fact that the project would be straddling the Meuse and Haute-Marne Districts, each pertaining to two different regions (Lorraine

  5. Alternatives for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1975-10-01

    The safety aspects of waste management alternatives are emphasized. The options for waste management, their safety characteristics, and the methods that might be used to evaluate the options and their safety are outlined

  6. Final Report - Management of High Sulfur HLW, VSL-13R2920-1, Rev. 0, dated 10/31/2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, Z.; Gan, H; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-11-13

    The present report describes results from a series of small-scale crucible tests to determine the extent of corrosion associated with sulfur containing HLW glasses and to develop a glass composition for a sulfur-rich HLW waste stream, which was then subjected to small-scale melter testing to determine the maximum acceptable sulfate loadings. In the present work, a new glass formulation was developed and tested for a projected Hanford HLW composition with sulfate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading. Testing was then performed on the DM10 melter system at successively higher waste loadings to determine the maximum waste loading without the formation of a separate sulfate salt phase. Small scale corrosion testing was also conducted using the glass developed in the present work, the glass developed in the initial phase of this work [26], and a high iron composition, all at maximum sulfur concentrations determined from melter testing, in order to assess the extent of Inconel 690 and MA758 corrosion at elevated sulfate contents.

  7. Status of Progress Made Toward Safety Analysis and Technical Site Evaluations for DOE Managed HLW and SNF.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gross, Michael B [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frederick, Jennifer M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on generic deep geologic disposal systems (i.e., repositories). This report describes specific activities in FY 2016 associated with the development of a Defense Waste Repository (DWR)a for the permanent disposal of a portion of the HLW and SNF derived from national defense and research and development (R&D) activities of the DOE.

  8. Summary of International Waste Management Programs (LLNL Input to SNL L3 MS: System-Wide Integration and Site Selection Concepts for Future Disposition Options for HLW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Harris R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blink, James A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Halsey, William G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-11

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation’s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. This Lessons Learned task is part of a multi-laboratory effort, with this LLNL report providing input to a Level 3 SNL milestone (System-Wide Integration and Site Selection Concepts for Future Disposition Options for HLW). The work package number is: FTLL11UF0328; the work package title is: Technical Bases / Lessons Learned; the milestone number is: M41UF032802; and the milestone title is: “LLNL Input to SNL L3 MS: System-Wide Integration and Site Selection Concepts for Future Disposition Options for HLW”. The system-wide integration effort will integrate all aspects of waste management and disposal, integrating the waste generators, interim storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal at a repository site. The review of international experience in these areas is required to support future studies that address all of these components in an integrated manner. Note that this report is a snapshot of nuclear power infrastructure and international waste management programs that is current as of August 2011, with one notable exception. No attempt has been made to discuss the currently evolving world-wide response to the tragic consequences of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan on March 11, 2011, leaving more than 15,000 people dead and more than 8,000 people missing, and severely damaging the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power complex. Continuing efforts in FY 2012 will update the data, and summarize it in an Excel spreadsheet for easy comparison and assist in the knowledge management of the study cases.

  9. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams-13000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  10. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-01-01

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry

  11. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  12. Implementation of a geological disposal facility (GDF) in the UK by the NDA Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD): the potential for interaction between the co-located ILW/LLW and HLW/SF components of a GDF - 16306

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, George; Hicks, Tim; Watson, Sarah; Norris, Simon

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008 the UK government published a 'White Paper' as part of the 'Managing Radioactive Waste Safety' (MRWS) programme to provide a framework for managing higher activity radioactive wastes in the long-term through geological disposal. The White Paper identifies that there are benefits to disposing all of the UK's higher activity wastes (Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LLW and ILW), High Level Waste (HLW), Spent Fuel (SF), Uranium (U) and Plutonium (Pu)) at the same site, and this is currently the preferred option. It also notes that research will be required to support the detailed design and safety assessment in relation to any potentially detrimental interactions between the different modules. Different disposal system designs and associated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) will be required for these different waste types, i.e. ILW/LLW and HLW/SF. If declared as waste U would be disposed as ILW and Pu as HLW/SF. The Geological Disposal Facility (GDF) would therefore comprise two co-located modules (respectively for ILW/LLW and HLW/SF). This paper presents an overview of a study undertaken to assess the implications of co-location by identifying the key Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) interactions that might occur during both the operational and post-closure phases, and their consequences for GDF design, performance and safety. The MRWS programme is currently seeking expressions of interest from communities to host a GDF. Therefore, the study was required to consider a wide range of potential GDF host rocks and consistent, conceptual disposal system designs. Two example disposal concepts (i.e. combinations of host rock, GDF design including wasteform and layout, etc.) were carried forward for detailed assessment and a third for qualitative analysis. Dimensional and 1D analyses were used to identify the key interactions, and 3D models were used to investigate selected interactions in more detail. The results of this study show that it is possible

  13. HLW immobilization in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  14. Safety of HLW shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The third shipment back to Japan of vitrified high-level radioactive waste (HLW) produced through reprocessing in France is scheduled to take place in early 1998. A consignment last March drew protest from interest groups and countries along the shipping route. Requirements governing the shipment of cargoes of this type and concerns raised by Greenpeace that were assessed by an international expert group, were examined in a previous article. A further report prepared on behalf of Greenpeace Pacific has been released. The paper: Transportation accident of a ship carrying vitrified high-level radioactive waste, Part 1 Impact on the Federated States of Micronesia by Resnikoff and Champion, is dated 31 July 1997. A considerable section of the report is given over to discussion of the economic situation of the Federated Statess of Micronesia, and lifestyle and dietary factors which would influence radiation doses arising from a release. It postulates a worst case accident scenario of a collision between the HLW transport ship and an oil tanker 1 km off Pohnpei with the wind in precisely the direction to result in maximum population exposure, and attempts to assess the consequences. In summary, the report postulates accident and exposure scenarios which are conceivable but not credible. It combines a series of worst case scenarios and attempts to evaluate the consequences. Both the combined scenario and consequences have probabilities of occurrence which are negligible. The shipment carried by the 'Pacific Swan' left Cherbourgon 21 January 1998 and comprised 30 tonnes of reprocessed vitrified waste in 60 stainless steel canisters loaded into three shipping casks. (author)

  15. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere

  16. Comparison of spent nuclear fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, C.L.; Caldwell, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the process an results of a trade study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)management alternatives. The purpose of the trade study was to provide: (1) a summary of various SNF management alternatives, (2) an objective comparison of the various alternatives to facilitate the decision making process, and (3) documentation of trade study rational and the basis for decisions

  17. Contribution of the European Commission to a European Strategy for HLW Management through Partitioning and Transmutation: Presentation of MYRRHA and its Role in the European P and T Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahim, H.A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Schyns, M.; Vandeplassche, D.; Kochetkov, A.

    2015-01-01

    To be able to answer the world's increasing demand for energy, nuclear energy must be part of the energy mix. As a consequence of the nuclear electricity generation, high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is produced. The HLW is presently considered to be managed through its burying in geological storage. Partitioning and transmutation (P and T) has been pointed out as the strategy to reduce the radiological impact of HLW. Transmutation can be achieved in an efficient way in fast neutron spectrum facilities, both in critical fast reactors as well as in accelerator driven systems (ADSs). For more than two decades, the European Commission has been co-funding various research and development projects conducted in many European research organisations and industries related to P and T as a complementary strategy for high-level waste management to the geological disposal. In 2005, a European strategy for the implementation of P and T for a large part of the HLW in Europe indicated the need for the demonstration of its feasibility at an 'engineering' level. The R and D activities of this strategy were arranged in four 'building blocks': 1. Demonstration of the capability to process a sizable amount of spent fuel from commercial light water reactors (LWRs) in order to separate plutonium, uranium and minor actinides. 2. Demonstration of the capability to fabricate at a semi-industrial level the dedicated fuel needed as load in a dedicated transmuter. 3. Design and construction of one or more dedicated transmuters. 4. Provision of a specific installation for processing of the dedicated fuel unloaded from the transmuter, which can be of a different type than the one used to process the original spent fuel unloaded from the commercial power plants, together with the fabrication of new dedicated fuel. MYRRHA contributes to the third building block. MYRRHA is an ADS under development at SCK.CEN in collaboration with a large number of European partners. One of

  18. Matrix Management: An Organizational Alternative for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    Describes various organizational structures and models, presents matrix management as an alternative to traditional hierarchical structures, and suggests matrix management as an appropriate organizational alternative for academic libraries. Benefits that are discussed include increased flexibility, a higher level of professional independence, and…

  19. West Valley Demonstration Project, Waste Management Area #3 -- Closure Alternative I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschke, Stephen F. [Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), New York, NY (United States)

    2000-06-30

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the completion of the West Valley Demonstration Project and closure and/or long-term management of facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center divided the site into Waste Management Areas (WMAs), and for each WMA, presented the impacts associated with five potential closure alternatives. This report focuses on WMA 3 (the High-Level Waste (HLW) Storage Area (Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2), the Vitrification Facility and other facilities) and closure Alternative I (the complete removal of all structures, systems and components and the release of the area for unrestricted use), and reestimates the impacts associated with the complete removal of the HLW tanks, and surrounding facilities. A 32-step approach was developed for the complete removal of Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2, the Supernatant Treatment System Support Building, and the Transfer Trench. First, a shielded Confinement Structure would be constructed to reduce the shine dose rate and to control radioactivity releases. Similarly, the tank heels would be stabilized to reduce potential radiation exposures. Next, the tank removal methodology would include: 1) excavation of the vault cover soil, 2) removal of the vault roof, 3) cutting off the tank’s top, 4) removal of the stabilized heel remaining inside the tank, 5) cutting up the tank’s walls and floor, 6) removal of the vault’s walls, the perlite blocks, and vault floor, and 7) radiation surveying and backfilling the resulting hole. After the tanks are removed, the Confinement Structure would be decontaminated and dismantled, and the site backfilled and landscaped. The impacts (including waste disposal quantities, emissions, work-effort, radiation exposures, injuries and fatalities, consumable materials used, and costs) were estimated based on this 32 step removal methodology, and added to the previously estimated impacts for closure of the other facilities within WMA 3 to obtain the total impacts from

  20. Long-term storage or disposal of HLW-dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M. M.; Raicevic, J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a new concept approach to HLW management founded on deterministic safety philosophy - i.e. long-term storage with final objective of destroying was justified and proposed instead of multi barrier concept with final disposal in extra stable environmental conditions, which are founded on probabilistic safety approach model. As a support to this new concept some methods for destruction of waste which are now accessible, on scientific stage only, as transmutation in fast reactors and accelerators of heavy ions were briefly discussed . It is justified to believe that industrial technology for destruction of HLW would be developed in not so far future. (author).

  1. Conclusions on the two technical panels on HLW-disposal and waste treatment processes respectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkespiller, J.A.; Dejonghe, P.; Feates, F.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reports the concluding panel session at the European Community Conference on radioactive waste management and disposal, Luxembourg 1985. The panel considered the conclusions of two preceeding technical panels on high level waste (HLW) disposal and waste treatment processes. Geological disposal of HLW, waste management, safety assessment of waste disposal, public opinion, public acceptance of the manageability of radioactive wastes, international cooperation, and waste management in the United States, are all discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Safety assessment of HLW geological disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Morimasa

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with the Japanese nuclear program, the liquid waste with a high level of radioactivity arising from reprocessing is solidified in a stable glass matrix (vitrification) in stainless steel fabrication containers. The vitrified waste is referred to as high-level radioactive waste (HLW), and is characterized by very high initial radioactivity which, even though it decreases with time, presents a potential long-term risk. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly manage HLW from human and his environment. After vitrification, HLW is stored for a period of 30 to 50 years to allow cooling, and finally disposed of in a stable geological environment at depths greater than 300 m below surface. The deep underground environment, in general, is considered to be stable over geological timescales compared with surface environment. By selecting an appropriate disposal site, therefore, it is considered to be feasible to isolate the waste in the repository from man and his environment until such time as radioactivity levels have decayed to insignificance. The concept of geological disposal in Japan is similar to that in other countries, being based on a multibarrier system which combines the natural geological environment with engineered barriers. It should be noted that geological disposal concept is based on a passive safety system that does not require any institutional control for assuring long term environmental safety. To demonstrate feasibility of safe HLW repository concept in Japan, following technical steps are essential. Selection of a geological environment which is sufficiently stable for disposal (site selection). Design and installation of the engineered barrier system in a stable geological environment (engineering measures). Confirmation of the safety of the constructed geological disposal system (safety assessment). For site selection, particular consideration is given to the long-term stability of the geological environment taking into account the fact

  3. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  4. HLW disposal dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Glodeanu, F.

    2003-01-01

    The radioactive waste is an inevitable residue from the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine, and from the operation of generating electricity nuclear power stations. The management and disposal of such waste is therefore an issue relevant to almost all countries. Undoubtedly the biggest issue concerning radioactive waste management is that of high level waste. The long-lived nature of some types of radioactive wastes and the associated safety implications of disposal plans have raised concern amongst those who may be affected by such facilities. For these reasons the subject of radioactive waste management has taken on a high profile in many countries. Not one Member State in the European Union can say that their high level waste will be disposed of at a specific site. Nobody can say 'that is where it is going to go'. Now, there is a very broad consensus on the concept of geological disposal. The experts have little, if any doubt that we could safely dispose of the high level wastes. Large sectors of the public continue to oppose to most proposals concerning the siting of repositories. Given this, it is increasingly difficult to get political support, or even political decisions, on such sites. The failure to advance to the next step in the waste management process reinforces the public's initial suspicion and resistance. In turn, this makes the political decisions even harder. In turn, this makes the political decisions even harder. The management of spent fuel from nuclear power plant became a crucial issue, as the cooling pond of the Romanian NPP is reaching saturation. During the autumn of 2000, the plant owner proceeded with an international tendering process for the supply of a dry storage system to be implemented at the Cernavoda station to store the spent fuel from Unit 1 and eventually from Unit 2 for a minimum period of 50 years. The facility is now in operation. As concern the disposal of the spent fuel, the 'wait and see

  5. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  6. Alternative policies for solid waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Percoco Marco

    2004-01-01

    Because of the recent dramatic increase in waste production, solid waste management and control have become one of the central issues in environmental policy. In this paper we review alternative fiscal instruments to control the production of residuals by using the benchmark given by the social optimum. Finnally, we apply the model to theoretically evaluate the TARI.

  7. Management alternatives of energy wood thinning stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkilae, Jani; Siren, Matti; Aeijaelae, Olli

    2007-01-01

    Energy wood thinning has become a feasible treatment alternative of young stands in Finland. Energy wood thinnings have been carried out mainly in stands where precommercial thinning has been neglected and the harvesting conditions for industrial wood thinning are difficult. Despite of its positive effects on harvesting costs and on renewable energy potential, whole-tree harvesting has been constantly criticized for causing growth loss. In this paper, the profitability of energy wood thinning was studied in 20 Scots pine-dominated stands where energy wood thinning was carried out. The growth of the stands after thinning was predicted with the help of Motti-stand simulator. Entire rotation time of the stands was simulated with different management alternatives. The intensity of first thinning and recovery level of logging residues varied between alternatives. In order to attain acceptable harvesting conditions, industrial wood thinning had to be delayed. The effect of energy wood thinning on subsequent stem wood growth was almost the same as in conventional thinning. Whole-tree harvesting for energy proved to be profitable alternative if the stumpage price is around 3EUR m -3 , the interest rate is 3% or 5% and the removal of pulpwood is less than 20 m 3 ha -1 . If the harvestable pulpwood yield is over 20 m 3 ha -1 , integrated harvesting of industrial and energy wood or delayed industrial wood harvesting becomes more profitable. (author)

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in situ experimental program for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be a facility to demonstrate the environmental and operational safety of storing radioactive wastes in a deep geologic bedded salt facility. The WIPP will be located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 30 miles east of the city of Carlsbad. The major focus of the pilot plant operation involves ERDA defense related low and intermediate-level transuranic wastes. The scope of the project also specifically includes experimentation utilizing commercially generated high-level wastes, or alternatively, spent unreprocessed fuel elements. WIPP HLW experiments are being conducted in an inter-related laboratory, bench-scale, and in situ mode. This presentation focuses on the planned in situ experiments which, depending on the availability of commercially reprocessed waste plus delays in the construction schedule of the WIPP, will begin in approximately 1985. Such experiments are necessary to validate preceding laboratory results and to provide actual, total conditions of geologic storage which cannot be adequately simulated. One set of planned experiments involves emplacing bare HLW fragments into direct contact with the bedded salt environment. A second set utilizes full-size canisters of waste emplaced in the salt in the same manner as planned for a future HLW repository. The bare waste experiments will study in an accelerated manner waste-salt bed-brine interactions including matrix integrity/degradation, brine leaching, system chemistry, and potential radionuclide migration through the salt bed. Utilization of full-size canisters of HLW in situ permits us to demonstrate operational effectiveness and safety. Experiments will evaluate corrosion and compatibility interactions between the waste matrix, canister and overpack materials, getter materials, stored energy, waste buoyancy, etc. Using full size canisters also allows us to demonstrate engineered retrievability of wastes, if necessary, at the end of experimentation

  9. Korean Reference HLW Disposal System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report outlines the results related to the development of Korean Reference Disposal System for High-level radioactive wastes. The research has been supported around for 10 years through a long-term research plan by MOST. The reference disposal method was selected via the first stage of the research during which the technical guidelines for the geological disposal of HLW were determined too. At the second stage of the research, the conceptual design of the reference disposal system was made. For this purpose the characteristics of the reference spent fuels from PWR and CANDU reactors were specified, and the material and specifications of the canisters were determined in term of structural analysis and manufacturing capability in Korea. Also, the mechanical and chemical characteristics of the domestic Ca-bentonite were analyzed in order to supply the basic design parameters of the buffer. Based on these parameters the thermal and mechanical analysis of the near-field was carried out. Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical behavior of the disposal system was analyzed. The reference disposal system was proposed through the second year research. At the final third stage of the research, the Korean Reference disposal System including the engineered barrier, surface facilities, and underground facilities was proposed through the performance analysis of the disposal system.

  10. A dose of HLW reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, J.

    1993-01-01

    What many people were sure they knew, and some others were fairly confident they knew, was acknowledged by the US Department of Energy in December: A monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility will not be ready to accept spent fuel by January 31, 1998. A dose of reality has thus been added to the US high-level radioactive waste scene. Perhaps as important as the new reality is the practical, businesslike nature of the DOE's plan. The Department's proposal has the quality of a plan aimed at genuinely solving a problem rather just going through the motions. (In contrast, some readers are familiar with New York State's procedures for siting and licensing a low-level waste facility - procedures so labyrinthine that they are much more likely to protect political careers in that state than they are to achieve an LLW site). The DOE has received a lot of criticism - some justified, some not - about its handling of the HLW program. In this instance, it is proposing what many in the industry might have recommended: Make available storage capacity for spent nuclear fuel at existing federal government sites

  11. R and D programme for HLW disposal in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboya, Takao

    1997-01-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has been active in developing an R and D programme for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in accordance with the overall HLW management programme defined by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) of Japan. The aim of the R and D activities at the current stage is to provide a scientific and technical basis for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan, which is turn promotes understanding of the safety concept not only in the scientific and technical community but also by the general public. As a major milestone in the R and D programme, PNC submitted a first progress report, referred to as H3, in September 1992. H3 summarised the results of R and D activities up to March 1992 and identified priority issues for further study. The second progress report, scheduled to be submitted around 2000, and should demonstrated more rigorously and transparently the feasibility of the specified disposal concept. It should also provide input for the siting and regulatory processes, which will be set in motion after the year 2000. (author). 10 refs., 4 figs

  12. Safeguards aspects for future fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Stein, G.; Gerstler, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the future, more flexible fuel management strategies will be realized in light-water reactor power stations. The incentives for this development are based on considerations related to safe and economic plant operation, e.g. improved fuel strategies can save fuel resources and waste management efforts. A further important aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle deals with recycling strategies. At the back-end of the fuel cycle, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will have to be assessed as an alternative to recycling strategies. These major development fields will also have consequences for international safeguards. In particular, reactor fuel strategies may involve higher burn-up, conditioning of spent fuel directly in the power plant, gadolinium-poisoned fuel and different levels of enrichment. These strategies will have an impact on inspection activities, especially on the applicability of NDA techniques. The inspection frequency could also be affected in recycling strategies using MOX fuel. There may be problems with NDA methods if reprocessed feed is used in enrichment plants. On the other hand, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will raise safeguards problems regarding design verification, long-term safeguarding and the very feasibility of inaccessible nuclear material

  13. SOURCE TERMS FOR HLW GLASS CANISTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.S. Tang

    2000-01-01

    This calculation is prepared by the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Design Section. The objective of this calculation is to determine the source terms that include radionuclide inventory, decay heat, and radiation sources due to gamma rays and neutrons for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from the, West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford Site (HS), and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This calculation also determines the source terms of the canister containing the SRS HLW glass and immobilized plutonium. The scope of this calculation is limited to source terms for a time period out to one million years. The results of this calculation may be used to carry out performance assessment of the potential repository and to evaluate radiation environments surrounding the waste packages (WPs). This calculation was performed in accordance with the Development Plan ''Source Terms for HLW Glass Canisters'' (Ref. 7.24)

  14. Issues at stake when considering long term storage of HLW. A comprehensive approach to designing the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marvy, A.; Ochem, D.

    2002-01-01

    CEA has been conducting a comprehensive R and D program to identify and study key HLW storage design criteria to possibly meet the lifetime goal of a century and beyond. A novel approach is being used since such installations must be understood as a global system comprised of various materials and hardware components, canisters, concrete and steel structures and specific procedures covering engineering steps from construction to operation including monitoring, care and maintenance as well as licensing. The challenge set by such a lifetime design goal made the R and D people focus on issues at stake and relevant to long term HLW storage in particular heat management, the effect of time on materials and the sustainability of care and maintenance. This opened up the R and D field from fundamental research areas to more conventional and technical aspects. Two major guiding principles have been devised as key design goals for the storage concepts under consideration. One is the paramount function of retrievability, which must allow the safe retrieval of any HLW package from the facility at any given time. Next is the passive containment philosophy requiring that a two-barrier system be considered. In the case of spent fuel, CEA's early assessment of the long-term behaviour of cladding shows that it cannot qualify as a reliable barrier over a long period of time. Therefore, the overriding strategy of preventing corrosion and material degradation to achieve canister protection, and therefore containment of radioactive material throughout the time of period envisaged, is at the heart of the R and D program and several design alternatives are being studied to meet that objective. For instance available thermal power from SF is used to establish dry corrosion conditions within the storage facility. The paper reviews all of these different R and D and engineering aspects. (author)

  15. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongyoul; Choi, Heuijoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Geonyoung; Kim, Kyeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system

  16. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jongyoul; Choi, Heuijoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Geonyoung; Kim, Kyeongsoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system.

  17. Comparing technical concepts for disposal of Belgian vitrified HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel, J.; Bock, C. de; Boyazis, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The choice of a suitable repository design for different categories of radioactive waste is an important element in the decisional process that will eventually lead to the waste disposal in geological ground layers during the next decades. Most countries are in the process of elaborating different technical solutions for their EBS '. Considering possible design alternatives offers more flexibility to cope with remaining uncertainties and allows optimizing some elements of the EBS in the future. However, it is not feasible to continue carrying out detailed studies for a large number of alternative design options. At different stages in the decisional process, choices, even preliminary ones, have to be made. Although the impact of different stakeholders (regulator, waste agencies, waste producers, research centers,...) in making these design choices can differ from one country to another, the choices should be based on sound, objective, clear and unambiguous justification grounds. Moreover, the arguments should be carefully reported and easy to understand by the decision makers. ONDRAF/NIRAS recently elaborated three alternative designs for the disposal of vitrified HLW. These three designs are briefly described in the next section. A first series of technological studies pointed out that the three options are feasible. It would however be unreasonable to continue R and D work on all three alternatives in parallel. It is therefore planned to make a preliminary choice of a reference design for the vitrified HLW in 2003. This selection will depend on the way the alternative design options can be evaluated against a number of criteria, mainly derived from general repository design requirements. The technique of multi-criteria analysis (MCA) will be applied as a tool for making the optimum selection, considering all selection criteria and considering different strategic approaches. This paper describes the used methodology. The decision on the actual selection will be

  18. Development of a Korean Reference disposal System(A-KRS) for the HLW from Advanced Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, J. W.; Lee, J. Y.

    2010-04-01

    A database program for analyzing the characteristics of spent fuels was developed, and A-SOURCE program for characterizing the source term of HLW from advanced fuel cycles. A new technique for developing a copper canister by introducing a cold spray technique was developed, which could reduce the amount of copper. Also, to enhance the performance of A-KRS, two kinds of properties, thermal performance and iodine adsorption, were studied successfully. A complex geological disposal system which can accommodate all the HLW (CANDU and HANARO spent fuels, HLW from pyro-processing of PWR spent fuels, decommissioning wastes) was developed, and a conceptual design was carried out. Operational safety assessment system was constructed for the long-term management of A-KRS. Three representative accidental cases were analyzed, and the probabilistic safety assessment was adopted as a methodology for the safety evaluation of A-KRS operation. A national program was proposed to support the HLW national policy on the HLW management. A roadmap for HLW management was proposed based on the optimum timing of disposal

  19. Status of Progress Made Toward Preliminary Design Concepts for the Inventory in Select Media for DOE-Managed HLW/SNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteo, Edward N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Park, Heeho Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rigali, Mark J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    As the title suggests, this report provides a summary of the status and progress for the Preliminary Design Concepts Work Package. Described herein are design concepts and thermal analysis for crystalline and salt host media. The report concludes that thermal management of defense waste, including the relatively small subset of high thermal output waste packages, is readily achievable. Another important conclusion pertains to engineering feasibility, and design concepts presented herein are based upon established and existing elements and/or designs. The multipack configuration options for the crystalline host media pose the greatest engineering challenges, as these designs involve large, heavy waste packages that pose specific challenges with respect to handling and emplacement. Defense-related Spent Nuclear Fuel (DSNF) presents issues for post-closure criticality control, and a key recommendation made herein relates to the need for special packaging design that includes neutron-absorbing material for the DSNF. Lastly, this report finds that the preliminary design options discussed are tenable for operational and post-closure safety, owing to the fact that these concepts have been derived from other published and well-studied repository designs.

  20. Processes for consensus building and role sharing. Lessons learned from HLW policies in European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This report attempts to obtain lessons in implementation of HLW management policies for Japan by reviewing past experiences and present status of policy formulation and implementation as well as reflection of public opinions and consensus building of selected European countries, such as Finland, Sweden and others. After examining the situations of those countries, the author derives four key aspects that need to be addressed; separation of nuclear energy policies and HLW policies, fundamental support shared among national public, sense of controllability, and proper scheme of responsibility sharing. (author)

  1. Alternative Agricultural Enterprises. Production, Management & Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Linda Kirk; And Others

    These nine cooperative extension bulletins provide basic information on various alternative agricultural enterprises. Discussed in the first eight bulletins are the following topics: business ownership (sole proprietorship, partnership, incorporation, cooperatives); business and the family (goals, qualifications, ways of ensuring family support,…

  2. 76 FR 22848 - Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Conflict Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ...-AI63 Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Conflict Management AGENCY: Defense Legal Services Agency... conflict management practices as an integral part of normal business practices within the Department of...) AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Sec. 83.1 Purpose. 83.2 Applicability. 83.3 Definitions. 83.4 Policy. 83.5...

  3. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Joseph, I.; Bowman, B.W.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L

    2009-01-01

    The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al 2 O 3 concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the

  4. NOx AND HETEROGENEITY EFFECTS IN HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, Dan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Orlando, Thom

    2000-01-01

    We summarize contributions from our EMSP supported research to several field operations of the Office of Environmental Management (EM). In particular we emphasize its impact on safety programs at the Hanford and other EM sites where storage, maintenance and handling of HLW is a major mission. In recent years we were engaged in coordinated efforts to understand the chemistry initiated by radiation in HLW. Three projects of the EMSP (''The NOx System in Nuclear Waste,'' ''Mechanisms and Kinetics of Organic Aging in High Level Nuclear Wastes, D. Camaioni--PI'' and ''Interfacial Radiolysis Effects in Tanks Waste, T. Orlando--PI'') were involved in that effort, which included a team at Argonne, later moved to the University of Notre Dame, and two teams at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Much effort was invested in integrating the results of the scientific studies into the engineering operations via coordination meetings and participation in various stages of the resolution of some of the outstanding safety issues at the sites. However, in this Abstract we summarize the effort at Notre Dame

  5. Alternative Transportation System Demand Estimation for Federal Land Management Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Estimating travel demand for alternative transportation systems (ATS) is challenging in any context, but is even more daunting for Federal Land Management Agencies (FLMAs). Federal public land sites vary widely in their characteristics. Moreover, tra...

  6. Alternative techniques for environmental project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, S.

    1994-01-01

    Beginning in the late 1970s and early 1980s, increased regulation and recognition of ground water as an important natural resource led industry to address subsurface contamination at many sites. This caused the industry's dependence on environmental consultants to increase drastically. Initially, the accepted practice for addressing environmental concerns was to rely upon consultants to determine appropriate work scope, budgets, procedures and regulatory interaction. While significant advances have been made in technology and consulting services, improvement in project management and cost containment have been limited. In order to effectively manage environmental projects, it is imperative that business risks and standardized project management practices be factored into environmental solutions. A standardized environmental project management program was developed and applied to projects at petroleum marketing facilities throughout the United States. Following development and implementation, detailed studies were conducted to measure the value of standardization in reducing costs and enhancing efficiencies. The results indicate significant improvement in both reducing project costs and in enhancing the efficiency of consultants

  7. Accelerators and alternative nuclear fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The development of special accelerators suggests the po tential for new directions in nuclear energy systems evolution. Such directions point towards a more acceptable form of nuclear energy by reason of the consequent accessibility of enhanced fuel management choices. Essential and specifically directed research and development activity needs to be under taken in order to clarify and resolve a number of technical issues

  8. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-01-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases

  9. A GoldSim Based Biosphere Assessment Model for a HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the performance of a repository, the dose exposure to a human being due to nuclide releases from a repository should be evaluated and the results compared to the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies. To evaluate a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, biosphere assessment models and their implemented codes such as ACBIO1 and ACBIO2 have been developed with the aid of AMBER during the last few years. BIOMASS methodology has been adopted for a HLW repository currently being considered in Korea, which has a similar concept to the Swedish KBS-3 HLW repository. Recently, not just only for verifying the purpose for biosphere assessment models but also for varying the possible alternatives to assess the consequences in a biosphere due to a HLW repository, another version of the assessment modesl has been newly developed in the frame of development programs for a total system performance assessment modeling tool by utilizing GoldSim. Through a current study, GoldSim approach for a biosphere modeling is introduced. Unlike AMBER by which a compartment scheme can be rather simply constructed with an appropriate transition rate between compartments, GoldSim was designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules by which specific models can be addressed in an additional manner, like solving jig saw puzzles

  10. Alternatives for Future Waste Management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Andersen, Frits; Cimpan, Ciprian; Dall, Ole

    The TOPWASTE project has addressed the challenges of planning robust solutions for future waste management. The purpose was to identify economic and environmentally optimal solutions ‐ taking into account different scenarios for the development of the surrounding systems, such as the energy syste......, environmental and resource efficiency of waste management solutions. The following chapters addresses these issues by answering some of the main research questions of the project.......The TOPWASTE project has addressed the challenges of planning robust solutions for future waste management. The purpose was to identify economic and environmentally optimal solutions ‐ taking into account different scenarios for the development of the surrounding systems, such as the energy system....... During the project, four decision support tools were developed:1. Frida ‐ The EPA's tool for forecasting future waste generation 2. OptiWaste ‐ a new tool for economic optimisation of investments and operation of the combined waste and energy system3. KISS ‐ a new lifecycle based model with focus...

  11. Probability model for analyzing fire management alternatives: theory and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick W. Bratten

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical probability model has been developed for analyzing program alternatives in fire management. It includes submodels or modules for predicting probabilities of fire behavior, fire occurrence, fire suppression, effects of fire on land resources, and financial effects of fire. Generalized "fire management situations" are used to represent actual fire...

  12. Alternative concepts for stages of VLLW management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, A.A.; Gupalo, T.A.; Karpikov, A.A.; Feshchenko, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    The only universally recognised method for final isolation of very-low-level radioactive waste (VLLW) (industrial waste generated at NPPs with specific β-activity of 0.3-100 kBq/kg or specific α-activity of 0.3-10 kBq/kg) is disposal in near-surface repositories. In order to locate a suitable site for a regional repository, a comparison should be performed between a number of sites where the waste is currently being accumulated in terms of their geological conditions, amount of VLLW available and transport costs to the repository. It is shown that when no social and administrative barriers are present, the most economic concept of VLLW management is centralized disposal in a regional repository [ru

  13. Counter current decantation washing of HLW sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooke, J.N.; Peterson, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 51 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks with typical dimensions 25.9 meters (85 feet) diameter and 10 meters (33 feet) high. Nearly 114 million liters (30 M gallons) of HLW waste is stored in these tanks in the form of insoluble solids called sludge, crystallized salt called salt cake, and salt solutions. This waste is being converted to waste forms stable for long term storage. In one of the processes, soluble salts are washed from HLW sludge in preparation for vitrification. At present, sludge is batch washed in a waste tank with one or no reuse of the wash water. Sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the wash water for tank corrosion protection; the large volumes of spent wash water are recycled to the evaporator system; additional salt cake is produced; and sodium carbonate is formed in the washed sludge during storage by reaction with CO 2 from the air. High costs and operational concerns with the current washing process prompts DOE and WSRC to seek an improved washing method. A new method should take full advantage of the physical/chemical properties of sludge, experience from other technical disciplines, processing rate requirements, inherent process safety, and use of proven processes and equipment. Counter current solids washing is a common process in the minerals processing and chemical industries. Washing circuits can be designed using thickeners, filters or centrifuges. Realizing the special needs of nuclear work and the low processing rates required, a Counter Current Decantation (CCD) circuit is proposed using small thickeners and fluidic pumps

  14. Source term measurements on vitrified HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, A.; Marples, J.A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium concentrations of Tc-99, Np-237, Pu-239/240 and Am-241 have been measured in the presence of materials likely to be present in a vitrified HLW repository: glass, iron, backfill and rock. Results were measured under both oxidising and reducing conditions and at pH values set by the backfill bentonite and cement. Under reducing conditions and with cementitious backfills, the equilibrium concentrations ranged from three to 30 times allowed drinking water levels for the four isotopes. (author)

  15. Integrated HLW Conceptual Process Flowsheet(s) for the Crystalline Silicotitanate Process SRDF-98-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Strategic Research and Development Fund (SRDF) provided funds to develop integrated conceptual flowsheets and material balances for a CST process as a potential replacement for, or second generation to, the ITP process. This task directly supports another SRDF task: Glass Form for HLW Sludge with CST, SRDF-98-01, by M. K. Andrews which seeks to further develop sludge/CST glasses that could be used if the ITP process were replaced by CST ion exchange. The objective of the proposal was to provide flowsheet support for development and evaluation of a High Level Waste Division process to replace ITP. The flowsheets would provide a conceptual integrated material balance showing the impact on the HLW division. The evaluation would incorporate information to be developed by Andrews and Harbour on CST/DWPF glass formulations and provide the bases for evaluating the economic impact of the proposed replacement process. Coincident with this study, the Salt Disposition Team began its evaluation of alternatives for disposition of the HLW salts in the SRS waste tanks. During that time, the CST IX process was selected as one of four alternatives (of eighteen Phase II alternatives) for further evaluation during Phase III

  16. Prioritization of sediment management alternatives using stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Guerra, Manuel; Canis, Laure; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos; Viguri, Javier R.; Linkov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Decision-making for sediment management is a complex task that requires the consideration of temporal and spatial impacts of several remedial alternatives as well as the associated economic, social and political impact. Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) is becoming increasingly recognized as an important environmental management tool that can be used to support the selection of suitable remediation alternatives and prioritization of management units in space and time. This paper proposes an MCDA framework for prioritizing sediment management alternatives. This framework involves identifying of a set of feasible options, as well as defining and evaluating criteria which integrate relevant technical, economic, social and environmental aspects of remedies. The methodology allows an explicit consideration of uncertainty in criteria scores and weights by assigning probability distributions and analyzing subsequent Monte-Carlo simulations. The consideration of different stakeholder simulated values is used to assess the robustness of alternative rankings and to guide the selection of remediation options. An application of this methodology to a case study in the Bay of Santander, Spain, is presented. An assessment is conducted for the case of unknown preferences as well as for hypothetical preferences profiles for four types of stakeholders: Idealist, Politician, Environmentalist and Balanced. The results are used to visualize stakeholder positions and potential disagreements, allowing for the identification of a group of least preferred alternatives for each stakeholder. Stakeholder involvement has the potential to ease the remedy selection process during all stages of the decision-making process and to eventually remedy implementation.

  17. Intentional replantation: A viable alternative for management of palatogingival groove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radicular groove is an anatomical malformation that often leads to combined endodontic-periodontic lesions. Treatment of complex groove presents a clinical challenge to the operator. A case of type III palatogingival groove is successfully treated with intentional replantation. With the understanding of the procedure and strict adherence to guidelines improves, practitioners can use intentional replantation as an easy and cost-effective alternative for the management of radicular groove. The paper presents a brief review of palatogingival groove and highlights an easy and predictable alternative for its management.

  18. Comparison of spent fuel management fee collection alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.K.; Engel, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Five alternative methods for recovering the costs of spent fuel management were evaluated. These alternatives consist of collecting the fee for various components of spent fuel management cost (AFR basin storage, transportation from AFR basin to the repository, packaging, repository, R and D, and government overhead) at times ranging from generation of power to delivery of the spent fuel to the government. The five fee collection mechanisms were analyzed to determine how well they serve the interests of the public and the electricity ratepayer

  19. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Altho...

  20. Land management planning: a method of evaluating alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres Weintraub; Richard Adams; Linda Yellin

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for developing and evaluating alternatives in land management planning. A structured set of 15 steps provides a framework for such an evaluation. when multiple objectives and uncertainty must be considered in the planning process. The method is consistent with other processes used in organizational evaluation, and allows for the interaction of...

  1. STAGES : a system for generating strategic alternatives for forest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Strategic planning is important in forest management. However, it has never been described clearly in literature. In this study a framework for strategic planning was developed and based on this a STrategic Alternatives Generating System (STAGES) to support decision making in strategic

  2. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  3. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  4. COMSOL Multiphysics Model for HLW Canister Filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesterson, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. Wastes containing high concentrations of Al2O3 and Na2O can contribute to nepheline (generally NaAlSiO4) crystallization, which can sharply reduce the chemical durability of high level waste (HLW) glass. Nepheline crystallization can occur during slow cooling of the glass within the stainless steel canister. The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in a WTP HLW canister during filling and cooling. The intent of the model is to support scoping work in the laboratory. It is not intended to provide precise predictions of temperature profiles, but rather to provide a simplified representation of glass cooling profiles within a full scale, WTP HLW canister under various glass pouring rates. These data will be used to support laboratory studies for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of nepheline crystallization. The model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercially available software. The model results were compared to available experimental data, TRR-PLT-080, and were found to yield sufficient results for the scoping nature of the study. The simulated temperatures were within 60 ºC for the centerline, 0.0762m (3 inch) from centerline, and 0.2286m (9 inch) from centerline thermocouples once the thermocouples were covered with glass. The temperature difference between the experimental and simulated values reduced to 40 ºC, 4 hours after the thermocouple was covered, and down to 20 ºC, 6 hours after the thermocouple was covered

  5. Weed control through crop rotation and alternative management practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böhm, Herwart

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Economic as well as agricultural and socio-political changes have an impact on crop management and thus also on crop rotation design and the related effects on the weed flora. Likewise other changes in cultivation such as reduced tillage practices, earlier sowing date, etc. cause an increase in weed infestation resp. an increased use of herbicides and if so contribute to herbicide resistance. The positive effects of crop rotation, but also of alternative management practices such as choice of varieties, catch crops, mixed cropping, green chop, and the share of predators, as well as methods of direct non-chemical weed control are presented and discussed for both, conventional and organic farming. If alternative management methods should be more practiced, especially trade-offs need to be broken, or incentives be offered.

  6. Management of Vegetation by Alternative Practices in Fields and Roadsides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen V. Barker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In attempts to reduce the amounts of conventional herbicides used, alternative practices are sought in the management of roadside vegetation. In this investigation, alternative herbicides (citric-acetic acids, clove oil, corn gluten meal, limonene, and pelargonic acid, flaming, and mulching were assessed in management of annual and perennial, herbaceous vegetation in field and roadside plots. Several formulations of alternative herbicides applied singly or repeatedly during the growing season were evaluated and compared with conventional herbicides (glyphosate and glufosinate ammonium or with flaming or mulching. Citric-acetic acid formulations, clove oil, limonene, or pelargonic acid applied as foliar sprays immediately desiccated foliage, but the efficacy lasted for no longer than five weeks. Repeated applications were better than single applications of these herbicides in suppressing plant vegetative growth. Corn gluten meal imparted little or no early control and stimulated late-season growth of vegetation. A single flaming of vegetation gave no better control than the alternative herbicides, but repeated flaming strongly restricted growth. Mulching with wood chips or bark gave season-long suppression of vegetation. Glyphosate gave season-long inhibition of vegetation, but the efficacy of glufosinate ammonium waned as the growing season progressed. For season-long suppression of vegetation with alternative herbicides or flaming repeated applications will be required.

  7. Calculation of projected waste loads for transuranic waste management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

    1995-01-01

    The level of treatment and the treatment and interim storage site configurations (decentralized, regional, or centralized) impact transuranic (TRU) waste loads at and en route to sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Other elements that impact waste loads are the volume and characteristics of the waste and the unit operation parameters of the technologies used to treat it. Projected annual complexwide TRU waste loads under various TRU waste management alternatives were calculated using the WASTEunderscoreMGMT computational model. WASTEunderscoreMGMT accepts as input three types of data: (1) the waste stream inventory volume, mass, and contaminant characteristics by generating site and waste stream category; (2) unit operation parameters of treatment technologies; and (3) waste management alternative definitions. Results indicate that the designed capacity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, identified under all waste management alternatives as the permanent disposal facility for DOE-generated TRU waste, is sufficient for the projected complexwide TRU waste load under any of the alternatives

  8. Alternative measure for performance of HLW geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joonhang, Ahn; Chambre, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    A repository performance model that can show effects of canister multiplicity and repository configuration has been developed. Masses of a radionuclide in the repository and in the far field are proposed as performance measures. Canister multiplicity has significant effects on the release of long-lived radionuclides from the repository. As more canisters are included in the same water stream, the radionuclide concentration in the stream increases, but becomes independent of the number of canisters for sufficiently many canisters. Effects of reduction of radionuclide mass in the repository on the repository performance are clearly observed if the canister multiplicity is taken into account and the mass-based measures are applied. (author)

  9. HLW disposal in Germany - R and D achievements and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steininger, W.

    2006-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of the status of R and D on HLW disposal. Shortly addressed is the current nuclear policy. After describing the responsibilities regarding R and D for disposing of heat-generating high-level (HLW) waste (vitrified waste and spent fuel), selected projects are mentioned to illustrate the state of knowledge in disposing of waste in rock salt. Participation in international projects and programs is described to illustrate the value for the German concepts and ideas for HLW disposal in different rock types. Finally, a condensed outlook on future activities is given. (author)

  10. Approach for systematic evaluation of transuranic waste management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, K.; Koebnick, B.; Kotek, T.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for systematic evaluation of management alternatives that are being considered for the treatment, storage, and disposal of transuranic waste (TRUW) at U.S. Department of Energy sites. The approach, which is currently under development, would apply WASTE-MGMT, a database application model developed at Argonne National Laboratory, to estimate projected environmental releases and would evaluate impact measures such as health risk and costs associated with each of the waste management alternatives. The customized application would combine site-specific TRUW inventory and characterization data with treatment and transportation parameters to estimate the quantities and characteristics of the wastes to be treated, emissions of hazardous substances from the treatment facilities, and the quantities and characteristics of the wastes to be shipped between sites. These data would then be used to estimate for several TRUW management scenarios the costs and health risks of constructing and operating the required treatment facilities and of transporting TRUW for treatment and final disposal. Treatment, storage, and disposal of TRUW at DOE sites is composed of many variables and options at each stage. The approach described in this paper would provide for efficient consideration of all of these facets when evaluating potentially feasible TRUW management alternatives. By expanding existing databases, this model could eventually be adapted to accommodate the introduction of new treatment technologies, updated TRUW characterization data, and/or revised waste acceptance criteria

  11. Integrated Parasite Management for Livestock - Alternative control methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Paul1

    Full Text Available Internal parasites are considered by some to be one of the most economically important constraints in raising livestock. The growing concern about the resistance of internal parasites to all classes of dewormers has caused people to look for alternatives. As dewormers lose their effectiveness, the livestock community fears increasing economic losses from worms. There is no one thing that can be given or done to replace chemical dewormers. It will take a combination of extremely good management techniques and possibly some alternative therapies. It is not wise to think that one can just stop deworming animals with chemical dewormers. It is something one will need to change gradually, observing and testing animals and soil, in order to monitor the progress. Alternative parasite control is an area that is receiving a lot of interest and attention. Programs and research will continue in the pursuit of parasite control, using alternative and more management-intensive methods. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(9.000: 431-435

  12. DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.

  13. Intentional replantation: A viable alternative for management of palatogingival groove

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar; Ajay Logani; Naseem Shah

    2013-01-01

    Radicular groove is an anatomical malformation that often leads to combined endodontic-periodontic lesions. Treatment of complex groove presents a clinical challenge to the operator. A case of type III palatogingival groove is successfully treated with intentional replantation. With the understanding of the procedure and strict adherence to guidelines improves, practitioners can use intentional replantation as an easy and cost-effective alternative for the management of radicular groove. The ...

  14. The use of mineral-like matrices for hlw solidification and spent fuel immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhitonov, J.A.; Starchenko, V.A.; Strelnikov, A.V.; Sorokin, V.T.; Shvedov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The conception of radioactive waste management is based upon the multi-barrier protection principle stating that the long-lived radionuclides safety isolation is ensured by a system of engineering and natural geological barriers. One of the effective ways of the long-lived radionuclides immobilization is the integration of these materials within a mineral-like matrice. This technique may be used both for isolation of separated groups of nuclides (Cs, Sr, TUE, TRE) and for immobilization of spent fuel which for some reason can't be processed at the radiochemical plant. In this paper two variants of flowsheets HLW management are discussed. The following ways of HLW reprocessing are considered: - The first cycle raffinate solidification (without partitioning); - The individual solidification of two separated radionuclide groups (Sr+Cs+FP fraction and TPE+TRE fraction). The calcination of some characteristics (annual and total amounts, specific activity, radiochemical composition and radiogenic heat) of HLW integrated within a mineral-like matrix are performed for both options. The matrix compositions may be also used for spent fuel immobilization by means of the hot isostatic pressing technique. (authors)

  15. Biosphere modelling for a HLW repository - scenario and parameter variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grogan, H.

    1985-03-01

    In Switzerland high-level radioactive wastes have been considered for disposal in deep-lying crystalline formations. The individual doses to man resulting from radionuclides entering the biosphere via groundwater transport are calculated. The main recipient area modelled, which constitutes the base case, is a broad gravel terrace sited along the south bank of the river Rhine. An alternative recipient region, a small valley with a well, is also modelled. A number of parameter variations are performed in order to ascertain their impact on the doses. Finally two scenario changes are modelled somewhat simplistically, these consider different prevailing climates, namely tundra and a warmer climate than present. In the base case negligibly low doses to man in the long term, resulting from the existence of a HLW repository have been calculated. Cs-135 results in the largest dose (8.4E-7 mrem/y at 6.1E+6 y) while Np-237 gives the largest dose from the actinides (3.6E-8 mrem/y). The response of the model to parameter variations cannot be easily predicted due to non-linear coupling of many of the parameters. However, the calculated doses were negligibly low in all cases as were those resulting from the two scenario variations. (author)

  16. Industrial scale-plant for HLW partitioning in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Glagolenko, Y.V.; Drojko, E.G.; Kurochkin, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    Radiochemical plant of PA > at Ozersk, which was come on line in December 1948 originally for weapon plutonium production and reoriented on the reprocessing of spent fuel, till now keeps on storage HLW of the military program. Application of the vitrification method since 1986 has not essentially reduced HLW volumes. So, as of September 1, 1995 vitrification installations had been processed 9590 m 3 HLW and 235 MCi of radionuclides was included in glass. However only 1100 m 3 and 20.5 MCi is part of waste of the military program. The reason is the fact, that the technology and equipment of vitrification were developed for current waste of Purex-process, for which low contents of corrosion-dangerous impurity to materials of vitrification installation is characteristic of. With reference to HLW, which are growing at PA > in the course of weapon plutonium production, the program of Science-Research Works includes the following main directions of work. Development of technology and equipment of installations for immobilising HLW with high contents of impurity into a solid form at induction melter. Application of High-temperature Adsorption Method for sorption of radionuclides from HLW on silica gel. Application of Partitioning Method of radionuclides from HLW, based on extraction cesium and strontium into cobalt dicarbollyde or crown-ethers, but also on recovery of cesium radionuclides by sorption on inorganic sorbents. In this paper the results of work on creation of first industrial scale-plant for partitioning HLW by the extraction and sorption methods are reported

  17. SNF/HLW Transfer System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. Holt

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF)/high-level radioactive waste (HLW) transfer system and associated bases, which will allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This SDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD is an engineering tool for design control. Accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This SDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flowdown of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The SDD follows the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in this SDD reflects the current results of the design process

  18. Stress analysis of HLW containers. Compas project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This document reports the work carried out for the Compas project which looked at the performance of various computer codes in a selected benchmark exercise. This exercise consisted of several analyses on simplified models which have features typical of HLW containers. These analyses comprise two groups; one related to thick walled, stressed shell overpacks, the other related to thin walled, supported shell overpacks with a lead filler. The first set of analyses looked at an elastic-plastic behaviour and large deformation of a cylinder representative of the main body of thick walled containers). The second set looked at creep behaviour of the lead filler, and the shape the base of thin walled containers will take up, after hundreds of years in the repository. On the thick walled analyses with the cylinder subject to an external pressure all the codes gave consistent results in the elastic region and there is good agreement in the yield pressures. Once in the plastic region there is more divergence in the results although a consistent trend is predicted. One of the analyses predicted a non-axisymmetric mode of deformation as would be expected in reality. Fewer results were received for the creep analysis, however the transient creep results showed consistency, and were bounded by the final-state results

  19. Progress report on safety research of high-level waste management for the period April, 1981 to March, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-10-01

    Main results obtained on Safety Research of High-Level Waste Management in 1981 were edited. The research tjeme are following. (1) Characterization of vitrified waste. (2) Alternative waste form development. (3) Durability tests for HLW storage facility. (4) Safety evaluation of geologic disposal. (5) Preparation for hot test. (author)

  20. Grouping in partitioning of HLW for burning and/or transmutation with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, Asashi; Mulyanto.

    1995-01-01

    A basic concept on partitioning and transmutation treatment by neutron reaction was developed in order to improve the waste management and the disposal scenario of high level waste (HLW). The grouping in partitioning was important factor and closely linked with the characteristics of B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment. The selecting and grouping concept in partitioning of HLW was proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (Np, Am, and unrecovered U and Pu), Group MA2 (Cm, Cf etc.), Group A (Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW), judging from the three criteria for B/T treatment proposed in this study, which is related to (1) the value of hazard index for long-term tendency based on ALI, (2) the relative dose factor related to the mobility or retardation in ground water penetrated through geologic layer, and (3) burning and/or transmutation characteristics for recycle B/T treatment and the decay acceleration ratio by neutron reaction. Group MA1 and Group A could be burned effectively by thermal B/T reactor. Group MA2 could be burned effectively by fast B/T reactor. Transmutation of Group B by neutron reaction is difficult, therefore the development of radiation application of Group B (Cs and Sr) in industrial scale may be an interesting option in the future. Group R, i.e. the partitioned remains of HLW, and also a part of Group B should be immobilized and solidified by the glass matrix. HI ALI , the hazard index based on ALI, due to radiotoxicity of Group R can be lower than HI ALI due to standard mill tailing (smt) or uranium ore after about 300 years. (author)

  1. Conflict analysis and management alternative for the Manayunk Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solution of a water resource allocation problem by an alternative social arrangement is presented. Classical Austrian economic theory and the new resources economics provide both theoretical and practical evidence to support the development of well-defined, private property rights to the water resource in question. A conflict analysis demonstrates that management of the Manayunk Canal by a firm would reconcile existing confrontations through compromise use of the water resource. Benefit and cost calculations show that a compromise among industrial and recreational interests, currently competing in the political arena, would increase social benefits

  2. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  3. Public Perspectives in the Japanese HLW Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inatsugu, Shigefumi; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Kato, Toshiaki [Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUNIO), Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Following legislation entitled the 'Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established in October 2000 as the implementing organization for geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste (HLW). Implementation of NUMO's disposal project will be based on three principles: 1) respecting public initiative and opinion, 2) adopting a stepwise approach and 3) ensuring transparency in information disclosure. NUMO has decided to adopt an open solicitation approach to finding volunteer municipalities for Preliminary Investigation Areas (PIAs). The official announcement of the start of the open solicitation program was made in 2002. Although no official applications had been received from volunteer municipalities by the end of 2005, NUMO has been continuing to carry out various activities aimed specifically at public communication and encouraging dialogue about the deep geological disposal project This paper summarizes the results obtained and lessons learned so far and identifies the issues that NUMO must tackle immediately in the areas of communication and dialogue.

  4. Public Perspectives in the Japanese HLW Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inatsugu, Shigefumi; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Kato, Toshiaki

    2006-01-01

    Following legislation entitled the 'Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established in October 2000 as the implementing organization for geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste (HLW). Implementation of NUMO's disposal project will be based on three principles: 1) respecting public initiative and opinion, 2) adopting a stepwise approach and 3) ensuring transparency in information disclosure. NUMO has decided to adopt an open solicitation approach to finding volunteer municipalities for Preliminary Investigation Areas (PIAs). The official announcement of the start of the open solicitation program was made in 2002. Although no official applications had been received from volunteer municipalities by the end of 2005, NUMO has been continuing to carry out various activities aimed specifically at public communication and encouraging dialogue about the deep geological disposal project This paper summarizes the results obtained and lessons learned so far and identifies the issues that NUMO must tackle immediately in the areas of communication and dialogue

  5. The AGP-Project conceptual design for a Spanish HLW final disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Engelmann, H.-J.; Huertas, F.; Ulibarri, A.

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the AGP Project a Conceptual Design for a HLW Final Disposal Facility to be eventually built in an underground salt formation in Spain has been developed. The AGP Project has the character of a system analysis. In the current project phase I several alternatives has been considered for different subsystems and/or components of the repository. The system variants, developed to such extent as to allow a comparison of their advantages and disadvantages, will allow the selection of a reference concept, which will be further developed to technical maturity in subsequent project phases. (author)

  6. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies.

  7. Complementary and Alternative Exercises for Management of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic condition characterized by degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint. With no cure currently available, the goals of treating OA are to alleviate pain, maintain, or improve joint mobility, increase the muscle strength of the joints, and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent research has suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM exercises may improve OA symptoms. This paper covers CAM mind-body exercises—Tai Chi, qigong, and yoga—for OA management and evaluates their benefits in pain reduction, muscle strength, physical function, stiffness, balance, fear of falling, self-efficacy, quality of life, and psychological outcomes in patients with OA, based on randomized controlled trials published. Findings from the literature suggest that CAM exercises demonstrate considerable promise in the management of OA. Future studies require rigorous randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes.

  8. HLW Flexible jumper materials compatibility evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-13

    H-Tank Farm Engineering tasked SRNL/Materials Science & Technology (MS&T) to evaluate the compatibility of Goodyear Viper® chemical transfer hose with HLW solutions. The hose is proposed as a flexible Safety Class jumper for up to six months service. SRNL/MS&T performed various tests to evaluate the effects of radiation, high pH chemistry and elevated temperature on the hose, particularly the inner liner. Test results suggest an upper dose limit of 50 Mrad for the hose. Room temperature burst pressure values at 50 Mrad are estimated at 600- 800 psi, providing a safety factor of 4.0-5.3X over the anticipated operating pressure of 150 psi and a safety factor of 3.0-4.0X over the working pressure of the hose (200 psi), independent of temperature effects. Radiation effects are minimal at doses less than 10 Mrad. Doses greater than 50 Mrad may be allowed, depending on operating conditions and required safety factors, but cannot be recommended at this time. At 250 Mrad, burst pressure values are reduced to the hose working pressure. At 300 Mrad, burst pressures are below 150 psi. At a bounding continuous dose rate of 57,870 rad/hr, the 50 Mrad dose limit is reached within 1.2 months. Actual dose rates may be lower, particularly during non-transfer periods. Refined dose calculations are therefore recommended to justify longer service. This report details the tests performed and interpretation of the results. Recommendations for shelf-life/storage, component quality verification, and post-service examination are provided.

  9. Evaluation of sludge management alternatives in Istanbul metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, M; Erdim, E; Kinaci, C; Akca, L

    2005-01-01

    The main concern of this paper was to predict the sludge quantities generated from 18 wastewater treatment plants, which were stated to be established in the "Istanbul Water Supply, Sewerage and Drainage, Sewage Treatment and Disposal Master Plan", 10 of which are in operation at present. Besides this, obtaining the required data to compare various treatment schemes was another goal of the study. Especially, the estimation of the sludge quantity in the case of enhanced primary sedimentation was of importance. Wastewater sludge management strategies were discussed in order to develop suggestions for Istanbul Metropolitan city. Within this context, the wastewater treatment facilities, mentioned in the Master Plan that had been completed by 2000, were evaluated in terms of sludge production rates, locations and technical and management aspects. Disposal alternatives of the wastewater treatment sludge were also evaluated in this study. Using of the dewatered sludge as a landfill cover material seems the best alternative usage. Up to the year of 2040, the requirement of cover material for landfills in Istanbul will be met by the dewatered sludge originated from wastewater treatment plants in the region.

  10. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  11. Safety case development in the Japanese programme for geological disposal of HLW: Evolution in the generic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Hiroyoshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Fujihara, Hiroshi; Takeda, Seietsu

    2014-01-01

    In the Japanese programme for nuclear power generation, the safe management of the resulting radioactive waste, particularly vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from fuel reprocessing, has been a major concern and a focus of R and D since the late 70's. According to the specifications in a report issued by an advisory committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC, 1997), the Second Progress Report on R and D for the Geological Disposal of HLW (H12 report) (JNC, 2000) was published after two decades of R and D activities and showed that disposal of HLW in Japan is feasible and can be practically implemented at sites which meet certain geological stability requirements. The H12 report supported government decisions that formed the basis of the 'Act on Final Disposal of Specified Radioactive Waste' (Final Disposal Act), which came into force in 2000. The Act specifies deep geological disposal of HLW at depths greater than 300 metres, together with a stepwise site selection process in three stages. Following the Final Disposal Act, the supporting 'Basic Policy for Final Disposal' and the 'Final Disposal Plan' were authorised in the same year. (authors)

  12. System study of alternative waste management techniques: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the important results achieved in conjunction with the Research and Development Priority ''Alternative Waste Management Techniques'' sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology from 1981 to 1984. The subject of these studies was solely ''direct disposal'' of spent fuel elements. For this purpose a reference concept was selected from a variety of possible processes and engineered in detailed form by firms in the nuclear industry. Those who worked on the engineering concepts consider this waste management method technically feasible. Several disposal casks have been fabricated. The basic licensability of direct disposal can be evaluated on the basis of the documentation developed by the companies. The direct disposal method was compared with the ''integrated waste management concept'' using reference fuel cycles with respect to the following criteria: radiological safety and nuclear material safeguards and, in addition, economic and energy-policy aspects. It was found that with respect to radiological safety, including the long-term safety of the final repository, there are no significant differences between the two fuel cycles with and without reprocessing. With respect to the nuclear material safeguards of a final repository containing spent fuel elements, there are still a number of unanswered questions. From an economic standpoint, direct disposal will be more economical in the foreseeable future than integrated waste management. Quantification of the effects of one or the other waste management method on the national economy is not necessarily possible. Reprocessing is supported primarily by technological and energy-policy considerations. On the basis of the results, the conclusion is reached that reprocessing should be pursued further, but that at the same time direct disposal should be developed to the point of practical maturity

  13. R and D on HLW Partitioning in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaperskaya, A.; Babain, V.; Alyapyshev, M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of more than thirty years investigations on high level radioactive waste (HLW) partitioning in Russia are described. The objectives of research and development is to assess HLW partitioning technical feasibility and its advantages compared to direct vitrification of long-lived radionuclides. Many technological flowsheets for long-lived nuclides (cesium, strontium and minor actinides) separation were developed and tested with simulated and actual HLW. Different classes of extractants, including carbamoyl-phosphine oxides, dialkyl-phosphoric acids, crown ethers and diamides of heterocyclic acids were studied. Some of these processes were tested at PA 'Mayak' and MCC. Many extraction systems based on chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD), including UNEX-extractant and its modifications, were also observed. Diamides of diglycolic acid and diamides of heterocyclic acids in polar diluents have shown promising properties for minor actinide-lanthanide extraction and separation. Comparison of different solvents and possible ways of implementing new flowsheets in radiochemical technology are also discussed. (authors)

  14. HLW Canister and Can-In-Canister Drop Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. Marr

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the HLW canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (''can-in-canister'' throughout this document) to the drop event during the handling operation. The objective of the calculation is to provide the structure parameter information to support the canister design and the waste handling facility design. Finite element solution is performed using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. Two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element representations for the standard HLW canister and the can-in-canister are developed and analyzed using the dynamic solver

  15. Alternative therapy in glaucoma management: Is there any role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh Rajul

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Various randomized controlled clinical trials have shown that lowering intraocular pressure (IOP does reduce progression of primary open-angle glaucoma. However, there is lots of interest in nonpharmacological options that includes lifestyle adjustment and alternative and complementary therapy (ACT. At least 5% glaucoma population uses ACT. Various lifestyle activities like exercise and alcohol can reduce IOP by 1 to 2 mm Hg but would have small effect on glaucoma. The psychological stress can increase IOP. Hypothetically and few studies do show neuroprotective effect (or effect on ocular blood flow of alcohol, Gingko biloba, bilberry, but the current evidence is weak for its routine use. We must also remember the side effects of ′medications′ (e.g., marijuana, alcohol before promoting as remedy for glaucoma. In current armamentarium of glaucoma management, ACT cannot substitute the conventional treatment available to lower IOP.

  16. Cooling and cracking of technical HLW glass products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, B.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses various cooling procedures applied to canisters filled with inactive simulated HLW glass and the measured temperature distributions compared with numerically computed data. Stress computations of the cooling process were carried out with a finite element method. Only those volume elements having temperatures below the transformation temperature Tg were assumed to contribute thermoelastically to the developing stresses. Model calculations were extended to include real HLW glass canisters with inherent thermal power. The development of stress as a function of variations of heat flow conditions and of the radioactive decay was studied

  17. Active geothermal systems as natural analogs of HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Cohen, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    Geologic analogs of long-lived processes in high-level waste (HLW) repositories have been much studied in recent years. However, most of these occurrences either involve natural processes going on today at 25 degree C, or, if they are concerned with behavior at temperatures similar to the peak temperatures anticipated near HLW canisters, have long since ended. This paper points out the usefulness of studying modern geothermal systems as natural analogs, and to illustrate the concept with a dramatic example, the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS)

  18. Development of database and QA systems for post closure performance assessment on a potential HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    In TSPA of long-term post closure radiological safety on permanent disposal of HLW in Korea, appropriate management of input and output data through QA is necessary. The robust QA system is developed using the T2R3 principles applicable for five major steps in R and D's. The proposed system is implemented in the web-based system so that all participants in TSRA are able to access the system. In addition, the internet based input database for TSPA is developed. Currently data from literature surveys, domestic laboratory and field experiments as well as expert elicitation are applied for TSPA

  19. Estimating the Economic Impacts of Recreation Response to Resource Management Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald B.K. English; J. Michael Bowker; John C. Bergstrom; H. Ken Cordell

    1995-01-01

    Managing forest resources involves tradeoffs and making decisions among resource management alternatives. Some alternatives will lead to changes in the level of recreation visitation and the amount of associated visitor spending. Thus, the alternatives can affect local economies. This paper reports a method that can be used to estimate the economic impacts of such...

  20. Development Of Glass Matrices For HLW Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc 99 , Cs 137 , and I 129 . Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  1. HLW immobilization in glass: industrial operation and product quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Leroy, P.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    This extended summary discusses the immobilization of high level wastes from the viewpoint of the quality of the final product, i.e. the HLW glass. The R and D studies comprise 3 steps: glass formulation, glass characterization and long term behaviour studies

  2. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  4. Application of QA to R ampersand D support of HLW programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Quality has always been of primary importance in the research and development (R ampersand D) environment. An organization's ability to attract funds for new or continued research is largely dependent on the quality of past performance. However, with the possible exceptions of peer reviews for fund allocation and the referee process prior to publication, past quality assurance (QA) activities were primarily informal good practices. This resulted in standards of acceptable practice that varied from organization to organization. The increasing complexity of R ampersand D projects and the increasing need for project results to be upheld outside the scientific community (i.e., lawsuits and licensing hearings) are encouraging R ampersand D organizations and their clients to adopt more formalized methods for the scientific process and to increase control over support organizations (i.e., suppliers and subcontractors). This has become especially true for R ampersand D organizations involved in the high-level (HLW) projects for a number of years. The PNL began to implement QA program requirements within a few HLW repository preliminary studies in 1978. In 1985, PNL developed a comprehensive QA program for R ampersand D activities in support of two of the proposed repository projects. This QA program was developed by the PNL QA department with a significant amount of support assistance and guidance from PNL upper management, the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), and the Salt Repository Program Office (SPRO). The QA program has been revised to add a three-level feature and is currently being implemented on projects sponsored by the Office of Geologic Repositories (DOE/OGR), Repository Technology Program (DOE-CH), Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project, and other HLW projects

  5. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  6. Battling Arrow's Paradox to Discover Robust Water Management Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Reed, P. M.; Hadka, D.

    2013-12-01

    This study explores whether or not Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, a theory of social choice, affects the formulation of water resources systems planning problems. The theorem discusses creating an aggregation function for voters choosing from more than three alternatives for society. The Impossibility Theorem is also called Arrow's Paradox, because when trying to add more voters, a single individual's preference will dictate the optimal group decision. In the context of water resources planning, our study is motivated by recent theoretical work that has generalized the insights for Arrow's Paradox to the design of complex engineered systems. In this framing of the paradox, states of society are equivalent to water planning or design alternatives, and the voters are equivalent to multiple planning objectives (e.g. minimizing cost or maximizing performance). Seen from this point of view, multi-objective water planning problems are functionally equivalent to the social choice problem described above. Traditional solutions to such multi-objective problems aggregate multiple performance measures into a single mathematical objective. The Theorem implies that a subset of performance concerns will inadvertently dictate the overall design evaluations in unpredictable ways using such an aggregation. We suggest that instead of aggregation, an explicit many-objective approach to water planning can help overcome the challenges posed by Arrow's Paradox. Many-objective planning explicitly disaggregates measures of performance while supporting the discovery of the planning tradeoffs, employing multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) to find solutions. Using MOEA-based search to address Arrow's Paradox requires that the MOEAs perform robustly with increasing problem complexity, such as adding additional objectives and/or decisions. This study uses comprehensive diagnostic evaluation of MOEA search performance across multiple problem formulations (both aggregated and many

  7. Integrating alternative providers into managed care: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, M

    1997-09-01

    Alternative medical techniques have become extremely popular, particularly in the western United States. Washington State recently enacted a law requiring certain health plans to include alternative providers on their physician panels. The author describes the efforts of one MCO to comply.

  8. The data base management system alternative for computing in the human services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, S; Schkade, L L; Schoech, D

    1983-01-01

    The traditional incremental approach to computerization presents substantial problems as systems develop and grow. The Data Base Management System approach to computerization was developed to overcome the problems resulting from implementing computer applications one at a time. The authors describe the applications approach and the alternative Data Base Management System (DBMS) approach through their developmental history, discuss the technology of DBMS components, and consider the implications of choosing the DBMS alternative. Human service managers need an understanding of the DBMS alternative and its applicability to their agency data processing needs. The basis for a conscious selection of computing alternatives is outlined.

  9. Simulating the Effects of Alternative Forest Management Strategies on Landscape Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Gustafson; Thomas Crow

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative, spatial tools are needed to assess the long-term spatial consequences of alternative management strategies for land use planning and resource management. We constructed a timber harvest allocation model (HARVEST) that provides a visual and quantitative means to predict the spatial pattern of forest openings produced by alternative harvest strategies....

  10. Linking linear programming and spatial simulation models to predict landscape effects of forest management alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Gustafson; L. Jay Roberts; Larry A. Leefers

    2006-01-01

    Forest management planners require analytical tools to assess the effects of alternative strategies on the sometimes disparate benefits from forests such as timber production and wildlife habitat. We assessed the spatial patterns of alternative management strategies by linking two models that were developed for different purposes. We used a linear programming model (...

  11. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  12. Managing Small-Scale Fisheries: Alternative Directions and Methods

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... instructors and students in fishery management; development organizations and ... fishers and fishing communities that wish to take responsibility for managing ... Fikret Berkes is Professor of Natural Resources at the University of Manitoba, ...

  13. HLW disposal by fission reactors; calculation of trans-mutation rate and recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyanto

    1997-01-01

    Transmutation of MA (Minor actinide) and LLFPS (long-lived fission products) into stable nuclide or short-lived isotopes by fission reactors seem to become an alternative technology for HLW disposal. in this study, transmutation rate and recycle calculation were developed in order to evaluate transmutation characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the fission reactors. inventory of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors were determined by solving of criticality equation with 1-D cylindrical geometry of multigroup diffusion equations at the beginning of cycle (BOC). transmutation rate and burn-up was determined by solving of depletion equation. inventory of MA and LLFPs was calculated for 40 years recycle. From this study, it was concluded that characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors can be evaluated by recycle calculation. by calculation of transmutation rate, performance of fission reactor for transmutation of MA or LLFPs can be discussed

  14. Higher Education Change and Its Managers: Alternative Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotho, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on a case study conducted in the context of UK higher education change. The article argues that "change" is a construct created in discourses of change policy and change management, and resulting in reductivist change management discourses which may impede rather than facilitate effective change management in the…

  15. Development of geological disposal system; localization of element cost data and cost evaluation on the HLW repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Sik; Kim, Kil Jung; Yang, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Chun [KOPEC, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    To estimate Total Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) for Korea HLW Repository through localization of element cost data, we review and re-organize each basic element cost data for reference repository system, localize various element cost and finally estimate TSLCC considering economic parameters. As results of the study, TSLCC is estimated as 17,167,689 million won, which includes costs for site preparation, surface facilities, underground facilities and management/integration. Since HLW repository Project is an early stage of pre-conceptual design at present, the information of design and project information are not enough to perform cost estimate and cost localization for the Project. However, project cost structure is re-organized based on the local condition and Total System Life Cycle Cost is estimated using the previous cost data gathered from construction experience of the local nuclear power plant. Project results can be used as basic reference data to assume total construction cost for the local HLW repository and should be revised to more reliable cost data with incorporating detail project design information into the cost estimate in a future. 20 refs. (Author)

  16. Interference of different ionic species on the analysis of phosphate in HLW using spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, P.K.; Ghongane, D.E.; Valsala, T.P.; Sonavane, M.S.; Kulkarni, Y.; Changrani, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    During reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by PUREX process different categories of radioactive liquid wastes like High Level (HL), Intermediate Level (IL) and Low Level (LL) are generated. Different methodologies are adopted for management of these wastes. Since PUREX solvent (30% Tri butyl phosphate-70% Normal Paraffin Hydrocarbon) undergoes chemical degradation in the highly acidic medium of dissolver solution, presence of phosphate in the waste streams is inevitable. Since higher concentrations of phosphate in the HLW streams will affect its management by vitrification, knowledge about the concentration of phosphate in the waste is essential before finalising the glass composition. Since a large number of anionic and cationic species are present in the waste, these species may interfere phosphate analysis using spectrophotometer. In the present work, the interference of different anionic and cationic species on the analysis of phosphate in waste solutions using spectrophotometer was studied

  17. Identification and development of waste management alternatives for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmond, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The European Union Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Directive (2001/42/EC) requires the assessment of likely significant effects on the environment of implementing plans or programmes and reasonable alternatives. While SEA regulations and guidelines emphasize rigour and objectivity in the assessment of alternatives they have little to say on their actual identification. Therefore, criteria should be developed which would aid decision makers in the identification of alternatives appropriate to the tier of decision-making and which meet the objectives of SEA. A methodology is set out in this paper for identifying SEA alternatives for a proposed waste management plan/programme. Specifically, the methodology describes a set of alternatives identification criteria, which will meet the requirements and objectives of SEA and waste management legislation. The outputs from the methodology will help focus on the identification of more sustainable alternatives for waste management planning in Ireland

  18. Final Report Integrated DM1200 Melter Testing Using AZ-102 And C-106/AY-102 HLW Simulants: HLW Simulant Verification VSL-05R5800-1, Rev. 0, 6/27/05

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Gong, W.; Bardakci, T.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Brandys, M.; Kot, W.K.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    comparison, the tests reported here were performed with AZ-102 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants and glass compositions that are essentially the same as those used for recent DM1200 tests. One exception was the use of an alternate, higher-waste-loading C-106/AY-102 glass composition that was used in previous DM100 tests to further evaluate the performance of the optimized bubbler configuration.

  19. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING USING AZ 102 AND C 106/AY-102 HLW SIMULANTS: HLW SIMULANT VERIFICATION VSL-05R5800-1 REV 0 6/27/05

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D' ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    comparison, the tests reported here were performed with AZ-102 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants and glass compositions that are essentially the same as those used for recent DM1200 tests. One exception was the use of an alternate, higher-waste-loading C-106/AY-102 glass composition that was used in previous DM100 tests to further evaluate the performance of the optimized bubbler configuration.

  20. An Intelligent Alternative Approach to the efficient Network Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTÍN, A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing complexity and heterogeneity of networks and services, many efforts have been made to develop intelligent techniques for management. Network intelligent management is a key technology for operating large heterogeneous data transmission networks. This paper presents a proposal for an architecture that integrates management object specifications and the knowledge of expert systems. We present a new approach named Integrated Expert Management, for learning objects based on expert management rules and describe the design and implementation of an integrated intelligent management platform based on OSI and Internet management models. The main contributions of our approach is the integration of both expert system and managed models, so we can make use of them to construct more flexible intelligent management network. The prototype SONAP (Software for Network Assistant and Performance is accuracy-aware since it can control and manage a network. We have tested our system on real data to the fault diagnostic in a telecommunication system of a power utility. The results validate the model and show a significant improvement with respect to the number of rules and the error rate in others systems.

  1. Alternative dispute resolution: a conflict management tool in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, A; Rotarius, T M; Kendall, L

    1997-12-01

    This article focuses on methods of resolving conflict either within or between health care organizations using an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) strategy. After identifying the principal sources of contemporary disagreements within health services settings, the authors describe the basis of ADR. This is followed by a discussion of some common obstacles to settling a dispute. The principal communication guidelines and stages of a mediation session are presented. An alternative dispute resolution framework is proposed that includes an Office of Dispute Resolution (ODR). Also provided is a series of attributes that together comprise the core of mediation as a discipline.

  2. Glass formulation development and testing for the vitrification of DWPF HLW sludge coupled with crystalline silicotitanate (CST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Workman, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    An alternative to the In Tank Precipitation and sodium titanate processes at the Savannah River Site is the removal of cesium, strontium, and plutonium from the tank supernate by ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate (CST). This inorganic material has been shown to effectively and selectively sorb these elements from supernate. The loaded CST could then be immobilized with High-Level Waste (HLW) sludge during vitrification. Initial efforts on the development of a glass formulation for a coupled waste stream indicate that reasonable loadings of both sludge and CST can be achieved in glass

  3. Focusing on clay formation as host media of HLW geological disposal in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing; Chen Shi; Sun Donghui

    2007-01-01

    Host medium is vitally important for safety for HLW geological disposal. Chinese HLW disposal effort in the past decades were mainly focused on granite formation. However, the granite formation has fatal disadvantage for HLW geological disposal. This paper reviews experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community and analyzes key factors affecting the site selection. It is recommended that clay formation should be taken into consideration and additional effort should be made before decision making of host media of HLW disposal in China. (authors)

  4. Effectiveness of alternative management strategies in meeting conservation objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards S. Holthausen; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2007-01-01

    This chapter evaluates how well various management strategies meet a variety of conservation objectives, summarizes their effectiveness in meeting objectives for rare or little-known (RLK) species, and proposes ways to combine strategies to meet overall conservation objectives. We address two broad categories of management strategies. Species approaches result in...

  5. Tapping Alternatives: The Benefits of Managing Urban Water Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegielewski, Benedykt; Baumann, Duane D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the California plan for water demand management. Water conservation techniques are used to balance demand with supply. Discusses the implementation process: (1) water-use and service area analysis; (2) water-use forecasts; (3) benefit-cost analysis; (4) and development of a long-term water management plan. (17 references) (MCO)

  6. Step 7: Choose the "Best" Risk Management Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate purpose of the SRM tactical phase is to choose how to manage risk. Prior to this stage, we determined the sources of risk, identified the relevant management actions and estimated the likelihood of all known outcomes. Next, we combine this information with your personal risk preference...

  7. Siting Process for HLW Repository in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, S.; Kitayama, K.; Umeki, H.; Naito, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the year 2000, the geological disposal program for high-level radioactive waste in Japan moved from the phase of generic research and development (R and D) into the phase of implementation. Following legislation entitled the ''Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act'', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established as the implementing organization. The assigned activities of NUMO include selection of the repository site, demonstration of disposal technology at the site, developing relevant licensing applications and construction, operation and closure of the repository. As the first milestone of siting process, NUMO announced to the public an overall procedure for selection of preliminary investigation areas for potential candidate sites on October 29, 2001. The procedure specifies that NUMO will solicit volunteer municipalities for preliminary investigation areas with publishing four documents as an information package. These documents are tentatively entitled ''Instructions for Application'', ''Siting Factors for the Preliminary Investigation Areas'', a ''Repository Concepts'' as well as an ''Site Investigation Community Outreach Scheme''

  8. The basic corrosion mechanisms of HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradt, R.; Roggendorf, H.; Ostertag, R.

    1986-01-01

    During the years 1975 to 1984, the Commission of the European Communities organized and promoted an R and D programme on the testing and evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms with the purpose of providing a scientific basis for the management and storage of radioactive waste. A fair number of materials were tested under a broad variation of experimental data. The Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Silicatforschung, Wuerzburg, has undertaken to perform a synoptic evaluation of the above data. The purpose of this evaluation is: - to compile the data from the individual national contributors (as presented in the joint annual reports of the EC) with respect to: the materials, or the experimental parameters, or further aspects, and to harmonize them with respect to their presentation, choice of units, etc., - to compare the results to the international state of information, - to elaborate and demonstrate common features of the diverse materials, e.g. common patterns of the corrosion behaviour, - to check the validity of present models, - to define shortcomings and questions that are still open

  9. Alternatives to traditional capitation in managed care agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, K M; Merlino, D J

    1998-04-01

    Risk arrangements typically fall into one of three categories: primary care capitation, professional services capitation, and global, or full-risk, capitation. Yet, in light of various disadvantages associated with these three methods, such as high administrative costs and inappropriate levels of risk assumed by providers, many healthcare payers and providers are experimenting with alternative payment plans. These alternatives include contact capitation arrangements, under which specialists receive a capitation payment on a per referral basis; open-access arrangements, under which patients do not need a gatekeeper referral to see specialists; and capitation arrangements with quality and hospital utilization bonuses, under which specialists and primary care physicians receive a capitation payment plus the potential for bonuses based on quality and utilization criteria.

  10. Low-level waste management alternatives and analysis in DOE`s programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstein, J.S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The PEIS has been divided into an Environmental Restoration section and a Waste Management section. Each section has a unique set of alternatives. This paper will focus on the waste management alternatives and analysis. The set of alternatives for waste management has been divided into waste categories. These categories are: high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, greater-than-class C and low-level waste from commercial sources, hazardous waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This paper will discuss the alternatives and analytical approach that will be used to evaluate these alternatives for the low-level waste section. Although the same alternatives will be considered for all waste types, the analysis will be performed separately for each waste type. In the sections that follow, information will be provided on waste management configurations, the analysis of waste management alternatives, waste types and locations, facility and transportation activities, the facility and transportation impacts assessment, and the compilation of impacts.

  11. Alternative approaches to condition monitoring in freeway management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In response to growing concerns over traffic congestion, traffic management systems have been built in large urban areas in an effort to improve the efficiency and safety of the transportation network. This research effort developed an automated cond...

  12. 12 Flasktransport of vitrified High Level Waste (HLW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdier, A.; Lancelot, J. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France); Gisbertz, A.; Graf, W. [GNS (Germany); Bartagnon, O. [COGEMA (AREVA Group) (France)

    2004-07-01

    The return of HLW to Germany has started in 1996 with the first attribution of 28 glass canisters to German utilities by COGEMA. After several transports comprising 1, 2 and 6 flasks per shipment German and French Authorities requested to transport 12 flasks in a single shipment. The first of these 12-flask-transports was performed with the type CASTOR {sup registered} HAW 20/28 CG flask in 2002 and the second followed in 2003. COGEMA LOGISTICS is responsible for the overall transport assigned by GNS (Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH) being itself entrusted by the German utilities with the return of reprocessing residues.

  13. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, C.T.; Scheffler, K.; Riege, U.

    1978-11-01

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 23 0 C and 115 0 C. (orig.) [de

  14. Rheology of Savannah River site tank 42 HLW radioactive sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of the rheology of the radioactive sludge slurries at the Savannah River Site is necessary in order to ensure that they can be retrieved from waste tanks and processed for final disposal. At Savannah River Site, Tank 42 sludge represents on of the first HLW radioactive sludges to be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The rheological properties of unwashed Tank 42 sludge slurries at various solids concentrations were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells at the Savannah River Technology Center using a modified Haake Rotovisco viscometer

  15. 12 Flasktransport of vitrified High Level Waste (HLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdier, A.; Lancelot, J.; Gisbertz, A.; Graf, W.; Bartagnon, O.

    2004-01-01

    The return of HLW to Germany has started in 1996 with the first attribution of 28 glass canisters to German utilities by COGEMA. After several transports comprising 1, 2 and 6 flasks per shipment German and French Authorities requested to transport 12 flasks in a single shipment. The first of these 12-flask-transports was performed with the type CASTOR registered HAW 20/28 CG flask in 2002 and the second followed in 2003. COGEMA LOGISTICS is responsible for the overall transport assigned by GNS (Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH) being itself entrusted by the German utilities with the return of reprocessing residues

  16. Influence of forest management alternatives and land type on susceptibility to fire in northern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Gustafson; Patrick A. Zollner; Brian R. Sturtevant; S. He Hong; David J. Mladenoff

    2004-01-01

    We used the LANDIS disturbance and succession model to study the effects of six alternative vegetation management scenarios on forest succession and the subsequent risk of canopy fire on a 2791 km2 landscape in northern Wisconsin, USA. The study area is a mix of fire-prone and fire-resistant land types. The alternatives vary the spatial...

  17. Evaluation of management alternatives for LWR hulls and caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudon, L.; Mehling, O.; Cecille, L.; Thiels, G.; Kowa, S.

    1993-01-01

    Hulls and caps resulting from the reprocessing of LWR spent fuels represent one of the major sources of alpha-bearing solid waste generated during the nuclear fuel cycle. The Commission of the European Communities has undertaken considerable R and D efforts on the development of advanced treatment and conditioning methods for this type of waste. In view of the encouraging results achieved, the Commission launched a theoretical assessment study on cladding waste management. Six practical or potential schemes were identified and elaborated: direct cementation, decontamination prior to cementation, rolling before cementation, rolling followed by embedding in graphite, compaction, and melting in a cold crucible. The economic aspects of each management option were also investigated. This included the assessment of the plant (treatment, conditioning and interim storage), transport and disposal costs. Further consideration will be required to define the best management option for 'cap' wastes. Transport and disposal costs will also require further analysis from an industrial standpoint

  18. Design element alternatives for stress-management intervention websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reg A; Gatien, Gary; Hagerty, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Typical public and military-sponsored websites on stress and depression tend to be prescriptive. Some require users to complete lengthy questionnaires. Others reproduce printed flyers, papers, or educational materials not adapted for online use. Some websites require users to follow a prescribed path through the material. Stress Gym was developed as a first-level, evidence-based, website intervention to help U.S. military members learn how to manage mild to moderate stress and depressive symptoms using a self-help intervention with progress tracking and 24/7 availablility. It was designed using web-based, health-management intervention design elements that have been proven effective and users reported they prefer. These included interactivity, self-pacing, and pleasing aesthetics. Users learned how to manage stress by accessing modules they choose, and by practicing proven stress management strategies interactively immediately after login. Test results of Stress Gym with Navy members demonstrated that it was effective, with significant decreases in reported perceived stress levels from baseline to follow-up assessment. Stress Gym used design elements that may serve as a model for future websites to emulate and improve upon, and as a template against which to compare and contrast the design and functionality of future online, health-intervention websites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using alternate wetting & drying (AWD) rice flooding management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research has shown that Mid-South producers can properly adapt and manage AWD, so as to reduce irrigation use while having no negative impact on grain yield. In addition to helping to reduce demand for groundwater, up to one gallon of diesel fuel may be saved for every acre-inch of groundwater that ...

  20. Traditional medicines and alternative practice in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was aimed at identifying Ghanaian traditional medicines used for the management of prostate diseases and their constituents. Reviews of studies conducted on them are also presented. Methodology: This was a prospective study. Traditional Medicine samples from consecutive patients with either ...

  1. Choosing among waste management alternatives: relevant criteria and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharefkin, M.

    1976-01-01

    Two broad goals of nuclear waste management are cost effectiveness (economic efficiency) and intratemporal/intertemporal fairness or equity (not imposing unreasonable burdens on future generations). These two goals are conflicting, and their trade-off is the subject of this paper

  2. Traditional medicines and alternative practice in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    main business district of Accra, were visited and traditional medicines for the management of prostate diseases ac- ... This was the constituent in four products (Uro 500®, UR-Quick mixture®, Prostacure® ... Herbal medicine, botanical medicine or phytomedicine ... along with quality clinical research supporting the value.

  3. Alternatives for managing post LWR reactor nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The two extremes in the LWR fuel cycle are discarding the spent fuel and recycling the U and Pu to the maximum extent possible. The waste volumes from the two alternatives are compared. A preliminary evaluation is made of the technology available for handling wastes from each step of the fuel cycle. The wastes considered are fuel materials, high--level wastes, other liquids, combustible and non-combustible solids, and non--high--level wastes. Evaluation of processing gaseous wastes indicates that technology is available for capture of Kr and I 2 , but further development is needed for T 2 . Technology for interim storage and geological isolation is considered adequate. An outline is given of the steps in the selection of a final storage site

  4. The chemical stockpile intergovernmental consultation program: Lessons for HLW public involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the appropriateness of the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program's (CSDP) Intergovernmental Consultation and Coordination Boards (ICCBs) as models for incorporating public concerns in the future siting of HLW repositories by DOE. ICCB structure, function, and implementation are examined, along with other issues relevant to the HLW context. 27 refs

  5. Comparison of risks due to HLW and SURF repositories in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.Y.; Ortiz, N.R.; Wahi, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology was developed for use in the analysis of risks from geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. This methodology is applied to two conceptual nuclear waste repositories in bedded salt containing High-Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Un-Reprocessed Fuel (SURF), respectively. A comparison of the risk estimated from the HLW and SURF repositories is presented

  6. Spent fuel and HLW transportation the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    With 53 nuclear power plants in operation at EDF and a fuel cycle with recycling policy of the valuable materials, COGEMA is faced with the transport of a wide range of radioactive materials. In this framework, the transport activity is a key link in closing the fuel cycle. COGEMA has developed a comprehensive Transport Organization System dealing with all the sectors of the fuel cycle. The paper will describe the status of transportation of spent fuel and HLW in France and the experience gathered. The Transport Organization System clearly defines the role of all actors where COGEMA, acting as the general coordinator, specifies the tasks to be performed and brings technical and commercial support to its various subcontractors: TRANSNUCLEAIRE, specialized in casks engineering and transport operations, supplies packaging and performs transport operations, LEMARECHAL and CELESTIN operate transport by truck in the Vicinity of the nuclear sites while French Railways are in charge of spent fuel transport by train. HLW issued from the French nuclear program is stored for 30 years in an intermediate storage installation located at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Ultimately, these canisters will be transported to the disposal site. COGEMA has set up a comprehensive transport organization covering all operational aspects including adapted procedures, maintenance programs and personnel qualification

  7. Melter Throughput Enhancements for High-Iron HLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gan, Hoa [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Chaudhuri, Malabika [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-26

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations in order to increase glass melting rates in high waste loading glass formulations for HLW with high concentrations of iron. Testing was designed to identify glass and melter feed formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts to assess melt rate using a vertical gradient furnace system and to develop new formulations with enhanced melt rate. Testing evaluated the effects of waste loading on glass properties and the maximum waste loading that can be achieved. The results from crucible-scale testing supported subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass and feed formulations on waste processing rate and product quality. The DM100 was selected as the platform for these tests due to its extensive previous use in processing rate determination for various HLW streams and glass compositions.

  8. Diversity Management Change Projects: In Need of Alternative Conceptual Approaches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Evans

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a meta-analysis of an evaluation of a European Social Fund project aimed at enhancing employment opportunities for women in Information Technology, Electronic and Computing (ITEC, this paper critically debates how effectual a diversity management approach alone is as an underpinning rationale for change in the complex area of diversity. The paper draws on the experiences of ‘partner organizations’, gathered through interviews conducted during the evaluation stage of the project. The paper discusses some of the tensions experienced by partner organizations, thus providing new insights into why such projects are not as effectual as they might be. The paper concludes by presenting a case for the need to re-conceptualise how change as part of a wider diversity management approach might best be conceptualized. We suggest that a ‘systems approach’ could prove a more fruitful way of conceptualizing change of this nature given the inter-dependences between different organizations and institutions.

  9. ERVA - AREVAs Alternative Way for Spare Parts Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, H.

    2014-07-01

    The availability of equipment and systems in power plants throughout the life of the plant is a key challenge for plant operators. Therefore, the management of spare parts during the entire life cycle of a plant is of particular importance. In order to maintain the functionality of the equipment without retrofit or re-design it is important to have original parts available for use or to ensure there is adequate stock available for the future. (Author)

  10. Managing Small-Scale Fisheries : Alternative Directions and Methods

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Managing Small-scale Fisheries va plus loin que le champ d'application de la gestion classique des pêches pour aborder d'autres concepts, outils, méthodes et ... Les gestionnaires des pêches, tant du secteur public que du secteur privé, les chargés de cours et les étudiants en gestion des pêches, les organisations et les ...

  11. Aviation Management Perception of Biofuel as an Alternative Fuel Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marticek, Michael

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore lived experiences and perceptions from a population of 75 aviation managers in various locations in Pennsylvania about the use of aviation biofuel and how it will impact the aviation industry. The primary research question for this study focused on the impact of biofuel on the airline industry and how management believes biofuel can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel. Grounded in the conceptual framework of sustainability, interview data collected from 27 airline and fueling leaders were analyzed for like terms, coded, and reduced to 3 themes. Data were organized and prioritized based on frequency of mention. The findings represented themes of (a) flight planning tools, (b) production, and (c) costs that are associated with aviation fuel. The results confirmed findings addressed in the literature review, specifically that aviation biofuel will transform the airline industry through lower cost and production. These findings have broad applicability for all management personnel in the aviation industry. Implications for social change and improved business environments could be realized with a cleaner environment, reduced fuel emissions, and improved air quality.

  12. Value Chain Development as Alternative Method For Mapping Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Hakim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid Waste management begin at the household as waste of consumption and ended as a new form of waste product or recycling. Based on its value chain the subsequent process will have distict differences with manufacturing product. Value chain of manufacturing product will characterize as value added chain along the chain, where every side of the chain will generate positive chain. In the other hand, some parties of waste management value chain will negative value existed. Some parties in this chain will generate negative value solely because they must establish some cost for wipe the waste. Dissimilarities between value chain on product and waste will contribute to discrepancy between parties. Main purpose of this research is to identify value chain from solid waste management using value chain development. Another purpose to accomplished is to resolve discrepancy in value chain.  Research results shown that household is the parties that experiences negative value. To minimize the discrepancies there should be an action towards household

  13. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

  14. Waste management R ampersand D Quality Assurance: An alternative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosseau, D.A.; Harlan, C.P.; Cochrell, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development and initial implementation of a Quality Assurance (QA) Program for technical activities associated with assessing compliance of an existing DOE nuclear waste site with applicable environmental regulations. The requirements for establishing the QA program are defined, along with the approach and emphasis used to develop the program. The structure of the program and the various levels of QA plans and procedures are briefly discussed. Initial implementation efforts are summarized. The QA program was developed by and for the project participants and was structured according to the major technical requirements of the project. The QA plans and procedures are written for the convenience and use of the technical staff and not merely to satisfy auditor expectations. Every effort was made to avoid an 18-point approach typical of many QA programs patterned after the dictates of the industry recognized ''national consensus standards.'' Flexibility is emphasized due to the nature of the research and development activities associated with the technical program. Recommendations are provided for using this alternative approach to QA program development for similar technical efforts elsewhere. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  15. Knowledge management: Postgraduate Alternative Evaluation Model (MAPA in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deisy Cristina Corrêa Igarashi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian stricto sensu postgraduate programs that include master and / or doctorate courses are evaluated by Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES - Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior. The evaluation method used by CAPES is recognized in national and international context. However, several elements of the evaluation method can be improved. For example: to consider programs diversity, heterogeneity and specificities; to reduce subjectivity and to explain how indicators are grouped into different dimensions to generate a final result, which is scoring level reached by a program. This study aims to analyze the evaluation process by CAPES, presenting questions, difficulties and objections raised by researchers. From the analysis, the study proposes an alternative evaluation model for postgraduate (MAPA - Modelo de Avaliação para Pós graduação Alternativo which incorporates fuzzy logic in result analysis to minimize limitations identified. The MAPA was applied in three postgraduate programs, allowing: (1 better understanding of procedures used for the evaluation, (2 identifying elements that need regulation, (3 characterization of indicators that generate local evaluation, (4 support in medium and long term planning.

  16. Alternative processes for managing existing commercial high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    A number of alternatives are discussed for managing high-level radioactive waste presently stored at the West Valley, New York, plant owned by Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. These alternatives (liquid storage, conversion to cement, shale fracturing, shale cement, calcination, aqueous silicate, conversion to glass, and salt cake) are limited to concepts presently under active investigation by ERDA. Each waste management option is described and examined regarding the status of the technology; its applications to managing NFS waste; its advantages and disadvantages; the research and development needed to implement the option; safety considerations; and estimated costs and time to implement the process

  17. Thinning alternatives for forest management; Metsaenkasvatus ja harvennusvaihtoehdot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielikaeinen, K; Hirvelae, H; Haerkoenen, K; Malinen, J [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-11-01

    The amount of economically producible energy wood, the effects of energy wood harvesting on the development of forests, and the changes required by harvesting of energy wood on the forest processing instructions at the area of the Forestry Board of Central Ostrobothnia were investigated. The calculations were made using the Metsaelaskelma (Forest calculation) MELA program. At the energy wood production cost level 45 FIM/MWh, and when the energy wood competes with the industrial wood, the annual energy wood accumulation was about 120 000 m{sup 3}, which would be sufficient for three heating plants using about 100 000 m{sup 3} of chips annually. Even if the fellings of industrial wood would remain on the low level of the beginning of 1990`s the harvesting of energy wood would not become much higher than this. By harvesting of energy wood it is impossible to effect on the forestry state and the future development of the Finnish forests remarkably before the separate harvesting of energy wood becomes profitable. Harvesting of felling residues from spruce predominant final cutting sites and integrated harvesting of pine predominant first thinning forests would be more profitable harvesting methods than the separate harvesting. On the basis of the information on the future net income obtained from the forests, the harvesting of the energy wood seemed, however, to be a profitable alternative. Harvesting of energy wood was not observed to effect on the forest cultivation models remarkably because the harvesting of energy wood was just a small fragment of the complete forest processing chain (first thinning phase) studied, and the economical profitability controlled the thinnings strongly independently on where the wood was utilized. (author)

  18. Financial Management of Economic Entity from the Perspective of Alternative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Munteanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the study the financial management presented is divided into three directions, namely financial analysis, financial planning and financial strategy, focusing on increasing the quality of financial management conducted at the economic entity by identifying an easier possible use for a system of alternative decisions in order to increase the profitability. The study also aims to identify new meanings of financial accounting information system in performing the managerial act through alternative decisions, trying to highlight the need to create a management tool generator of variants possible to be adopted with an impact on their application in the economic entity as a whole. Based on qualitative research on the financial management act, it is revealed the importance of the financial management act manifested in the economic entity and also its quality improvement through simulations targeting the management through budget system.

  19. Cost-effective management alternatives for Snake River Chinook salmon: a biological-economic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsing, David L; Moore, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    The mandate to increase endangered salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin of North America has created a complex, controversial resource-management issue. We constructed an integrated assessment model as a tool for analyzing biological-economic trade-offs in recovery of Snake River spring- and summer-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We merged 3 frameworks: a salmon-passage model to predict migration and survival of smolts; an age-structured matrix model to predict long-term population growth rates of salmon stocks; and a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine a set of least-cost management alternatives for achieving particular population growth rates. We assessed 6 individual salmon-management measures and 76 management alternatives composed of one or more measures. To reflect uncertainty, results were derived for different assumptions of effectiveness of smolt transport around dams. Removal of an estuarine predator, the Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia), was cost-effective and generally increased long-term population growth rates regardless of transport effectiveness. Elimination of adult salmon harvest had a similar effect over a range of its cost estimates. The specific management alternatives in the cost-effective set depended on assumptions about transport effectiveness. On the basis of recent estimates of smolt transport effectiveness, alternatives that discontinued transportation or breached dams were prevalent in the cost-effective set, whereas alternatives that maximized transportation dominated if transport effectiveness was relatively high. More generally, the analysis eliminated 80-90% of management alternatives from the cost-effective set. Application of our results to salmon management is limited by data availability and model assumptions, but these limitations can help guide research that addresses critical uncertainties and information. Our results thus demonstrate that linking biology and economics through integrated models can

  20. Risk assessment for the off-site transportation of high-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers risks to collective populations and individuals under both routine and accident transportation conditions for truck and rail shipment modes. The report discusses the scope of the HLW transportation assessment, describes the analytical methods used for the assessment, defines the alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, and details important assessment assumptions. Results are reported for five alternatives. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific areas of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis on how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives

  1. Policy and practice of radioactive waste management in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder Radzhan, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Indian program on radioactive waste management comprising two main variants: engineering subsurface repositories for low- and intermediate-level wastes and deep geological formations for alpha-bearing and high-level wastes (HLW) is presented. One of the problems deals with the matrices with improved properties for HLW inclusion. The other aspect concerns development of management with alpha-emitting radionuclides in HLW. Special attention is paid to the problems of safety

  2. Feasibility of Target Material Recycling as Waste Management Alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.; Wilson, P.; Henderson, D.; Varuttamaseni, A.

    2004-01-01

    The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management include disposal in repositories, recycling, or clearance from regulatory control, following a reasonable cooling period. This paper concerns the feasibility of recycling the heavy-ion-beam targets, in particular the hohlraum wall materials that include, for example, Au/Gd, Au, W, Pb, Hg, Ta, Pb/Ta/Cs, Hg/W/Cs, Pb/Hf, Hf, solid Kr, and solid Xe. The choice between target material disposal and recycling depends on the amount of waste generated relative to the nuclear island, the strategy to solve the recycling problem, and the impact of the additional cost and complexity of the recycling process on the overall machine. A detailed flow diagram for the elements of the recycling process was developed to analyze two extreme activation cases: (a) one-shot use and then disposal in a repository and (b) recycling continuously during plant life without removal of transmutation products. Metrics for comparing the two scenarios included waste level, dose to recycling equipment, additional cost, and design complexity. Comparing the two approaches indicated a preference for the one-shot scenario as it generates 1 m 3 /yr of extremely low-level waste (Class A) and offers attractive design and economics features. Recycling reduces the target waste stream by a factor of 10 or more but introduces additional issues. It may produce high-level waste, requires remote handling, adds radioactive storage facilities, and increases the cost and complexity of the plant. The inventory analysis indicated that the heavy-ion-beam (HIB) target materials represent a very small waste stream compared to that of the nuclear island (<1% of the total waste). This means recycling is not a 'must' requirement for IFE-HIB power plants unless the target materials have cost and/or resource problems (e.g., Au and Gd). In this

  3. DETERMINATION OF HLW GLASS MELT RATE USING X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.; Miller, D.; Immel, D.

    2011-10-06

    , a significant amount of glassy material interspersed among the gas bubbles will be excluded, thus underestimating the melt rate. Likewise, if they are drawn too high, many large voids will be counted as glass, thus overestimating the melt rate. As will be shown later in this report, there is also no guarantee that a given distribution of glass and gas bubbles along a particular sectioned plane will always be representative of the entire sample volume. Poor reproducibility seen in some LMR data may be related to these difficulties of the visual method. In addition, further improvement of the existing melt rate model requires that the overall impact of feed chemistry on melt rate be reflected on measured data at a greater quantitative resolution on a more consistent basis than the visual method can provide. An alternate method being pursued is X-ray computed tomography (CT). It involves X-ray scanning of glass samples, performing CT on the 2-D X-ray images to build 3-D volumetric data, and adaptive segmentation analysis of CT results to not only identify but quantify the distinct regions within each sample based on material density and morphologies. The main advantage of this new method is that it can determine the relative local density of the material remaining in the beaker after the heat treatment regardless of its morphological conditions by selectively excluding all the voids greater than a given volumetric pixel (voxel) size, thus eliminating much of the subjectivity involved in the visual method. As a result, the melt rate data obtained from CT scan will give quantitative descriptions not only on the fully-melted glass, but partially-melted and unmelted feed materials. Therefore, the CT data are presumed to be more reflective of the actual melt rate trends in continuously-fed melters than the visual data. In order to test the applicability of X-ray CT scan to the HLW glass melt rate study, several new series of HLW simulant/frit mixtures were melted in the

  4. RECENT PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HLW THROUGHPUT AT THE DWPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, C

    2007-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the world's largest operating high level waste (HLW) vitrification plant, began stabilizing about 35 million gallons of SRS liquid radioactive waste by-product in 1996. The DWPF has since filled over 2000 canisters with about 4000 pounds of radioactive glass in each canister. In the past few years there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process and therefore minimized process upsets and thus downtime. These improvements, which include glass former optimization, increased waste loading of the glass, the melter heated bellows liner, and glass surge protection software, will be discussed in this paper

  5. Demonstration of pyrometallurgical processing for metal fuel and HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadafumi, Koyama; Kensuke, Kinoshita; Takatoshi, Hizikata; Tadashi, Inoue; Ougier, M.; Rikard, Malmbeck; Glatz, J.P.; Lothar, Koch

    2001-01-01

    CRIEPI and JRC-ITU have started a joint study on pyrometallurgical processing to demonstrate the capability of this type of process for separating actinide elements from spent fuel and HLW. The equipment dedicated for this experiments has been developed and installed in JRC-ITU. The stainless steel box equipped with tele-manipulators is operated under pure Ar atmosphere, and prepared for later installation in a hot cell. Experiments on pyro-processing of un-irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal alloy fuel by molten salt electrorefining has been carried out. Recovery of U and Pu from this type alloy fuel was first demonstrated with using solid iron cathode and liquid Cd cathode, respectively. (author)

  6. Development of gap filling technique in HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Saito, Akira; Ishii, Takashi; Toguri, Satohito; Okihara, Mitsunobu; Iwasa, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    HLW is supposed to be disposed underground at depths more than 300 m in Japan. Buffer is an artificial barrier that controls radionuclides migrating into the groundwater. The buffer would be made of a natural swelling clay, bentonite. Construction technology for the buffer has been studied for many years, but studies for the gaps surrounding the buffer are little. The proper handling of the gaps is important for guaranteeing the functions of the buffer. In this paper, gap filling techniques using bentonite pellets have been developed in order to the gap having the same performance as the buffer. A new method for manufacturing high-density spherical pellets has been developed to fill the gap higher density ever reported. For the bentonite pellets, the filling performance and how to use were determined. And full-scale filling tests provided availability of the bentonite pellets and filling techniques. (author)

  7. The comparison of alternatives for nuclear spent fuel management using multi-attribute utility function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J. W.; Kang, C. S.

    1999-01-01

    It is necessary to find a solution immediately to nuclear spent fuel management that is temporarily stored in on-site spent fuel storage before the saturation of the storage. However the choice of alternative for nuclear spent fuel management consists of complex process that are affected by economic, technical and social factors. And it is not easy to quantify these factors; public opinion, probability of diplomatic problem and contribution to development of nuclear technology. Therefore the analysis of the affecting factors and assessment of alternatives are required. This study performed the comparison of the alternatives for nuclear spent fuel management using MAU (Multi-Attribute Utility Function) and AHP(Analytic Hierarchy Process)

  8. Setting up a safe deep repository for long-lived HLW and ILW in Russia: Current state of the works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, Yu.D.; Porsov, A.Yu.; Beigul, V.P.; Palenov, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of RW disposal in Russia in accordance with the Federal Law 'On Radioactive Waste Management and Amendments to Specific Legal Acts of the Russian Federation' No. 190-FL dated 11 July 2011, is oriented at the ultimate disposal of waste, without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. The law 190-FL has it as follows: - A radioactive waste repository is a radioactive waste storage facility intended for disposal of the radioactive wastes without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. - Disposal of solid long-lived high-level waste and solid long-lived intermediate-level waste is carried out in deep repositories for radioactive waste. - Import into the Russian Federation of radioactive waste for the purpose of its storage, processing and disposal, except for spent sealed sources of ionising radiation originating from the Russian Federation, is prohibited. For safe final disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW, it is planned to construct a deep repository for radioactive waste (DRRW) in a low-pervious monolith rock massif in the Krasnoyarsk region in the production territory of the Mining and Chemical Combine (FSUE 'Gorno-khimicheskiy kombinat'). According to the IAEA recommendations and in line with the international experience in feasibility studies for setting up of HLW and SNF underground disposal facilities, the first mandatory step is the construction of an underground research laboratory. An underground laboratory serves the following purposes: - itemised research into the characteristics of enclosing rock mass, with verification of massive material suitability for safe disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW; - research into and verification of the isolating properties of an engineering barrier system; - development of engineering solutions and transportation and process flow schemes for construction and running of a future RW ultimate isolation facility. (authors)

  9. Methods and Algorythms of Alternatives Ranging in Managing the Telecommunication Services Guality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Quang Hiep

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with methods of solving the problem of ranging of alternatives in information-analytical system of managing the quality of telecommunication services rendering process. Tasks of choice are determined, in which the alternatives are as follows: states of quality of different objects in the structure of telecommunication company management. An algorithm of ranging of objects is elaborated for the case of using unstructured set of indices. The algorithm enables to determine the objects priorities and to select the best ones among them. The suggested methods may be used while elaborating the programs of improvement of telecommunication companies competitiveness.

  10. High-level waste management technology program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs

  11. High-level waste management technology program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Using the baseline environmental management report (BEMR) to examine alternate program scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristofferson, K.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) released the first Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) in March, 1995. The Congressionally-mandated report provides life-cycle cost estimates, tentative schedules, and projected activities necessary to complete DOE's Environmental Management Program. This ''base case'' estimate is based on current program assumptions and the most likely set of activities. However, since the future course of the Environmental Management Program depends upon a number of fundamental technical and policy choices, alternate program scenarios were developed. These alternate cases show the potential cost impacts of changing assumptions in four key areas: future land use, program funding and scheduling, technology development, and waste management configurations. Several cost and program evaluation tools were developed to support the analysis of these alternate cases. The objective of this paper is to describe the analytical tool kit developed to support the development of the 1995 Baseline Report and to discuss the application of these tools to evaluate alternate program scenarios

  13. Using expert judgments to explore robust alternatives for forest management under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniels, Timothy; Mills, Tamsin; Gregory, Robin; Ohlson, Dan

    2012-12-01

    We develop and apply a judgment-based approach to selecting robust alternatives, which are defined here as reasonably likely to achieve objectives, over a range of uncertainties. The intent is to develop an approach that is more practical in terms of data and analysis requirements than current approaches, informed by the literature and experience with probability elicitation and judgmental forecasting. The context involves decisions about managing forest lands that have been severely affected by mountain pine beetles in British Columbia, a pest infestation that is climate-exacerbated. A forest management decision was developed as the basis for the context, objectives, and alternatives for land management actions, to frame and condition the judgments. A wide range of climate forecasts, taken to represent the 10-90% levels on cumulative distributions for future climate, were developed to condition judgments. An elicitation instrument was developed, tested, and revised to serve as the basis for eliciting probabilistic three-point distributions regarding the performance of selected alternatives, over a set of relevant objectives, in the short and long term. The elicitations were conducted in a workshop comprising 14 regional forest management specialists. We employed the concept of stochastic dominance to help identify robust alternatives. We used extensive sensitivity analysis to explore the patterns in the judgments, and also considered the preferred alternatives for each individual expert. The results show that two alternatives that are more flexible than the current policies are judged more likely to perform better than the current alternatives on average in terms of stochastic dominance. The results suggest judgmental approaches to robust decision making deserve greater attention and testing. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Alternative approaches for better municipal solid waste management in Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathi, Sarika

    2006-01-01

    Waste is an unavoidable by product of human activities. Economic development, urbanization and improving living standards in cities, have led to an increase in the quantity and complexity of generated waste. Rapid growth of population and industrialization degrades the urban environment and places serious stress on natural resources, which undermines equitable and sustainable development. Inefficient management and disposal of solid waste is an obvious cause of degradation of the environment in most cities of the developing world. Municipal corporations of the developing countries are not able to handle increasing quantities of waste, which results in uncollected waste on roads and in other public places. There is a need to work towards a sustainable waste management system, which requires environmental, institutional, financial, economic and social sustainability. This study explores alternative approaches to municipal solid waste (MSW) management and estimates the cost of waste management in Mumbai, India. Two alternatives considered in the paper are community participation and public private partnership in waste management. Data for the present study are from various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and from the private sector involved in waste management in Mumbai. Mathematical models are used to estimate the cost per ton of waste management for both of the alternatives, which are compared with the cost of waste management by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM). It is found that the cost per ton of waste management is Rs. 1518 (US$35) with community participation; Rs. 1797 (US$41) with public private partnership (PPP); and Rs. 1908 (US$44) when only MCGM handles the waste. Hence, community participation in waste management is the least cost option and there is a strong case for comprehensively involving community participation in waste management

  15. Formalizing expert knowledge to compare alternative management plans: sociological perspective to the future management of Baltic salmon stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haapasaari, Päivi Elisabet; Karjalainen, Timo P.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and implementing long-term management plans is difficult both because of the complexity of the fisheries system, and the behaviour of humans. We compared four alternative management plans for the Baltic salmon stocks through approaching experts who interpreted and expressed the views of d...... net provides potential for creating a holistic picture of a fishery by combining the data describing fishers’ commitment with biological data regarding fish stock dynamics and with economic data analyzing economically sound fisheries management.......Designing and implementing long-term management plans is difficult both because of the complexity of the fisheries system, and the behaviour of humans. We compared four alternative management plans for the Baltic salmon stocks through approaching experts who interpreted and expressed the views...... of different stakeholder groups on the options. The focus of the study was on stakeholders’ commitment to the alternative management plans. Committing enhances the probability of achieving the ultimate objective of a plan, while if stakeholders do not commit, the effects of the plan may be less predictable...

  16. Grouping of HLW in partitioning for B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment with neutron reactors based on three criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, Mulyanto; Kitamoto, Asashi

    1995-01-01

    A grouping concept of HLW in partitioning for B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment by fission reactor was developed in order to improve the disposal in waste management from the safety aspect. The selecting and grouping concept was proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (Np, Am, and unrecovered U and Pu), Group MA2 (Cm, and trace quantity of Cf, etc.), Group A (Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remains of HLW), judging from the three criteria for B/T treatment, based on (1) the concept of the potential risk estimated by the hazard index for long-term tendency based on ALI (2) the concept of the relative dose factor related to the adsorbed migration rate transferred through ground water, and (3) the concept of the decay acceleration factor, the burning and/or transmutation characteristics for recycle B/T treatment. (author)

  17. Waste management project’s alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Sotirchos, Anastasios; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examine the evaluation of a waste management project’s alternatives. ► We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. ► In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project’s alternatives. ► Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers’ risk preferences is examined. ► Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project’s alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives’ B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project’s alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers’ risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

  18. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A. A.; Matlack, Keith S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Kot, Wing K.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-01-01

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts

  19. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.

  20. White pine blister rust in northern ldaho and western Montana: alternatives for integrated management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan K. Hagle; Geral I. McDonald; Eugene A. Norby

    1989-01-01

    This report comprises a handbook for managing western white pine in northern ldaho and western Montana, under the threat of white pine blister rust. Various sections cover the history of the disease and efforts to combat it, the ecology of the white pine and Ribes, alternate host of the rust, and techniques for evaluating the rust hazard and attenuating it. The authors...

  1. Long-term strategies for flood risk management: scenario definition and strategic alternative design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de K.; Klijn, F.; McGahey, C.; Mens, M.; Wolfert, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    This report reviews some mainstream existing methods of scenario development and use, as well as experiences with the design and assessment of strategic alternatives for flood risk management. Next, a procedure and methods are proposed and discussed. Thirdly, the procedure and methods are tried on

  2. Adminsitrator Perception of Management Skills Comparing Traditionally and Alternatively Certified Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Candi Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Within the scientific literature there has been no examination of teacher preparation regarding classroom and behavior management skills comparing educators who obtained traditional teacher certification through a university-based education program and those who obtained alternative certification. Consequently, the goal of this study was to assess…

  3. Study of alternative methods for the management of liquid scintillation counting wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche-Farmer, L.

    1980-02-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Waste Disposal Site in Richland, Washington, is the only radioactive waste disposal facility that will accept liquid scintillation counting wastes (LSCW) for disposal. That site is scheduled to discontinue receiving LSCW by the end of 1982. This document explores alternatives presently available for management of LSCW: evaporation, distillation, solidification, conversion, and combustion

  4. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles: Resources for Fleet Managers (Clean Cities) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, A.

    2011-04-01

    A discussion of the tools and resources on the Clean Cities, Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, and the FuelEconomy.gov Web sites that can help vehicle fleet managers make informed decisions about implementing strategies to reduce gasoline and diesel fuel use.

  5. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  6. 77 FR 36485 - Alternative Personnel Management System (APMS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... also identify waiver language needed to retain the original system feature of an extended probationary... comments to Amy K. Cubert, Supervisory Human Resources Specialist, National Institute of Standards and... period, a feature of the original demonstration project and subsequent Alternative Personnel Management...

  7. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 11, Alphabetically indexed bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  8. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 12, Numerically indexed bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

  9. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 4, Appendix B: RDF technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix contains background information, technical descriptions, economic data, mass and energy balances, and information on environmental releases for the refuse derived fuels (RDF) option in municipal solid waste management alternatives. Demonstration programs at St. Louis, Missouri; Franklin, Ohio; and Delaware are discussed. Information on pellet production and cofiring with coal is also presented.

  10. Technical Evaluation Report 24: Open Source Software: an alternative to costly Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Depow

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This is the first in a series of two reports discussing the use of open source software (OSS and free software (FS in online education as an alternative to expensive proprietary software. It details the steps taken in a Canadian community college to download and install the Linux Operating System in order to support an OSS/ FS learning management system (LMS.

  11. Performance Assessment Uncertainty Analysis for Japan's HLW Program Feasibility Study (H12)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BABA, T.; ISHIGURO, K.; ISHIHARA, Y.; SAWADA, A.; UMEKI, H.; WAKASUGI, K.; WEBB, ERIK K.

    1999-01-01

    Most HLW programs in the world recognize that any estimate of long-term radiological performance must be couched in terms of the uncertainties derived from natural variation, changes through time and lack of knowledge about the essential processes. The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute followed a relatively standard procedure to address two major categories of uncertainty. First, a FEatures, Events and Processes (FEPs) listing, screening and grouping activity was pursued in order to define the range of uncertainty in system processes as well as possible variations in engineering design. A reference and many alternative cases representing various groups of FEPs were defined and individual numerical simulations performed for each to quantify the range of conceptual uncertainty. Second, parameter distributions were developed for the reference case to represent the uncertainty in the strength of these processes, the sequencing of activities and geometric variations. Both point estimates using high and low values for individual parameters as well as a probabilistic analysis were performed to estimate parameter uncertainty. A brief description of the conceptual model uncertainty analysis is presented. This paper focuses on presenting the details of the probabilistic parameter uncertainty assessment

  12. Legal precedents regarding use and defensibility of risk assessment in Federal transportation of SNF and HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, E.J. Jr.; Bentz, C.B.; O'Hora, T.D.; Chen, S.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Risk assessment has become an increasingly important and essential tool in support of Federal decision-making regarding the handling, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This paper analyzes the current statutory and regulatory framework and related legal precedents with regard to SNF and HLW transportation. The authors identify key scientific and technical issues regarding the use and defensibility of risk assessment in Federal decision-making regarding anticipated shipments

  13. The experiment of affective web risk communication on HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Akihide; Yoshikawa, Eiwa; Wakabayashi, Yasunaga; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Uda, Akinobu; Ito, Kyoko

    2006-01-01

    Dialog mode web contents regarding the HLW risk is effective to altruism. To make it more effectively, we introduced affective elements such as facial expression of character agents and sympathetic response on the BBS by experts, which brought us smooth risk communication. This paper describes the result of preliminary experiments surrounding the affective ways to communicate on the risk of HLW geological disposal, leading to enhance the social cooperation, and the public open experiment for one month on the Web. (author)

  14. Nuclide transport models for HLW repository safety assessment in Finland, Japan, Sweden, and Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Myoung; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Kim, Sung Gi; Koh, Won Il

    1997-10-01

    Disposal and design concepts in such countries as Sweden, Finland, Canada and Japan which have already published safety assessment reports for the HLW repositories have been reviewed mainly in view of nuclide transport models used in their assessment. This kind of review would be very helpful in doing similar research in Korea where research program regarding HLW has been just started. (author). 44 refs., 2 tabs., 30 figs

  15. Regional economic impacts of current and proposed management alternatives for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Lynne; Sexton, Natalie; Ishizaki, Asuka; Ritten, John

    2013-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP). The CCP must describe the desired future conditions of a refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. Charles M. Russell (CMR) National Wildlife Refuge, located in north-central Montana, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the CCP. The CCP for the Refuge must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed refuge-management strategies. For refuge CCP planning, an economic analysis provides a means of estimating how current management (No Action Alternative) and proposed management activities (Alternatives) affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of information: (1) it illustrates a refuge’s contribution to the local community; and (2) it can help in determining whether economic effects are or are not a real concern in choosing among management alternatives. It is important to note that the economic value of a refuge encompasses more than just the impacts on the regional economy. Refuges also provide substantial nonmarket values (values for items not exchanged in established markets) such as maintaining endangered species, preserving wetlands, educating future generations, and adding stability to the ecosystem (Carver and Caudill, 2007). However, quantifying these types of nonmarket values is beyond the scope of this study. This report first presents a description of the local community and economy near the Refuge. Next, the methods used to conduct a regional economic impact analysis are described. An analysis of the final CCP management strategies that could affect stakeholders and residents and the local economy is then presented. The refuge management activities of economic concern in this analysis are:

  16. Environmental risk assessment: its contribution to criteria development for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.M.; Little, R.H.; Watkins, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Principles for radioactive waste management have been provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Safety Series No.111-F, which was published in 1995. This has been a major step forward in the process of achieving acceptance for proposals for disposal of radioactive waste, for example, for High Level Waste disposal in deep repositories. However, these principles have still to be interpreted and developed into practical radiation protection criteria. Without prejudicing final judgements on the acceptability of waste proposals, an important aspect is that practical demonstration of compliance (or the opposite) with these criteria must be possible. One of the IAEA principles requires that radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way as to provide an acceptable level of protection of the environment. There has been and continues to be considerable debate as to how to demonstrate compliance with such a principle. This paper briefly reviews the current status and considers how experience in other areas of environmental protection could contribute to criteria development for HLW disposal

  17. Environmental and other evaluations of alternatives for long-term management of stored INEL transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This study identifies, develops, and evaluates, in a preliminary manner, alternatives for long-term management of TRU waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the INEL. The evaluations concern waste currently at the RWMC and waste expected to be received by the beginning of the year 1985. The effects of waste that might be received after that date are addressed in an appendix. The technology required for managing the waste, the environmental effects, the risks to the public, the radiological and nonradiological hazards to workers, and the estimated costs are discussed

  18. Environmental and other evaluations of alternatives for long-term management of stored INEL transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    This study identifies, develops, and evaluates, in a preliminary manner, alternatives for long-term management of TRU waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the INEL. The evaluations concern waste currently at the RWMC and waste expected to be received by the beginning of the year 1985. The effects of waste that might be received after that data are addressed in an appendix. The technology required for managing the waste, the environmental effects, the risks to the public, the radiological and nonradiological hazards to workers, and the estimated costs are discussed

  19. Environmental and other evaluations of alternatives for long-term management of stored INEL transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    This study identifies, develops, and evaluates, in a preliminary manner, alternatives for long-term management of TRU waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the INEL. The evaluations concern waste currently at the RWMC and waste expected to be received by the beginning of the year 1985. The effects of waste that might be received after that date are addressed in an appendix. The technology required for managing the waste, the environmental effects, the risks to the public, the radiological and nonradiological hazards to workers, and the estimated costs are discussed.

  20. Vermicomposting and anaerobic digestion – viable alternative options for terrestrial weed management – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath Saha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of terrestrial weed is of great concern for the scientific community as these weeds cause adverse effect in different ecosystems like forest, agriculture and urban. The widespread of these weeds by their adaptive capability and morphological advancement is difficult to control. Parthenium hysterophorous, Lantana camara, Saccharum spontaneum, Ageratum conyzoides are the weeds that spread all over the world. There are various management practices employed for the control of this weeds. But all of these practices have some drawbacks those are neither environment friendly nor economical. In this paper a review has been done to evaluate various alternative management practices for these terrestrial weeds and to analyze their feasibility. Vermicomposting and anaerobic digestion can be viable alternative option which is cost effective as well. There are few studies regarding vermicomposting and anaerobic digestions of terrestrial weeds are done.

  1. Stress analysis of HLW containers advanced test work Compas project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. This document describes the activities performed between June and August 1989 forming the advanced test work phase of this project. This is the culmination of two years' analysis and test work to demonstrate whether the analytical ability exists to model containers subjected to realistic loads. Three mild steel containers were designed and manufactured to be one-third scale models of a realistic HLW container, modified to represent the effect of anisotropic loading and to facilitate testing. The containers were tested under a uniform external pressure and all failed by buckling in the mid-body region. The outer surface of each container was comprehensively strain-gauged to provide strain history data at all positions of interest. In parallel with the test work, Compas project partners, from five different European countries, independently modelled the behaviour of each of the containers using their computer codes to predict the failure pressure and produce strain history data at a number of specified locations. The first axisymmetric container was well modelled but predictions for the remaining two non-axisymmetric containers were much more varied, with differences of up to 50% occurring between failure predictions and test data

  2. Thermal analysis of the vertical disposal for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Honggang; Wang Ju; Liu Yuemiao; Su Rui

    2013-01-01

    The temperature on the canister surface is set to be no more than 100℃ in the high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository, it is a criterion to dictate the thermal dimension of the repository. The factors that affect the temperature on the canister surface include the initial power of the canister, the thermal properties of material as the engineered barrier system (EBS), the gaps around the canister in the EBS, the initial ground temperature and thermal properties of the host rock, the repository layout, etc. This article examines the thermal properties of the material in host rock and the EBS, the thermal conductivity properties of the different gaps in the EBS, the temperature evolution around the single canister by using the analysis method and the numerical method. The findings are as follows: 1) The most important and the sensitive parameter is the initial disposal power of the canister; 2) The two key factors that affect the highest temperature on the canister surface are the parameter of uncertainty and nature variability of material as the host rock and the EBS, and the gaps around the canister in the EBS; 3) The temperature difference between the canister and bentonite is no more than 10℃ , and the bigger the inner gaps are, the bigger the temperature difference will be; when the gap between the bentonite and the host rock is filled with water, the temperature difference becomes small, but it will be 1∼3℃ higher than the gaps filled will air. (authors)

  3. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers intermediate testwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. This document describes the series of experiments and associated calculations performed in the Intermediate testwork phase of this project. Seven mild steel, one-third scale simplified models of HLW containers were manufactured in a variety of configurations of geometry and weld type. The effects of reducing the wall thickness, corroding the external surface of the container, and using different welding methods were all investigated. The containers were tested under the action of a uniform external pressure up to their respective failure points. All containers failed by buckling at pressures of between 42 and 87 MPa dependent upon the particular geometric and weld configuration. The outer surface of each container was comprehensively strain-gauged in order to provide strain histories at positions of interest. The Compas project partners, from five different European countries, independently modelled the behaviour of three of the five different containers. Test results and computer predictions were compared and an assessment of the overall performance of the codes demonstrated good agreement in the initial loading of each container. However once stresses exceeded the material yield point there was a considerable spread in the predicted container behaviour

  4. Rheology of Savannah River Site Tank 51 HLW radioactive sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.

    1993-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 51 HLW radioactive sludge represents a major portion of the first batch of sludge to be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The rheological properties of Tank 51 sludge will determine if the waste sludge can be pumped by the current DWPF process cell pump design and the homogeneity of melter feed slurries. The rheological properties of Tank 51 sludge and sludge/frit slurries at various solids concentrations were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells Operations (SCO) at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) using a modified Haake Rotovisco viscometer system. Rheological properties of Tank 51 radioactive sludge/Frit 202 slurries increased drastically when the solids content was above 41 wt %. The yield stresses of Tank 51 sludge and sludge/frit slurries fall within the limits of the DWPF equipment design basis. The apparent viscosities also fall within the DWPF design basis for sludge consistency. All the results indicate that Tank 51 waste sludge and sludge/frit slurries are pumpable throughout the DWPF processes based on the current process cell pump design, and should produce homogeneous melter feed slurries

  5. Tc Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy S.; Conradsen, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    Tc complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that long-term consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges we are conducting a research program to study to develop thermodynamic data on Tc-organic complexation over a wide range of chemical conditions. We will attempt to characterize Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques to validate our model. On the basis of such studies we will develop credible model of Tc chemistry in HLW that will allow prediction of Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  6. 'Practicality' as a key constraint to HLW repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Kazumi; Sakabe, Yasushi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Designs of repositories in Japan for HLW have focused very much on demonstration of post-closure safety. Safety can be assured using very simple assessment techniques, which make many conservative simplifications. Such a situation is reasonable for the early stages of generic concept demonstration, but becomes less appropriate as NUMO moves towards siting, where a number of issues involved with construction and operation of a repository - generally grouped together as 'practicality'. The engineering logistics and conventional safety of repository construction and operation have been relatively little studied and present major challenges. Current designs emphasise a minimum of infrastructure in the emplacement tunnels and remote-handled operation. This would be difficult enough, but such operations need to be carried out to strict quality limits and need to be robust in the event of equipment failure or disruptive events. The paper will first examine how designs can be modified from the viewpoint of logistics. The implications of such modifications on operational robustness and associated safety in case of perturbation scenarios are then considered. (author)

  7. Progress of the research and development on the geological disposal technology of HLW with aid of the industry/university collaboration system and fixed term researcher system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Fumitaka; Sonobe, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), various systems associated with the collaboration with industries and universities on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and the Postdoctoral Fellow system, etc. are enacted. These systems have been operated considering the needs of JAEA's program, industry and academia, resultantly contributed, for example, to basic research and the project development. The activities under these collaboration systems contain personal exchanges, the publication of the accomplishments and utilization of those, in research and development concerning geological disposal technology of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). These activities have progressed in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), which are the successive predecessors of JAEA, through JAEA. The accomplishments from these systems have been not only published as papers in journals and individual technical reports but also integrated into the project reports, accordingly contributed to the advancement of the national program on the geological disposal of HLW. In this report, the progress of the research and development under these systems was investigated from the beginning of the operation of the systems. The contribution to the research and development on geological disposal technology of HLW was also studied. On the basis of these studies, the future utilization of the systems of the collaboration was also discussed from the view point of the management of research and development program. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  8. Environmental consequences to water resources from alternatives of managing spent nuclear fuel at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, G.; McDonald, J.P.; Sato, C.

    1994-11-01

    With an environmental restoration and waste management program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in developing policies pertinent to the transport, storage, and management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The DOE Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Programmatic SNF management is documented in a Volume 1 report, which contains an assessment of the Hanford installation, among others. Because the Hanford installation contains approximately 80% of the SNF associated with the DOE complex, it has been included in the decision for the ultimate disposition of the fuel. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a series of assessments on five alternatives at Hanford for managing the SNF: No-Action, Decentralization, 1992/1993 Planning Basis, Regionalization, and Centralization. The environmental consequences associated with implementing these assessment alternatives potentially impact socioeconomic conditions; environmental quality of the air, groundwater, surface water, and surface soil; ecological, cultural, and geological resources; and land-use considerations. The purpose of this report is to support the Programmatic SNF-EIS by investigating the environmental impacts associated with water quality and related consequences, as they apply to the five assessment alternatives at the Hanford installation. The results of these scenarios are discussed and documented

  9. A multi-criteria decision analysis of management alternatives for anaerobically digested kraft pulp mill sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Eikelboom

    Full Text Available The Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA procedure was used to compare waste management options for kraft pulp mill sludge following its anaerobic digestion. Anaerobic digestion of sludge is advantageous because it produces biogas that may be used to generate electricity, heat and biofuels. However, adequate management of the digested sludge is essential. Landfill disposal is a non-sustainable waste management alternative. Kraft pulp mill digested sludge applied to land may pose risks to the environment and public health if the sludge has not been properly treated. This study is aimed to compare several recycling alternatives for anaerobically digested sludge from kraft pulp mills: land application, landfill disposal, composting, incineration, pyrolysis/gasification, and biofuel production by algae. The MCDA procedure considered nine criteria into three domains to compare digested sludge recycling alternatives in a kraft pulp mill: environmental (CO2 emission, exposure to pathogens, risk of pollution, material and energy recovery, economic (overall costs, value of products and technical (maintenance and operation, feasibility of implementation. The most suitable management options for digested sludge from kraft pulp mills were found to be composting and incineration (when the latter was coupled with recycling ash to the cement industry. Landfill disposal was the worst option, presenting low performance in feasibility of implementation, risk of pollution, material and energy recovery.

  10. A multi-criteria decision analysis of management alternatives for anaerobically digested kraft pulp mill sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, Martijn; Lopes, Alice do Carmo Precci; Silva, Claudio Mudadu; Rodrigues, Fábio de Ávila; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2018-01-01

    The Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) procedure was used to compare waste management options for kraft pulp mill sludge following its anaerobic digestion. Anaerobic digestion of sludge is advantageous because it produces biogas that may be used to generate electricity, heat and biofuels. However, adequate management of the digested sludge is essential. Landfill disposal is a non-sustainable waste management alternative. Kraft pulp mill digested sludge applied to land may pose risks to the environment and public health if the sludge has not been properly treated. This study is aimed to compare several recycling alternatives for anaerobically digested sludge from kraft pulp mills: land application, landfill disposal, composting, incineration, pyrolysis/gasification, and biofuel production by algae. The MCDA procedure considered nine criteria into three domains to compare digested sludge recycling alternatives in a kraft pulp mill: environmental (CO2 emission, exposure to pathogens, risk of pollution, material and energy recovery), economic (overall costs, value of products) and technical (maintenance and operation, feasibility of implementation). The most suitable management options for digested sludge from kraft pulp mills were found to be composting and incineration (when the latter was coupled with recycling ash to the cement industry). Landfill disposal was the worst option, presenting low performance in feasibility of implementation, risk of pollution, material and energy recovery. PMID:29298296

  11. Simulating post-wildfire forest trajectories under alternative climate and management scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarancón, Alicia Azpeleta; Fulé, Peter Z; Shive, Kristen L; Sieg, Carolyn H; Meador, Andrew Sánchez; Strom, Barbara

    Post-fire predictions of forest recovery under future climate change and management actions are necessary for forest managers to make decisions about treatments. We applied the Climate-Forest Vegetation Simulator (Climate-FVS), a new version of a widely used forest management model, to compare alternative climate and management scenarios in a severely burned multispecies forest of Arizona, USA. The incorporation of seven combinations of General Circulation Models (GCM) and emissions scenarios altered long-term (100 years) predictions of future forest condition compared to a No Climate Change (NCC) scenario, which forecast a gradual increase to high levels of forest density and carbon stock. In contrast, emissions scenarios that included continued high greenhouse gas releases led to near-complete deforestation by 2111. GCM-emissions scenario combinations that were less severe reduced forest structure and carbon stock relative to NCC. Fuel reduction treatments that had been applied prior to the severe wildfire did have persistent effects, especially under NCC, but were overwhelmed by increasingly severe climate change. We tested six management strategies aimed at sustaining future forests: prescribed burning at 5, 10, or 20-year intervals, thinning 40% or 60% of stand basal area, and no treatment. Severe climate change led to deforestation under all management regimes, but important differences emerged under the moderate scenarios: treatments that included regular prescribed burning fostered low density, wildfire-resistant forests composed of the naturally dominant species, ponderosa pine. Non-fire treatments under moderate climate change were forecast to become dense and susceptible to severe wildfire, with a shift to dominance by sprouting species. Current U.S. forest management requires modeling of future scenarios but does not mandate consideration of climate change effects. However, this study showed substantial differences in model outputs depending on climate

  12. Limited Participative Management as a Problem-Solving Alternative for Library Managers: A Decade in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Glenn R.

    The derivation of the concept of participative management from a variety of complementary managerial and motivational theories, and its acceptance and use as a managerial technique in library administration are reviewed in detail. The major contributions to the development of the concept of participative management, including Maslow's hierarchy of…

  13. Strategy for safety case development: impact of a volunteering approach to siting a japanese HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, K.; Ishiguro, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Tsuchi, H.; Kato, T.; Sakabe, Y.; Wakasugi, K.

    2008-01-01

    NUMO strategy for safety case development is constrained by a staged siting approach, which has been initiated by a call for volunteer municipalities to host the HLW repository. For each site, the safety case is an important factor to be considered at the selection steps which narrow down towards the preferred repository location. This is particularly challenging, however, as every site requires a tailored repository concept, with associated performance assessment and an individual site evaluation programme all of which evolve with gradually increasing understanding of the host environment. In order to maintain flexibility without losing focus, NUMO has developed a formalized tailoring procedure, termed the NUMO Structured Approach (NSA). The NSA guides the interaction of the key site characterisation, repository design and performance assessment groups and is facilitated by tools to help the decision making associated with the tailoring process (e.g. a requirements management system) and with comparison of siting and design options (e.g. multi-attribute analysis). Pragmatically, the post-closure safety case will initially emphasize near-field processes and a robust engineering barrier system, considering the limited geological information at early stages. This will be complemented by a more realistic assessment of total system performance, as needed to compare options. In addition, efforts to rigorously assess operational phase safety and the practicality of assuring quality of the constructed engineered barriers are components of the total safety case which are receiving particular attention now, as they may better discriminate between sites while information is still limited. (authors)

  14. "Always work with a straight back": the fallacies of modern management and the alternative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Verner C.

    2005-01-01

    -organisation and value-based leadership. Design/methodology/approach - Practical examples are used to discuss and demonstrate the problematic consequences of using management tools like detailed work descriptions, standards, comprehensive measurement schemes, and rule-based specifications of responsibility. Constructed...... examples and emerging theoretical concepts are used to discuss and propose an alternative to the use of such tools. Findings - The discussion indicates that the use of detailed work descriptions, standards, comprehensive measurement schemes, and rule-based specifications of responsibility will result......Purpose - The purpose of this article is to show that the tools of modern management which are supposed to promote effectiveness, efficiency and responsible behaviour, may in fact contribute to the opposite, and to present the outline of an alternative based upon new ideas of self...

  15. A Comparison of Traditional and Alternative Certification Routes on Classroom Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Uriegas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Texas, there are different ways teachers can attain certification. Thus, teachers are entering the classroom through various certification routes with varying levels of training as the traditional and alternative programs differ in their requirements. Classroom management can determine the success or failure of teachers and students. The research involved in this study attempted to determine whether university-certified teachers differ from alternatively certified teachers in the area of classroom management as determined by referrals, while controlling for level of education, years of teaching experience, age, race, and gender at both middle and high school levels. The population for this study was the middle and high school teachers in one rural south central Texas school district. Data were collected from the school district’s personnel database as well as from the campus-level administrators. Hierarchical regressions were used to test null hypotheses and recommendations were suggested.

  16. Evaluation of alternative waste management schemes for LWR hulls and caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudon, L.; Cecille, L.; Klein, M.; Kowa, S.; Mehling, O.; Thiels, G.

    1990-01-01

    LWR hulls and caps represent one of the major sources of α bearing solid waste generated in the nuclear fuel cycle. For this reason, the CEC launched a theoretical study to evaluate alternative schemes for the overall management of this waste. Both volume reduction techniques and α decontamination of the hulls were assessed. The study demonstrated that the transport and disposal of the conditioned waste in deep geological formations play a dominant part in the total management costs. Important cost savings can be achieved through the implementation of efficient volume reduction techniques, i.e. melting or compaction. As an alternative approach, exhaustive α decontamination of the hulls appears promising, provided that the conditioned waste can be made to comply with the disposal criteria of mines. Finally, prolongation of the interim storage period for the waste packages from 1 to 30 years may prove beneficial on the transport costs

  17. Radiation doses in alternative commercial high-level waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Lavender, J.C.; Daling, P.M.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the commercial high-level waste management system, potential changes are being considered that will augment the benefits of an integral monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that alternative options could be implemented in the authorized waste management system (i.e., without an integral MRS facility) to potentially achieve some of the same beneficial effects of the integral MRS system. This paper summarizes those DOE-sponsored analyses related to radiation doses resulting from changes in the waste management system. This report presents generic analyses of aggregated radiation dose impacts to the public and occupational workers, of nine postulated changes in the operation of a spent-fuel management system without an MRS facility

  18. Alternative Center of emergency Management; Centro alternativo de gestion de la emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turrion Lopez, F.

    2013-07-01

    Requirements and general considerations The alternative Center for emergency management (CAGE) is the project engineering and construction that have operating NPPS Spanish in December 2015. It will allow to support the Organization of response to Emergencies, combining the continuity of mitigation actions of the accident with rest and protection of staff, accommodating such executions. Depending on the State of the plant and the evolution of the emergency. The CSN and UNESA have been progressively defined the detailed criteria that has of design CAGE.

  19. Supraglottic devices as alternative equipment to airway management in state of sudden cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Czyż

    2017-08-01

    All of supraglottic devices are characterized by easiness in applying without experience in use them. Additionally time need to airway management in use of them is many times shorter than with traditional endotracheal intubation. Fundamental defect in these devices is a fact that they don’t provide total safety before aspiration for chime. Current literature shows us that supraglottic airway devices are perfect alternative to endotracheal intubation.

  20. Complementary and alternative approaches used by parents of children with epilepsy on epilepsy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işler, Ayşegül; Turan, Fatma Dilek; Gözüm, Sebahat; Oncel, Selma

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the complementary and alternative approaches used by parents of children with epilepsy on epilepsy management. This descriptive study included a total of 304 parents of children with epilepsy aged between 0 and 18years evaluated at the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Akdeniz University Hospital in Turkey between January and May 2013. Data were collected by using a questionnaire developed by the researchers. It was determined that all the parents use complementary and alternative approaches for their children with epilepsy, and the most common approaches are praying (99.3%); keeping their children away from the effects of smoking (79.8%); feeding their children walnuts (79.6%), butter (59.2%), and bone marrow (58.6%); providing their children with good quality sleep (58.6%); and enabling their children to play games (51%). The approaches commonly applied during seizures include praying (96.2%), comforting their children in their arms and showing affection (55.6%), waiting for seizures to finish at home (45.7%), and laying children on their side (41.1%). Of parents, 98% stated that alternative approaches enable them to control their child's seizures, 100% said that alternative approaches have no adverse effect, and 98.4% stated that they will continue to use these approaches. The children's approaches to cope with epilepsy included looking after pets (72.7%), listening to music (70.1%), watching television (64.5%), playing games (55.3%), praying (51%), and spending time with friends (48.7%). Most of the approaches used by parents and children with epilepsy for the management of illness are determined to consist of complementary approaches that may contribute to management of epilepsy. Knowing the approaches of parents and children with epilepsy that could adversely affect disease management is important for educating parents and children to avoid these potentially harmful interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. An assessment of alternative agricultural management practice impacts on soil carbon in the corn belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnwell, T.O. Jr.; Jackson, R.B.; Mulkey, L.A. [Environmental Research Laboratory, Athens, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This impact of alternative management practices on agricultural soil C is estimated by a soil C mass balance modeling study that incorporates policy considerations in the analysis. A literature review of soil C modeling and impacts of management practices has been completed. The models selected for use and/or modification to meet the needs of representing soil C cycles in agroecosystems and impacts of management practices are CENTURY and DNDC. These models share a common ability to examine the impacts of alternative management practices on soil organic C, and are readily accessible. An important aspect of this effort is the development of the modeling framework and methodology that define the agricultural production systems and scenarios (i.e., crop-soil-climate combinations) to be assessed in terms of national policy, the integration of the model needs with available databases, and the operational mechanics of evaluating C sequestration potential with the integrated model/database system. We are working closely with EPA`s Office of Policy and Program Evaluation to define a reasonable set of policy alternatives for this assessment focusing on policy that might be affected through a revised Farm Bill, such as incentives to selectively promote conservation tillage, crop rotations, and/or good stewardship of the conservation reserve. Policy alternatives are translated into basic data for use in soil C models through economic models. These data, including such elements as agricultural practices, fertilization rates, and production levels are used in the soil C models to produce net carbon changes on a per unit area basis. The unit-area emissions are combined with areal-extent data in a GIS to produce an estimate of total carbon and nitrogen changes and thus estimate greenhouse benefits.

  2. Alternative management structures for municipal waste collection services: The influence of economic and political factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plata-Díaz, Ana María, E-mail: amplata@ugr.es; Zafra-Gómez, José Luis, E-mail: jlzafra@ugr.es; Pérez-López, Gemma, E-mail: gemmapl@ugr.es; López-Hernández, Antonio Manuel, E-mail: alopezh@ugr.es

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We analyzed the factors that influence on the restructuring of MSW services. • We evaluated five different alternatives for public and private service. • Our analysis covers a broad time horizon, 2002–2010. • We used a conditional fixed-effects logistic regression as the evaluation method. • Municipalities tend to contract out the MSW service in the presence of high costs and fiscal stress. - Abstract: Identifying and characterising the factors that determine why a local authority opts for a particular way of managing its waste collection service is an important issue, warranting research interest in the field of municipal solid waste (MSW) management. This paper presents empirical evidence spanning a broad time horizon (2002–2010) showing that economic and political factors impact in different ways on the provision of waste management services. We examine five alternatives in this area, including public and private service delivery formulas and, within each field, individual and joint options. Our findings highlight the importance of the service cost and that of the various indicators of fiscal stress as determinant factors of management decisions regarding the provision of MSW management services.

  3. Alternative management structures for municipal waste collection services: The influence of economic and political factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plata-Díaz, Ana María; Zafra-Gómez, José Luis; Pérez-López, Gemma; López-Hernández, Antonio Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyzed the factors that influence on the restructuring of MSW services. • We evaluated five different alternatives for public and private service. • Our analysis covers a broad time horizon, 2002–2010. • We used a conditional fixed-effects logistic regression as the evaluation method. • Municipalities tend to contract out the MSW service in the presence of high costs and fiscal stress. - Abstract: Identifying and characterising the factors that determine why a local authority opts for a particular way of managing its waste collection service is an important issue, warranting research interest in the field of municipal solid waste (MSW) management. This paper presents empirical evidence spanning a broad time horizon (2002–2010) showing that economic and political factors impact in different ways on the provision of waste management services. We examine five alternatives in this area, including public and private service delivery formulas and, within each field, individual and joint options. Our findings highlight the importance of the service cost and that of the various indicators of fiscal stress as determinant factors of management decisions regarding the provision of MSW management services

  4. Project Entsorgungsnachweis, 'Demonstration of disposal feasibility for SF/HLW/ILW in the Opalinus Clay of the Zuercher Weinland', Background, Objectives and Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Juerg; Zuidema, P.

    2004-01-01

    Juerg Schneider (Nagra, Switzerland) described the project on the Opalinus Clay (Project Entsorgungsnachweis, demonstration of disposal feasibility for SF/HLW/ILW in the Opalinus Clay of the Zuercher Weinland) for which the main objective is to demonstrate disposal feasibility and to provide input to the decision how to proceed. The report structure was described, the focus of the presentation being the report that aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of long-term safety. The current situation was described in the presentation as follows: - The key need is to provide arguments for having proposed a good system for which there is sufficient understanding to allow a credible safety evaluation. - Alternative options exist, on which attention is maintained by a task-force. However, Nagra is confident in its results on Project Entsorgungsnachweis, given the knowledge base that currently exists, and has put forward a proposal, for consideration by the Swiss Government, to focus future work on the Opalinus Clay (OPA) of the Zuercher Weinland. - Making the safety case requires a proper integration of science, engineering and safety assessment. - Three key issues were identified in making a safety case: completeness, sufficient safety, and robustness to diminish the importance of uncertainties. - A safety case needs to be adequate to support a decision to proceed to the next stage in the programme, with multiple arguments including the existence of reserve FEP's. - The interacting functions of the relevant teams were viewed as a key component of the process of preparing a safety case: management; science; safety assessment; bias audit. During the discussion, the role of the bias team was recognised as being helpful to ensure completeness, as well as using the NEA FEP database as a check list. When speaking about sufficient safety, it should not imply predictive capability but rather that there is enough confidence in the current level of understanding to

  5. Regional economic analysis of current and proposed management alternatives for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Lynne; Sexton, Natalie; Donovan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge (refuge) is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the refuge must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed refuge management strategies. The purpose of this study was to assess the regional economic implications associated with draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies. Special interest groups and local residents often criticize a change in refuge management, especially if there is a perceived negative impact to the local economy. Having objective data on economic impacts may show that these fears are overstated. Quite often, the extent of economic benefits a refuge provides to a local community is not fully recognized, yet at the same time the effects of negative changes is overstated. Spending associated with refuge recreational activities, such as wildlife viewing and hunting, can generate considerable tourist activity for surrounding communities. Additionally, refuge personnel typically spend considerable amounts of money purchasing supplies in local stores, repairing equipment and purchasing fuel at the local service stations, and reside and spend their salaries in the local community. For refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic assessment provides a means of estimating how current management (no action alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) could affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of

  6. Using Epidemiological Principles to Explain Fungicide Resistance Management Tactics: Why do Mixtures Outperform Alternations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderfield, James A D; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco J; van den Bosch, Frank; Cunniffe, Nik J

    2018-07-01

    Whether fungicide resistance management is optimized by spraying chemicals with different modes of action as a mixture (i.e., simultaneously) or in alternation (i.e., sequentially) has been studied by experimenters and modelers for decades. However, results have been inconclusive. We use previously parameterized and validated mathematical models of wheat Septoria leaf blotch and grapevine powdery mildew to test which tactic provides better resistance management, using the total yield before resistance causes disease control to become economically ineffective ("lifetime yield") to measure effectiveness. We focus on tactics involving the combination of a low-risk and a high-risk fungicide, and the case in which resistance to the high-risk chemical is complete (i.e., in which there is no partial resistance). Lifetime yield is then optimized by spraying as much low-risk fungicide as is permitted, combined with slightly more high-risk fungicide than needed for acceptable initial disease control, applying these fungicides as a mixture. That mixture rather than alternation gives better performance is invariant to model parameterization and structure, as well as the pathosystem in question. However, if comparison focuses on other metrics, e.g., lifetime yield at full label dose, either mixture or alternation can be optimal. Our work shows how epidemiological principles can explain the evolution of fungicide resistance, and also highlights a theoretical framework to address the question of whether mixture or alternation provides better resistance management. It also demonstrates that precisely how spray tactics are compared must be given careful consideration. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  7. Complementary and alternative therapies for management of odor in malignant fungating wounds: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gethin G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Georgina Gethin,1 Caroline McIntosh,2 Sebastian Probst3 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, National University of Ireland, Galway, 2Discipline of Podiatric Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland; 3School of Health, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland Abstract: Malignant fungating wounds (MFWs affect an estimated 5%–10% of all people with cancer. They have a profound effect on the individual, and their associated symptoms such as bleeding, odor, exudate, and pain cause much distress, anxiety, and social isolation. Odor is cited by patients and clinicians as the worst aspect of such wounds. Strategies to manage odor at the wound site include the use of complementary and alternative therapies. This review aimed to synthesize the current evidence for the use of complementary and alternative therapies in the management of odor in MFWs. No restrictions on date, language, or care setting were applied. Nine databases were searched yielding four papers meeting our criteria. Of the four papers, one was a randomized controlled trial (RCT, and three were case studies. Two papers investigated the use of green tea teabags as a secondary dressing, while others used essential oils either combined with a cream applied directly to the wound or as a secondary dressing. In an RCT, green tea was used as a solution to cleanse the wound followed by the application of green tea teabag as a secondary dressing versus metronidazole powder for the management of odor over 7 days. All patients reported a reduction in odor and physical discomfort, and an improvement in social interaction and appetite, but the difference between groups was not statistically significant. The case studies all reported an improvement in odor management. The use of complementary and alternative therapies in the management of MFW-associated malodor is not supported by evidence from RCTs. Green tea may have potential as a secondary dressing to

  8. Provider and patient perspectives on opioids and alternative treatments for managing chronic pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Lauren S; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; DeBar, Lynn L; Elder, Charles; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Current literature describes the limits and pitfalls of using opioid pharmacotherapy for chronic pain and the importance of identifying alternatives. The objective of this study was to identify the practical issues patients and providers face when accessing alternatives to opioids, and how multiple parties view these issues. Qualitative data were gathered to evaluate the outcomes of acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) services for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) using structured interview guides among patients with CMP (n = 90) and primary care providers (PCPs) (n = 25) purposively sampled from a managed care health care system as well as from contracted community A/C providers (n = 14). Focus groups and interviews were conducted patients with CMP with varying histories of A/C use. Plan PCPs and contracted A/C providers took part in individual interviews. All participants were asked about their experiences managing chronic pain and experience with and/or attitudes about A/C treatment. Audio recordings were transcribed and thematically coded. A summarized version of the focus group/interview guides is included in the Additional file 1. We identified four themes around opioid use: (1) attitudes toward use of opioids to manage chronic pain; (2) the limited alternative options for chronic pain management; (3) the potential of A/C care as a tool to help manage pain; and (4) the complex system around chronic pain management. Despite widespread dissatisfaction with opioid medications for pain management, many practical barriers challenged access to other options. Most of the participants' perceived A/C care as helpful for short term pain relief. We identified that problems with timing, expectations, and plan coverage limited A/C care potential for pain relief treatment. These results suggest that education about realistic expectations for chronic pain management and therapy options, as well as making A/C care more easily accessible, might lead to more

  9. Management functions, issues, and configuration alternatives: TO support a transportation management configuration study: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the safe transporation and disposal of spent nuclear fuel from utility-owned nuclear power generation reactors and high-level radioactive waste from both defense and civilian generators to long-term storage repositories. Given the volume, duration, and sensitivity of the operation, DOE is seeking not only the safest and best transportation system but also the most effective and resource-efficient management concept. Within the general guidelines of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 calling for the fullest possible use of private industry contracts, this study examines the technical and administrative functions as well as the key issues to be addressed in the formation of a management structure. In order to stand alone as a comprehensive treatment of the total requirement, the material contained in many seperate and sometimes divergent DOE/OCRWM documents was evaluated and is compiled here. An attempt was made to succinctly define the nature of the problem, the objectives and scope of both the operating and management systems, and then to dissect the functions required in order to meet the objectives and operating functions are listed and described

  10. Human-in-the-Loop Assessment of Alternative Clearances in Interval Management Arrival Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Wilson, Sara R.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Johnson, William C.; Roper, Roy D.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Goess, Paul A.; Shay, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) was a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment conducted to explore the Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) Concept of Operations (ConOps), which combines advanced arrival scheduling, controller decision support tools, and aircraft avionics to enable multiple time deconflicted, efficient arrival streams into a high-density terminal airspace. Interval Management (IM) is designed to support the ATD-1 concept by having an "Ownship" (IM-capable) aircraft achieve or maintain a specific time or distance behind a "Target" (preceding) aircraft. The IM software uses IM clearance information and the Ownship data (route of flight, current location, and wind) entered by the flight crew, and the Target aircraft's Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast state data, to calculate the airspeed necessary for the IM-equipped aircraft to achieve or maintain the assigned spacing goal.

  11. Transmural coil embolization—alternative technique for management of arterial perforation during subintimal angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan Damodharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subintimal angioplasty of lower limb arterial occlusion carries a relatively higher risk of vessel perforation compared to transluminal angioplasty. Vessel perforation is a potentially life threatening complication which requires prompt recognition and management. They are usually managed by endovascular techniques such as low-pressure balloon tamponade, covered stents, and coil embolization of the ruptured artery. We describe a technique of treating vessel perforation following balloon angioplasty. Patient developed a large perforation of the proximal superficial femoral artery (SFA after balloon inflation during subintimal angioplasty of complete SFA occlusion. Following failure of balloon tamponade in sealing the perforation, we successfully treated it by deploying an embolization coil at the site of perforation through the vessel wall followed by balloon tamponade. Our technique could be a useful relatively inexpensive alternative treatment option in the management of vessel perforation compared to covered stents.

  12. First-line managers' experiences of alternative modes of funding in elderly care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsson, Helen; Korjonen, Susanne Eriksson; Rosengren, Kristina

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe first-line managers' experiences of alternative modes of funding elderly care in two communities in western Sweden. A growing elderly population demands alternative modes of funding elderly care for better outcomes for patients and better efficiency as it is publicly funded through taxation. The study comprised a total of eight semi-structured interviews with first-line managers working within elderly care. The interviews were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Respect for the individuals was a main concern in the study. One category, quality improvement, and four subcategories freedom of choice, organisational structure, quality awareness and market forces effects were identified to describe first-line managers' experiences of the operation of elderly care. Quality improvement was an important factor to deal with when elderly care was operated in different organisational perspectives, either private or public. The first-line manager is a key person for developing a learning organisation that encourages both staff, clients and their relatives to improve the organisation. Moreover, person-centred care strengthens the client's role in the organisation, which is in line with the government's goal for the quality improvement of elderly care. However, further research is needed on how quality improvement could be developed when different caregivers operate in the same market in order to improve care from the elderly perspective. This study highlights alternative modes of funding elderly care. The economical perspectives should not dominate without taking care of quality improvement when the operation of elderly care is planned and implemented. Strategies such as a learning organisational structure built on person-centred care could create quality improvement in elderly care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Essential oils: an alternative approach to management of powdery mildew diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena STURCHIO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been growing interest in the application of plant-derived substances in agriculture as alternatives to the use of pesticides, in order to obtain healthy crops and more environmentally sustainable crop production systems. The properties of some essential oils as natural fungicides were evaluated, to promote their use in alternative agriculture. Potentially detrimental effects caused by essential oil residues in soil were also assessed by mutagenicity assays to avoid possible adverse effects related to the use of these materials. Trials in a controlled environment were set up, using ‘Romanesco’ zucchini treated with essential oils, either exclusively or alternated with a synthetic fungicide. The treatments were applied when natural infection by Podosphaera xanthii appeared on test plants, and powdery mildew incidence and severity were assessed after six weeks. Preliminary results indicated that the alternation of natural materials with effective synthetic fungicide maintained effective disease control, and may also assist with management of pesticide resistance in P. xanthii. No relevant mutagenic effects of essential oil residues in soil were revealed, although an appropriate formulation useful under field conditions is required for effective application.

  14. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of crushed COx argillite used as backfilling material in HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chaosheng; Shi Bin; Cui Yujun; Anh-Minh Tang

    2010-01-01

    At present, the crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite powder is proposed as an alternative backfilling material in France, which will be constructed in the engineering barrier of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this investigation, the compression behavior of two crushed COx argillite powders (coarser one and finer one) was studied by running l-D compression tests with several loading-unloading cycles. After the final dry density 2.0 g/cm 3 was reached, the specimen was flooding with distilled water and the evolution of axial stress was studied during saturation process. The effects of initial axial stress level and grain size distribution (GSD) on hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted specimen were analyzed. The results show that the compression curves are significantly influenced by the GSD of the soils. To obtain the same degree of compaction, the axial stress applied to finer soil is much higher than that of coarser soil. In addition, the compression index of the finer soil is bigger than that of coarser soil. The swelling index at initial water content increases with the dry density and seems to be independent of the GSD. During saturation, the initial lower axial stress causes obvious swelling behavior for both the coarser and finer powder samples and the corresponding axial stress increase gradually. At initial higher axial stress condition, monotone collapse behavior is observed for the coarser powder samples. Whereas the axial stress decrease firstly, then increase and finally decrease again for the finer powder samples. After saturation, the equilibrium axial stresses of finer powder samples are higher than that of coarser powder samples. (authors)

  15. Development of thermal analysis method for the near field of HLW repository using ABAQUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuh, Jung Eui; Kang, Chul Hyung; Park, Jeong Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    An appropriate tool is needed to evaluate the thermo-mechanical stability of high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this report a thermal analysis methodology for the near field of HLW repository is developed to use ABAQUS which is one of the multi purpose FEM code and has been used for many engineering area. The main contents of this methodology development are the structural and material modelling to simulate a repository, setup of side conditions, e.g., boundary and load conditions, and initial conditions, and the procedure to selection proper material parameters. In addition to these, the interface programs for effective production of input data and effective change of model size for sensitivity analysis for disposal concept development are developed. The results of this work will be apply to evaluate the thermal stability and to use as main input data for mechanical analysis of HLW repository. (author). 20 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Applicability of thermodynamic database of radioactive elements developed for the Japanese performance assessment of HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Mikazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Rai, Dhanpat; Ochs, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) published a second progress report (also known as H12 report) on high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in Japan (JNC 1999). This report helped to develop confidence in the selected HLW disposal system and to establish the implementation body in 2000 for the disposal of HLW. JNC developed an in-house thermodynamic database for radioactive elements for performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (EBS) and the geosphere for H12 report. This paper briefly presents the status of the JNC's thermodynamic database and its applicability to perform realistic analyses of the solubilities of radioactive elements, evolution of solubility-limiting solid phases, predictions of the redox state of Pu in the neutral pH range under reducing conditions, and to estimate solubilities of radioactive elements in cementitious conditions. (author)

  17. The Results of HLW Processing Using Zirconium Salt of Dibutyl phosphoric Acid in Hot Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, Yu.S.; Zilberman, B.Ya.; Shmidt, O.V. [Khlopin Radium Institute, 2nd Murinsky Ave., 28, Saint-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP), is an effective solvent for liquid HLW and ILW (high and intermediate level wastes) processing with radionuclide partitioning into different groups for further immobilization according to radiotoxicity. The rig trials in mixer-settles in hot cells were carried out using 30 L of real HLW containing transplutonium (TPE), rare earths (RE), Sr and Cs in 2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, characterized by total specific activity 520 MBk/L. The recovery factor for TPE and RE was as high as 10{sup 4}, but only 10 for Sr. Purification factor of TPE and RE from Cs and Sr was 10{sup 4}, and that of Sr from TPE and Cs was 10{sup 3}. Almost all Cs was localized in the second cycle raffinate. So Zr salt of HDBP can be used in HLW processing with radionuclide partitioning with respect to the categories of radiotoxicity. (authors)

  18. Regulatory status on the safety assessment of a HLW repository in other countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2008-12-01

    To construct a HLW repository, it is essential to meet the requirements on the regulation for a deep geological disposal. Even if the construction of a HLW repository is determined positively, technical standards which assert the performance of a repository will be needed. Among various technical standards, safety assessment based on the repository evolution in the future will play an important role in the licensing process. The foreign countries' technical standards on the safety assessment of a HLW repository may be an indicator to carry out the R and D activities on geological disposal effectively. In this report, assessment period, limit of radiation dose and uncertainty related to the safety assessment are investigated and analyzed in detail. Especially, the technical reviews of USA regulation bodies seems to be reasonable in the point of the intrinsic attribute of safety assessment

  19. Study on evaluation method for potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Makoto; Makino, Hitoshi; Umeda, Koji; Osawa, Hideaki; Seo, Toshihiro; Ishimaru, Tsuneaki

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation for the potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system is an important issue in safety assessment. A scenario construction method for the effects on a HLW disposal system condition and performance has been developed for two purposes: the first being effective elicitation and organization of information from investigators of natural phenomena and performance assessor and the second being, maintenance of traceability of scenario construction processes with suitable records. In this method, a series of works to construct scenarios is divided into pieces to facilitate and to elicit the features of potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system and is organized to create reasonable scenarios with consistency, traceability and adequate conservativeness within realistic view. (author)

  20. Major alternatives for government policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify and assess major alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States. The National Academy of Public Administration agreed to identify and evaluate alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management. It agreed to review present policies and practices in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management, to review selected experiences and practices of governmental agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and industries other than the nuclear power industry, and to identify alternatives to the present nuclear emergency system

  1. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, A M; Esteban, J A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  2. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza, A. M.; Esteban, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  3. 78 FR 69147 - Ranger Alternative Management, L.P. and Ranger Funds Investment Trust; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ...] Ranger Alternative Management, L.P. and Ranger Funds Investment Trust; Notice of Application November 12... Application: Applicants request an order that would permit (a) certain open-end management investment... Units; and (e) certain registered management investment companies and unit investment trusts outside of...

  4. 78 FR 48205 - Ranger Alternative Management, L.P. and Ranger Funds Investment Trust; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Alternative Management, L.P. and Ranger Funds Investment Trust; Notice of Application August 1, 2013. AGENCY... Management, L.P. (``Ranger'') and Ranger Funds Investment Trust (the ``Trust''). Summary of Application... (e) certain registered management investment companies and unit investment trusts outside of the same...

  5. 77 FR 63872 - Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc...., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc., Select Staffing, and... follows: ''All workers of Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time...

  6. A survey of Bureau of Land Management employees on collaboration and alternative dispute resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruell, Emily W.; Burkardt, Nina; Donovan, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has been actively expanding its capacity to work cooperatively with other agencies, Tribes, the public, and other stakeholders using collaborative and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) approaches. In 1997, the BLM created the BLM’s Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (Collaboration/ADR Program) to centralize, strengthen, and coordinate these efforts. Specifically, the Collaboration/ADR Program is charged with developing ADR policies; ensuring that statutory and regulatory requirements are met; and providing training, resources, and direct support for collaboration and ADR in the BLM. At the request of the Collaboration/ADR Program, the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, located in the Fort Collins Science Center, conducted an online survey of BLM employees in early 2013 to address four overarching questions: What information sources and assistance resources are BLM employees currently accessing to fill their conflict/dispute resolution and collaboration needs? 

  7. Support for HLW Direct Feed - Phase 2, VSL-15R3440-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlack, K. S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, I. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, I. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, MD (United States); Kot, W. K. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations originating from a potential flow-sheet for the direct vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) with minimal or no pretreatment. In the HLW direct feed option that is under consideration for early operations at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the pretreatment facility would be bypassed in order to support an earlier start-up of the vitrification facility. For HLW, this would mean that the ultrafiltration and caustic leaching operations that would otherwise have been performed in the pretreatment facility would either not be performed or would be replaced by an interim pretreatment function (in-tank leaching and settling, for example). These changes would likely affect glass formulations and waste loadings and have impacts on the downstream vitrification operations. Modification of the pretreatment process may result in: (i) Higher aluminum contents if caustic leaching is not performed; (ii) Higher chromium contents if oxidative leaching is not performed; (iii) A higher fraction of supernate in the HLW feed resulting from the lower efficiency of in-tank washing; and (iv) A higher water content due to the likely lower effectiveness of in-tank settling compared to ultrafiltration. The HLW direct feed option has also been proposed as a potential route for treating HLW streams that contain the highest concentrations of fast-settling plutoniumcontaining particles, thereby avoiding some of the potential issues associated with such particles in the WTP Pretreatment facility [1]. In response, the work presented herein focuses on the impacts of increased supernate and water content on wastes from one of the candidate source tanks for the direct feed option that is high in plutonium.

  8. Cesium and strontium fractionation from HLW for thermal-stress reduction in a geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.

    1983-02-01

    Results are described for a study to assess the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic repository thermal stresses. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of a vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum integrity packages at relatively high heat loading. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository for each waste type. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers, potentially, a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or loser costs

  9. Management of spent oxide fuel from thermal reactors: the environmental and radiological effects of alternative approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Fry, T.M.; Edmunds, J.

    1983-07-01

    The report presents the results of a study of the environmental and radiological effects of alternative approaches to the management of spent oxide fuel from the UK nuclear power programme. The two main alternatives are extended storage of the fuel, pending decisions on fissile material recycle, and reprocessing of the fuel commencing in the early 1990s. A review is made of experience in spent fuel storage, of the technical issues in long-term storage and of the possible needs of the UK nuclear programme. The main environmental and radiological effects of reprocessing considered in the study are the generation of radioactive wastes, the release of radioactivity in effluents with the resulting radiation exposure of the public, and occupational radiation exposure. The influence of the delay between reprocessing and fabrication of mixed oxide fuel on the environmental and radiological effects of plutonium recycle is investigated and it is shown that the effects would be minimised if reprocessing were delayed until there was a requirement for recycle. Strategies for the management of heavy elements other than plutonium are discussed and results are presented illustrating aspects of actinide management. (author)

  10. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into mainstream healthcare services: the perspectives of health service managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Judy; Adams, Jon

    2014-05-22

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly included within mainstream integrative healthcare (IHC) services. Health service managers are key stakeholders central to ensuring effective integrative health care services. Yet, little research has specifically investigated the role or perspective of health service managers with regards to integrative health care services under their management. In response, this paper reports findings from an exploratory study focusing exclusively on the perspectives of health service managers of integrative health care services in Australia regarding the role of CAM within their service and the health service managers rational for incorporating CAM into clinical care. Health service managers from seven services were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the health service managers. The services addressed trauma and chronic conditions and comprised: five community-based programs including drug and alcohol rehabilitation, refugee mental health and women's health; and two hospital-based specialist services. The CAM practices included in the services investigated included acupuncture, naturopathy, Western herbal medicine and massage. Findings reveal that the health service managers in this study understand CAM to enhance the holistic capacity of their service by: filling therapeutic gaps in existing healthcare practices; by treating the whole person; and by increasing healthcare choices. Health service managers also identified CAM as addressing therapeutic gaps through the provision of a mind-body approach in psychological trauma and in chronic disease management treatment. Health service managers describe the addition of CAM in their service as enabling patients who would otherwise not be able to afford CAM to gain access to these treatments thereby increasing healthcare choices. Some health service managers expressly align the notion of treating the whole person

  11. Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Phase 1 High-Level Waste Feed Tanks Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRAWFORD, T.W.

    1999-01-01

    A recent revision of the US Department of Energy privatization contract for the immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) at Hanford necessitates the investigation of alternative waste feed sources to meet contractual feed requirements. This analysis identifies wastes to be considered as HLW feeds and develops and conducts alternative analyses to comply with established criteria. A total of 12,426 cases involving 72 waste streams are evaluated and ranked in three cost-based alternative models. Additional programmatic criteria are assessed against leading alternative options to yield an optimum blended waste feed stream

  12. Using process instrumentation to obviate destructive examination of canisters of HLW glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.; Slate, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    An important concern of a manufacturer of packages of solidified high-level waste (HLW) is quality assurance of the waste form. The vitrification of HLW as a borosilicate glass is considered, and, based on a reference vitrification process, it is proposed that information from process instrumentation may be used to assure quality without the need for additional information obtained by destructive examining (core drilling) canisters of glass. This follows mainly because models of product performance and process behavior must be previously established in order to confidently select the desired glass formulation, and to have confidence that the process is well enough developed to be installed and operated in a nuclear facility

  13. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE AND ONE PERCENT CRYSTAL CONTENT MODELS FOR INITIAL HANFORD HLW GLASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, John D.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Peeler, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary models for liquidus temperature (TL) and temperature at 1 vol% crystal (T01) applicable to WTP HLW glasses in the spinel primary phase field were developed. A series of literature model forms were evaluated using consistent sets of data form model fitting and validation. For TL, the ion potential and linear mixture models performed best, while for T01 the linear mixture model out performed all other model forms. TL models were able to predict with smaller uncertainty. However, the lower T01 values (even with higher prediction uncertainties) were found to allow for a much broader processing envelope for WTP HLW glasses

  14. Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabelssi, B.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M.; Jackson, R.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences

  15. Evaluating environmental and economic consequences of alternative pest management strategies: results of modeling workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard L.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.L.; Ellison, Richard A.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.; McNamee, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs a comprehensive method to evaluate the human health and environmental effects of alternative agricultural pest management strategies. This project explored the utility of Adaptive Environmental Assessment (AEA) techniques for meeting this need. The project objectives were to produce models for environmental impact analysis, improve communications, identify research needs and data requirements, and demonstrate a process for resolving conflicts. The project was structured around the construction (in an initial 2 1/2-day workshop) and examination (in a second 2 1/2-day workshop) of a simulation model of a corn agroecosystem.

  16. Demography management and challenges of alternating shift work; Demographiemanagement und Herausforderungen der Wechselschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzkowiak, Matthias [Arbeitsmedizin Rheinisches Revier, RWE Power AG, Bergheim (Germany); Schmitz, Michael [Personalcontrolling/-strategie, RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany); Feldhaus, Christian [Arbeitsmedizin/Betriebliches Gesundheitsmanagement, RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    RWE Power has launched a comprehensive process to develop strategies for future demography management. A special focus is on the challenges which result from the age structure of the workforce in connection with alternating shift work. A comprehensive catalogue of measures was developed which is currently being implemented. Among other things, it includes programmes for the employees on issues like health and ergonomics or optimisation of existing shift systems. Several follow-up projects are also included. The measures presented in this paper are meant to help in responding proactively to future demographic trends and the resulting challenges. (orig.)

  17. Health care alliances and alternative dispute resolution: managing trust and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, T; Liberman, A

    2000-03-01

    The U.S. health care industry has entered an unprecedented era of alliance activity. These alliances involve medical groups and hospitals, as well as many of the newer health care entities such as managed care organizations and integrated delivery systems. The increase in organizational collaboration has resulted in an increase in organizational conflict. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques can serve as a valuable tool for mitigating this type of conflict. The role of ADR is to refocus partners' attentions away from an adversarial posture and toward a complementary existence. This will permit the partners to realize the intended outcomes of the collaboration.

  18. Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Could Dietary Polyphenols Be an Alternative to Existing Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinedum Eleazu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is gradually on the increase. While conventional drugs such as the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists and 5α-reductase inhibitors have been found to be useful in the treatment of BPH, the adverse side effects associated with their usage, have led to increased search for alternative means of managing this disease. Furthermore, although surgery has also been suggested to be a sure method, the cost and risks associated with it excludes it as a routine treatment. Dietary polyphenols have gained public interest in recent times due to their roles in the prevention of various diseases that implicate free radicals/reactive oxygen species. However, their roles in the management of BPH have not been explored. Hence, this review on their prospects in the management of BPH and their mechanisms of action. Literature search was carried out in several electronic data bases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, Agora, and Hinari from1970 to 2017 to identify the current status of knowledge on this concept. The findings from these data bases suggest that while dietary polyphenols may not replace the need for the existing therapies in the management of BPH, they hold promise in BPH management which could be explored by researchers working in this field.

  19. High level waste containing granules coated and embedded in metal as an alternative to HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.

    1980-01-01

    Simulated high level waste containing granules were overcoated with pyrocarbon or nickel respectively. The coatings were performed by the use of chemical vapour deposition in a fluidized bed. The coated granules were embedded in an aluminium-silicon-alloy to improve the dissipation of radiation induced heat. The metal-granules-composites obtained were of improved product stability related to the high level waste containing glasses. (orig.) [de

  20. Development of the Internet Library for the Second Progress Report on R and D for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotsuki, Masao; Ishikawa, Hirohisa

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet Library, the goal of which is to improve the quality assurance of the technical content of the Second Progress Report on R and D into the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. The Internet Library is used to centralize information management for the Second Progress Report. It uses a database system which stores a large quantity of technical memoranda and numeric data which provide the technical basis for the report. Members of the public and specialists are allowed access the data held on the system and may communicate their opinions and expert reviews, through the Internet. (author)

  1. A web-based application to simulate alternatives for sustainable forest management: SIMANFOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, F.; Rodriguez, F.; Ordonez, C.

    2012-11-01

    Growth and yield models at different scales are useful tools for forest stake holders. Adequate simulation of forest stand conditions after different silviculture scenarios allows stake holders to adopt appropriate actions to maintain forest integrity while forest products and services are obtained to benefit society as a whole. SIMANFOR is a platform to simulate sustainable forest management alternatives, integrating different modules to manage forest inventories, simulate and project stand conditions and maintain systems security and integrity. SIMANFOR output is compatible with an Office environment (Microsoft or Open), allowing users to exchange data and files between SIMANFOR and their own software. New developments are being planned under a web 2.0 environment to take advantage of user input to improve SIMANFOR in the future. (Author) 9 refs.

  2. A Review on Landfill Management in the Utilization of Plastic Waste as an Alternative Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayah Nurul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastes from landfills originate from many spheres of life. These are produces as a result of human activities either domestically or industrially. The global plastic production increased over years due to the vast applications of plastics in many sectors. The continuous demand of plastics caused the plastic wastes accumulation in the landfill consumed a lot of spaces that contributed to the environmental. In addition, economic growth and development also increased our demand and dependency on plastics which leads to its accumulation in landfills imposing risk on human health, animals and cause environmental pollution problems such as ground water contamination, sanitary related issues, etc. The management and disposal of plastic waste have become a major concern, especially in developing cities. The idea of waste to energy recovery is one of the promising techniques used for managing the waste of plastic. Hence, this paper aims review at utilizing of plastic as an alternative fuel.

  3. A Review on Landfill Management in the Utilization of Plastic Waste as an Alternative Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayah, Nurul; Syafrudin

    2018-02-01

    Wastes from landfills originate from many spheres of life. These are produces as a result of human activities either domestically or industrially. The global plastic production increased over years due to the vast applications of plastics in many sectors. The continuous demand of plastics caused the plastic wastes accumulation in the landfill consumed a lot of spaces that contributed to the environmental. In addition, economic growth and development also increased our demand and dependency on plastics which leads to its accumulation in landfills imposing risk on human health, animals and cause environmental pollution problems such as ground water contamination, sanitary related issues, etc. The management and disposal of plastic waste have become a major concern, especially in developing cities. The idea of waste to energy recovery is one of the promising techniques used for managing the waste of plastic. Hence, this paper aims review at utilizing of plastic as an alternative fuel.

  4. Environmental assessment of alternative municipal solid waste management strategies. A Spanish case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovea, M D; Ibáñez-Forés, V; Gallardo, A; Colomer-Mendoza, F J

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare, from an environmental point of view, different alternatives for the management of municipal solid waste generated in the town of Castellón de la Plana (Spain). This town currently produces 207 ton of waste per day and the waste management system employed today involves the collection of paper/cardboard, glass and light packaging from materials banks and of rest waste at street-side containers. The proposed alternative scenarios were based on a combination of the following elements: selective collection targets to be accomplished by the year 2015 as specified in the Spanish National Waste Plan (assuming they are reached to an extent of 50% and 100%), different collection models implemented nationally, and diverse treatments of both the separated biodegradable fraction and the rest waste to be disposed of on landfills. This resulted in 24 scenarios, whose environmental behaviour was studied by applying the life cycle assessment methodology. In accordance with the ISO 14040-44 (2006) standard, an inventory model was developed for the following stages of the waste management life cycle: pre-collection (bags and containers), collection, transport, pre-treatment (waste separation) and treatment/disposal (recycling, composting, biogasification+composting, landfill with/without energy recovery). Environmental indicators were obtained for different impact categories, which made it possible to identify the key variables in the waste management system and the scenario that offers the best environmental behaviour. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was used to test some of the assumptions made in the initial life cycle inventory model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alternatives for management of wastes generated by the formerly utilized sites remedial action program and supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Vocke, R.W.; Alexander, J.K.

    1983-03-01

    Alternatives for disposal or stabilization of the wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) are identified and compared, with emphasis on the long-term aspects. These wastes consist of soil material and rubble containing trace amounts of radionuclides. A detailed pathway analysis for the dose to the maximally exposed individual is carried out using an adaptation of the natural analogue method. Comparisons of the different alternatives, based on the results of the pathway analysis and qualitative cost considerations, indicate that, if the hazard is such that the wastes must be removed and disposed of rather than stabilized in place, disposal by immediate dispersal is preferable to containment, and containment followed by slow planned dispersal is preferable to containment without dispersal. The Supplement presents refinements of work that was reported at the 1982 International Decommissioning Symposium. The new material consists of revisions of the estimates of the predicted potential dose to the maximally exposed individual and a more detailed comparative assessment of the radiological impacts of alternatives for management of wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

  6. Criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management: an alternative for monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Cué García

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The work was developed in the province of Cienfuegos, Cuba, with the hope of presenting an alternative methodology for monitoring criteria and indicators of sustainable forest management. Participatory workshops were used with actors and makers of SilviculturalUnits in the definition of criteria and indicators, based on the rules set forth by Herrero (2005. The Delphi method was used in the validation of the proposal. A hierarchical system that facilitates standardization of indicators and their aggregation to indices as well as the procedural guide indicators and checklist of them was used. The adequacy of Sustainability Barometer Prescott-Allen, 1997, quoted by Van Bellen (2004 was performed. The results of the analysis of the reliability of the instrument applied to the expert are acceptable because the Hotelling T2 value was 322.46 p = 0.007, there is a strong significant correlation between the elements of the instrument, expressed in an intraclass correlation coefficient from 0.756 to p = 0.038, Alpha reliability coefficient Cronbach 0.806, Spearman-Brown coefficient equal to 0.656 and Guttman split halves coefficient of 0.606. This alternative ensures a more comprehensive and holistic observance of the attributes of a system of sustainability indicators in the field of specialized forest Cuban business sector, enabling the assessment of the trend of sustainable forest management according to the specifics of each forestry unit.

  7. Integrating knowledge exchange and the assessment of dryland management alternatives - A learning-centered participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Susana; Llovet, Joan; Ocampo-Melgar, Anahí; Vilagrosa, Alberto; Mayor, Ángeles G; Murias, Cristina; Vallejo, V Ramón; Orr, Barron J

    2017-06-15

    The adoption of sustainable land management strategies and practices that respond to current climate and human pressures requires both assessment tools that can lead to better informed decision-making and effective knowledge-exchange mechanisms that facilitate new learning and behavior change. We propose a learning-centered participatory approach that links land management assessment and knowledge exchange and integrates science-based data and stakeholder perspectives on both biophysical and socio-economic attributes. We outline a structured procedure for a transparent assessment of land management alternatives, tailored to dryland management, that is based on (1) principles of constructivism and social learning, (2) the participation of stakeholders throughout the whole assessment process, from design to implementation, and (3) the combination of site-specific indicators, identified by local stakeholders as relevant to their particular objectives and context conditions, and science-based indicators that represent ecosystem services of drylands worldwide. The proposed procedure follows a pattern of eliciting, challenging, and self-reviewing stakeholder perspectives that aims to facilitate learning. The difference between the initial baseline perspectives and the final self-reviewed stakeholder perspectives is used as a proxy of learning. We illustrate the potential of this methodology by its application to the assessment of land uses in a Mediterranean fire-prone area in East Spain. The approach may be applied to a variety of socio-ecological systems and decision-making and governance scales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Complementary and alternative medicines for diabetes mellitus management in ASEAN countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumthong, Ganniga; Nathason, Amornrat; Tuseewan, Musikorn; Pinthong, Pailin; Klangprapun, Supathra; Thepsuriyanon, Daracha; Kotta, Paiwan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore complementary or alternative practices used to promote health and reduce complications of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This qualitative, interpretative study recruited 30 adults including practitioners (n=15) and DM patients (n=15). The participants reside in the northeast of Thailand and in Vientiane of Lao People's Democratic Republic, and they have undergone treatment with at least a kind of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) for the care and management of DM. They were interviewed about their experiences, and the data were analyzed thematically. The study methodology was informed by hermeneutic phenomenology. After several years of ineffective treatments, practitioners looked for an alternative to conventional health care to treat patients on long-term antidiabetic drugs, yet the patients suffered from progressive complications. They sought out health care that would more effectively meet their self-perceived needs in treatment particularly of a chronic disease such as DM. The result suggested that CAMs such as acupuncture, massage, exercise, and herbalism were able to meet their requirement in terms of health-care effectiveness obtained from experiences, additional cheap cost and availability in their community, and in accordance with the culture and lifestyles in the context of the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) community. The study explored and revealed the social perceptions of practitioners and patients using Chinese acupuncture, Thai massage, stretching exercise, and herbalism, as CAMs for DM management. The perceptions attributed to patient-practitioner consensus can hold a key to a more comprehensive health care, as a means to expand the boundaries for contemporary health-care provision. However, more study is needed in the future clinical trial research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Feasibility studies of actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A strategy of actinide burnup in LMFBRs is being investigated as a waste management alternative to long term storage of high level nuclear waste. This strategy is being evaluated because many of the actinides in the waste from spent-fuel reprocessing have half-lives of thousands of years and an alternative to geological storage may be desired. From a radiological viewpoint, the actinides and their daughters dominate the waste hazard for decay times beyond about 400 years. Actinide burnup in LMFBRs may be an attractive alternative to geological storage because the actinides can be effectively transmuted to fission products which have significantly shorter half-lives. Actinide burnup in LMFBRs rather than LWRs is preferred because the ratio of fission reaction rate to capture reaction rate for the actinides is higher in an LMFBR, and an LMFBR is not so sensitive to the addition of the actinide isotopes. An actinide target assembly recycle scheme is evaluated to determine the effects of the actinides on the LMFBR performance, including local power peaking, breeding ratio, and fissile material requirements. Several schemes are evaluated to identify any major problems associated with reprocessing and fabrication of recycle actinide-containing assemblies. The overall efficiency of actinide burnout in LMFBRs is evaluated, and equilibrium cycle conditions are determined. It is concluded that actinide recycle in LMFBRs offers an attractive alternative to long term storage of the actinides, and does not significantly affect the performance of the host LMFBR. Assuming a 0.1 percent or less actinide loss during reprocessing, a 0.1 percent loss of less during fabrication, and proper recycle schemes, virtually all of the actinides produced by a fission reactor economy could be transmuted in fast reactors

  10. A Multicriteria Risk Analysis to Evaluate Impacts of Forest Management Alternatives on Forest Health in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Jactel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to climate change, forests are likely to face new hazards, which may require adaptation of our existing silvicultural practices. However, it is difficult to imagine a forest management approach that can simultaneously minimize all risks of damage. Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA has been developed to help decision makers choose between actions that require reaching a compromise among criteria of different weights. We adapted this method and produced a multicriteria risk analysis (MCRA to compare the risk of damage associated with various forest management systems with a range of management intensity. The objective was to evaluate the effect of four forest management alternatives (FMAs (i.e., close to nature, extensive management with combined objectives, intensive even-aged plantations, and short-rotation forestry for biomass production on biotic and abiotic risks of damage in eight regional case studies combining three forest biomes (Boreal, Continental, Atlantic and five tree species (Eucalyptus globulus, Pinus pinaster, Pinus sylvestris, Picea sitchensis, and Picea abies relevant to wood production in Europe. Specific forest susceptibility to a series of abiotic (wind, fire, and snow and biotic (insect pests, pathogenic fungi, and mammal herbivores hazards were defined by expert panels and subsequently weighted by corresponding likelihood. The PROMETHEE ranking method was applied to rank the FMAs from the most to the least at risk. Overall, risk was lower in short-rotation forests designed to produce wood biomass, because of the reduced stand susceptibility to the most damaging hazards. At the opposite end of the management intensity gradient, close-to-nature systems also had low overall risk, due to lower stand value exposed to damage. Intensive even-aged forestry appeared to be subject to the greatest risk, irrespective of tree species and bioclimatic zone. These results seem to be robust as no significant differences in relative

  11. Design options for HLW repository operation technology. (4) Shotclay technique for seamless construction of EBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ichizo; Fujisawa, Soh; Nakajima, Makoto; Toida, Masaru; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Asano, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    The shotclay method is construction method of the high density bentonite engineered barrier by spraying method. Using this method, the dry density of 1.6 Mg/m 3 , which was considered impossible with the spray method, is achieved. In this study, the applicability of the shotclay method to HLW bentonite-engineered barriers was confirmed experimentally. In the tests, an actual scale vertical-type HLW bentonite-engineered barrier was constructed. This was a bentonite-engineered barrier with a diameter of 2.22 m and a height of 3.13 m. The material used was bentonite with 30% silica sand, and water content was adjusted by mixing chilled bentonite with powdered ice before thawing. Work progress was 11.2 m 3 and the weight was 21.7 Mg. The dry density of the entire buffer was 1.62 Mg/m 3 , and construction time was approximately 8 hours per unit. After the formworks were removed, the core and block of the actual scale HLW bentonite-engineered barrier were sampled to confirm homogeneity. As a result, homogeneity was confirmed, and no gaps were observed between the formwork and the buffer material and between the simulated waste and the buffer material. The applicability to HLW of the shotclay method has been confirmed through this examination. (author)

  12. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal

  13. Final Report Tests On The Duramelter 1200 HLW Pilot Melter System Using AZ-101 HLW Simulants VSL-02R0100-2, Rev. 1, 2/17/03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Bardakci, T.; Gong, W.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Schatz, T.R.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter(trademark) 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 (1). Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m 2 ) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m 2 /d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system (1) concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger

  14. FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D' ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the

  15. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonavane, M S; Mishra, P.K., E-mail: maheshss@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Recycle Board, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mandal, S; Barik, S; Roy Chowdhury, A; Sen, R [Central Glass and Ceramic Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2012-10-15

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  16. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonavane, M.S.; Mishra, P.K.; Mandal, S.; Barik, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.; Sen, R.

    2012-01-01

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  17. Waste management in the Irkutsk region, Siberia, Russia: An environmental assessment of alternative development scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Eriksen, Marie K; Christensen, Thomas H

    2018-04-01

    The current waste management system, handling around 500,000 t of household, commercial, and institutional waste annually in the Irkutsk region, Siberia, is based on landfilling in an old landfill with no controls of leachate and gas. Life-cycle assessment modelling of the current system shows that it is a major load on the environment, while the simulation of seven alternative systems results in large savings in many impact categories. With respect to climate change, it is estimated that a saving of about 1200 kg CO 2 equivalents is possible per year, per inhabitant, which is a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The best alternatives involve efficient energy recovery from waste and recycling by source separation for commercial and institutional waste, the major waste type in the Irkutsk region. Recycling of household waste seems less attractive, and it is therefore recommended only to consider this option after experience has been gained with the commercial and institutional waste. Sensitivity analysis shows that recovery of energy - in particular electricity, heat, and steam - from waste is crucial to the environmental performance of the waste management system. This relates to the efficiencies of energy recovery as well as what the recovered energy substitutes, that is, the 'dirtier' the off-set energy, the higher the environmental savings for the waste management system. Since recovered energy may be utilised by only a few energy grids or industrial users, it is recommended to perform additional local assessments of the integration of the waste energy into existing systems and facilities.

  18. Alternative Monetary Systems in the Context of Managing the National Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vartsaba Vira I.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to investigate alternative monetary systems, each of which can be an algorithm for managing the national economy. By analyzing, systematizing and summarizing the scientific works of both foreign and domestic scientists, it is established that money is a phenomenon capable of managing the socio-economic relations in the time and space development coordinates following the institutionalized functioning algorithms. There justified the informational nature of money, i.e., that money is artificial information, a peculiar way of understanding social and economic relations, since the monetary subsystem is algorithmizing social and economic relations and is a derivative of the functioning and development of the national economy. The effectiveness of the national currency depends on the built-in algorithms of its functioning, which are realized in the model of the national economy. The study reflects the basic variations of potential alternative monetary systems. In particular, world money, the issuers of which are highly developed countries; S. Gesell’s “free money”; S. Sharapov’s “absolute money”; money secured by commodity values; private money; virtual money — electronic money and crypto currency, etc. Given that the socio-economic system of Ukraine as a synergetic system have been in a state of bifurcation for a long time, the article considers and proposes the most effective way of the development and functioning of the monetary system in the context of a harmonious interrelations with the national economy in time and space coordinates by direct emission of money for innovative projects of development of the national economy. Prospects for further research are the trans-scientific paradigm of managing the national economy.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of nitrogen mitigation by alternative household wastewater management technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alison; Blackhurst, Michael; Hawkins, Troy; Xue, Xiaobo; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Garland, Jay

    2015-03-01

    Household wastewater, especially from conventional septic systems, is a major contributor to nitrogen pollution. Alternative household wastewater management technologies provide similar sewerage management services but their life cycle costs and nitrogen flow implications remain uncertain. This paper addresses two key questions: (1) what are the total costs, nitrogen mitigation potential, and cost-effectiveness of a range of conventional and alternative municipal wastewater treatment technologies, and (2) what uncertainties influence these outcomes and how can we improve our understanding of these technologies? We estimate a household nitrogen mass balance for various household wastewater treatment systems and combine this mass balance with life cycle cost assessment to calculate the cost-effectiveness of nitrogen mitigation, which we define as nitrogen removed from the local watershed. We apply our methods to Falmouth, MA, where failing septic systems have caused heightened eutrophication in local receiving water bodies. We find that flushing and dry (composting) urine-diversion toilets paired with conventional septic systems for greywater management demonstrate the lowest life cycle cost and highest cost-effectiveness (dollars per kilogram of nitrogen removed from the watershed). Composting toilets are also attractive options in some cases, particularly best-case nitrogen mitigation. Innovative/advanced septic systems designed for high-level nitrogen removal are cost-competitive options for newly constructed homes, except at their most expensive. A centralized wastewater treatment plant is the most expensive and least cost-effective option in all cases. Using a greywater recycling system with any treatment technology increases the cost without adding any nitrogen removal benefits. Sensitivity analysis shows that these results are robust considering a range of cases and uncertainties. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT OF IMPORTED FROZEN BEEF: AN ALTERNATIVE TO INTEGRATE WITH LOCAL BEEF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sani R.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe the supply chain management of imported frozen beef from Australia to Indonesia; to analyze where the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for the frozen meat distributor, and what strategy should be chosen; and to analyze alternatives of cooperation between imported frozen beef distribution with local beef distribution chain. The research approach is qualitative, and the research strategy is a case study. This research was conducted in Jakarta, data collecting technique by interview method and literature study. Data analysis techniques use supply chain management (SCM and strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis. The results show that the distribution chain management of imported frozen beef needs to tripartite cooperation with government and local beef distributors to conduct joint marketing of imported frozen beef and cooler procurement to the point of retailers in traditional markets; expanding the market share of imported frozen beef to industrial segments (hotels, restaurant, catering company; and meat processing factories; and cooperate with imported beef suppliers to overcome the problem of taste flavor and lack of weight of imported frozen meat, and clarify halal certification.

  1. Effects of tree size and spatial distribution on growth of ponderosa pine forests under alternative management scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.W. Woodall; C.E. Fiedler; R.E. McRoberts

    2009-01-01

    Forest ecosystems may be actively managed toward heterogeneous stand structures to provide both economic (e.g., wood production and carbon credits) and environmental benefits (e.g., invasive pest resistance). In order to facilitate wider adoption of possibly more sustainable forest stand structures, defining growth expectations among alternative management scenarios is...

  2. An alternative waste form for the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) on the basis of a survey of solidification and final disposal of HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, C.

    1982-01-01

    The dissertation comprises two separate parts. The first part presents the basic conditions and concepts of the process leading to the development of a waste form, such as:origin, composition and characteristics of the high-level radioactive waste; evaluation of the methods available for the final disposal of radioactive waste, especially the disposal in a geological formation, including the resulting consequences for the conditions of state in the surroundings of the waste package; essential option for the conception of a waste form and presentation of the waste forms developed and examined on an international level up to now. The second part describes the production of a waste form on TiO 2 basis, in which calcined radioactive waste particles in the submillimeter range are embedded in a rutile matrix. That waste form is produced by uniaxial pressure sintering in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1423 K and pressures between 5 MPa and 20 MPa. Microstructure, mechanical properties and leaching rates of the waste form are presented. Moreover, a method is explained allowing compacting of the rutile matrix and also integration of a wasteless overpack of titanium or TiO 2 into the waste form. (orig.) [de

  3. Herbal medicines for the management of opioid addiction: safe and effective alternatives to conventional pharmacotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeanine; Rosenbaum, Christopher; Hernon, Christina; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2011-12-01

    Striking increases in the abuse of opioids have expanded the need for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. The obstacles that confront effective treatment of opioid addiction - shortage of treatment professionals, stigma associated with treatment and the ability to maintain abstinence - have led to increased interest in alternative treatment strategies among both treatment providers and patients alike. Herbal products for opioid addiction and withdrawal, such as kratom and specific Chinese herbal medications such as WeiniCom, can complement existing treatments. Unfortunately, herbal treatments, while offering some advantages over existing evidence-based pharmacotherapies, have poorly described pharmacokinetics, a lack of supportive data derived from well controlled clinical trials, and severe toxicity, the cause for which remains poorly defined. Herbal products, therefore, require greater additional testing in rigorous clinical trials before they can expect widespread acceptance in the management of opioid addiction.

  4. Development of pathogen risk assessment models for the evaluation of sludge management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, J.G.; Sheridan, R.E.; Ward, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The constraints imposed on sewage treatment and disposal by clean air and water legislation make it clear that, in the near future, there will be increasing amounts of sewage sludge and fewer alternatives for its disposal. Additionally, this legislation has encouraged the use of waste management procedures which emphasize the recycling of waste materials. Decisions regarding optimal methods of sludge handling will primarily be controlled by economic considerations including the intrinsic value of the sludge, the cost of transporting sludge and sludge products, and the degree of treatment necessary to make the sludge suitable for particular applications. One principal reason to treat sludge is to inactivate pathogens. However, the actual health risks posed by pathogenic species that result from different methods of sludge utilization and how these risks are affected by different treatment processes are poorly understood. Therefore, computerized models are being developed to describe pathogen transport through environmental pathways and to help predict the risk of certain sludge utilization practices

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer pain management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QoL encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients.

  6. Spent fuel management - two alternatives at the FiR 1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenhaara, S.E.J.

    2001-01-01

    The FiR 1 -reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The reactor with its subsystems has experienced a large renovation work in 1996-97. The main purpose of the upgrading was to install the new Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) irradiation facility. The BNCT work dominates the current utilization of the reactor: four days per week for BNCT purposes and only one day per week for neutron activation analysis and isotope production. The Council of State (government) granted for the reactor a new operating license for twelve years starting from the beginning of the year 2000. There is however a special condition in the new license. We have to achieve a binding agreement between our Research Centre and the domestic Nuclear Power Plant Companies about the possibility to use the final disposal facility of the Nuclear Power Plants for our spent fuel, if we want to continue the reactor operation beyond the year 2006. In addition to the choosing of one of the spent fuel management alternatives the future of the reactor will also depend strongly on the development of the BNCT irradiations. If the number of patients per year increases fast enough and the irradiations of the patients will be economically justified, the operation of the reactor will continue independently of the closing of the USDOE alternative in 2006. Otherwise, if the number of patients will be low, the funding of the reactor will be probably stopped and the reactor will be shut down. (author)

  7. Technological alternative on environmental management for pipeline installation in the Amazon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frade, Amadeu Farage; Teixeira, Ivan Jose [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Riquena, Renata Maria; Freitas, Wanderleia Isabel P. de [CONCREMAT, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Usually pipelines construction are located in isolated places which are difficult to access. Due this characteristic the logistical support services are not available as easily as it is in large centers. Even so these enterprises may not release these services mainly due to high demand from stakeholders and the commitment to quality that these pipelines are submitted. This work presents some alternatives in environmental management implemented during an installation of pipelines in the Amazon forest with emphasis on the quality of water bodies and correct effluents destination. Located in western Amazonia in a region with several restrictions like: logistics, low supply of skilled labor and high environmental requirements. The project aligned competence and creativity since from its planning until its delivery to overcome difficulties and meet the demands of stakeholders. Usual techniques to assist legal requirements such as effluent treatment and environmental monitoring had to be adapted to the Amazon reality, always seeking for balance between technical and alignment economic and respect for social and environmental aspects. Using the methodology of 'wetland' (system of alternative treatment of effluents, based on the use of regional plants - macrophytes), the reuse of sludge from sewage treatment station, floating sewage treatment system, was crucial to meet the challenge to deploy this product to work in Amazonia. The aim of this work is to disseminate the techniques used and help other enterprises with the same challenges. (author)

  8. Database Objects vs Files: Evaluation of alternative strategies for managing large remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baru, Chaitan; Nandigam, Viswanath; Krishnan, Sriram

    2010-05-01

    Increasingly, the geoscience user community expects modern IT capabilities to be available in service of their research and education activities, including the ability to easily access and process large remote sensing datasets via online portals such as GEON (www.geongrid.org) and OpenTopography (opentopography.org). However, serving such datasets via online data portals presents a number of challenges. In this talk, we will evaluate the pros and cons of alternative storage strategies for management and processing of such datasets using binary large object implementations (BLOBs) in database systems versus implementation in Hadoop files using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). The storage and I/O requirements for providing online access to large datasets dictate the need for declustering data across multiple disks, for capacity as well as bandwidth and response time performance. This requires partitioning larger files into a set of smaller files, and is accompanied by the concomitant requirement for managing large numbers of file. Storing these sub-files as blobs in a shared-nothing database implemented across a cluster provides the advantage that all the distributed storage management is done by the DBMS. Furthermore, subsetting and processing routines can be implemented as user-defined functions (UDFs) on these blobs and would run in parallel across the set of nodes in the cluster. On the other hand, there are both storage overheads and constraints, and software licensing dependencies created by such an implementation. Another approach is to store the files in an external filesystem with pointers to them from within database tables. The filesystem may be a regular UNIX filesystem, a parallel filesystem, or HDFS. In the HDFS case, HDFS would provide the file management capability, while the subsetting and processing routines would be implemented as Hadoop programs using the MapReduce model. Hadoop and its related software libraries are freely available

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Management of Premature Ejaculation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katy; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Kaltenthaler, Eva; Dickinson, Kath; Cantrell, Anna; Ren, Shijie; Wylie, Kevan; Frodsham, Leila; Hood, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is defined as ejaculation within 1 minute (lifelong PE) or 3 minutes (acquired PE), inability to delay ejaculation, and negative personal consequences. Management includes behavioral and pharmacologic approaches. To systematically review effectiveness, safety, and robustness of evidence for complementary and alternative medicine in managing PE. Nine databases including Medline were searched through September 2015. Randomized controlled trials evaluating complementary and alternative medicine for PE were included. Studies were included if they reported on intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) and/or another validated PE measurement. Adverse effects were summarized. Ten randomized controlled trials were included. Two assessed acupuncture, five assessed Chinese herbal medicine, one assessed Ayurvedic herbal medicine, and two assessed topical "severance secret" cream. Risk of bias was unclear in all studies because of unclear allocation concealment or blinding, and only five studies reported stopwatch-measured IELT. Acupuncture slightly increased IELT over placebo in one study (mean difference [MD] = 0.55 minute, P = .001). In another study, Ayurvedic herbal medicine slightly increased IELT over placebo (MD = 0.80 minute, P = .001). Topical severance secret cream increased IELT over placebo in two studies (MD = 8.60 minutes, P medicine with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) favored SSRIs (MD = 1.01 minutes, P = .02). However, combination treatment with Chinese medicine plus SSRIs improved IELT over SSRIs alone (two studies; MD = 1.92 minutes, P medicine alone (two studies; MD = 2.52 minutes, P effects were not consistently assessed but where reported were generally mild. There is preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Ayurvedic herbal medicine, and topical severance secret cream in improving IELT and other outcomes. However, results are based on clinically

  10. Life-cycle cost and impacts: alternatives for managing KE basin sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the results of a life-cycle cost and impacts evaluation of alternatives for managing sludge that will be removed from the K Basins. The two basins are located in the 100-K Area of the Hanford Site. This evaluation was conducted by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and its subcontractors to support decisions regarding the ultimate disposition of the sludge. The long-range plan for the Hanford Site calls for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), sludge, debris, and water to be removed from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. This activity will be conducted as a removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The scope of the CERCLA action will be limited to removing the SNF, sludge, debris, and water from the basins and transferring them to authorized facilities for interim storage and/or treatment and disposal. The scope includes treating the sludge and water in the 100-K Area prior to the transfer. Alternatives for the removal action are evaluated in a CERCLA engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) and include different methods for managing sludge from the KE Basins. The scope of the removal action does not include storing, treating, or disposing of the sludge once it is transferred to the receiving facility and the EE/CA does not evaluate those downstream activities. This life-cycle evaluation goes beyond the EE/CA and considers the full life-cycle costs and impacts of dispositioning sludge

  11. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Jenkins, C.

    1996-02-01

    At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study

  12. Information management and complementary alternative medicine: the anatomy of information about CAMs through PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Salvatore; Argano, Christiano; Colomba, Daniela; Ippolito, Calogero; Gargano, Vincenzo; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Licata, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and the use of CAM interventions has become more common among people. For these reasons, health professionals must be able to effectively manage information in this field of knowledge according to an evidence-based point of view. This study assessed the anatomy of the available information about CAMs using PubMed, to give practical instructions to manage information in this field. We also analyzed the anatomy of information according to each alternative medicine branch, narrow and broad search methods, subset filters for indexed-for-Medline and non-indexed citations, and different publication types including randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses. Our results demonstrated that the use of CAMs subset (supplied by PubMed search engine) leads to a great number of citations determining an information overload. Our data reveal that it would be more useful to search for the CAM separately, identifying specific items and study design. Moreover, we found the largest number of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses related to herbal medicine and acupuncture, neither RCTs nor meta-analyses were available for bach and flower remedies, auriculoacupuncture, iridology, and pranotherapy. For the first time, our study gives a comprehensive view of the anatomy of information regarding CAMs and each branch of them. We suggest a methodological approach to face with searching information about this emerging issue from an evidence-based point of view. Finally, our data pointed out some "grey zones" since neither RCTs nor meta-analyses were available for some CAMs.

  13. Cross-Sectoral Resource Management: How Forest Management Alternatives Affect the Provision of Biomass and Other Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Frank

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Integrated forest management is faced with the challenge that the contribution of forests to economic and ecological planning targets must be assessed in a socio-ecological system context. This paper introduces a way to model spatio-temporal dynamics of biomass production at a regional scale in order to derive land use strategies that enhance biomass provision and avoid trade-offs for other ecosystem services. The software platform GISCAME was employed to bridge the gap between local land management decisions and regional planning by linking growth and yield models with an integrative mesoscale modeling and assessment approach. The model region is located in Saxony, Germany. Five scenarios were simulated, which aimed at testing different alternatives for adapted land use in the context of climate change and increasing biomass demand. The results showed, for example, that forest conversion towards climate-change-adapted forest types had positive effects on ecological integrity and landscape aesthetics. In contrast, negative impacts on landscape aesthetics must be expected if agricultural sites were converted into short rotation coppices. Uncertainties with stem from assumptions regarding growth and yield models were discussed. Future developmental steps which consider, for example, accessibility of the resources were identified.

  14. Anaerobic co-digestion of vinasse and chicken manure: alternative for Colombian agrowaste management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Daniel Marin Batista

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is an attractive technology for waste management meanwhile energy is recovering. This study evaluated the feasibility of codigesting vinasse and chicken manure (CM as management alternative for Colombian agro industries. Biochemical methane potential was tested for different vinasse to CM ratios of 1:0, 3:1, 1:3 and 0:1 on VS basis. Vinasse and CM ratio of 3:1 increased the specific methane production up to 55% regard to the weighted specific methane production of 0.65 m3CH4/kg VS. Mixtures between the substrates had a positive synergistic effect. CM improved buffer capacity diminishing the risk on acidification by drastic pH shift during vinasse digestion. Furthermore, vinasse allowed dilution of total ammonia nitrogen concentration avoiding ammonia inhibition. Since a higher methane production, vinasse and CM co-treatment improves the energy-recovery and economic feasibility of installing biogas plant as part of the ethanol production chain.

  15. Integration of complementary and alternative medicine information and advice in chronic disease management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Canaway, Rachel; Manderson, Lenore

    2011-01-01

    The growing evidence on the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its high rate of use (69% of Australians) - particularly for chronic or recurrent conditions - means increasing attention on CAM. However, few people disclose CAM use to their GP, and health professionals tend to inadequately discuss CAM-related issues with their patients, partly due to insufficient knowledge. As clinical and non-clinical chronic condition management guidelines are a means to educate primary health care practitioners, we undertook a content analysis of guidelines relevant to two common chronic conditions - cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - to assess their provision of CAM-related information. Ten current Australian guidelines were reviewed, revealing scant CAM content. When available, the CAM-relevant information was brief, in some cases unclear, inconclusive and lacking in direction to the GP or health care provider. Although we focus on CVD and T2DM, we argue the value of all chronic condition management guidelines integrating relevant evidence-informed information and advice on CAM risks, benefits and referrals, to increase GP awareness and knowledge of appropriate CAM therapies, and potentially to facilitate doctor-client discussion about CAM.

  16. Epidemiological and Economic Evaluation of Alternative On-Farm Management Scenarios for Ovine Footrot in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Zingg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Footrot is a multifactorial infectious disease mostly affecting sheep, caused by the bacteria Dichelobacter nodosus. It causes painful feet lesions resulting in animal welfare issues, weight loss, and reduced wool production, which leads to a considerable economic burden in animal production. In Switzerland, the disease is endemic and mandatory coordinated control programs exist only in some parts of the country. This study aimed to compare two nationwide control strategies and a no intervention scenario with the current situation, and to quantify their net economic effect. This was done by sequential application of a maximum entropy model (MEM, epidemiological simulation, and calculation of net economic effect using the net present value method. Building upon data from a questionnaire, the MEM revealed a nationwide footrot prevalence of 40.2%. Regional prevalence values were used as inputs for the epidemiological model. Under the application of the nationwide coordinated control program without (scenario B and with (scenario C improved diagnostics [polymerase chain reaction (PCR test], the Swiss-wide prevalence decreased within 10 years to 14 and 5%, respectively. Contrary, an increase to 48% prevalence was observed when terminating the current control strategies (scenario D. Management costs included labor and material costs. Management benefits included reduction of fattening time and improved animal welfare, which is valued by Swiss consumers and therefore reduces societal costs. The net economic effect of the alternative scenarios B and C was positive, the one of scenario D was negative and over a period of 17 years quantified at CHF 422.3, 538.3, and −172.3 million (1 CHF = 1.040 US$, respectively. This implies that a systematic Swiss-wide management program under the application of the PCR diagnostic test is the most recommendable strategy for a cost-effective control of footrot in Switzerland.

  17. Alternatives for long-term management of transuranic waste at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, O.A. Jr.; Molen, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    The six alternatives proposed consider the effects of making no decision (Alternative 1), delaying a decision for up to 100 years (Alternatives 2 and 3), or taking significant action (Alternatives 4, 5, or 6). Alternative 4 exhibits intermediate cost and risk values, and indicates good agreement with ideal disposal characteristics. Alternative 6, which is comparable to Alternative 4 in risk and disposal characteristics, would require a large single outlay of capital funds, whereas funds for Alternative 4 could be staged. The cases described, excluding the no-action case, represent the better alternatives of the 34 that have been studied. Their costs range from 80 to 270 million dollars, while the sum of the population risk and worker dose ranges from 95 to 13,800 man-rem. The naturally occurring dose from cosmic rays and terrestrial activity to the same population over the same period is many times larger

  18. An economic analysis of alternative fertility control and associated management techniques for three BLM wild horse herds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholow, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary cost projections were computed for several alternative strategies that could be used by BLM to manage three wild horse populations. The alternatives included existing gather and selective removal methods, combined with potential contraceptive applications of varying duration and other potentially useful management techniques. Costs were projected for a 20-year economic life using the Jenkins wild horse population model and cost estimates from BLM that reflect state-by-state per horse removal, adoption, long-term holding, and contraceptive application expenses. Important findings include: Application of currently available 2-year contraceptives appears capable of reducing variable operating costs for wild horse populations by about 21% on average.

  19. Concept of grouping in partitioning of HLW for self-consistent fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    A concept of grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to examine the possibility of a self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). Group B is difficult to be transmuted by neutron reaction, so a radiation application in an industrial scale should be developed in the future. Group A and Group MA1 can be burned by a thermal reactor, on the other hand Group MA2 should be burned by a fast reactor. P-T treatment can be optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively

  20. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers: behaviour under realistic disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove Arup and Partners, London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste (HLW) forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. In this final stage of the project, analysis of an HLW overpack of realistic design is performed to predict its behaviour when subjected to likely repository loads. This analysis work is undertaken with the benefit of experience gained in previous phases of the project in which the ability to accurately predict overpack behaviour, when subjected to a uniform external pressure, was demonstrated. Burial in clay, granite and salt environments has been considered and two distinct loading arrangements identified, in an attempt to represent the worst conditions that could be imposed by such media. The analysis successfully demonstrates the ability of the containers to withstand extreme, yet credible, repository loads

  1. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Luo Taian; Zhu Guoping; Chen Qingchun

    2007-12-01

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  2. The interpretation of remote sensing image on the stability of fault zone at HLW repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Linqing; Yu Yunxiang

    1994-01-01

    It is attempted to interpret the buried fault at the preselected HLW repository site in western Gansu province with a remote sensing image. The authors discuss the features of neotectonism of Shule River buried fault zone and its two sides in light of the remote sensing image, geomorphology, stream pattern, type and thickness difference of Quaternary sediments, and structural basin, etc.. The stability of Shule River fault zone is mainly dominated by the neotectonic movement pattern and strength of its two sides. Although there exist normal and differential vertical movements along it, their strengths are small. Therefore, this is a weakly-active passive fault zone. The east Beishan area north to Shule River fault zone is weakliest active and is considered as the target for further pre-selection for HLW repository site

  3. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaodong, Liu [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China); [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Resources and Environment of Ministry of Education, Fuzhou (China); Taian, Luo; Guoping, Zhu; Qingchun, Chen [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China)

    2007-12-15

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  4. Neutralized current acid waste consolidation management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Brown, R.G.; Galbraith, J.; Jensen, C.; Place, D.E.; Reddick, G.W.; Zuroff, W.; Brothers, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this evaluation is to recommend a management plan for the high-heat tank waste, including neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) in AY and AZ Tank Farms, and tank C-106 waste. The movement of solids, liquids and salt cake in the designated tank farms is included. Decision analysis techniques were used to determine a recommended alternative. The recommended course of action was replacement of a 75-hp mixer pump in tank AY-102 and in-tank concentration of tank AZ-102 supernate. The alternative includes transfer fo tank C-106 sludge to tank AY-102, then transfer to tank AY-102 and tank C-106 sludge to tank AZ-101 using the new 75-hp mixer pump installed in tank AY-102. Tank AZ-101 becomes a storage tank for high-level waste (HLW) sludge, with the capacity to mix and transfer sludge as desired

  5. Sustainable waste management: Waste to energy plant as an alternative to landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucchiella, Federica; D’Adamo, Idiano; Gastaldi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • WTE plant is a reasonable and sustainable alternative technology to landfill. • A 150 kt plant in the only electrical configuration for Abruzzo region. • The percentage of energy recovery ranges from 21% to 25% in examined scenarios. • Financial Net Present Value is equal to 25.4 € per kiloton of treated waste. • The annual reduction of emissions is equal to 370 kgCO_2eq per ton of treated waste. - Abstract: The management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has been identified as one of the global challenges that must be carefully faced in order to achieve sustainability goals. European Union (EU) has defined as Waste to Energy (WTE) technology is able to create synergies with EU energy and climate policy, without compromising the achievement of higher reuse and recycling rates. The methodology used in this paper is based on two levels. A strategy analysis defines the amount of waste to incinerate with energy recovery considering different approaches based on unsorted waste, landfilled waste and separated collection rate, respectively. Consequently, it is evaluated the sustainability of a WTE plant as an alternative to landfill for a specific area. Two indicators are used: the Reduction of the Emissions of equivalent Carbon Dioxide (ER_C_O_2_e_q) and Financial Net Present Value (FNPV). Furthermore, a social analysis is conducted through interviews to identify the most critical elements determining the aversion toward the WTE realization. The obtained results show the opportunity to realize a 150 kt plant in the only electrical configuration. In fact, the cogenerative configuration reaches better environmental performances, but it is not profitable for this size. Profits are equal to 25.4 € per kiloton of treated waste and 370 kgCO_2eq per ton of treated waste are avoided using a WTE plant as an alternative to landfill. In this way, the percentage of energy recovery ranges from 21% to 25% in examined scenarios and disposal waste is minimised

  6. Current status and future plans of R and D on geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Noriaki

    1994-01-01

    As to the final disposal of HLW, it is considered highly important to provide a clear distinction between implementation of disposal and the research and development as independent processes, and to increase the transparency of the overall disposal program by defining concrete schedules and the roles and responsibilities of the organizations involved. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has being conducted research and development on the geological disposal of HLW, as the leading organization. The responsibility of PNC is to ensure smooth progress of research and development project and to carry out studies of geological environment. The role of the Japanese government is to take overall responsibilities for appropriate and steady implementations of the program, as well as enacting any laws or policies required. On the other hand, electricity supply utilities are responsible to secure necessary funds for disposal, and in accordance with their role as waste producers, they are expected to cooperate even at the stage of research and development. Fundamental features of research and development of PNC carried out at this stage are as follows; (1) Generic research and development, (2) To establish scientific and technical bases of geological isolation of HLW in Japan, (3) About 15 years program from 1989 with documentation of progress reports, (4) Approach from near-field to far-field. PNC summarized the findings obtained by 1991, and submitted a document (H3 Report) in September 1992 as the first progress report. H3 Report is the first and comprehensive technical report on geological disposal of HLW in Japan, and provides information for the public to find out the current status of the research and development. This paper reviews the conclusions of H3 Report, overall procedures and schedule for implementing geological disposal, and future plans of R and D in PNC. (J.P.N.)

  7. Roles and Responsibilities of Coordinators/Alternates in Managing IAEA Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otwoma, D.

    2009-01-01

    Indicates that, the responsibilities of the coordinators include, to collect lessons learned from past experiences of coordinators/alternates in implementation and to collect information from all stake holders who include, coordinators' and alternates' institutions, regulatory,operations, general public

  8. HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Callow, Richard A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Abramowitz, Howard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Brandys, Marek [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-11-13

    Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150°C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

  9. HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A A.; Joseph, Innocent; Matlack, Keith S.; Callow, Richard A.; Abramowitz, Howard; Pegg, Ian L.; Brandys, Marek; Kot, Wing K.

    2012-01-01

    Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m 2 and depth of ∼ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150°C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage

  10. Researches on tectonic uplift and denudation with relation to geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Sanga, Tomoji; Moriya, Toshifumi

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the present state of researches on tectonic uplift and denudation, and shows perspective goals and direction of future researches from the viewpoint of geological disposal of HLW in Japan. Detailed history of tectonics and denudation in geologic time scale, including the rates, temporal and spatial distributions and processes, reconstructed from geologic and geomorphologic evidences will enable us to make the geological predictions. Improvements of the analytic methods for the geological histories, e.g. identification of the tectonic and denudational imprints and age determinations, are indispensable for the accurate prediction. Developments of the tools and methodologies for assessments of the degree and extension of influences by the tectonic uplift, subsidence and denudation on the geological environments such as ground water flows are also fundamental problem in the study field of the geological disposal of HLW. Collaboration of scientific researches using the geological and geomorphological methods and applied technology, such as numerical simulations of ground water flows, is important in improving the safety and accuracy of the geological disposal of HLW. (author)

  11. Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors

  12. Alternative management of diabetic ketoacidosis in a Brazilian pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savoldelli Roberta D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DKA is a severe metabolic derangement characterized by dehydration, loss of electrolytes, hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, acidosis and progressive loss of consciousness that results from severe insulin deficiency combined with the effects of increased levels of counterregulatory hormones (catecholamines, glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone. The biochemical criteria for diagnosis are: blood glucose > 200 mg/dl, venous pH 3 mmol/L and presence of ketonuria. A patient with DKA must be managed in an emergency ward by an experienced staff or in an intensive care unit (ICU, in order to provide an intensive monitoring of the vital and neurological signs, and of the patient's clinical and biochemical response to treatment. DKA treatment guidelines include: restoration of circulating volume and electrolyte replacement; correction of insulin deficiency aiming at the resolution of metabolic acidosis and ketosis; reduction of risk of cerebral edema; avoidance of other complications of therapy (hypoglycemia, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, hyperchloremic acidosis; identification and treatment of precipitating events. In Brazil, there are few pediatric ICU beds in public hospitals, so an alternative protocol was designed to abbreviate the time on intravenous infusion lines in order to facilitate DKA management in general emergency wards. The main differences between this protocol and the international guidelines are: intravenous fluid will be stopped when oral fluids are well tolerated and total deficit will be replaced orally; if potassium analysis still indicate need for replacement, it will be given orally; subcutaneous rapid-acting insulin analog is administered at 0.15 U/kg dose every 2-3 hours until resolution of metabolic acidosis; approximately 12 hours after treatment initiation, intermediate-acting (NPH insulin is initiated at the dose of 0.6-1 U/kg/day, and it will be lowered to 0.4-0.7 U/kg/day at discharge from hospital.

  13. Magnetopriming - an alternate strategy for crop stress management of field crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are major deterrent to sustainable crop production worldwide. Seed germination and early seedling growth are considered as the most critical stages of plant growth under stress conditions. Maximising stress tolerance of crop species by breeding is an integral part of development of strategies for improving sustainable food production under stressed environment but the unprecedented rate at which stress is increasing vis-a-vis the time taken for development of a tolerant variety, necessitates exploring alternate strategies of crop stress management. Seed priming has emerged as a promising crop stress management technique that increases the speed of germination thus ensuring synchronized field emergence of the crop. Magnetopriming (exposure of seeds to magnetic field) is a non invasive physical stimulant used for improving seedling vigour that helps in establishment of crop stand under stress. In our experiments on maize; chickpea and wheat under water deficit and salinity, respectively, improved seed water absorption characteristics resulted in faster hydration of enzymes (amylases, protease and dehydrogenase) leading to early germination and enhanced vigour of seedlings under stress. Increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in faster germinating - magnetoprimed seeds, under both the growing conditions, suggested its role in oxidative signaling during seed germination process. An 'oxidative window' for reactive oxygen species ensured that faster germination rate in magnetoprimed seeds led to vigourous seedlings. Improved root system integrated with higher photosynthetic efficiency and efficient partitioning of Na + increased yield from magnetoprimed seeds under salinity in controlled experiments. Magnetopriming can be effectively used as a pre-sowing treatment for mitigating adverse effects of water deficit and salinity at seed germination and early seedling growth. Unlike other conventional priming techniques it avoids seed hydration and

  14. Cutting out the middleman: physicians can contract directly with employers--a viable alternative to adversarial managed care agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Howard

    2002-01-01

    HMOs, PPOs, and other managed care "middlemen" control the means by which most physicians do business with employers. As physicians face dwindling reimbursements, greater practice restrictions, and increased pressure to sign adversarial middleman contracts, interest in direct contracting has grown. This article introduces direct contracting as an important alternative to commercial managed care agreements; cites the key advantages and process of direct contracting; and offers practical recommendations for helping physician practices successfully negotiate direct physician/employer agreements.

  15. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2004-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site high level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross flow filter, produces 0.02 gpm/ft2 of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technologies, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media

  16. DAIRY INDUSTRY: ALTERNATIVES TO RECOVERY WHEY AS A MEANS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Marquardt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium industries of dairy products in Brazil are facing serious problems of competition for the consumer market due to factors such as small scale production, lack of standardization of products and processes, deficiencies in effective control of quality, difficult to define niche markets and different levels of technology, although they are generating jobs and income. In addition to these factors, it appears that the control of environmental impacts caused by these industries, given the current environmental legislation, has forced a change of attitude on the part of entrepreneurs, in order to control pollution, despite the shortcomings often perceived in infrastructure linked to industrialization, such as high energy and water. The treatment and disposal of effluents and solid waste disposal, which are critical in industrial processes, are often overlooked in small and medium industries, generating significant environmental impacts. Among the main environmental impacts generated by the dairy industry stands to generate significant amounts of wastewater with high organic load. In this sense, the main objective of this study was a literature survey concerning the main factors of environmental impact of small and medium industries in the dairy sector, aiming to propose alternative environmental management that favors the minimization of the factors generating these impacts.

  17. Cost effectiveness of Alternative Helicobacter pylori Eradication Strategies in the Management of Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie O'Brien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Published data and techniques for decision analysis were used to construct a model to estimate the cost effectiveness of nine alternative strategies for the management of patients diagnosed with uncomplicated duodenal ulcer. Two strategies of intermittent therapy with either ranitidine or omeprazole, one strategy of continuous maintenance treatment with ranitidine, and six strategies for ulcer healing and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection were considered. Healing time curves were estimated by using published data, allowing for estimation of expected time for acute healing episodes. The expected number of weeks to heal per patient, in a one-year period, was estimated by combining healing time data with probability of ulcer recurrence. It was found that patients that underwent any of the six H pylori eradication regimens had fewer days with ulcer per year than those who underwent maintenance or intermittent ranitidine. Four eradication regimens had lower costs and better outcomes than ranitidine therapy. In comparing H pylori strategies, the two strategies of omeprazole plus one antibiotic (either amoxicillin or clarithromycin are more costly than omeprazole plus two antibiotics (specifically amoxicillin and metronidazole or clarithromycin and metronidazole and result in similar outcomes. Although omeprazole-based eradication regimens are more costly than ranitidine bismuth triple therapy, they are associated with fewer recurrences of ulcer and days of symptoms. A limitation of the analysis is that it did not incorporate issues of compliance and metronidazole resistance; however, the former concern may be less of an issue as H pylori regimens become simpler and shorter in duration.

  18. Acceptance of Hibah as an Alternative Mechanism in Muslims Asset Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Khairiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to identify the acceptance of hibah by beneficiaries based on cases registered in Melaka. Using secondary data collected from the Melaka Syariah Court and Amanah Raya Berhad Melaka, a number of hibah cases were identified from 2013-2015 and highlighted for further discussion in the paper. Interviews, telephone and email correspondences were conducted to further understand the issues concerning hibah cases and their reasoning. The findings indicated that the highest number of registered on hibah cases was recorded in 2015, increasing from 2013. The data result shows that there are more than 20 cases recorded in Melaka except only 12 cases in 2013. Due to increasing number of cases regarding hibah, it shows that citizen of Melaka is still low in understanding the concept and implementation of hibah. Therefore, it is a need to have a standard guideline regarding hibah to avoid any dispute about this matter in the future. Besides that, the dissemination of knowledge about hibah should be done in order to increase the awareness about the acceptable procedure of hibah because it is considered as the best alternative of asset management and to avoid unclaimed Muslim asset.

  19. Panel session: Disposal of HLW - ready for implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremans, R.; Come, B.; Barbreau, A.; Girardi, F.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is a report of a panel session at the European Community conference on radioactive waste management and disposal, Luxembourg 1985, concerning the safe and long-term disposal of high-activity and long-lived waste. The subjects discussed include: geological barriers including deep sea-bed sediments, engineered barriers, technological problems (repository construction, waste emplacement, backfilling and sealing), safety analysis, performance assessment of disposal system components, and finally institutional, legal and financial aspects of geological disposal. (U.K.)

  20. Enzyme Activities as Sensitive Indicators of Changes in Soil Metabolic Functioning in Alternative Management for Continuous Cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton production practices in the Texas High Plains (THP) region have involved monocultures, heavy irrigation, and conventional tillage since 1940, which must have contributed to the soil erosion and degradation observed in soils. Within the past 10 years, alternative cotton cropping management pra...

  1. Evaluating the effects of alternative forest management plans under various physiographic settings using historical records as a reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangjian Zhang; Hong S. He; Stephen R. Shifley; Jian Yang; Brian J. Palik

    2011-01-01

    Using historical General Land Office record as a reference, this study employed a landscape-scale disturbance and succession model to estimate the future cumulative effects of six alternative management plans on the tree species composition for various physiographic settings for the Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri. The results indicate that over a 200-year...

  2. Treating Youths with Selective Mutism with an Alternating Design of Exposure-Based Practice and Contingency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Jennifer; Kearney, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Selective mutism is a severe childhood disorder involving failure to speak in public situations in which speaking is expected. The present study examined 9 youths with selective mutism treated with child-focused, exposure-based practices and parent-focused contingency management via an alternating treatments design. Broadband measures of…

  3. The importance of corporate foreign debt as an alternative to currency derivatives in actual management of exchange rate exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    This empirical study of the exchange rate exposure management of Danish non-financial firms listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange shows that debt denominated in foreign currency ("foreign debt") is a very important alternative to the use of currency derivatives. The results show that the relati...

  4. Long-term influence of alternative forest management treatments on total ecosystem and wood product carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua J. Puhlick; Aaron R. Weiskittel; Ivan J. Fernandez; Shawn Fraver; Laura S. Kenefic; Robert S. Seymour; Randall K. Kolka; Lindsey E. Rustad; John C. Brissette

    2016-01-01

    Developing strategies for reducing atmospheric CO2 is one of the foremost challenges facing natural resource professionals today. The goal of this study was to evaluate total ecosystem and harvested wood product carbon (C) stocks among alternative forest management treatments (selection cutting, shelterwood cutting, commercial clearcutting, and...

  5. Citizen Contributions to the Closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 18 and 19 at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) - 13448

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawless, W.F. [Paine College, Departments of Math and Psychology, 1235 15th Street, Augusta, GA 30901 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Citizen involvement in DOE's decision-making for the environmental cleanup from DOE's management of its nuclear wastes across the DOE complex has had a positive effect on the cleanup of its SRS site, characterized by an acceleration of cleanup not only for the Transuranic wastes at SRS, but also for DOE's first two closures of HLW tanks, both of which occurred at SRS. The Citizens around SRS had pushed successfully for the closures of Tanks 17 and 20 in 1997, becoming the first closures of HLW tanks under regulatory guidance in the USA. However, since then, HLW tank closures ceased due to a lawsuit, the application of new tank clean-up technology, interagency squabbling between DOE and NRC over tank closure criteria, and finally and almost fatally, from budget pressures. Despite an agreement with its regulators for the closure of Tanks 18 and 19 by the end of calendar year 2012, the outlook in Fall 2011 to close these two tanks had dimmed. It was at this point that the citizens around SRS became reengaged with tank closures, helping DOE to reach its agreed upon milestone. (authors)

  6. Long-term product consistency test of simulated 90-19/Nd HLW glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, X.Y.; Zhang, Z.T.; Yuan, W.Y.; Wang, L.; Bai, Y.; Ma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical durability of 90-19/Nd glass, a simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass in contact with the groundwater was investigated with a long-term product consistency test (PCT). Generally, it is difficult to observe the long term property of HLW glass due to the slow corrosion rate in a mild condition. In order to overcome this problem, increased contacting surface (S/V = 6000 m -1 ) and elevated temperature (150 o C) were employed to accelerate the glass corrosion evolution. The micro-morphological characteristics of the glass surface and the secondary minerals formed after the glass alteration were analyzed by SEM-EDS and XRD, and concentrations of elements in the leaching solution were determined by ICP-AES. In our experiments, two types of minerals, which have great impact on glass dissolution, were found to form on 90-19/Nd HLW glass surface when it was subjected to a long-term leaching in the groundwater. One is Mg-Fe-rich phyllosilicates with honeycomb structure; the other is aluminosilicates (zeolites). Mg and Fe in the leaching solution participated in the formation of phyllosilicates. The main components of phyllosilicates in alteration products of 90-19/Nd HLW glass are nontronite (Na 0.3 Fe 2 Si 4 O 10 (OH) 2 .4H 2 O) and montmorillonite (Ca 0.2 (Al,Mg) 2 Si 4 O 10 (OH) 2 .4H 2 O), and those of aluminosilicates are mordenite ((Na 2 ,K 2 ,Ca)Al 2 Si 10 O 24 .7H 2 O)) and clinoptilolite ((Na,K,Ca) 5 Al 6 Si 30 O 72 .18H 2 O). Minerals like Ca(Mg)SO 4 and CaCO 3 with low solubility limits are prone to form precipitant on the glass surface. Appearance of the phyllosilicates and aluminosilicates result in the dissolution rate of 90-19/Nd HLW glass resumed, which is increased by several times over the stable rate. As further dissolution of the glass, both B and Na in the glass were found to leach out in borax form.

  7. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  8. HLW vitrification in France industrial experience and glass quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvaux, J.L.; Delahaye, P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the vitrification process, the technology and process improvements at the La Hague plant in R 7 and T 7 facilities. The main achievements relate to the process flexibility, the reliability of the equipment and solid waste management. The quality of the vitrified glass produced and canisters compliance with agreed specifications are demonstrated through characterization studies. Since the active start-up of R 7/T 7 facilities, canisters compliance with specifications relies upon a complete quality assurance/quality control program including process control. 1 tab., 1 fig

  9. Spacing Sensitivity Analysis of HLW Intermediate Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Bum Soo; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2010-01-01

    Currently, South Korea's spent fuels are stored in its temporary storage within the plant. But the temporary storage is expected to be reaching saturation soon. For the effective management of spent fuel wastes, the need for intermediate storage facility is a desperate position. However, the research for the intermediate storage facility for waste has not made active so far. In addition, in case of foreign countries it is mostly treated confidentially and the information isn't easy to collect. Therefore, the purpose of this study is creating the basic thermal analysis data for the waste storage facility that will be valuable in the future

  10. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2005-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces approximately 0.02 gpm/sq. ft. of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media. Personnel revised the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service

  11. TNX/HLW Long Shaft Pumps 1995-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanPelt, B.

    2002-01-01

    Problems with long shaft pumps are becoming clearer due to increased use, better instrumentation, more analysis, and increased testing activity. The problems are with reliability and not with hydraulic performance. The root cause of reliability problems is usually excessive vibration caused by design. The outlook for satisfactory pumps is improved as understanding of problems increases. Promising developments are emerging such as the tilt pad bearing. Alternative configurations, such as gas filled columns and submerged motor pumps, will require development. Continued development, in general, should be expected due to changing technology and industry changes. This report describes thirteen distinct pump programs starting with leakage of original mixer pumps in the 1980s and ending with the testing of tilt pad bearings now in progress. Eight of the programs occurred from 1996 to 2000. All involve long shaft pumps; all involve testing at TNX; and all involve a problem of some kind. The co mmon technical issue among the activities is vibration and shaft (or rotor) instability due to journal bearings. In every case, excessive shaft vibration is a reasonable and probable explanation for some or all of the problems

  12. High level waste (HLW) steam reducing station evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gannon, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Existing pressure equipment in High Level Waste does not have a documented technical baseline. Based on preliminary reviews, the existing equipment seems to be based on system required capacity instead of system capability. A planned approach to establish a technical baseline began September 1992 and used the Works Management System preventive maintenance schedule. Several issues with relief valves being undersized on steam reducing stations created a need to determine the risk of maintaining the steam in service. An Action Plan was developed to evaluate relief valves that did not have technical baselines and provided a path forward for continued operation. Based on Action Plan WER-HLE-931042, the steam systems will remain in service while the designs are being developed and implemented

  13. LISA technologies in new light: exploring alternatives for charge management and optical bench construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Chilton, Andrew; Olatunde, Taiwo; Apple, Stephen; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-08-01

    A LISA-like gravitational wave observatory is the choice candidate for ESA's L3 large mission scheduled to launch in 2034. The LISA Test Package (LTP) mission will launch later this year and test many critical technologies needed for such an observatory, among which are picometer interferometry in space and UV charge management of the Test Mass (TM). The design of these subsystems has been frozen many years ago during the final formulation of the LTP mission; since then, the LISA mission concept has evolved and new technologies have become available, making it possible to re-think the way these subsystem are implemented. With the final formulation of the L3 mission still years in the future and the LTP results expected in about one year, now is an ideal time look for areas of possible improvement and explore alternative implementations that can enhance performance, reduce costs or mitigate risks.Recently developed UV LED are lighter, cheaper and more powerful than traditional mercury lamps; in addition, their fast response time can be used to implement AC discharge techniques that can save even more space and power, and provide a more precise control of the charge.The most recent iteration of the mission baseline design allows for eliminating some of the optical components initially deemed essential; paired with the use of polarization multiplexing, this permits a redesign of the optical bench that simplifies the layout and enables a modular approach to machining and assembly, thus reducing the risks and costs associated with the current monolithic design without compromising the picometer stability of the optical path.Leveraging on extensive previous experience with LISA interferometry and the availability of a torsion pendulum-based LISA test-bed, the University of Florida LISA group is working at developing, demonstrating and optimizing both these technologies. I will describe the most recent advancements and results.

  14. Energy management in vehicles with alternative drives; Energiemanagement in Fahrzeugen mit alternativen Antrieben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, S; Schimanski, M

    2007-11-21

    Within the next few years, the automotive industry will be confronted with many challenges, as for example stricter emission standards and increasing oil prices. To meet the challenges, alternative drive concepts are currently being developed and placed in the market. To ensure a secure and efficient operation of the electric components, the introduction of an integrated energy management is required. It comprises all planning, controlling and predictive measures. The first part of this dissertation presents a new system concept, which can make an online prognosis of expected driving situations, such as speed and altitude profiles by means of internal vehicle information during an operating cycle. Based on this the control strategy can calculate the future power requirement of the vehicle and initiate control commands to enable a more efficient driving. The basis of this system concept is the recognition of routes with characteristic steering angle information and the creation of a history database for the routes driven with the respective vehicle speeds and altitudes. On the basis of an extensive analysis of the vehicle's electrical system in the second part of the dissertation, different effects on the development process for dimensioning the electrical system power supply are discussed. From this follows the necessity to develop a tool chain based on simulations. The tool chain consists of commercial simulation tools and the software Avanti (Advanced Analysis Tool and Simulation Interface) which is developed within the scope of the dissertation. Avanti enables an automated and optimal procedure when dimensioning the vehicle's electrical system in consideration of different control algorithms. A substantial part of this tool chain is the integration of a verified VHDL-AMS model library for the electrical system components. (orig.)

  15. Predicting thermally stressful events in rivers with a strategy to evaluate management alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, K.O.; Cole, J.C.; Schmid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is an important factor in river ecology. Numerous models have been developed to predict river temperature. However, many were not designed to predict thermally stressful periods. Because such events are rare, traditionally applied analyses are inappropriate. Here, we developed two logistic regression models to predict thermally stressful events in the Delaware River at the US Geological Survey gage near Lordville, New York. One model predicted the probability of an event >20.0 °C, and a second predicted an event >22.2 °C. Both models were strong (independent test data sensitivity 0.94 and 1.00, specificity 0.96 and 0.96) predicting 63 of 67 events in the >20.0 °C model and all 15 events in the >22.2 °C model. Both showed negative relationships with released volume from the upstream Cannonsville Reservoir and positive relationships with difference between air temperature and previous day's water temperature at Lordville. We further predicted how increasing release volumes from Cannonsville Reservoir affected the probabilities of correctly predicted events. For the >20.0 °C model, an increase of 0.5 to a proportionally adjusted release (that accounts for other sources) resulted in 35.9% of events in the training data falling below cutoffs; increasing this adjustment by 1.0 resulted in 81.7% falling below cutoffs. For the >22.2 °C these adjustments resulted in 71.1% and 100.0% of events falling below cutoffs. Results from these analyses can help managers make informed decisions on alternative release scenarios.

  16. Energy management in vehicles with alternative drives; Energiemanagement in Fahrzeugen mit alternativen Antrieben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, S.; Schimanski, M.

    2007-11-21

    Within the next few years, the automotive industry will be confronted with many challenges, as for example stricter emission standards and increasing oil prices. To meet the challenges, alternative drive concepts are currently being developed and placed in the market. To ensure a secure and efficient operation of the electric components, the introduction of an integrated energy management is required. It comprises all planning, controlling and predictive measures. The first part of this dissertation presents a new system concept, which can make an online prognosis of expected driving situations, such as speed and altitude profiles by means of internal vehicle information during an operating cycle. Based on this the control strategy can calculate the future power requirement of the vehicle and initiate control commands to enable a more efficient driving. The basis of this system concept is the recognition of routes with characteristic steering angle information and the creation of a history database for the routes driven with the respective vehicle speeds and altitudes. On the basis of an extensive analysis of the vehicle's electrical system in the second part of the dissertation, different effects on the development process for dimensioning the electrical system power supply are discussed. From this follows the necessity to develop a tool chain based on simulations. The tool chain consists of commercial simulation tools and the software Avanti (Advanced Analysis Tool and Simulation Interface) which is developed within the scope of the dissertation. Avanti enables an automated and optimal procedure when dimensioning the vehicle's electrical system in consideration of different control algorithms. A substantial part of this tool chain is the integration of a verified VHDL-AMS model library for the electrical system components. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of costs for three hypothetical alternative kitchen waste management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiettecatte, Wim; Tize, Ronald; De Wever, Heleen

    2014-11-01

    Urban water and waste management continues to be a major challenge, with the Earth's population projected to rise to 9 billion by 2050, with 70% of this population expected to live in cities. A combined treatment of wastewater and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste offers opportunities for improved environmental protection and energy recovery, but the collection and transport of organic wastes must be cost effective. This study compares three alternative kitchen waste collection and transportation systems for a virtual modern urban area with 300,000 residents and a population density of 10,000 persons per square kilometre. Door-to-door collection, being the standard practice in modern urban centres, remains the most economically advantageous at a cost of 263 euros per tonne of kitchen waste. Important drawbacks are the difficult logistics, increased city traffic, air and noise pollution. The quieter, cleaner and more hygienic vacuum transport of kitchen waste comes with a higher cost of 367 euros per tonne, mainly resulting from a higher initial investment cost for the system installation. The third option includes the well-known use of under-sink food waste disposers (often called garbage grinders) that are connected to the kitchen's wastewater piping system, with a total yearly cost of 392 euros per tonne. Important advantages with this system are the clean operation and the current availability of a city-wide sewage conveyance pipeline system. Further research is recommended, for instance the application of a life cycle assessment approach, to more fully compare the advantages and disadvantages of each option. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Investigating geochemical aspects of managed aquifer recharge by column experiments with alternating desalinated water and groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen-Eliraz, Gefen; Russak, Amos; Nitzan, Ido; Guttman, Joseph; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) events are occasionally carried out with surplus desalinated seawater that has been post-treated with CaCO 3 in infiltration ponds overlying the northern part of the Israeli Coastal Aquifer. This water's chemical characteristics differ from those of any other water recharged to the aquifer and of the natural groundwater. As the MAR events are short (hours to weeks), the sediment under the infiltration ponds will intermittently host desalinated and natural groundwater. As part of comprehensive research on the influence of those events, column experiments were designed to simulate the alternation of the two water types: post-treated desalinated seawater (PTDES) and natural groundwater (GW). Each experiment included three stages: (i) saturation with GW; (ii) inflow of PTDES; (iii) inflow of GW. Three runs were conducted, each with different sediments extracted from the field and representing a different layer below the infiltration pond: (i) sand (<1% CaCO 3 ), (ii) sand containing 7% CaCO 3 , and (iii) crushed calcareous sandstone (35% CaCO 3 ). The results from all columns showed enrichment of K + and Mg 2+ (up to 0.4meq/L for 20 pore volumes) when PTDES replaced GW, whereas an opposite trend of Ca 2+ depletion (up to 0.5meq/L) was observed only in the columns that contained a high percentage of CaCO 3 . When GW replaced PTDES, depletion of Mg 2+ and K + was noted. The results indicated that adsorption/desorption of cations are the main processes causing the observed enrichment/depletion. It was concluded that the high concentration of Ca 2+ (relative to the total concentration of cations) and the low concentration of Mg 2+ in the PTDES relative to natural GW are the factors controlling the main sediment-water interaction. The enrichment of PTDES with Mg 2+ may be viewed as an additional post-treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 4. Alternatives for waste isolation and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Volume IV of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for final storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. Section titles include: basic concepts for geologic isolation; geologic storage alternatives; geologic disposal alternatives; extraterrestrial disposal; and, transmutation

  20. Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 4. Alternatives for waste isolation and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    Volume IV of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for final storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. Section titles include: basic concepts for geologic isolation; geologic storage alternatives; geologic disposal alternatives; extraterrestrial disposal; and, transmutation. (JGB)

  1. Predisposal management of high level radioactive waste. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in the generation of electricity in nuclear power plants and in the use of radioactive material in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. The principles and requirements that govern the safety of the management of radioactive waste are presented in 'The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management', 'Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety' and 'Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, Including Decommissioning'. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established in Refs for the predisposal management of HLW. This Safety Guide applies to the predisposal management of HLW. For liquid HLW arising from the reprocessing of spent fuel the recommendations of this Safety Guide apply from when liquid waste from the first extraction process is collected for storage and subsequent processing. Recommendations and guidance on the storage of spent fuel, whether or not declared as waste, subsequent to its removal from the storage facility of a reactor are provided in Refs. For spent fuel declared as waste this Safety Guide applies to all activities subsequent to its removal from the storage facility of a reactor and prior to its disposal. Requirements pertaining to the transport of spent fuel, whether or not declared as waste, and of all forms of HLW are established. This Safety Guide provides recommendations on the safety aspects of managing HLW, including the planning, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of equipment or facilities for the predisposal management of HLW. It addresses the following elements: (a) The characterization and processing (i.e. pretreatment

  2. Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for alternative strategies for the long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 1: Main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This PEIS assesses the potential impacts of alternative management of alternative management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) currently stored at three DOE sites: Paducah site near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth site near Portsmouth, Ohio; and K-25 site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The alternatives analyzed in the PEIS include no action, long-term storage as UF 6 , long-term storage as uranium oxide, use as uranium oxide, use as uranium metal, and disposal. The preferred alternative for the long-term management of depleted UF 6 is to use the entire inventory of material

  3. Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for alternative strategies for the long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This PEIS assesses the potential impacts of alternative management of alternative management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) currently stored at three DOE sites: Paducah site near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth site near Portsmouth, Ohio; and K-25 site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The alternatives analyzed in the PEIS include no action, long-term storage as UF 6 , long-term storage as uranium oxide, use as uranium oxide, use as uranium metal, and disposal. The preferred alternative for the long-term management of depleted UF 6 is to use the entire inventory of material. This volume contains the appendices to volume I

  4. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Bowan, B.W.; Joseph, I.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.K.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m 2 and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m 2 . The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al 2 O 3 concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m 2 .day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m 2 .day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m 2 .day).

  5. Actinide partitioning from HLW in a continuous DIDPA extraction process by means of centrifugal extractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Y.; Kubota, M.; Glatz, J.P.; Koch, L.; Pagliosa, G.; Roemer, K.; Nicholl, A.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment on actinide partitioning from real high level waste (HLW) was performed in a continuous process by extraction with diisodecylphosphoric acid (DIDPA) using a battery of 12 centrifugal extractors installed in a hot cell. The HNO 3 concentration of the HLW was adjusted to 0.5 M by dilution. The extraction section had 8 stages, and H 2 O 2 was added to extract Np effectively. After extraction, Am and Cm were back-extracted with 4 M HNO 3 in 4 stages and Np and Pu were stripped with 0.8 M H 2 C 2 O 4 in 8 stages. The actinides, expect Np, were extracted from HLW with a very high yield. Although only 84% of the Np were recovered in the present experiment, the recovery would be improved to 99.7 % by increasing the temperature to 45 degree C, the number of stages from 8 to 16 and the H 2 O 2 concentration from 1 M to 2 M. Long-lived Tc and the main heat and radiation emitters Cs and Sr were not extracted and were thus separated from the actinides with high decontamination factors. About 98% of Am and Cm were recovered from the loaded solvent in the first stripping step with 4M HNO 3 . About 86% of Np and about 92% of Pu were back-extracted with 0.8 M H 2 C 2 O 4 . These incomplete recoveries would be improved by increasing the number of stages and by optimizing the other process parameters. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Cost effects of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal costs of an HLW repository in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides the cost effect results of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal cost for an HLW repository in Korea. In the cost analysis for both of these cost drivers, the price of Cu powder and the bentonite can affect the canister cost and the bentonite cost of the disposal holes as well as backfilling cost of the tunnels, respectively. Finally, we found that the unit cost of Cu and bentonite was the dominant cost drivers for the surface and underground facilities of an HLW repository. Therefore, an optimization of a canister and the layout of a disposal hole and disposal tunnels are essential to decrease the direct disposal cost of spent fuels. The disposal costs can be largely divided into two parts such as a surface facilities' cost and an underground facilities' cost. According to the KRS' cost analysis, the encapsulation material as well as the buffering and backfilling cost were the significant costs. Especially, a canister's cost was approximately estimated to be more than one fourth of the overall disposal costs. So it can be estimated that the unit cost of Cu powder is an important cost diver. Because the outer shell of the canister was made of Cu powder by a cold spray coating method. In addition, the unit cost of bentonite can also affect the buffering and the backfilling costs of the disposal holes and the disposal tunnels. But, these material costs will be highly expensive and unstable due to the modernization of the developing countries. So the studies for a material cost should be continued to identify the actual cost of an HLW repository

  7. An analytical overview of the consequences of microbial activity in a Swiss HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.G.; West, J.M.; Grogan, H.A.

    1985-04-01

    Microorganisms are known to be important factors in many geochemical processes and their presence can be assured throughout the envisaged Swiss type C repository for HLW. It is likely that both introduced and resident microbes will colonise the near-field even at times when ambient temperature and radiation fields are relatively high. A simple quantitative model has been developed which indicates that microbial growth in the near-field is limited by the rate of supply of chemical energy from corrosion of the canister. Microbial processes examined include biodegradation of structural and packaging materials, alteration of groundwater chemistry (Eh, pH, organic complexant concentration) and direct nuclide uptake by microorganisms. The most important effects of such organisms are likely to be enhancement of release and mobility of key nuclides due to their complexation by microbial by-product. Resident micro-organisms in the far-field could potentially act as 9 living colloids' thus enhancing nuclide transport. In the case of flow paths through shear zones (kakirites), however, any microbes capable of penetrating the surrounding weathered rock matrix would be extensively retarded. It is concluded that microbial processes are unlikely to be of significance for HLW but will be more important for low/intermediate waste types. As data requirements are similar for all waste types, results from such studies would also resolve the main uncertainties remaining for the HLW case. Key research areas are identified as characterisation of a) nutrient availability in the near-field, b) the bioenergetics of iron corrosion, c) production of organic by-products, d) nuclide sorption by organisms and e) microbial mobility in the near-and far-field

  8. Sensitivity of Nuclide Release Behavior to Groundwater Flow in an HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of the dose exposure rate to human being due to long-term nuclide releases from a high-level waste repository (HLW) is of importance to meet the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies in order to ensure the performance of a repository. During the last few years, tools by which such a dose rate to an individual can be evaluated have been developed and implemented for a practical calculation to demonstrate the suitability of an HLW repository, with the aid of commercial tools such as AMBER and GoldSim, both of which are capable of probabilistic and deterministic calculations with their convenient user interface. Recently a migration from AMBER based models to GoldSim based ones has been made in accordance with a better feature of GoldSim, which is designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules to address any specialized programs, similar to solving jig saw puzzles and shows more advantage in a detailed complex modeling over AMBER. Recently a compartment modeling approach both for a geosphere and biosphere has been mainly carried out with AMBER in KAERI, which causes a necessity for a newly devised system performance evaluation model in which geosphere and biosphere models could be coupled organically together with less conservatism in the frame of the development of a total system performance assessment modeling tool, which could be successfully done with the aid of GoldSim. Therefore, through the current study, some probabilistic results of the GoldSim approach for a normal situation that could take place in a typical HLW repository are introduced

  9. Studies on the long-term characteristics of HLW glass under ultimate storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roggendorf, H.; Conradt, R.; Ostertag, R.

    1987-01-01

    This interim report deals with first results of corrosion investigations of HLW simulation glass (COGEMA glass SON 68) in quinary salt solutions of different concentrations; the aim of these investigations was to find out about the corrosion mechanism at the surface of the glass and the quantitative registration of the corrosion products. It became obvious that the surface layers developed can be easily removed and that a determination of weight losses becomes possible thereby. The corrosion rates for a test period of 30 days were determined. (RB) [de

  10. Viability for controlling long-term leaching of radionuclides from HLW glass by amorphous silica additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Y.; Uehara, S.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolution and deterioration experiments in coexistence system of amorphous silica and vitrified wastes have been executed in order to evaluating the effects of amorphous silica addition to high level radioactive vitrified waste (HLW glass) on suppression of nuclide leaching. Geo-chemical reaction mechanism among the vitrified waste, the amorphous silica and water was also evaluated. Dissolution of the silica network was suppressed by addition of the amorphous silica. However, the leaching of soluble nuclides like B proceeded depending on the hydration deterioration reaction. (A. Hishinuma)

  11. Ecology of Fungus Gnats (Bradysia spp.) in Greenhouse Production Systems Associated with Disease-Interactions and Alternative Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, Raymond A

    2015-04-09

    Fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.) are major insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops mainly due to the direct feeding damage caused by the larvae, and the ability of larvae to transmit certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Currently, insecticides and biological control agents are being used successively to deal with fungus gnat populations in greenhouse production systems. However, these strategies may only be effective as long as greenhouse producers also implement alternative management strategies such as cultural, physical, and sanitation. This includes elimination of algae, and plant and growing medium debris; placing physical barriers onto the growing medium surface; and using materials that repel fungus gnat adults. This article describes the disease-interactions associated with fungus gnats and foliar and soil-borne diseases, and the alternative management strategies that should be considered by greenhouse producers in order to alleviate problems with fungus gnats in greenhouse production systems.

  12. Ecology of Fungus Gnats (Bradysia spp. in Greenhouse Production Systems Associated with Disease-Interactions and Alternative Management Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond A. Cloyd

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungus gnats (Bradysia spp. are major insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops mainly due to the direct feeding damage caused by the larvae, and the ability of larvae to transmit certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Currently, insecticides and biological control agents are being used successively to deal with fungus gnat populations in greenhouse production systems. However, these strategies may only be effective as long as greenhouse producers also implement alternative management strategies such as cultural, physical, and sanitation. This includes elimination of algae, and plant and growing medium debris; placing physical barriers onto the growing medium surface; and using materials that repel fungus gnat adults. This article describes the disease-interactions associated with fungus gnats and foliar and soil-borne diseases, and the alternative management strategies that should be considered by greenhouse producers in order to alleviate problems with fungus gnats in greenhouse production systems.

  13. Notification: Notification Memo for Evaluation of Management Controls for Alternative Asbestos Control Method Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY12-0011, February 27, 2012. This memorandum is to notify you that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) is initiating an evaluation on the Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) experiments.

  14. MIIT: International in-situ testing of simulated HLW forms--preliminary analyses of SRL 165/TDS waste glass and metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Lodding, A.R.; Macedo, P.B.; Molecke, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The first in-situ tests involving burial of simulated high-level waste (HLW) forms conducted in the United States were started on July 22, 1986. This effort, called the Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), comprises the largest, most cooperative field testing venture in the international waste management community. Included in the study are over 900 waste form samples comprising 15 different systems supplied by seven countries. Also included are almost 300 potential canister or overpack metal samples of 11 different metals along with more than 500 geologic and backfill specimens. There are a total of 1926 relevant interactions that characterize this effort which is being conducted in the bedded salt site at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico

  15. Alternatives for long-term management of defense high-level radioactive waste, Hanford Reservations, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The objective of this document is to provide information or alternatives that are being considered for the long-term management of defense high-level radioactive waste stored at Hanford in underground tanks and in stainless steel-lined concrete basins. For purposes of basic programmatic decision making, four major alternatives based on disposal location are considered. The steps leading to placement of the waste in the following locations are illustrated: existing waste tanks; onsite engineered surface facilities; onsite geologic repository; and offsite geologic repository. The four major disposal alternatives are expanded into 27 alternative plans by considering: (1) variations in the final form of the high-level fraction (with radionuclide removal) to include glass, concrete, and powder; (2) variations in the final form of the dehydrated waste product to include glass, calcined clay, and powder; and (3) variations in the treatment and handling of encapsulated waste to include packaging of capsules in canisters and conversion of the strontium fluoride and cesium chloride to glass; canisters stored in sealed casks on the surface are disposed of in a surface vault after the radionuclides have decayed sufficiently to avoid a heat-transfer problem. A description of the technology, a preliminary risk assessment, and preliminary cost estimates for each of these 27 plans are presented. The technology required to implement any of the 27 alternative plans has not been developed to the point where any plan can be considered completely technically sound and feasible

  16. The role of alternative and natural agents, cryotherapy, and/or laser for management of alimentary mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, Cesar A; Oberle-Edwards, Loree; Schubert, Mark

    2006-06-01

    To review the literature and update the current guidelines of alternative/natural agents, cryotherapy, and/or laser therapy in the management of alimentary mucositis (AM). The original guidelines developed by the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) mucositis study group were the basis for this study. A medical librarian conducted an initial Medline search to identify research articles published between 2002 and 2005 in English language. A search term combination that included stomatitis, mucositis, mucous membrane, neoplasm, lasers, complimentary therapies, amino acids, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, plant extracts, and cryotherapy was conducted. This initial search identified articles with a strong scientific methodology that included both preclinical and clinical research. Using standardized scoring forms, authors reviewed and scored individual articles. A consensus result of the review was achieved in a meeting of reviewers in June of 2005. The initial search identified a total of 167 new articles. Of these, 14 were selected and reviewed: alternative/natural therapy (one preclinical study); cryotherapy (four clinical studies); lasers (two clinical studies); and alternative/natural agents (seven clinical studies). A new guideline could be established for the use of cryotherapy in the management of AM in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients receiving melphalan in the conditioning phase. The rapid progress in the understanding of AM created a need for new prevention and management protocols. Frequent literature review is now necessary to identify agents and protocols being developed in this important area of supportive care in cancer.

  17. The Dammam aquifer in Bahrain - Hydrochemical characterization and alternatives for management of groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubari, Waleed K.

    Over-ion of the Dammam aquifer, the principal aquifer in Bahrain, by the agricultural and domestic sectors, has led to its salinization by adjacent brackish and saline water bodies. A hydrochemical study identified the locations of the sources of aquifer salinization and delineated their areas of influence. The investigation indicates that the aquifer water quality is significantly modified as groundwater flows from the northwestern parts of Bahrain, where the aquifer receives its water by lateral underflow from eastern Saudi Arabia, to the southern and southeastern parts. Four types of salinization of the aquifer are identified: brackish-water up-flow from the underlying brackish-water zones in north-central, western, and eastern regions; seawater intrusion in the eastern region; intrusion of sabkha water in the southwestern region; and irrigation return flow in a local area in the western region. Four alternatives for the management of groundwater quality that are available to the water authorities in Bahrain are discussed and their priority areas are proposed, based on the type and extent of each salinization source, in addition to groundwater use in that area. The effectiveness of the proposed management options in controlling the degradation of water quality in the Dammam aquifer should be evaluated using simulation modeling. Résumé La surexploitation de l'aquifère de Damman, principal aquifère de Bahreïn, du fait des besoins agricoles et domestiques, a conduit à sa salinisation à partir d'eaux voisines saumâtres et salées. Une étude hydrochimique a identifié les origines de la salinisation de l'aquifère et a délimité leurs zones d'influence. Les recherches montrent que la qualité de l'eau souterraine est modifiée de façon significative pour les écoulements souterrains dirigés vers les secteurs sud et sud-est et provenant de la région nord-ouest de Bahreïn, là où l'aquifère est alimenté latéralement à partir de l'Arabie Saoudite

  18. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  19. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  20. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  1. Benefits Of Vibration Analysis For Development Of Equipment In HLW Tanks - 12341

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely

  2. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely

  3. Studies on the immobilization of simulated HLW in NaTi2(PO4)3 (NTP) matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja Madhavan, R.; Govindan Kutty, K.V.; Gandhi, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of high level nuclear waste (HLW) is a big challenge faced by the nuclear industry today. The HLW has to be contained and isolated from the biosphere for geological timescales. NZP family of compounds is very versatile monophasic hosts for HLW immobilization. Their crystal structure can accommodate nearly all the cations known to be present in HLW due to its open structure with voids of different size. In the present study a systematic investigation on NaTi 2 (PO 4 ) 3 belonging to the NZP family; as a potential host for HLW immobilization was carried out. A simulated HLW expected from Fast Breeder Test Reactor, India (FBTR) (150Gwd/T burnup, 1 year cooling) was used. Simulated NTP waste forms with 5, 10, 15 wt. % waste loading were prepared by employing a wet chemical method and characterized. Single phase simulated NTP waste forms with up to 5 wt.% waste loading could be prepared for samples sintered in air and above 5 wt.% waste loading, monazite phase is observed as a minor secondary phase. It was found that when sintering is done in Ar/10%H 2 , NTP matrix accepts up to 10 wt.% waste loading without formation of any second phase. From the SEM studies, it was observed that samples sintered in air as well as Ar/10%H 2 palladium segregated as a metal phase and uniformly distributed throughout the waste matrix. The elemental mapping revealed retention of some of the fission products like Ru, Mo, Cs that are volatile during sintering above 1173 K and are homogenously distributed in the matrix. (author)

  4. An analytical hierarchy process for decision making of high-level-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.H.C.; Jang, W.

    1995-01-01

    To prove the existence value of nuclear technology for the world of post cold war, demonstration of safe rad-waste disposal is essential. High-level-waste (HLW) certainly is the key issue to be resolved. To assist a rational and persuasive process on various disposal options, an Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for the decision making of HLW management is presented. The basic theory and rationale are discussed, and applications are shown to illustrate the usefulness of the AHP. The authors wish that the AHP can provide a better direction for the current doomed situations of Taiwan nuclear industry, and to exchange with other countries for sharing experiences on the HLW management

  5. What should medical practitioners know about the role of alternative medicines in cardiovascular disease management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2010-04-01

    Alternative medications as a term call up many different meanings, significance, and perceptions to various medical practitioners. Some are good; others are bad. A wide range of alternative medications with relevance or connection to cardiovascular (CV) disease have been considered. While many are worthless, others have definite benefit, and at least one, chelation therapy, is associated with definite harm, significant risk, no benefit, and enrichment of the practitioners who prescribe it. The issues concerning alternative therapies will likely never be studied with randomized clinical trials due to the lack of a profit motive on the part of pharmaceutical companies--only rarely do other institutions, such as the National Institutes of Health, support medicinal studies. Basic knowledge of alternative therapies is essential for the CV specialist and other practicing physicians and other practitioners, since at least a few of their patients will take these medications regardless of medical advice. The result is that a number of these alternative medications will then interact with conventional CV medications, many times unfavorably.

  6. Capacity of burning and transmutation reactor and grouping in partitioning of HLW in self-consistent fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    The concept of capacity of B/T reactor and grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to perform self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Te, 129 I, and 135 Cs), Group B ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). In this study P-T treatment were optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs

  7. Enhanced sludge processing of HLW: Hydrothermal oxidation of chromium, technetium, and complexants by nitrate. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, S.J.; Robinson, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for hydrothermal separation of chromium from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges. The worked is aimed at attaining a fundamental understanding of chromium speciation, oxidation/reduction and dissolution kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and transport properties under hydrothermal conditions in both simple and complex salt solutions that will ultimately lead to an efficient chromium leaching process. This report summarizes the research over the first 1.5 years of a 3 year project. The authors have examined the dissolution of chromium hydroxide using different oxidants as a function of temperature and alkalinity. The results and possible applications to HLW sludges are discussed'

  8. Technical status report on environmental aspects of long-term management of high-level defense waste at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Since 1944, radioactive wastes have accumulated at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) 1500-km 2 Hanford Site in southeastern Washington, where nine nuclear reactors have produced nuclear materials for National defense. Today, only one production reactor is still operating, but a large inventory of radioactive high-level waste (HLW), the residue from processing the spent fuel to recover plutonium and uranium, remains stored in underground tanks and in metal capsules in water basins. So that this waste will pose no significant threat to the public health and safety, it must be isolated from the biosphere for thousands of years. This document contains an evaluation of environmental impacts of four alternative methods for long-term management of these HLW. The alternatives range from continuing the present action of storing the waste near the surface of the ground to retrieving the waste and disposing of it deep underground in a mined geologic repository. The alternatives are: near-term geologic disposal of stored waste; deferred geologic disposal of in-tank waste; in situ disposal of in-tank waste; and continued present action for stored waste. The environmental impacts of the four alternatives are small relative to that radiation received from natural sources or the available natural resources in the earth

  9. Time evolution of the Clay Barrier Chemistry in a HLW deep geological disposal in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, I.; Miguel, M. J.; Juncosa, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of a high level waste geological disposal is to guarantee the waste isolation from the biosphere, locking them away into very deep geological formations. The best way to assure the isolation is by means of a multiple barrier system. These barriers, in a serial disposition, should assure the confinement function of the disposal system. Two kinds of barriers are considered: natural barriers (geological formations) and engineered barriers (waste form, container and backfilling and sealing materials). Bentonite is selected as backfilling and sealing materials for HLW disposal into granite formations, due to its very low permeability and its ability to fill the remaining spaces. bentonite has also other interesting properties, such as, the radionuclide retention capacity by sorption processes. Once the clay barrier has been placed, the saturation process starts. The granite groundwater fills up the voids of the bentonite and because of the chemical interactions, the groundwater chemical composition varies. Near field processes, such as canister corrosion, waste leaching and radionuclide release, strongly depends on the water chemical composition. Bentonite pore water composition is such a very important feature of the disposal system and its determination and its evolution have great relevance in the HLW deep geological disposal performance assessment. The process used for the determination of the clay barrier pore water chemistry temporal evolution, and its influence on the performance assessment, are presented in this paper. (Author)

  10. Enhanced HLW glass formulations for the waste treatment and immobilization plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [DOE-WTP Project Office, US Department of Energy, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Current estimates and glass formulation efforts are conservative vis-a-vis achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum, chromium, bismuth, iron, phosphorous, zirconium, and sulfur compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. DOE has a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by 25% or more. (authors)

  11. Proposals of geological sites for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Geological background. Text volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    On April 2008, the Swiss Federal Council approved the conceptual part of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories. The Plan sets out the details of the site selection procedure for geological repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). It specifies that selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages, the first one (the subject of this report) being the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in the later stages of the Sectoral Plan. The geoscientific background is based on the one hand on an evaluation of the geological investigations previously carried out by Nagra on deep geological disposal of HLW and L/ILW in Switzerland (investigation programmes in the crystalline basement and Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland, investigations of L/ILW sites in the Alps, research in rock laboratories in crystalline rock and clay); on the other hand, new geoscientific studies have also been carried out in connection with the site selection process. Formulation of the siting proposals is conducted in five steps: A) In a first step, the waste inventory is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; B) The second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability, reliability of geological findings and engineering suitability; C) In the third step, the large-scale geological-tectonic situation is assessed and large-scale areas that remain under consideration are defined. For the L

  12. Threshold Assessment: Definition of Acceptable Sites as Part of Site Selection for the Japanese HLW Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, S.A.; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Webb, E.K.; Makino, Hitoshi; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Baba, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Umeki, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    For the last ten years, the Japanese High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) repository program has focused on assessing the feasibility of a basic repository concept, which resulted in the recently published H12 Report. As Japan enters the implementation phase, a new organization must identify, screen and choose potential repository sites. Thus, a rapid mechanism for determining the likelihood of site suitability is critical. The threshold approach, described here, is a simple mechanism for defining the likelihood that a site is suitable given estimates of several critical parameters. We rely on the results of a companion paper, which described a probabilistic performance assessment simulation of the HLW reference case in the H12 report. The most critical two or three input parameters are plotted against each other and treated as spatial variables. Geostatistics is used to interpret the spatial correlation, which in turn is used to simulate multiple realizations of the parameter value maps. By combining an array of realizations, we can look at the probability that a given site, as represented by estimates of this combination of parameters, would be good host for a repository site

  13. Natural analogues for containment-providing barriers for a HLW repository in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, J.; Noseck, U.

    2015-06-15

    In 2005, a German research project was started to develop a novel approach to prove safety for a HLW repository in a salt formation, to refine the safety concept, to identify open scientific issues and to define necessary R&D work. This project aimed at identifying the key information for a HLW repository in salt. One important question is how this information may be best fulfilled by natural analogue studies. This question is answered by starting a review of the required key information needs of the safety case (post-closure phase) in order to assess whether or not these requirements can be supported by natural analogues information. In order to structure the review and to address the key elements of the safety concepts, three types of natural analogues are distinguished: (i) natural analogues for the integrity of the geological barrier, (ii) natural analogues for the integrity of the geotechnical barriers and (iii) natural analogues for release scenarios. For the safety case in salt type (i) and (ii) are of highest importance and are treated in this paper. The assessment documented in this paper on the one hand indicates the high potential benefit of natural analogues for a safety case in salt and on the other hand helps to focus the available human and financial resources for the safety case on the most safety-relevant aspects. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of different end-of-life management alternatives for used natural cork stoppers through life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demertzi, Martha; Dias, Ana Cláudia; Matos, Arlindo; Arroja, Luís Manuel

    2015-12-01

    An important aspect of sustainable development is the implementation of effective and sustainable waste management strategies. The present study focuses on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach to different waste management strategies for natural cork stoppers, namely incineration at a municipal solid waste incinerator, landfilling in a sanitary landfill, and recycling. In the literature, there are no LCA studies analyzing in detail the end-of-life stage of natural cork stoppers as well as other cork products. In addition, cork is usually treated as wood at the end-of-life stage. Thus, the outcome of this study can provide an important insight into this matter. The results showed that different management alternatives, namely incineration and recycling, could be chosen depending on the impact category considered. The former alternative presented the best environmental results in the impact categories of climate change, ozone depletion and acidification, while the latter for photochemical ozone formation and mineral and fossil resource depletion. The landfilling alternative did not present the best environmental performance in any of the impact categories. However, when the biogenic carbon dioxide emission was assessed for the climate change category, the landfilling alternative was found to be the most effective since most of the biogenic carbon would be permanently stored in the cork products and not emitted into the atmosphere. A sensitivity analysis was performed and the results showed that there are various parameters that can significantly influence the results (e.g., carbon content in cork and decay rate of cork in the landfill). Thus, LCA studies should include a detailed description concerning their assumptions when the end-of-life stage is included in the boundaries since they can influence the results, and furthermore, to facilitate the comparison of different end-of-life scenarios. The present study and the obtained results could be useful for the

  15. Implementation of multimode release criteria and dose standard alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, R.

    1993-01-01

    The current standard that regulates the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) wastes evaluates the cumulative risk of all repositories with a single derived set of generic release limits. This paper reviews the technical basis, attributes, and deficiencies of the present approach and two alternative modifications and extensions. The alternatives are the multimode release limits applied at the point of release and a dose standard alternative suggested at the first Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) waste disposal workshop. Methods of developing and applying the alternatives are presented and some suggestions are given for incorporating them in the standards

  16. Alternative concepts for treatment and disposal of Hanford site high-level waste in tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claghorn, R.D.; Powell, W.J.

    1994-12-01

    Some innovative approaches have recently been proposed that may have significant schedule, cost, or environmental advantages which could improve the current HLW program strategy. Three general categories of alternative concepts are now under consideration: (1) process/product alternatives, (2) facility layout options, and (3) contracting strategies. This report compares the alternate approaches to the current program baseline to illustrate their potential significance and to identify the risks associated with each approach.

  17. Alternative concepts for treatment and disposal of Hanford site high-level waste in tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claghorn, R.D.; Powell, W.J.

    1994-12-01

    Some innovative approaches have recently been proposed that may have significant schedule, cost, or environmental advantages which could improve the current HLW program strategy. Three general categories of alternative concepts are now under consideration: (1) process/product alternatives, (2) facility layout options, and (3) contracting strategies. This report compares the alternate approaches to the current program baseline to illustrate their potential significance and to identify the risks associated with each approach

  18. Status of the safety concept and safety demonstration for an HLW repository in salt. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Filbert, W.; and others

    2013-12-15

    Salt formations have been the preferred option as host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive waste in Germany for more than 40 years. During this period comprehensive geological investigations have been carried out together with a broad spectrum of concept and safety related R and D work. The behaviour of an HLW repository in salt formations, particularly in salt domes, has been analysed in terms of assessment of the total system performance. This was first carried out for concepts of generic waste repositories in salt and, since 1998, for a repository concept with specific boundary conditions, taking the geology of the Gorleben salt dome as an example. Suitable repository concepts and designs were developed, the technical feasibility has been proven and operational and long-term safety evaluated. Numerical modelling is an important input into the development of a comprehensive safety case for a waste repository. Significant progress in the development of numerical tools and their application for long-term safety assessment has been made in the last two decades. An integrated approach has been used in which the repository concept and relevant scientific and engineering data are combined with the results from iterative safety assessments to increase the clarity and the traceability of the evaluation. A safety concept that takes full credit of the favourable properties of salt formations was developed in the course of the R and D project ISIBEL, which started in 2005. This concept is based on the safe containment of radioactive waste in a specific part of the host rock formation, termed the containment providing rock zone, which comprises the geological barrier, the geotechnical barriers and the compacted backfill. The future evolution of the repository system will be analysed using a catalogue of Features, Events and Processes (FEP), scenario development and numerical analysis, all of which are adapted to suit the safety concept. Key elements of the

  19. Managing visitor impacts in parks: A multi-method study of the effectiveness of alternative management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, L.O.; Marion, J.L.; Manning, R.E.; Lawson, S.R.; Jacobi, C.

    2008-01-01

    How can recreation use be managed to control associated environmental impacts? What management practices are most effective and why? This study explored these and related questions through a series of experimental ?treatments? and associated ?controls? at the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park, a heavily used and environmentally fragile area. The treatments included five management practices designed to keep visitors on maintained trails, and these practices ranged from ?indirect? (information/education) to ?direct? (a fence bordering the trail). Research methods included unobtrusive observation of visitors to determine the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail and a follow-up visitor survey to explore why management practices did or didn?t work. All of the management practices reduced the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail. More aggressive applications of indirect practices were more effective than less aggressive applications, and the direct management practice of fencing was the most effective of all. None of the indirect management practices reduced walking off-trail to a degree that is likely to control damage to soil and vegetation at the study site. Study findings suggest that an integrated suite of direct and indirect management practices be implemented on Cadillac Mountain (and other, similar sites) that includes a) a regulation requiring visitors to stay on the maintained trail, b) enforcement of this regulation as needed, c) unobtrusive fencing along the margins of the trail, d) redesign of the trail to extend it, widen it in key places, and provide short spur trails to key ?photo points?, and e) an aggressive information/education program to inform visitors of the regulation to stay on the trail and the reasons for it. These recommendations are a manifestation of what may be an emerging principle of park and outdoor recreation management: intensive use requires intensive management.

  20. Regional economic effects of current and proposed management alternatives for Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Lynne; Lambert, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP). The CCP must describe the desired future conditions of a Refuge and provide long range guidance and management direction to achieve Refuge purposes. Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), located 27 miles northeast of Aberdeen, South Dakota, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the CCP. The CCP for Sand Lake NWR must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed Refuge management strategies.

  1. Regional economic effects of current and proposed management alternatives for Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Lynne; Lambert, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP). The CCP must describe the desired future conditions of a Refuge and provide long range guidance and management direction to achieve Refuge purposes. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), located along the James River in east central North Dakota, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the CCP. The CCP for Arrowwood NWR must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed Refuge management strategies.

  2. Disposal alternatives and recommendations for waste salt management for repository excavation in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report documents an evaluation of five alternatives for the disposal of waste salt that would be generated by the construction of a repository for radioactive waste in underground salt deposits at either of two sites in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. The alternatives include commercial disposal, offsite deep-well injection, disposal in abandoned mines, ocean disposal, and land surface disposal on or off the site. For each alternative a reference case was rated - positive, neutral, or negative - in terms of environmental and dependability factors developed specifically for Texas sites. The factors constituting the environmental checklist relate to water quality impact, water- and land-use conflicts, ecological compatibility, conformity with air quality standards, and aesthetic impact. Factors on the dependability check-list relate to public acceptance, the adequacy of site characterization, permit and licensing requirements, technological requirements, and operational availability. A comparison of the ratings yielded the following viable alternatives, in order of preference: (1) land surface disposal, specifically disposal on tailings piles associated with abandoned potash mines; (2) disposal in abandoned mines, specifically potash mines; and (3) commercial disposal. Approaches to the further study of these three salt management techniques are recommended

  3. The Omitted Factor in Risk Management: Corporate Foreign Debt as an Alternative to Currency Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    Empirical surveys on exchange rate risk management in non-financial companies focus on the use of currency derivatives while omitting the use of corporate debt denominated in foreign currency ("foreign debt") even though the latter in risk management terms is identical to one or a series of forward...

  4. What Do University Endowment Managers Worry About? An Analysis of Alternative Asset Investments and Background Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Harvey S.; Sappington, Alexander J. W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether university endowment managers think only in terms of the assets they manage or also take into account background income, that is, the other flows of income to the university. Specifically, we test whether the level and variability of a university's background income (e.g., from tuition and government grants) affect its…

  5. Vocational Education and Training Manager Discursive Practices at the Frontline: Alternative Possibilities in a Victorian Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at how the neoliberal reform process is affecting the professional identity of frontline managers in the Australian vocational education and training sector. The article examines how frontline managers are required to negotiate their working practices between their understandings and experiences as educators and the new…

  6. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume IV of V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type.Transportation is an integral component of the alternatives being considered for each type of radioactive waste in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The types of radioactive waste considered in Part I are high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRUW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW). For some alternatives, radioactive waste would be shipped among the DOE sites at various stages of the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) process. The magnitude of the transportation-related activities varies with each alternative, ranging from minimal transportation for decentralized approaches to significant transportation for some centralized approaches. The human health risks associated with transporting various waste materials were assessed to ensure a complete appraisal of the impacts of each PEIS alternative being considered

  7. Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding with Emphasis on Alternatives to Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billow, Megan R; El-Nashar, Sherif A

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common problem that negatively impacts a woman's health-related quality of life and activity. Initial medical treatment includes hormonal and nonhormonal medications. If bleeding persists and no structural abnormalities are present, a repeat trial of medical therapy, a levonorgestrel intrauterine system, or an endometrial ablation can be used dependent on future fertility wishes. The levonorgestrel intrauterine system and endometrial ablation are effective, less invasive, and safe alternatives to a hysterectomy in women with AUB. A hysterectomy is the definitive treatment of AUB irrespective of the suspected cause when alternative treatments fail. Future studies should focus on detection of predictors for treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Final report, Task 2: alternative waste management options, Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Of the alternatives considered for disposal of the high-level waste in tanks 8D2 and 8D4, the following process is recommended: homogenization of the contents of tank 8D2, centrifugation of the sludge and supernate, mixing of the 8D4 acid waste with the centrifuged sludge, and converting the mixture to a borosilicate glass using the Hanford spray calciner/in-can melter

  9. The impact of current alternative herbal remedies on dental patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, K

    1999-01-01

    With the recent boom in holistic and herbal medicine and an ever-growing trend among the general population to refer to herbal remedies as an alternative to traditional pharmaceutical therapies, dental health care providers must be aware of the wide consumption of such products and understand their nature. It becomes imperative, therefore, to include questions regarding the use of herbal preparations as a matter of routine in the patient's drug history, since this may impact a safe dental patient care delivery.

  10. Alternative approach to automated management of load flow in engineering networks considering functional reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ирина Александровна Гавриленко

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The approach to automated management of load flow in engineering networks considering functional reliability was proposed in the article. The improvement of the concept of operational and strategic management of load flow in engineering networks was considered. The verbal statement of the problem for thesis research is defined, namely, the problem of development of information technology for exact calculation of the functional reliability of the network, or the risk of short delivery of purpose-oriented product for consumers

  11. Community-based home-care program for the management of pre-eclampsia: an alternative.

    OpenAIRE

    Helewa, M; Heaman, M; Robinson, M A; Thompson, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, acceptability and cost of a community-based home-care program for the management of mild pre-eclampsia. DESIGN: A descriptive study of outcomes between Apr. 1, 1985, and Dec. 31, 1989. SETTING: St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg. PATIENTS: Urban Winnipeg residents between 27 and 40 weeks' gestation with mild pre-eclampsia who demonstrated acceptance and compliance with home-care management; 321 patients of 1330 were enrolled in the program. INTERVENTION...

  12. Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Batch Transfer and Sampling Performance of Simulated HLW - 12307

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Jesse; Townson, Paul; Vanatta, Matt [EnergySolutions, Engineering and Technology Group, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste treatment Plant (WTP) has been recognized as a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. At the end of 2009 DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), awarded a contract to EnergySolutions to design, fabricate and operate a demonstration platform called the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) to establish pre-transfer sampling capacity, and batch transfer performance data at two different scales. This data will be used to examine the baseline capacity for a tank mixed via rotational jet mixers to transfer consistent or bounding batches, and provide scale up information to predict full scale operational performance. This information will then in turn be used to define the baseline capacity of such a system to transfer and sample batches sent to WTP. The Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) platform consists of 43'' and 120'' diameter clear acrylic test vessels, each equipped with two scaled jet mixer pump assemblies, and all supporting vessels, controls, services, and simulant make up facilities. All tank internals have been modeled including the air lift circulators (ALCs), the steam heating coil, and the radius between the wall and floor. The test vessels are set up to simulate the transfer of HLW out of a mixed tank, and collect a pre-transfer sample in a manner similar to the proposed baseline configuration. The collected material is submitted to an NQA-1 laboratory for chemical analysis. Previous work has been done to assess tank mixing performance at both scales. This work involved a combination of unique instruments to understand the three dimensional distribution of solids using a combination of Coriolis meter measurements, in situ chord length distribution

  13. Evaluating alternative management strategies for bigeye tuna, Thunnus obesus, in the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhe Tong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus support a large commercial fishery in the Indian Ocean. However, explicit management strategies and harvest control rules are yet to be developed for the management of this fishery. We used a stochastic age-structured production model as an operating model to evaluate several potential management strategies under different assumptions of stock productivity. Five management strategies—constant fishing mortality, constant catch, quasi-constant catch, constant escapement, and status-dependent strategies—were evaluated and compared using the performance indicators including average catch, average spawning stock biomass, variation in catch, average fishing mortality and lowest biomass during the time period considered in the simulation. This study shows that (1 for the constant catch strategy, an annual catch of 90000 t would result in a low risk of stock being overfished while obtaining a stable catch; (2 for the constant fishing mortality strategy fishing mortality of 0.3 per year could yield a higher catch, but might have a high probability (64% of stock dropping below the spawning stock biomass (SSB that could achieve maximum sustainable yield (SSBmsy; and (3 for the quasi-constant catch strategy an annual catch of 110000 t was sustainable if the current SSB was higher than SSBmsy. Constant escapement and status-dependent strategies were robust with respect to different levels of virgin recruitment and steepness. This study suggests that it is important to incorporate uncertainties associated with key life history, fisheries and management processes in evaluating management strategies.

  14. Effects of a Capital Investment and a Discount Rate on the Optimal Operational Duration of an HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the effects of a capital investment and a discount rate on the optimal operational duration of an HLW repository. According to the previous researches of the KRS(Korea Reference System) for an HLW repository, the amounts of 7,068,200 C$K and 2,636.2 MEUR are necessary to construct and operate surface and underground facilities. Since these huge costs can be a burden to some national economies, a study for a cost optimization should be performed. So we aim to drive the dominant cost driver for an optimal operational duration. A longer operational duration may be needed to dispose of more spent fuels continuously from a nuclear power plant, or to attain a retrievability of an HLW repository at a depth of 500 m below the ground level in a stable plutonic rock body. In this sense, an extended operational duration for an HLW repository affects the overall disposal costs of a repository. In this paper, only the influence of a capital investment and a discount rate was estimated from the view of optimized economics. Because these effects must be significant factors to minimize the overall disposal costs based on minimizing the sum of operational costs and capital investments

  15. Study on systematic integration technology of design and safety assessment for HLW geological disposal. 2. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Fukui, Hiroshi; Sagawa, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kenichi; Ito, Takaya; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kuwayama, Yuki

    2003-02-01

    The present study was carried out relating to basic design of the Geological Disposal Technology Integration System' that will be systematized as knowledge base for design analysis and safety assessment of HLW geological disposal system by integrating organically and hierarchically various technical information in three study field. The key conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) As referring to the current performance assessment report, the technical information for R and D program of HLW geological disposal system was systematized hierarchically based on summarized information in a suitable form between the work flow (work item) and processes/characteristic flow (process item). (2) As the result of the systematized technical information, database structure and system functions necessary for development and construction to the computer system were clarified in order to secure the relation between technical information and data set for assessment of HLW geological disposal system. (3) The control procedure for execution of various analysis code used by design and safety assessment in HLW geological disposal study was arranged possibility in construction of 'Geological Disposal Technology Integration System' after investigating the distributed computing technology. (author)

  16. Alternative Fuel Guidelines for Alternative Transportation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    The Volpe Center documented the increased use of alternative fuels on vehicles owned and operated by federal land management agencies. For each alternative fuel type, the Volpe Center documented the availability of vehicles, fueling mechanisms and pr...

  17. Stockpile stewardship and management programmatic environmental impact statement data for the no action and phase-out alternatives at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Alternatives for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being considered under the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSM). The three alternatives under consideration include: continuing the secondary manufacturing operations in a down-sized footprint; no action; and phasing out the secondary manufacturing operations at Y-12. This report provides specific environmental data requested for the Y-12 Plant alternatives of no action and phase out

  18. Regenerated water reuse as a merging alternative for water stress reduction and sustainable management of water resources; La reutilizacion de aguas depuradas como alternative emergente para la reduccion del estres hidrico y la gestion sostenible del recurso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urkiaga, A.; Fuentes, L de as; Etxebarria, J.

    2003-07-01

    This work offers a wide and updated overview of the potential of reuse of treated wastewater. This option, together with desalination are the two most promising alternatives to overcome the increasing water stress (as alternative sources of water) and valuable tools to fulfil with a sustainable water management. In this article legislative, quality and technology issues are tackled both in the national and world levels. Furthermore, some experiences of Gaiker on this topic are pointed out. (Author) 26 refs.

  19. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat

  20. Food waste and the food-energy-water nexus: A review of food waste management alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, Kelly M; Reinhart, Debra; Hawkins, Christopher; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Wright, James

    2018-04-01

    Throughout the world, much food produced is wasted. The resource impact of producing wasted food is substantial; however, little is known about the energy and water consumed in managing food waste after it has been disposed. Herein, we characterize food waste within the Food-Energy-Water (FEW) nexus and parse the differential FEW effects of producing uneaten food and managing food loss and waste. We find that various food waste management options, such as waste prevention, landfilling, composting, anaerobic digestion, and incineration, present variable pathways for FEW impacts and opportunities. Furthermore, comprehensive sustainable management of food waste will involve varied mechanisms and actors at multiple levels of governance and at the level of individual consumers. To address the complex food waste problem, we therefore propose a "food-waste-systems" approach to optimize resources within the FEW nexus. Such a framework may be applied to devise strategies that, for instance, minimize the amount of edible food that is wasted, foster efficient use of energy and water in the food production process, and simultaneously reduce pollution externalities and create opportunities from recycled energy and nutrients. Characterization of FEW nexus impacts of wasted food, including descriptions of dynamic feedback behaviors, presents a significant research gap and a priority for future work. Large-scale decision making requires more complete understanding of food waste and its management within the FEW nexus, particularly regarding post-disposal impacts related to water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 1, Report text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste`s origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

  2. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume I: report text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste's origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

  3. Evaluation of alternatives to shallow land burial at the radioactive waste management complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerven, F.

    1988-01-01

    Alternative waste disposal technologies were reviewed relative to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 10 CFR 61 low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria and the emerging DOE 5820.2 Chapter 3 criteria. The intent of the review was to select a technology which would meet or improve upon the disposal practices set forth in these regulations and orders. The evaluation of the disposal technologies yielded a disposal design which incorporates three elements: an all earth cover, earth vaults for the Class A (1) bottom discharge cask inserts, and a concrete vault for the Class B and C (2 and 3) bulk waste

  4. Alternative waste management concept for medium and low level wastes by in-situ solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, R.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1976, a German R and D project has been carried out to find an alternative concept for the treatment and disposal of MLW and LLW arising mainly in the planned German reprocessing plant and other nuclear facilities (LWR, fuel fabrication, R and D establishments). The main feature of this concept is an in-situ solidification of preconditioned waste granules in large salt caverns located in the deep geological underground, thus avoiding such non-radioactive ballast as lost concrete shielding and container material. (orig./RW)

  5. Alternative approaches to pollution control and waste management: Regulatory and economic instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the most common strategies and policy instruments (that is, regulatory and economic) used in developed and developing countries to achieve pollution control and waste management objectives. Although this topic has been at the center of theoretical controversy both within and outside the World Bank, the paper is not intended to contribute to this debate. Rather, its purpose is to explore how regulatory and economic instruments are used to control air and water pollution, protect ground water, and manage solid and hazardous wastes. The paper is directed to policy makers at the national, state, and local levels of government, as well as to other parties responsible for pollution control and waste management programs

  6. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 1. Main achievements of the joint study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glibert, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the main achievements of a joint theoretical study aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR wastes, relying to a certain extent on national practices in this particular area, on the basis of economical and radiological criteria. All individual intermediate steps entering a management route, from radioactive-wastes production up to their disposal in near-surface sites or in a deep repository, have been identified, described and cost-evaluated throughout the study. The radiological impact assessment comprises estimates of both individual and collective doses resulting from normal discharges of radioactive effluents and from disposal of radioactive waste products in near-surfaces sites. All specific data concerning the description of the different management routes considered as well as the methodology applied to evaluate cost and radiological impact are detailed in the subsequent volumes of the series (Volumes 2 to 8)

  7. A Study on Alternative Approaches to Instill Environmental Concerns in the Domain of Production Management of Industrial Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Manzan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comparative analysis of alternative models of production with environmental concerns that may lead to higher effectiveness in initiatives undertaken by industrial firms towards the development of more sustainable operations. The objective is to organize the knowledge on the subject of such models and provide guidelines that may help managers in selecting the most fitting approach for their business, according to the strategy and conditions of the firm. Among the presented models, the Cleaner Production model stands out for promoting the approach of nurturing the concurrent strengthening of quality, productivity, and sustainability in the existing manufacturing processes by dealing more comprehensively with factors internal to the firm that may be directly controlled by the managers.

  8. Proceedings: EPRI Workshop 2 -- Technical basis for EPA HLW disposal criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.

    1993-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sponsored this workshop to address the scientific and technical issues underlying the regulatory criteria, or standard, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and transuranic waste, commonly referred to collectively as high-level waste (HLW). These regulatory criteria were originally promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 40 CFR Part 191 in 1985. However, significant portions of the regulation were remanded by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1987. This is the second of two workshops. Topics discussed include: gas pathway; individual and groundwater protection; human intrusion; population protection; performance; TRU conversion factors and discussions. Individual projects re processed separately for the databases

  9. KAERI Underground Research Facility (KURF) for the Demonstration of HLW Disposal Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, P. S.; Cho, W. J.; Kwon, S.

    2006-01-01

    In order to dispose of high-level radioactive waste(HLW) safely in geological formations, it is necessary to assess the feasibility, safety, appropriateness, and stability of the disposal concept at an underground research site, which is constructed in the same geological formation as the host rock. In this paper, the current status of the conceptual design and the construction of a small scale URL, which is named as KURF, were described. To confirm the validity of the conceptual design of the underground facility, a geological survey including a seismic refraction survey, an electronic resistivity survey, a borehole drilling, and in situ and laboratory tests had been carried out. Based on the site characterization results, it was possible to effectively design the KURF. The construction of the KURF was started in May 2005 and the access tunnel was successfully completed in March 2006. Now the construction of the research modules is under way

  10. Role of international collaboration in PNC's R ampersand D programme for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Sumio; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Yamakawa, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    PNC has been active in promoting international cooperation in connection with the Japanese HLW disposal programme, based on both a bilateral and multilateral approach. Both types of cooperation are extremely useful; in particular, bilateral cooperation has the advantage of providing opportunities for in-depth discussions in mutual areas of interest. By way of contrast, multilateral cooperation also provides an international arena for broader discussion and corroboration of output from individual R ampersand D programmes. International collaboration also provides young researchers with an opportunity to learn from experience. Depending on the issues to be tackled, appropriate forms of collaboration have been integrated into PNC's strategy for maximizing output. The lessons learned from collaboration are very valuable and can be used directly in their programme to enhance its credibility. The format of collaboration has also been extensively developed: it has been found that resources can be utilized more effectively by sharing them appropriately

  11. Depth optimization for the Korean HLW repository System within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Seok; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-12-01

    The present study is to evaluate the material properties of the compacted bentonite, backfill material, canister cast iron insert, and the rock mass for the Korean HLW repository system. These material properties are either measured, or taken from other countries, through the evaluation of the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior of a repository. After the evaluation of the material properties, the most appropriate and economical depth as well as the layout of a single layer repository is to be recommended. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and ground water are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  12. Technical Standards on the Safety Assessment of a HLW Repository in Other Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    The basic function of HLW disposal system is to prevent excessive radio-nuclides being leaked from the repository in a short time. To do this, many technical standards should be developed and established on the components of disposal system. Safety assessment of a repository is considered as one of technical standards, because it produces quantitative results of the future evolution of a repository based on a reasonably simplified model. In this paper, we investigated other countries' regulations related to safely assessment focused on the assessment period, radiation dose limits and uncertainties of the assessment. Especially, in the investigation process of the USA regulations, the USA regulatory bodies' approach to assessment period and peak dose is worth taking into account in case of a conflict between peak dose from safety assessment and limited value in regulation.

  13. Influence of the reprocessing flow sheet on the HLW solidification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetsle, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    The introduction of Pu recycled LWR and CMFBR fuel will require the addition of a second dissolution step to quantitation recover Pu. If process modifications can be brought to the head-end procedures it is advisable to remove Ru, Te, Mo, Pd by high performance centrifugation and to volatilize soluble RuNO(NO 3 ) 2 by sparing with ozone. This changes improve the liquid extraction efficiency and simplify the off gas treatment during calcination and vitrification of HAWC. The conversion of HAW to HAWC by evaporation is accompagnied by some-volatilization of Ru and Cs. Organic reductants reduce the Ru volatilization. The introduction of salt free reagents during feed adjustment steps will decrease Na content in the HLW. The main impact of the use of salt free reagent will have its bearing on the LAW and ILIW treatment and conditioning. (DG)

  14. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, V.; Bardez-Giboire, I.; Perret, D.; Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO2 - Al2O3 - B2O3 - Na2O - Li2O - CaO - La2O3 system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al3+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na+, Li+ or Ca2+. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, Tg), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties.

  15. An Ilustrative Nuclide Release Behavior from an HLW Repository due to an Earthquake Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Won

    2008-01-01

    Program for the evaluation of a high-level waste repository which is conceptually modeled. During the last few years, programs developed with the aid of AMBER and GoldSim by which nuclide transports in the near- and far-field of a repository as well as transport through the biosphere under various normal and disruptive release scenarios could be modeled and evaluated, have been continuously demonstrated. To show its usability, as similarly done for the natural groundwater flow scheme, influence of a possible disruptive event on a nuclide release behavior from an HLW repository system caused naturally due to an earthquake has been investigated and illustrated with the newly developed GoldSim program

  16. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full-scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  17. Assessment of dose conversion factors in a generic biosphere of a Korea HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Park, J. B.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive species released from a waste repository migrate through engineered and natural barriers and eventually reach the biosphere. Once entered the biosphere, contaminants transport various exposure pathways and finally reach a human. In this study the full RES matrix explaining the key compartments in the biosphere and their interactions is introduced considering the characteristics of the Korean biosphere. Then the three exposure groups are identified based on the compartments of interest. The full exposure pathways and corresponding mathematical expression for mass transfer coefficients and etc are developed and applied to assess the dose conversion factors of nuclides for a specific exposure group. Dose conversion factors assessed in this study will be used for total system performance assessment of a potential Korean HLW repository

  18. Current status of preparing buffer/backfill block in HLW disposal abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Ming; Wang Xuewen; Zhang Huyuan

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for China to commence the full-scale compaction test, resolving the preparation problem for buffer/backfill blocks when underground research laboratory project is planned for High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) disposal. The foreign countries have some research about the preparation of buffer/backfill blocks in engineered barrier systems. The foreign research shows that installation of clay blocks with sector shape at waste pollution area is a feasible engineering method. Compacted clay blocks need to be cured in a cabinet with controlled temperature and humidity to avoid desiccation and surface powdering. A freeze mixing method, mixing powdered-ice and cooled bentonite, can be operated more easily and obtain more uniform hydration than the traditional mixing of water and bentonite. It is helpful to review and adsorb the foreign research results for the design of full-scale test of bentonite compaction. (authors)

  19. Soil, water, and nutrient losses from management alternatives for degraded pasture in Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Junior, Paulo Roberto da; Andrade, Felipe Vaz; Mendonça, Eduardo de Sá; Donagemma, Guilherme Kangussú; Fernandes, Raphael Bragança Alves; Bhattharai, Rabin; Kalita, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate sediment, water and nutrient losses from different pasture managements in the Atlantic Rainforest biome. A field study was carried out in Alegre Espiríto Santo, Brazil, on a Xanthic Ferralsol cultivated with braquiaria (Brachiaria brizantha). The six pasture managements studied were: control (CON), chisel (CHI), fertilizer (FER), burned (BUR), plowing and harrowing (PH), and integrated crop-livestock (iCL). Runoff and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P) and organic carbon contents. Soil physical attributes and above and below biomass were also evaluated. The results indicated that higher water loss was observed for iCL (129.90mm) and CON (123.25mm) managements, and the sediment losses were higher for CON (10.24tha -1 ) and BUR (5.20tha -1 ) managements when compared to the other managements. Majority of the nutrients losses occurred in dissolved fraction (99% of Ca, 99% of Mg, 96% of K, and 65% of P), whereas a significant fraction of organic carbon (80%) loss occurred in a particulate form. Except for P, other nutrients (Ca, Mg and K) and organic carbon losses were higher in coarse sediment compared to fine sediment. The greater losses of sediment, organic carbon, and nutrients were observed for CON followed by BUR management (plosses from various practices, to reduce pasture degradation, farmers should adopt edaphic practices by applying lime and fertilize to improve pasture growth and soil cover, and reducing soil erosion in the hilly Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest biome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evaluation, testing and application of participatory approaches in the Czech Republic Consensus panel - Spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. Deliverable 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtechova, Hana

    2009-06-01

    An important part of the ARGONA project is the testing and application of novel participation and dialogue approaches. The ways in this is being done include a series of events involving different stakeholders such as a focused science shop, a consensus panel and an interaction panel. In the framework of these activities in the Czech Republic the consensus panel was held on June 12, 2008 in Rez and addressed the theme: 'Spent nuclear fuel management alternatives'. The main goals of this consensus panel were: 1. Identification of the main criteria relevant to the assessment of the existing alternatives and determination their importance (weight) from the perspective of all stakeholders; 2. Achieving at least a partial consensus on selecting the most suitable alternative (management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel). A broader audience was selected with a suitable mixture of specialists and interested technical and non-technical peers including representatives from NRI, universities, Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry of the Environment, State Office for Nuclear Safety and Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, representatives of municipalities and NGOs, and waste producers such as CEZ plc etc. In opinion of all participants, there was a 'safe space' for debate ensured and everyone had the same opportunity to express his opinion. All participants also agreed that the whole course of seminar was transparent and correct. From this perspective, the chosen format of dialogue seems appropriate to ensure the exchange of new information and mutual discussion among the interested parties on the contentious issues in the NWM and nuclear energy in general. It was also found, however, that at present the social and political problems are the most important and the most urgent problems in the field of the nuclear waste management in the Czech Republic. It is very important not only to ensure a safe space for meaningful communication, but also: - To increase the

  1. When and how to recommend 'alternative approaches' in the management of high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Robert D; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Giorgini, Paolo; McGowan, Cheri L

    2015-06-01

    Several nonpharmacologic therapies, such as sodium restriction and weight loss, have been promoted by hypertension guidelines based on the trial evidence supporting their capacity to lower blood pressure. However, many patients may not respond or be able to adhere to these nonpharmacologic treatments. Despite numerous formal diet and lifestyle recommendations, the prevalence of hypertension continues to grow worldwide. As such, additional approaches are needed to help combat this public health epidemic. In this review, we outline the evidence supporting the efficacy of a number of alternative approaches for blood pressure lowering. On the basis of the recommendations by a recent American Heart Association scientific statement, we also provide guidance on when and how to implement these methods in clinical practice. The available evidence supports several approaches, including Transcendental Meditation, device-guided slow breathing, and aerobic, resistance, and isometric exercises. Nonetheless, many questions remain, and future recommendations for using alternative approaches will need to be updated as new trials are published. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Challenges and Alternatives to Sustainable Management of Agriculture and Pastoral Ecosystems in Asian Drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, J.

    2015-12-01

    There is no question that human must produce additional 70% food to feed the new 2.2 billion of people on the planet by 2050, but the question is where to grow the additional food. The demand for the additional food lies not only in producing the basic resources needed to sustain a healthy lifestyle, but also from a changing diet, especially in rapidly developing countries in the dryland regions around the world. It is forecast that this demand for meat will require an additional 0.2 billion tons per year by 2050, which is almost a doubling of present meat consumption. These new demands create mounting pressures on agriculture and pastoral ecosystems and the reported trajectory of warmer and drier climate in the future increases uncertainties in food security, adding further stresses to the already stressed nations in the Asian dryland belt. Different approaches are being either proposed or practiced in the region but the question is whether or not the current practices are sustainable or optimal in addressing the emerging issues. Given the complexity and interplay among the food, water and energy, what are alternatives to ensure a sustainable trajectory of regional development to meet the new food demand? This presentation reviews existing practices and proposes alternative solutions, by specifically examining the trade-offs between different ecosystem services that drylands in Asian may provide. Preliminary analysis suggested that the current trajectory of meat and milk production is likely not on a sustainable pathway.

  3. Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives

  4. Drop Calculations of HLW Canister and Pu Can-in-Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (Pu) (''can-in-canister'' [CIC] throughout this document) subjected to drop DBEs (design basis events) during the handling operation. The evaluated DBE in the former case is 7-m (23-ft) vertical (flat-bottom) drop. In the latter case, two 2-ft (0.61-m) corner (oblique) drops are evaluated in addition to the 7-m vertical drop. These Pu CIC calculations are performed at three different temperatures: room temperature (RT) (20 C), T = 200 F = 93.3 C , and T = 400 F = 204 C ; in addition to these the calculation characterized by the highest maximum stress intensity is performed at T = 750 F = 399 C as well. The scope of the HLW canister calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of: stress intensity and effective plastic strain in the canister, directional residual strains at the canister outer surface, and change of canister dimensions. The scope of Pu CIC calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity, and effective plastic strain in the canister. The information provided by the sketches from Reference 26 (Attachments 5.3,5.5,5.8, and 5.9) is that of the potential CIC design considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the Plutonium Immobilization Project and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. It should be noted that the 9-m vertical drop DBE, included in Reference 24, is not included in the objective of this calculation since it did not become a waste acceptance requirement. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  5. Experimental programme to demonstrate the viability of the supercontainer concept for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Humbeeck, Hughes; De Bock, Chris; Bastiaens, Wim; Van Cotthem, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The EIG EURIDICE (a joint venture between the Belgian Organisation for Radioactive Waste Management - ONDRAF/NIRAS - and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre - SCKoCEN) is responsible for performing large-scale tests, technical demonstrations and experiments to assess the feasibility of a final disposal of vitrified radioactive waste in deep clay layers. This is part of the Belgian Research and Development programme managed by ONDRAF/NIRAS. The current Belgian reference design for vitrified HLW and spent fuel assemblies is the so-called Supercontainer design. The vitrified waste canisters or spent fuel assemblies are enclosed in a carbon steel overpack which has to prevent contact between water from the host formation and the waste during the thermal phase. In order to maintain favourable chemical conditions to avoid corrosion during this period (several hundred or even thousand of years), the overpack is surrounded by a high alkaline concrete buffer of about 70 cm thick. The buffer also provides permanent radiological shielding for the workers, simplifying handling and other operations. All the components of the Supercontainer are constructed in above ground installations, thus creating favourable QA/QC conditions. After the emplacement of the Supercontainers in the disposal galleries, the remaining space will be backfilled. Tests to demonstrate the viability and the construction feasibility of the supercontainer design have been initiated. The viability programme includes Tests to verify the feasibility to construct and emplace the components of the supercontainers, and tests to verify the feasibility to backfill the disposal galleries once the supercontainers are placed. Supercontainer construction: Tests in column to verify the construction feasibility (risk of cracking) of the buffer with two different types of concrete (a self-compacting concrete - SCC - and a rheoplastic concrete RPC) were performed in collaboration with the Belgian concrete factory Socea. A

  6. Enhancing the diversity of breeding invertebrates within field margins of intensively managed grassland: Effects of alternative management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritch, Rochelle A; Sheridan, Helen; Finn, John A; McCormack, Stephen; Ó hUallacháin, Daire

    2017-11-01

    Severe declines in biodiversity have been well documented for many taxonomic groups due to intensification of agricultural practices. Establishment and appropriate management of arable field margins can improve the diversity and abundance of invertebrate groups; however, there is much less research on field margins within grassland systems. Three grassland field margin treatments (fencing off the existing vegetation "fenced"; fencing with rotavation and natural regeneration "rotavated" and; fencing with rotavation and seeding "seeded") were compared to a grazed control in the adjacent intensively managed pasture. Invertebrates were sampled using emergence traps to investigate species breeding and overwintering within the margins. Using a manipulation experiment, we tested whether the removal of grazing pressure and nutrient inputs would increase the abundance and richness of breeding invertebrates within grassland field margins. We also tested whether field margin establishment treatments, with their different vegetation communities, would change the abundance and richness of breeding invertebrates in the field margins. Exclusion of grazing and nutrient inputs led to increased abundance and richness in nearly all invertebrate groups that we sampled. However, there were more complex effects of field margin establishment treatment on the abundance and richness of invertebrate taxa. Each of the three establishment treatments supported a distinct invertebrate community. The removal of grazing from grassland field margins provided a greater range of overwintering/breeding habitat for invertebrates. We demonstrate the capacity of field margin establishment to increase the abundance and richness in nearly all invertebrate groups in study plots that were located on previously more depauperate areas of intensively managed grassland. These results from grassland field margins provide evidence to support practical actions that can inform Greening (Pillar 1) and agri

  7. Using Simulation to Support Novice Teachers' Classroom Management Skills: Comparing Traditional and Alternative Certification Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankowski, Jennifer; Walker, Joan T.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from research on situated cognition and the development of expertise and simulations in professional education, we designed two simulation tasks that provided novice teachers with repeated opportunities to deliberately practice managing a classroom under no-fault conditions. The simulations immersed novices in two perennial classroom…

  8. Using Bayesian Networks to Evaluate Management Alternatives Based on Ecosystem Service Tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2008, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force launched a research initiative to address the effects of land management decisions on coastal resources in the Guánica Bay watershed. While municipal and agricultural growth in the Guánica area has provided social and economic...

  9. Abandonment landscapes: user attitudes, alternative futures and land management in Castro Laboreiro, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Emma H.; Carvalho-Ribeiro, Sónia M.; Verburg, P.H.

    2018-01-01

    Land abandonment is an important process for the European Union, which primarily occurs in less productive, remote and mountainous areas with unfavourable conditions for agriculture. Future management directions of these abandonment areas are under debate, with increasing calls to adjust policies to

  10. PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES FOR THE LONG TERM MANAGEMENT OF EXCESS MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the use of a systematic method for comparing options for the long term management and retirement of surplus mercury in the U.S. The method chosen is the Analytical Hierarchy Procedure (AHP) as embodied in the Expert Choice 2000 software. The goal, criteria, ...

  11. Songbird response to alternative forest density management in young Douglas-fir stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan C. Hagar

    2013-01-01

    Th inning has been increasingly used in the Pacifi c Northwest to restore structural and biological diversity to densely-stocked young- to mid-aged forests that have been previously intensively managed for timber production. In the short term, thinning promotes development of understory vegetation, which in turn can increase habitat diversity for wildlife, particularly...

  12. Waste management in the Irkutsk region, Siberia, Russia: An environmental assessment of alternative development scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Eriksen, Marie Kampmann

    2018-01-01

    The current waste management system, handling around 500,000 t of household, commercial, and institutional waste annually in the Irkutsk region, Siberia, is based on landfilling in an old landfill with no controls of leachate and gas. Life-cycle assessment modelling of the current system shows th...

  13. ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES FOR THE LONG TERM MANAGEMENT OF EXCESS MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a systematic method for comparing options for the long-term management of surplus elemental mercury in the U.S., using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) as embodied in commercially available Expert Choice software. A limited scope multi-criteria decisionan...

  14. An alternate property tax program requiring a forest management plan and scheduled harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.F. Dennis; P.E. Sendak

    1991-01-01

    Vermont's Use Value Appraisal property tax program, designed to address problems such as tax inequity and forced development caused by taxing agricultural and forest land based on speculative values, requires a forest management plan and scheduled harvests. A probit analysis of enrollment provides evidence of the program's success in attracting large parcels...

  15. Alternative Work Arrangements among Professionals and Managers: Rethinking Career Development and Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermid, Shelley M.; Lee, Mary Dean; Buck, Michelle; Williams, Margaret L.

    2001-01-01

    A study of 78 women professionals/managers working reduced hours for family or personal reasons showed that less successful arrangements were associated with lack of upward mobility, underemployment, pressure to work full time, and difficult relations with co-workers. Career development was a concern for those in both more and less successful…

  16. Gossiping as a response to conflict with the boss: Alternative conflict management behavior?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, M.T.M.; Beersma, B.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The current paper aims to argue that it is important for conflict management research to start focusing on leader–follower conflict as a “special case” of conflict because the relationship between leaders and followers is, by definition, characterized by divergence of interest and, second,

  17. Alternative Methods in the Evaluation of School District Cash Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Frederick L.

    1980-01-01

    Empirically evaluates three measures of effectiveness of school district cash management: the rate of return method in common use and two new measures--efficiency rating and Net Present Value (NPV). The NPV approach allows examination of efficiency and provides a framework for evaluating other areas of educational policy. (Author/IRT)

  18. Herbicides as an alternative to prescribed burning for achieving wildlife management objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Bently Wigley; Karl V. Miller; David S. deCalesta; Mark W. Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Prescribed burning is used for many silvicultural and wildlife management objectives. However, the use of prescribed burning can be constrained due to difficulties in obtaining burning permits, concerns about liability, potential effects of scorch on growth and survival of crop trees, its sometimes ineffective results, limited burning days, and the costs of applying,...

  19. Reforming the Discipline Management Process in Schools: An Alternative Approach to Zero Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajs, Lawrence T.

    2006-01-01

    There is a need for educational reform of zero tolerance policies in school disciplinary management procedures. Zero tolerance policies are rigid mandates of predetermined consequences for specific student misconduct. Common sense and fairness are not necessarily served by the application of inflexible disciplinary rules that do not address the…

  20. Growth and yield considerations and implications for alternative density management objectives and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    David. Marshall

    2013-01-01

    Density management through thinning is the most important tool foresters have to aff ect stand development and stand structure of existing stands. Reducing stand density by thinning increases the growing space and resource availability (e.g., light, water, and nutrients) for the remaining trees. Th is can result in increased average tree growth. More available site...

  1. Proposal for geological site selection for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Statement of requirements, procedure and results. Technical report 08-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Important steps in the process of managing radioactive wastes have already been implemented in Switzerland. These include the handing and packaging of the waste, waste characterisation and documentation of waste inventories and interim storage along with associated transport. In terms of preparing for deep geological disposal, the necessary scientific and technical work is well advanced and the feasibility of constructing geological repositories that provide the required long-term safety has been successfully demonstrated for all waste types arising in Switzerland. Sufficient knowledge is available to allow the next steps in the selection of repository sites to be defined. The legal framework is also in place and organisational measures have been provided that will allow the tasks to be performed in the coming years to be implemented efficiently. The selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages. Stage 1 ends with the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in stages 2 and 3. This report documents and justifies the siting proposals prepared by Nagra for the repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). Formulation of these proposals is conducted in five steps: 1) The waste inventory, which includes reserves for future developments, is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; 2) Based on this waste allocation, the second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability

  2. Alternative management techniques for the uranium mill tailings site at Salt Lake City, UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.; Gantner, G.K.

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of 226 Ra and other uranium-chain radionuclides present in tailings piles at uranium-milling sites are on the order of 10 3 times higher than those usually found in soil-surface minerals. The public radiation exposure attributable to these sites is primarily due to inhalation of 222 Rn progeny. This paper presents the radiological assessment of the uranium-milling site at Salt Lake City, Utah. Adverse health effects are estimated from present and projected public radiation exposures. Three alternative remedial action measures can be used to reduce radiation exposures: (1) decontamination of offsite areas contaminated by tailings materials; (2) covering the tailings with contamination-free material; and (3) removal of the tailings to a more remote location. These three measures are examined in terms of costs incurred and serious health effects avoided

  3. An alternative approach to the management of reactive metals: tolerant cementitious systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, P.; Cox, J.; Wise, M.; McKinney, J.; Rhodes, C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years research has focused on preventing or minimising corrosion of reactive metals to ensure long-term waste package integrity. An alternative approach to the encapsulation of reactive metals is being explored. The approach will identify a cementitious-based encapsulating material that will allow corrosion of reactive metals to occur in a controlled and predictable manner, rather than seeking to limit or prevent the corrosion, whilst retaining waste package integrity. A low strength grout will be developed that will be 'tolerant' to the expansive forces generated by the corrosion products of reactive metals. Novel cementitious systems (e.g. foamed cements, rubber composite cements, cenosphere composite cements, lime mortars, bentonite cements etc.) that may be tolerant to potentially expansive waste products, such as reactive metals will be considered and assessed in a series of small-scale preliminary trials (compressive strength, porosity, permeability, pore solution pH, etc.)

  4. Feasibility studies of actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Actinide recycle in LMFBRs offers an attractive alternative on long-term storage of the actinides. The concept will not significantly affect the performance of the LMFBR, but will affect other parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. Assuming that hands-on maintenance will be allowed for Pu-recycle fuel fabrication facilities, the transplutonium actinides should be kept separate from the PuO 2 --UO 2 fuel. Thus, the ''reference'' recycle scheme should be defined as a scheme in which the actinides are recycled in target assemblies. The target assemblies should be reprocessed either in batches separate from spent-fuel batches or in a separate, relatively small, special purpose reprocessing plant. The target assemblies should be fabricated in a special purpose, remotely maintained facility

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance: Its Surveillance, Impact, and Alternative Management Strategies in Dairy Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Rokana, Namita; Chandra, Mudit; Singh, Brij Pal; Gulhane, Rohini Devidas; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh; Ray, Pallab; Puniya, Anil Kumar; Panwar, Harsh

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), one among the most common priority areas identified by both national and international agencies, is mushrooming as a silent pandemic. The advancement in public health care through introduction of antibiotics against infectious agents is now being threatened by global development of multidrug-resistant strains. These strains are product of both continuous evolution and un-checked antimicrobial usage (AMU). Though antibiotic application in livestock has largely contributed toward health and productivity, it has also played significant role in evolution of resistant strains. Although, a significant emphasis has been given to AMR in humans, trends in animals, on other hand, are not much emphasized. Dairy farming involves surplus use of antibiotics as prophylactic and growth promoting agents. This non-therapeutic application of antibiotics, their dosage, and withdrawal period needs to be re-evaluated and rationally defined. A dairy animal also poses a serious risk of transmission of resistant strains to humans and environment. Outlining the scope of the problem is necessary for formulating and monitoring an active response to AMR. Effective and commendably connected surveillance programs at multidisciplinary level can contribute to better understand and minimize the emergence of resistance. Besides, it requires a renewed emphasis on investments into research for finding alternate, safe, cost effective, and innovative strategies, parallel to discovery of new antibiotics. Nevertheless, numerous direct or indirect novel approaches based on host–microbial interaction and molecular mechanisms of pathogens are also being developed and corroborated by researchers to combat the threat of resistance. This review places a concerted effort to club the current outline of AMU and AMR in dairy animals; ongoing global surveillance and monitoring programs; its impact at animal human interface; and strategies for combating resistance with an extensive

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance: Its Surveillance, Impact, and Alternative Management Strategies in Dairy Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Rokana, Namita; Chandra, Mudit; Singh, Brij Pal; Gulhane, Rohini Devidas; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh; Ray, Pallab; Puniya, Anil Kumar; Panwar, Harsh

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), one among the most common priority areas identified by both national and international agencies, is mushrooming as a silent pandemic. The advancement in public health care through introduction of antibiotics against infectious agents is now being threatened by global development of multidrug-resistant strains. These strains are product of both continuous evolution and un-checked antimicrobial usage (AMU). Though antibiotic application in livestock has largely contributed toward health and productivity, it has also played significant role in evolution of resistant strains. Although, a significant emphasis has been given to AMR in humans, trends in animals, on other hand, are not much emphasized. Dairy farming involves surplus use of antibiotics as prophylactic and growth promoting agents. This non-therapeutic application of antibiotics, their dosage, and withdrawal period needs to be re-evaluated and rationally defined. A dairy animal also poses a serious risk of transmission of resistant strains to humans and environment. Outlining the scope of the problem is necessary for formulating and monitoring an active response to AMR. Effective and commendably connected surveillance programs at multidisciplinary level can contribute to better understand and minimize the emergence of resistance. Besides, it requires a renewed emphasis on investments into research for finding alternate, safe, cost effective, and innovative strategies, parallel to discovery of new antibiotics. Nevertheless, numerous direct or indirect novel approaches based on host-microbial interaction and molecular mechanisms of pathogens are also being developed and corroborated by researchers to combat the threat of resistance. This review places a concerted effort to club the current outline of AMU and AMR in dairy animals; ongoing global surveillance and monitoring programs; its impact at animal human interface; and strategies for combating resistance with an extensive

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance: Its Surveillance, Impact, and Alternative Management Strategies in Dairy Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AMR, one among the most common priority areas identified by both national and international agencies, is mushrooming as a silent pandemic. The advancement in public health care through introduction of antibiotics against infectious agents is now being threatened by global development of multidrug-resistant strains. These strains are product of both continuous evolution and un-checked antimicrobial usage (AMU. Though antibiotic application in livestock has largely contributed toward health and productivity, it has also played significant role in evolution of resistant strains. Although, a significant emphasis has been given to AMR in humans, trends in animals, on other hand, are not much emphasized. Dairy farming involves surplus use of antibiotics as prophylactic and growth promoting agents. This non-therapeutic application of antibiotics, their dosage, and withdrawal period needs to be re-evaluated and rationally defined. A dairy animal also poses a serious risk of transmission of resistant strains to humans and environment. Outlining the scope of the problem is necessary for formulating and monitoring an active response to AMR. Effective and commendably connected surveillance programs at multidisciplinary level can contribute to better understand and minimize the emergence of resistance. Besides, it requires a renewed emphasis on investments into research for finding alternate, safe, cost effective, and innovative strategies, parallel to discovery of new antibiotics. Nevertheless, numerous direct or indirect novel approaches based on host–microbial interaction and molecular mechanisms of pathogens are also being developed and corroborated by researchers to combat the threat of resistance. This review places a concerted effort to club the current outline of AMU and AMR in dairy animals; ongoing global surveillance and monitoring programs; its impact at animal human interface; and strategies for combating resistance

  8. YIELD AND QUALITY OF YELLOW PASSION FRUITS ACCORDING TO ORGANIC FERTILIZATION AND ALTERNATIVE PHYTOSANITARY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anália Lúcia Vieira Pacheco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Growing yellow passion fruit is a profitable activity, with a high demand for labor, and it is practiced especially by family-based farmers. However, the production cost is rather high and a significant part of this cost is associated with the expenses related to fertilization and phytosanitary treatments necessary for obtaining satisfactory yields and high commercial quality fruit. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of using organic compound in fertilization of plants and alternative products in phytosanitary treatments on the yield and quality of fruits. Yellow passion fruits were submitted to three types of fertilization (mineral, organic and organic-mineral and two types of phytosanitary treatment (‘conventional’ and ‘alternative’. This experiment evaluated fruit yield (kg/plant and fruit quality by using the following evaluations: seedless pulp yield, soluble solids content (SS, titratable acidity (TA, SS/TA ratio and vitamin C content. The different types of fertilization did not interfere in fruit yield, however, plants under conventional phytosanitary treatment displayed higher yields. The SS content and TA of the fruits were influenced only by fertilization, where plants that received mineral and organic-mineral fertilization produced fruit with higher contents of SS and TA. Pulp yield, SS/TA ratio and vitamin C content were not influenced by any of the evaluated factors. Regarding cultivation of passion fruit, it is possible to substitute some mineral fertilizers for organic fertilizers with no negative effects on the fruit yield or quality. However, the substitution of pesticides for alternative products compromises fruit yield.

  9. INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D' ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

  10. Integrated DM 1200 Melter Testing Of HLW C-106/AY-102 Composition Using Bubblers VSL-03R3800-1, Rev. 0, 9/15/03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Bardakci, T.; Gong, W.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

  11. Environmental evaluation of alternatives for long-term management of Defense high-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the selection of a strategy for the long-term management of the defense high-level wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This report describes the environmental impacts of alternative strategies. These alternative strategies include leaving the calcine in its present form at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), or retrieving and modifying the calcine to a more durable waste form and disposing of it either at the INEL or in an offsite repository. This report addresses only the alternatives for a program to manage the high-level waste generated at the ICPP. 24 figures, 60 tables.

  12. Environmental evaluation of alternatives for long-term management of Defense high-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the selection of a strategy for the long-term management of the defense high-level wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This report describes the environmental impacts of alternative strategies. These alternative strategies include leaving the calcine in its present form at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), or retrieving and modifying the calcine to a more durable waste form and disposing of it either at the INEL or in an offsite repository. This report addresses only the alternatives for a program to manage the high-level waste generated at the ICPP. 24 figures, 60 tables

  13. Alternatives for solid waste management in Isfahan, Iran: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduli, Mohammed A; Tavakolli, Hossein; Azari, Ariandokht

    2013-05-01

    This articles presents the status of municipal solid waste (MSW) management practices in the city of Isfahan, Iran. It provides an overview of the generation, collection, separation, recycling and disposal of MSW. Field studies were carried out from 2009 to 2010. According to this study, the city generates about 399,000 metric tons of MSW per year, of which 72.5% is organic matter. In Isfahan more than 90% of the MSW is collected by official municipal forces and the other 10% is collected by informal collectors. About 70% of the MSW in Isfahan is composted to produce a humus material, 5% is rejected and 25% is stockpiled for future use as fuel in a waste-to-energy incineration plant. Non-compostable waste and other residues are landfilled. This investigation also includes an analysis of economic benefits that could be realized by implementing incineration and a discussion of the challenges confronted in Isfahan for implementing changes to the city's existing MSW management system. This article concludes with recommendations for improving the city's MSW management system.

  14. Management strategies to curb rhino poaching: Alternative options using a cost benefit approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam M. Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The combination of increasing demand and high black market prices for rhino horn in Asian markets has fueled an escalation in rhino poaching since 2007, particularly in South Africa. This situation has in turn resulted in greatly increased rhino protection costs, loss in confidence by the private sector in rhinos, loss of revenue to conservation authorities and reduced rhino population growth rates. Within current CITES processes, management responses to threats posed by poaching to rhino persistence fall within a mixture of reactive responses of increased protection and law enforcement and some pro-active responses such as demand reduction tactics, along with a parallel call for opening a legal trade in horn. These rhino management strategies carry different risks and benefits in meeting several conservation objectives. An expert-based risk-benefit analysis of five different rhino management strategies was undertaken to assess their potential for delivering upon agreed rhino conservation objectives. The outcomes indicated that benefits may exceed risks for those strategies that in some or other format legally provided horn for meeting demand. Expert risk-benefit approaches are suggested to offer a rational, inclusive and consensus generating means of addressing complex issues such as rhino poaching and augmenting the information used within the CITES decision-making processes.

  15. Management of tritium-contaminated wastes a survey of alternative options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannone, F.

    1990-01-01

    The European Tritium Handling Experimental Laboratory (ETHEL) under construction on the site of Ispra Joint Research Centre of the Commission of European Communities has been commissioned to experimentally develop operational and environmental safety aspects related to the tritium technology in fusion, i.e. dealing with the behaviour and reliability of materials, equipment and containment systems under tritium impact. For this reason a part of the experimental activities to be performed in ETHEL will be devoted to laboratory research on tritiated waste management. However, since all experimental activities planned for the execution in ETHEL will by itselves generate tritiated wastes, current strategies and practices to be applied for the routine management of these wastes need also to be defined. To attain this target an adequate background information must be provided, which is the intent of this report. Through an exhaustive literature survey tritiated waste management options till now investigated or currently applied in several countries have been assessed. A particular importance has been attached to the tritium leach test programmes, whose results enable to assess the tritium retention efficiency of the various waste immobilization options. The conclusions resulting from the overall assessment are presented

  16. Controlled drilling technology for HLW management. Directional drilling and mechanics/stress measurements in the borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiho, Kenzo; Shin, Koichi; Okada, Tetsuji; Obuchi, Yasuyoshi; Sunaga, Takayuki; Hase, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Since 2000, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has been conducting the project on controlled drilling and the logging/measurement technologies in its boreholes. Especially borehole pressure meter and bore hole stress measurement apparatus which can apply to the controlled drilling system was developed. The bore hole was drilled to the 1000 m long in order to intersect the Omagari fault located at Horonobe town in Hokkaido and its core recovery was 99.8% as of FY. 2011. Using borehole logging/measurement/survey, the geological, hydrological, geo-mechanical, geophysical and geochemical data were collected and the Omagari fault was characterized. (author)

  17. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 3, Appendix A: Mass burn technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

  18. Traditional medicines and alternative practice in the management of prostate diseases in southern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei, Mathew Y; Klufio, George O; Ayamba, Ali; Mohammed, Sherif

    2017-09-01

    This study was aimed at identifying Ghanaian traditional medicines used for the management of prostate diseases and their constituents. Reviews of studies conducted on them are also presented. This was a prospective study. Traditional Medicine samples from consecutive patients with either lower urinary symptoms (LUTS) presenting at the Urology Unit of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) in Accra from January 2015 to June 2016 and had a prior treatment with traditional medicines, had the samples retrieved. Additionally, all the 58 licensed pharmaceutical shops in Okaishie, a whole sale and retail depot for medicines in the main business district of Accra, were visited and traditional medicines for the management of prostate diseases acquired. The products constituent as labeled were documented and entered once on a proforma. This study was part of a study on the management of benign prostate hyperplasia at the KBTH approved by the Medical Directorate.The findings were analyzed and presented using descriptive statistics and presented as a table. Eleven products were identified with the main indigenous medicinal plant identified being the root extract of Croton membranaceus . This was the constituent in four products (Uro 500 ® , UR-Quick mixture ® , Prostacure® and prostat®60). Although studies on the basic pharmacology and animal studies have confirmed its effect on the prostate, only one clinical study was identified. Croton membranaceus was the indigenous traditional medicine identified for relieving LUTS due to prostate disease. There is the need for empirical evidence on its efficacy in treating Prostate cancer. Not declared.

  19. COMPANY SUSTAINABILITY PROVISION ORGANIZATIONAL MECHANISM AS ALTERNATIVE TO ANTI-CRISIS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bobryshev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience available for practical implementation of anti-crisis company (particularly industrial enterprise management methods under conditions of proceeding destruction of scientifi c and technical potential of the country proves their ineff ectiveness, so other theoretical and practical solutions capable of changing the situation are to be searched. In this respect, creation of an organizational mechanism for a company to function sustainably through minimization of the infl uence of crisis phenomena consequences on activities of the company seems to have good prospects.

  20. Biosolids management strategies: an evaluation of energy production as an alternative to land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Maureen

    2013-07-01

    Currently, more than half of the biosolids produced within the USA are land applied. Land application of biosolids introduces organic contaminants into the environment. There are potential ecological and human health risks associated with land application of biosolids. Biosolids may be used as a renewable energy source. Nutrients may be recovered from biosolids used for energy generation for use as fertilizer. The by-products of biosolids energy generation may be used beneficially in construction materials. It is recommended that energy generation replace land application as the leading biosolids management strategy.

  1. New Biofuel Alternatives: Integrating Waste Management and Single Cell Oil Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Elia Judith; Raghavan, Vijaya; González-Andrés, Fernando; Gómez, Xiomar

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about greenhouse gas emissions have increased research efforts into alternatives in bio-based processes. With regard to transport fuel, bioethanol and biodiesel are still the main biofuels used. It is expected that future production of these biofuels will be based on processes using either non-food competing biomasses, or characterised by low CO2 emissions. Many microorganisms, such as microalgae, yeast, bacteria and fungi, have the ability to accumulate oils under special culture conditions. Microbial oils might become one of the potential feed-stocks for biodiesel production in the near future. The use of these oils is currently under extensive research in order to reduce production costs associated with the fermentation process, which is a crucial factor to increase economic feasibility. An important way to reduce processing costs is the use of wastes as carbon sources. The aim of the present review is to describe the main aspects related to the use of different oleaginous microorganisms for lipid production and their performance when using bio-wastes. The possibilities for combining hydrogen (H2) and lipid production are also explored in an attempt for improving the economic feasibility of the process. PMID:25918941

  2. Costs and benefits of alternatives for mill-tailings management: a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chee, P.C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Roberts, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    Past milling of uranium and thorium ore in the United States has produced tailings that are stored at numerous sites around the country. Some of these storage sites are located near towns and cities, and the local populations are exposed to radiation and radioactive materials migrating off the sites. The federal government has initiated remedial action programs (for example the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program and the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program) to clean up land and buildings that have become contaminated with radioactive material and thus eliminate or reduce population exposure to radiation. The degree of long-term benefit from any reduction of the population dose will be different for each remedial action, as will the cost. To gain a perspective on the cost-benefit ratios of various alternatives (remedial actions), estimates are made of the potential radiation doses to affected populations near two inactive sites and of the costs associated with (1) onsite stabilization of radioactive tailings, and (2) transportation of tailings to remote locations for stabilization. The calculations presented in this paper were based on actual conditions at an inactive uranium mill tailings site (the Vitro site in Salt Lake City, Utah) and at a former thorium-processing facility (Kerr-McGee site in West Chicago, Illinois)

  3. New Biofuel Alternatives: Integrating Waste Management and Single Cell Oil Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Judith Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about greenhouse gas emissions have increased research efforts into alternatives in bio-based processes. With regard to transport fuel, bioethanol and biodiesel are still the main biofuels used. It is expected that future production of these biofuels will be based on processes using either non-food competing biomasses, or characterised by low CO2 emissions. Many microorganisms, such as microalgae, yeast, bacteria and fungi, have the ability to accumulate oils under special culture conditions. Microbial oils might become one of the potential feed-stocks for biodiesel production in the near future. The use of these oils is currently under extensive research in order to reduce production costs associated with the fermentation process, which is a crucial factor to increase economic feasibility. An important way to reduce processing costs is the use of wastes as carbon sources. The aim of the present review is to describe the main aspects related to the use of different oleaginous microorganisms for lipid production and their performance when using bio-wastes. The possibilities for combining hydrogen (H2 and lipid production are also explored in an attempt for improving the economic feasibility of the process.

  4. New biofuel alternatives: integrating waste management and single cell oil production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Elia Judith; Raghavan, Vijaya; González-Andrés, Fernando; Gómez, Xiomar

    2015-04-24

    Concerns about greenhouse gas emissions have increased research efforts into alternatives in bio-based processes. With regard to transport fuel, bioethanol and biodiesel are still the main biofuels used. It is expected that future production of these biofuels will be based on processes using either non-food competing biomasses, or characterised by low CO₂ emissions. Many microorganisms, such as microalgae, yeast, bacteria and fungi, have the ability to accumulate oils under special culture conditions. Microbial oils might become one of the potential feed-stocks for biodiesel production in the near future. The use of these oils is currently under extensive research in order to reduce production costs associated with the fermentation process, which is a crucial factor to increase economic feasibility. An important way to reduce processing costs is the use of wastes as carbon sources. The aim of the present review is to describe the main aspects related to the use of different oleaginous microorganisms for lipid production and their performance when using bio-wastes. The possibilities for combining hydrogen (H₂) and lipid production are also explored in an attempt for improving the economic feasibility of the process.

  5. Clinical roundtable monograph. New alternatives in CLL therapy: managing adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanan-Khan, Asher; Kipps, Thomas; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2010-08-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell leukemia mainly affecting older adults. Historically, CLL has been regarded as an incurable disease, and treatment has been confined to cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. However, prognosis for patients treated with these agents remained poor, prompting the development of new, targeted agents. The introduction of rituximab, a CD20-targeted monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment for this disease. Rituximab in combination with fludarabine improved response rates and length of progression-free survival. The success of rituximab in this setting has prompted the development of many more investigational agents for CLL, including other antibody agents. However, as with any medication, the potential benefit achieved with CLL therapies is mitigated by the safety risk for the patient. These agents have been associated with adverse events such as immunosuppression, reactivation of cytomegalovirus, and infusion-related reactions that can occur with antibody administration. Adverse events can greatly affect the patient’s quality of life and ability to tolerate therapy. Management of adverse events is a critical component of the overall treatment strategy for CLL, particularly in elderly patients. In this clinical roundtable monograph, 3 expert physicians discuss the latest clinical studies evaluating the treatment of CLL, focusing on the adverse events associated with each agent and the potential interventions that can be used to manage their occurrence.

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative futures of deforestation and agricultural management in the southern Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galford, Gillian L; Melillo, Jerry M; Kicklighter, David W; Cronin, Timothy W; Cerri, Carlos E P; Mustard, John F; Cerri, Carlos C

    2010-11-16

    The Brazilian Amazon is one of the most rapidly developing agricultural areas in the world and represents a potentially large future source of greenhouse gases from land clearing and subsequent agricultural management. In an integrated approach, we estimate the greenhouse gas dynamics of natural ecosystems and agricultural ecosystems after clearing in the context of a future climate. We examine scenarios of deforestation and postclearing land use to estimate the future (2006-2050) impacts on carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)), and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from the agricultural frontier state of Mato Grosso, using a process-based biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystems Model (TEM). We estimate a net emission of greenhouse gases from Mato Grosso, ranging from 2.8 to 15.9 Pg CO(2)-equivalents (CO(2)-e) from 2006 to 2050. Deforestation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions over this period, but land uses following clearing account for a substantial portion (24-49%) of the net greenhouse gas budget. Due to land-cover and land-use change, there is a small foregone carbon sequestration of 0.2-0.4 Pg CO(2)-e by natural forests and cerrado between 2006 and 2050. Both deforestation and future land-use management play important roles in the net greenhouse gas emissions of this frontier, suggesting that both should be considered in emissions policies. We find that avoided deforestation remains the best strategy for minimizing future greenhouse gas emissions from Mato Grosso.

  7. Carbon footprint related to cattle production in Brazil, management practices and new alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, Eduardo; de oliveira, Ricardo; Berchielli, Telma; Reis, Ricardo; La Scala, Newton

    2013-04-01

    Brazil has the World largest commercial beef cattle herd, over 209.5 million heads in 2010 and is the leading exports of cattle meat. It has been argued that this activity has an important impact on GHG emissions, but a variety of options exists for greenhouse gases (GHG) mitigation in agriculture. Among those, the most prominent options are associated to the improvement of crops and grazing land management. Our study is focused on the GHG balance related to the improvement of brachiaria spp. pasture, leading to increases in the animal stocking rate and meat production per area and time. This study is based on the IPCC (2006) methodology and others Brazil specific data and results presented by scientific literature to estimate GHG balance (emissions sources and sinks) for three scenarios proposed for brachiaria pasture: 1) degraded pasture, 2) managed pasture and 3) crop-livestock-forest integration system (CLFIS). The approach takes into account the amounts of supplies per hectare used for each of the simulated scenario projected over a 20 years period. The GHG estimates are presented in kg CO2eq per kg of liveweight, considering the following emission sources and sinks within farm-gate: i) CH4 from enteric fermentation, ii) CH4 from manure deposited on pasture, iii) N2O emissions from urine and dung deposited by cattle on pasture, iv) N2O emissions from N synthetic fertilizer, v) N2O emissions from crop residues as of N-fixing crops and pasture renewal returned to soils, vi) CO2 from potassium use, vii) CO2 from phosphorus use, viii) CO2 from insecticides use, ix) CO2 from herbicides use, x) CO2 emissions due to lime application, xi) emissions due to diesel combustion, xii) eucalyptus biomass sequestration and xiii) soil carbon sequestration. We considered initial body weight of 200 kg for each heifer and a final slaughter weight of 450 kg head-1 for all scenarios; for degraded pasture a stocking rate of 0,5 head ha-1 year-1 and liveweight gain of 83 kg head-1

  8. Evaluating environmental impacts of alternative construction waste management approaches using supply-chain-linked life-cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukvar, Murat; Egilmez, Gokhan; Tatari, Omer

    2014-06-01

    Waste management in construction is critical for the sustainable treatment of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) waste materials, and recycling of these wastes has been considered as one of the best strategies in minimization of C&D debris. However, recycling of C&D materials may not always be a feasible strategy for every waste type and therefore recycling and other waste treatment strategies should be supported by robust decision-making models. With the aim of assessing the net carbon, energy, and water footprints of C&D recycling and other waste management alternatives, a comprehensive economic input-output-based hybrid life-cycle assessment model is developed by tracing all of the economy-wide supply-chain impacts of three waste management strategies: recycling, landfilling, and incineration. Analysis results showed that only the recycling of construction materials provided positive environmental footprint savings in terms of carbon, energy, and water footprints. Incineration is a better option as a secondary strategy after recycling for water and energy footprint categories, whereas landfilling is found to be as slightly better strategy when carbon footprint is considered as the main focus of comparison. In terms of construction materials' environmental footprint, nonferrous metals are found to have a significant environmental footprint reduction potential if recycled. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. An evaluation of alternative technologies for the management of industrial wastes at Nalluk Base, Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, A.R.

    1993-05-01

    A study was carried out to identify and evaluate alternative waste treatment and/or disposal technologies that would be effective in improving the management of slops, used glycol and industrial solid wastes at Nalluk Base, Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories. This site was used as a base for an offshore oil and gas drilling program between 1983 and 1992. Background research was conducted to review the biophysical, regulatory and socioeconomic conditions which have had an influence on Nalluk Base waste management operations. Concerns in relation to management of industrial wastes at the base include: extreme climate, permafrost geology, remote location, excessive government regulations but no specific legislation, and distrust of white man by local Inuvialuit. The five major waste streams handled at the base (used glycol, oily slops, scrap metal, used containers and ash) were characterized in terms of physical and chemical characteristics, anticipated volumes, and potential contaminants. Eighty-six waste treatment and disposal processes were reviewed for their applicability in treating each of the five waste streams. Short-listed options were subjected to full-cost environmental accounting. Preferred options identified were: used glycol, one site reuse using vacuum distillation; unseparated slops and used oil/fuel, off-site cement kiln incineration; oily wastewater, on-site evaporation; sludge, offsite landfill; scrap metal and used containers, Hamlet landfill (current practise); and ash, off-site landfill. 178 refs., 15 figs., 34 tabs.

  10. Simulation of HTM processes in buffer-rock barriers based on the French HLW disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoshuo; Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Zhang, Chunliang

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The main objectives of this paper are to gain experience with modelling and analysis of HTM processes in clay rock and bentonite buffer surrounding heat-generating radioactive waste. The French concept for HLW disposal in drifts with backfilled bentonite buffer considered in numerical calculations which are carried out by using the computer code CODE-BRIGHT developed by the Technical University of Catalonia in Barcelona. The French repository designed by ANDRA is located in the middle of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation (COX) of 250 m thickness at a depth of 500 to 630 m below the surface. The French concept has been simplified at this simulation work. A drift is considered to be excavated at a depth of 500 m below the surface. It has a diameter of 2.2 m and a length of 20 m. A large volume of the rock mass around the drift is taken into account by an axisymmetric model of 100 m radius and 100 m length. In fact, this model represents a cylindrical rock-buffer-system with the central axis of the containers, as shown in Figure 1. Some points are selected in the buffer and the rock along the radial line (dash yellow line) in the middle of the drift for recording HTM parameters with time. The display and analysis of the results at this paper are chiefly along this line. The simulation work has been divided to two time steps. At the first step, the drift excavation and ventilation is simulated by reducing the stress normal to the drift wall down to zero and circulating gas along the drift wall with relative humidity of 85 %. Following the drift excavation and ventilation, the HLW containers and the bentonite are emplaced in the drift as the second step of the simulation. This is simulated by simultaneously applying the initial conditions of the buffer and the decayed heat emitting from the waste containers as thermal boundary conditions. Two materials (Clay rock and bentonite buffer) are taken into account

  11. Laparoscopic resection versus myolysis in the management of symptomatic uterine adenomyosis: alternatives to conventional treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachyu Hadisaputra

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective therapy preserving reproductive function in adenomyosis is warranted. From June 2003 to June 2004, patients diagnosed as having adenomyosis by transvaginal ultrasound and had symptoms of menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, and pelvic pain were randomly allocated to either receive laparoscopic resection or myolysis. GnRH analog was given for 3 cycles after surgery. Within 6 months, symptoms were evaluated using questionnaires and at the end of follow up, adenomyosis volume was assessed by transvaginal ultra-sound. There were 20 patients included, 10 patients had resection and the rest underwent myolysis. Both procedures did not yield sig-nificant complications. Subjective evaluation by questionnaires was done in all patients. Three patients could not be evaluated objec-tively by transvaginal ultrasound, 2 patients resigned and 1 was pregnant. There was no significant difference in menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea reduction score between the 2 groups (p=0.399 and 0.213, respectively. In both groups, dysmenorrhea was reduced significantly after treatment. No significant statistical difference was found in median adenomyosis volume increment (p=0.630 be-tween the resection (median=+15.35% (-100-159} and myolysis groups (median=+48.43% (-100-553. Five patients were pregnant, 3 from the resection group and 2 from the myolysis group. Uterine rupture was found in 1 patient (from the myolysis group at the age of 8 months of pregnancy. The effectiveness of laparoscopic adenomyosis resection was not significantly different compared with lapa-rascopic myolysis as an alternative conservative surgery in treating symptomatic adenomyosis. Myolysis was not recommended for women who wish to be pregnant. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:9-17Keywords: laparascopy, resection, myolysis, conservative surgery, symptomatic adenomyosis

  12. USE OF BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF THE MEXICAN BEAN WEEVIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAREN FERREIRA DA SILVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the insecticidal activity of eight botanical species in the behavior and biological development of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae under laboratory conditions. The botanical species were applied on bean grains (Phaseolus vulgaris Linnaeus directly as powder or indirectly within TNT bags. Three laboratory assays were performed. First, a repellent activity test was performed by exposing twenty couples of Z. subfasciatus adults in a choice-test arena. Second, a mortality test was performed for seven days after infestation. Finally, the oviposition and emergency rates of adults (% and the development from egg to adult (in days were evaluated in seven couples (males and females for seven days inside of a vial containing 0.3g of the powder from each botanical species and 10 g of bean grains (3% w.w-1. The study was conducted in a completely randomized design, and the treatments were arranged as a factorial design (2 x 9 with two factors (factor 1= powder and TNT bag application forms and factor 2= eight botanical species and control with eight replications. The powder application form was more efficient in controlling Z. subfasciatus. Azadirachta indica (powder application, Ruta graveolens (powder application, and Piper aduncum (TNT bag reduced the infestation of adults. The species A. inidica, Piper tuberculatum, Trichilia catigua, Pfaffia glomerata, R. graveolens, and Mentha pulegium inhibited the oviposition of the insects regardless of the formulation applied. R. graveolens (powder application caused 100% of mortality. The powder application of R. graveolens and M. pulegium reduced egg viability and insect emergence; therefore, they are very promising alternatives to control Z. subfasciatus in stored grains.

  13. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AN ALTERNATIVE FOR NEW FUNDING SOURCES OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Petru

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to answer mainly the questions: What are the consequences of the taxation base increase? What forms does the taxation base have? What can local authorities do in order to make certain areas attractive? Which are the specific players involved in the local economic development? Also, beyond the rigours imposed by the mathematical presentation of the sustainable economic development, we appreciate that for the financial management, too, knowing the gear determined by the allocation of public resources and generation of additional revenues will be very useful in establishing and underlying the decisions to invest in the public infrastructure and, also, to calculate the time period in which these can be depreciated especially based on the financial flows from supplementary revenues.

  14. Endoscopically placed stents: a useful alternative for the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Nogales

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign esophageal strictures are relatively frequent and can severely affect the quality of life of a patient. Stenting has been proposed for the treatment of refractory cases. Lesions affecting the cervical esophagus are more difficult to treat, and the placement of stents in this location has traditionally been restricted due to potential adverse events. The aim of this study was to describe the efficacy and safety of endoscopic stenting in the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal strictures (RBCES in a single-center cohort study. Methods: We analyzed 12 patients with RBCES (Kochman's criteria and severe dysphagia. We recorded previous endoscopic treatments, stricture characteristics and demographic data. The two types of stents used were fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMS and uncovered biodegradable stents (BDS. FCSEMS were removed eight weeks after placement, and BDS were followed-up until degradation. We assessed technical and clinical success, rate of stricture recurrence and adverse events. Results: The mean age of participants was 64 years (range 30-85. A total of 23 stents (13 FCSEMS and 10 BDS were placed in 12 patients (median 1.92, range 1-4. The technical success rate was 96% (22/23 stents. Eight patients (66.6% maintained adequate oral intake at the end of follow-up (median 33.3 months, range 3-84 months. Migration was recorded in 7/23 stents (30.4% and epithelial hyperplasia in 4/23 stents (17.4%. No severe adverse events were noted. All patients complained of minor cervical pain after placement that was well controlled with mild analgesia. Conclusions: Endoscopic stent therapy seems to be effective and safe in the management of RBCES.

  15. Endoscopically placed stents: a useful alternative for the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Óscar; Clemente, Ana; Caballero-Marcos, Aránzazu; García-Lledó, Javier; Pérez-Carazo, Leticia; Merino, Beatriz; López-Ibáñez, María; Pérez Valderas, María Dolores; Bañares, Rafael; González-Asanza, Cecilia

    2017-07-01

    Benign esophageal strictures are relatively frequent and can severely affect the quality of life of a patient. Stenting has been proposed for the treatment of refractory cases. Lesions affecting the cervical esophagus are more difficult to treat, and the placement of stents in this location has traditionally been restricted due to potential adverse events. The aim of this study was to describe the efficacy and safety of endoscopic stenting in the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal strictures (RBCES) in a single-center cohort study. We analyzed 12 patients with RBCES (Kochman's criteria) and severe dysphagia. We recorded previous endoscopic treatments, stricture characteristics and demographic data. The two types of stents used were fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMS) and uncovered biodegradable stents (BDS). FCSEMS were removed eight weeks after placement, and BDS were followed-up until degradation. We assessed technical and clinical success, rate of stricture recurrence and adverse events. The mean age of participants was 64 years (range 30-85). A total of 23 stents (13 FCSEMS and 10 BDS) were placed in 12 patients (median 1.92, range 1-4). The technical success rate was 96% (22/23 stents). Eight patients (66.6%) maintained adequate oral intake at the end of follow-up (median 33.3 months, range 3-84 months). Migration was recorded in 7/23 stents (30.4%) and epithelial hyperplasia in 4/23 stents (17.4%). No severe adverse events were noted. All patients complained of minor cervical pain after placement that was well controlled with mild analgesia. Endoscopic stent therapy seems to be effective and safe in the management of RBCES.

  16. Assessment of alternative management techniques of tank bottom petroleum sludge in Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Futaisi, Ahmed; Jamrah, Ahmad; Yaghi, Basma; Taha, Ramzi

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated several options for environmentally acceptable management techniques of tank bottom oily sludge. In particular, we tested the applicability of managing the sludge by three options: (1) as a fuel supplement; (2) in solidification; (3) as a road material. Environmental testing included determination of heavy metals concentration; toxic organics concentration and radiological properties. The assessment of tank bottom sludge as a fuel supplement included various properties such as proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and energy content. Solidified sludge mixtures and road application sludge mixtures were subjected to leaching using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Tank bottom sludge was characterized as having higher concentrations of lead, zinc, and mercury, but lower concentrations of nickel, copper and chromium in comparison with values reported in the literature. Natural occurring radioactive minerals (NORM) activity values obtained on different sludge samples were very low or negligible compared to a NORM standard value of 100 Bq/g. The fuel assessment results indicate that the heating values, the carbon content and the ash content of the sludge samples are comparable with bituminous coal, sewage sludge, meat and bone meal and petroleum coke/coal mixture, but lower than those in car tyres and petroleum coke. The nitrogen content is lower than those fuels mentioned above, while the sulfur content seems comparable with bituminous coal, petroleum coke and a petroleum coke/coal mixture. The apparent lack of leachability of metals from solidification and road material sludge applications suggests that toxic metals and organics introduced to these applications are not readily attacked by weak acid solutions and would not be expected to migrate or dissolved into the water. Thus, in-terms of trace metals and organics, the suggested sludge applications would not be considered hazardous as defined by the TCLP leaching procedure

  17. A comparative assessment of alternative waste management procedures for selected reprocessing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickford, G.E.; Plews, M.J.

    1983-07-01

    This report, which has been prepared by Associated Nuclear Services for the Department of the Environment, presents the results of a study and comparative assessment of management procedures for low and intermediate level solid waste streams arising from current and future fuel reprocessing operations on the Sellafield site. The characteristics and origins of the wastes under study are discussed and a reference waste inventory is presented, based on published information. Waste management strategy in the UK and its implications for waste conditioning, packaging and disposal are discussed. Wastes currently arising which are not suitable for Drigg burial or sea dumping are stored in an untreated form. Work is in hand to provide additional and improved disposal facilities which will accommodate all the waste streams under study. For each waste stream viable procedures are identified for further assessment. The procedures comprise a series of on-site operations-recovery from storage, pre-treatment, treatment, encapsulation, and packaging, prior to storage or disposal of the conditioned waste form. Assessments and comparisons of each procedure for each waste are presented. These address various process, operational, economic, radiological and general safety factors. The results are presented in a series of tables with supporting text. For the majority of wastes direct encapsulation with minimal treatment appears to be a viable procedure. Occupational exposure and general safety are not identified as significant factors governing the choice of procedures. The conditioned wastes meet the general requirements for safe handling during storage and transportation. The less active wastes suitable for disposal by currently available routes meet the appropriate disposal criteria. It is not possible to consider in detail the suitability for disposal of the more active wastes for which disposal facilities are not yet available. (Author)

  18. Final Report Start-Up And Commissioning Tests On The Duramelter 1200 HLW Pilot Melter System Using AZ-101 HLW Simulants VSL-01R0100-2, Rev. 0, 1/20/03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Brandys, M.; Wilson, C.N.; Schatz, T.R.; Gong, W.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter(trademark) 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI (1). Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m 2 ) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

  19. FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

  20. Discussing compliance. Summary report from discussions with Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple regarding compliance with the Swedish HLW Regulations from meetings in Stockholm May 3 and 4, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mikael

    1999-06-01

    Summary report from discussions with Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple regarding compliance with the Swedish HLW Regulations from meetings in Stockholm. The report also contains bibliographical information and preliminary observations made by Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple.