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Sample records for hlw immobilization technologies

  1. HLW immobilization in glass

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  2. HLW immobilization in glass: industrial operation and product quality

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Leroy, P.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    This extended summary discusses the immobilization of high level wastes from the viewpoint of the quality of the final product, i.e. the HLW glass. The R and D studies comprise 3 steps: glass formulation, glass characterization and long term behaviour studies

  3. The use of mineral-like matrices for hlw solidification and spent fuel immobilization

    Pokhitonov, J.A.; Starchenko, V.A.; Strelnikov, A.V.; Sorokin, V.T.; Shvedov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The conception of radioactive waste management is based upon the multi-barrier protection principle stating that the long-lived radionuclides safety isolation is ensured by a system of engineering and natural geological barriers. One of the effective ways of the long-lived radionuclides immobilization is the integration of these materials within a mineral-like matrice. This technique may be used both for isolation of separated groups of nuclides (Cs, Sr, TUE, TRE) and for immobilization of spent fuel which for some reason can't be processed at the radiochemical plant. In this paper two variants of flowsheets HLW management are discussed. The following ways of HLW reprocessing are considered: - The first cycle raffinate solidification (without partitioning); - The individual solidification of two separated radionuclide groups (Sr+Cs+FP fraction and TPE+TRE fraction). The calcination of some characteristics (annual and total amounts, specific activity, radiochemical composition and radiogenic heat) of HLW integrated within a mineral-like matrix are performed for both options. The matrix compositions may be also used for spent fuel immobilization by means of the hot isostatic pressing technique. (authors)

  4. HLW Long-term Management Technology Development

    Choi, Jong Won; Kang, C. H.; Ko, Y. K.

    2010-02-01

    Permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuels from the power generation is considered to be the unique method for the conservation of human being and nature in the present and future. In spite of spent nuclear fuels produced from power generation, based on the recent trends on the gap between supply and demand of energy, the advance on energy price and reduction of carbon dioxide, nuclear energy is expected to play a role continuously in Korea. It means that a new concept of nuclear fuel cycle is needed to solve problems on spent nuclear fuels. The concept of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle including PYRO processing and SFR was presented at the 255th meeting of the Atomic Energy Commission. According to the concept of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle, actinides and long-term fissile nuclides may go out of existence in SFR. And then it is possible to dispose of short term decay wastes without a great risk bearing. Many efforts had been made to develop the KRS for the direct disposal of spent nuclear fuels in the representative geology of Korea. But in the case of the adoption of Advanced nuclear fuel cycle, the disposal of PYRO wastes should be considered. For this, we carried out the Safety Analysis on HLW Disposal Project with 5 sub-projects such as Development of HLW Disposal System, Radwaste Disposal Safety Analysis, Feasibility study on the deep repository condition, A study on the Nuclide Migration and Retardation Using Natural Barrier, and In-situ Study on the Performance of Engineered Barriers

  5. Enhanced HLW glass formulations for the waste treatment and immobilization plant

    Kruger, Albert A. [DOE-WTP Project Office, US Department of Energy, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Current estimates and glass formulation efforts are conservative vis-a-vis achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum, chromium, bismuth, iron, phosphorous, zirconium, and sulfur compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. DOE has a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by 25% or more. (authors)

  6. Studies on the immobilization of simulated HLW in NaTi2(PO4)3 (NTP) matrix

    Raja Madhavan, R.; Govindan Kutty, K.V.; Gandhi, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of high level nuclear waste (HLW) is a big challenge faced by the nuclear industry today. The HLW has to be contained and isolated from the biosphere for geological timescales. NZP family of compounds is very versatile monophasic hosts for HLW immobilization. Their crystal structure can accommodate nearly all the cations known to be present in HLW due to its open structure with voids of different size. In the present study a systematic investigation on NaTi 2 (PO 4 ) 3 belonging to the NZP family; as a potential host for HLW immobilization was carried out. A simulated HLW expected from Fast Breeder Test Reactor, India (FBTR) (150Gwd/T burnup, 1 year cooling) was used. Simulated NTP waste forms with 5, 10, 15 wt. % waste loading were prepared by employing a wet chemical method and characterized. Single phase simulated NTP waste forms with up to 5 wt.% waste loading could be prepared for samples sintered in air and above 5 wt.% waste loading, monazite phase is observed as a minor secondary phase. It was found that when sintering is done in Ar/10%H 2 , NTP matrix accepts up to 10 wt.% waste loading without formation of any second phase. From the SEM studies, it was observed that samples sintered in air as well as Ar/10%H 2 palladium segregated as a metal phase and uniformly distributed throughout the waste matrix. The elemental mapping revealed retention of some of the fission products like Ru, Mo, Cs that are volatile during sintering above 1173 K and are homogenously distributed in the matrix. (author)

  7. Technology for the long-term management of defense HLW at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Staples, B.A.; Berreth, J.R.; Knecht, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Defense Waste Management Plan of June 1983 includes a reference plan for the long-term management of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) high-level waste (HLW), with a goal of disposing of the annual output in 500 canisters a year by FY-2008. Based on the current vitrification technology, the ICPP base-glass case would produce 1700 canisters per year after FY-2007. Thus, to meet the DWMP goal processing steps including fuel dissolution, waste treatment, and waste immobilization are being studied as areas where potential modifications could result in HLW volume reductions for repository disposal. It has been demonstrated that ICPP calcined wastes can be densified by hot isostatic pressing to multiphase ceramic forms of high loading and density. Conversion of waste by hot isostatic pressing to these forms has the potential of reducing the annual ICPP waste production to volumes near those of the goal of the DWMP. This report summarizes the laboratory-scale information currently available on the development of these forms

  8. Immobilization needs and technology programs

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.; Armantrout, G.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium in keeping with US policy that plutonium must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, we first reviewed published information on high-level waste immobilization technologies and identified 72 possible plutonium immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were further screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine the most promising technology families. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long- term disposition of plutonium. From this evaluation, a detailed research and development plan has been developed to provide answers to these remaining questions

  9. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume I

    1979-06-01

    An investigation was made of the high-level radioactive waste immobilization technology programs in the U.S. and Europe, and of the associated regulatory programs and waste management perspectives in the countries studied. Purpose was to assess the ability of those programs to satisfy DOE waste management needs and U.S. regulatory requirements. This volume includes: introduction, immobilization strategies in the context of waste isolation program needs, high-level waste management as an integrated system, regulatory goals, engineered-barrier characteristics, barrier technology, high-level waste disposal programs, analysis of HLW immobilization technology in the context of policy and regulatory requirements, and waste immobilization program option

  10. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume II

    1979-06-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: selected immobilization processes, directory of selected European organizations involved in HLW management, U.S. high-level waste inventories, and selected European HLW program

  11. Immobilization technology for krypton in amorphous zeolite

    Takusagawa, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Keiichi

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive krypton recovered from the offgas of a reprocessing plant requires long-term storage on the order of 100 years. Immobilization technology for krypton into amorphous zeolite 5A is considered one of the best methods for long-term storage. In this report, conditions for immobilization treatment and stability of amorphous zeolite 5A loaded krypton against heat, radiation and water are discussed, and a treatment system using this technology is described. (author)

  12. Study on a Preliminary Survey and Analysis of HLW Management Technology Suitable for Nuclear Industrial Environment in Korea

    Kim, Eun Ka; Suh, In Suk; Ro, Seong Gy; Yoo, Kun Joong; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Cho, Sung Soo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to suggest development direction of related technologies to analyze patented technology filed as a leading technology and to identify the technology trend for developing HLW management technology suitable for atomic industrial environment in Korea. For patent analysis of HLW management technology, international patent data were collected. And international application number, patent share of applicant and nationality, annual number of applications, application trends of assignees and detail technology, and frequency of patent citations / citations-to were analyzed by statistical analysis. Technical level and competitiveness through quantitative analysis by indicators of patent analysis were confirmed. And technology developments of blank technology, similarity analysis, the point of the main patent and a range of patent rights were analyzed through in-depth analysis. Trends of the patented technology of our country and world patent technology in such results have been identified, and statistical data on patents were secured. Especially in HLW management technology, patent application in Korea compared ti United States, Japan and European Union was began much later for the '90s, and are showing the annual increase on trend of patent application. Patent trend in Korea corresponds to development generation, while declining in foreign patent. The result of this study will be usefully applied to setting a development direction and blank technology of patent technology to pursue future in Korea

  13. Study on systematic integration technology of design and safety assessment for HLW geological disposal. 2. Research document

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Fukui, Hiroshi; Sagawa, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kenichi; Ito, Takaya; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kuwayama, Yuki

    2003-02-01

    The present study was carried out relating to basic design of the Geological Disposal Technology Integration System' that will be systematized as knowledge base for design analysis and safety assessment of HLW geological disposal system by integrating organically and hierarchically various technical information in three study field. The key conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) As referring to the current performance assessment report, the technical information for R and D program of HLW geological disposal system was systematized hierarchically based on summarized information in a suitable form between the work flow (work item) and processes/characteristic flow (process item). (2) As the result of the systematized technical information, database structure and system functions necessary for development and construction to the computer system were clarified in order to secure the relation between technical information and data set for assessment of HLW geological disposal system. (3) The control procedure for execution of various analysis code used by design and safety assessment in HLW geological disposal study was arranged possibility in construction of 'Geological Disposal Technology Integration System' after investigating the distributed computing technology. (author)

  14. Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, Eric M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chung, Chul-Woo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

  15. Radiation technology for immobilization of bioactive materials

    1988-12-01

    Within the framework of the Agency's coordinated research programme on ''Application of Radiation Technology in Immobilization of Bioactive Materials'', the third and final research coordination meeting was held at Beijing University, Beijing, People's Republic of China, 15-18 June 1987. The present publication compiles all presentations made at the meeting. Fundamental processes for the immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, cells and drugs were developed and established using gamma radiation, electron beams and plasma discharge. Applications of various biofunctional components, immobilized by radiation techniques in different processes, were studied. A range of backbone polymers has been examined together with various monomers. Coupling procedures have been developed which are relevant to our particular requirements. Enzymes of various types and characteristics have been immobilized with considerable efficiency. The immobilized biocatalysts have been shown to possess significant activity and retention of activity on storage. There appears to be a high degree of specificity associated with the properties of the immobilised biocatalysts, their activity and the ease of their preparation. Novel additives which lower the total radiation dose in grafting have been discovered and their value in immobilization processes assessed. Potential applications include: medical (diagnostic, therapeutic), and industrial processes (fermentation, bioseparation, etc.). Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Technologies for immobilization and disposal of tritium

    Coppari, N.R.

    1996-01-01

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to know the state of the technology development for tritium separation in the moderator circuit at HWR and to define the possible technologies to be applied to the Argentine nuclear power plants. Within this framework the strategies adopted by each country and the available technologies for a safe disposal of tritium, not only in its gaseous state tritium but also as tritiated water were analyzed. It is considered that if the selected separation method is such that the tritium is in its gaseous state, the hydride formation for long periods of immobilization should be studied. whereas if it were triated water immobilization should be studied to choose the technology between cementation and drying agents, in both cases the final disposal site will have to be selected. (author). 8 refs

  17. Immobilized High-Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report - second Generation Implementing Architecture

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document

  18. Design options for HLW repository operation technology. (4) Shotclay technique for seamless construction of EBS

    Kobayashi, Ichizo; Fujisawa, Soh; Nakajima, Makoto; Toida, Masaru; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Asano, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    The shotclay method is construction method of the high density bentonite engineered barrier by spraying method. Using this method, the dry density of 1.6 Mg/m 3 , which was considered impossible with the spray method, is achieved. In this study, the applicability of the shotclay method to HLW bentonite-engineered barriers was confirmed experimentally. In the tests, an actual scale vertical-type HLW bentonite-engineered barrier was constructed. This was a bentonite-engineered barrier with a diameter of 2.22 m and a height of 3.13 m. The material used was bentonite with 30% silica sand, and water content was adjusted by mixing chilled bentonite with powdered ice before thawing. Work progress was 11.2 m 3 and the weight was 21.7 Mg. The dry density of the entire buffer was 1.62 Mg/m 3 , and construction time was approximately 8 hours per unit. After the formworks were removed, the core and block of the actual scale HLW bentonite-engineered barrier were sampled to confirm homogeneity. As a result, homogeneity was confirmed, and no gaps were observed between the formwork and the buffer material and between the simulated waste and the buffer material. The applicability to HLW of the shotclay method has been confirmed through this examination. (author)

  19. Development Of Glass Matrices For HLW Radioactive Wastes

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc 99 , Cs 137 , and I 129 . Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  1. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-01-01

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry

  2. Process Technology for Immobilized Lipasecatalyzed Reactions

    Xu, Yuan

    Biocatalysis has attracted significant attention recently, mainly due to its high selectivity and potential benefits for sustainability. Applications can be found in biorefineries, turning biomass into energy and chemicals, and also for products in the food and pharmaceutical industries. However......, most applications remain in the production of high-value fine chemicals, primarily because of the expense of introducing new technology. In particular lipasecatalyzed synthesis has already achieved efficient operations for high-value products and more interesting now is to establish opportunities...... for low-value products. In order to guide the industrial implementation of immobilized-lipase catalyzed reactions, especially for highvolume low-value products, a methodological framework for dealing with the technical and scientific challenges and establishing an efficient process via targeted scale...

  3. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  4. KAERI Underground Research Facility (KURF) for the Demonstration of HLW Disposal Technology

    Hahn, P. S.; Cho, W. J.; Kwon, S.

    2006-01-01

    In order to dispose of high-level radioactive waste(HLW) safely in geological formations, it is necessary to assess the feasibility, safety, appropriateness, and stability of the disposal concept at an underground research site, which is constructed in the same geological formation as the host rock. In this paper, the current status of the conceptual design and the construction of a small scale URL, which is named as KURF, were described. To confirm the validity of the conceptual design of the underground facility, a geological survey including a seismic refraction survey, an electronic resistivity survey, a borehole drilling, and in situ and laboratory tests had been carried out. Based on the site characterization results, it was possible to effectively design the KURF. The construction of the KURF was started in May 2005 and the access tunnel was successfully completed in March 2006. Now the construction of the research modules is under way

  5. Influence of the reprocessing flow sheet on the HLW solidification technology

    Baetsle, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    The introduction of Pu recycled LWR and CMFBR fuel will require the addition of a second dissolution step to quantitation recover Pu. If process modifications can be brought to the head-end procedures it is advisable to remove Ru, Te, Mo, Pd by high performance centrifugation and to volatilize soluble RuNO(NO 3 ) 2 by sparing with ozone. This changes improve the liquid extraction efficiency and simplify the off gas treatment during calcination and vitrification of HAWC. The conversion of HAW to HAWC by evaporation is accompagnied by some-volatilization of Ru and Cs. Organic reductants reduce the Ru volatilization. The introduction of salt free reagents during feed adjustment steps will decrease Na content in the HLW. The main impact of the use of salt free reagent will have its bearing on the LAW and ILIW treatment and conditioning. (DG)

  6. Electron beam technology for production of preparations of immobilized enzymes

    Gonchar, A.M.; Auslender, V.L.; Polyakov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    Possibility of electron beam usage for proteases immobilization on 1,4-polyalkylene oxide (1,4-PAO) was studied to obtain biologically active complex for multi-purpose usage. It is shown that immobilization of Bacillus Subtilis protease is done due to free-radical linking of enzyme and carrier with formation of mycelium-like structures. Immobilization improves heat resistance of enzyme up to 60 centigrade without substrate and up to 80 centigrade in presence of substrate, widens range pH activity in comparison with non-immobilized forms. Immobilized proteases does not contain peroxides and long-live radicals. Our results permitted to create technologies for production of medical and veterinary preparations, active components for wool washing agents and leather fabrication technology

  7. Immobilization Technologies in Probiotic Food Production

    Gregoria Mitropoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed.

  8. Cleanup of a HLW nuclear fuel-reprocessing center using 3-D database modeling technology

    Sauer, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A significant challenge in decommissioning any large nuclear facility is how to solidify the large volume of residual high-level radioactive waste (HLW) without structurally interfering with the existing equipment and piping used at the original facility or would require rework due to interferences which were not identified during the design process. This problem is further compounded when the nuclear facility to be decommissioned is a 35 year old nuclear fuel reprocessing center designed to recover usable uranium and plutonium. Facilities of this vintage usually tend to lack full documentation of design changes made over the years and as a result, crude traps or pockets of high-level contamination may not be fully realized. Any miscalculation in the construction or modification sequences could compound the overall dismantling and decontamination of the facility. This paper reports that development of a 3-dimensional (3-D) computer database tool was considered critical in defining the most complex portions of this one-of-a-kind vitrification facility

  9. Process Technology for Immobilized LipaseProcess Technology for Immobilized Lipase-catalyzed

    Xu, Yuan

    Biocatalysis has attracted significant attention recently, mainly due to its high selectivity and potential benefits for sustainability. Applications can be found in biorefineries, turning biomass into energy and chemicals, and also for products in the food and pharmaceutical industries. However......, most applications remain in the production of high-value fine chemicals, primarily because of the expense of introducing new technology. In particular lipasecatalyzed synthesis has already achieved efficient operations for high-value products and more interesting now is to establish opportunities......-down experimental work is described in this thesis. The methodology uses economic targets to test options characterized via a set of tools. In order to validate the methodology, two processes based on immobilized lipase-catalysis have been studied: transesterification and esterification of vegetable oils...

  10. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal

  11. Progress of the research and development on the geological disposal technology of HLW with aid of the industry/university collaboration system and fixed term researcher system

    Yamada, Fumitaka; Sonobe, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), various systems associated with the collaboration with industries and universities on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and the Postdoctoral Fellow system, etc. are enacted. These systems have been operated considering the needs of JAEA's program, industry and academia, resultantly contributed, for example, to basic research and the project development. The activities under these collaboration systems contain personal exchanges, the publication of the accomplishments and utilization of those, in research and development concerning geological disposal technology of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). These activities have progressed in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), which are the successive predecessors of JAEA, through JAEA. The accomplishments from these systems have been not only published as papers in journals and individual technical reports but also integrated into the project reports, accordingly contributed to the advancement of the national program on the geological disposal of HLW. In this report, the progress of the research and development under these systems was investigated from the beginning of the operation of the systems. The contribution to the research and development on geological disposal technology of HLW was also studied. On the basis of these studies, the future utilization of the systems of the collaboration was also discussed from the view point of the management of research and development program. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  12. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-01-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases

  13. Immobilization and Waste Form Product Acceptance for Low Level and TRU Waste Forms

    Holtzscheiter, E.W.; Harbour, J.R.

    1998-05-01

    The Tanks Focus Area is supporting technology development in immobilization of both High Level (HLW) and Low Level (LLW) radioactive wastes. The HLW process development at Hanford and Idaho is patterned closely after that of the Savannah River (Defense Waste Processing Facility) and West Valley Sites (West Valley Demonstration Project). However, the development and options open to addressing Low Level Waste are diverse and often site specific. To start, it is important to understand the breadth of Low Level Wastes categories

  14. Controlled drilling technology for HLW management. Directional drilling and mechanics/stress measurements in the borehole

    Kiho, Kenzo; Shin, Koichi; Okada, Tetsuji; Obuchi, Yasuyoshi; Sunaga, Takayuki; Hase, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Since 2000, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has been conducting the project on controlled drilling and the logging/measurement technologies in its boreholes. Especially borehole pressure meter and bore hole stress measurement apparatus which can apply to the controlled drilling system was developed. The bore hole was drilled to the 1000 m long in order to intersect the Omagari fault located at Horonobe town in Hokkaido and its core recovery was 99.8% as of FY. 2011. Using borehole logging/measurement/survey, the geological, hydrological, geo-mechanical, geophysical and geochemical data were collected and the Omagari fault was characterized. (author)

  15. Enzyme Technology of Peroxidases: Immobilization, Chemical and Genetic Modification

    Longoria, Adriana; Tinoco, Raunel; Torres, Eduardo

    An overview of enzyme technology applied to peroxidases is made. Immobilization on organic, inorganic, and hybrid supports; chemical modification of amino acids and heme group; and genetic modification by site-directed and random mutagenesis are included. Different strategies that were carried out to improve peroxidase performance in terms of stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity are analyzed. Immobilization of peroxidases on inorganic and organic materials enhances the tolerance of peroxidases toward the conditions normally found in many industrial processes, such as the presence of an organic solvent and high temperature. In addition, it is shown that immobilization helps to increase the Total Turnover Number at levels high enough to justify the use of a peroxidase-based biocatalyst in a synthesis process. Chemical modification of peroxidases produces modified enzymes with higher thermostability and wider substrate variability. Finally, through mutagenesis approaches, it is possible to produce modified peroxidases capable of oxidizing nonnatural substrates with high catalytic activity and affinity.

  16. Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

    Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A.; Mitchell, M.

    2000-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D and T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D and T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D and T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency

  17. SOURCE TERMS FOR HLW GLASS CANISTERS

    J.S. Tang

    2000-01-01

    This calculation is prepared by the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Design Section. The objective of this calculation is to determine the source terms that include radionuclide inventory, decay heat, and radiation sources due to gamma rays and neutrons for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from the, West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford Site (HS), and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This calculation also determines the source terms of the canister containing the SRS HLW glass and immobilized plutonium. The scope of this calculation is limited to source terms for a time period out to one million years. The results of this calculation may be used to carry out performance assessment of the potential repository and to evaluate radiation environments surrounding the waste packages (WPs). This calculation was performed in accordance with the Development Plan ''Source Terms for HLW Glass Canisters'' (Ref. 7.24)

  18. Model for acquiring innovative waste immobilization technologies

    Dole, L.R.; Singh, S.P.N.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) has established the Waste Management Technology Center (WMTC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assist in meeting the environmental requirements for federal facilities as stated in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The WMTC will bring innovative mixed chemical and radioactive waste treatment and site closure technologies to bear on the many mixed chemical and radioactive waste problems at the DOE-ORO facilities located in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio. The WMTC seeks innovative technologies through a phased procurement cycle that encourages the teaming of emerging technologies with experienced contractors in order to comply with on-site requirements of DOE orders concerning protection of the environment. This three-phase procurement cycle includes: (1) a feasibility study and implementation plan, (2) an on-site pilot demonstration, and (3) full-scale implementation. This paper describes the statements of work for some related demonstrations and remedial actions

  19. Immobilized cell technology in beer brewing: Current experience and results

    Leskošek-Čukalov Ida J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilized cell technology (ICT has been attracting continual attention in the brewing industry over the past 30 years. Some of the reasons are: faster fermentation rates and increased volumetric productivity, compared to those of traditional beer production based on freely suspended cells, as well as the possibility of continuous operation. Nowadays, ICT technology is well established in secondary fermentation and alcohol- free and low-alcohol beer production. In main fermentation, the situation is more complex and this process is still under scrutiny on both the lab and pilot levels. The paper outlines the most important ICT processes developed for beer brewing and provides an overview of carrier materials, bioreactor design and examples of their industrial applications, as well as some recent results obtained by our research group. We investigated the possible applications of polyvinyl alcohol in the form of LentiKats®, as a potential porous matrices carrier for beer fermentation. Given are the results of growth studies of immobilized brewer's yeast Saccharomyces uvarum and the kinetic parameters obtained by using alginate microbeads with immobilized yeast cells and suspension of yeast cells as controls. The results indicate that the immobilization procedure in LentiKat® carriers has a negligible effect on cell viability and growth. The apparent specific growth rate of cells released in medium was comparable to that of freely suspended cells, implying preserved cell vitality. A series of batch fermentations performed in shaken flasks and an air-lift bioreactor indicated that the immobilized cells retained high fermentation activity. The full attenuation in green beer was reached after 48 hours in shaken flasks and less than 24 hours of fermentation in gas-lift bioreactors.

  20. Application of spent fuel treatment technology to plutonium immobilization

    McPheeters, C.C.; Ackerman, J.P.; Gay, E.C., Johnson, G.K.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the electrometallurgical treatment technology being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is to convert certain spent nuclear fuels into waste forms that are suitable for disposal in a geological repository for nuclear waste. The spent fuels of interest are those that cannot be safely stored for a long time in their current condition, and those that cannot be qualified for repository disposal. This paper explores the possibility of applying this electrometallurgical treatment technology to immobilization of surplus fissile materials, primarily plutonium. Immobilization of surplus fissile materials by electrometallurgical treatment could be done in the same facilities, at the same time. and in the same equipment as the proposed treatment of the present inventory of spent nuclear fuel. The cost and schedule savings of this simultaneous treatment scheme would be significant

  1. On immobilization of high-level waste in an Y–Al garnet-based cermet matrix in SHS conditions

    Konovalov, E.E.; Lastov, A.I.; Nerozin, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    A method of high-level waste (HLW) radionuclide immobilization in a long-life matrix based on Y–Al garnet, a material highly chemically resistant to natural environments, has been developed for the ultimate HLW isolation from the environment. Model systems containing Ce, Nd, Sm, Zr, Mo, 238U, and 241Am were used in the study as simulators of HLW radionuclides. An energy-saving technology of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) was employed to synthesize the matrix material with f...

  2. Historical fuel reprocessing and HLW management in Idaho

    Knecht, D.A.; Staiger, M.D.; Christian, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article review some of the key decision points in the historical development of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management practices at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that have helped ICPP to successfully accomplish its mission safely and with minimal impact on the environment. Topics include ICPP reprocessing development; batch aluminum-uranium dissolution; continuous aluminum uranium dissolution; batch zirconium dissolution; batch stainless steel dissolution; semicontinuous zirconium dissolution with soluble poison; electrolytic dissolution of stainless steel-clad fuel; graphite-based rover fuel processing; fluorinel fuel processing; ICPP waste management consideration and design decisions; calcination technology development; ICPP calcination demonstration and hot operations; NWCF design, construction, and operation; HLW immobilization technology development. 80 refs., 4 figs

  3. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of

  4. Bulk Vitrification Technology For The Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    Ard, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  5. BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    ARD KE

    2011-04-11

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  6. Performance Criteria for Capture and/or Immobilization Technologies

    Jubin, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, S. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strachan, D. M. [Strata-G, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States); Soelberg, N. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, B. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Riley, B. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The capture and subsequent immobilization of the four volatile radionuclides (3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I) from the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility has been a topic of substantial research interest for the US DOE and international colleagues. Regulations set forth by the US EPA direct that some or all of these radionuclides (based upon fuel burnup, fuel type, cooling time, etc.) will require removal, to some extent, from the plant effluent streams prior to discharge to the environment. Upon removal, the radionuclide, as well as any associated sorbent, is destined for waste. Research of separation and capture methodologies has included a wide range of technologies including liquid caustic scrubbing systems, solid adsorbents, and cryogenic distillation. The studies of waste forms have been correspondingly diverse. In considering the technologies available for future development and implementation of both sorbents and waste forms, it will be necessary to use benchmarked measures of performance to objectively evaluate each sorbent system or waste form. This document is intended to provide initial guidance on the types of performance criteria for capture materials and waste forms intended for use in the recycling removal and disposal of UNF and, where possible, the minimum acceptable values for those criteria.

  7. A Joule-Heated Melter Technology For The Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    Kelly, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  8. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  9. Verification study on technology for preliminary investigation for HLW geological disposal. Part 2. Verification of surface geophysical prospecting through establishing site descriptive models

    Kondo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hasegawa, Takuma; Goto, Keiichiro; Yoshimura, Kimitaka; Muramoto, Shigenori

    2012-01-01

    The Yokosuka demonstration and validation project using Yokosuka CRIEPI site has been conducted since FY 2006 as a cooperative research between NUMO (Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan) and CRIEPI. The objectives of this project are to examine and to refine the basic methodology of the investigation and assessment of properties of geological environment in the stage of Preliminary Investigation for HLW geological disposal. Within Preliminary Investigation technologies, surface geophysical prospecting is an important means of obtaining information from deep geological environment for planning borehole surveys. In FY 2010, both seismic prospecting (seismic reflection and vertical seismic profiling methods) for obtaining information about geological structure and electromagnetic prospecting (magneto-telluric and time domain electromagnetic methods) for obtaining information about resistivity structure reflecting the distribution of salt water/fresh water boundary to a depth of over several hundred meters were conducted in the Yokosuka CRIEPI site. Through these surveys, the contribution of geophysical prospecting methods in the surface survey stage to improving the reliability of site descriptive models was confirmed. (author)

  10. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4

  11. Technologies for in situ immobilization and isolation of radioactive wastes at disposal and contaminated sites

    1997-11-01

    This report describes technologies that have been developed worldwide and the experiences applied to both waste disposal and contaminated sites. The term immobilization covers both solidification and embedding of wastes

  12. HLW Canister and Can-In-Canister Drop Calculation

    H. Marr

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the HLW canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (''can-in-canister'' throughout this document) to the drop event during the handling operation. The objective of the calculation is to provide the structure parameter information to support the canister design and the waste handling facility design. Finite element solution is performed using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. Two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element representations for the standard HLW canister and the can-in-canister are developed and analyzed using the dynamic solver

  13. Study on immobilization technology of krypton gas by ion-implantation and sputtering process

    Hayashi, S.; Kamiya, S.; Ikeda, S.; Nakanishi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    At the Waste Technology Development Division of PNC''s Tokai Works, we have been carrying out the development of the recovering and storing technology of radioactive krypton to reduce the radioactive gaseous effluent released to the environment arising from reprocessing of nuclear spent fuels. As a part of this technical development, the method of storing radioactive krypton is an encapsulation in a metal matrix which appears to offer the most secure immobilization of krypton. From the result of the ion-implantation test used non-radioactive krypton and the evaluation of electrical characteristics, we have selected the metallic materials, they are Nickel and Yttrium, and designed the vessel and the apparatus which continuously immobilized the krypton into metal matrix. This article described the following experiment result. (1) The long-term immobilization technology was established with respect to handling a equipment and plasma controlling. (2) Stability of the krypton immobilized alloy was considered satisfactory because the release was tolerably small. (author)

  14. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP

    Kruger, A.A.; Joseph, I.; Bowman, B.W.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L

    2009-01-01

    The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al 2 O 3 concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the

  15. HLW Disposal System Development

    Choi, J. W.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, J. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A KRS is suggested through design requirement analysis of the buffer and the canister which are the constituent of disposal system engineered barrier and HLW management plans are proposed. In the aspect of radionuclide retention capacity, the thickness of the buffer is determined 0.5m, the shape to be disc and ring and the dry density to be 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. The maximum temperature of the buffer is below 100 .deg. which meets the design requirement. And bentonite blocks with 5 wt% of graphite showed more than 1.0 W/mK of thermal conductivity without the addition of sand. The result of the thermal analysis for proposed double-layered buffer shows that decrease of 7 .deg. C in maximum temperature of the buffer. For the disposal canister, the copper for the outer shell material and cast iron for the inner structure material is recommended considering the results analyzed in terms of performance of the canisters and manufacturability and the geochemical properties of deep groundwater sampled from the research area with granite, salt water intrusion, and the heavy weight of the canister. The results of safety analysis for the canister shows that the criticality for the normal case including uncertainty is the value of 0.816 which meets subcritical condition. Considering nation's 'Basic Plan for Electric Power Demand and Supply' and based on the scenario of disposing CANDU spent fuels in the first phase, the disposal system that the repository will be excavated in eight phases with the construction of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) beginning in 2020 and commissioning in 2040 until the closure of the repository is proposed. Since there is close correlation between domestic HLW management plans and front-end/back-end fuel cycle plans causing such a great sensitivity of international environment factor, items related to assuring the non-proliferation and observing the international standard are showed to be the influential factor and acceptability

  16. Safety of HLW shipments

    1998-01-01

    The third shipment back to Japan of vitrified high-level radioactive waste (HLW) produced through reprocessing in France is scheduled to take place in early 1998. A consignment last March drew protest from interest groups and countries along the shipping route. Requirements governing the shipment of cargoes of this type and concerns raised by Greenpeace that were assessed by an international expert group, were examined in a previous article. A further report prepared on behalf of Greenpeace Pacific has been released. The paper: Transportation accident of a ship carrying vitrified high-level radioactive waste, Part 1 Impact on the Federated States of Micronesia by Resnikoff and Champion, is dated 31 July 1997. A considerable section of the report is given over to discussion of the economic situation of the Federated Statess of Micronesia, and lifestyle and dietary factors which would influence radiation doses arising from a release. It postulates a worst case accident scenario of a collision between the HLW transport ship and an oil tanker 1 km off Pohnpei with the wind in precisely the direction to result in maximum population exposure, and attempts to assess the consequences. In summary, the report postulates accident and exposure scenarios which are conceivable but not credible. It combines a series of worst case scenarios and attempts to evaluate the consequences. Both the combined scenario and consequences have probabilities of occurrence which are negligible. The shipment carried by the 'Pacific Swan' left Cherbourgon 21 January 1998 and comprised 30 tonnes of reprocessed vitrified waste in 60 stainless steel canisters loaded into three shipping casks. (author)

  17. Industrial scale-plant for HLW partitioning in Russia

    Dzekun, E.G.; Glagolenko, Y.V.; Drojko, E.G.; Kurochkin, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    Radiochemical plant of PA > at Ozersk, which was come on line in December 1948 originally for weapon plutonium production and reoriented on the reprocessing of spent fuel, till now keeps on storage HLW of the military program. Application of the vitrification method since 1986 has not essentially reduced HLW volumes. So, as of September 1, 1995 vitrification installations had been processed 9590 m 3 HLW and 235 MCi of radionuclides was included in glass. However only 1100 m 3 and 20.5 MCi is part of waste of the military program. The reason is the fact, that the technology and equipment of vitrification were developed for current waste of Purex-process, for which low contents of corrosion-dangerous impurity to materials of vitrification installation is characteristic of. With reference to HLW, which are growing at PA > in the course of weapon plutonium production, the program of Science-Research Works includes the following main directions of work. Development of technology and equipment of installations for immobilising HLW with high contents of impurity into a solid form at induction melter. Application of High-temperature Adsorption Method for sorption of radionuclides from HLW on silica gel. Application of Partitioning Method of radionuclides from HLW, based on extraction cesium and strontium into cobalt dicarbollyde or crown-ethers, but also on recovery of cesium radionuclides by sorption on inorganic sorbents. In this paper the results of work on creation of first industrial scale-plant for partitioning HLW by the extraction and sorption methods are reported

  18. Cast Stone Technology For The Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    Minwall, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

  19. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    MINWALL HJ

    2011-04-08

    Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

  20. Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G.; McKibben, J.M.; Danker, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996

  1. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  2. R and D on HLW Partitioning in Russia

    Khaperskaya, A.; Babain, V.; Alyapyshev, M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of more than thirty years investigations on high level radioactive waste (HLW) partitioning in Russia are described. The objectives of research and development is to assess HLW partitioning technical feasibility and its advantages compared to direct vitrification of long-lived radionuclides. Many technological flowsheets for long-lived nuclides (cesium, strontium and minor actinides) separation were developed and tested with simulated and actual HLW. Different classes of extractants, including carbamoyl-phosphine oxides, dialkyl-phosphoric acids, crown ethers and diamides of heterocyclic acids were studied. Some of these processes were tested at PA 'Mayak' and MCC. Many extraction systems based on chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD), including UNEX-extractant and its modifications, were also observed. Diamides of diglycolic acid and diamides of heterocyclic acids in polar diluents have shown promising properties for minor actinide-lanthanide extraction and separation. Comparison of different solvents and possible ways of implementing new flowsheets in radiochemical technology are also discussed. (authors)

  3. Technologies for immobilization and disposal of tritium; Tecnologias para inmobilizacion y disposicion de tritio

    Coppari, N R [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina). Unidad de Actividad Reactores y Centrales Nucleares

    1997-12-31

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to know the state of the technology development for tritium separation in the moderator circuit at HWR and to define the possible technologies to be applied to the Argentine nuclear power plants. Within this framework the strategies adopted by each country and the available technologies for a safe disposal of tritium, not only in its gaseous state tritium but also as tritiated water were analyzed. It is considered that if the selected separation method is such that the tritium is in its gaseous state, the hydride formation for long periods of immobilization should be studied. whereas if it were triated water immobilization should be studied to choose the technology between cementation and drying agents, in both cases the final disposal site will have to be selected. (author). 8 refs.

  4. Immobilization of zinc from metallurgical waste and water solutions using geopolymerization technology

    Nikolići I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymeraization technology is recognized as a promising method for immobilization of heavy metals by the stabilization or solidification process. This process involves the chemical reaction of alumino-silicate oxides with highly alkaline activator yielding the new material with amorphous or semi-amorphous structure, called geopolymer. Fly ash and blast furnace slag were mainly used as a raw material for geopolymerization process. In this paper we have investigated the possibility of immobilization of Zn from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD through geopolymerization of fly ash and possibility of Zn2+ adsorption from waste waters using fly ash based geopolymers. Efficacy of Zn immobilization from electric arc furnace dust was evaluated by TCLP test while the immobilization of Zn2+ ions from the water solution was evaluated through the removal efficiency. The results have shown that geopolymerization process may successfully be used for immobilization of Zn by stabilization of EAFD and for production of low cost adsorbent for waste water treatment.

  5. Technologies for recovery of transuranics and immobilization of non-high-level wastes

    Richardson, G.L.

    1976-06-01

    This paper supplements the preceding Symposium paper on ''Treatment Technologies for Non-High-Level Wastes (U.S.A.)'' by C. R. Cooley and D. E. Clark (HEDL-SA-851), and covers the additional treatment technologies in use and under development for recovering transuranics and immobilizing non-high-level wastes for transportation and storage. Methods used for nondestructive assay (NDA) of TRU elements in non-high-level wastes are also discussed briefly

  6. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  7. COMSOL Multiphysics Model for HLW Canister Filling

    Kesterson, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. Wastes containing high concentrations of Al2O3 and Na2O can contribute to nepheline (generally NaAlSiO4) crystallization, which can sharply reduce the chemical durability of high level waste (HLW) glass. Nepheline crystallization can occur during slow cooling of the glass within the stainless steel canister. The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in a WTP HLW canister during filling and cooling. The intent of the model is to support scoping work in the laboratory. It is not intended to provide precise predictions of temperature profiles, but rather to provide a simplified representation of glass cooling profiles within a full scale, WTP HLW canister under various glass pouring rates. These data will be used to support laboratory studies for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of nepheline crystallization. The model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercially available software. The model results were compared to available experimental data, TRR-PLT-080, and were found to yield sufficient results for the scoping nature of the study. The simulated temperatures were within 60 ºC for the centerline, 0.0762m (3 inch) from centerline, and 0.2286m (9 inch) from centerline thermocouples once the thermocouples were covered with glass. The temperature difference between the experimental and simulated values reduced to 40 ºC, 4 hours after the thermocouple was covered, and down to 20 ºC, 6 hours after the thermocouple was covered

  8. Long-term storage or disposal of HLW-dilemma

    Ninkovic, M. M.; Raicevic, J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a new concept approach to HLW management founded on deterministic safety philosophy - i.e. long-term storage with final objective of destroying was justified and proposed instead of multi barrier concept with final disposal in extra stable environmental conditions, which are founded on probabilistic safety approach model. As a support to this new concept some methods for destruction of waste which are now accessible, on scientific stage only, as transmutation in fast reactors and accelerators of heavy ions were briefly discussed . It is justified to believe that industrial technology for destruction of HLW would be developed in not so far future. (author).

  9. HLW Tank Space Management, Final Report

    Sessions, J.

    1999-01-01

    The HLW Tank Space Management Team (SM Team) was chartered to select and recommend an HLW Tank Space Management Strategy (Strategy) for the HLW Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) until an alternative salt disposition process is operational. Because the alternative salt disposition process will not be available to remove soluble radionuclides in HLW until 2009, the selected Strategy must assure that it safely receives and stores HLW at least until 2009 while continuing to supply sludge slurry to the DWPF vitrification process

  10. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    Kan, T.

    1998-01-01

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D and T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D and T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D and T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the

  11. Remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals with an emphasis on immobilization technology.

    Derakhshan Nejad, Zahra; Jung, Myung Chae; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2018-06-01

    The major frequent contaminants in soil are heavy metals which may be responsible for detrimental health effects. The remediation of heavy metals in contaminated soils is considered as one of the most complicated tasks. Among different technologies, in situ immobilization of metals has received a great deal of attention and turned out to be a promising solution for soil remediation. In this review, remediation methods for removal of heavy metals in soil are explored with an emphasis on the in situ immobilization technique of metal(loid)s. Besides, the immobilization technique in contaminated soils is evaluated through the manipulation of the bioavailability of heavy metals using a range of soil amendment conditions. This technique is expected to efficiently alleviate the risk of groundwater contamination, plant uptake, and exposure to other living organisms. The efficacy of several amendments (e.g., red mud, biochar, phosphate rock) has been examined to emphasize the need for the simultaneous measurement of leaching and the phytoavailability of heavy metals. In addition, some amendments that are used in this technique are inexpensive and readily available in large quantities because they have been derived from bio-products or industrial by-products (e.g., biochar, red mud, and steel slag). Among different amendments, iron-rich compounds and biochars show high efficiency to remediate multi-metal contaminated soils. Thereupon, immobilization technique can be considered a preferable option as it is inexpensive and easily applicable to large quantities of contaminants derived from various sources.

  12. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  13. Steam Reforming Technology for Denitration and Immobilization of DOE Tank Wastes

    Mason, J. B.; McKibbin, J.; Ryan, K.; Schmoker, D.

    2003-01-01

    THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (THOR) is a joint venture formed in June 2002 by Studsvik, Inc. (Studsvik) and Westinghouse Government Environmental Services Company LLC to further develop, market, and deploy Studsvik's patented THORSM non-incineration, steam reforming waste treatment technology. This paper provides an overview of the THORSM steam reforming process as applied to the denitration and conversion of Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes to an immobilized mineral form. Using the THORSM steam reforming technology to treat nitrate containing tank wastes could significantly benefit the DOE by reducing capital and life-cycle costs, reducing processing and programmatic risks, and positioning the DOE to meet or exceed its stakeholder commitments for tank closure. Specifically, use of the THORSM technology can facilitate processing of up to 75% of tank wastes without the use of vitrification, yielding substantial life-cycle cost savings

  14. Immobilization as a route to surplus fissile materials disposition

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium (Pu) in keeping with the national policy that Pu must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, the authors first reviewed published information on high-level waste (HLW) immobilization technologies in order to identify 72 possible Pu immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multiattribute analysis to determine the most promising technologies. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long-term disposition of plutonium. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Fissile Materials Disposition Project Office to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in the fourth quarter of FY96

  15. The Results of HLW Processing Using Zirconium Salt of Dibutyl phosphoric Acid in Hot Cell

    Fedorov, Yu.S.; Zilberman, B.Ya.; Shmidt, O.V. [Khlopin Radium Institute, 2nd Murinsky Ave., 28, Saint-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP), is an effective solvent for liquid HLW and ILW (high and intermediate level wastes) processing with radionuclide partitioning into different groups for further immobilization according to radiotoxicity. The rig trials in mixer-settles in hot cells were carried out using 30 L of real HLW containing transplutonium (TPE), rare earths (RE), Sr and Cs in 2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, characterized by total specific activity 520 MBk/L. The recovery factor for TPE and RE was as high as 10{sup 4}, but only 10 for Sr. Purification factor of TPE and RE from Cs and Sr was 10{sup 4}, and that of Sr from TPE and Cs was 10{sup 3}. Almost all Cs was localized in the second cycle raffinate. So Zr salt of HDBP can be used in HLW processing with radionuclide partitioning with respect to the categories of radiotoxicity. (authors)

  16. TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF PRODUCING POLYMERIC COMPOSITIONS FOR BIOFILTER WITH IMPROVED IMMOBILIZATION PROPERTIES

    L. N. Studenikina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the material loading of the filters, it is recommended to use a polymer composition having high immobilization capacity. The introduction of the polyolefins natural polysaccharides attached polymer composition, the ability to retain on its surface microflora, and additional content in the composition of nutrients will ensure the maintenance of microbial life in the event of termination of enrolment in the biofilter nutrients. We have investigated the technological aspects of polymer compositions based on polyethylene (PE, containing natural polysaccharides starch and alkaline pulp (waste vegetable oil refining, in the ratio of 80 : 20 wt.%, when the processing in modern high-speed equipment. In the study of rheological indicators, it was found that contained in the cellulose fatty acid and wax soften the composition, where the effective viscosity is filled with PE with the use of cellulose is celebrated on 30 ÷ 35 % lower than the composition with starch. For polymer compositions containing as starch and cellulose, at a temperature of processing 200 °С observed fracture of flow curves, and when the critical temperature 220 °С there is a rapid release, followed by decomposition of the compositions. It is noted that the composition containing the cellulose has a higher porosity than containing starch, which facilitates immobilization of the microflora. For use as a load of biofilters more recommended songs based on PE and cellulose because they have superior immobilization due to their porous structure, and the presence in the composition of polysaccharides and nutrients, as evidenced development on the surface of the samples of the composition of microscopic fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium.

  17. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis

  18. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  19. Enzymatic saccharification of Tapioca processing wastes into biosugars through immobilization technology (Mini Review

    Nurul Aini Edama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is very popular in Nigeria, Brazil, Thailand and Indonesia. The global cassava production is currently estimated at more than 200 million tons and the trend is increasing due to higher demand for food products. Together with food products, huge amounts of cassava wastes are also produced including cassava pulp, peel and starchy wastewater. To ensure the sustainability of this industry, these wastes must be properly managed to reduce serious threat to the environment and among the strategies to achieve that is to convert them into biosugars. Later on, biosugars could be converted into other end products such as bioethanol. The objective of this paper is to highlight the technical feasibility and potentials of converting cassava processing wastes into biosugars by understanding their generation and mass balance at the processing stage. Moreover, enzyme immobilization technology for better biosugar conversion and future trends are also discussed.

  20. TESTS WITH HIGH-BISMUTH HLW GLASSES FINAL REPORT VSL-10R1780-1, Rev. 0; 12/13/10

    Matlack, K.S.; Kruger, A.A.; Joseph, I.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.K.; Chaudhuri, M.; Mohr, R.K.; Mckeown, D.A.; Bardakei, T.; Gong, W.; Buecchele, A.C.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This Final Report describes the testing of glass formulations developed for Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) containing high concentrations of bismuth. In previous work on high-bismuth HLW streams specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP), fully compliant, high waste loading compositions were developed and subjected to melter testing on the DM100 vitrification system. However, during heat treatment according to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW canister centerline cooling (CCC) curves, crucible melts of the high-bismuth glasses were observed to foam. Clearly, such an occurrence during cooling of actual HLW canisters would be highly undesirable. Accordingly, the present work involves larger-scale testing to determine whether this effect occurs under more prototypical conditions, as well as crucible-scale tests to determine the causes and potentially remediate the observed foaming behavior. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts designed to determine the underlying causes of the foaming behavior as well as to assess potential mitigation strategies. Testing was also conducted on the DM1200 HLW Pilot melter with a composition previously tested on the DM100 and shown to foam during crucible-scale CCC heat treatment. The DM1200 tests evaluated foaming of glasses over a range of bismuth concentrations poured into temperature-controlled, 55-gallon drums which have a diameter that is close to that of the full-scale WTP HLW canisters. In addition, the DM1200 tests provided the first large-scale melter test data on high-bismuth WTP HLW compositions, including information on processing rates, cold cap behavior and off-gas characteristics, and data from this waste composition on the prototypical DM1200 off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for ORP on the same waste composition. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was

  1. TESTS WITH HIGH-BISMUTH HLW GLASSES FINAL REPORT VSL-10R1780-1 REV 0 12/13/10

    MATLACK KS; KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; CHAUDHURI M; MOHR RK; MCKEOWN DA; BARDAKEI T; GONG W; BUECCHELE AC; PEGG IL

    2011-01-05

    This Final Report describes the testing of glass formulations developed for Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) containing high concentrations of bismuth. In previous work on high-bismuth HLW streams specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP), fully compliant, high waste loading compositions were developed and subjected to melter testing on the DM100 vitrification system. However, during heat treatment according to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW canister centerline cooling (CCC) curves, crucible melts of the high-bismuth glasses were observed to foam. Clearly, such an occurrence during cooling of actual HLW canisters would be highly undesirable. Accordingly, the present work involves larger-scale testing to determine whether this effect occurs under more prototypical conditions, as well as crucible-scale tests to determine the causes and potentially remediate the observed foaming behavior. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts designed to determine the underlying causes of the foaming behavior as well as to assess potential mitigation strategies. Testing was also conducted on the DM1200 HLW Pilot melter with a composition previously tested on the DM100 and shown to foam during crucible-scale CCC heat treatment. The DM1200 tests evaluated foaming of glasses over a range of bismuth concentrations poured into temperature-controlled, 55-gallon drums which have a diameter that is close to that of the full-scale WTP HLW canisters. In addition, the DM1200 tests provided the first large-scale melter test data on high-bismuth WTP HLW compositions, including information on processing rates, cold cap behavior and off-gas characteristics, and data from this waste composition on the prototypical DM1200 off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for ORP on the same waste composition. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was

  2. Support for HLW Direct Feed - Phase 2, VSL-15R3440-1

    Matlack, K. S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, I. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, I. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, MD (United States); Kot, W. K. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations originating from a potential flow-sheet for the direct vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) with minimal or no pretreatment. In the HLW direct feed option that is under consideration for early operations at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the pretreatment facility would be bypassed in order to support an earlier start-up of the vitrification facility. For HLW, this would mean that the ultrafiltration and caustic leaching operations that would otherwise have been performed in the pretreatment facility would either not be performed or would be replaced by an interim pretreatment function (in-tank leaching and settling, for example). These changes would likely affect glass formulations and waste loadings and have impacts on the downstream vitrification operations. Modification of the pretreatment process may result in: (i) Higher aluminum contents if caustic leaching is not performed; (ii) Higher chromium contents if oxidative leaching is not performed; (iii) A higher fraction of supernate in the HLW feed resulting from the lower efficiency of in-tank washing; and (iv) A higher water content due to the likely lower effectiveness of in-tank settling compared to ultrafiltration. The HLW direct feed option has also been proposed as a potential route for treating HLW streams that contain the highest concentrations of fast-settling plutoniumcontaining particles, thereby avoiding some of the potential issues associated with such particles in the WTP Pretreatment facility [1]. In response, the work presented herein focuses on the impacts of increased supernate and water content on wastes from one of the candidate source tanks for the direct feed option that is high in plutonium.

  3. Korean Reference HLW Disposal System

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report outlines the results related to the development of Korean Reference Disposal System for High-level radioactive wastes. The research has been supported around for 10 years through a long-term research plan by MOST. The reference disposal method was selected via the first stage of the research during which the technical guidelines for the geological disposal of HLW were determined too. At the second stage of the research, the conceptual design of the reference disposal system was made. For this purpose the characteristics of the reference spent fuels from PWR and CANDU reactors were specified, and the material and specifications of the canisters were determined in term of structural analysis and manufacturing capability in Korea. Also, the mechanical and chemical characteristics of the domestic Ca-bentonite were analyzed in order to supply the basic design parameters of the buffer. Based on these parameters the thermal and mechanical analysis of the near-field was carried out. Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical behavior of the disposal system was analyzed. The reference disposal system was proposed through the second year research. At the final third stage of the research, the Korean Reference disposal System including the engineered barrier, surface facilities, and underground facilities was proposed through the performance analysis of the disposal system.

  4. A dose of HLW reality

    Payne, J.

    1993-01-01

    What many people were sure they knew, and some others were fairly confident they knew, was acknowledged by the US Department of Energy in December: A monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility will not be ready to accept spent fuel by January 31, 1998. A dose of reality has thus been added to the US high-level radioactive waste scene. Perhaps as important as the new reality is the practical, businesslike nature of the DOE's plan. The Department's proposal has the quality of a plan aimed at genuinely solving a problem rather just going through the motions. (In contrast, some readers are familiar with New York State's procedures for siting and licensing a low-level waste facility - procedures so labyrinthine that they are much more likely to protect political careers in that state than they are to achieve an LLW site). The DOE has received a lot of criticism - some justified, some not - about its handling of the HLW program. In this instance, it is proposing what many in the industry might have recommended: Make available storage capacity for spent nuclear fuel at existing federal government sites

  5. Performance Criteria for Capture and/or Immobilization Technologies - Milestone Report

    Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The capture and subsequent immobilization of the four regulated volatile radionuclides (3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I) from the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility has been a topic of substantial research interest for the US Department of Energy and its international colleagues. Removal of some or all of these radionuclides (e.g., based upon fuel burnup, fuel type, cooling time) from the plant effluent streams prior to discharge to the environment is required to meet regulations set forth by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Upon removal, the radionuclide, as well as associated sorbents that cannot be cost-effectively regenerated, is destined for conversion to a waste form. Research in separation and capture methodologies has included a wide range of technologies, including liquid caustic scrubbing systems, solid adsorbents, and cryogenic distillation. The studies of waste forms have been correspondingly diverse. In considering the technologies available for future development and implementation of both sorbents and waste forms, it is necessary to identify benchmark measures of performance to evaluate objectively each sorbent system or waste form.

  6. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  7. Reduction and Immobilization of Potassium Permanganate on Iron Oxide Catalyst by Fluidized-Bed Crystallization Technology

    Guang-Xia Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A manganese immobilization technology in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR was developed by using a waste iron oxide (i.e., BT-3 as catalyst which is a by-product from the fluidized-bed Fenton reaction (FBR-Fenton. It was found that BT-3 could easily reduce potassium permanganate (KMnO4 to MnO2. Furthermore, MnO2 could accumulate on the surface of BT-3 catalyst to form a new Fe-Mn oxide. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the KMnO4-reduction mechanism, including the effect of KMnO4 concentration, BT-3 dosage, and operational solution pH. The results showed that the pH solution was a significant factor in the reduction of KMnO4. At the optimum level, pHf 6, KMnO4 was virtually reduced in 10 min. A pseudo-first order reaction was employed to describe the reduction rate of KMnO4.

  8. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  9. Rheology of Savannah River site tank 42 HLW radioactive sludge

    Ha, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of the rheology of the radioactive sludge slurries at the Savannah River Site is necessary in order to ensure that they can be retrieved from waste tanks and processed for final disposal. At Savannah River Site, Tank 42 sludge represents on of the first HLW radioactive sludges to be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The rheological properties of unwashed Tank 42 sludge slurries at various solids concentrations were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells at the Savannah River Technology Center using a modified Haake Rotovisco viscometer

  10. Refuse derived bio-organics and immobilized soybean peroxidase for green chemical technology

    Magnacca, Giuliana; Laurenti, Enzo; Vigna, Erika

    2012-01-01

    in the reaction of hydrogen peroxide, 3-(dimethylamino)benzoic acid (DMAB) and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH), by comparison with the same reaction performed with native SBP in solution. The reaction performed in the presence of immobilized SBP was slower than that catalyzed by native SBP...... Peroxidase (SBP). Compared to the pristine powder, the monolith exhibited lower specific surface area (about 30% less), total pore volume and pore size (of about 200 Å of width), and bond less SBP under the same experimental conditions. The immobilized SBP products were tested for their catalytic activity...... in solution. However, in spite of its lower SBP content, monolith immobilized SBP (M-SBP) was found kinetically more active than the powder immobilized SBP (P-SBP). Also, M-SBP allowed to achieve the same reagents conversion as native SBP (95% of reagent conversion), although in longer time, whereas...

  11. Improvement of Taihu water quality by the technology of immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria

    Li Zhengkui; Zhang Weidong; Zhu Jiating; Pu Peimin; Hu Weipin; Hu Chunhua; Chen Baojun; Li Bo; Cheng Xiaoying; Zhang Shengzhao; Fan Yunqi

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies were carried out on the purification of eutrophic Taihu Lake water by dynamic experiment using immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria (INCB). The results showed that the eutrophic water of Taihu Lake can be purified effectively as it passes through the experimental reactor into which some immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria were put. The removal efficiencies for Total N (TN), NH 4 + -N with immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria were 72.4% and 85.6%, respectively. It was found that the immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria also have purificatory effect on eutrophic water of Taihu Lake at winter temperature (7 degree C), and that the removal efficiencies for Total N (TN), NH 4 + -N were 55.6%, and 58.9%, respectively. The removal efficiencies for TN and NH 4 + -N depend on the time the water stays in the experimental reactor

  12. HLW Flexible jumper materials compatibility evaluation

    Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-13

    H-Tank Farm Engineering tasked SRNL/Materials Science & Technology (MS&T) to evaluate the compatibility of Goodyear Viper® chemical transfer hose with HLW solutions. The hose is proposed as a flexible Safety Class jumper for up to six months service. SRNL/MS&T performed various tests to evaluate the effects of radiation, high pH chemistry and elevated temperature on the hose, particularly the inner liner. Test results suggest an upper dose limit of 50 Mrad for the hose. Room temperature burst pressure values at 50 Mrad are estimated at 600- 800 psi, providing a safety factor of 4.0-5.3X over the anticipated operating pressure of 150 psi and a safety factor of 3.0-4.0X over the working pressure of the hose (200 psi), independent of temperature effects. Radiation effects are minimal at doses less than 10 Mrad. Doses greater than 50 Mrad may be allowed, depending on operating conditions and required safety factors, but cannot be recommended at this time. At 250 Mrad, burst pressure values are reduced to the hose working pressure. At 300 Mrad, burst pressures are below 150 psi. At a bounding continuous dose rate of 57,870 rad/hr, the 50 Mrad dose limit is reached within 1.2 months. Actual dose rates may be lower, particularly during non-transfer periods. Refined dose calculations are therefore recommended to justify longer service. This report details the tests performed and interpretation of the results. Recommendations for shelf-life/storage, component quality verification, and post-service examination are provided.

  13. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable

  14. R ampersand D plan for immobilization technologies: fissile materials disposition program. Revision 1.0

    Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long- term fissile material management options, the Department of Energy's Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is conducting studies of options for the storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One set of alternatives for disposition involve immobilization. The immobilization alternatives provide for fixing surplus fissile materials in a host matrix in order to create a solid disposal form that is nuclear criticality-safe, proliferation-resistant and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal

  15. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  16. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  17. HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0

    Kruger, A A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Callow, Richard A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Abramowitz, Howard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Brandys, Marek [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-11-13

    Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150°C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

  18. HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0

    Kruger, A A.; Joseph, Innocent; Matlack, Keith S.; Callow, Richard A.; Abramowitz, Howard; Pegg, Ian L.; Brandys, Marek; Kot, Wing K.

    2012-01-01

    Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m 2 and depth of ∼ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150°C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage

  19. Rheology of Savannah River site tank 42 and tank 51 HLW radioactive sludges

    Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of the rheology of the radioactive sludge slurries at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is necessary in order to ensure that they can be retrieved from waste tanks and processed for final disposal. The high activity radioactive wastes stored as caustic slurries at SRS result from the neutralization of acid waste generated from production of nuclear defense materials. During storage, the wastes separate into a supernate layer and a sludge layer. In the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS, the radionuclides from the sludge and supernate will be immobilized into borosilicate glass for long term storage and eventual disposal. Before transferring the waste from a storage tank to the DWPF, a portion of the aluminum in the waste sludge will be dissolved and the sludge will be extensively washed to remove sodium. Tank 51 and Tank 42 radioactive sludges represent the first batch of HLW sludge to be processed in the DWPF. This paper presents results of rheology measurements of Tank 51 and Tank 42 at various solids concentrations. The rheologies of Tank 51 and Tank 42 radioactive slurries were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells Operations (SCO) at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) using a modified Haake Rotovisco RV-12 with an M150 measuring drive unit and TI sensor system. Rheological properties of the Tank 51 and Tank 42 radioactive sludges were measured as a function of weight percent solids. The weight percent solids of Tank 42 sludge was 27, as received. Tank 51 sludge had already been washed. The weight percent solids were adjusted by dilution with water or by concentration through drying. At 12, 15, and 18 weight percent solids, the yield stresses of Tank 51 sludge were 5, 11, and 14 dynes/cm2, respectively. The apparent viscosities were 6, 10, and 12 centipoises at 300 sec-1 shear rate, respectively

  20. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    Lee, Jongyoul; Choi, Heuijoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Geonyoung; Kim, Kyeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system

  1. Key Factors to Determine the Borehole Spacing in a Deep Borehole Disposal for HLW

    Lee, Jongyoul; Choi, Heuijoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Geonyoung; Kim, Kyeongsoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified and reducing conditions will sharply limit solubility of most dose critical radionuclides at the depth. Finally, high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. Therefore, as an alternative disposal concept, i.e., deep borehole disposal technology is under consideration in number of countries in terms of its outstanding safety and cost effectiveness. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or high level radioactive wastes which has been developed by some countries according to the rapid advance in the development of drilling technology, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, was reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. In this paper, the general concept for deep borehole disposal of spent fuels or HLW wastes, as an alternative method to the deep geological disposal method, were reviewed. After then an analysis on key factors for the determining the distance between boreholes for the disposal of HLW was carried out. These results can be used for the development of the HLW deep borehole disposal system.

  2. Tc Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    Hess, Nancy S.; Conradsen, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    Tc complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that long-term consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges we are conducting a research program to study to develop thermodynamic data on Tc-organic complexation over a wide range of chemical conditions. We will attempt to characterize Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques to validate our model. On the basis of such studies we will develop credible model of Tc chemistry in HLW that will allow prediction of Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  3. Grouping in partitioning of HLW for burning and/or transmutation with nuclear reactors

    Kitamoto, Asashi; Mulyanto.

    1995-01-01

    A basic concept on partitioning and transmutation treatment by neutron reaction was developed in order to improve the waste management and the disposal scenario of high level waste (HLW). The grouping in partitioning was important factor and closely linked with the characteristics of B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment. The selecting and grouping concept in partitioning of HLW was proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (Np, Am, and unrecovered U and Pu), Group MA2 (Cm, Cf etc.), Group A (Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW), judging from the three criteria for B/T treatment proposed in this study, which is related to (1) the value of hazard index for long-term tendency based on ALI, (2) the relative dose factor related to the mobility or retardation in ground water penetrated through geologic layer, and (3) burning and/or transmutation characteristics for recycle B/T treatment and the decay acceleration ratio by neutron reaction. Group MA1 and Group A could be burned effectively by thermal B/T reactor. Group MA2 could be burned effectively by fast B/T reactor. Transmutation of Group B by neutron reaction is difficult, therefore the development of radiation application of Group B (Cs and Sr) in industrial scale may be an interesting option in the future. Group R, i.e. the partitioned remains of HLW, and also a part of Group B should be immobilized and solidified by the glass matrix. HI ALI , the hazard index based on ALI, due to radiotoxicity of Group R can be lower than HI ALI due to standard mill tailing (smt) or uranium ore after about 300 years. (author)

  4. Development of gap filling technique in HLW repository

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Saito, Akira; Ishii, Takashi; Toguri, Satohito; Okihara, Mitsunobu; Iwasa, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    HLW is supposed to be disposed underground at depths more than 300 m in Japan. Buffer is an artificial barrier that controls radionuclides migrating into the groundwater. The buffer would be made of a natural swelling clay, bentonite. Construction technology for the buffer has been studied for many years, but studies for the gaps surrounding the buffer are little. The proper handling of the gaps is important for guaranteeing the functions of the buffer. In this paper, gap filling techniques using bentonite pellets have been developed in order to the gap having the same performance as the buffer. A new method for manufacturing high-density spherical pellets has been developed to fill the gap higher density ever reported. For the bentonite pellets, the filling performance and how to use were determined. And full-scale filling tests provided availability of the bentonite pellets and filling techniques. (author)

  5. Counter current decantation washing of HLW sludge

    Brooke, J.N.; Peterson, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 51 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks with typical dimensions 25.9 meters (85 feet) diameter and 10 meters (33 feet) high. Nearly 114 million liters (30 M gallons) of HLW waste is stored in these tanks in the form of insoluble solids called sludge, crystallized salt called salt cake, and salt solutions. This waste is being converted to waste forms stable for long term storage. In one of the processes, soluble salts are washed from HLW sludge in preparation for vitrification. At present, sludge is batch washed in a waste tank with one or no reuse of the wash water. Sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the wash water for tank corrosion protection; the large volumes of spent wash water are recycled to the evaporator system; additional salt cake is produced; and sodium carbonate is formed in the washed sludge during storage by reaction with CO 2 from the air. High costs and operational concerns with the current washing process prompts DOE and WSRC to seek an improved washing method. A new method should take full advantage of the physical/chemical properties of sludge, experience from other technical disciplines, processing rate requirements, inherent process safety, and use of proven processes and equipment. Counter current solids washing is a common process in the minerals processing and chemical industries. Washing circuits can be designed using thickeners, filters or centrifuges. Realizing the special needs of nuclear work and the low processing rates required, a Counter Current Decantation (CCD) circuit is proposed using small thickeners and fluidic pumps

  6. Safety assessment of HLW geological disposal system

    Naito, Morimasa

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with the Japanese nuclear program, the liquid waste with a high level of radioactivity arising from reprocessing is solidified in a stable glass matrix (vitrification) in stainless steel fabrication containers. The vitrified waste is referred to as high-level radioactive waste (HLW), and is characterized by very high initial radioactivity which, even though it decreases with time, presents a potential long-term risk. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly manage HLW from human and his environment. After vitrification, HLW is stored for a period of 30 to 50 years to allow cooling, and finally disposed of in a stable geological environment at depths greater than 300 m below surface. The deep underground environment, in general, is considered to be stable over geological timescales compared with surface environment. By selecting an appropriate disposal site, therefore, it is considered to be feasible to isolate the waste in the repository from man and his environment until such time as radioactivity levels have decayed to insignificance. The concept of geological disposal in Japan is similar to that in other countries, being based on a multibarrier system which combines the natural geological environment with engineered barriers. It should be noted that geological disposal concept is based on a passive safety system that does not require any institutional control for assuring long term environmental safety. To demonstrate feasibility of safe HLW repository concept in Japan, following technical steps are essential. Selection of a geological environment which is sufficiently stable for disposal (site selection). Design and installation of the engineered barrier system in a stable geological environment (engineering measures). Confirmation of the safety of the constructed geological disposal system (safety assessment). For site selection, particular consideration is given to the long-term stability of the geological environment taking into account the fact

  7. Source term measurements on vitrified HLW

    Hough, A.; Marples, J.A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium concentrations of Tc-99, Np-237, Pu-239/240 and Am-241 have been measured in the presence of materials likely to be present in a vitrified HLW repository: glass, iron, backfill and rock. Results were measured under both oxidising and reducing conditions and at pH values set by the backfill bentonite and cement. Under reducing conditions and with cementitious backfills, the equilibrium concentrations ranged from three to 30 times allowed drinking water levels for the four isotopes. (author)

  8. Strategic management of HLW repository projects

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to strategic management of HLW repository projects based on the premise that a primary objective of project activities is resolution of issues. The approach would be implemented by establishing an issues management function with responsibility to define the issues agenda, develop and apply the tools for assessing progress toward issue resolution, and develop the issue resolution criteria. A principal merit of the approach is that it provides a defensible rationale for project plans and activities. It also helps avoid unnecessary costs and schedule delays, and it helps assure coordination between project functions that share responsibilities for issue resolution

  9. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    Peeler, D.

    1999-01-01

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  10. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    Peeler, D.

    1999-06-22

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  11. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat

  12. Comparing technical concepts for disposal of Belgian vitrified HLW

    Bel, J.; Bock, C. de; Boyazis, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The choice of a suitable repository design for different categories of radioactive waste is an important element in the decisional process that will eventually lead to the waste disposal in geological ground layers during the next decades. Most countries are in the process of elaborating different technical solutions for their EBS '. Considering possible design alternatives offers more flexibility to cope with remaining uncertainties and allows optimizing some elements of the EBS in the future. However, it is not feasible to continue carrying out detailed studies for a large number of alternative design options. At different stages in the decisional process, choices, even preliminary ones, have to be made. Although the impact of different stakeholders (regulator, waste agencies, waste producers, research centers,...) in making these design choices can differ from one country to another, the choices should be based on sound, objective, clear and unambiguous justification grounds. Moreover, the arguments should be carefully reported and easy to understand by the decision makers. ONDRAF/NIRAS recently elaborated three alternative designs for the disposal of vitrified HLW. These three designs are briefly described in the next section. A first series of technological studies pointed out that the three options are feasible. It would however be unreasonable to continue R and D work on all three alternatives in parallel. It is therefore planned to make a preliminary choice of a reference design for the vitrified HLW in 2003. This selection will depend on the way the alternative design options can be evaluated against a number of criteria, mainly derived from general repository design requirements. The technique of multi-criteria analysis (MCA) will be applied as a tool for making the optimum selection, considering all selection criteria and considering different strategic approaches. This paper describes the used methodology. The decision on the actual selection will be

  13. Cyanide destruction/immobilization of residual sludge - mixed waste focus area. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    1998-02-01

    Innovative Technology Summary Reports are designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They are also designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users. Each report describes a technology, system, or process that has been developed and tested with funding from DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST). A report presents the full range of problems that a technology, system, or process will address and its advantages to the DOE cleanup in terms of system performance, cost, and cleanup effectiveness. Most reports include comparisons to baseline technologies as well as other competing technologies. Information about commercial availability and technology readiness for implementation is also included. Innovative Technology Summary Reports are intended to provide summary information. References for more detailed information are provided in an appendix. Efforts have been made to provide key data describing the performance, cost, and regulatory acceptance of the technology. If this information was not available at the time of publication, the omission is noted

  14. Application of self-propagation high-temperature synthesis for immobilization of hard radioactive wastes in ceramet materials

    Ilyin, E.; Pashkeev, I.; Senin, A.; Gerasimova, N.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SPHTS) application for an immobilization of solid high level wastes (HLW) in cermet materials is considered. The schemes of multilayer cermet blocks formation are offered. Such blocks consist of a ceramet core with immobilized HLW and a protective cover - ceramet without HLW. The influence of the base components form (pure Ti and Si, ferrotitanium and ferrosilicon), metallic components (Ni, Cu, Cr, Fe, ferrochromium) and nonmetallic components (SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 ) on burning rate and cover ceramet structure is investigated in compositions on a basis of Ti+B, Ti+Si, Ti+C systems. Model samples of multilayer cermet blocks are manufactured using of HLW simulators. (authors)

  15. Overview of the applications of cement-based immobilization technologies developed at US DOE facilities

    Dole, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25-mm-(1-in.-) diam pellets in a glove box to producing 240-m-(800-ft-) diam grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of immobilization materials. The US DOE sites and their programs are: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Hydrofracture Grout; (2) Hanford, Transportable Grout Facility (TGF); (3) Savannah River Plant (SRP), Nitrate Saltcrete; (4) EG and G Idaho, Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP); (5) Mound Laboratory (ML), Waste Pelletization Process; (6) ORNL, FUETAP Concretes, and (7) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Inert Carrier Concrete Process (ICCP). The major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems are also presented. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is included along with a discussion of future trends in cement-based waste form developments and applications. 35 refs., 12 figs

  16. Immobilization technologies for the management of hazardous industrial waste using granite waste (case study)

    Lasheen, Mohamed R.; Ashmawy, Azza M.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.; Moniem, Shimaa M. Abdel [National Research Centre, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-03-15

    Full characterization of granite waste sludge (GWS) was accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Xray fluorescence (XRF) for identification of its phase and chemical composition. Different leaching tests were conducted to determine the efficiency of the GWS for metal stabilization in hazardous sludge. The leaching of the metals from stabilized contaminated sludge was decreased as the GWS amount increased. Only 15% of GWS was sufficient for stabilization of all metal ions under investigation. The main reason for metal immobilization was attributed to the aluminosilicates or silicates matrix within the GWS, which can transform the metals in the form of their insoluble hydroxides or absorbed in the stabilized matrix. Also, solidification/stabilization technique was used for remediation of contaminated sludge. Compressive strength test after curing for 28 days was used for measuring the effectiveness of remediation technique; it was found to be 1.88MPa. This indicated that the remediated sludge was well solidified and safe to be used as a raw substance for roadway blocks. Therefore, this huge amount of by-product sludge derived from the granite cutting industry, which has a negative environmental impact due to its disposal, can be utilized as a binder material for solidification/stabilization of hazardous sludge.

  17. HLW disposal in Germany - R and D achievements and outlook

    Steininger, W.

    2006-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of the status of R and D on HLW disposal. Shortly addressed is the current nuclear policy. After describing the responsibilities regarding R and D for disposing of heat-generating high-level (HLW) waste (vitrified waste and spent fuel), selected projects are mentioned to illustrate the state of knowledge in disposing of waste in rock salt. Participation in international projects and programs is described to illustrate the value for the German concepts and ideas for HLW disposal in different rock types. Finally, a condensed outlook on future activities is given. (author)

  18. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    Kruger, A.A.; Bowan, B.W.; Joseph, I.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.K.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m 2 and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m 2 . The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al 2 O 3 concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m 2 .day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m 2 .day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m 2 .day).

  19. Glass formulation development and testing for the vitrification of DWPF HLW sludge coupled with crystalline silicotitanate (CST)

    Andrews, M.K.; Workman, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    An alternative to the In Tank Precipitation and sodium titanate processes at the Savannah River Site is the removal of cesium, strontium, and plutonium from the tank supernate by ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate (CST). This inorganic material has been shown to effectively and selectively sorb these elements from supernate. The loaded CST could then be immobilized with High-Level Waste (HLW) sludge during vitrification. Initial efforts on the development of a glass formulation for a coupled waste stream indicate that reasonable loadings of both sludge and CST can be achieved in glass

  20. Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Compound for Immobilization of Radioactive Waste Containing Actinide and Rare Earth Elements

    Sergey E. Vinokurov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective immobilization of liquid radioactive waste (LRW is key to the successful development of nuclear energy. The possibility of using the magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP compound for LRW immobilization on the example of nitric acid solutions containing actinides and rare earth elements (REE, including high level waste (HLW surrogate solution, is considered in the research work. Under the study of phase composition and structure of the MKP compounds that is obtained by the XRD and SEM methods, it was established that the compounds are composed of crystalline phases—analogues of natural phosphate minerals (struvite, metaankoleite. The hydrolytic stability of the compounds was determined according to the semi-dynamic test GOST R 52126-2003. Low leaching rates of radionuclides from the compound are established, including a differential leaching rate of 239Pu and 241Am—3.5 × 10−7 and 5.3 × 10−7 g/(cm2∙day. As a result of the research work, it was concluded that the MKP compound is promising for LRW immobilization and can become an alternative material combining the advantages of easy implementation of the technology, like cementation and the high physical and chemical stability corresponding to a glass-like compound.

  1. Immobilization of hazardous and radioactive waste into glass structures

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of more than three decades of international research, glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization of a wide range of potentially hazardous radioactive and non-radioactive materials. The ability of glass structures to incorporate and then immobilize many different elements into durable, high integrity, waste glass products is a direct function of the unique random network structure of the glassy state. Every major country involved with long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has either selected or is considering glass as the matrix of choice for immobilizing and ultimately, disposing of the potentially hazardous, high-level radioactive material. There are many reasons why glass is preferred. Among the most important considerations are the ability of glass structures to accommodate and immobilize the many different types of radionuclides present in HLW, and to produce a product that not only has excellent technical properties, but also possesses good processing features. Good processability allows the glass to be fabricated with relative ease even under difficult remote-handling conditions necessary for vitrification of highly radioactive material. The single most important property of the waste glass produced is its ability to retain hazardous species within the glass structure and this is reflected by its excellent chemical durability and corrosion resistance to a wide range of environmental conditions. In addition to immobilization of HLW glass matrices are also being considered for isolation of many other types of hazardous materials, both radioactive as well as nonradioactive. This includes vitrification of various actinides resulting from clean-up operations and the legacy of the cold war, as well as possible immobilization of weapons grade plutonium resulting from disarmament activities. Other types of wastes being considered for immobilization into glasses include transuranic wastes, mixed wastes, contaminated

  2. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full-scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  3. Drop Calculations of HLW Canister and Pu Can-in-Canister

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (Pu) (''can-in-canister'' [CIC] throughout this document) subjected to drop DBEs (design basis events) during the handling operation. The evaluated DBE in the former case is 7-m (23-ft) vertical (flat-bottom) drop. In the latter case, two 2-ft (0.61-m) corner (oblique) drops are evaluated in addition to the 7-m vertical drop. These Pu CIC calculations are performed at three different temperatures: room temperature (RT) (20 C), T = 200 F = 93.3 C , and T = 400 F = 204 C ; in addition to these the calculation characterized by the highest maximum stress intensity is performed at T = 750 F = 399 C as well. The scope of the HLW canister calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of: stress intensity and effective plastic strain in the canister, directional residual strains at the canister outer surface, and change of canister dimensions. The scope of Pu CIC calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity, and effective plastic strain in the canister. The information provided by the sketches from Reference 26 (Attachments 5.3,5.5,5.8, and 5.9) is that of the potential CIC design considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the Plutonium Immobilization Project and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. It should be noted that the 9-m vertical drop DBE, included in Reference 24, is not included in the objective of this calculation since it did not become a waste acceptance requirement. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  4. Researches on tectonic uplift and denudation with relation to geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Sanga, Tomoji; Moriya, Toshifumi

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the present state of researches on tectonic uplift and denudation, and shows perspective goals and direction of future researches from the viewpoint of geological disposal of HLW in Japan. Detailed history of tectonics and denudation in geologic time scale, including the rates, temporal and spatial distributions and processes, reconstructed from geologic and geomorphologic evidences will enable us to make the geological predictions. Improvements of the analytic methods for the geological histories, e.g. identification of the tectonic and denudational imprints and age determinations, are indispensable for the accurate prediction. Developments of the tools and methodologies for assessments of the degree and extension of influences by the tectonic uplift, subsidence and denudation on the geological environments such as ground water flows are also fundamental problem in the study field of the geological disposal of HLW. Collaboration of scientific researches using the geological and geomorphological methods and applied technology, such as numerical simulations of ground water flows, is important in improving the safety and accuracy of the geological disposal of HLW. (author)

  5. SNF/HLW Transfer System Description Document

    W. Holt

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF)/high-level radioactive waste (HLW) transfer system and associated bases, which will allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This SDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD is an engineering tool for design control. Accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This SDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flowdown of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The SDD follows the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in this SDD reflects the current results of the design process

  6. Stress analysis of HLW containers. Compas project

    1989-01-01

    This document reports the work carried out for the Compas project which looked at the performance of various computer codes in a selected benchmark exercise. This exercise consisted of several analyses on simplified models which have features typical of HLW containers. These analyses comprise two groups; one related to thick walled, stressed shell overpacks, the other related to thin walled, supported shell overpacks with a lead filler. The first set of analyses looked at an elastic-plastic behaviour and large deformation of a cylinder representative of the main body of thick walled containers). The second set looked at creep behaviour of the lead filler, and the shape the base of thin walled containers will take up, after hundreds of years in the repository. On the thick walled analyses with the cylinder subject to an external pressure all the codes gave consistent results in the elastic region and there is good agreement in the yield pressures. Once in the plastic region there is more divergence in the results although a consistent trend is predicted. One of the analyses predicted a non-axisymmetric mode of deformation as would be expected in reality. Fewer results were received for the creep analysis, however the transient creep results showed consistency, and were bounded by the final-state results

  7. Rheology of Savannah River Site Tank 51 HLW radioactive sludge

    Ha, B.C.

    1993-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 51 HLW radioactive sludge represents a major portion of the first batch of sludge to be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The rheological properties of Tank 51 sludge will determine if the waste sludge can be pumped by the current DWPF process cell pump design and the homogeneity of melter feed slurries. The rheological properties of Tank 51 sludge and sludge/frit slurries at various solids concentrations were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells Operations (SCO) at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) using a modified Haake Rotovisco viscometer system. Rheological properties of Tank 51 radioactive sludge/Frit 202 slurries increased drastically when the solids content was above 41 wt %. The yield stresses of Tank 51 sludge and sludge/frit slurries fall within the limits of the DWPF equipment design basis. The apparent viscosities also fall within the DWPF design basis for sludge consistency. All the results indicate that Tank 51 waste sludge and sludge/frit slurries are pumpable throughout the DWPF processes based on the current process cell pump design, and should produce homogeneous melter feed slurries

  8. Microorganism immobilization

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  9. Specialty glass development for radiation shielding windows and nuclear waste immobilization

    Mandal, S.; Ghorui, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.; Sen, R.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Sen, S.; Maiti, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    The technology of two important varieties of specialty glasses, namely high density Radiation Shielding Window (RSW) glass and specialty glass beads of borosilicate composition have been successfully developed in CGCRI with an aim to meet the countries requirement. Radiation Shielding Windows used in nuclear installations, are viewing devices, which allow direct viewing into radioactive areas while still providing adequate protection to the operating personnel. The glass blocks are stabilized against damage from radiation by introducing cerium in definite proportions. Considering the essentially of developing an indigenous technology to make the country self-sufficient for this critical item, CGCRI has taken up a major programme to develop high lead containing glasses required for RSWs under a MoD with BARC. On the other hand, the specialty glass bead of specific composition and properties is a critical material required for management of radioactive waste in a closed nuclear fuel cycle that is followed by India. During reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel, high level radio-active liquid waste (HLW) is produced containing unwanted radio isotopes some of which remain radioactive for thousands of years. The need is to immobilize them within a molecular structure so that they will not come out and be released to the ambience and thereby needs to be resolved if nuclear power is to make a significant contribution to the country's power requirement. Borosilicate glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization due to its unique random network structure

  10. Collaboration, Automation, and Information Management at Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms

    Aurah, Mirwaise Y.; Roberts, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), operator of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms at the Hanford Site, is taking an over 20-year leap in technology, replacing systems that were monitored with clipboards and obsolete computer systems, as well as solving major operations and maintenance hurdles in the area of process automation and information management. While WRPS is fully compliant with procedures and regulations, the current systems are not integrated and do not share data efficiently, hampering how information is obtained and managed

  11. Cooling and cracking of technical HLW glass products

    Kienzler, B.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses various cooling procedures applied to canisters filled with inactive simulated HLW glass and the measured temperature distributions compared with numerically computed data. Stress computations of the cooling process were carried out with a finite element method. Only those volume elements having temperatures below the transformation temperature Tg were assumed to contribute thermoelastically to the developing stresses. Model calculations were extended to include real HLW glass canisters with inherent thermal power. The development of stress as a function of variations of heat flow conditions and of the radioactive decay was studied

  12. Active geothermal systems as natural analogs of HLW repositories

    Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Cohen, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    Geologic analogs of long-lived processes in high-level waste (HLW) repositories have been much studied in recent years. However, most of these occurrences either involve natural processes going on today at 25 degree C, or, if they are concerned with behavior at temperatures similar to the peak temperatures anticipated near HLW canisters, have long since ended. This paper points out the usefulness of studying modern geothermal systems as natural analogs, and to illustrate the concept with a dramatic example, the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS)

  13. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS, TEST PLAN 09T1690-1

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.

    2009-01-01

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and

  14. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  15. Research on vitrification technology to immobilize radioactive sludge generated from Fukushima Daiichi power plant. Enhanced glass medium

    Amamoto, Ippei; Kobayashi, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Naoto; Takebe, Hiromichi; Mitamura, Naoki; Tsuzuki, Tatsuya; Fukayama, Daigen; Nagano, Yuichi; Jantzen, Tatjana; Hack, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The search for an enhanced glass medium to immobilize the sludge at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is our main purpose. The iron phosphate glass (IPG) is a potential candidate as we set about assessing it by means of theoretical and experimental investigation. Based on the results of this study, the IPG showed favorable characteristics as a vitrification medium for the sludge. (author)

  16. Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in existing facilities at the Savannah River site

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources, and through a ceramic immobilization process converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans

  17. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  18. Performance Enhancements to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low-Activity Waste Vitrification System

    Hamel, W. F.; Gerdes, K.; Holton, L. K.; Pegg, I.L.; Bowan, B.W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the treatment and vitrification of underground tank wastes stored at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The WTP comprises four major facilities: a pretreatment facility to separate the tank waste into high level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) process streams, a HLW vitrification facility to immobilize the HLW fraction; a LAW vitrification facility to immobilize the LAW fraction, and an analytical laboratory to support the operations of all four treatment facilities. DOE has established strategic objectives to optimize the performance of the WTP facilities and the LAW and HLW waste forms to reduce the overall schedule and cost for treatment and vitrification of the Hanford tank wastes. This strategy has been implemented by establishing performance expectations in the WTP contract for the facilities and waste forms. In addition, DOE, as owner-operator of the WTP facilities, continues to evaluate 1) the design, to determine the potential for performance above the requirements specified in the WTP contract; and 2) improvements in production of the LAW and HLW waste forms. This paper reports recent progress directed at improving production of the LAW waste form. DOE's initial assessment, which is based on the work reported in this paper, is that the treatment rate of the WTP LAW vitrification facility can be increased by a factor of 2 to 4 with a combination of revised glass formulations, modest increases in melter glass operating temperatures, and a second-generation LAW melter with a larger surface area. Implementing these improvements in the LAW waste immobilization capability can benefit the LAW treatment mission by reducing the cost of waste treatment. (authors)

  19. Application of QA to R ampersand D support of HLW programs

    Ryder, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Quality has always been of primary importance in the research and development (R ampersand D) environment. An organization's ability to attract funds for new or continued research is largely dependent on the quality of past performance. However, with the possible exceptions of peer reviews for fund allocation and the referee process prior to publication, past quality assurance (QA) activities were primarily informal good practices. This resulted in standards of acceptable practice that varied from organization to organization. The increasing complexity of R ampersand D projects and the increasing need for project results to be upheld outside the scientific community (i.e., lawsuits and licensing hearings) are encouraging R ampersand D organizations and their clients to adopt more formalized methods for the scientific process and to increase control over support organizations (i.e., suppliers and subcontractors). This has become especially true for R ampersand D organizations involved in the high-level (HLW) projects for a number of years. The PNL began to implement QA program requirements within a few HLW repository preliminary studies in 1978. In 1985, PNL developed a comprehensive QA program for R ampersand D activities in support of two of the proposed repository projects. This QA program was developed by the PNL QA department with a significant amount of support assistance and guidance from PNL upper management, the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), and the Salt Repository Program Office (SPRO). The QA program has been revised to add a three-level feature and is currently being implemented on projects sponsored by the Office of Geologic Repositories (DOE/OGR), Repository Technology Program (DOE-CH), Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project, and other HLW projects

  20. Immobilized ligninolytic enzymes: An innovative and environmental responsive technology to tackle dye-based industrial pollutants - A review.

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2017-01-15

    In the twenty-first century, chemical and associated industries quest a transition prototype from traditional chemical-based concepts to a greener, sustainable and environmentally-friendlier catalytic alternative, both at the laboratory and industrial scale. In this context, bio-based catalysis offers numerous benefits along with potential biotechnological and environmental applications. The bio-based catalytic processes are energy efficient than conventional methodologies under moderate processing, generating no and negligible secondary waste pollution. Thanks to key scientific advances, now, solid-phase biocatalysts can be economically tailored on a large scale. Nevertheless, it is mandatory to recover and reprocess the enzyme for their commercial feasibility, and immobilization engineering can efficiently accomplish this challenge. The first part of the present review work briefly outlines the immobilization of lignin-modifying enzymes (LMEs) including lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase of white-rot fungi (WRF). Whereas, in the second part, a particular emphasis has been given on the recent achievements of carrier-immobilized LMEs for the degradation, decolorization, or detoxification of industrial dyes and dye-based industrial wastewater effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Permitting plan for the immobilized low-activity waste project

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage and disposal of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) and (2) interim storage of TWRS immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms. Low-activity waste (LAW), low-level waste (LLW), and high-level waste (HLW) are defined by the TWRS, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) DOE/EIS-0189, August 1996 (TWRS, Final EIS). By definition, HLW requires permanent isolation in a deep geologic repository. Also by definition, LAW is ''the waste that remains after separating from high-level waste as much of the radioactivity as is practicable that when solidified may be disposed of as LLW in a near-surface facility according to the NRC regulations.'' It is planned to store/dispose of (ILAW) inside four empty vaults of the five that were originally constructed for the Group Program. Additional disposal facilities will be constructed to accommodate immobilized LLW packages produced after the Grout Vaults are filled. The specifications for performance of the low-activity vitrified waste form have been established with strong consideration of risk to the public. The specifications for glass waste form performance are being closely coordinated with analysis of risk. RL has pursued discussions with the NRC for a determination of the classification of the Hanford Site's low-activity tank waste fraction. There is no known RL action to change law with respect to onsite disposal of waste

  2. Regional Geologic Evaluations for Disposal of HLW and SNF: The Pierre Shale of the Northern Great Plains

    Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-14

    The DOE Spent Fuel and Waste Technology (SWFT) R&D Campaign is supporting research on crystalline rock, shale (argillite) and salt as potential host rocks for disposal of HLW and SNF in a mined geologic repository. The distribution of these three potential repository host rocks is limited to specific regions of the US and to different geologic and hydrologic environments (Perry et al., 2014), many of which may be technically suitable as a site for mined geologic disposal. This report documents a regional geologic evaluation of the Pierre Shale, as an example of evaluating a potentially suitable shale for siting a geologic HLW repository. This report follows a similar report competed in 2016 on a regional evaluation of crystalline rock that focused on the Superior Province of the north-central US (Perry et al., 2016).

  3. Waste treatment and immobilization technologies involving inorganic sorbents. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1992-1996

    1997-06-01

    A Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) for the application of inorganic sorbents in liquid waste treatment and immobilization was initiated by the IAEA in 1992. The results of this CRP are presented in this report. Fifteen institutions from fourteen countries were involved in this programme. The framework of this CRP was: (1) to conduct fundamental studies on sorbent structure and sorption mechanism; (2) to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic data of the treatment process; (3) to define sorption mechanism of radionuclides on different soils; (4) to identify sorbents appropriate for treatment of liquid waste streams; (5) to develop standard tests to be able to compare results of different groups of investigations. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. River Protection Project (RPP) Immobilized High-Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Plan

    BRIGGS, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    This document replaces HNF-1751, Revision 1. It incorporates updates to reflect changes in programmatic direction associated with the vitrification plant contract and associated DOE-ORP guidance. In addition it includes planning associated with failed/used melter and sample handling and disposition work scope. The document also includes format modifications and section numbering update consistent with CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. procedures

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in situ experimental program for HLW

    Molecke, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be a facility to demonstrate the environmental and operational safety of storing radioactive wastes in a deep geologic bedded salt facility. The WIPP will be located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 30 miles east of the city of Carlsbad. The major focus of the pilot plant operation involves ERDA defense related low and intermediate-level transuranic wastes. The scope of the project also specifically includes experimentation utilizing commercially generated high-level wastes, or alternatively, spent unreprocessed fuel elements. WIPP HLW experiments are being conducted in an inter-related laboratory, bench-scale, and in situ mode. This presentation focuses on the planned in situ experiments which, depending on the availability of commercially reprocessed waste plus delays in the construction schedule of the WIPP, will begin in approximately 1985. Such experiments are necessary to validate preceding laboratory results and to provide actual, total conditions of geologic storage which cannot be adequately simulated. One set of planned experiments involves emplacing bare HLW fragments into direct contact with the bedded salt environment. A second set utilizes full-size canisters of waste emplaced in the salt in the same manner as planned for a future HLW repository. The bare waste experiments will study in an accelerated manner waste-salt bed-brine interactions including matrix integrity/degradation, brine leaching, system chemistry, and potential radionuclide migration through the salt bed. Utilization of full-size canisters of HLW in situ permits us to demonstrate operational effectiveness and safety. Experiments will evaluate corrosion and compatibility interactions between the waste matrix, canister and overpack materials, getter materials, stored energy, waste buoyancy, etc. Using full size canisters also allows us to demonstrate engineered retrievability of wastes, if necessary, at the end of experimentation

  6. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  7. Management strategy for site characterization at candidate HLW repository sites

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for HLW repository site characterization which is aimed at producing an optimal characterization trajectory for site suitability and licensing evaluations. The core feature of the strategy is a matrix of alternative performance targets and alternative information-level targets which can be used to allocate and justify program effort. Strategies for work concerning evaluation of expected and disrupted repository performance are distinguished, and the need for issue closure criteria is discussed

  8. International technology exchange in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform production

    Kitchen, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The nearly completed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility at the Savannah River Site that is designed to immobilize defense high level radioactive waste (HLW) by vitrification in borosilicate glass and containment in stainless steel canisters suitable for storage in the future DOE HLW repository. The DWPF is expected to start cold operation later this year (1990), and will be the first full scale vitrification facility operating in the United States, and the largest in the world. The DOE has been coordinating technology transfer and exchange on issues relating to HLW treatment and disposal through bi-lateral agreements with several nations. For the nearly fifteen years of the vitrification program at Savannah River Laboratory, over two hundred exchanges have been conducted with a dozen international agencies involving about five-hundred foreign national specialists. These international exchanges have been beneficial to the DOE's waste management efforts through confirmation of the choice of the waste form, enhanced understanding of melter operating phenomena, support for paths forward in political/regulatory arenas, confirmation of costs for waste form compliance programs, and establishing the need for enhancements of melter facility designs. This paper will compare designs and schedules of the international vitrification programs, and will discuss technical areas where the exchanges have provided data that have confirmed and aided US research and development efforts, impacted the design of the DWPF and guided the planning for regulatory interaction and product acceptance

  9. R and D programme for HLW disposal in Japan

    Tsuboya, Takao

    1997-01-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has been active in developing an R and D programme for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in accordance with the overall HLW management programme defined by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) of Japan. The aim of the R and D activities at the current stage is to provide a scientific and technical basis for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan, which is turn promotes understanding of the safety concept not only in the scientific and technical community but also by the general public. As a major milestone in the R and D programme, PNC submitted a first progress report, referred to as H3, in September 1992. H3 summarised the results of R and D activities up to March 1992 and identified priority issues for further study. The second progress report, scheduled to be submitted around 2000, and should demonstrated more rigorously and transparently the feasibility of the specified disposal concept. It should also provide input for the siting and regulatory processes, which will be set in motion after the year 2000. (author). 10 refs., 4 figs

  10. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams-13000

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  11. Vitrification of HLW in cold crucible melter

    Bordier, G.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), COGEMA (Industrial Operator), and SGN (COGEMA's Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities: the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed remotely in one of the R7 vitrification

  12. Status of the safety concept and safety demonstration for an HLW repository in salt. Summary report

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Filbert, W.; and others

    2013-12-15

    safety demonstration are the integrity proofs for the geological and geotechnical barriers and analysis of backfill compaction. In addition, any possible radionuclide release from the repository to the environment has also to be assessed. The safety and demonstration concept developed in the course of the ISIBEL project was further evolved and applied in the course of the R and D project ''Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben - VSG'' (preliminary safety analysis Gorleben) as an example for an HLW repository in a domal salt structure. The repository concepts also consider the requirement for retrievability of stored waste during the operational phase of the repository. The results of the R and D project VSG provide evidence that a safe HLW repository within a salt dome of a suitable geologic structure is feasible. The long-term safety can be ensured using state-of-the-art science and technology. In 2010, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) issued new safety requirements for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste. These requirements have been included in the analysis. This study shows the depth of the geological and technical knowledge on final disposal of HLW in a salt dome with a suitable geologic structure and demonstrates that the tools required for safety evaluations are available and allow reliable safety assessments of HLW repositories in salt formations.

  13. EIS Data Call Report: Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans

  14. Focusing on clay formation as host media of HLW geological disposal in China

    Zheng Hualing; Chen Shi; Sun Donghui

    2007-01-01

    Host medium is vitally important for safety for HLW geological disposal. Chinese HLW disposal effort in the past decades were mainly focused on granite formation. However, the granite formation has fatal disadvantage for HLW geological disposal. This paper reviews experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community and analyzes key factors affecting the site selection. It is recommended that clay formation should be taken into consideration and additional effort should be made before decision making of host media of HLW disposal in China. (authors)

  15. Siting Process for HLW Repository in Japan

    Masuda, S.; Kitayama, K.; Umeki, H.; Naito, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the year 2000, the geological disposal program for high-level radioactive waste in Japan moved from the phase of generic research and development (R and D) into the phase of implementation. Following legislation entitled the ''Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act'', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established as the implementing organization. The assigned activities of NUMO include selection of the repository site, demonstration of disposal technology at the site, developing relevant licensing applications and construction, operation and closure of the repository. As the first milestone of siting process, NUMO announced to the public an overall procedure for selection of preliminary investigation areas for potential candidate sites on October 29, 2001. The procedure specifies that NUMO will solicit volunteer municipalities for preliminary investigation areas with publishing four documents as an information package. These documents are tentatively entitled ''Instructions for Application'', ''Siting Factors for the Preliminary Investigation Areas'', a ''Repository Concepts'' as well as an ''Site Investigation Community Outreach Scheme''

  16. Final Report Integrated DM1200 Melter Testing Using AZ-102 And C-106/AY-102 HLW Simulants: HLW Simulant Verification VSL-05R5800-1, Rev. 0, 6/27/05

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Gong, W.; Bardakci, T.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Brandys, M.; Kot, W.K.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter tests were to determine the effects of feed rheology, feed solid content, and bubbler configuration on glass production rate and off-gas system performance while processing the HLW AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 feed compositions; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components, as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table. The data provided in this Final Report address the impacts of HLW melter feed rheology on melter throughput and validation of the simulated HLW melter feeds. The primary purpose of this testing is to further validate/verify the HLW melter simulants that have been used for previous melter testing and to support their continued use in developing melter and off-gas related processing information for the Project. The primary simulant property in question is rheology. Simulants and melter feeds used in all previous melter tests were produced by direct addition of chemicals; these feed tend to be less viscous than rheological the upper-bound feeds made from actual wastes. Data provided here compare melter processing for the melter feed used in all previous DM100 and DM1200 tests (nominal melter feed) with feed adjusted by the feed vendor (NOAH Technologies) to be more viscous, thereby simulating more closely the upperbounding feed produced from actual waste. This report provides results of tests that are described in the Test Plan for this work. The Test Plan is responsive to one of several test objectives covered in the WTP Test Specification for this work; consequently, only part of the scope described in the Test Specification was addressed in this particular Test Plan. For the purpose of

  17. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING USING AZ 102 AND C 106/AY-102 HLW SIMULANTS: HLW SIMULANT VERIFICATION VSL-05R5800-1 REV 0 6/27/05

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D' ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter tests were to determine the effects of feed rheology, feed solid content, and bubbler configuration on glass production rate and off-gas system performance while processing the HLW AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 feed compositions; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components, as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table. The data provided in this Final Report address the impacts of HLW melter feed rheology on melter throughput and validation of the simulated HLW melter feeds. The primary purpose of this testing is to further validate/verify the HLW melter simulants that have been used for previous melter testing and to support their continued use in developing melter and off-gas related processing information for the Project. The primary simulant property in question is rheology. Simulants and melter feeds used in all previous melter tests were produced by direct addition of chemicals; these feed tend to be less viscous than rheological the upper-bound feeds made from actual wastes. Data provided here compare melter processing for the melter feed used in all previous DM100 and DM1200 tests (nominal melter feed) with feed adjusted by the feed vendor (NOAH Technologies) to be more viscous, thereby simulating more closely the upperbounding feed produced from actual waste. This report provides results of tests that are described in the Test Plan for this work. The Test Plan is responsive to one of several test objectives covered in the WTP Test Specification for this work; consequently, only part of the scope described in the Test Specification was addressed in this particular Test Plan. For the purpose of

  18. Initiating the Validation of CCIM Processability for Multi-phase all Ceramic (SYNROC) HLW Form: Plan for Test BFY14CCIM-C

    Maio, Vince [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This plan covers test BFY14CCIM-C which will be a first–of–its-kind demonstration for the complete non-radioactive surrogate production of multi-phase ceramic (SYNROC) High Level Waste Forms (HLW) using Cold Crucible Induction Melting (CCIM) Technology. The test will occur in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) CCIM Pilot Plant and is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 15, 2014. The purpose of the test is to begin collecting qualitative data for validating the ceramic HLW form processability advantages using CCIM technology- as opposed to existing ceramic–lined Joule Heated Melters (JHM) currently producing BSG HLW forms. The major objectives of BFY14CCIM-C are to complete crystalline melt initiation with a new joule-heated resistive starter ring, sustain inductive melting at temperatures between 1600 to 1700°C for two different relatively high conductive materials representative of the SYNROC ceramic formation inclusive of a HLW surrogate, complete melter tapping and pouring of molten ceramic material in to a preheated 4 inch graphite canister and a similar canister at room temperature. Other goals include assessing the performance of a new crucible specially designed to accommodate the tapping and pouring of pure crystalline forms in contrast to less recalcitrant amorphous glass, assessing the overall operational effectiveness of melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a dedicated power source, and observing the tapped molten flow and subsequent relatively quick crystallization behavior in pans with areas identical to standard HLW disposal canisters. Surrogate waste compositions with ceramic SYNROC forming additives and their measured properties for inductive melting, testing parameters, pre-test conditions and modifications, data collection requirements, and sampling/post-demonstration analysis requirements for the produced forms are provided and defined.

  19. HLW disposal by fission reactors; calculation of trans-mutation rate and recycle

    Mulyanto

    1997-01-01

    Transmutation of MA (Minor actinide) and LLFPS (long-lived fission products) into stable nuclide or short-lived isotopes by fission reactors seem to become an alternative technology for HLW disposal. in this study, transmutation rate and recycle calculation were developed in order to evaluate transmutation characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the fission reactors. inventory of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors were determined by solving of criticality equation with 1-D cylindrical geometry of multigroup diffusion equations at the beginning of cycle (BOC). transmutation rate and burn-up was determined by solving of depletion equation. inventory of MA and LLFPs was calculated for 40 years recycle. From this study, it was concluded that characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors can be evaluated by recycle calculation. by calculation of transmutation rate, performance of fission reactor for transmutation of MA or LLFPs can be discussed

  20. 12 Flasktransport of vitrified High Level Waste (HLW)

    Verdier, A.; Lancelot, J. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France); Gisbertz, A.; Graf, W. [GNS (Germany); Bartagnon, O. [COGEMA (AREVA Group) (France)

    2004-07-01

    The return of HLW to Germany has started in 1996 with the first attribution of 28 glass canisters to German utilities by COGEMA. After several transports comprising 1, 2 and 6 flasks per shipment German and French Authorities requested to transport 12 flasks in a single shipment. The first of these 12-flask-transports was performed with the type CASTOR {sup registered} HAW 20/28 CG flask in 2002 and the second followed in 2003. COGEMA LOGISTICS is responsible for the overall transport assigned by GNS (Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH) being itself entrusted by the German utilities with the return of reprocessing residues.

  1. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    Walker, C.T.; Scheffler, K.; Riege, U.

    1978-11-01

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 23 0 C and 115 0 C. (orig.) [de

  2. 12 Flasktransport of vitrified High Level Waste (HLW)

    Verdier, A.; Lancelot, J.; Gisbertz, A.; Graf, W.; Bartagnon, O.

    2004-01-01

    The return of HLW to Germany has started in 1996 with the first attribution of 28 glass canisters to German utilities by COGEMA. After several transports comprising 1, 2 and 6 flasks per shipment German and French Authorities requested to transport 12 flasks in a single shipment. The first of these 12-flask-transports was performed with the type CASTOR registered HAW 20/28 CG flask in 2002 and the second followed in 2003. COGEMA LOGISTICS is responsible for the overall transport assigned by GNS (Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH) being itself entrusted by the German utilities with the return of reprocessing residues

  3. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lindberg, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heasler, Patrick G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mercier, Theresa M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, William E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eibling, Russell E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  4. Durability, mechanical, and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high level waste

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1990-01-01

    The high-level liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is routinely solidified into granular calcined high-level waste (HLW) and stored onsite. Research is being conducted at the ICPP on methods of immobilizing the HLW, including developing a durable glass-ceramic form which has the potential to significantly reduce the final waste volume by up to 60% compared to a glass form. Simulated, pilot plant, non-radioactive, calcines similar to the composition of the calcined HLW and glass forming additives are used to produce experimental glass-ceramic forms. The objective of the research reported in this paper is to study the impact of ground calcine particle size on durability and mechanical and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms

  5. Computer-aided design of bromelain and papain covalent immobilization

    Cutiño-Avila, Bessy; Gil Pradas, Dayrom; Aragón Abreu, Carlos; Fernández Marrero, Yuniel; Hernández de la Torre, Martha; Salas Sarduy, Emir; Chávez Planes, María de los Ángeles; Guisán Seijas, José Manuel; Díaz Brito, Joaquín; del Monte-Martínez, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes as immobilized derivatives have been widely used in Food, Agrochemical, Pharmaceutical and Biotechnological industries. Protein immobilization is probably the most used technology to improve the operational stability of these molecules. Bromelain (Ananas comosus) and papain (Carica papaya) are cystein proteases extensively used as immobilized biocatalyst with several applications in therapeutics, racemic mixtures resolution, affinity chromatography and others industrial scenarios. The...

  6. Immobilization of microbial cells: A promising tool for treatment of ...

    The review articles on cell immobilization have been published since 1980 and reflect the general interest in this topic. Immobilized microbial cells create opportunities in a wide range of sectors including environmental pollution control. Compared with suspended microorganism technology, cell immobilization shows many ...

  7. Status of Progress Made Toward Safety Analysis and Technical Site Evaluations for DOE Managed HLW and SNF.

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gross, Michael B [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frederick, Jennifer M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on generic deep geologic disposal systems (i.e., repositories). This report describes specific activities in FY 2016 associated with the development of a Defense Waste Repository (DWR)a for the permanent disposal of a portion of the HLW and SNF derived from national defense and research and development (R&D) activities of the DOE.

  8. The chemical stockpile intergovernmental consultation program: Lessons for HLW public involvement

    Feldman, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the appropriateness of the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program's (CSDP) Intergovernmental Consultation and Coordination Boards (ICCBs) as models for incorporating public concerns in the future siting of HLW repositories by DOE. ICCB structure, function, and implementation are examined, along with other issues relevant to the HLW context. 27 refs

  9. Comparison of risks due to HLW and SURF repositories in bedded salt

    Chu, M.S.Y.; Ortiz, N.R.; Wahi, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology was developed for use in the analysis of risks from geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. This methodology is applied to two conceptual nuclear waste repositories in bedded salt containing High-Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Un-Reprocessed Fuel (SURF), respectively. A comparison of the risk estimated from the HLW and SURF repositories is presented

  10. Spent fuel and HLW transportation the French experience

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    With 53 nuclear power plants in operation at EDF and a fuel cycle with recycling policy of the valuable materials, COGEMA is faced with the transport of a wide range of radioactive materials. In this framework, the transport activity is a key link in closing the fuel cycle. COGEMA has developed a comprehensive Transport Organization System dealing with all the sectors of the fuel cycle. The paper will describe the status of transportation of spent fuel and HLW in France and the experience gathered. The Transport Organization System clearly defines the role of all actors where COGEMA, acting as the general coordinator, specifies the tasks to be performed and brings technical and commercial support to its various subcontractors: TRANSNUCLEAIRE, specialized in casks engineering and transport operations, supplies packaging and performs transport operations, LEMARECHAL and CELESTIN operate transport by truck in the Vicinity of the nuclear sites while French Railways are in charge of spent fuel transport by train. HLW issued from the French nuclear program is stored for 30 years in an intermediate storage installation located at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Ultimately, these canisters will be transported to the disposal site. COGEMA has set up a comprehensive transport organization covering all operational aspects including adapted procedures, maintenance programs and personnel qualification

  11. Melter Throughput Enhancements for High-Iron HLW

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gan, Hoa [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Chaudhuri, Malabika [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-26

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations in order to increase glass melting rates in high waste loading glass formulations for HLW with high concentrations of iron. Testing was designed to identify glass and melter feed formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts to assess melt rate using a vertical gradient furnace system and to develop new formulations with enhanced melt rate. Testing evaluated the effects of waste loading on glass properties and the maximum waste loading that can be achieved. The results from crucible-scale testing supported subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass and feed formulations on waste processing rate and product quality. The DM100 was selected as the platform for these tests due to its extensive previous use in processing rate determination for various HLW streams and glass compositions.

  12. NOx AND HETEROGENEITY EFFECTS IN HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    Meisel, Dan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Orlando, Thom

    2000-01-01

    We summarize contributions from our EMSP supported research to several field operations of the Office of Environmental Management (EM). In particular we emphasize its impact on safety programs at the Hanford and other EM sites where storage, maintenance and handling of HLW is a major mission. In recent years we were engaged in coordinated efforts to understand the chemistry initiated by radiation in HLW. Three projects of the EMSP (''The NOx System in Nuclear Waste,'' ''Mechanisms and Kinetics of Organic Aging in High Level Nuclear Wastes, D. Camaioni--PI'' and ''Interfacial Radiolysis Effects in Tanks Waste, T. Orlando--PI'') were involved in that effort, which included a team at Argonne, later moved to the University of Notre Dame, and two teams at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Much effort was invested in integrating the results of the scientific studies into the engineering operations via coordination meetings and participation in various stages of the resolution of some of the outstanding safety issues at the sites. However, in this Abstract we summarize the effort at Notre Dame

  13. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, E. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, C. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, C. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, N. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valenta, M. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, G. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, D. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Robbins, R. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, L. E. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  14. Improved technique that allows the performance of large-scale SNP genotyping on DNA immobilized by FTA technology.

    He, Hongbin; Argiro, Laurent; Dessein, Helia; Chevillard, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    FTA technology is a novel method designed to simplify the collection, shipment, archiving and purification of nucleic acids from a wide variety of biological sources. The number of punches that can normally be obtained from a single specimen card are often however, insufficient for the testing of the large numbers of loci required to identify genetic factors that control human susceptibility or resistance to multifactorial diseases. In this study, we propose an improved technique to perform large-scale SNP genotyping. We applied a whole genome amplification method to amplify DNA from buccal cell samples stabilized using FTA technology. The results show that using the improved technique it is possible to perform up to 15,000 genotypes from one buccal cell sample. Furthermore, the procedure is simple. We consider this improved technique to be a promising methods for performing large-scale SNP genotyping because the FTA technology simplifies the collection, shipment, archiving and purification of DNA, while whole genome amplification of FTA card bound DNA produces sufficient material for the determination of thousands of SNP genotypes.

  15. RECENT PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HLW THROUGHPUT AT THE DWPF

    Herman, C

    2007-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the world's largest operating high level waste (HLW) vitrification plant, began stabilizing about 35 million gallons of SRS liquid radioactive waste by-product in 1996. The DWPF has since filled over 2000 canisters with about 4000 pounds of radioactive glass in each canister. In the past few years there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process and therefore minimized process upsets and thus downtime. These improvements, which include glass former optimization, increased waste loading of the glass, the melter heated bellows liner, and glass surge protection software, will be discussed in this paper

  16. Demonstration of pyrometallurgical processing for metal fuel and HLW

    Tadafumi, Koyama; Kensuke, Kinoshita; Takatoshi, Hizikata; Tadashi, Inoue; Ougier, M.; Rikard, Malmbeck; Glatz, J.P.; Lothar, Koch

    2001-01-01

    CRIEPI and JRC-ITU have started a joint study on pyrometallurgical processing to demonstrate the capability of this type of process for separating actinide elements from spent fuel and HLW. The equipment dedicated for this experiments has been developed and installed in JRC-ITU. The stainless steel box equipped with tele-manipulators is operated under pure Ar atmosphere, and prepared for later installation in a hot cell. Experiments on pyro-processing of un-irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal alloy fuel by molten salt electrorefining has been carried out. Recovery of U and Pu from this type alloy fuel was first demonstrated with using solid iron cathode and liquid Cd cathode, respectively. (author)

  17. A Strategy for Maintenance of the Long-Term Performance Assessment of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Glass

    Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Approximately 50 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as a result of the past production of nuclear materials, primarily for defense uses. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proceeding with plans to permanently dispose of this waste. Plans call for separating the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which will be vitrified at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Principal radionuclides of concern in LAW are 99Tc, 129I, and U, while non-radioactive contaminants of concern are Cr and nitrate/nitrite. HLW glass will be sent off-site to an undetermined federal site for deep geological disposal while the much larger volume of immobilized low-activity waste will be placed in the on-site, near-surface Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

  18. US DOE Initiated Performance Enhancements to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low-activity Waste Vitrification (LAW) System

    Hamel, William F.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Holton, Langdon K.; Pegg, Ian L.; Bowen, Brad W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the treatment and vitrification of underground tank wastes stored at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The WTP comprises four major facilities: a pretreatment facility to separate the tank waste into high level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) process streams, a HLW vitrification facility to immobilize the HLW fraction; a LAW vitrification facility to immobilize the LAW fraction, and an analytical laboratory to support the operations of all four treatment facilities. DOE has established strategic objectives to optimize the performance of the WTP facilities and the LAW and HLW waste forms to reduce the overall schedule and cost for treatment and vitrification of the Hanford tank wastes. This strategy has been implemented by establishing performance expectations in the WTP contract for the facilities and waste forms. In addition, DOE, as owner-operator of the WTP facilities, continues to evaluate (1) the design, to determine the potential for performance above the requirements specified in the WTP contract; and (2) improvements in production of the LAW and HLW waste forms. This paper reports recent progress directed at improving production of the LAW waste form. DOE's initial assessment, which is based on the work reported in this paper, is that the capacity of the WTP LAW vitrification facility can be increased by a factor of 2 to 4 with a combination of revised glass formulations, modest increases in melter glass operating temperatures, and a second-generation LAW melter with a larger surface area. Implementing these improvements in the LAW waste immobilization capability can benefit the LAW treatment mission by reducing both processing time and cost

  19. Cavern disposal concepts for HLW/SF: assuring operational practicality and safety with maximum programme flexibility

    McKinley, Ian G.; Apted, Mick; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Most conventional engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for HLW/SF repositories are based on concepts developed in the 1970s and 1980s that assured feasibility with high margins of safety, in order to convince national decision makers to proceed with geological disposal despite technological uncertainties. In the interval since the advent of such 'feasibility designs', significant progress has been made in reducing technological uncertainties, which has lead to a growing awareness of other, equally important uncertainties in operational implementation and challenges regarding social acceptance in many new, emerging national repository programs. As indicated by the NUMO repository concept catalogue study (NUMO, 2004), there are advantages in reassessing how previous designs can be modified and optimised in the light of improved system understanding, allowing a robust EBS to be flexibly implemented to meet nation-specific and site-specific conditions. Full-scale emplacement demonstrations, particularly those carried out underground, have highlighted many of the practical issues to be addressed; e.g., handling of compacted bentonite in humid conditions, use of concrete for support infrastructure, remote handling of heavy radioactive packages in confined conditions, quality inspection, monitoring / ease of retrieval of emplaced packages and institutional control. The CAvern REtrievable (CARE) concept reduces or avoids such issues by emplacement of HLW or SF within multi-purpose transportation / storage / disposal casks in large ventilated caverns at a depth of several hundred metres. The facility allows the caverns to serve as inspectable stores for an extended period of time (up to a few hundred years) until a decision is made to close them. At this point the caverns are backfilled and sealed as a final repository, effectively with the same safety case components as conventional 'feasibility designs'. In terms of operational practicality an d safety, the CARE

  20. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  1. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    Kruger, A. A.; Matlack, Keith S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Kot, Wing K.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-01-01

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts

  2. Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.

  3. Novel waste forms for HLW and ILW immobilisation

    Lee, William E.; Milestone, Neil B.; Ojovan, Michael I.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Stennett, Martin C.; Setiadi, Anthony; Zhou, Qizhi

    2006-01-01

    The complex nature and heterogeneity of legacy wastes means that a toolbox of different host systems must be developed in which to immobilize them. New zirconolite ceramic, glass composite materials and novel cement systems including calcium sulpho aluminate cements and alkali activated slags being examined in the Immobilisation Science Laboratory at the University of Sheffield are described. (authors)

  4. Conclusions on the two technical panels on HLW-disposal and waste treatment processes respectively

    Dinkespiller, J.A.; Dejonghe, P.; Feates, F.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reports the concluding panel session at the European Community Conference on radioactive waste management and disposal, Luxembourg 1985. The panel considered the conclusions of two preceeding technical panels on high level waste (HLW) disposal and waste treatment processes. Geological disposal of HLW, waste management, safety assessment of waste disposal, public opinion, public acceptance of the manageability of radioactive wastes, international cooperation, and waste management in the United States, are all discussed. (U.K.)

  5. Legal precedents regarding use and defensibility of risk assessment in Federal transportation of SNF and HLW

    Bentz, E.J. Jr.; Bentz, C.B.; O'Hora, T.D.; Chen, S.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Risk assessment has become an increasingly important and essential tool in support of Federal decision-making regarding the handling, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This paper analyzes the current statutory and regulatory framework and related legal precedents with regard to SNF and HLW transportation. The authors identify key scientific and technical issues regarding the use and defensibility of risk assessment in Federal decision-making regarding anticipated shipments

  6. The experiment of affective web risk communication on HLW geological disposal

    Kugo, Akihide; Yoshikawa, Eiwa; Wakabayashi, Yasunaga; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Uda, Akinobu; Ito, Kyoko

    2006-01-01

    Dialog mode web contents regarding the HLW risk is effective to altruism. To make it more effectively, we introduced affective elements such as facial expression of character agents and sympathetic response on the BBS by experts, which brought us smooth risk communication. This paper describes the result of preliminary experiments surrounding the affective ways to communicate on the risk of HLW geological disposal, leading to enhance the social cooperation, and the public open experiment for one month on the Web. (author)

  7. Nuclide transport models for HLW repository safety assessment in Finland, Japan, Sweden, and Canada

    Lee, Young Myoung; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Kim, Sung Gi; Koh, Won Il

    1997-10-01

    Disposal and design concepts in such countries as Sweden, Finland, Canada and Japan which have already published safety assessment reports for the HLW repositories have been reviewed mainly in view of nuclide transport models used in their assessment. This kind of review would be very helpful in doing similar research in Korea where research program regarding HLW has been just started. (author). 44 refs., 2 tabs., 30 figs

  8. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  9. Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms

    Singh, D.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel low-temperature solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology for immobilizing waste streams containing fission products such as cesium, strontium, and technetium in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic. This technology can immobilize partitioned tank wastes and decontaminate waste streams containing volatile fission products

  10. Radioactive Waste Conditioning, Immobilisation, And Encapsulation Processes And Technologies: Overview And Advances (Chapter 7)

    Jantzen, Carol M. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken SC (United States); Lee, William E. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials; Ojovan, Michael I. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2012-10-19

    The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCM’s), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate

  11. Public Perspectives in the Japanese HLW Disposal Program

    Inatsugu, Shigefumi; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Kato, Toshiaki [Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUNIO), Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Following legislation entitled the 'Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established in October 2000 as the implementing organization for geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste (HLW). Implementation of NUMO's disposal project will be based on three principles: 1) respecting public initiative and opinion, 2) adopting a stepwise approach and 3) ensuring transparency in information disclosure. NUMO has decided to adopt an open solicitation approach to finding volunteer municipalities for Preliminary Investigation Areas (PIAs). The official announcement of the start of the open solicitation program was made in 2002. Although no official applications had been received from volunteer municipalities by the end of 2005, NUMO has been continuing to carry out various activities aimed specifically at public communication and encouraging dialogue about the deep geological disposal project This paper summarizes the results obtained and lessons learned so far and identifies the issues that NUMO must tackle immediately in the areas of communication and dialogue.

  12. Stress analysis of HLW containers advanced test work Compas project

    Ove Arup and Partners

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. This document describes the activities performed between June and August 1989 forming the advanced test work phase of this project. This is the culmination of two years' analysis and test work to demonstrate whether the analytical ability exists to model containers subjected to realistic loads. Three mild steel containers were designed and manufactured to be one-third scale models of a realistic HLW container, modified to represent the effect of anisotropic loading and to facilitate testing. The containers were tested under a uniform external pressure and all failed by buckling in the mid-body region. The outer surface of each container was comprehensively strain-gauged to provide strain history data at all positions of interest. In parallel with the test work, Compas project partners, from five different European countries, independently modelled the behaviour of each of the containers using their computer codes to predict the failure pressure and produce strain history data at a number of specified locations. The first axisymmetric container was well modelled but predictions for the remaining two non-axisymmetric containers were much more varied, with differences of up to 50% occurring between failure predictions and test data

  13. Technical and economic optimization study for HLW waste management

    Deffes, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the technical and economic aspects of high level waste (HLW) management with the objective of optimizing the interim storage duration and the dimensions of the underground repository site. The procedure consisted in optimizing the economic criterion under specified constraints. The results are intended to identify trends and guide the choice from among available options; simple and highly flexible models were therefore used in this study, and only nearfield thermal constraints were taken into consideration. Because of the present uncertainty on the physicochemical properties of the repository environment and on the unit cost figures, this study focused on developing a suitable method rather than on obtaining definitive results. With the physical and economic data bases used for the two media investigated (granite and salt) the optimum values found show that it is advisable to minimize the interim storage time, and that the geological repository should feature a high degree of spatial dilution. These results depend to a considerable extent on the assumption of high interim storage costs

  14. Public Perspectives in the Japanese HLW Disposal Program

    Inatsugu, Shigefumi; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Kato, Toshiaki

    2006-01-01

    Following legislation entitled the 'Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established in October 2000 as the implementing organization for geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste (HLW). Implementation of NUMO's disposal project will be based on three principles: 1) respecting public initiative and opinion, 2) adopting a stepwise approach and 3) ensuring transparency in information disclosure. NUMO has decided to adopt an open solicitation approach to finding volunteer municipalities for Preliminary Investigation Areas (PIAs). The official announcement of the start of the open solicitation program was made in 2002. Although no official applications had been received from volunteer municipalities by the end of 2005, NUMO has been continuing to carry out various activities aimed specifically at public communication and encouraging dialogue about the deep geological disposal project This paper summarizes the results obtained and lessons learned so far and identifies the issues that NUMO must tackle immediately in the areas of communication and dialogue

  15. Thermal analysis of the vertical disposal for HLW

    Zhao Honggang; Wang Ju; Liu Yuemiao; Su Rui

    2013-01-01

    The temperature on the canister surface is set to be no more than 100℃ in the high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository, it is a criterion to dictate the thermal dimension of the repository. The factors that affect the temperature on the canister surface include the initial power of the canister, the thermal properties of material as the engineered barrier system (EBS), the gaps around the canister in the EBS, the initial ground temperature and thermal properties of the host rock, the repository layout, etc. This article examines the thermal properties of the material in host rock and the EBS, the thermal conductivity properties of the different gaps in the EBS, the temperature evolution around the single canister by using the analysis method and the numerical method. The findings are as follows: 1) The most important and the sensitive parameter is the initial disposal power of the canister; 2) The two key factors that affect the highest temperature on the canister surface are the parameter of uncertainty and nature variability of material as the host rock and the EBS, and the gaps around the canister in the EBS; 3) The temperature difference between the canister and bentonite is no more than 10℃ , and the bigger the inner gaps are, the bigger the temperature difference will be; when the gap between the bentonite and the host rock is filled with water, the temperature difference becomes small, but it will be 1∼3℃ higher than the gaps filled will air. (authors)

  16. Biosphere modelling for a HLW repository - scenario and parameter variations

    Grogan, H.

    1985-03-01

    In Switzerland high-level radioactive wastes have been considered for disposal in deep-lying crystalline formations. The individual doses to man resulting from radionuclides entering the biosphere via groundwater transport are calculated. The main recipient area modelled, which constitutes the base case, is a broad gravel terrace sited along the south bank of the river Rhine. An alternative recipient region, a small valley with a well, is also modelled. A number of parameter variations are performed in order to ascertain their impact on the doses. Finally two scenario changes are modelled somewhat simplistically, these consider different prevailing climates, namely tundra and a warmer climate than present. In the base case negligibly low doses to man in the long term, resulting from the existence of a HLW repository have been calculated. Cs-135 results in the largest dose (8.4E-7 mrem/y at 6.1E+6 y) while Np-237 gives the largest dose from the actinides (3.6E-8 mrem/y). The response of the model to parameter variations cannot be easily predicted due to non-linear coupling of many of the parameters. However, the calculated doses were negligibly low in all cases as were those resulting from the two scenario variations. (author)

  17. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers intermediate testwork

    Ove Arup and Partners London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. This document describes the series of experiments and associated calculations performed in the Intermediate testwork phase of this project. Seven mild steel, one-third scale simplified models of HLW containers were manufactured in a variety of configurations of geometry and weld type. The effects of reducing the wall thickness, corroding the external surface of the container, and using different welding methods were all investigated. The containers were tested under the action of a uniform external pressure up to their respective failure points. All containers failed by buckling at pressures of between 42 and 87 MPa dependent upon the particular geometric and weld configuration. The outer surface of each container was comprehensively strain-gauged in order to provide strain histories at positions of interest. The Compas project partners, from five different European countries, independently modelled the behaviour of three of the five different containers. Test results and computer predictions were compared and an assessment of the overall performance of the codes demonstrated good agreement in the initial loading of each container. However once stresses exceeded the material yield point there was a considerable spread in the predicted container behaviour

  18. 'Practicality' as a key constraint to HLW repository design

    Kitayama, Kazumi; Sakabe, Yasushi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Designs of repositories in Japan for HLW have focused very much on demonstration of post-closure safety. Safety can be assured using very simple assessment techniques, which make many conservative simplifications. Such a situation is reasonable for the early stages of generic concept demonstration, but becomes less appropriate as NUMO moves towards siting, where a number of issues involved with construction and operation of a repository - generally grouped together as 'practicality'. The engineering logistics and conventional safety of repository construction and operation have been relatively little studied and present major challenges. Current designs emphasise a minimum of infrastructure in the emplacement tunnels and remote-handled operation. This would be difficult enough, but such operations need to be carried out to strict quality limits and need to be robust in the event of equipment failure or disruptive events. The paper will first examine how designs can be modified from the viewpoint of logistics. The implications of such modifications on operational robustness and associated safety in case of perturbation scenarios are then considered. (author)

  19. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  20. Preliminary formulation studies for a ''hydroceramic'' alternative waste form for INEEL HLW

    Siemer, D.D.; Gougar, M.L.D.; Grutzeck, M.W.; Scheetz, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    Herein the authors discuss scoping studies performed to develop an efficient way to prepare the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) nominally high-level (∼40 W/m 3 ) calcined radioactive waste (HLW) and liquid metal (sodium) reactor coolants for disposal. The investigated approach implements the chemistry of Hanford's cancrinite-making clay reaction process via Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) formed-under-elevated-temperatures-and-pressures concrete monolith-making technology to make hydroceramics (HCs). The HCs differ from conventional Portland cement/blast furnace slag (PC/BFS) grouts in that the binder minerals formed during the curing process are hydrated alkali-aluminosilicates (feldspathoids-sodalites, cancrinites, and zeolites) rather than hydrated calcium silicates (CSH). This is desirable because (a) US defense-type radioactive wastes generally contain much more sodium and aluminum than calcium; (b) sodalites/cancrinites do a much better job of retaining the anionic components of real radioactive waste (e.g., nitrate) than do calcium silicates; (c) natural feldspathoids form from glasses (and therefore are more stable) in that region of the United States where a repository for this sort of waste could be sited; and (d) if eventually deemed necessary, feldspathoid-type concrete wasteforms could be hot-isostatically-pressed into even more durable materials without removing them from their original canisters

  1. Foreign travel report: Visits to UK, Belgium, Germany, and France to benchmark European spent fuel and waste management technology

    Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    The ICPP WINCO Spent Fuel and Waste Management Development Program recently was funded by DOE-EM to develop new technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels, sodium-bearing liquid waste, and calcine to a form suitable for disposal. European organizations are heavily involved, in some cases on an industrial scale in areas of waste management, including spent fuel disposal and HLW vitrification. The purpose of this trip was to acquire first-hand European efforts in handling of spent reactor fuel and nuclear waste management, including their processing and technical capabilities as well as their future planning. Even though some differences exist in European and U.S. DOE waste compositions and regulations, many aspects of the European technologies may be applicable to the U.S. efforts, and several areas offer potential for technical collaboration

  2. Foreign travel report: Visits to UK, Belgium, Germany, and France to benchmark European spent fuel and waste management technology

    Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    The ICPP WINCO Spent Fuel and Waste Management Development Program recently was funded by DOE-EM to develop new technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels, sodium-bearing liquid waste, and calcine to a form suitable for disposal. European organizations are heavily involved, in some cases on an industrial scale in areas of waste management, including spent fuel disposal and HLW vitrification. The purpose of this trip was to acquire first-hand European efforts in handling of spent reactor fuel and nuclear waste management, including their processing and technical capabilities as well as their future planning. Even though some differences exist in European and U.S. DOE waste compositions and regulations, many aspects of the European technologies may be applicable to the U.S. efforts, and several areas offer potential for technical collaboration.

  3. Treatment and immobilization of intermediate level radioactive wastes

    Lerch, R.E.; Greenhalgh, W.O.; Partridge, J.A.; Richardson, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses a new program underway to develop and demonstrate treatment and immobilization technologies for intermediate level wastes (ILW) generated in the nuclear fuel cycle. Initial work has defined the sources, quantities and types of wastes which comprise ILW. Laboratory studies are underway to define treatment technologies for liquid ILW which contains volatile contaminants and to define immobilization parameters for the residues resulting from treatment of ILW. Immobilization agents initially being evaluated for the various residues include cement, urea-formaldehyde, and bitumen although other immobilization agents will be studied. The program also includes development of acceptable test procedures for the final immobilized products as well as development of proposed criteria for storage, transportation, and disposal of the immobilized ILW. 20 figures, 10 tables

  4. Final Report Determination Of The Processing Rate Of RPP-WTP HLW Simulants Using A Duramelter J 1000 Vitrification System VSL-00R2590-2, Rev. 0, 8/21/00

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Perez-Cardenas, F.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m 2 , which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m 2 /d

  5. FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass

  6. Immobilized waste leaching

    Suarez, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author) [pt

  7. Hanford immobilized LAW product acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area testing data package

    JD Vienna; A Jiricka; BP McGrail; BM Jorgensen; DE Smith; BR Allen; JC Marra; DK Peeler; KG Brown; IA Reamer; WL Ebert

    2000-03-08

    The Hanford Site's mission has been to produce nuclear materials for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during plutonium production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The total volume of LAW requiring immobilization will include the LAW separated from the tank waste, as well as new wastes generated by the retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes. Per the Tri-Party Agreement (1994), both the LAW and HLW will be vitrified. It has been estimated that vitrification of the LAW waste will result in over 500,000 metric tons or 200,000 m{sup 3} of immobilized LAW (ILAW) glass. The ILAW glass is to be disposed of onsite in a near-surface burial facility. It must be demonstrated that the disposal system will adequately retain the radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. This report describes a study of the impacts of systematic glass-composition variation on the responses from accelerated laboratory corrosion tests of representative LAW glasses. A combination of two tests, the product consistency test and vapor-hydration test, is being used to give indictations of the relative rate at which a glass could be expected to corrode in the burial scenario.

  8. Hanford immobilized LAW product acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area testing data package

    JD Vienna; A Jiricka; BP McGrail; BM Jorgensen; DE Smith; BR Allen; JC Marra; DK Peeler; KG Brown; IA Reamer; WL Ebert

    2000-01-01

    The Hanford Site's mission has been to produce nuclear materials for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during plutonium production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The total volume of LAW requiring immobilization will include the LAW separated from the tank waste, as well as new wastes generated by the retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes. Per the Tri-Party Agreement (1994), both the LAW and HLW will be vitrified. It has been estimated that vitrification of the LAW waste will result in over 500,000 metric tons or 200,000 m 3 of immobilized LAW (ILAW) glass. The ILAW glass is to be disposed of onsite in a near-surface burial facility. It must be demonstrated that the disposal system will adequately retain the radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. This report describes a study of the impacts of systematic glass-composition variation on the responses from accelerated laboratory corrosion tests of representative LAW glasses. A combination of two tests, the product consistency test and vapor-hydration test, is being used to give indictations of the relative rate at which a glass could be expected to corrode in the burial scenario

  9. Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation

    Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations

  10. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  11. Barium borosilicate glass - a potential matrix for immobilization of sulfate bearing high-level radioactive liquid waste

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Sengupta, P.; Kumar, Amar; Das, D.; Kale, G.B.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-01-01

    Borosilicate glass formulations adopted worldwide for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is not suitable for sulphate bearing HLW, because of its low solubility in such glass. A suitable glass matrix based on barium borosilicate has been developed for immobilization of sulphate bearing HLW. Various compositions based on different glass formulations were made to examine compatibility with waste oxide with around 10 wt% sulfate content. The vitrified waste product obtained from barium borosilicate glass matrix was extensively evaluated for its characteristic properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, glass transition temperature, thermal conductivity, impact strength, etc. using appropriate techniques. Process parameters like melt viscosity and pour temperature were also determined. It is found that SB-44 glass composition (SiO 2 : 30.5 wt%, B 2 O 3 : 20.0 wt%, Na 2 O: 9.5 wt% and BaO: 19.0 wt%) can be safely loaded with 21 wt% waste oxide without any phase separation. The other product qualities of SB-44 waste glass are also found to be on a par with internationally adopted waste glass matrices. This formulation has been successfully implemented in plant scale

  12. Application of magnetic nanoparticles in smart enzyme immobilization.

    Vaghari, Hamideh; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Mohammadlou, Mojgan; Berenjian, Aydin; Anarjan, Navideh; Jafari, Nahideh; Nasiri, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    Immobilization of enzymes enhances their properties for efficient utilization in industrial processes. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio and easy separation under external magnetic fields, are highly valued. Significant progress has been made to develop new catalytic systems that are immobilized onto magnetic nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of recent developments in enzyme immobilization and stabilization protocols using this technology. The current applications of immobilized enzymes based on magnetic nanoparticles are summarized and future growth prospects are discussed. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research.

  13. Development of thermal analysis method for the near field of HLW repository using ABAQUS

    Kuh, Jung Eui; Kang, Chul Hyung; Park, Jeong Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    An appropriate tool is needed to evaluate the thermo-mechanical stability of high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this report a thermal analysis methodology for the near field of HLW repository is developed to use ABAQUS which is one of the multi purpose FEM code and has been used for many engineering area. The main contents of this methodology development are the structural and material modelling to simulate a repository, setup of side conditions, e.g., boundary and load conditions, and initial conditions, and the procedure to selection proper material parameters. In addition to these, the interface programs for effective production of input data and effective change of model size for sensitivity analysis for disposal concept development are developed. The results of this work will be apply to evaluate the thermal stability and to use as main input data for mechanical analysis of HLW repository. (author). 20 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Applicability of thermodynamic database of radioactive elements developed for the Japanese performance assessment of HLW repository

    Yui, Mikazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Rai, Dhanpat; Ochs, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) published a second progress report (also known as H12 report) on high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in Japan (JNC 1999). This report helped to develop confidence in the selected HLW disposal system and to establish the implementation body in 2000 for the disposal of HLW. JNC developed an in-house thermodynamic database for radioactive elements for performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (EBS) and the geosphere for H12 report. This paper briefly presents the status of the JNC's thermodynamic database and its applicability to perform realistic analyses of the solubilities of radioactive elements, evolution of solubility-limiting solid phases, predictions of the redox state of Pu in the neutral pH range under reducing conditions, and to estimate solubilities of radioactive elements in cementitious conditions. (author)

  15. Regulatory status on the safety assessment of a HLW repository in other countries

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2008-12-01

    To construct a HLW repository, it is essential to meet the requirements on the regulation for a deep geological disposal. Even if the construction of a HLW repository is determined positively, technical standards which assert the performance of a repository will be needed. Among various technical standards, safety assessment based on the repository evolution in the future will play an important role in the licensing process. The foreign countries' technical standards on the safety assessment of a HLW repository may be an indicator to carry out the R and D activities on geological disposal effectively. In this report, assessment period, limit of radiation dose and uncertainty related to the safety assessment are investigated and analyzed in detail. Especially, the technical reviews of USA regulation bodies seems to be reasonable in the point of the intrinsic attribute of safety assessment

  16. Study on evaluation method for potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system

    Kawamura, Makoto; Makino, Hitoshi; Umeda, Koji; Osawa, Hideaki; Seo, Toshihiro; Ishimaru, Tsuneaki

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation for the potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system is an important issue in safety assessment. A scenario construction method for the effects on a HLW disposal system condition and performance has been developed for two purposes: the first being effective elicitation and organization of information from investigators of natural phenomena and performance assessor and the second being, maintenance of traceability of scenario construction processes with suitable records. In this method, a series of works to construct scenarios is divided into pieces to facilitate and to elicit the features of potential effect of natural phenomena on a HLW disposal system and is organized to create reasonable scenarios with consistency, traceability and adequate conservativeness within realistic view. (author)

  17. Hanford Supplemental Treatment: Literature and Modeling Review of SRS HLW Salt Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization

    Choi, A. S.; Flach, G. P.; Martino, C. J.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Harris, M. K.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Calloway, T. B.

    2005-03-23

    In order to accelerate waste treatment and disposal of Hanford tank waste by 2028, the Department of Energy (DOE) and CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG), Inc. are evaluating alternative technologies which will be used in conjunction with the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to safely pretreat and immobilize the tank waste. Several technologies (Bulk Vitrification and Steam Reforming) are currently being evaluated for immobilizing the pretreated waste. Since the WTP does not have sufficient capacity to pretreat all the waste going to supplemental treatment by the 2028 milestone, two technologies (Selective Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization) are being considered for pretreatment of salt waste. The scope of this task was to: (1) evaluate the recent Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 41 dissolution campaign and other literature to provide a more complete understanding of selective dissolution, (2) provide an update on the progress of salt dissolution and modeling activities at SRS, (3) investigate SRS experience and outside literature sources on industrial equipment and experimental results of previous fractional crystallization processes, and (4) evaluate recent Hanford AP104 boildown experiments and modeling results and recommend enhancements to the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to improve its predictive capabilities. This report provides a summary of this work and suggested recommendations.

  18. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Esparza, A M; Esteban, J A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  19. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Esparza, A. M.; Esteban, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  20. Cesium and strontium fractionation from HLW for thermal-stress reduction in a geologic repository

    McKee, R.W.

    1983-02-01

    Results are described for a study to assess the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic repository thermal stresses. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of a vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum integrity packages at relatively high heat loading. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository for each waste type. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers, potentially, a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or loser costs

  1. Geological boundary conditions for a safety demonstration and verification concept for a HLW repository in claystone in Germany. AnSichT

    Stark, Lena; Bebiolka, Anke; Gerardi, Johannes [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Underground Space for Storage and Economic Use; and others

    2015-07-01

    Within the framework of the R and D project ''AnSichT'', DBE TECHNOLOGY, BGR and GRS are developing a method to demonstrate the safety of a HLW repository in claystone in Germany. The methodological approach basing on a holistic concept, links the legal and geologic boundary conditions, the disposal and closure concept, the demonstration of barrier integrity, and the long-term analysis of the repository evolution as well. The geologic boundary conditions are specified by the description of the geological situation and generic models, the selection of representative parameters and geoscientific long-term predictions. They form a fundament for the system analysis.

  2. Processes for consensus building and role sharing. Lessons learned from HLW policies in European countries

    Nagano, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This report attempts to obtain lessons in implementation of HLW management policies for Japan by reviewing past experiences and present status of policy formulation and implementation as well as reflection of public opinions and consensus building of selected European countries, such as Finland, Sweden and others. After examining the situations of those countries, the author derives four key aspects that need to be addressed; separation of nuclear energy policies and HLW policies, fundamental support shared among national public, sense of controllability, and proper scheme of responsibility sharing. (author)

  3. Using process instrumentation to obviate destructive examination of canisters of HLW glass

    Kuhn, W.L.; Slate, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    An important concern of a manufacturer of packages of solidified high-level waste (HLW) is quality assurance of the waste form. The vitrification of HLW as a borosilicate glass is considered, and, based on a reference vitrification process, it is proposed that information from process instrumentation may be used to assure quality without the need for additional information obtained by destructive examining (core drilling) canisters of glass. This follows mainly because models of product performance and process behavior must be previously established in order to confidently select the desired glass formulation, and to have confidence that the process is well enough developed to be installed and operated in a nuclear facility

  4. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE AND ONE PERCENT CRYSTAL CONTENT MODELS FOR INITIAL HANFORD HLW GLASSES

    Vienna, John D.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Peeler, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary models for liquidus temperature (TL) and temperature at 1 vol% crystal (T01) applicable to WTP HLW glasses in the spinel primary phase field were developed. A series of literature model forms were evaluated using consistent sets of data form model fitting and validation. For TL, the ion potential and linear mixture models performed best, while for T01 the linear mixture model out performed all other model forms. TL models were able to predict with smaller uncertainty. However, the lower T01 values (even with higher prediction uncertainties) were found to allow for a much broader processing envelope for WTP HLW glasses

  5. High-level waste immobilization program: an overview

    Bonner, W.R.

    1979-09-01

    The High-Level Waste Immobilization Program is providing technology to allow safe, affordable immobilization and disposal of nuclear waste. Waste forms and processes are being developed on a schedule consistent with national needs for immobilization of high-level wastes stored at Savannah River, Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and West Valley, New York. This technology is directly applicable to high-level wastes from potential reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The program is removing one more obstacle previously seen as a potential restriction on the use and further development of nuclear power, and is thus meeting a critical technological need within the national objective of energy independence

  6. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming For Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    Hewitt, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

  7. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING FOR TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    HEWITT WM

    2011-04-08

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

  8. Immobilizing Biomolecules Near the Diffraction Limit

    Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di

    2009-01-01

    Our group has previously shown that biomolecules containing disulfide bridges in close proximity to aromatic residues can be immobilized, through covalent bonds, onto thiol derivatized surfaces upon UV excitation of the aromatic residue(s). We have also previously shown that our new technology ca...

  9. Application of radiopolymerization for immobilization of enzymes

    Higa, O.Z.; Mastro, N.L. del; Castagnet, A.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrophilic glass-forming monomers were used in an application of irradiation technology for the immobilization of cellulase and cellobiase. Experiments to observe the effect of additives such as silicates and polyethylene glycol in the enzyme entrapment are reported on. In all cases, enzymatic activity was maintained for more than fifteen batch enzyme reactions. (Author) [pt

  10. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  11. External Criticality Risk of Immobilized Plutonium Waste Form in a Geologic Repository

    McClure, J.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive summary of the waste package (WP) external criticality-related risk of the Plutonium Disposition ceramic waste form, which is being developed and evaluated by the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Potential accumulation of the fissile materials, 239 Pu and 235 U, in rock formations having a favorable chemical environment for such actions, requires analysis because autocatalytic configurations, while unlikely to form, never-the-less have consequences which are undesirable and require evaluation. Secondly, the WP design has evolved necessitating a re-evaluation of the internal WP degradation scenarios that contribute to the external source terms. The scope of this study includes a summary of the revised WP degradation calculations, a summary of the accumulation mechanisms in fractures and lithophysae in the tuff beneath the WP footprint, and a summary of the criticality risk calculations from any accumulated fissile material. Accumulations of fissile material external to the WP sufficient to pose a potential criticality risk require a deposition mechanism operating over sufficient time to reach required levels. The transporting solution concentrations themselves are well below critical levels (CRWMS 2001e). The ceramic waste form consists of Pu immobilized in ceramic disks, which would be embedded in High-Level Waste (HLW) glass in the standard HLW glass disposal canister. The ceramic disks would occupy approximately 12% of the HLW canister volume, while most of the remaining 88% of the volume would be occupied by HLW glass

  12. Immobilization of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase on nano-sized polytaurine: A new platform for application of nano-polymeric materials on enzymatic biosensing technology

    Omidinia, Eskandar, E-mail: skandar@pasteur.ac.ir [Enzyme Technology Lab., Biochemistry Dept., Genetic and Metabolism Group, Pasteur Institute of Iran, P.O. Box 13164, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadjou, Nasrin, E-mail: nasrin.shadjou@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanzadeh, Mohammad, E-mail: mhmmd_hasanzadeh@yahoo.com [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase (PheDH) entrapment within the polytaurine matrix is demonstrated to probe the direct electrochemistry of phenylalanine (Pha). It was found that PheDH has been stably immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified by polytaurine based on simple technique. Cyclic voltammetric study indicated that the oxidation process is irreversible and diffusion controlled. The number of exchanged electrons in the electro-oxidation process was obtained, and the data indicated that Pha is oxidized via one-electron steps. The results revealed that Pha promotes the rate of oxidation by increasing the peak current. The diffusion coefficient and electron-transfer coefficient of Pha were found to be 0.2 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} and 0.467, respectively. A sensitive, simple and time-saving differential-pulse voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of Pha. The results show that by using the proposed method, Pha can be determined with a detection limit of 9 nM. - Highlights: • PheDH has been stably immobilized on GCE modified by polytaurine (PT) matrix. • A sensitive PT/PheDH/glutaraldehyde/GCE was developed for the detection of Pha. • The detection limit of the PT/PheDH/GA/GCE toward Pha was 9 nM.

  13. A GoldSim Based Biosphere Assessment Model for a HLW Repository

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the performance of a repository, the dose exposure to a human being due to nuclide releases from a repository should be evaluated and the results compared to the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies. To evaluate a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, biosphere assessment models and their implemented codes such as ACBIO1 and ACBIO2 have been developed with the aid of AMBER during the last few years. BIOMASS methodology has been adopted for a HLW repository currently being considered in Korea, which has a similar concept to the Swedish KBS-3 HLW repository. Recently, not just only for verifying the purpose for biosphere assessment models but also for varying the possible alternatives to assess the consequences in a biosphere due to a HLW repository, another version of the assessment modesl has been newly developed in the frame of development programs for a total system performance assessment modeling tool by utilizing GoldSim. Through a current study, GoldSim approach for a biosphere modeling is introduced. Unlike AMBER by which a compartment scheme can be rather simply constructed with an appropriate transition rate between compartments, GoldSim was designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules by which specific models can be addressed in an additional manner, like solving jig saw puzzles

  14. Final Report Tests On The Duramelter 1200 HLW Pilot Melter System Using AZ-101 HLW Simulants VSL-02R0100-2, Rev. 1, 2/17/03

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Bardakci, T.; Gong, W.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Schatz, T.R.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter(trademark) 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 (1). Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m 2 ) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m 2 /d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system (1) concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger

  15. FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D' ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the

  16. Production of organic acids in an immobilized cell reactor using ...

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... 1Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Noushirvani University of Technology, Babol, Iran. 2Faculty of Civil ... downstream, immobilization was the method of choice which was ..... These methods can be applied to various.

  17. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  18. Department of Energy Technology Readiness Assessments - Process Guide and Training Plan

    2008-09-12

    Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ( WTP ) Analytical Laboratory, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and Balance of Facilities (3 TRAs... WTP High-Level Waste (HLW) Facility – WTP Pre-Treatment (PT) Facility – Hanford River Protection Project Low Activity Waste Treatment Alternatives

  19. Technetium Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    Hess, Nancy J.; Blanchard, David L. Jr.; Campbell, James A.; Cho, Herman M.; Rai, Dhanpat Rai; Xia, Yuanxian; Conradson, Steven D.

    2002-01-01

    Technetium complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that longterm consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists, and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges, we present a research program to study Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques. On the basis of such studies, we will acquire thermodynamic data for the identified Tc-organic complexes over a wide range of chemical conditions in order to develop credible models to predict Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  20. Enzyme Immobilization: An Overview on Methods, Support Material, and Applications of Immobilized Enzymes.

    Sirisha, V L; Jain, Ankita; Jain, Amita

    Immobilized enzymes can be used in a wide range of processes. In recent years, a variety of new approaches have emerged for the immobilization of enzymes that have greater efficiency and wider usage. During the course of the last two decades, this area has rapidly expanded into a multidisciplinary field. This current study is a comprehensive review of a variety of literature produced on the different enzymes that have been immobilized on various supporting materials. These immobilized enzymes have a wide range of applications. These include applications in the sugar, fish, and wine industries, where they are used for removing organic compounds from waste water. This study also reviews their use in sophisticated biosensors for metabolite control and in situ measurements of environmental pollutants. Immobilized enzymes also find significant application in drug metabolism, biodiesel and antibiotic production, bioremediation, and the food industry. The widespread usage of immobilized enzymes is largely due to the fact that they are cheaper, environment friendly, and much easier to use when compared to equivalent technologies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immobilization of microorganisms. Part 1. Preparation of immobilized Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Lee, K H

    1981-01-01

    The immobilization of Lactobacillus bulgaricus on polyacrylamide and on alginate beads was investigated. The most active immobilized cells were obtained by entrapment in Ca alginate beads. These immobilized microbial cells, when introduced into 4.5% lactose solution and whey solution showed maximum relative activity of 28% for lactose and 18% for whey compared to free cells.

  2. Limb immobilization and corticobasal syndrome.

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Drubach, Daniel A; Knopman, David S; Ahlskog, J Eric; Golden, Erin C; Drubach, Dina I; Petersen, Ronald C; Josephs, Keith A

    2012-12-01

    Recently, we evaluated two patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) who reported symptom onset after limb immobilization. Our objective was to investigate the association between trauma, immobilization and CBS. The charts of forty-four consecutive CBS patients seen in the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer Disease Research Center were reviewed with attention to trauma and limb immobilization. 10 CBS patients (23%) had immobilization or trauma on the most affected limb preceding the onset or acceleration of symptoms. The median age at onset was 61. Six patients manifested their first symptoms after immobilization from surgery or fracture with one after leg trauma. Four patients had pre-existing symptoms of limb dysfunction but significantly worsened after immobilization or surgery. 23 percent of patients had immobilization or trauma of the affected limb. This might have implications for management of CBS, for avoiding injury, limiting immobilization and increasing movement in the affected limb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Magnetic Carriers Based on Immobilized Enzyme

    Li, F. H.; Tang, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Du, W.; Xiang, J.; Cheng, P. G.

    2018-05-01

    Several new types of carriers and technologies have been implemented to improve traditional enzyme immobilization in industrial biotechnology. The magnetic immobilized enzyme is a kind of new method of enzyme immobilization developed in recent years. An external magnetic field can be used to control the motion mode and direction of immobilized enzyme, and to improve the catalytic efficiency of immobilized enzyme. In this paper, Fe3O4-CaCO3-PDA complex and CaCO3/Fe3O4 composite modified by PEI were prepared. The results show that the morphology of Fe3O4-CaCO3-PDA complex formation is irregular, while the morphology of CaCO3/Fe3O4 composite modified by PEI is regular and has a porous structure.

  4. Membranes suited for immobilizing biomolecules

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to flow-through membranes suitable for the immobilization of biomols., methods for the prepn. of such membranes and the use of such membranes for the immobilization of biomols. and subsequent detection of immobilized biomols. The invention concerns a flow-through

  5. Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESP-IP): Technology summary

    1994-02-01

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESPIP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. These wastes and environmental problems, located at more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories, are the result of half a century of nuclear processing activities by DOE and its predecessor organizations. The cost of cleaning up this legacy has been estimated to be of the order of hundreds of billions of dollars, and ESPIP's origin came with the realization that if new separations and processes can produce even a marginal reduction in cost then billions of dollars will be saved. The ultimate mission for ESPIP, as outlined in the ESPIP Strategic Plan, is: to provide Separations Technologies and Processes (STPS) to process and immobilize a wide spectrum of radioactive and hazardous defense wastes; to coordinate STP research and development efforts within DOE; to explore the potential uses of separated radionuclides; to transfer demonstrated separations and processing technologies developed by DOE to the US industrial sector, and to facilitate competitiveness of US technology and industry in the world market. Technology research and development currently under investigation by ESPIP can be divided into four broad areas: cesium and strontium removal; TRU and other HLW separations; sludge technology, and other technologies

  6. Immobilization of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase on nano-sized polytaurine: a new platform for application of nano-polymeric materials on enzymatic biosensing technology.

    Omidinia, Eskandar; Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase (PheDH) entrapment within the polytaurine matrix is demonstrated to probe the direct electrochemistry of phenylalanine (Pha). It was found that PheDH has been stably immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified by polytaurine based on simple technique. Cyclic voltammetric study indicated that the oxidation process is irreversible and diffusion controlled. The number of exchanged electrons in the electro-oxidation process was obtained, and the data indicated that Pha is oxidized via one-electron steps. The results revealed that Pha promotes the rate of oxidation by increasing the peak current. The diffusion coefficient and electron-transfer coefficient of Pha were found to be 0.2×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) and 0.467, respectively. A sensitive, simple and time-saving differential-pulse voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of Pha. The results show that by using the proposed method, Pha can be determined with a detection limit of 9 nM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Concept of grouping in partitioning of HLW for self-consistent fuel cycle

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    A concept of grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to examine the possibility of a self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). Group B is difficult to be transmuted by neutron reaction, so a radiation application in an industrial scale should be developed in the future. Group A and Group MA1 can be burned by a thermal reactor, on the other hand Group MA2 should be burned by a fast reactor. P-T treatment can be optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively

  8. Compas project stress analysis of HLW containers: behaviour under realistic disposal conditions

    Ove Arup and Partners, London

    1990-01-01

    The Compas project is concerned with the structural performance of metal overpacks which may be used to encapsulate vitrified high-level waste (HLW) forms before disposal in deep geological repositories. In this final stage of the project, analysis of an HLW overpack of realistic design is performed to predict its behaviour when subjected to likely repository loads. This analysis work is undertaken with the benefit of experience gained in previous phases of the project in which the ability to accurately predict overpack behaviour, when subjected to a uniform external pressure, was demonstrated. Burial in clay, granite and salt environments has been considered and two distinct loading arrangements identified, in an attempt to represent the worst conditions that could be imposed by such media. The analysis successfully demonstrates the ability of the containers to withstand extreme, yet credible, repository loads

  9. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    Liu Xiaodong; Luo Taian; Zhu Guoping; Chen Qingchun

    2007-12-01

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  10. The interpretation of remote sensing image on the stability of fault zone at HLW repository site

    Liu Linqing; Yu Yunxiang

    1994-01-01

    It is attempted to interpret the buried fault at the preselected HLW repository site in western Gansu province with a remote sensing image. The authors discuss the features of neotectonism of Shule River buried fault zone and its two sides in light of the remote sensing image, geomorphology, stream pattern, type and thickness difference of Quaternary sediments, and structural basin, etc.. The stability of Shule River fault zone is mainly dominated by the neotectonic movement pattern and strength of its two sides. Although there exist normal and differential vertical movements along it, their strengths are small. Therefore, this is a weakly-active passive fault zone. The east Beishan area north to Shule River fault zone is weakliest active and is considered as the target for further pre-selection for HLW repository site

  11. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    Xiaodong, Liu [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China); [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Resources and Environment of Ministry of Education, Fuzhou (China); Taian, Luo; Guoping, Zhu; Qingchun, Chen [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China)

    2007-12-15

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  12. US Department of Energy Plutonium Stabilization and Immobilization Workshop, December 12-14, 1995: Final proceedings

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to foster communication within the technical community on issues surrounding stabilization and immobilization of the Department`s surplus plutonium and plutonium- contaminated wastes. The workshop`s objectives were to: build a common understanding of the performance, economics and maturity of stabilization and immobilization technologies; provide a system perspective on stabilization and immobilization technology options; and address the technical issues associated with technologies for stabilization and immobilization of surplus plutonium and plutonium- contaminated waste. The papers presented during this workshop have been indexed separately.

  13. Current status and future plans of R and D on geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    Sasaki, Noriaki

    1994-01-01

    As to the final disposal of HLW, it is considered highly important to provide a clear distinction between implementation of disposal and the research and development as independent processes, and to increase the transparency of the overall disposal program by defining concrete schedules and the roles and responsibilities of the organizations involved. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has being conducted research and development on the geological disposal of HLW, as the leading organization. The responsibility of PNC is to ensure smooth progress of research and development project and to carry out studies of geological environment. The role of the Japanese government is to take overall responsibilities for appropriate and steady implementations of the program, as well as enacting any laws or policies required. On the other hand, electricity supply utilities are responsible to secure necessary funds for disposal, and in accordance with their role as waste producers, they are expected to cooperate even at the stage of research and development. Fundamental features of research and development of PNC carried out at this stage are as follows; (1) Generic research and development, (2) To establish scientific and technical bases of geological isolation of HLW in Japan, (3) About 15 years program from 1989 with documentation of progress reports, (4) Approach from near-field to far-field. PNC summarized the findings obtained by 1991, and submitted a document (H3 Report) in September 1992 as the first progress report. H3 Report is the first and comprehensive technical report on geological disposal of HLW in Japan, and provides information for the public to find out the current status of the research and development. This paper reviews the conclusions of H3 Report, overall procedures and schedule for implementing geological disposal, and future plans of R and D in PNC. (J.P.N.)

  14. Development of a Korean Reference disposal System(A-KRS) for the HLW from Advanced Fuel Cycles

    Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, J. W.; Lee, J. Y.

    2010-04-01

    A database program for analyzing the characteristics of spent fuels was developed, and A-SOURCE program for characterizing the source term of HLW from advanced fuel cycles. A new technique for developing a copper canister by introducing a cold spray technique was developed, which could reduce the amount of copper. Also, to enhance the performance of A-KRS, two kinds of properties, thermal performance and iodine adsorption, were studied successfully. A complex geological disposal system which can accommodate all the HLW (CANDU and HANARO spent fuels, HLW from pyro-processing of PWR spent fuels, decommissioning wastes) was developed, and a conceptual design was carried out. Operational safety assessment system was constructed for the long-term management of A-KRS. Three representative accidental cases were analyzed, and the probabilistic safety assessment was adopted as a methodology for the safety evaluation of A-KRS operation. A national program was proposed to support the HLW national policy on the HLW management. A roadmap for HLW management was proposed based on the optimum timing of disposal

  15. Integrated HLW Conceptual Process Flowsheet(s) for the Crystalline Silicotitanate Process SRDF-98-04

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Strategic Research and Development Fund (SRDF) provided funds to develop integrated conceptual flowsheets and material balances for a CST process as a potential replacement for, or second generation to, the ITP process. This task directly supports another SRDF task: Glass Form for HLW Sludge with CST, SRDF-98-01, by M. K. Andrews which seeks to further develop sludge/CST glasses that could be used if the ITP process were replaced by CST ion exchange. The objective of the proposal was to provide flowsheet support for development and evaluation of a High Level Waste Division process to replace ITP. The flowsheets would provide a conceptual integrated material balance showing the impact on the HLW division. The evaluation would incorporate information to be developed by Andrews and Harbour on CST/DWPF glass formulations and provide the bases for evaluating the economic impact of the proposed replacement process. Coincident with this study, the Salt Disposition Team began its evaluation of alternatives for disposition of the HLW salts in the SRS waste tanks. During that time, the CST IX process was selected as one of four alternatives (of eighteen Phase II alternatives) for further evaluation during Phase III

  16. The senate working party on HLW management in Spain - historical perspective

    Lang-Lenton, J.

    2007-01-01

    As the first case history Jorge Lang Lenton, Corporate Director of ENRESA, recounted the failed attempt to establish an underground disposal facility for HLW. The site selection process, which was planned by ENRESA in the 1980's, was aimed at finding the 'technically best' site. The process was conducted by technical experts without public involvement. When 40 candidate siting areas were identified in the mid-1990's, information leaked out, creating vigorous public opposition in all of these locations. In 1998 the siting process was halted. The Senate proposed to continue R and D on geological disposal and on P and T, to reduce waste production, and to develop an energy policy that relies more on renewable energy sources. They also suggested that public participation be promoted. The 5. General Radioactive Waste Management Plan, which was developed in 1999, took these proposals into consideration. Regarding underground disposal, the government postponed any decision until 2010. At the end of 2004 a decision was made by Parliament to establish a centralized storage facility for HLW. Mr. Lang-Lenton highlighted the main lessons of the failed siting attempt. First, it has to be acknowledged that HLW management is a societal rather than a technical problem. Second, for any radioactive waste management facility a socially feasible rather than a technically optimal site should be selected, i.e., 'the best site is the possible site'. Finally, transparency and openness are needed for building confidence in the decision-making process. (author)

  17. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2004-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site high level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross flow filter, produces 0.02 gpm/ft2 of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technologies, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media

  18. Panel session: Disposal of HLW - ready for implementation

    Heremans, R.; Come, B.; Barbreau, A.; Girardi, F.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is a report of a panel session at the European Community conference on radioactive waste management and disposal, Luxembourg 1985, concerning the safe and long-term disposal of high-activity and long-lived waste. The subjects discussed include: geological barriers including deep sea-bed sediments, engineered barriers, technological problems (repository construction, waste emplacement, backfilling and sealing), safety analysis, performance assessment of disposal system components, and finally institutional, legal and financial aspects of geological disposal. (U.K.)

  19. Citizen Contributions to the Closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 18 and 19 at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) - 13448

    Lawless, W.F. [Paine College, Departments of Math and Psychology, 1235 15th Street, Augusta, GA 30901 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Citizen involvement in DOE's decision-making for the environmental cleanup from DOE's management of its nuclear wastes across the DOE complex has had a positive effect on the cleanup of its SRS site, characterized by an acceleration of cleanup not only for the Transuranic wastes at SRS, but also for DOE's first two closures of HLW tanks, both of which occurred at SRS. The Citizens around SRS had pushed successfully for the closures of Tanks 17 and 20 in 1997, becoming the first closures of HLW tanks under regulatory guidance in the USA. However, since then, HLW tank closures ceased due to a lawsuit, the application of new tank clean-up technology, interagency squabbling between DOE and NRC over tank closure criteria, and finally and almost fatally, from budget pressures. Despite an agreement with its regulators for the closure of Tanks 18 and 19 by the end of calendar year 2012, the outlook in Fall 2011 to close these two tanks had dimmed. It was at this point that the citizens around SRS became reengaged with tank closures, helping DOE to reach its agreed upon milestone. (authors)

  20. Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    DiSabatino, A.; Loftus, D.

    1999-01-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant

  1. Long-term product consistency test of simulated 90-19/Nd HLW glass

    Gan, X.Y.; Zhang, Z.T.; Yuan, W.Y.; Wang, L.; Bai, Y.; Ma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical durability of 90-19/Nd glass, a simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass in contact with the groundwater was investigated with a long-term product consistency test (PCT). Generally, it is difficult to observe the long term property of HLW glass due to the slow corrosion rate in a mild condition. In order to overcome this problem, increased contacting surface (S/V = 6000 m -1 ) and elevated temperature (150 o C) were employed to accelerate the glass corrosion evolution. The micro-morphological characteristics of the glass surface and the secondary minerals formed after the glass alteration were analyzed by SEM-EDS and XRD, and concentrations of elements in the leaching solution were determined by ICP-AES. In our experiments, two types of minerals, which have great impact on glass dissolution, were found to form on 90-19/Nd HLW glass surface when it was subjected to a long-term leaching in the groundwater. One is Mg-Fe-rich phyllosilicates with honeycomb structure; the other is aluminosilicates (zeolites). Mg and Fe in the leaching solution participated in the formation of phyllosilicates. The main components of phyllosilicates in alteration products of 90-19/Nd HLW glass are nontronite (Na 0.3 Fe 2 Si 4 O 10 (OH) 2 .4H 2 O) and montmorillonite (Ca 0.2 (Al,Mg) 2 Si 4 O 10 (OH) 2 .4H 2 O), and those of aluminosilicates are mordenite ((Na 2 ,K 2 ,Ca)Al 2 Si 10 O 24 .7H 2 O)) and clinoptilolite ((Na,K,Ca) 5 Al 6 Si 30 O 72 .18H 2 O). Minerals like Ca(Mg)SO 4 and CaCO 3 with low solubility limits are prone to form precipitant on the glass surface. Appearance of the phyllosilicates and aluminosilicates result in the dissolution rate of 90-19/Nd HLW glass resumed, which is increased by several times over the stable rate. As further dissolution of the glass, both B and Na in the glass were found to leach out in borax form.

  2. Cold-Crucible Design Parameters for Next Generation HLW Melters

    Gombert, D.; Richardson, J.; Aloy, A.; Day, D.

    2002-01-01

    The cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) design eliminates many materials and operating constraints inherent in joule-heated melter (JHM) technology, which is the standard for vitrification of high-activity wastes worldwide. The cold-crucible design is smaller, less expensive, and generates much less waste for ultimate disposal. It should also allow a much more flexible operating envelope, which will be crucial if the heterogeneous wastes at the DOE reprocessing sites are to be vitrified. A joule-heated melter operates by passing current between water-cooled electrodes through a molten pool in a refractory-lined chamber. This design is inherently limited by susceptibility of materials to corrosion and melting. In addition, redox conditions and free metal content have exacerbated materials problems or lead to electrical short-circuiting causing failures in DOE melters. In contrast, the CCIM design is based on inductive coupling of a water-cooled high-frequency electrical coil with the glass, causing eddycurrents that produce heat and mixing. A critical difference is that inductance coupling transfers energy through a nonconductive solid layer of slag coating the metal container inside the coil, whereas the jouleheated design relies on passing current through conductive molten glass in direct contact with the metal electrodes and ceramic refractories. The frozen slag in the CCIM design protects the containment and eliminates the need for refractory, while the corrosive molten glass can be the limiting factor in the JH melter design. The CCIM design also eliminates the need for electrodes that typically limit operating temperature to below 1200 degrees C. While significant marketing claims have been made by French and Russian technology suppliers and developers, little data is available for engineering and economic evaluation of the technology, and no facilities are available in the US to support testing. A currently funded project at the Idaho National Engineering

  3. HLW vitrification in France industrial experience and glass quality

    Desvaux, J.L.; Delahaye, P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the vitrification process, the technology and process improvements at the La Hague plant in R 7 and T 7 facilities. The main achievements relate to the process flexibility, the reliability of the equipment and solid waste management. The quality of the vitrified glass produced and canisters compliance with agreed specifications are demonstrated through characterization studies. Since the active start-up of R 7/T 7 facilities, canisters compliance with specifications relies upon a complete quality assurance/quality control program including process control. 1 tab., 1 fig

  4. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2005-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces approximately 0.02 gpm/sq. ft. of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media. Personnel revised the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service

  5. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Yoshida, M.; Asano, M.; Himei, M.; Tamura, M.; Hayashi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Immobilization of various enzymes was performed by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers at low temperatures. Alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were effectively immobilized in hydrophilic polymer carrier such as poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and also in rather hydrophobic carrier such as poly(tetraethylene-glycol diacrylate). Immobilized human hemoglobin underwent the reversible oxygenation concomitantly with change of oxygen concentration outside of the matrices. (author)

  6. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  7. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 ∼ 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature (∼ 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms

  8. TNX/HLW Long Shaft Pumps 1995-2000

    VanPelt, B.

    2002-01-01

    Problems with long shaft pumps are becoming clearer due to increased use, better instrumentation, more analysis, and increased testing activity. The problems are with reliability and not with hydraulic performance. The root cause of reliability problems is usually excessive vibration caused by design. The outlook for satisfactory pumps is improved as understanding of problems increases. Promising developments are emerging such as the tilt pad bearing. Alternative configurations, such as gas filled columns and submerged motor pumps, will require development. Continued development, in general, should be expected due to changing technology and industry changes. This report describes thirteen distinct pump programs starting with leakage of original mixer pumps in the 1980s and ending with the testing of tilt pad bearings now in progress. Eight of the programs occurred from 1996 to 2000. All involve long shaft pumps; all involve testing at TNX; and all involve a problem of some kind. The co mmon technical issue among the activities is vibration and shaft (or rotor) instability due to journal bearings. In every case, excessive shaft vibration is a reasonable and probable explanation for some or all of the problems

  9. Ceramification: A plutonium immobilization process

    Rask, W.C. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States); Phillips, A.G. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a low temperature technique for stabilizing and immobilizing actinide compounds using a combination process/storage vessel of stainless steel, in which measured amounts of actinide nitrate solutions and actinide oxides (and/or residues) are systematically treated to yield a solid article. The chemical ceramic process is based on a coating technology that produces rare earth oxide coatings for defense applications involving plutonium. The final product of this application is a solid, coherent actinide oxide with process-generated encapsulation that has long-term environmental stability. Actinide compounds can be stabilized as pure materials for ease of re-use or as intimate mixtures with additives such as rare earth oxides to increase their degree of proliferation resistance. Starting materials for the process can include nitrate solutions, powders, aggregates, sludges, incinerator ashes, and others. Agents such as cerium oxide or zirconium oxide may be added as powders or precursors to enhance the properties of the resulting solid product. Additives may be included to produce a final product suitable for use in nuclear fuel pellet production. The process is simple and reduces the time and expense for stabilizing plutonium compounds. It requires a very low equipment expenditure and can be readily implemented into existing gloveboxes. The process is easily conducted with less associated risk than proposed alternative technologies.

  10. Treatment and immobilization of intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    Lerch, R.E.; Greenhalgh, W.O.; Partridge, J.A.; Richardson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    A new program underway at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to develop and demonstrate treatment and immobilization technologies for intermediate-level wastes (ILW) generated in the nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. ILW are defined as those liquid and solid radioactive wastes, other than high-level wastes and fuel cladding hulls, that in packaged form have radiation dose readings greater than 200 millirem/hr at the packaged surface and 10 millirem/hr at three feet from the surface. The IAEA value of 10 4 Ci/m 3 for ILW defines the upper limit. For comparative purposes, reference is also made to certain aspects of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Initial work has defined the sources, quantities and types of wastes which comprise ILW. Because of the wide differences in composition (e.g., acids, salt solutions, resins and zeolites, HEPA filters, etc.) the wastes may require different treatments, particularly those wastes containing volatile contaminants. The various types of ILW have been grouped into categories amenable to similar treatment. Laboratory studies are underway to define treatment technologies for liquid ILW which contain volatile contaminants and to define immobilization parameters for the residues resulting from treatment of ILW. Immobilization agents initially being evaluated for the various residues include cement, urea-formaldehyde, and bitumen although other immobilization agents will be studied. The program also includes development of acceptable test procedures for the final immobilized products as well as development of proposed criteria for storage, transportation, and disposal of the immobilized ILW

  11. Biodegradation of chlorobenzene using immobilized crude extracts ...

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... immobilized crude extracts were reused for all other experiments and found that immobilization .... India which are of analytical reagent grade. .... 9. 60. 3. 1. Figure 3. Degradation of chlorobenzene by immobilized crude.

  12. Supramolecular protein immobilization on lipid bilayers

    Bosmans, R.P.G.; Hendriksen, W.E.; Verheijden, Mark Lloyd; Eelkema, R.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, J.H.; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and

  13. Actinide partitioning from HLW in a continuous DIDPA extraction process by means of centrifugal extractors

    Morita, Y.; Kubota, M.; Glatz, J.P.; Koch, L.; Pagliosa, G.; Roemer, K.; Nicholl, A.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment on actinide partitioning from real high level waste (HLW) was performed in a continuous process by extraction with diisodecylphosphoric acid (DIDPA) using a battery of 12 centrifugal extractors installed in a hot cell. The HNO 3 concentration of the HLW was adjusted to 0.5 M by dilution. The extraction section had 8 stages, and H 2 O 2 was added to extract Np effectively. After extraction, Am and Cm were back-extracted with 4 M HNO 3 in 4 stages and Np and Pu were stripped with 0.8 M H 2 C 2 O 4 in 8 stages. The actinides, expect Np, were extracted from HLW with a very high yield. Although only 84% of the Np were recovered in the present experiment, the recovery would be improved to 99.7 % by increasing the temperature to 45 degree C, the number of stages from 8 to 16 and the H 2 O 2 concentration from 1 M to 2 M. Long-lived Tc and the main heat and radiation emitters Cs and Sr were not extracted and were thus separated from the actinides with high decontamination factors. About 98% of Am and Cm were recovered from the loaded solvent in the first stripping step with 4M HNO 3 . About 86% of Np and about 92% of Pu were back-extracted with 0.8 M H 2 C 2 O 4 . These incomplete recoveries would be improved by increasing the number of stages and by optimizing the other process parameters. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Cost effects of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal costs of an HLW repository in

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides the cost effect results of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal cost for an HLW repository in Korea. In the cost analysis for both of these cost drivers, the price of Cu powder and the bentonite can affect the canister cost and the bentonite cost of the disposal holes as well as backfilling cost of the tunnels, respectively. Finally, we found that the unit cost of Cu and bentonite was the dominant cost drivers for the surface and underground facilities of an HLW repository. Therefore, an optimization of a canister and the layout of a disposal hole and disposal tunnels are essential to decrease the direct disposal cost of spent fuels. The disposal costs can be largely divided into two parts such as a surface facilities' cost and an underground facilities' cost. According to the KRS' cost analysis, the encapsulation material as well as the buffering and backfilling cost were the significant costs. Especially, a canister's cost was approximately estimated to be more than one fourth of the overall disposal costs. So it can be estimated that the unit cost of Cu powder is an important cost diver. Because the outer shell of the canister was made of Cu powder by a cold spray coating method. In addition, the unit cost of bentonite can also affect the buffering and the backfilling costs of the disposal holes and the disposal tunnels. But, these material costs will be highly expensive and unstable due to the modernization of the developing countries. So the studies for a material cost should be continued to identify the actual cost of an HLW repository

  15. An analytical overview of the consequences of microbial activity in a Swiss HLW repository

    McKinley, I.G.; West, J.M.; Grogan, H.A.

    1985-04-01

    Microorganisms are known to be important factors in many geochemical processes and their presence can be assured throughout the envisaged Swiss type C repository for HLW. It is likely that both introduced and resident microbes will colonise the near-field even at times when ambient temperature and radiation fields are relatively high. A simple quantitative model has been developed which indicates that microbial growth in the near-field is limited by the rate of supply of chemical energy from corrosion of the canister. Microbial processes examined include biodegradation of structural and packaging materials, alteration of groundwater chemistry (Eh, pH, organic complexant concentration) and direct nuclide uptake by microorganisms. The most important effects of such organisms are likely to be enhancement of release and mobility of key nuclides due to their complexation by microbial by-product. Resident micro-organisms in the far-field could potentially act as 9 living colloids' thus enhancing nuclide transport. In the case of flow paths through shear zones (kakirites), however, any microbes capable of penetrating the surrounding weathered rock matrix would be extensively retarded. It is concluded that microbial processes are unlikely to be of significance for HLW but will be more important for low/intermediate waste types. As data requirements are similar for all waste types, results from such studies would also resolve the main uncertainties remaining for the HLW case. Key research areas are identified as characterisation of a) nutrient availability in the near-field, b) the bioenergetics of iron corrosion, c) production of organic by-products, d) nuclide sorption by organisms and e) microbial mobility in the near-and far-field

  16. Sensitivity of Nuclide Release Behavior to Groundwater Flow in an HLW Repository

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of the dose exposure rate to human being due to long-term nuclide releases from a high-level waste repository (HLW) is of importance to meet the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies in order to ensure the performance of a repository. During the last few years, tools by which such a dose rate to an individual can be evaluated have been developed and implemented for a practical calculation to demonstrate the suitability of an HLW repository, with the aid of commercial tools such as AMBER and GoldSim, both of which are capable of probabilistic and deterministic calculations with their convenient user interface. Recently a migration from AMBER based models to GoldSim based ones has been made in accordance with a better feature of GoldSim, which is designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules to address any specialized programs, similar to solving jig saw puzzles and shows more advantage in a detailed complex modeling over AMBER. Recently a compartment modeling approach both for a geosphere and biosphere has been mainly carried out with AMBER in KAERI, which causes a necessity for a newly devised system performance evaluation model in which geosphere and biosphere models could be coupled organically together with less conservatism in the frame of the development of a total system performance assessment modeling tool, which could be successfully done with the aid of GoldSim. Therefore, through the current study, some probabilistic results of the GoldSim approach for a normal situation that could take place in a typical HLW repository are introduced

  17. Iodine immobilization in apatites

    Audubert, F.; Lartigue, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In the context of a scientific program on long-lived radionuclide conditioning, a matrix for iodine 129 immobilization has been studied. A lead vanado-phosphate apatite was prepared from the melt of lead vanado-phosphate Pb 3 (VO 4 ) 1.6 (PO 4 ) 0.4 and lead iodide PbI 2 in stoichiometric proportions by calcination at 700 deg. C during 3 hours. Natural sintering of this apatite is not possible because the product decomposition occurs at 400 deg. C. Reactive sintering is the solution. The principle depends on the coating of lead iodide with lead vanado-phosphate. Lead vanado-phosphate coating is used as iodo-apatite reactant and as dense covering to confine iodine during synthesis. So the best condition to immobilize iodine during iodo-apatite synthesis is a reactive sintering at 700 deg. C under 25 MPa. We obtained an iodo-apatite surrounded with dense lead vanadate. Leaching behaviour of the matrix synthesized by solid-solid reaction is under progress in order to determine chemical durability, basic mechanisms of the iodo-apatite alteration and kinetic rate law. Iodo-apatite dissolution rates were pH and temperature dependent. We obtained a rate of 2.5 10 -3 g.m -2 .d -1 at 90 deg. C in initially de-ionised water. (authors)

  18. Development of database and QA systems for post closure performance assessment on a potential HLW repository

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    In TSPA of long-term post closure radiological safety on permanent disposal of HLW in Korea, appropriate management of input and output data through QA is necessary. The robust QA system is developed using the T2R3 principles applicable for five major steps in R and D's. The proposed system is implemented in the web-based system so that all participants in TSRA are able to access the system. In addition, the internet based input database for TSPA is developed. Currently data from literature surveys, domestic laboratory and field experiments as well as expert elicitation are applied for TSPA

  19. The AGP-Project conceptual design for a Spanish HLW final disposal facility

    Biurrun, E.; Engelmann, H.-J.; Huertas, F.; Ulibarri, A.

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the AGP Project a Conceptual Design for a HLW Final Disposal Facility to be eventually built in an underground salt formation in Spain has been developed. The AGP Project has the character of a system analysis. In the current project phase I several alternatives has been considered for different subsystems and/or components of the repository. The system variants, developed to such extent as to allow a comparison of their advantages and disadvantages, will allow the selection of a reference concept, which will be further developed to technical maturity in subsequent project phases. (author)

  20. Studies on the long-term characteristics of HLW glass under ultimate storage conditions

    Roggendorf, H.; Conradt, R.; Ostertag, R.

    1987-01-01

    This interim report deals with first results of corrosion investigations of HLW simulation glass (COGEMA glass SON 68) in quinary salt solutions of different concentrations; the aim of these investigations was to find out about the corrosion mechanism at the surface of the glass and the quantitative registration of the corrosion products. It became obvious that the surface layers developed can be easily removed and that a determination of weight losses becomes possible thereby. The corrosion rates for a test period of 30 days were determined. (RB) [de

  1. Viability for controlling long-term leaching of radionuclides from HLW glass by amorphous silica additives

    Inagaki, Y.; Uehara, S.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolution and deterioration experiments in coexistence system of amorphous silica and vitrified wastes have been executed in order to evaluating the effects of amorphous silica addition to high level radioactive vitrified waste (HLW glass) on suppression of nuclide leaching. Geo-chemical reaction mechanism among the vitrified waste, the amorphous silica and water was also evaluated. Dissolution of the silica network was suppressed by addition of the amorphous silica. However, the leaching of soluble nuclides like B proceeded depending on the hydration deterioration reaction. (A. Hishinuma)

  2. An Assessment of Using Vibrational Compaction of Calcined HLW and LLW in DWPF Canisters

    Yi, Yun-Bo; Amme, Robert C.; Shayer, Zeev

    2008-01-01

    Since 1963, the INEL has calcined almost 8 million gallons of liquid mixed waste and liquid high-level waste, converting it to some 1.1 million gallons of dry calcine (about 4275.0 m3), which consists of alumina-and zirconia-based calcine and zirconia-sodium blend calcine. In addition, if all existing and projected future liquid wastes are solidified, approximately 2,000 m3 of additional calcine will be produced primarily from sodium-bearing waste. Calcine is a more desirable material to store than liquid radioactive waste because it reduces volume, is much less corrosive, less chemically reactive, less mobile under most conditions, easier to monitor and more protective of human health and the environment. This paper describes the technical issue involved in the development of a feasible solution for further volume reduction of calcined nuclear waste for transportation and long term storage, using a standard DWPF canister. This will be accomplished by developing a process wherein the canisters are transported into a vibrational machine, for further volume reduction by about 35%. The random compaction experiments show that this volume reduction is achievable. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate through computer modeling that it is feasible to use volume reduction vibrational machine without developing stress/strain forces that will weaken the canister integrity. Specifically, the paper presents preliminary results of the stress/strain analysis of the DWPF canister as a function of granular calcined height during the compaction and verifying that the integrity of the canister is not compromised. This preliminary study will lead to the development of better technology for safe compactions of nuclear waste that will have significant economical impact on nuclear waste storage and treatment. The preliminary results will guide us to find better solutions to the following questions: 1) What are the optimum locations and directions (vertical versus horizontal or

  3. Waste management issues, a set of technologies

    Gautrot, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    As any other industry, nuclear fuel cycle back-end raises the major issue of waste management. In France, spent fuel is considered as valuable materials and only the ultimate waste are considered as actual waste. Accordingly, waste issue is as follows: a sorting out has to be done, in order to separate valuable materials from actual wastes, put any outlet flow under a stable form and condition them appropriately to their respective recycling or disposal routes. This implies the implementation of a comprehensive set of technologies. Actually, it is an industrial reality, as the COGEMA Group has for a long time set up a reprocessing and conditioning strategy in its plants. Waste management issues are common to many activities. European as well as French regulators already introduced the twofold necessity to reduce waste volumes, and to dispose of only ''ultimate waste'' as concerns industrial and household waste mainly. In this objective, French nuclear reprocessing and recycling industry may be seen as a breeding ground of well-proven technologies and management options. Actually, processes used can also give an answer to such different issues as excess plutonium immobilization, sites cleaning up (including for instance treatment of the liquid HLW legacy), dismantling wastes management. There are a number of operations to be dealt with worldwide that will find a solution in any of the technologies implemented and optimized in COGEMA facilities. Based on the COGEMA Group know-how, the present paper will describe those technologies and explain how they can solve the other stringent waste management issues worldwide. (author)

  4. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Status Of The Development Of In-Tank/At-Tank Separations Technologies For High-Level Waste Processing For The U.S. Department Of Energy

    Aaron, G.; Wilmarth, B.

    2011-01-01

    Within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development, the Office of Waste Processing manages a research and development program related to the treatment and disposition of radioactive waste. At the Savannah River (South Carolina) and Hanford (Washington) Sites, approximately 90 million gallons of waste are distributed among 226 storage tanks (grouped or collocated in 'tank farms'). This waste may be considered to contain mixed and stratified high activity and low activity constituent waste liquids, salts and sludges that are collectively managed as high level waste (HLW). A large majority of these wastes and associated facilities are unique to the DOE, meaning many of the programs to treat these materials are 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. As a result, the technologies required to disposition these wastes must be developed from basic principles, or require significant re-engineering to adapt to DOE's specific applications. Of particular interest recently, the development of In-tank or At-Tank separation processes have the potential to treat waste with high returns on financial investment. The primary objective associated with In-Tank or At-Tank separation processes is to accelerate waste processing. Insertion of the technologies will (1) maximize available tank space to efficiently support permanent waste disposition including vitrification; (2) treat problematic waste prior to transfer to the primary processing facilities at either site (i.e., Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) or Savannah River's Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF)); and (3) create a parallel treatment process to shorten the overall treatment duration. This paper will review the status of several of the R and D projects being developed by the U.S. DOE including insertion of the ion exchange (IX) technologies, such as Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at Savannah River. This has the potential to align the

  6. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team

  7. Capacity of burning and transmutation reactor and grouping in partitioning of HLW in self-consistent fuel recycle

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    The concept of capacity of B/T reactor and grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to perform self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Te, 129 I, and 135 Cs), Group B ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). In this study P-T treatment were optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs

  8. Enhanced sludge processing of HLW: Hydrothermal oxidation of chromium, technetium, and complexants by nitrate. 1998 annual progress report

    Buelow, S.J.; Robinson, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for hydrothermal separation of chromium from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges. The worked is aimed at attaining a fundamental understanding of chromium speciation, oxidation/reduction and dissolution kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and transport properties under hydrothermal conditions in both simple and complex salt solutions that will ultimately lead to an efficient chromium leaching process. This report summarizes the research over the first 1.5 years of a 3 year project. The authors have examined the dissolution of chromium hydroxide using different oxidants as a function of temperature and alkalinity. The results and possible applications to HLW sludges are discussed'

  9. Time evolution of the Clay Barrier Chemistry in a HLW deep geological disposal in granite

    Font, I.; Miguel, M. J.; Juncosa, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of a high level waste geological disposal is to guarantee the waste isolation from the biosphere, locking them away into very deep geological formations. The best way to assure the isolation is by means of a multiple barrier system. These barriers, in a serial disposition, should assure the confinement function of the disposal system. Two kinds of barriers are considered: natural barriers (geological formations) and engineered barriers (waste form, container and backfilling and sealing materials). Bentonite is selected as backfilling and sealing materials for HLW disposal into granite formations, due to its very low permeability and its ability to fill the remaining spaces. bentonite has also other interesting properties, such as, the radionuclide retention capacity by sorption processes. Once the clay barrier has been placed, the saturation process starts. The granite groundwater fills up the voids of the bentonite and because of the chemical interactions, the groundwater chemical composition varies. Near field processes, such as canister corrosion, waste leaching and radionuclide release, strongly depends on the water chemical composition. Bentonite pore water composition is such a very important feature of the disposal system and its determination and its evolution have great relevance in the HLW deep geological disposal performance assessment. The process used for the determination of the clay barrier pore water chemistry temporal evolution, and its influence on the performance assessment, are presented in this paper. (Author)

  10. Proposals of geological sites for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Geological background. Text volume

    2008-01-01

    On April 2008, the Swiss Federal Council approved the conceptual part of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories. The Plan sets out the details of the site selection procedure for geological repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). It specifies that selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages, the first one (the subject of this report) being the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in the later stages of the Sectoral Plan. The geoscientific background is based on the one hand on an evaluation of the geological investigations previously carried out by Nagra on deep geological disposal of HLW and L/ILW in Switzerland (investigation programmes in the crystalline basement and Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland, investigations of L/ILW sites in the Alps, research in rock laboratories in crystalline rock and clay); on the other hand, new geoscientific studies have also been carried out in connection with the site selection process. Formulation of the siting proposals is conducted in five steps: A) In a first step, the waste inventory is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; B) The second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability, reliability of geological findings and engineering suitability; C) In the third step, the large-scale geological-tectonic situation is assessed and large-scale areas that remain under consideration are defined. For the L

  11. Threshold Assessment: Definition of Acceptable Sites as Part of Site Selection for the Japanese HLW Program

    McKenna, S.A.; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Webb, E.K.; Makino, Hitoshi; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Baba, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Umeki, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    For the last ten years, the Japanese High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) repository program has focused on assessing the feasibility of a basic repository concept, which resulted in the recently published H12 Report. As Japan enters the implementation phase, a new organization must identify, screen and choose potential repository sites. Thus, a rapid mechanism for determining the likelihood of site suitability is critical. The threshold approach, described here, is a simple mechanism for defining the likelihood that a site is suitable given estimates of several critical parameters. We rely on the results of a companion paper, which described a probabilistic performance assessment simulation of the HLW reference case in the H12 report. The most critical two or three input parameters are plotted against each other and treated as spatial variables. Geostatistics is used to interpret the spatial correlation, which in turn is used to simulate multiple realizations of the parameter value maps. By combining an array of realizations, we can look at the probability that a given site, as represented by estimates of this combination of parameters, would be good host for a repository site

  12. Natural analogues for containment-providing barriers for a HLW repository in salt

    Wolf, J.; Noseck, U.

    2015-06-15

    In 2005, a German research project was started to develop a novel approach to prove safety for a HLW repository in a salt formation, to refine the safety concept, to identify open scientific issues and to define necessary R&D work. This project aimed at identifying the key information for a HLW repository in salt. One important question is how this information may be best fulfilled by natural analogue studies. This question is answered by starting a review of the required key information needs of the safety case (post-closure phase) in order to assess whether or not these requirements can be supported by natural analogues information. In order to structure the review and to address the key elements of the safety concepts, three types of natural analogues are distinguished: (i) natural analogues for the integrity of the geological barrier, (ii) natural analogues for the integrity of the geotechnical barriers and (iii) natural analogues for release scenarios. For the safety case in salt type (i) and (ii) are of highest importance and are treated in this paper. The assessment documented in this paper on the one hand indicates the high potential benefit of natural analogues for a safety case in salt and on the other hand helps to focus the available human and financial resources for the safety case on the most safety-relevant aspects. (authors)

  13. Process arrangement options for Defense waste immobilization

    1980-02-01

    Current plans are to immobilize the SRP high-level liquid wastes in a high integrity form. Borosilicate glass was selected in 1977 as the reference waste form and a mjaor effort is currently underway to develop the required technology. A large new facility, referred to as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is being designed to carry out this mission, with project authorization targeted for 1982 and plant startup in 1989. However, a number of other process arrangements or manufacturing strategies, including staging the major elements of the project or using existing SRP facilities for some functions, have been suggested in lieu of building the reference DWPF. This study assesses these various options and compares them on a technical and cost basis with the DWPF. Eleven different manufacturing options for SRP defense waste solidification were examined in detail. These cases are: (1) vitrification of acid waste at current generation rate; (2) vitrification of current rate acid waste and caustic sludge; (3 and 4) vitrification of the sludge portion of neutralized waste; (5) decontamination of salt cake and storage of concentrated cesium and strontium for later immobilization; (6) processing waste in a facility with lower capacity than the DWPF; (7) processing waste in a combination of existing and new facilities; (8) waste immobilization in H Canyon; (9) vitrification of both sludge and salt; (10) DWPF with onsite storage; (11) deferred authorization of DWPF

  14. Remote material handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project. Revision 1

    Brault, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    With the downsizing of the US and Russian nuclear stockpiles, large quantities of weapons-usable plutonium in the US are being declared excess and will be disposed of by the Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program. To implement this program, DOE has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the construction and operation of three new facilities: pit disassembly and conversion; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and plutonium immobilization. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize a portion of the excess plutonium in a hybrid ceramic and glass form containing high level waste for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The PIP is divided into three distinct operating areas: Plutonium Conversion, First Stage Immobilization, and Second Stage Immobilization. Processing technology for the PIP is being developed jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper will discuss development of the automated unpacking and sorting operations in the conversion area, and the automated puck and tray handling operations in the first stage immobilization area. Due to the high radiation levels and toxicity of the materials to be disposed of, the PIP will utilize automated equipment in a contained (glovebox) facility. Most operations involving plutonium-bearing materials will be performed remotely, separating personnel from the radiation source. Source term materials will be removed from the operations during maintenance. Maintenance will then be performed hands on within the containment using glove ports

  15. Summary of International Waste Management Programs (LLNL Input to SNL L3 MS: System-Wide Integration and Site Selection Concepts for Future Disposition Options for HLW)

    Greenberg, Harris R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blink, James A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Halsey, William G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-11

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation’s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. This Lessons Learned task is part of a multi-laboratory effort, with this LLNL report providing input to a Level 3 SNL milestone (System-Wide Integration and Site Selection Concepts for Future Disposition Options for HLW). The work package number is: FTLL11UF0328; the work package title is: Technical Bases / Lessons Learned; the milestone number is: M41UF032802; and the milestone title is: “LLNL Input to SNL L3 MS: System-Wide Integration and Site Selection Concepts for Future Disposition Options for HLW”. The system-wide integration effort will integrate all aspects of waste management and disposal, integrating the waste generators, interim storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal at a repository site. The review of international experience in these areas is required to support future studies that address all of these components in an integrated manner. Note that this report is a snapshot of nuclear power infrastructure and international waste management programs that is current as of August 2011, with one notable exception. No attempt has been made to discuss the currently evolving world-wide response to the tragic consequences of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan on March 11, 2011, leaving more than 15,000 people dead and more than 8,000 people missing, and severely damaging the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power complex. Continuing efforts in FY 2012 will update the data, and summarize it in an Excel spreadsheet for easy comparison and assist in the knowledge management of the study cases.

  16. Immobilization routes - they're not standing still

    Basta, N

    1982-04-19

    A review of the current stage of research into enzyme immobilization and the application of this technology in food processing and biomass-energy conversion is presented. The major success of the technology at present is the production of high-fructose corn syrup in the U.S. A commercial-scale plant to make sweeteners from cheese whey using immobilized lactase has come onstream in the U.K. Of two other processes reported, one uses immobilized bacteria to treat waste-water and produces pipeline-quality methane, the other holds promise for cutting the cost of corn-to-ethanol processing and enhancing the performance of cellulose-to-ethanol routes.

  17. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    Holtslander, W.J.; Yaraskavitch, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T 2 . Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  18. Immobilization of Uranium Silicides in Sintered Glass

    Mateos, P.; Russo, D.O.; Heredia, A.D.; Sanfilippo, M.

    2003-01-01

    High activity nuclear spent fuels vitrification by fusion is a well known technology which has industrial scale in France, England, Japan, EEUU. Borosilicates glasses are used in this process.Sintered glasses are an alternative to the immobilization task in which there is also a wide experience around the world.The available technics are: cold pressing and sintering , hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing.This work compares Borosilicates and Iron silicates sintered glasses behaviour when different ammounts of nuclear simulated waste is added

  19. Study on immobilizations of ovine anti-human IgG and MCAb against EHF on radiation-modified silicone films

    Jinhui, Guo; Hongfei, Ha; Yuhua, Zhang [Beijing Univ., BJ (China). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1990-08-01

    Films of silicone (silastic) were grafted by monomer acrylamide vis {gamma}-radiation technology and then the ovine anti-human IgG, Epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF)-MCAb were immobilized on the silastic-AAM films with different grafting yields passthrough associate reactions. Measruements of relationships between grafting yields. Contents of immobilized antibodies and immunoactivities for immobilized silastic-AAM films were performed by using {sup 125}I method ELISA method was used to measure the immunoactivities for the immobilized monoantibody. The results showed that the antibodies used can be immobilized on radiation-grafted silicone films and this immobilization method has its potential significance in clinical practice.

  20. Study on immobilizations of ovine anti-human IgG and MCAb against EHF on radiation-modified silicone films

    Guo Jinhui; Ha Hongfei; Zhang Yuhua

    1990-01-01

    Films of silicone (silastic) were grafted by monomer acrylamide vis γ-radiation technology and then the ovine anti-human IgG, Epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF)-MCAb were immobilized on the silastic-AAM films with different grafting yields passthrough associate reactions. Measruements of relationships between grafting yields. Contents of immobilized antibodies and immunoactivities for immobilized silastic-AAM films were performed by using 125 I method ELISA method was used to measure the immunoactivities for the immobilized monoantibody. The results showed that the antibodies used can be immobilized on radiation-grafted silicone films and this immobilization method has its potential significance in clinical practice

  1. High-level-waste immobilization

    Crandall, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form

  2. Bioremediation of contaminated surface water by immobilized Micrococcus roseus.

    Li, H; Li, P; Hua, T; Zhang, Y; Xiong, X; Gong, Z

    2005-08-01

    The problems caused by contaminated surface water have gradually become more serious in recent years. Although various remediation technologies were investigated, unfortunately, no efficient method was developed. In this paper, a new bioremediation technology was studied using Micrococcus roseus, which was immobilized in porous spherical beads by an improved polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) - sodium alginate (SA) embedding method. The experimental results indicated that COD removal rate could reach 64.7 % within 72 hours when immobilized M. roseus beads were used, which was ten times as high as that of free cells. The optimum inoculation rate of immobilized M. roseus beads was 10 % (mass percent of the beads in water sample, g g(-1)). Suitable aeration was proved necessary to enhance the bioremediation process. The immobilized cells had an excellent tolerance to pH and temperature changes, and were also more resistant to heavy metal stress compared with free cells. The immobilized M. roseus beads had an excellent regeneration capacity and could be reused after 180-day continuous usage. The Scanning Electronic Microscope (SEM) analysis showed that the bead microstructure was suitable for M. roseus growth, however, some defect structures should still be improved.

  3. Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Batch Transfer and Sampling Performance of Simulated HLW - 12307

    Jensen, Jesse; Townson, Paul; Vanatta, Matt [EnergySolutions, Engineering and Technology Group, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste treatment Plant (WTP) has been recognized as a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. At the end of 2009 DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), awarded a contract to EnergySolutions to design, fabricate and operate a demonstration platform called the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) to establish pre-transfer sampling capacity, and batch transfer performance data at two different scales. This data will be used to examine the baseline capacity for a tank mixed via rotational jet mixers to transfer consistent or bounding batches, and provide scale up information to predict full scale operational performance. This information will then in turn be used to define the baseline capacity of such a system to transfer and sample batches sent to WTP. The Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) platform consists of 43'' and 120'' diameter clear acrylic test vessels, each equipped with two scaled jet mixer pump assemblies, and all supporting vessels, controls, services, and simulant make up facilities. All tank internals have been modeled including the air lift circulators (ALCs), the steam heating coil, and the radius between the wall and floor. The test vessels are set up to simulate the transfer of HLW out of a mixed tank, and collect a pre-transfer sample in a manner similar to the proposed baseline configuration. The collected material is submitted to an NQA-1 laboratory for chemical analysis. Previous work has been done to assess tank mixing performance at both scales. This work involved a combination of unique instruments to understand the three dimensional distribution of solids using a combination of Coriolis meter measurements, in situ chord length distribution

  4. Effects of a Capital Investment and a Discount Rate on the Optimal Operational Duration of an HLW Repository

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the effects of a capital investment and a discount rate on the optimal operational duration of an HLW repository. According to the previous researches of the KRS(Korea Reference System) for an HLW repository, the amounts of 7,068,200 C$K and 2,636.2 MEUR are necessary to construct and operate surface and underground facilities. Since these huge costs can be a burden to some national economies, a study for a cost optimization should be performed. So we aim to drive the dominant cost driver for an optimal operational duration. A longer operational duration may be needed to dispose of more spent fuels continuously from a nuclear power plant, or to attain a retrievability of an HLW repository at a depth of 500 m below the ground level in a stable plutonic rock body. In this sense, an extended operational duration for an HLW repository affects the overall disposal costs of a repository. In this paper, only the influence of a capital investment and a discount rate was estimated from the view of optimized economics. Because these effects must be significant factors to minimize the overall disposal costs based on minimizing the sum of operational costs and capital investments

  5. Safety case development in the Japanese programme for geological disposal of HLW: Evolution in the generic stage

    Ueda, Hiroyoshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Fujihara, Hiroshi; Takeda, Seietsu

    2014-01-01

    In the Japanese programme for nuclear power generation, the safe management of the resulting radioactive waste, particularly vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from fuel reprocessing, has been a major concern and a focus of R and D since the late 70's. According to the specifications in a report issued by an advisory committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC, 1997), the Second Progress Report on R and D for the Geological Disposal of HLW (H12 report) (JNC, 2000) was published after two decades of R and D activities and showed that disposal of HLW in Japan is feasible and can be practically implemented at sites which meet certain geological stability requirements. The H12 report supported government decisions that formed the basis of the 'Act on Final Disposal of Specified Radioactive Waste' (Final Disposal Act), which came into force in 2000. The Act specifies deep geological disposal of HLW at depths greater than 300 metres, together with a stepwise site selection process in three stages. Following the Final Disposal Act, the supporting 'Basic Policy for Final Disposal' and the 'Final Disposal Plan' were authorised in the same year. (authors)

  6. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Augmented Formulation Matrix Tests

    Cozzi, A.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Hansen, E.; Roberts, K.

    2015-01-01

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Washington State. The HLW will be vitrified in the HLW facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. A portion (~35%) of the LAW will be vitrified in the LAW vitrification facility for disposal onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize all of the wastes destined for those facilities. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. Cast Stone, a cementitious waste form, is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW. A statistically designed test matrix was used to evaluate the effects of key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. For the processing properties, the water-to-dry-blend mix ratio was the most significant parameter in affecting the range of values observed for each property. The single shell tank (SST) Blend simulant also showed differences in measured properties compared to the other three simulants tested. A review of the testing matrix and results indicated that an additional set of tests would be beneficial to improve the understanding of the impacts noted in the

  7. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Augmented Formulation Matrix Tests

    Cozzi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hansen, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Roberts, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-20

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in Washington State. The HLW will be vitrified in the HLW facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. A portion (~35%) of the LAW will be vitrified in the LAW vitrification facility for disposal onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize all of the wastes destined for those facilities. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. Cast Stone, a cementitious waste form, is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW. A statistically designed test matrix was used to evaluate the effects of key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. For the processing properties, the water-to-dry-blend mix ratio was the most significant parameter in affecting the range of values observed for each property. The single shell tank (SST) Blend simulant also showed differences in measured properties compared to the other three simulants tested. A review of the testing matrix and results indicated that an additional set of tests would be beneficial to improve the understanding of the impacts noted in the Screening

  8. Proceedings: EPRI Workshop 2 -- Technical basis for EPA HLW disposal criteria

    Rogers, V.

    1993-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sponsored this workshop to address the scientific and technical issues underlying the regulatory criteria, or standard, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and transuranic waste, commonly referred to collectively as high-level waste (HLW). These regulatory criteria were originally promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 40 CFR Part 191 in 1985. However, significant portions of the regulation were remanded by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1987. This is the second of two workshops. Topics discussed include: gas pathway; individual and groundwater protection; human intrusion; population protection; performance; TRU conversion factors and discussions. Individual projects re processed separately for the databases

  9. Interference of different ionic species on the analysis of phosphate in HLW using spectrophotometer

    Mishra, P.K.; Ghongane, D.E.; Valsala, T.P.; Sonavane, M.S.; Kulkarni, Y.; Changrani, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    During reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by PUREX process different categories of radioactive liquid wastes like High Level (HL), Intermediate Level (IL) and Low Level (LL) are generated. Different methodologies are adopted for management of these wastes. Since PUREX solvent (30% Tri butyl phosphate-70% Normal Paraffin Hydrocarbon) undergoes chemical degradation in the highly acidic medium of dissolver solution, presence of phosphate in the waste streams is inevitable. Since higher concentrations of phosphate in the HLW streams will affect its management by vitrification, knowledge about the concentration of phosphate in the waste is essential before finalising the glass composition. Since a large number of anionic and cationic species are present in the waste, these species may interfere phosphate analysis using spectrophotometer. In the present work, the interference of different anionic and cationic species on the analysis of phosphate in waste solutions using spectrophotometer was studied

  10. Role of international collaboration in PNC's R ampersand D programme for HLW disposal

    Masuda, Sumio; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Yamakawa, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    PNC has been active in promoting international cooperation in connection with the Japanese HLW disposal programme, based on both a bilateral and multilateral approach. Both types of cooperation are extremely useful; in particular, bilateral cooperation has the advantage of providing opportunities for in-depth discussions in mutual areas of interest. By way of contrast, multilateral cooperation also provides an international arena for broader discussion and corroboration of output from individual R ampersand D programmes. International collaboration also provides young researchers with an opportunity to learn from experience. Depending on the issues to be tackled, appropriate forms of collaboration have been integrated into PNC's strategy for maximizing output. The lessons learned from collaboration are very valuable and can be used directly in their programme to enhance its credibility. The format of collaboration has also been extensively developed: it has been found that resources can be utilized more effectively by sharing them appropriately

  11. Depth optimization for the Korean HLW repository System within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Seok; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-12-01

    The present study is to evaluate the material properties of the compacted bentonite, backfill material, canister cast iron insert, and the rock mass for the Korean HLW repository system. These material properties are either measured, or taken from other countries, through the evaluation of the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior of a repository. After the evaluation of the material properties, the most appropriate and economical depth as well as the layout of a single layer repository is to be recommended. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and ground water are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  12. Technical Standards on the Safety Assessment of a HLW Repository in Other Countries

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    The basic function of HLW disposal system is to prevent excessive radio-nuclides being leaked from the repository in a short time. To do this, many technical standards should be developed and established on the components of disposal system. Safety assessment of a repository is considered as one of technical standards, because it produces quantitative results of the future evolution of a repository based on a reasonably simplified model. In this paper, we investigated other countries' regulations related to safely assessment focused on the assessment period, radiation dose limits and uncertainties of the assessment. Especially, in the investigation process of the USA regulations, the USA regulatory bodies' approach to assessment period and peak dose is worth taking into account in case of a conflict between peak dose from safety assessment and limited value in regulation.

  13. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Piovesan, V.; Bardez-Giboire, I.; Perret, D.; Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO2 - Al2O3 - B2O3 - Na2O - Li2O - CaO - La2O3 system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al3+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na+, Li+ or Ca2+. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, Tg), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties.

  14. An Ilustrative Nuclide Release Behavior from an HLW Repository due to an Earthquake Event

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Won

    2008-01-01

    Program for the evaluation of a high-level waste repository which is conceptually modeled. During the last few years, programs developed with the aid of AMBER and GoldSim by which nuclide transports in the near- and far-field of a repository as well as transport through the biosphere under various normal and disruptive release scenarios could be modeled and evaluated, have been continuously demonstrated. To show its usability, as similarly done for the natural groundwater flow scheme, influence of a possible disruptive event on a nuclide release behavior from an HLW repository system caused naturally due to an earthquake has been investigated and illustrated with the newly developed GoldSim program

  15. Assessment of dose conversion factors in a generic biosphere of a Korea HLW repository

    Hwang, Y. S.; Park, J. B.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive species released from a waste repository migrate through engineered and natural barriers and eventually reach the biosphere. Once entered the biosphere, contaminants transport various exposure pathways and finally reach a human. In this study the full RES matrix explaining the key compartments in the biosphere and their interactions is introduced considering the characteristics of the Korean biosphere. Then the three exposure groups are identified based on the compartments of interest. The full exposure pathways and corresponding mathematical expression for mass transfer coefficients and etc are developed and applied to assess the dose conversion factors of nuclides for a specific exposure group. Dose conversion factors assessed in this study will be used for total system performance assessment of a potential Korean HLW repository

  16. Current status of preparing buffer/backfill block in HLW disposal abroad

    Yan Ming; Wang Xuewen; Zhang Huyuan

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for China to commence the full-scale compaction test, resolving the preparation problem for buffer/backfill blocks when underground research laboratory project is planned for High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) disposal. The foreign countries have some research about the preparation of buffer/backfill blocks in engineered barrier systems. The foreign research shows that installation of clay blocks with sector shape at waste pollution area is a feasible engineering method. Compacted clay blocks need to be cured in a cabinet with controlled temperature and humidity to avoid desiccation and surface powdering. A freeze mixing method, mixing powdered-ice and cooled bentonite, can be operated more easily and obtain more uniform hydration than the traditional mixing of water and bentonite. It is helpful to review and adsorb the foreign research results for the design of full-scale test of bentonite compaction. (authors)

  17. Immobilization of bacterial proteases on water-solved polymer by means of electron beam

    Gonchar, A. M.; Auslender, V. L.

    1996-12-01

    Possibility of electron beam usage for proteases' immobilization on 1,4-polyalkylene oxide (1,4-PAO) was studied to obtain biologically active complex for multi-purpose usage. It is shown that immobilization of Bacillus Subtilis protease takes place due to free-radical linking of enzyme and carrier with formation of mycellium-like structures. Immobilization improves heat resistance of enzyme up to 60°C without substrate and up to 80°C in presence of substrate, widens range of pH activity in comparison with non-immobilized forms. Immobilized proteases do not contain peroxides or long-live radicals. Our results permitted to create technologies for production of medical and veterinary preparations, active components for wool washing agents and leather fabrication technology.

  18. Immobilization of bacterial proteases on water-solved polymer by means of electron beam

    Gonchar, A.M.; Auslender, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    Possibility of electron beam usage for proteases' immobilization on 1,4-polyalkylene oxide (1,4-PAO) was studied to obtain biologically active complex for multi-purpose usage. It is shown that immobilization of Bacillus Subtilis protease takes place due to free-radical linking of enzyme and carrier with formation of mycellium-like structures. Immobilization improves heat resistance of enzyme up to 60 o C without substrate and up to 80 o C in presence of substrate, widens range of pH activity in comparison with non-immobilized forms. Immobilized proteases do not contain peroxides or long-live radicals. Our results permitted to create technologies for production of medical and veterinary preparations, active components for wool washing agents and leather fabrication technology. (Author)

  19. ORNL grouting technologies for immobilizing hazardous wastes

    Dole, L.R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Cement and Concrete Applications Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed versatile and inexpensive processes to solidify large quantities of hazardous liquids, sludges, and solids. By using standard off the shelf processing equipment, these batch or continuous processes are compatible with a wide range of disposal methods, such as above-ground storage, shallow-land burial, deep geological disposal, sea-bed dumping, and bulk in-situ solidification. Because of their economic advantages, these latter bulk in-situ disposal scenarios have received the most development. ORNL's experience has shown that tailored cement-based formulas can be developed which tolerate wide fluctuations in waste feed compositions and still maintain mixing properties that are compatible with standard equipment. In addition to cements, these grouts contain pozzolans, clays and other additives to control the flow properties, set-times, phase separations and impacts of waste stream fluctuation. The cements, fly ashes and other grout components are readily available in bulk quantities and the solids-blends typically cost less than $0.05 to 0.15 per waste gallon. Depending on the disposal scenario, total disposal costs (material, capital, and operating) can be as low as $0.10 to 0.50 per gallon

  20. DETERMINATION OF HLW GLASS MELT RATE USING X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Choi, A.; Miller, D.; Immel, D.

    2011-10-06

    The purpose of the high-level waste (HLW) glass melt rate study is two-fold: (1) to gain a better understanding of the impact of feed chemistry on melt rate through bench-scale testing, and (2) to develop a predictive tool for melt rate in support of the on-going frit development efforts for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). In particular, the focus is on predicting relative melt rates, not the absolute melt rates, of various HLW glass formulations solely based on feed chemistry, i.e., the chemistry of both waste and glass-forming frit for DWPF. Critical to the successful melt rate modeling is the accurate determination of the melting rates of various HLW glass formulations. The baseline procedure being used at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is to; (1) heat a 4 inch-diameter stainless steel beaker containing a mixture of dried sludge and frit in a furnace for a preset period of time, (2) section the cooled beaker along its diameter, and (3) measure the average glass height across the sectioned face using a ruler. As illustrated in Figure 1-1, the glass height is measured for each of the 16 horizontal segments up to the red lines where relatively large-sized bubbles begin to appear. The linear melt rate (LMR) is determined as the average of all 16 glass height readings divided by the time during which the sample was kept in the furnace. This 'visual' method has proved useful in identifying melting accelerants such as alkalis and sulfate and further ranking the relative melt rates of candidate frits for a given sludge batch. However, one of the inherent technical difficulties of this method is to determine the glass height in the presence of numerous gas bubbles of varying sizes, which is prevalent especially for the higher-waste-loading glasses. That is, how the red lines are drawn in Figure 1-1 can be subjective and, therefore, may influence the resulting melt rates significantly. For example, if the red lines are drawn too low

  1. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  2. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-01-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R ampersand D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl 2 Ti 6 O 16 ) and rutile (TiO 2 ). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and monazite (CePO 4 ), to name a few of the most promising. R ampersand D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO 2 powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues

  3. Evaluation of methods and tools to develop safety concepts and to demonstrate safety for an HLW repository in salt. Final report

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Doerr, S.; and others

    2017-03-15

    safety demonstration are the integrity proofs for the geological and geotechnical barriers and analysis of backfill compaction. In addition, any possible radionuclide release from the repository to the environment has also to be assessed. The safety and demonstration concept developed in the course of the ISIBEL project was further evolved and applied in the course of the R and D project ''Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben - VSG'' (preliminary safety analysis Gorleben) as an example for an HLW repository in a domal salt structure. The repository concepts also consider the requirement for retrievability of stored waste during the operational phase of the repository. The results of the R and D project VSG provide evidence that a safe HLW repository within a salt dome of a suitable geologic structure is feasible. The long-term safety can be ensured using state-of-the-art science and technology. In 2010, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) issued new safety requirements for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste. These requirements have been included in the analysis. After completion of the VSG project in 2013 complementary work has been performed within the framework of the ISIBEL programme. In this context e.g. potential contributions of natural and antropogenic analogs to confidence building were addressed as well as the feasibility and limits of deriving a repository conc ept strictly from requirements. The report in hands provides a comprehensive summary of the results of R and D work regarding HLW disposal in domal salt formations that has been performed after launching the ISIBEL programme in 2005. This study shows the depth of the geological and technical knowledge on final disposal of HLW in a salt dome with a suitable geologic structure that had been gained up to now and demonstrates that the tools required for safety evaluations are available and allow reliable safety

  4. Evaluation of methods and tools to develop safety concepts and to demonstrate safety for an HLW repository in salt. Final report

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Doerr, S.

    2017-03-01

    safety demonstration are the integrity proofs for the geological and geotechnical barriers and analysis of backfill compaction. In addition, any possible radionuclide release from the repository to the environment has also to be assessed. The safety and demonstration concept developed in the course of the ISIBEL project was further evolved and applied in the course of the R and D project ''Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben - VSG'' (preliminary safety analysis Gorleben) as an example for an HLW repository in a domal salt structure. The repository concepts also consider the requirement for retrievability of stored waste during the operational phase of the repository. The results of the R and D project VSG provide evidence that a safe HLW repository within a salt dome of a suitable geologic structure is feasible. The long-term safety can be ensured using state-of-the-art science and technology. In 2010, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) issued new safety requirements for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste. These requirements have been included in the analysis. After completion of the VSG project in 2013 complementary work has been performed within the framework of the ISIBEL programme. In this context e.g. potential contributions of natural and antropogenic analogs to confidence building were addressed as well as the feasibility and limits of deriving a repository conc ept strictly from requirements. The report in hands provides a comprehensive summary of the results of R and D work regarding HLW disposal in domal salt formations that has been performed after launching the ISIBEL programme in 2005. This study shows the depth of the geological and technical knowledge on final disposal of HLW in a salt dome with a suitable geologic structure that had been gained up to now and demonstrates that the tools required for safety evaluations are available and allow reliable safety assessments of HLW

  5. Development of high-level waste solidification technology 1

    Kim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Hwan Young; Kim, In Tae [and others

    1999-02-01

    Spent nuclear fuel contains useful nuclides as valuable resource materials for energy, heat and catalyst. High-level wastes (HLW) are expected to be generated from the R and D activities and reuse processes. It is necessary to develop vitrification or advanced solidification technologies for the safe long-term management of high level wastes. As a first step to establish HLW vitrification technology, characterization of HLWs that would arise at KAERI site, glass melting experiments with a lab-scale high frequency induction melter, and fabrication and property evaluation of base-glass made of used HEPA filter media and additives were performed. Basic study on the fabrication and characterization of candidate ceramic waste form (Synroc) was also carried out. These HLW solidification technologies would be directly useful for carrying out the R and Ds on the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management. (author). 70 refs., 29 tabs., 35 figs.

  6. Computer-aided design of bromelain and papain covalent immobilization

    Bessy Cutiño-Avila; Dayrom Gil Pradas; Carlos Aragón Abreu; Yuniel Fernández Marrero; Martha Hernández de la Torre; Emir Salas Sarduy; María de los Ángeles Chávez Planes; José Manuel Guisán Seijas; Joaquín Díaz Brito; Alberto del Monte-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Título en español: Diseño asistido por computadora de la inmovilización covalente de bromelina y papaína. Título corto: Computer-aided design of bromelain and papain.  Abstract: Enzymes as immobilized derivatives have been widely used in Food, Agrochemical, Pharmaceutical and Biotechnological industries. Protein immobilization is probably the most used technology to improve the operational stability of these molecules. Bromelain (Ananas comosus) and papain (Carica papaya) are cystein pr...

  7. INTEGRATED DM 1200 MELTER TESTING OF HLW C-106/AY-102 COMPOSITION USING BUBBLERS VSL-03R3800-1 REV 0 9/15/03

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D' ANGELO NA; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

  8. Integrated DM 1200 Melter Testing Of HLW C-106/AY-102 Composition Using Bubblers VSL-03R3800-1, Rev. 0, 9/15/03

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Bardakci, T.; Gong, W.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW C-106/AY-102 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post test inspections of system components.

  9. Mitigating CO2 Leakage by Immobilizing CO2 into Solid Reaction Products: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT 2016. 14 November 2016 through 18 November 2016

    Wasch, L.J.; Wollenweber, J.; Neele, F.; Fleury, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the unlikely case of CO2 leakage from a storage reservoir, it is desirable to close the leak efficiently and permanently. This could be done by injecting a reactive solution into the leak path, thereby immobilizing migrating CO2 by consuming the gas and forming solid reactants. With regard to

  10. Experimental programme to demonstrate the viability of the supercontainer concept for HLW

    Van Humbeeck, Hughes; De Bock, Chris; Bastiaens, Wim; Van Cotthem, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The EIG EURIDICE (a joint venture between the Belgian Organisation for Radioactive Waste Management - ONDRAF/NIRAS - and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre - SCKoCEN) is responsible for performing large-scale tests, technical demonstrations and experiments to assess the feasibility of a final disposal of vitrified radioactive waste in deep clay layers. This is part of the Belgian Research and Development programme managed by ONDRAF/NIRAS. The current Belgian reference design for vitrified HLW and spent fuel assemblies is the so-called Supercontainer design. The vitrified waste canisters or spent fuel assemblies are enclosed in a carbon steel overpack which has to prevent contact between water from the host formation and the waste during the thermal phase. In order to maintain favourable chemical conditions to avoid corrosion during this period (several hundred or even thousand of years), the overpack is surrounded by a high alkaline concrete buffer of about 70 cm thick. The buffer also provides permanent radiological shielding for the workers, simplifying handling and other operations. All the components of the Supercontainer are constructed in above ground installations, thus creating favourable QA/QC conditions. After the emplacement of the Supercontainers in the disposal galleries, the remaining space will be backfilled. Tests to demonstrate the viability and the construction feasibility of the supercontainer design have been initiated. The viability programme includes Tests to verify the feasibility to construct and emplace the components of the supercontainers, and tests to verify the feasibility to backfill the disposal galleries once the supercontainers are placed. Supercontainer construction: Tests in column to verify the construction feasibility (risk of cracking) of the buffer with two different types of concrete (a self-compacting concrete - SCC - and a rheoplastic concrete RPC) were performed in collaboration with the Belgian concrete factory Socea. A

  11. DWPF upgrade, immobilization Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement input. Revision 1

    Sullivan, I.K.; Bignell, D.

    1994-01-01

    This Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) addresses the immobilization of plutonium by vitrification. Existing engineering documents, analyses, EIS, and technical publications were used and incorporated wherever possible to provide a timely response to this support effort. Although the vitrification technology is proven for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste, more study and technical detail will be necessary to provide a comprehensive EIS that fully addresses all aspects of introduction of plutonium to the vitrification process. This document describes the concept(s) of plutonium processing as it relates to the upgrade of the DWPF and is therefore conceptual in nature. These concepts are based on technical data and experience at the Savannah River Site and will be detailed and finalized to support execution of this immobilization option

  12. Immobilization of cellulase by radiation polymerization

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1983-01-01

    Immobilization of cellulase by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The enzymatic activity of immobilized cellulase pellets varied with the monomer, enzyme concentration, and the thickness of immobilized cellulase pellets. The optimum monomer concentration in the immobilization of cellulase was 30-50% at the pellet thickness of 1.0 mm, in which the enzymatic activity was 50%. The enzymatic activity of immobilized cellulase pellets was examined using various substrates such as cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, and paper pretreated by radiation. It was found that irradiated paper can be hydrolyzed by immobilized cellulase pellets. (author)

  13. Immobile Complex Verbs in Germanic

    Vikner, Sten

    2005-01-01

    the V° requirements or the V* requirements. Haider (1993, p. 62) and Koopman (1995), who also discuss such immobile verbs, only account for verbs with two prefix-like parts (e.g., German uraufführen ‘to perform (a play) for the first time' or Dutch herinvoeren ‘to reintroduce'), not for the more...... frequent type with only one prefix-like part (e.g., German bauchreden/Dutch buikspreken ‘to ventriloquize'). This analysis will try to account not only for the data discussed in Haider (1993) and Koopman (1995) but also for the following: - why immobile verbs include verbs with only one prefix-like part...... are immobile, - why such verbs are not found in Germanic VO-languages such as English and Scandinavian....

  14. Simulation of HTM processes in buffer-rock barriers based on the French HLW disposal concept

    Li, Xiaoshuo; Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Zhang, Chunliang

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The main objectives of this paper are to gain experience with modelling and analysis of HTM processes in clay rock and bentonite buffer surrounding heat-generating radioactive waste. The French concept for HLW disposal in drifts with backfilled bentonite buffer considered in numerical calculations which are carried out by using the computer code CODE-BRIGHT developed by the Technical University of Catalonia in Barcelona. The French repository designed by ANDRA is located in the middle of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation (COX) of 250 m thickness at a depth of 500 to 630 m below the surface. The French concept has been simplified at this simulation work. A drift is considered to be excavated at a depth of 500 m below the surface. It has a diameter of 2.2 m and a length of 20 m. A large volume of the rock mass around the drift is taken into account by an axisymmetric model of 100 m radius and 100 m length. In fact, this model represents a cylindrical rock-buffer-system with the central axis of the containers, as shown in Figure 1. Some points are selected in the buffer and the rock along the radial line (dash yellow line) in the middle of the drift for recording HTM parameters with time. The display and analysis of the results at this paper are chiefly along this line. The simulation work has been divided to two time steps. At the first step, the drift excavation and ventilation is simulated by reducing the stress normal to the drift wall down to zero and circulating gas along the drift wall with relative humidity of 85 %. Following the drift excavation and ventilation, the HLW containers and the bentonite are emplaced in the drift as the second step of the simulation. This is simulated by simultaneously applying the initial conditions of the buffer and the decayed heat emitting from the waste containers as thermal boundary conditions. Two materials (Clay rock and bentonite buffer) are taken into account

  15. Performance of the ACWA Pilot Immobilized Cell Bioreactor in Degradation of HD and Tetrytol Payloads of the M60 Chemical Round

    Guelta, Mark A; Chester, Nancy A; Kurnas, Carl W; Haley, Mark V; Lupton, F. S; Koch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    .... Neutralization followed by biodegradation was one technology identified as having potential. Guelta and DeFrank conducted preliminary laboratory studies using 1-liter Immobilized Cell Bioreactors (ICB...

  16. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  17. Final Report Start-Up And Commissioning Tests On The Duramelter 1200 HLW Pilot Melter System Using AZ-101 HLW Simulants VSL-01R0100-2, Rev. 0, 1/20/03

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.K.; Brandys, M.; Wilson, C.N.; Schatz, T.R.; Gong, W.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter(trademark) 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI (1). Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m 2 ) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

  18. FINAL REPORT START-UP AND COMMISSIONING TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-01R0100-2 REV 0 1/20/03

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BRANDYS M; WILSON CN; SCHATZ TR; GONG W; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from commissioning tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM 1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part BI [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plan. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Report. The DM1200 system will be used for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. This will include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The results presented in this report are from the initial series of short-duration tests that were conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system prior to conducting the main body of development tests that have been planned for this system. These tests were directed primarily at system 'debugging,' operator training, and procedure refinement. The AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing was selected for these tests.

  19. Discussing compliance. Summary report from discussions with Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple regarding compliance with the Swedish HLW Regulations from meetings in Stockholm May 3 and 4, 1999

    Jensen, Mikael

    1999-06-01

    Summary report from discussions with Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple regarding compliance with the Swedish HLW Regulations from meetings in Stockholm. The report also contains bibliographical information and preliminary observations made by Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple.

  20. Discussing compliance. Summary report from discussions with Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple regarding compliance with the Swedish HLW Regulations from meetings in Stockholm May 3 and 4, 1999

    Jensen, Mikael

    1999-06-01

    Summary report from discussions with Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple regarding compliance with the Swedish HLW Regulations from meetings in Stockholm. The report also contains bibliographical information and preliminary observations made by Robert Bernero and Chris Whipple

  1. HLW Feed Delivery AZ101 Batch Transfer to the Private Contractor Transfer and Mixing Process Improvements [Initial Release at Rev 2

    DUNCAN, G.P.

    2000-02-28

    The primary purpose of this business case is to provide Operations and Maintenance with a detailed transfer process review for the first High Level Waste (HLW) feed delivery to the Privatization Contractor (PC), AZ-101 batch transfer to PC. The Team was chartered to identify improvements that could be implemented in the field. A significant penalty can be invoked for not providing the quality, quantity, or timely delivery of HLW feed to the PC.

  2. Final Report - Testing of Optimized Bubbler Configuration for HLW Melter VSL-13R2950-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/12/2013

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Callow, R. A.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W. K.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of this work was to determine the glass production rate increase and ancillary effects of adding more bubbler outlets to the current WTP HLW melter baseline. This was accomplished through testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) at VSL. The DM1200 unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with several HLW waste streams including the four tank wastes proposed for initial processing at Hanford. This melter system was also used for the development and optimization of the present baseline WTP HLW bubbler configuration for the WTP HLW melter, as well as for MACT testing for both HLW and LAW. Specific objectives of these tests were to: Conduct DM1200 melter testing with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Conduct DM1200 melter testing to differentiate the effects of total bubbler air flow and bubbler distribution on glass production rate and cold cap formation. Collect melter operating data including processing rate, temperatures at a variety of locations within the melter plenum space, melt pool temperature, glass melt density, and melter pressure with the baseline WTP bubbling configuration and as augmented with additional bubblers. Collect melter exhaust samples to compare particulate carryover for different bubbler configurations. Analyze all collected data to determine the effects of adding more bubblers to the WTP HLW melter to inform decisions regarding future lid re-designs. The work used a high aluminum HLW stream composition defined by ORP, for which an appropriate simulant and high waste loading glass formulation were developed and have been previously processed on the DM1200.

  3. Safety studies of HLW-disposal in the Mors salt dome - Support to the salt option of the Pagis project

    Lindstroem Jensen, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The study, which is a support to the Pagis project, covers three tasks concerning the evaluation of the Danish salt dome Mors (variant disposal site): evaluation of the human intrusion scenario where a cavern is excavated near the HLW-repository by solution mining technique. The waste is supposed to be leached during the operation period until the abandoned cavern is closed by convergence and the contaminated brine is pressed up into the overburden. Evaluation of the brine intrusion scenario, where the HLW-repository is inadvertently located close to a major brine pocket which subsequently releases its brine content through defects in the repository to the discharge stream for the catchment area. Collection and description of hydrological data of surface and deep layers (down to circa 700 metres) in the repository region. The data will be used by GSF to calculate the radionuclide migration in the geosphere

  4. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    Wang Guanghui; Ha Hongfei; Wang Xia; Wu Jilan

    1988-01-01

    Catalase was immobilized by a chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles produced by radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78 0 C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical arm to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2 O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed. (author)

  5. Determination of alpha dose rate profile at the HLW nuclear glass/water interface

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M.; Rolland, S. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [CEA Saclay, NIMBE UMR 3685 CEA/CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The nuclear glass/water interface is studied. • The way the energy of alpha particles is deposited is modeled using MCNPX code. • A model giving dose rate profiles at the interface using intrinsic data is proposed. • Bulk dose rate is a majoring estimation in alteration layer and in surrounding water. • Dose rate is high in small cracks; in larger ones irradiated volume is negligible. - Abstract: Alpha irradiation and radiolysis can affect the alteration behavior of High Level Waste (HLW) nuclear glasses. In this study, the way the energy of alpha particles, emitted by a typical HLW glass, is deposited in water at the glass/water interface is investigated, with the aim of better characterizing the dose deposition at the glass/water interface during water-induced leaching mechanisms. A simplified chemical composition was considered for the nuclear glass under study, wherein the dose rate is about 140 Gy/h. The MCNPX calculation code was used to calculate alpha dose rate and alpha particle flux profiles at the glass/water interface in different systems: a single glass grain in water, a glass powder in water and a water-filled ideal crack in a glass package. Dose rate decreases within glass and in water as distance to the center of the grain increases. A general model has been proposed to fit a dose rate profile in water and in glass from values for dose rate in glass bulk, alpha range in water and linear energy transfer considerations. The glass powder simulation showed that there was systematic overlapping of radiation fields for neighboring glass grains, but the water dose rate always remained lower than the bulk value. Finally, for typical ideal cracks in a glass matrix, an overlapping of irradiation fields was observed while the crack aperture was lower than twice the alpha range in water. This led to significant values for the alpha dose rate within the crack volume, as long as the aperture remained lower than 60 μm.

  6. Long term corrosion behavior of the WAK-HLW glass in salt solutions

    Luckscheiter, B.; Nesovic, M.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of the HLW glass GP WAK1 containing simulated HLW oxides from the WAK reprocessing plant in Karlsruhe is investigated in long-term corrosion experiments at high S/V ratios in two reference brines at 110 and 190 C. In case of the MgCl 2 -rich solution the leachate becomes increasingly acid with reaction time up to a final pH of about 3.5 at 190 C. In the NaCl-rich solution the pH rises to about 8.5 after one year of reaction. The release of soluble elements in MgCl 2 solution, under Si-saturated conditions, is proportional to the surface area of the sample and the release increases at 190 C according to a t 1/2 rate law. This time dependence may be an indication of diffusion controlled matrix dissolution. However, at 110 C the release of the mobile elements cannot be described by a t 1/2 rate law as the time exponents are much lower than 0.5. This difference in corrosion behavior may be explained by the higher pH of about 5 at 110 C. In case of NaCl solution under alkaline conditions, the release of soluble elements is not proportional to the surface area of the sample and it increases with time exponents much lower than 0.5. After one year of reaction at 190 C a sharp increase of the release values of some elements was observed. This increase might be explained by the high pH of the solution attained after one year. The corrosion mechanism in NaCl solution, as well as in MgCl 2 solution at 110 C, has not yet been explained. By corrosion experiments in water at constant pH values between 2 and 10, it could be shown that the time exponents of the release of Li and B decrease with increasing pH of the solution. This result can explain qualitatively the differences found in the corrosion behavior of the glass under the various conditions

  7. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Knecht, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 degrees C, a higher temperature (1450 degrees C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature

  8. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Robotic canister loading

    Hamilton, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site (SRS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). When operational in 2008, the PIP will fulfill the nation's nonproliferation commitment by placing surplus weapons-grade plutonium in a permanently stable ceramic form and making it unattractive for reuse. Since there are significant radiation and security concerns, the program team is developing novel and unique technology to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. The remote task covered in this paper employs a jointed arm robot to load seven 3.5 inch diameter, 135-pound cylinders (magazines) through the 4 inch diameter neck of a stainless steel canister. Working through the narrow canister neck, the robot secures the magazines into a specially designed rack pre-installed in the canister. To provide the deterrent effect, the canisters are filled with a mixture of high-level waste and glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

  10. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  11. Enhanced sludge processing of HLW: Hydrothermal oxidation of chromium, technetium, and complexants by nitrate. 1997 mid-year progress report

    Buelow, S.

    1997-01-01

    'Treatment of High Level Waste (HLW) is the second most costly problem identified by OEM. In order to minimize costs of disposal, the volume of HLW requiring vitrification and long term storage must be reduced. Methods for efficient separation of chromium from waste sludges, such as the Hanford Tank Wastes (HTW), are key to achieving this goal since the allowed level of chromium in high level glass controls waste loading. At concentrations above 0.5 to 1.0 wt.% chromium prevents proper vitrification of the waste. Chromium in sludges most likely exists as extremely insoluble oxides and minerals, with chromium in the plus III oxidation state [1]. In order to solubilize and separate it from other sludge components, Cr(III) must be oxidized to the more soluble Cr(VI) state. Efficient separation of chromium from HLW could produce an estimated savings of $3.4B[2]. Additionally, the efficient separation of technetium [3], TRU, and other metals may require the reformulation of solids to free trapped species as well as the destruction of organic complexants. New chemical processes are needed to separate chromium and other metals from tank wastes. Ideally they should not utilize additional reagents which would increase waste volume or require subsequent removal. The goal of this project is to apply hydrothermal processing for enhanced chromium separation from HLW sludges. Initially, the authors seek to develop a fundamental understanding of chromium speciation, oxidation/reduction and dissolution kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and transport properties under hydrothermal conditions in both simple and complex salt solutions. The authors also wish to evaluate the potential of hydrothermal processing for enhanced separations of technetium and TRU by examining technetium and TRU speciation at hydrothermal conditions optimal for chromium dissolution.'

  12. Immobilization and characterization of inulinase from Ulocladium

    Ulocladium atrum inulinase was immobilized on different composite membranes composed of chitosan/nonwoven fabrics. Km values of free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on different composite membranes were calculated. The enzyme had optimum pH at 5.6 for free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on polyester ...

  13. Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0

    Kruger, A. A.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao; Kot, Wing K.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency

  14. Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency.

  15. Immobilization of radioactive strontium in contaminated soils by phosphate treatment

    Kim, K.H.; Ammons, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of in situ phosphate- and metal- (calcium, aluminum, and iron) solution treatment for 90 Sr immobilization was investigated. Batch and column experiments were performed to find optimum conditions for coprecipitation of 90 Sr with Ca-, Al-, and Fe-phosphate compounds in contaminated soils. Separate columns were packed with artificially 85 Sr-contaminated acid soil as well as 90 Sr-contaminated soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation. After metal-phosphate treatment, the columns were then leached successively with either tapwater or 0.001 M CaCl 2 solution. Most of the 85 Sr coprecipitated with the metal phosphate compounds. Immobilization of 85 Sr and 90 Sr was affected by such factors as solution pH, metal and phosphate concentration, metal-to-phosphate ratio, and soil characteristics. Equilibration time after treatments also affected 85 Sr immobilization. Many technology aspects still need to be investigated before field applications are feasible, but these experiments indicate that phosphate-based in situ immobilization should prevent groundwater contamination and will be useful as a treatment technology for 90 Sr-contaminated sites. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Immobilization of Mitochondria on Graphene

    2013-08-29

    poly-L-lysine has also been reported for immobilization of yeast mitochondria. Coating was performed by repetitive washing of cover slips with 0.02...of Poly-L-lysine Applications of PLL PLL is a production of bacterial fermentation and is used as a food preservative. In biology, PLL is used in

  17. Design and validation of the THMC China-Mock-Up test on buffer material for HLW disposal

    Yuemiao Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the preliminary concept of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW repository in China, a large-scale mock-up facility, named China-Mock-Up was constructed in the laboratory of Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (BRIUG. A heater, which simulates a container of radioactive waste, is placed inside the compacted Gaomiaozi (GMZ-Na-bentonite blocks and pellets. Water inflow through the barrier from its outer surface is used to simulate the intake of groundwater. The numbers of water injection pipes, injection pressure and the insulation layer were determined based on the numerical modeling simulations. The current experimental data of the facility are herein analyzed. The experiment is intended to evaluate the thermo-hydro-mechano-chemical (THMC processes occurring in the compacted bentonite-buffer during the early stage of HLW disposal and to provide a reliable database for numerical modeling and further investigation of engineered barrier system (EBS, and the design of HLW repository.

  18. Final Report - Management of High Sulfur HLW, VSL-13R2920-1, Rev. 0, dated 10/31/2013

    Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, Z.; Gan, H; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-11-13

    The present report describes results from a series of small-scale crucible tests to determine the extent of corrosion associated with sulfur containing HLW glasses and to develop a glass composition for a sulfur-rich HLW waste stream, which was then subjected to small-scale melter testing to determine the maximum acceptable sulfate loadings. In the present work, a new glass formulation was developed and tested for a projected Hanford HLW composition with sulfate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading. Testing was then performed on the DM10 melter system at successively higher waste loadings to determine the maximum waste loading without the formation of a separate sulfate salt phase. Small scale corrosion testing was also conducted using the glass developed in the present work, the glass developed in the initial phase of this work [26], and a high iron composition, all at maximum sulfur concentrations determined from melter testing, in order to assess the extent of Inconel 690 and MA758 corrosion at elevated sulfate contents.

  19. Development of geological disposal system; localization of element cost data and cost evaluation on the HLW repository

    Lee, Byung Sik; Kim, Kil Jung; Yang, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Chun [KOPEC, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    To estimate Total Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) for Korea HLW Repository through localization of element cost data, we review and re-organize each basic element cost data for reference repository system, localize various element cost and finally estimate TSLCC considering economic parameters. As results of the study, TSLCC is estimated as 17,167,689 million won, which includes costs for site preparation, surface facilities, underground facilities and management/integration. Since HLW repository Project is an early stage of pre-conceptual design at present, the information of design and project information are not enough to perform cost estimate and cost localization for the Project. However, project cost structure is re-organized based on the local condition and Total System Life Cycle Cost is estimated using the previous cost data gathered from construction experience of the local nuclear power plant. Project results can be used as basic reference data to assume total construction cost for the local HLW repository and should be revised to more reliable cost data with incorporating detail project design information into the cost estimate in a future. 20 refs. (Author)

  20. The mechanisms of heavy metal immobilization by cementitious material treatments and thermal treatments: A review.

    Guo, Bin; Liu, Bo; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Shengen

    2017-05-15

    Safe disposal of solid wastes containing heavy metals is a significant task for environment protection. Immobilization treatment is an effective technology to achieve this task. Cementitious material treatments and thermal treatments are two types of attractive immobilization treatments due to that the heavy metals could be encapsulated in their dense and durable wasteforms. This paper discusses the heavy metal immobilization mechanisms of these methods in detail. Physical encapsulation and chemical stabilization are two fundamental mechanisms that occur simultaneously during the immobilization processes. After immobilization treatments, the wasteforms build up a low permeable barrier for the contaminations. This reduces the exposed surface of wastes. Chemical stabilization occurs when the heavy metals transform into more stable and less soluble metal bearing phases. The heavy metal bearing phases in the wasteforms are also reviewed in this paper. If the heavy metals are incorporated into more stable and less soluble metal bearing phases, the potential hazards of heavy metals will be lower. Thus, converting heavy metals into more stable phases during immobilization processes should be a common way to enhance the immobilization effect of these immobilization methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Time evolution of dissolved oxygen and redox conditions in a HLW repository

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-02-01

    The evolution of oxygen in a HLW repository has been studied using presently available geochemical background information. The important processes affecting oxygen migration in the near-field include diffusion and oxidation of pyrite and dissolved Fe(II). The evaluation of time scales of oxygen decrease is carried out with 1. an analytical approach involving the coupling of diffusion and chemical reaction, 2. a numerical geochemical approach involving the application of a newly developed diffusion-extended version of the STEADYQL code. Both approaches yield consistent rates of oxygen decrease and indicate that oxidation of pyrite impurities in the clay is the dominant process. The results obtained fRom geochemical modelling are interpreted in terms of evolution of redox conditions. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of the major geochemical and physical parameters is performed. These results indicate that the uncertainties associated with reactive pyrite surface area impose the overall uncertainties of prediction of time scales. Thus, the obtained time of decrease to 1% of initial O 2 concentrations range between 7 and 290 years. The elapsed time at which the transition to anoxic conditions occurs is estimated to be within the same time range. Additional experimental information on redox sensitive impurities in the envisioned buffer and backfill material would further constrain the evaluated time scales. 41 refs

  2. Use of Gap-fills in the Buffer and Backfill of an HLW Repository

    Lee, Jae Owan; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The buffer and backfill are significant barrier components of the repository. They play the roles of preventing the inflow of groundwater from the surrounding rock, retarding the release of radionuclides from the waste, supporting disposal container against external impacts, and discharging decay heat from the waste. When the buffer and backfill are installed for the HLW repository, there may be gaps between the container and buffer and between the backfill and the wall of disposal tunnels, respectively. These gaps occur because spaces are allowed for ease of the installation of the buffer and backfill in excavated deposition boreholes and disposal tunnels. If the gaps are left without any sealing as they are, however, the buffer and backfill can't accomplish their functions as the barrier components. This paper reviews the gap-fill concepts of the developed foreign countries, and then suggests a gap-fill concept which is applicable for the KRS. The gap-fill is suggested to employ bentonite- based materials with a type of pellet, granule, and pellet-granule mixture. The roller compression method and extrusion-cutting method are applicable for the fabrication of the bentonite pellets which can have the high density and the required amount for use to the buffer and backfill. For the installation of the gap-fill, the pouring and then pressing method and the shotcrete- blowing method are preferable for the gap of the deposition borehole and the gap of the disposal tunnel, respectively.

  3. Performance Assessment Uncertainty Analysis for Japan's HLW Program Feasibility Study (H12)

    BABA, T.; ISHIGURO, K.; ISHIHARA, Y.; SAWADA, A.; UMEKI, H.; WAKASUGI, K.; WEBB, ERIK K.

    1999-01-01

    Most HLW programs in the world recognize that any estimate of long-term radiological performance must be couched in terms of the uncertainties derived from natural variation, changes through time and lack of knowledge about the essential processes. The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute followed a relatively standard procedure to address two major categories of uncertainty. First, a FEatures, Events and Processes (FEPs) listing, screening and grouping activity was pursued in order to define the range of uncertainty in system processes as well as possible variations in engineering design. A reference and many alternative cases representing various groups of FEPs were defined and individual numerical simulations performed for each to quantify the range of conceptual uncertainty. Second, parameter distributions were developed for the reference case to represent the uncertainty in the strength of these processes, the sequencing of activities and geometric variations. Both point estimates using high and low values for individual parameters as well as a probabilistic analysis were performed to estimate parameter uncertainty. A brief description of the conceptual model uncertainty analysis is presented. This paper focuses on presenting the details of the probabilistic parameter uncertainty assessment

  4. Strategy for safety case development: impact of a volunteering approach to siting a japanese HLW repository

    Kitayama, K.; Ishiguro, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Tsuchi, H.; Kato, T.; Sakabe, Y.; Wakasugi, K.

    2008-01-01

    NUMO strategy for safety case development is constrained by a staged siting approach, which has been initiated by a call for volunteer municipalities to host the HLW repository. For each site, the safety case is an important factor to be considered at the selection steps which narrow down towards the preferred repository location. This is particularly challenging, however, as every site requires a tailored repository concept, with associated performance assessment and an individual site evaluation programme all of which evolve with gradually increasing understanding of the host environment. In order to maintain flexibility without losing focus, NUMO has developed a formalized tailoring procedure, termed the NUMO Structured Approach (NSA). The NSA guides the interaction of the key site characterisation, repository design and performance assessment groups and is facilitated by tools to help the decision making associated with the tailoring process (e.g. a requirements management system) and with comparison of siting and design options (e.g. multi-attribute analysis). Pragmatically, the post-closure safety case will initially emphasize near-field processes and a robust engineering barrier system, considering the limited geological information at early stages. This will be complemented by a more realistic assessment of total system performance, as needed to compare options. In addition, efforts to rigorously assess operational phase safety and the practicality of assuring quality of the constructed engineered barriers are components of the total safety case which are receiving particular attention now, as they may better discriminate between sites while information is still limited. (authors)

  5. Nuclide release calculation in the near-field of a reference HLW repository

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2004-01-01

    The HLW-relevant R and D program for disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since early 1997 in order to develop a conceptual Korea Reference Repository System for direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel by the end of 2007. A preliminary reference geologic repository concept considering such established criteria and requirements as waste and generic site characteristics in Korea was roughly envisaged in 2003 focusing on the near-field components of the repository system. According to above basic repository concept, which is similar to that of Swedish KBS-3 repository, the spent fuel is first encapsulated in corrosion resistant canisters, even though the material has not yet been determined, and then emplaced into the deposition holes surrounded by high density bentonite clay in tunnels constructed at a depth of about 500 m in a stable plutonic rock body. Not only to demonstrate how much a reference repository is safe in the generic point of view with several possible scenarios and cases associated with a preliminary repository concept by conducting calculations for nuclide release and transport in the near-field components of the repository, even though enough information has not been available that much yet, but also to show a methodology by which a generic safety assessment could be performed for further development of Korea reference repository concept, nuclide release calculation study strongly seems to be necessary

  6. Biosphere Modeling for the Dose Assessment of a HLW Repository: Development of ACBIO

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2006-01-15

    For the purpose of evaluating a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, a biosphere assessment model and an implemented code, ACBIO, based on the BIOMASS methodology have been developed by utilizing AMBER, a general compartment modeling tool. To demonstrate its practicability and usability as well as to observe the sensitivity of the compartment scheme, the concentration, the activity in the compartments as well as the annual flux between the compartments at their peak values, were calculated and investigated. For each case when changing the structure of the compartments and GBIs as well as varying selected input Kd values, all of which seem very important among the others, the dose rate per nuclide release rate is calculated separately and analyzed. From the maximum dose rates, the flux to dose conversion factors for each nuclide were derived, which are used for converting the nuclide release rate appearing from the geosphere through various GBIs to dose rates (Sv/y) for an individual in a critical group. It has also been observed that the compartment scheme, the identification of a possible exposure group and the GBIs could all be highly sensitive to the final consequences in a biosphere modeling.

  7. Storage of HLW in engineered structures: air-cooled and water-cooled concepts

    Ahner, S.; Dekais, J.J.; Puttke, B.; Staner, P.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative study on an air-cooled and a water-cooled intermediate storage of vitrified, highly radioactive waste (HLW) in overground installations has been performed by Nukem and Belgonucleaire respectively. In the air-cooled storage concept the decay heat from the storage area will be removed using natural convection. In the water-cooled storage concept the decay heat is carried off by a primary and secondary forced-cooling system with redundant and diverse devices. The safety study carried out by Nukem used a fault tree method. It shows that the reliability of the designed water-cooled system is very high and comparable to the inherent, safe, air-cooled system. The impact for both concepts on the environment is determined by the release route, but even during accident conditions the release is far below permissible limits. The economic analysis carried out by Belgonucleaire shows that the construction costs for both systems do not differ very much, but the operation and maintenance costs for the water-cooled facility are higher than for the air cooled facility. The result of the safety and economic analysis and the discussions with the members of the working group have shown some possible significant modifications for both systems, which are included in this report. The whole study has been carried out using certain national criteria which, in certain Member States at least, would lead to a higher standard of safety than can be justified on any social, political or economic grounds

  8. Development of a computer tool to support scenario analysis for safety assessment of HLW geological disposal

    Makino, Hitoshi; Kawamura, Makoto; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Okubo, Hiroo; Takase, Hiroyasu

    2007-02-01

    In 'H12 Project to Establishing Technical Basis for HLW Disposal in Japan' a systematic approach that was based on an international consensus was adopted to develop scenarios to be considered in performance assessment. Adequacy of the approach was, in general term, appreciated through the domestic and international peer review. However it was also suggested that there were issues related to improving transparency and traceability of the procedure. To achieve this, improvement of scenario analysis method has been studied. In this study, based on an improvement method for treatment of FEP interaction a computer tool to support scenario analysis by specialists of performance assessment has been developed. Anticipated effects of this tool are to improve efficiency of complex and time consuming scenario analysis work and to reduce possibility of human errors in this work. This tool also enables to describe interactions among a vast number of FEPs and the related information as interaction matrix, and analysis those interactions from a variety of perspectives. (author)

  9. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    Kruger, A. A.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Matyas, J.; Owen, A. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Lang, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ∼185+-155 μm, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers

  10. The development of basic glass formulations for solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Jiang Yaozhong; Tang Baolong; Zhang Baoshan; Zhou Hui

    1995-01-01

    Basic glass formulations 90U/19, 90U/20, 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 applied in electric melting process are developed by using the mathematical model of the viscosity and electric resistance of waste glass. The yellow phase does not occur for basic glass formulations 90U/19 and 90U/20 solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant when the waste loading is 20%. Under the waste loading is 16%, the process and product properties of glass 90U/19 and 90U/20 come up to or surpass the properties of the same kind of foreign waste glasses, and other properties are about the same to them of foreign waste glasses. The process and product properties of basic glass formulations 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 used for the solidification of 'U replaced by Nd' liquid waste are almost similar to them of 90U/19 and 90U/20. These properties fairly meet the requirements of 'joint test' (performed at KfK-INE, Germany). Among these formulations, 90Nd/7 is applied in cold engineering scale electric melting test performed at KfK-INE in Germany. The main process properties of cold test is similar to laboratory results

  11. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Piovesan, V. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Bardez-Giboire, I., E-mail: isabelle.giboire@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Perret, D. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France)

    2017-01-15

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO{sub 2} – Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} – B{sub 2}O{sub 3} – Na{sub 2}O – Li{sub 2}O – CaO – La{sub 2}O{sub 3} system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al{sup 3+} in comparison with modifier elements such as Na{sup +}, Li{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+}. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, T{sub g}), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties. - Highlights: • A Design of Experiment approach to link composition and glass properties. • Adding alkali decreases glass transition temperature. • Adding La{sub 2}O{sub 3} strongly decreases glass melt viscosity. • Adding La{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases density.

  12. Biosphere Modeling for the Dose Assessment of a HLW Repository: Development of ACBIO

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of evaluating a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, a biosphere assessment model and an implemented code, ACBIO, based on the BIOMASS methodology have been developed by utilizing AMBER, a general compartment modeling tool. To demonstrate its practicability and usability as well as to observe the sensitivity of the compartment scheme, the concentration, the activity in the compartments as well as the annual flux between the compartments at their peak values, were calculated and investigated. For each case when changing the structure of the compartments and GBIs as well as varying selected input Kd values, all of which seem very important among the others, the dose rate per nuclide release rate is calculated separately and analyzed. From the maximum dose rates, the flux to dose conversion factors for each nuclide were derived, which are used for converting the nuclide release rate appearing from the geosphere through various GBIs to dose rates (Sv/y) for an individual in a critical group. It has also been observed that the compartment scheme, the identification of a possible exposure group and the GBIs could all be highly sensitive to the final consequences in a biosphere modeling

  13. Stress analysis of HLW containers. Preliminary ring test exercise Compas project

    1989-01-01

    This document describes the series of experiments and associated calculations performed as the Compas preliminary ring test exercise. A number of mild steel rings, representative of sections through HLW containers, some notched and pre-cracked, were tested in compression right up to and beyond their ultimate load. The Compas project partners independently modelled the behaviour of these rings using their finite element codes. Four different ring types were tested, and each test was repeated three times. For three of the ring types, the three test repetitions gave identical results. The fourth ring, which was not modelled by the partners, had a 4 mm thick layer of weld metal deposited on its surface. The three tests on this ring did not give identical results and suggested that the effect of welding methods should be addressed at a later stage of the project. Fracture was not found to be a significant cause of ring failure. The results of the ring tests were compared with the partners predictions, and additionally some time was spent assessing where the use of the codes could be improved. This exercise showed that the partners codes have the ability to produce results within acceptable limits. Most codes were unable to model stable crack growth. There were indications that some codes would not be able to cope with a significantly more complex three-dimensional analysis

  14. Seismic design evaluation guidelines for buried piping for the DOE HLW Facilities

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Antaki, G.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Bush, S.H.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground piping for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-Level-Waste (HLW) Facilities. The underground piping includes both single and double containment steel pipes and concrete pipes with steel lining, with particular emphasis on the double containment piping. The design and evaluation guidelines presented in this paper follow the generally accepted beam-on-elastic-foundation analysis principle and the inertial response calculation method, respectively, for piping directly in contact with the soil or contained in a jacket. A standard analysis procedure is described along with the discussion of factors deemed to be significant for the design of the underground piping. The following key considerations are addressed: the design feature and safety requirements for the inner (core) pipe and the outer pipe; the effect of soil strain and wave passage; assimilation of the necessary seismic and soil data; inertial response calculation for the inner pipe; determination of support anchor movement loads; combination of design loads; and code comparison. Specifications and justifications of the key parameters used, stress components to be calculated and the allowable stress and strain limits for code evaluation are presented

  15. Environmental risk assessment: its contribution to criteria development for HLW disposal

    Smith, G.M.; Little, R.H.; Watkins, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Principles for radioactive waste management have been provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Safety Series No.111-F, which was published in 1995. This has been a major step forward in the process of achieving acceptance for proposals for disposal of radioactive waste, for example, for High Level Waste disposal in deep repositories. However, these principles have still to be interpreted and developed into practical radiation protection criteria. Without prejudicing final judgements on the acceptability of waste proposals, an important aspect is that practical demonstration of compliance (or the opposite) with these criteria must be possible. One of the IAEA principles requires that radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way as to provide an acceptable level of protection of the environment. There has been and continues to be considerable debate as to how to demonstrate compliance with such a principle. This paper briefly reviews the current status and considers how experience in other areas of environmental protection could contribute to criteria development for HLW disposal

  16. A Safety Case Approach for Deep Geologic Disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in Bedded Salt - 13350

    Sevougian, S. David [Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Leigh, Christi D. [Defense Waste Management Programs Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hansen, Frank D. [Geoscience Research and Applications Group, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and utility of developing a defensible safety case for disposal of United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) high-level waste (HLW) and DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a conceptual deep geologic repository that is assumed to be located in a bedded salt formation of the Delaware Basin [1]. A safety case is a formal compilation of evidence, analyses, and arguments that substantiate and demonstrate the safety of a proposed or conceptual repository. We conclude that a strong initial safety case for potential licensing can be readily compiled by capitalizing on the extensive technical basis that exists from prior work on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), other U.S. repository development programs, and the work published through international efforts in salt repository programs such as in Germany. The potential benefits of developing a safety case include leveraging previous investments in WIPP to reduce future new repository costs, enhancing the ability to effectively plan for a repository and its licensing, and possibly expediting a schedule for a repository. A safety case will provide the necessary structure for organizing and synthesizing existing salt repository science and identifying any issues and gaps pertaining to safe disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in bedded salt. The safety case synthesis will help DOE to plan its future R and D activities for investigating salt disposal using a risk-informed approach that prioritizes test activities that include laboratory, field, and underground investigations. It should be emphasized that the DOE has not made any decisions regarding the disposition of DOE HLW and DOE SNF. Furthermore, the safety case discussed herein is not intended to either site a repository in the Delaware Basin or preclude siting in other media at other locations. Rather, this study simply presents an approach for accelerated development of a safety case for a potential

  17. A Safety Case Approach for Deep Geologic Disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in Bedded Salt - 13350

    Sevougian, S. David; MacKinnon, Robert J.; Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Frank D.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and utility of developing a defensible safety case for disposal of United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) high-level waste (HLW) and DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a conceptual deep geologic repository that is assumed to be located in a bedded salt formation of the Delaware Basin [1]. A safety case is a formal compilation of evidence, analyses, and arguments that substantiate and demonstrate the safety of a proposed or conceptual repository. We conclude that a strong initial safety case for potential licensing can be readily compiled by capitalizing on the extensive technical basis that exists from prior work on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), other U.S. repository development programs, and the work published through international efforts in salt repository programs such as in Germany. The potential benefits of developing a safety case include leveraging previous investments in WIPP to reduce future new repository costs, enhancing the ability to effectively plan for a repository and its licensing, and possibly expediting a schedule for a repository. A safety case will provide the necessary structure for organizing and synthesizing existing salt repository science and identifying any issues and gaps pertaining to safe disposal of DOE HLW and DOE SNF in bedded salt. The safety case synthesis will help DOE to plan its future R and D activities for investigating salt disposal using a risk-informed approach that prioritizes test activities that include laboratory, field, and underground investigations. It should be emphasized that the DOE has not made any decisions regarding the disposition of DOE HLW and DOE SNF. Furthermore, the safety case discussed herein is not intended to either site a repository in the Delaware Basin or preclude siting in other media at other locations. Rather, this study simply presents an approach for accelerated development of a safety case for a potential

  18. Preliminary evaluation of alternative forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level defense wastes

    Schulz, W.W.; Beary, M.M.; Gallagher, S.A.; Higley, B.A.; Johnston, R.G.; Jungfleisch, F.M.; Kupfer, M.J.; Palmer, R.A.; Watrous, R.A.; Wolf, G.A.

    1980-09-01

    A preliminary evaluation of solid waste forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive defense wastes is presented. Nineteen different waste forms were evaluated and compared to determine their applicability and suitability for immobilization of Hanford salt cake, sludge, and residual liquid. This assessment was structured to address waste forms/processes for several different leave-retrieve long-term Hanford waste management alternatives which give rise to four different generic fractions: (1) sludge plus long-lived radionuclide concentrate from salt cake and residual liquid; (2) blended wastes (salt cake plus sludge plus residual liquid); (3) residual liquid; and (4) radionuclide concentrate from residual liquid. Waste forms were evaluated and ranked on the basis of weighted ratings of seven waste form and seven process characteristics. Borosilicate Glass waste forms, as marbles or monoliths, rank among the first three choices for fixation of all Hanford high-level wastes (HLW). Supergrout Concrete (akin to Oak Ridge National Laboratory Hydrofracture Process concrete) and Bitumen, low-temperature waste forms, rate high for bulk disposal immobilization of high-sodium blended wastes and residual liquid. Certain multi-barrier (e.g., Coated Ceramic) and ceramic (SYNROC Ceramic, Tailored Ceramics, and Supercalcine Ceramic) waste forms, along with Borosilicate Glass, are rated as the most satisfactory forms in which to incorporate sludges and associated radionuclide concentrates. The Sol-Gel process appears superior to other processes for manufacture of a generic ceramic waste form for fixation of Hanford sludge. Appropriate recommendations for further research and development work on top ranking waste forms are made

  19. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work reported here was to develop and identify HLW glass compositions that maximize waste processing rates for the aluminum limted waste composition specified by ORP while maintaining high waste loadings and acceptable glass properties. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, confirmation tests on the DM100 melter system, and demonstration at pilot scale (DM1200). The DM100-BL unit was selected for these tests since it was used previously with the HLW waste streams evaluated in this study, was used for tests on HLW glass compositions to support subsequent tests on the HLW Pilot Melter, conduct tests to determine the effect of various glass properties (viscosity and conductivity) and oxide concentrations on glass production rates with HLW feed streams, and to assess the volatility of cesium and technetium during the vitrification of an HLW AZ-102 composition. The same melter was selected for the present tests in order to maintain comparisons between the previously collected data. These tests provide information on melter processing characteristics and off-gas data, including formation of secondary phases and partitioning. Once DM100 tests were completed, one of the compositions was selected for further testing on the DM1200; the DM1200 system has been used for processing a variety of simulated Hanford waste streams. Tests on the larger melter provide processing data at one third of the scale of the actual WTP HLW melter and, therefore, provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of production rates and potential processing issues. The work focused on maximizing waste processing rates for high aluminum HLW compositions. In view of the diversity of forms of aluminum in the Hanford tanks, tests were also conducted on the DM100 to determine the effect of changes in the form of aluminum on feed properties and production rate. In addition, the work evaluated the effect on production rate of modest increases

  20. Immobilization Techniques for Microarray: Challenges and Applications

    Satish Balasaheb Nimse

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The highly programmable positioning of molecules (biomolecules, nanoparticles, nanobeads, nanocomposites materials on surfaces has potential applications in the fields of biosensors, biomolecular electronics, and nanodevices. However, the conventional techniques including self-assembled monolayers fail to position the molecules on the nanometer scale to produce highly organized monolayers on the surface. The present article elaborates different techniques for the immobilization of the biomolecules on the surface to produce microarrays and their diagnostic applications. The advantages and the drawbacks of various methods are compared. This article also sheds light on the applications of the different technologies for the detection and discrimination of viral/bacterial genotypes and the detection of the biomarkers. A brief survey with 115 references covering the last 10 years on the biological applications of microarrays in various fields is also provided.

  1. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  2. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reaching (sub-)micrometer resolution of photo-immobilized proteins using diffracted light beams

    Skovsen, Esben; Neves Petersen, Teresa; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2008-01-01

    , with dimensions as small as a few micrometers. The ultimate size of the immobilized spots is dependent on the focal area of the UV beam. The technology involves light induced formation of free, reactive thiol groups in molecules containing aromatic residues nearby disulphide bridges. It is not only limited...... to immobilizing molecules according to conventional patterns like microarrays, as any bitmap motif can virtually be used a template for patterning. We now show that molecules (proteins) can be immobilized on a surface with any arbitrary pattern according to diffraction patterns of light. The pattern of photo......-immobilized proteins reproduces the diffraction pattern of light expected with the optical setup. Immobilising biomolecules according to diffraction patterns of light will allow achievement of smaller patterns with higher resolution. The flexibility of this new technology leads to any patterns of photo...

  4. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  5. Contaminant immobilization via microbial activity

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to search the literature to identify biological techniques that could be applied to the restoration of contaminated groundwaters near uranium milling sites. Through bioremediation it was hypothesized that the hazardous heavy metals could be immobilized in a stable, low-solubility form, thereby halting their progress in the migrating groundwater. Three basic mechanisms were examined: reduction of heavy metals by microbially produced hydrogen sulfide; direct microbial mediated reduction; and biosorption

  6. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    Clark, W.E.; Thompson, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3 to 20 wt percent iodine as Ba(IO 3 ) 2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO 3 ) 2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. 10 claims, 2 figures

  7. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams

  8. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    Teles, F.R.R.; Fonseca, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms

  9. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications

    Polakovič, M.; Švitel, J.; Bučko, M.; Filip, J.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2017), s. 667-683 ISSN 0141-5492 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biocatalysis * immobilization methods * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * process economics * reaction engineering Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Bioprocessing technologies (industrial processes relying on biological agents to drive the process) biocatalysis, fermentation Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2016

  10. Methodology of fuel cycles long-term safety assessment of SNF/HLW geological disposal

    Pritrsky, J.

    2008-02-01

    Methodology for the long-term safety assessment of nuclear fuel cycles is given in the presented doctoral thesis. The aim of work was to develop a geological repository model for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) using an appropriate software code able to calculate the influence of partitioning and transmutation in advanced fuel cycles. The first step in this process was specifying of indicators which can be used to quantify the radiological impact of each fuel cycle. Indicators such as annual effective dose and radiotoxicity of inventory have been quantitatively analysed to determine the potential risk and radiological consequences associated with production of SNF/HLW. Advanced fuel types bring a number of advantages in comparison to uranium oxide fuel UO 2 used worldwide nowadays in terms of safety improvement due to minor actinides transmutation and non-proliferation aspects as well. Within the scope of work, three different fuel cycles are compared from the point of view of long-term safety of deep geological repository. The first considered fuel cycle is the currently used open fuel cycle (UOX) which uses only U-FA (Uranium Fuel Assembly). The second assessed cycle is a closed fuel cycle (MOX) with MOX-FA (Mixed OXides Fuel Assembly) and the third considered one is a partially closed fuel cycle (IMF) with IMC-FA (Inert Matrix Combined Fuel Assembly). Description and input data of advanced fuel cycles have been gained by participation in the EC project RED-IMPACT. Results were calculated using code AMBER, which is a flexible software tool that allows building dynamic compartmental models to represent the migration and fate of contaminants in a system, for example in the surface and sub-surface environment. Contaminants in solid, liquid and gaseous phases can be considered. AMBER gives the user the flexibility to define any number of compartments; any number of contaminants and associated decays; deterministic, probabilistic and

  11. Methodology of fuel cycles long-term safety assessment of SNF/HLW geological disposal

    Pritrsky, J.

    2008-01-01

    Methodology for the long-term safety assessment of nuclear fuel cycles is given in the presented doctoral thesis. The aim of work was to develop a geological repository model for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) using an appropriate software code able to calculate the influence of partitioning and transmutation in advanced fuel cycles. The first step in this process was specifying of indicators which can be used to quantify the radiological impact of each fuel cycle. Indicators such as annual effective dose and radiotoxicity of inventory have been quantitatively analysed to determine the potential risk and radiological consequences associated with production of SNF/HLW. Advanced fuel types bring a number of advantages in comparison to uranium oxide fuel UO 2 used worldwide nowadays in terms of safety improvement due to minor actinides transmutation and non-proliferation aspects as well. Within the scope of work, three different fuel cycles are compared from the point of view of long-term safety of deep geological repository. The first considered fuel cycle is the currently used open fuel cycle (UOX) which uses only U-FA (Uranium Fuel Assembly). The second assessed cycle is a closed fuel cycle (MOX) with MOX-FA (Mixed OXides Fuel Assembly) and the third considered one is a partially closed fuel cycle (IMF) with IMC-FA (Inert Matrix Combined Fuel Assembly). Description and input data of advanced fuel cycles have been gained by participation in the EC project RED-IMPACT. Results were calculated using code AMBER, which is a flexible software tool that allows building dynamic compartmental models to represent the migration and fate of contaminants in a system, for example in the surface and sub-surface environment. Contaminants in solid, liquid and gaseous phases can be considered. AMBER gives the user the flexibility to define any number of compartments; any number of contaminants and associated decays; deterministic, probabilistic and

  12. The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions -- FY 1995 progress report

    Barney, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    At the Hanford Site organic compounds were measured in tank supernate simulant solutions during FY 1995. This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. Solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, and caproate salts; iron and aluminum and butylphosphate salts; and aluminum oxalate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25 degree C, 30 degree C, 40 degree C, and 50 degree C. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. The solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, caproate, and butylphosphate in HLW tank supernate solutions were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. High solubilities will prevent solid sodium salts of these organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions. The total organic carbon concentrations (YOC) of actual tank supernates are generally much lower than the TOC ranges for simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is so even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank and supernate is due to only one of these eight soluble compounds (an unlikely situation). Metal ion complexes of and butylphosphate and oxalate in supernate solutions were not stable in the presence of the hydroxide concentrations expected in most tanks. Iron and aluminum dibutylphosphate compounds reacted with hydroxide to form soluble sodium dibutylphosphate and precipitated iron and aluminum hydroxides. Aluminum oxalate complexes were also not stable in the basic simulated supernate solutions. Solubilities of all the organic salts decrease with increasing sodium hydroxide concentration because of the common ion effect of Na+. Increasing temperatures raised the solubilities of the organic

  13. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of crushed COx argillite used as backfilling material in HLW repository

    Tang Chaosheng; Shi Bin; Cui Yujun; Anh-Minh Tang

    2010-01-01

    At present, the crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite powder is proposed as an alternative backfilling material in France, which will be constructed in the engineering barrier of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this investigation, the compression behavior of two crushed COx argillite powders (coarser one and finer one) was studied by running l-D compression tests with several loading-unloading cycles. After the final dry density 2.0 g/cm 3 was reached, the specimen was flooding with distilled water and the evolution of axial stress was studied during saturation process. The effects of initial axial stress level and grain size distribution (GSD) on hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted specimen were analyzed. The results show that the compression curves are significantly influenced by the GSD of the soils. To obtain the same degree of compaction, the axial stress applied to finer soil is much higher than that of coarser soil. In addition, the compression index of the finer soil is bigger than that of coarser soil. The swelling index at initial water content increases with the dry density and seems to be independent of the GSD. During saturation, the initial lower axial stress causes obvious swelling behavior for both the coarser and finer powder samples and the corresponding axial stress increase gradually. At initial higher axial stress condition, monotone collapse behavior is observed for the coarser powder samples. Whereas the axial stress decrease firstly, then increase and finally decrease again for the finer powder samples. After saturation, the equilibrium axial stresses of finer powder samples are higher than that of coarser powder samples. (authors)

  14. Dissolution of ORNL HLW sludge and partitioning of the actinides using the TRUEX process

    Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z.; Beahm, E.C.; Chase, C.W.; Dillow, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for partitioning actinides from actual dissolved high-level radioactive waste (HLW) sludge. Samples of sludge from melton Valley Storage Tank W-25 were rinsed with mild caustic (0.2 M NaOH) to reduce the concentrations of nitrates and fission products associated with the interstitial liquid. In one campaign the rinsed sludge was leached in nitric acid, and about 50% of the dry mass of the sludge was dissolved. The resulting solution contained total metal concentrations of ∼ 1.8 M with a nitric acid concentration of 2.9 M. In the other campaign the sludge was neutralized with nitric acid to destroy the carbonates, then leached with 2.6 M NaOH for ∼ 6 h before rinsing with the mild caustic. The sludge was then leached in nitric acid, and about 80% of the sludge dissolved. The resulting solution contained total metal concentrations of ∼ 0.6 M with a nitric acid concentration of 1.7 M. Chemical analyses of both phases were used to evaluate the process. Evaluation was based on two metrics: the fraction of TRU elements removed from the dissolved sludge and comparison of the results with predictions made with the Generic TRUEX Model (GTM). The fractions of Eu, Pu, Cm, Th and U species removed from aqueous solution in only one extraction stage were > 95% and were close to the values predicted by the GTM. Mercury was also found to be strongly extracted, with a one-stage removal of > 92%. In one test, vanadium appeared to be moderately extracted

  15. Time-frames and the demonstration of safety for HLW disposal

    Watkins, B.; Kessler, J.

    1999-01-01

    An important principle which is often embodied in the criteria for the safe disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes is that a similar level of radiation protection should be provided to future generations as that provided for those alive today. This has resulted in the development of performance assessment methodologies to evaluate the potential long term impacts of HLW disposal on humans, usually in terms of individual dose or risk. However, the actual periods of time over which it is expected that there will be full control over high level waste disposals are extremely short in comparison with the times over which radionuclides in the wastes could potentially move from the deep repository and emerge into the surface environment. This leads to problems in setting quantitative dose or risk based standard appropriate for the short and long term, and in setting the time-frames for which calculations should be carried out. This is especially difficult in view of the uncertainty in predicting changes in human behaviour and changes in the biosphere and geosphere over the time-scales involved. Different assessment time-frames and approaches proposed by IAEA, Nordic countries, Britain and US guidance documents are briefly reviewed. Whilst accepting the basic radiation protection objective of protecting future generations, no international consensus bas been agreed on what time-frames should be used in performance assessments. It is recommended that different time-frames should be associated with different quantitative or qualitative performance measures. As a result, a range of indicators of safety may be appropriate in demonstrating compliance with regulatory performance criteria and the consequent overall assessment context. It is argued that what is required is a simple, robust yet defensible approach to time-frames and performance indicators which can be accepted by the public, regulators and the nuclear industry

  16. DESIGN OF A CONCRETE SLAB FOR STORAGE OF SNF AND HLW CASKS

    J. Bisset

    2005-01-01

    This calculation documents the design of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and High-Level Waste (HLW) Cask storage slab for the Aging Area. The design is based on the weights of casks that may be stored on the slab, the weights of vehicles that may be used to move the casks, and the layout shown on the sketch for a 1000 Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MTHM) storage pad on Attachment 2, Sht.1 of the calculation 170-C0C-C000-00100-000-00A (BSC 2004a). The analytical model used herein is based on the storage area for 8 vertical casks. To simplify the model, the storage area of the horizontal concrete modules and their related shield walls is not included. The heavy weights of the vertical storage casks and the tensile forces due to pullout at the anchorages will produce design moments and shear forces that will envelope those that would occur in the storage area of the horizontal modules. The design loadings will also include snow and live loads. In addition, the design will also reflect pertinent geotechnical data. This calculation will document the preliminary thickness and general reinforcing steel requirements for the slab. This calculation also documents the initial design of the cask anchorage. Other slab details are not developed in this calculation. They will be developed during the final design process. The calculation also does not include the evaluation of the effects of cask drop loads. These will be evaluated in this or another calculation when the exact cask geometry is known

  17. Development of grouting technologies for geological disposal of high level waste in Japan (1). Overall program and application of developed technologies

    Fujita, Tomoo; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Sugita, Yutaka; Matsui, Hiroya

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency started a grout project for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in 2007. The aim of the project was to develop new grouting technologies and grout materials and also to develop models for performance assessments, prediction of the long-term radionuclide migration and identify detrimental changes in the host rock by the grout material leachate. This study presents the overall program and the application of key engineering technologies to the construction and operation of an underground facility for the geological disposal of HLW, with particular emphasis on the long-term effects of grout materials. (author)

  18. Autonomous execution of the Precision Immobilization Technique

    Mascareñas, David D. L.; Stull, Christopher J.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2017-03-01

    Over the course of the last decade great advances have been made in autonomously driving cars. The technology has advanced to the point that driverless car technology is currently being tested on publicly accessed roadways. The introduction of these technologies onto publicly accessed roadways not only raises questions of safety, but also security. Autonomously driving cars are inherently cyber-physical systems and as such will have novel security vulnerabilities that couple both the cyber aspects of the vehicle including the on-board computing and any network data it makes use of, with the physical nature of the vehicle including its sensors, actuators, and the vehicle chassis. Widespread implementation of driverless car technology will require that both the cyber, as well as physical security concerns surrounding these vehicles are addressed. In this work, we specifically developed a control policy to autonomously execute the Precision Immobilization Technique, a.k.a. the PIT maneuver. The PIT maneuver was originally developed by law enforcement to end high-speed vehicular pursuits in a quasi-safe manner. However, there is still a risk of damage/roll-over to both the vehicle executing the PIT maneuver as well as to the vehicle subject to the PIT maneuver. In law enforcement applications, it would be preferable to execute the PIT maneuver using an autonomous vehicle, thus removing the danger to law-enforcement officers. Furthermore, it is entirely possible that unscrupulous individuals could inject code into an autonomously-driving car to use the PIT maneuver to immobilize other vehicles while maintaining anonymity. For these reasons it is useful to know how the PIT maneuver can be implemented on an autonomous car. In this work a simple control policy based on velocity pursuit was developed to autonomously execute the PIT maneuver using only a vision and range measurements that are both commonly collected by contemporary driverless cars. The ability of this

  19. The framework which aims at improving compatibility of the high-level radioactive waste disposal technology with social values and the role of risk communication

    Sakamoto, Shuichi; Kanda, Keiji

    2002-01-01

    Public perception on safety is the key factor for achieving public acceptance of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal program. Past studies on public perception and HLW management have confirmed that the public do not share the confidence of the experts in safety and feasibility of HLW disposal. The importance of a more comprehensive approach to enhance acceptability of the HLW disposal technology is recognized. This paper proposes a framework for inducing the implementers and regulators to improve compatibility of the HLW disposal technology with social values. In this framework, the implementers and regulators identify technical components which are subject to substantial influence from public concerns. Then, they manage these components through the following actions: 1) establishing policies, targets and plans to make these components compatible with social values, 2) developing and utilizing the components based on the above policies, targets and plans, 3) checking the extent of compatibility through intensive risk communication and 4) improving the process of developing and utilizing the components. This framework requires information disclosure and evaluation by an independent body which are expected to intensify the incentive to take the above actions. Canada's environmental assessment review process regarding the HLW disposal concept suggests that this framework could work effectively. (author)

  20. Issues at stake when considering long term storage of HLW. A comprehensive approach to designing the facility

    Marvy, A.; Ochem, D.

    2002-01-01

    CEA has been conducting a comprehensive R and D program to identify and study key HLW storage design criteria to possibly meet the lifetime goal of a century and beyond. A novel approach is being used since such installations must be understood as a global system comprised of various materials and hardware components, canisters, concrete and steel structures and specific procedures covering engineering steps from construction to operation including monitoring, care and maintenance as well as licensing. The challenge set by such a lifetime design goal made the R and D people focus on issues at stake and relevant to long term HLW storage in particular heat management, the effect of time on materials and the sustainability of care and maintenance. This opened up the R and D field from fundamental research areas to more conventional and technical aspects. Two major guiding principles have been devised as key design goals for the storage concepts under consideration. One is the paramount function of retrievability, which must allow the safe retrieval of any HLW package from the facility at any given time. Next is the passive containment philosophy requiring that a two-barrier system be considered. In the case of spent fuel, CEA's early assessment of the long-term behaviour of cladding shows that it cannot qualify as a reliable barrier over a long period of time. Therefore, the overriding strategy of preventing corrosion and material degradation to achieve canister protection, and therefore containment of radioactive material throughout the time of period envisaged, is at the heart of the R and D program and several design alternatives are being studied to meet that objective. For instance available thermal power from SF is used to establish dry corrosion conditions within the storage facility. The paper reviews all of these different R and D and engineering aspects. (author)

  1. Setting up a safe deep repository for long-lived HLW and ILW in Russia: Current state of the works

    Polyakov, Yu.D.; Porsov, A.Yu.; Beigul, V.P.; Palenov, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of RW disposal in Russia in accordance with the Federal Law 'On Radioactive Waste Management and Amendments to Specific Legal Acts of the Russian Federation' No. 190-FL dated 11 July 2011, is oriented at the ultimate disposal of waste, without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. The law 190-FL has it as follows: - A radioactive waste repository is a radioactive waste storage facility intended for disposal of the radioactive wastes without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. - Disposal of solid long-lived high-level waste and solid long-lived intermediate-level waste is carried out in deep repositories for radioactive waste. - Import into the Russian Federation of radioactive waste for the purpose of its storage, processing and disposal, except for spent sealed sources of ionising radiation originating from the Russian Federation, is prohibited. For safe final disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW, it is planned to construct a deep repository for radioactive waste (DRRW) in a low-pervious monolith rock massif in the Krasnoyarsk region in the production territory of the Mining and Chemical Combine (FSUE 'Gorno-khimicheskiy kombinat'). According to the IAEA recommendations and in line with the international experience in feasibility studies for setting up of HLW and SNF underground disposal facilities, the first mandatory step is the construction of an underground research laboratory. An underground laboratory serves the following purposes: - itemised research into the characteristics of enclosing rock mass, with verification of massive material suitability for safe disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW; - research into and verification of the isolating properties of an engineering barrier system; - development of engineering solutions and transportation and process flow schemes for construction and running of a future RW ultimate isolation facility. (authors)

  2. Suggestions on selection of clay site as a key alternative of underground repository for HLW geological disposal in China

    Zheng Hualing; Fu Bingjun; Fan Xianhua; Chen Shi; Sun Donghui

    2006-01-01

    Site selection for the underground repository is a vital problem with respect to the HLW geological disposal. Over the past decades, we have been focusing our attention on granite as a priority in China. However, there are some problems have to be discussed on this matter. In this paper, both experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community regarding the site selection are described. And then, after analyzing a lot of some key factors affecting the site selection, some comments and suggestions on selection of clay site as a key alternative before final decision making in China are presented. (authors)

  3. Natural analogue of redox front formation in near-field environment at post-closure phase of HLW geological disposal

    Yoshida, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Koushi; Amano, Yuki

    2005-01-01

    Redox fronts are created in the near field of rocks, in a range of oxidation environments, by microbial activity in rock groundwater. Such fronts, and the associated oxide formation, are usually unavoidable around high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories, whatever their design. The long term behaviour of these oxides after repositories have been closed is however little known. Here we introduce an analogue of redox front formation, such as 'iron oxide' deposits, known as takashikozo forming cylindrical nodules, and the long term behaviour of secondarily formed iron oxyhydroxide in subsequent geological environments. (author)

  4. Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal. Annual Report 2011

    Geckeis, H.; Stumpf, T.

    2012-01-01

    The R and D at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, INE, (Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung) of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) focuses on (i) long term safety research for nuclear waste disposal, (ii) immobilization of high level radioactive waste (HLW), (iii) separation of minor actinides from HLW and (iv) radiation protection.

  5. Properties of immobilized papain by radiation polymerization

    Kumakura, Minoru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1984-01-01

    Papain was immobilized by the radiation polymerization of various monomers at low temperatures and the effects of the polymer matrix on the enzyme activity and thermal stability of the immobilized enzymes were studied. The activity of the immobilized enzymes prepared from monofunctional (acrylate and methacrylate) monomers was higher than that from bifunctional (bismethacrylate) monomers and that from polyoxyethylene dimethacrylate monomers increased with an increase in the number of oxyethylene units. The thermal stability of the immobilized enzymes prepared from hydrophilic monomers was higher than that from hydrophobic monomers and increased markedly with increasing monomer concentration. (author)

  6. FINAL REPORT DM1200 TESTS WITH AZ 101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-03R3800-4 REV 0 2/17/04

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; BARDAKCI T; D' ANGELO NA; GONG W; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test success criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.

  7. Final Report DM1200 Tests With AZ 101 HLW Simulants VSL-03R3800-4, Rev. 0, 2/17/04

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Bardakci, T.; D'Angelo, N.A.; Gong, W.; Kot, W.K.; Pegg, I.L.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test success criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.

  8. Production of Biodiesel Using Immobilized Lipase and the Characterization of Different Co-Immobilizing Agents and Immobilization Methods

    Kang Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipase from Candida sp. 99–125 is widely employed to catalyzed transesterification and can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, the lipase was immobilized by combined adsorption and entrapment to catalyze biodiesel production from waste cooking oil (WCO via transesterification, and investigating co-immobilizing agents as additives according to the enzyme activity. The addition of the mixed co-immobilizing agents has positive effects on the activities of the immobilized lipase. Three different immobilizing methods were compared by the conversion ratio of biodiesel and structured by Atom Force Microscopy (AFM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, respectively. It was found that entrapment followed by adsorption was the best method. The effect of the co-immobilizing agent amount, lipase dosage, water content, and reuse ability of the immobilized lipase was investigated. By comparison with previous research, this immobilized lipase showed good reuse ability: the conversion ratio excesses 70% after 10 subsequent reactions, in particular, was better than Novozym435 and TLIM on waste cooking oil for one unit of lipase.

  9. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED HLW

    Pareizs, J. M.; Jantzenm, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and synthetic zeolites are extremely versatile materials. They can adsorb a variety of liquids and gases, and also take part in cation exchange reactions. Zeolites have the ability to sequester ions in lattice positions or within their networks of channels and voids. The zeolites can host alkali, alkaline earth and a variety of higher valance cations. As such they may be a viable alternative for immobilization of low activity waste (LAW) salts and calcines. The process for synthesizing zeolites is well documented for pure starting materials. A reactive aluminosilicate is reacted with an alkaline hydroxide at low temperature (<300 C) to form a zeolite. Processing time and temperature and specific reactants determine the type of zeolite formed. Zeolites are easy to make, and can be synthesized from a wide variety of natural and man made materials. However, relatively little is known about the process if one of the starting materials is a poorly characterized complex mixture of oxides (waste) containing nearly every element in the periodic table. The purpose of this work is to develop a clearer understanding of the advantages and limitations of producing a zeolite waste form from radioactive waste. Dr. M. W. Grutzeck at the Pennsylvania State University is investigating the production of a zeolite waste form using nonradioactive simulants. Dr. C. M. Jantzen and J. M. Pareizs at the Savannah River Technology Center will use the results from simulant work as a starting point for producing a zeolite waste form from an actual Savannah River Site radioactive waste stream

  10. Physical, chemical, and structural evolution of zeolite-containing waste forms produced from metakaolinite and calcined HLW

    Pareizs, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and synthetic zeolites are extremely versatile materials. They can adsorb a variety of liquids and gases, and also take part in cation exchange reactions. Zeolites have the ability to sequester ions in lattice positions or within their networks of channels and voids. The zeolites can host alkali, alkaline earth and a variety of higher valence cations. As such they may be a viable alternative for immobilization of low activity waste (LAW) salts and calcines. The process for synthesizing zeolites is well documented for pure starting materials. A reactive aluminosilicate is reacted with an alkaline hydroxide at low temperature to form a zeolite. Processing time and temperature and specific reactants determine the type of zeolite formed. Zeolites are easy to make, and can be synthesized from a wide variety of natural and man made materials. However, relatively little is known about the process if one of the starting materials is a poorly characterized complex mixture of oxides (waste) containing nearly every element in the periodic table. The purpose of this work is to develop a clearer understanding of the advantages and limitations of producing a zeolite waste form from radioactive waste. Dr. M. W. Grutzeck at the Pennsylvania State University is investigating the production of a zeolite waste form using non-radioactive simulants. Dr. C. M. Jantzen and J. M. Pareizs at the Savannah River Technology Center will use the results from simulant work as a starting point for producing a zeolite waste form from an actual Savannah River Site radioactive waste stream

  11. Enhancing the functional properties of thermophilic enzymes by chemical modification and immobilization.

    Cowan, Don A; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2011-09-10

    The immobilization of proteins (mostly typically enzymes) onto solid supports is mature technology and has been used successfully to enhance biocatalytic processes in a wide range of industrial applications. However, continued developments in immobilization technology have led to more sophisticated and specialized applications of the process. A combination of targeted chemistries, for both the support and the protein, sometimes in combination with additional chemical and/or genetic engineering, has led to the development of methods for the modification of protein functional properties, for enhancing protein stability and for the recovery of specific proteins from complex mixtures. In particular, the development of effective methods for immobilizing large multi-subunit proteins with multiple covalent linkages (multi-point immobilization) has been effective in stabilizing proteins where subunit dissociation is the initial step in enzyme inactivation. In some instances, multiple benefits are achievable in a single process. Here we comprehensively review the literature pertaining to immobilization and chemical modification of different enzyme classes from thermophiles, with emphasis on the chemistries involved and their implications for modification of the enzyme functional properties. We also highlight the potential for synergies in the combined use of immobilization and other chemical modifications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptation of vacuum-assisted mouthpiece head immobilization system for precision infant brain radiation therapy.

    Wong, Kenneth; Cheng, Justine; Bowlin, Kristine; Olch, Arthur

    Our purpose was to describe an adaptation of a commercially available mouthpiece for vacuum-assisted mouthpiece immobilization for radiation therapy in infants. An infant diagnosed with a brain tumor required radiation therapy. After reviewing dental literature about obturators, we designed a modification for the smallest commercially available mouthpiece tray. The patient was simulated with the adapted mouthpiece tray. We achieved excellent immobilization and had small daily image guided treatment position shifts. Our patient tolerated treatment well without injury to oral cavity or mucosa. Head immobilization with a vacuum-assisted modified mouthpiece has not been described in infants. Our modification is a novel and safe and permits effective and accurate immobilization for infants for radiation therapy. New manufacturing technologies may allow creation of individualized mouthpieces. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nano-Immobilized Biocatalysts for Biodiesel Production from Renewable and Sustainable Resources

    Keon Hee Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cost of biodiesel production relies on feedstock cost. Edible oil is unfavorable as a biodiesel feedstock because of its expensive price. Thus, non-edible crop oil, waste oil, and microalgae oil have been considered as alternative resources. Non-edible crop oil and waste cooking oil are more suitable for enzymatic transesterification because they include a large amount of free fatty acids. Recently, enzymes have been integrated with nanomaterials as immobilization carriers. Nanomaterials can increase biocatalytic efficiency. The development of a nano-immobilized enzyme is one of the key factors for cost-effective biodiesel production. This paper presents the technology development of nanomaterials, including nanoparticles (magnetic and non-magnetic, carbon nanotubes, and nanofibers, and their application to the nano-immobilization of biocatalysts. The current status of biodiesel production using a variety of nano-immobilized lipase is also discussed.

  14. Immobilization of molecular catalysts in supported ionic liquid phases.

    Van Doorslaer, Charlie; Wahlen, Joos; Mertens, Pascal; Binnemans, Koen; De Vos, Dirk

    2010-09-28

    In a supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalyst system, an ionic liquid (IL) film is immobilized on a high-surface area porous solid and a homogeneous catalyst is dissolved in this supported IL layer, thereby combining the attractive features of homogeneous catalysts with the benefits of heterogeneous catalysts. In this review reliable strategies for the immobilization of molecular catalysts in SILPs are surveyed. In the first part, general aspects concerning the application of SILP catalysts are presented, focusing on the type of catalyst, support, ionic liquid and reaction conditions. Secondly, organic reactions in which SILP technology is applied to improve the performance of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts are presented: hydroformylation, metathesis reactions, carbonylation, hydrogenation, hydroamination, coupling reactions and asymmetric reactions.

  15. Synroc tailored waste forms for actinide immobilization

    Gregg, Daniel J.; Vance, Eric R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee (Australia). ANSTOsynroc, Inst. of Materials Engineering

    2017-07-01

    Since the end of the 1970s, Synroc at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has evolved from a focus on titanate ceramics directed at PUREX waste to a platform waste treatment technology to fabricate tailored glass-ceramic and ceramic waste forms for different types of actinide, high- and intermediate level wastes. The particular emphasis for Synroc is on wastes which are problematic for glass matrices or existing vitrification process technologies. In particular, nuclear wastes containing actinides, notably plutonium, pose a unique set of requirements for a waste form, which Synroc ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms can be tailored to meet. Key aspects to waste form design include maximising the waste loading, producing a chemically durable product, maintaining flexibility to accommodate waste variations, a proliferation resistance to prevent theft and diversion, and appropriate process technology to produce waste forms that meet requirements for actinide waste streams. Synroc waste forms incorporate the actinides within mineral phases, producing products which are much more durable in water than baseline borosilicate glasses. Further, Synroc waste forms can incorporate neutron absorbers and {sup 238}U which provide criticality control both during processing and whilst within the repository. Synroc waste forms offer proliferation resistance advantages over baseline borosilicate glasses as it is much more difficult to retrieve the actinide and they can reduce the radiation dose to workers compared to borosilicate glasses. Major research and development into Synroc at ANSTO over the past 40 years has included the development of waste forms for excess weapons plutonium immobilization in collaboration with the US and for impure plutonium residues in collaboration with the UK, as examples. With a waste loading of 40-50 wt.%, Synroc would also be considered a strong candidate as an engineered waste form for used nuclear fuel and highly

  16. FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D' ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the

  17. Modelling of radionuclide migration and heat transport from an High-Level-Radioactive-Waste-repository (HLW) in Boom clay

    Put, M.; Henrion, P.

    1992-01-01

    For the modelling of the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay formation, the analytical code MICOF has been updated with a 3-dimensional analytical solution for discrete sources. the MICOF program is used for the calculation of the release of α and β emitters from the HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES (HLW). A coherent conceptual model is developed which describes all the major physico-chemical phenomena influencing the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay. The concept of the diffusion accessible porosity is introduced and included in the MICOF code. Different types of migration experiments are described with their advantages and disadvantages. The thermal impact of the HLW disposal in the stratified Boom clay formation has been evaluated by a finite element simulation of the coupled heat and mass transport equation. The results of the simulations show that under certain conditions thermal convection cells may form, but the convective heat transfer in the clay formation is negligible. 6 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 5 appendices

  18. A methodology of uncertainty/sensitivity analysis for PA of HLW repository learned from 1996 WIPP performance assessment

    Lee, Y. M.; Kim, S. K.; Hwang, Y. S.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    The WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) is a mined repository constructed by the US DOE for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by activities related to defence of the US since 1970. Its historical disposal operation began in March 1999 following receipt of a final permit from the State of NM after a positive certification decision for the WIPP was issued by the EPA in 1998, as the first licensed facility in the US for the deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The CCA (Compliance Certification Application) for the WIPP that the DOE submitted to the EPA in 1966 was supported by an extensive Performance Assessment (PA) carried out by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with so-called 1996 PA. Even though such PA methodologies could be greatly different from the way we consider for HLW disposal in Korea largely due to quite different geologic formations in which repository are likely to be located, a review on lots of works done through the WIPP PA studies could be the most important lessons that we can learn from in view of current situation in Korea where an initial phase of conceptual studies on HLW disposal has been just started. The objective of this work is an overview of the methodology used in the recent WIPP PA to support the US DOE WIPP CCA ans a proposal for Korean case

  19. Thermo-mechanical analysis for multi-level HLW repository concept

    Kwon, Sang Ki; Choi, Jong Won

    2004-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the influence of design parameters for the underground high-level nuclear waste repository with multi-level concept. B. Necessity o In order to construct an HLW repository in deep underground, it is required to select a site, which is far from major discontinuities. To dispose the whole spent fuels generated from the Korean nuclear power plants in a repository, the underground area of about 4km 2 is required. This would be a constraints for selecting an adequate repository site. It is recommended to dispose the two different spent fuels, PWR and CANDU, in different areas at the operation efficiency point of view. It is necessary to investigate the influence of parameters, which can affect the stability of multi-level repository. It is also needed to consider the influence of heat generated from the HLW and the high in situ stress in deep location. Therefore, thermo-mechanical coupling analysis should be carried out and the results should be compared with the results from single-level repository concept. Three-dimensional analysis is required to model the disposal tunnel and deposition hole. It is recommended to use the Korean geological condition and actually measured rock properties in Korea in order to achieve reliable modeling results. A FISH routine developed for effective modeling of Thermal-Mechanical coupling was implemented in the modeling using FLAC3D, which is a commercial three-dimensional FDM code. The thermal and mechanical properties of rock and rock mass achieved from Yusung drilling site, were used for the computer modeling. Different parameters such as level distance, waste type disposed on different levels, and time interval between the operation on different levels, were considered in the three-dimensional analysis. From the analysis, it was possible to derive adequate multi-level repository concept. Results and recommendations for application From the thermal-mechanical analysis for the multi-level repository

  20. U.S. Department of Energy's 'initiatives for proliferation prevention' program: solidification technologies for radioactive waste treatment in Russia - 16037

    Pokhitonov, Yuri; Kelley, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Large amounts of liquid radioactive waste have existed in the U.S. and Russia since the 1950's as a result of the Cold War. Comprehensive action to treat and dispose of waste products has been lacking due to insufficient funding, ineffective technologies or no proven technologies, low priority by governments among others. Today the U.S. and Russian governments seek new, more reliable methods to treat liquid waste, in particular the legacy waste streams. A primary objective of waste generators and regulators is to find economical and proven technologies that can provide long-term stability for repository storage. In 2001, the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (Khlopin), St. Petersburg, Russia, and Pacific Nuclear Solutions (PNS), Indianapolis, Indiana, began extensive research and test programs to determine the validity of polymer technology for the absorption and immobilization of standard and complex waste streams. Over 60 liquid compositions have been tested including extensive irradiation tests to verify polymer stability and possible degradation. With conclusive scientific evidence of the polymer's effectiveness in treating liquid waste, both parties have decided to enter the Russian market and offer the solidification technology to nuclear sites for waste treatment and disposal. In conjunction with these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will join Khlopin and PNS to explore opportunities for direct application of the polymers at predetermined sites and to conduct research for new product development. Under DOE's 'Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention' (IPP) program, funding will be provided to the Russian participants over a three year period to implement the program plan. This paper will present updated details of U.S. DOE's IPP program, the project structure and its objectives both short and long-term, polymer tests and applications for LLW, ILW and HLW, and new product development initiatives. (authors)

  1. Optimization of Adsorptive Immobilization of Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    Trivedi, Archana; Heinemann, Matthias; Spiess, Antje C.; Daussmann, Thomas; Büchs, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a systematic examination of various parameters of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) on solid support is performed and the impact of these parameters on immobilization efficiency is studied. Depending on the source of the enzymes, these parameters differently

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Equipment Review

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.

    1998-05-01

    This report lists the operations required to complete the Can Loading steps on the Pu Immobilization Plant Flow Sheets and evaluates the equipment options to complete each operation. This report recommends the most appropriate equipment to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations

  3. Strong and Reversible Monovalent Supramolecular Protein Immobilization

    Young, Jacqui F.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Yang, Lanti; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with an iron clasp: Site-selective incorporation of a ferrocene molecule into a protein allows for easy, strong, and reversible supramolecular protein immobilization through a selective monovalent interaction of the ferrocene with a cucurbit[7]uril immobilized on a gold surface. The

  4. Drug immobilization of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

    DeMaster, D.P.; Faro, J.B.; Estes, J.A.; Taggart, James; Zabel, C.

    1981-01-01

    Five out of nine walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) were successfully immobilized at Round Island, Alaska, in May of 1978 by combinations of phencyclidine hydrochloride and acepromazine hydrochloride. A crossbow was an effective delivery technique. Walruses that had recently hauled out were more suitable for immobilization than well-rested animals. Care was taken to prevent walruses from overheating or suffocating.

  5. Survey and analysis of the domestic technology level for the concept development of high level waste disposal

    Kang, Chang Sun; Kim, Byung Su; Song, Jae Hyok [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kwang Hon; Hwang, Ju Ho; Park, Sung Hyun; Lee, Jae Min [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea); Han, Joung Sang; Kim, Ku Young [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Jae Ki; Chang, Jae Kwon [Hangyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    The objectives of this study are the analysis of the status of HLW disposal technology and the investigation of the domestic technology level. The study has taken two years to complete with the participation of forty five researchers. The study was mainly carried out through means of literature surveys, collection of related data, visits to research institutes, and meetings with experts in the specific fields. During the first year of this project, the International Symposium on the Concept Development of the High Level Waste Disposal System was held in Taejon, Korea in October, 1997. Eight highly professed foreign experts whose fields of expertise projected to the area of high level waste disposal were invited to the symposium. This study is composed of four major areas; disposal system design/construction, engineered barrier characterization, geologic environment evaluation and performance assessment and total safety. A technical tree scheme of HLW disposal has been illustrated according to the investigation and an analysis for each technical area. For each detailed technology, research projects, performing organization/method and techniques that are to be secured in the order of priority are proposed, but the suggestions are merely at a superfluous level of propositional idea due to the reduction of the budget in the second year. The detailed programs on HLW disposal are greatly affected by governmental HLW disposal policy and in this study, the primary decisions to be made in each level of HLW disposal enterprise and a rough scheme are proposed. (author). 20 refs., 97 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  7. Immobilization and positioning systems for treatment of patients with image-guided radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy)

    Hueso Bernad, M. Nuria; Suarez Dieguez, Raquel; Roures Ramos, M. Teresa; Broseta Tormos, M.Mercedes; Tirado Porcar, Miriam M; Del Castillo Arres, Jose; Franch Martinez, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    For adequate reproduction of daily patient positioning during treatment we use a 3-coordinate system alignment. The first set of axes would be the system of light (laser). - The second coordinate system is recognized by marks on the skin patient and / or immobilization systems. The third set of alignment refers to alignment of coordinates volume to try to locate the isocenter use Guided Radiotherapy Imaging when applied technologies with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy treatment fields tend to be very small so it made individual protection and immobilization systems such as thermoplastic masks, vacuum sealed bags exterotaxicos conjugated systems and immobilization systems carbon fiber results by combining these immobilization and positioning systems can ensure effective treatment volume to be treated. There is no perfect immobilization system. However the choice of pool of qualified stun makes treatment more precise. (author)

  8. The Defense Waste Processing Facility: an innovative process for high-level waste immobilization

    Cowan, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), under construction at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), will process defense high-level radioactive waste so that it can be disposed of safely. The DWPF will immobilize the high activity fraction of the waste in borosilicate glass cast in stainless steel canisters which can be handled, stored, transported and disposed of in a geologic repository. The low-activity fraction of the waste, which represents about 90% of the high-level waste HLW volume, will be decontaminated and disposed of on the SRP site. After decontamination the canister will be welded shut by an upset resistance welding technique. In this process a slightly oversized plug is pressed into the canister opening. At the same time a large current is passed through the canister and plug. The higher resistance of the canister/plug interface causes the heat which welds the plug in place. This process provides a high quality, reliable weld by a process easily operated remotely

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item

  10. Immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3-month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents

  11. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    stronger for the mesocosms with the higher Fe(II) load. Analysis via XANES showed that a fraction (up to ~1/3) of uranium was reduced to U(IV), for mesocosms operated under low iron loading, indicating that iron cycling in the rhizosphere also results in uranium reduction and immobilization. For mesocosms operating under the higher iron loading, the fraction of uranium immobilized as U(IV) was much lower, indicating that uranium co-precipitation with iron might have been the dominant immobilization process. In parallel to these mesocosm experiments, dialysis samplers have been deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory near a creek with uranium contamination, to determine dissolved species, including Fe(II) and U(VI) in these wetland soils and their seasonal variability. The results show that there is a strong seasonal variability in dissolved iron and uranium, indicating a strong immobilization during the growing season, which is consistent with the mesocosm experimental results that the rhizosphere iron and uranium cycling are closely linked.

  12. Benefits Of Vibration Analysis For Development Of Equipment In HLW Tanks - 12341

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely

  13. Risk and uncertainty assessment for a potential HLW repository in Korea: TSPA 2006

    Hwang, Y.S.; Kang, C.H.

    2004-01-01

    KAERI has worked on the concept development on permanent disposal of HLW and its total system performance assessment since 1997. More than 36 000 MT of spent nuclear fuel from PWR and CANDU reactors is planned to be disposed of in crystalline bed-rocks. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) tools are under development. The KAERI FEP encyclopedia is actively developed to include all potential FEP suitable for Korean geo- and socio conditions. The FEPs are prioritized and then categorized to the intermediate level FEP groups. These groups become elements of the rock engineering system (RES) matrix. Then the sub-scenarios such as a container failure, groundwater migration, solute transport, etc are developed by connecting interactions between diagonal elements of the RES matrix. The full scenarios are developed from the combination of sub-scenarios. For each specific scenario, the assessment contexts and associated assessment method flow charts are developed. All information on these studies is recorded into the web based programme, FEAS (FEP to Assessment through Scenarios.) KAERI applies three basic programmes for the post closure radionuclide transport calculations; MASCOT-K, AMBER, and the new MDPSA under development. The MASCOT-K originally developed by Serco for a LLW repository has been extended extensively by KAERI to simulate release reactions such as congruent and gap releases in spent nuclear fuel. The new MDPSA code is dedicated for the probabilistic assessment of radio-nuclides in multi-dimensions of a fractured porous medium. To acquire input data for TSPA domestic experiment programmes as well as literature survey are performed. The data are stored in the Performance Assessment Input Data system (PAID.) To assure the transparency, traceability, retrievability, reproducibility, and review (T2R3) the web based KAERI QA system is developed. All tasks in TSPA are recorded under the concept of a 'Project' in this web system. Currently, FEAS, PAID

  14. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely

  15. Description of processes for the immobilization of selected transuranic wastes

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1980-12-01

    Processed sludge and incinerator-ash wastes contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements may require immobilization to prevent the release of these elements to the environment. As part of the TRU Waste Immobilization Program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing applicable waste-form and processing technology that may meet this need. This report defines and describes processes that are capable of immobilizing a selected TRU waste-stream consisting of a blend of three parts process sludge and one part incinerator ash. These selected waste streams are based on the compositions and generation rates of the waste processing and incineration facility at the Rocky Flats Plant. The specific waste forms that could be produced by the described processes include: in-can melted borosilicate-glass monolith; joule-heated melter borosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter aluminosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter basaltic-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter glass-ceramic monolith; cast-cement monolith; pressed-cement pellet; and cold-pressed sintered-ceramic pellet

  16. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y.; Messing, E.; Rubens, D.; Sarkar, N.; Ng, W.

    2008-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  17. Execution techniques and approach for high level radioactive waste disposal in Japan: Demonstration of geological disposal techniques and implementation approach of HLW project

    Kawanishi, M.; Komada, H.; Kitayama, K.; Akasaka, H.; Tsuchi, H.

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal project is expected to start fully after establishment of the implementing organization, which is planned around the year 2000 and to dispose the wastes in the 2030s to at latest in the middle of 2040s. Considering each step in the implementation of the HLW disposal project in Japan, this paper discusses the execution procedure for HLW disposal project, such as the selection of candidate/planned disposal sites, the construction and operation of the disposal facility, the closure and decommissioning of facilities, and the institutional control and monitoring after the closure of disposal facility, from a technical viewpoint for the rational execution of the project. Furthermore, we investigate and propose some ideas for the concept of the design of geological disposal facility, the validation and demonstration of the reliability on the disposal techniques and performance assessment methods at a candidate/planned site. Based on these investigation results, we made clear a milestone for the execution of the HLW disposal project in Japan. (author)

  18. The removal of thermo-tolerant coliform bacteria by immobilized waste stabilization pond algae.

    Pearson, H W; Marcon, A E; Melo, H N

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of laboratory- scale columns of immobilized micro-algae to disinfect effluents using thermo-tolerant coliforms (TTC) as a model system. Cells of a Chlorella species isolated from a waste stabilization pond complex in Northeast Brazil were immobilized in calcium alginate, packed into glass columns and incubated in contact with TTC suspensions for up to 24 hours. Five to six log removals of TTC were achieved in 6 hours and 11 log removals in 12 hours contact time. The results were similar under artificial light and shaded sunlight. However little or no TTC removal occurred in the light in columns of alginate beads without immobilized algae present or when the immobilized algae were incubated in the dark suggesting that the presence of both algae and light were necessary for TTC decay. There was a positive correlation between K(b) values for TTC and increasing pH in the effluent from the immobilized algal columns within the range pH 7.2 and 8.9. The potential of immobilized algal technology for wastewater disinfection may warrant further investigation.

  19. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  20. Experimental study on cesium immobilization in struvite structures

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S.Y.; Shkuropatenko, V.A.; Tarasov, R.V.; Dykiy, M.P.; Svitlychniy, Y.O.; Virych, V.D.; Ulybkina, E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: X-ray diffraction patterns of Ceramicrete forms, green representing struvite-K, and red, struvite-(K,Cs) with 10 wt.% CsCl in it. Cs substitutes partially for K, which immobilizes Cs at room temperature by the acid–base reaction. - Highlights: • Struvite structure of Ceramicrete is an excellent host of radioactive cesium. • The volatility problem of cesium can be avoided by this method. • This method can be used to produce cesium waste forms in ambient conditions. • It can also be used to pretreat cesium in glass vitrification technology. • It also provides a method to produce safe sealed radioactive sources of cesium. - Abstract: Ceramicrete, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid–base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate that has a struvite-K mineral structure. In this study, we demonstrate that this crystalline structure is ideal for incorporating radioactive Cs into a Ceramicrete matrix. This is accomplished by partially replacing K by Cs in the struvite-K structure, thus forming struvite-(K, Cs) mineral. X-ray diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analyses are used to confirm such a replacement. The resulting product is non-leachable and stable at high temperatures, and hence it is an ideal matrix for immobilizing Cs found in high-activity nuclear waste streams. The product can also be used for immobilizing secondary waste streams generated during glass vitrification of spent fuel, or the method described in this article can be used as a pretreatment method during glass vitrification of high level radioactive waste streams. Furthermore, it suggests a method of producing safe commercial radioactive Cs sources.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    Maciel, J. C., E-mail: jackeline-maciel@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Roraima (Brazil); Mercês, A. A. D.; Cabrera, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (Brazil); Shigeyosi, W. T. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física (Brazil); Souza, S. D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D. [Universidade Federal dos Vales de Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (Brazil); Cardoso, C. A. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física (Brazil); Neri, D. F. M. [Universidade Federal do Vale do São Francisco (Brazil); Silva, M. P. C.; Carvalho, L. B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe {sup 3+} ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ∼15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and {sup 57}Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite (γFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled “mPANI”) presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample “mPANIG-Trypsin”). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 {sup ∘}C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  2. Experimental study on cesium immobilization in struvite structures

    Wagh, Arun S., E-mail: asw@anl.gov [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, IL 60439 (United States); Sayenko, S.Y.; Shkuropatenko, V.A.; Tarasov, R.V.; Dykiy, M.P.; Svitlychniy, Y.O.; Virych, V.D.; Ulybkina, E.A. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2016-01-25

    Graphical abstract: X-ray diffraction patterns of Ceramicrete forms, green representing struvite-K, and red, struvite-(K,Cs) with 10 wt.% CsCl in it. Cs substitutes partially for K, which immobilizes Cs at room temperature by the acid–base reaction. - Highlights: • Struvite structure of Ceramicrete is an excellent host of radioactive cesium. • The volatility problem of cesium can be avoided by this method. • This method can be used to produce cesium waste forms in ambient conditions. • It can also be used to pretreat cesium in glass vitrification technology. • It also provides a method to produce safe sealed radioactive sources of cesium. - Abstract: Ceramicrete, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid–base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate that has a struvite-K mineral structure. In this study, we demonstrate that this crystalline structure is ideal for incorporating radioactive Cs into a Ceramicrete matrix. This is accomplished by partially replacing K by Cs in the struvite-K structure, thus forming struvite-(K, Cs) mineral. X-ray diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analyses are used to confirm such a replacement. The resulting product is non-leachable and stable at high temperatures, and hence it is an ideal matrix for immobilizing Cs found in high-activity nuclear waste streams. The product can also be used for immobilizing secondary waste streams generated during glass vitrification of spent fuel, or the method described in this article can be used as a pretreatment method during glass vitrification of high level radioactive waste streams. Furthermore, it suggests a method of producing safe commercial radioactive Cs sources.

  3. Immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrix

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is discussed for the immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrices, which were obtained by radiation polymerization of hydrophilic monomers. In this method, the immobilized enzyme matrix was prepared by enzyme absorbtion in the porous polymer matrix and drying treatment. The enzyme activity of the immobilized enzyme matrix varied with monomer concentration, cooling rate of the monomer solution, and hydrophilicity of the polymer matrix, takinn the change of the nature of the porous structure in the polymer matrix. The leakage of the enzymes from the polymer matrix was not observed in the repeated batch enzyme reactions

  4. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  5. Mineral surface processes responsible for the decreased retardation (or enhanced mobilization) of 137Cs from HLW tank discharges. 1998 annual progress report

    Bertsch, P.M.; Zachara, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    'Cesium (137) is a major component of high level weapons waste. At Hanford, single shell tanks (SST''s) with high level wastes (HLW) have leaked supernate containing over 10 6 Ci of 137 Cs and other co-contaminants into the vadose zone. In select locations, 137 Cs has migrated further than expected from retardation experiments and performance assessment calculations. Deep 137 Cs migration has been observed beneath the SX tank farm at Hanford with REDOX wastes as the carrier causing regulatory and stakeholder concern. The causes for expedited migration are unclear. This research is investigating how the sorption chemistry of Cs on Hanford vadose zone sediments changes after contact with solutions characteristic of HLW. The central scientific hypothesis is that the high Na concentration of HLW will suppress surface-exchange reactions of Cs, except those to highly-selective frayed edge sites (FES) of the micaceous fraction. The authors further speculate that the concentrations, ion selectivity, and structural aspects of the FES will change after contact with HLW and that these changes will be manifest in the macroscopic sorption behavior of Cs. The authors believe that migration predictions of Cs can be improved substantially if such changes are understood and quantified. The research has three objectives: (1.) identify how the multi-component surface exchange behavior of Cs on Hanford sediments changes after contact with HLW simulants that span a range of relevant chemical (Na, OH, Al, K) and temperature conditions (23-80 C); (2) reconcile changes in sorption chemistry with microscopic and molecular changes in site distribution, chemistry, mineralogy, and surface structure of the micaceous fraction; (3) integrate mass-action-solution exchange measurements with changes in the structure/site distribution of the micaceous fraction to yield a multicomponent exchange model relevant to high ionic strength and hydroxide for prediction of environmental Cs sorption.'

  6. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. I. Laboratory investigations

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2013-06-15

    All over the world, clay formations are being investigated as host medium for geologic disposal of radioactive waste because of their favourable properties, such as very low hydraulic conductivity against fluid transport, good sorption capacity for retardation of radionuclides, and high potential of self-sealing of fractures. The construction of a repository, the disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the backfilling and sealing of the remaining voids, however, will inevitably induce mechanical (M), hydraulic (H), thermal (T) and chemical (C) disturbances to the host formation and the engineered barrier system (EBS) over very long periods of time during the operation and post-closure phases of the repository. The responses and resulting property changes of the clay host rock and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repository.

  7. Study on a transportation and emplacement system of pre-assembled EBS module for HLW geological disposal

    Awano, Toshihiko; Kanno, Takeshi; Katsumata, Syunsuke; Kosuge, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    HLW disposal is one of the largest issue to utilize Nuclear power safely. In the past study, the concept, which buffer materials and Overpacked waste were transported into underground respectively, have shown. The concept of pre-assembled engineered barrier has advantage to simplify the logistics and emplacement procedure, however there are difficulties to support heavy weight of pre-assembled package by equipment under the condition of little clearance between tunnel and package. In this study, Combination of air bearing and two degree-of-freedom wheels were suggested for transportation, and air jack was suggested for unloading and emplacement system. Also, whole system for transportation and emplacement procedure was designed, and Scale model test was examined to evaluate the feasibility of these concept and functions. (author)

  8. Alternative biosphere modeling for safety assessment of HLW disposal taking account of geosphere-biosphere interface of marine environment

    Kato, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Naito, Morimasa; Ikeda, Takao; Little, Richard

    2001-03-01

    In the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system, it is required to estimate radiological impacts on future human beings arising from potential radionuclide releases from a deep repository into the surface environment. In order to estimated the impacts, a biosphere model is developed by reasonably assuming radionuclide migration processes in the surface environment and relevant human lifestyles. It is important to modify the present biosphere models or to develop alternative biosphere models applying the biosphere models according to quality and quantify of the information acquired through the siting process for constructing the repository. In this study, alternative biosphere models were developed taking geosphere-biosphere interface of marine environment into account. Moreover, the flux to dose conversion factors calculated by these alternative biosphere models was compared with those by the present basic biosphere models. (author)

  9. A comparison of three methods for determining the amount of nitric acid needed to treat HLW sludge at SRS

    Siegwald, S.F.; Ferrara, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A comparison was made of three methods for determining the amount of nitric acid which will be needed to treat a sample of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm. The treatment must ensure the resulting melter feed will have the necessary rheological and oxidation-reduction properties, reduce mercury and manganese in the sludge, and be performed in a fashion which does not produce a flammable gas mixture. The three methods examined where an empirical method based on pH measurements, a computational method based on known reactions of the species in the sludge and a titration based on neutralization of carbonate in the solution

  10. Microcrack growing and long-term mechanical stability in a HLW deep-borehole repository in granite

    Biurrun, E.; Hahne, K.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term host rock integrity assessment of a deep borehole emplacement for HLW in granite has been addressed with a detailed new constitutive model considering temperature and pressure effects on microscale phenomena (as microcracking) under repository conditions. The results of these finite element calculations have been compared with results obtained using conventional, state-of-the-art constitutive modelling. While the results of conventional modelling did suggest the existence of an important safety margin before failure, the improved calculations with the new model predict a thin but very long region of degradated host rock along the waste canister column. The results obtained up to now may well be considered as safety relevant, because they suggest that the actual long-term granite strength lies well below the conventionally determined failure limits, thus challenging the barrier properties of this host rock if the actual strength is not properly considered in the repository design

  11. Preparation and characterization of immobilized lipase on magnetic hydrophobic microspheres

    Guo, Zheng; Bai, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2003-01-01

    H for the immobilized CCL were determined. Activity amelioration of the immobilized CCL for the hydrolysis of olive oil was observed, indicating an interfacial activation of the enzyme after immobilization. Moreover, the immobilized CCL showed enhanced thermal stability and good durability in the repeated use after...

  12. Evaluation of bitumens for nuclear facilities radioactive waste immobilization

    Guzella, Marcia F.R.; Silva, Tania V. da; Loiola, Roberto; Monte, Lauro J.B.

    2000-01-01

    The activities developed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN/CNEN, include the research and development work of the radioactive wastes immobilization in different kind of bitumen. The present work describes the bituminization of simulated low level wastes of evaporator concentrates.Two types of bitumen are used for incorporation of the simulated wastes generated by nuclear power plants. Studies on rheological properties, leaching data, differential thermoanalysis and water content of the waste-products have been carried out. (author)

  13. Antimicrobial activity of immobilized lactoferrin and lactoferricin.

    Chen, Renxun; Cole, Nerida; Dutta, Debarun; Kumar, Naresh; Willcox, Mark D P

    2017-11-01

    Lactoferrin and lactoferricin were immobilized on glass surfaces via two linkers, 4-azidobenzoic acid (ABA) or 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenyl azide (FNA). The resulting surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The antimicrobial activity of the surfaces was determined using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains by fluorescence microscopy. Lactoferrin and lactoferricin immobilization was confirmed by XPS showing significant increases (p lactoferricin immobilized on glass significantly (p lactoferricin were successfully immobilized on glass surfaces and showed promising antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2612-2617, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report

  15. Immobilization and characterization of inulinase from Ulocladium ...

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... The enzyme had optimum pH at 5.6 for free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on polyester ... ceutical industry because of their beneficial effects in ..... Hanover LWJ 1993 Manufacturing, composing and applications of.

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Bagless Transfer Can Size Evaluation

    Kriikku, E.; Stokes, M.; Rogers, L.; Ward, C.

    1998-02-01

    This report identifies and documents the most appropriate bagless transfer can size to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations. Also, this report considers can diameter, can wall thickness, and can length

  17. Modeling intrinsic kinetics in immobilized photocatalytic microreactors

    Visan, Aura; Rafieian Boroujeni, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a simple model for immobilized photocatalytic microreactors following a first order reaction rate with either light independency or light dependency described by photon absorption carrier generation semiconductor physics. Experimental data obtained for various residence times,

  18. A simplified technique for nasoendotracheal tube immobilization.

    Berardo, N.; Leban, S. G.; Williams, F. A.

    1989-01-01

    A simplified technique for immobilization of a nasoendotracheal tube is described in which a wide strap of open cell, hypoallergenic, foam-backed fabric is secured to the patient's head with a Velcro fastener.

  19. Operational safety and radiation protection considerations in designing an HLW repository in Germany

    Filbert, W.; Kreienmeyer, M.; Poehler, M.; Niehues, N.

    2008-01-01

    In Germany the reference concept for disposal of heat generating radioactive waste considers emplacing canisters with vitrified waste in deep vertical boreholes drilled from the drifts of a repository mine in salt at a depth of 870 m. Spent fuel is to be disposed of in self-shielding POLLUX casks in horizontal drifts. An optimized disposal concept anticipates emplacing unshielded canisters with vitrified HLW and canisters containing the fuel rods of 3 PWR or 9 BWR fuel assemblies in boreholes with a diameter of 60 cm and a depth of up to 300 m.. In all cases the void space between POLLUX cask and drifts and canisters and borehole wall will be backfilled with crushed salt. (1) Operational Safety: Based on a detailed description of all underground disposal operation steps, the possible impacts on the disposal operations were analysed and the need for further studies determined. The disposal operation steps comprise e.g. rail bound transport from the shaft to the emplacement drift and emplacement process itself. As possible impacts the following occurrences were considered: ventilation failure, power supply failure, rock mechanics impact including cross-section convergence, irregular floor uplift and rock fall, brine and natural gas intrusion, derailing of transport carts and finally internal fire. (2) Radiation Protection: According to the German Atomic Energy Act (AtG), the design, construction and operation of a nuclear site like a final repository has to be licensed by the responsible authority. The Radiological Protection Ordinance and further guidelines i.e. concerning the emission and immission of released radioactive nuclides or the risk analysis of possible failure, build the basis for the licensing procedures. To ensure adequate protection against undue radiation exposure the repository is divided into different radiological protection areas. Generally, the handling of shielded waste packages above und under ground (including all the pathway of transport and

  20. Biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes.

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2017-02-10

    Vanillin is an important and popular plant flavor, but the amount of this compound available from plant sources is very limited. Biotechnological methods have high potential for vanillin production as an alternative to extraction from plant sources. Here, we report a new approach using immobilized enzymes for the production of vanillin. The recently discovered oxygenase Cso2 has coenzyme-independent catalytic activity for the conversion of isoeugenol and 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. Immobilization of Cso2 on Sepabeads EC-EA anion-exchange carrier conferred enhanced operational stability enabling repetitive use. This immobilized Cso2 catalyst allowed 6.8mg yield of vanillin from isoeugenol through ten reaction cycles at a 1mL scale. The coenzyme-independent decarboxylase Fdc, which has catalytic activity for the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, was also immobilized on Sepabeads EC-EA. We demonstrated that the immobilized Fdc and Cso2 enabled the cascade synthesis of vanillin from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol with repetitive use of the catalysts. This study is the first example of biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes, a process that provides new possibilities for vanillin production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Progress in emerging techniques for characterization of immobilized viable whole-cell biocatalysts

    Bučko, M.; Vikartovská, A.; Schenkmayerová, A.; Tkáč, J.; Filip, J.; Chorvát Jr., D.; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, M.B.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2017), s. 2309-2324 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : bioelectrocatalysis * imaging techniques * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * multienzyme cascade reactions * online kinetics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Bioprocessing technologies (industrial processes relying on biological agents to drive the process) biocatalysis, fermentation Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  2. Immobilization of mixed bacterial cultures degrading EDTA and isolated from Bulgarian and Czech sources

    Ivanova, V.; Tonkova, A.; Vassileva, A.; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2004), s. 312-317 ISSN 0477-0250. [Food Science, Techniques and Technologies 2004. Plovdiv, 27.10.2004-29.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS6087204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : EDTA * degradation * immobilization Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  3. Derived Requirements for Double Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste (HLW) Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    TEDESCHI, A.R.

    2000-02-28

    The potential need for auxiliary double-shell tank waste mixing and solids mobilization requires an evaluation of optional technologies. This document formalizes those operating and design requirements needed for further engineering evaluations.

  4. Derived Requirements for Double-Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste (HLW) Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    TEDESCHI, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    The potential need for auxiliary double-shell tank waste mixing and solids mobilization requires an evaluation of optional technologies. This document formalizes those operating and design requirements needed for further engineering evaluations

  5. Melter Technologies Assessment

    Perez, J.M. Jr. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schumacher, R.F. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States); Forsberg, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The problem of controlling and disposing of surplus fissile material, in particular plutonium, is being addressed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Immobilization of plutonium by vitrification has been identified as a promising solution. The Melter Evaluation Activity of DOE`s Plutonium Immobilization Task is responsible for evaluating and selecting the preferred melter technologies for vitrification for each of three immobilization options: Greenfield Facility, Adjunct Melter Facility, and Can-In-Canister. A significant number of melter technologies are available for evaluation as a result of vitrification research and development throughout the international communities for over 20 years. This paper describes an evaluation process which will establish the specific requirements of performance against which candidate melter technologies can be carefully evaluated. Melter technologies that have been identified are also described.

  6. Dye decolorization and detoxification potential of Ca-alginate beads immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-12-10

    In view of compliance with increasingly stringent environmental legislation, an eco-friendly treatment technology of industrial dyes and effluents is a major environmental challenge in the color industry. In present study, a promising and eco-friendly entrapment approach was adopted to immobilize purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced from an indigenous strain of Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 on Ca-alginate beads. The immobilized MnP was subsequently used for enhanced decolorization and detoxification of textile reactive dyes). MnP isolated from solid-state culture of G. lucidum IBL-05, presented highest immobilization yield (83.9 %) using alginate beads prepared at optimized conditions of 4 % (w/v) sodium alginate, 2 % (w/v) Calcium chloride (CaCl2) and 0.5 mg/ml enzyme concentration. Immobilization of MnP enhanced optimum temperature but caused acidic shift in optimum pH of the enzyme. The immobilized MnP showed optimum activity at pH 4.0 and 60 °C as compared to pH 5.0 and 35 °C for free enzyme. The kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) of MnP were significantly improved by immobilization. The enhanced catalytic potential of immobilized MnP led to 87.5 %, 82.1 %, 89.4 %, 95.7 % and 83 % decolorization of Sandal-fix Red C4BLN, Sandal-fix Turq Blue GWF, Sandal-fix Foron Blue E2BLN, Sandal-fix Black CKF and Sandal-fix Golden Yellow CRL dyes, respectively. The insolubilized MnP was reusable for 7 repeated cycles in dye color removal. Furthermore, immobilized MnP also caused a significant reduction in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (94.61-95.47 %), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (91.18-94.85 %), and total organic carbon (TOC) (89.58-95 %) of aqueous dye solutions. G. lucidum MnP was immobilized in Ca-alginate beads by entrapment method to improve its practical effectiveness. Ca-alginate bound MnP was catalytically more vigorous, thermo-stable, reusable and worked over wider ranges of pH and temperature as compared to its free counterpart. Results of cytotoxicity like

  7. Reversible thermal denaturation of immobilized rhodanese

    Horowitz, P.; Bowman, S.

    1987-01-01

    For the first time, the enzyme rhodanese had been refolded after thermal denaturation. This was previously not possible because of the strong tendency for the soluble enzyme to aggregate at temperatures above 37 degrees C. The present work used rhodanese that was covalently coupled to a solid support under conditions that were found to preserve enzyme activity. Rhodanese was immobilized using an N-hydroxymalonimidyl derivative of Sepharose containing a 6-carbon spacer. The number of immobilized competent active sites was measured by using [ 35 S]SO 3 (2-) to form an active site persulfide that is the obligatory catalytic intermediate. Soluble enzyme was irreversibly inactivated in 10 min at 52 degrees C. The immobilized enzyme regained at least 30% of its original activity even after boiling for 20 min. The immobilized enzyme had a Km and Vmax that were each approximately 3 times higher than the corresponding values for the native enzyme. After preincubation at high temperatures, progress curves for the immobilized enzyme showed induction periods of up to 5 min before attaining apparently linear steady states. The pH dependence of the activity was the same for both the soluble and the immobilized enzyme. These results indicate significant stabilization of rhodanese after immobilization, and instabilities caused by adventitious solution components are not the sole reasons for irreversibility of thermal denaturation seen with the soluble enzyme. The results are consistent with models for rhodanese that invoke protein association as a major cause of inactivation of the enzyme. Furthermore, the induction period in the progress curves is consistent with studies which show that rhodanese refolding proceeds through intermediate states

  8. Characteristics of Immobilized Urease on Grafted Alginate Bead Systems

    Enas N. Danial

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the biological importance of immobilized urease enzyme over the free urease. The support material used for urease immobilization was alginate. Generally, the immobilization of urease in alginate gel showed a marked increase in Km and Vmax. However, the immobilized urease showed higher thermal stability than that of free enzyme. The rate of thermal inactivation of the immobilized enzyme decreased due to entrapment in gel matrix. Also, the activity of the immobilized urease was more stable in retention than that of the free enzyme during the storage in solution, although the activity of the immobilized enzyme was lower in comparison with the free enzyme. A stable immobilized system and long storage life are convenient for applications that would not be feasible with a soluble enzyme system. These results highlighted the technical and biochemical benefits of immobilized urease over the free enzyme.

  9. Patient positioning and immobilization in static and dynamic adaptive radiotherapy: an integral part of IGRT

    Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment deals with different varieties of treatment procedures depending on type and stages of tumors. These treatments are grossly classified into palliative curative treatment. Immobilizations used in this treatment are designed with respect to this classification as well as the techniques. With the improvements in imaging technology used in Radiotherapy, patient position set up margin can be reduced as compared to the conventional radiotherapy. Still immobilization in patient position setup has been an integral part of Image Guided Radiotherapy (lGRT) and Stereotactic Radio Surgery (SRS) and Radiotherapy (SRT). Immobilization used in this technique should produce a minimum attenuation of radiation beam as well as positioning comfort and this will enhance the reproducibility for the daily position setup and immobilize the patient during the treatment. Advanced dose delivery technique like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy (VMAT) can do differential dose sculpting around and inside the irregular shape different target volumes while minimizing the dose to the surrounding organs at risk. A small positional error may produce the mistreatment of target and exposure of organs at risk beyond the acceptable dose limits. Such a potential positional error can be reduced if different varieties of good immobilizing devices are properly utilized. The immobilization used in the treatment of Head and Neck and Cranial tumor can produce better immobilization as compared to abdominal and pelvic tumors which are forced to move by the inability to control movements of lung and heart as well as the very large flabby tissues which are attached skeleton bones

  10. Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09

    Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the HLW glass formulations. Appropriate candidate HLW glass formulations were selected, based on characterization results, to support subsequent melter tests. In the present work, crucible melts were formulated that exhibit up to about 4.4 vol% crystallization.

  11. High-level waste management technology program plan

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs

  12. High-level waste management technology program plan

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R and D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R and D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the

  14. Production of cellulase from immobilized Trichoderma reesei

    Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao; Kumakura, Minoru

    1989-05-01

    This report completed the results that obtained on the study of the enzyme activity in the culture of immobilized Trichoderma reesei cells in flask scale (100ml) and bench scale (30l). In the flask scale culture, the batch and repeated batch culture were carried out, and in the bench scale culture, the batch, repeated batch and continuous culture were done by using a culture equipment that is an unit process of the bench scale test plant for saccharification of cellulosic wastes. The enzyme activity of the immobilized cells was higher than that of the intact cells in the flask scale culture and it was confirmed that the enzyme activity was not decreased on the repeated batch culture of six times even. In the bench scale culture, it was found that a optimum culture condition of the immobilized cells was not different from that of the free cells and the immobilized cells gave the enzyme solution with a high enzyme activity in the culture condition of 450rpm stirring speed and air supply of 0.1v/v/m above. The technique of the repeated batch and continuous culture for long times in bench scale without contamination was established. The enzyme activity of the immobilized cells in continuous culture became to be 85 % to that in batch culture and it was found that the enzyme solution with high enzyme activity was continuously obtained in the continuous culture for long times. (author)

  15. Haloalkane hydrolysis with an immobilized haloalkane dehalogenase.

    Dravis, B C; Swanson, P E; Russell, A J

    2001-11-20

    Haloalkane dehalogenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous was covalently immobilized onto a polyethyleneimine impregnated gamma-alumina support. The dehalogenating enzyme was found to retain greater than 40% of its original activity after immobilization, displaying an optimal loading (max. activity/supported protein) of 70 to 75 mg/g with an apparent maximum (max. protein/support) of 156 mg/g. The substrate, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, was found to favorably partition (adsorb) onto the inorganic alumina carrier (10 to 20 mg/g), thereby increasing the local reactant concentration with respect to the catalyst's environment, whereas the product, 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, demonstrated no affinity. Additionally, the inorganic alumina support exhibited no adverse effects because of solvent/component incompatibilities or deterioration due to pH variance (pH 7.0 to 10.5). As a result of the large surface area to volume ratio of the support matrix and the accessibility of the bound protein, the immobilized biocatalyst was not subject to internal mass transfer limitations. External diffusional restrictions could be eliminated with simple agitation (mixing speed: 50 rpm; flux: 4.22 cm/min). The pH-dependence of the immobilized dehalogenase was essentially the same as that for the native enzyme. Finally, both the thermostability and resistance toward inactivation by organic solvent were improved by more than an order of magnitude after immobilization. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Recent Developments in the Site-Specific Immobilization of Proteins onto Solid Supports

    Camarero, J A

    2007-02-21

    Immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications, including protein analysis, drug screening, and medical diagnostics, among others. The success of all these technologies relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach a protein to the corresponding surface. Non-specific physical adsorption or chemical cross-linking with appropriate surfaces results in the immobilization of the protein in random orientations. Site-specific covalent attachment, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and allows the use of spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein and the surface. The present work reviews the latest chemical and biochemical developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto solid supports.

  17. Grouping of HLW in partitioning for B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment with neutron reactors based on three criteria

    Kitamoto, Mulyanto; Kitamoto, Asashi

    1995-01-01

    A grouping concept of HLW in partitioning for B/T (burning and/or transmutation) treatment by fission reactor was developed in order to improve the disposal in waste management from the safety aspect. The selecting and grouping concept was proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (Np, Am, and unrecovered U and Pu), Group MA2 (Cm, and trace quantity of Cf, etc.), Group A (Tc and I), Group B (Cs and Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remains of HLW), judging from the three criteria for B/T treatment, based on (1) the concept of the potential risk estimated by the hazard index for long-term tendency based on ALI (2) the concept of the relative dose factor related to the adsorbed migration rate transferred through ground water, and (3) the concept of the decay acceleration factor, the burning and/or transmutation characteristics for recycle B/T treatment. (author)

  18. Immobilization of biomolecules on cysteamine-modified polyaniline film for highly sensitive biosensing.

    Cai, Qi; Xu, Baojian; Ye, Lin; Di, Zengfeng; Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Xue, Jian; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-03-01

    We present a new cysteamine (CS)-modified polyaniline (PANI) film for highly efficient immobilization of biomolecules in biosensing technology. This electrochemical deposited PANI film treated with CS and glutaraldehyde could be employed as an excellent substrate for biomolecules immobilization. The parameters of PANI growth were optimized to obtain suitable surface morphology of films for biomolecules combination with the help of electron and atomic force microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was utilized to illustrate the different electrochemical activities of each modified electrode. Due to the existence of sulfydryl group and amino group in CS, surface modification with CS was proven to reduce oxidized units on PANI film remarkably, as evidenced by both ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy characterizations. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to investigate the immobilization efficiency of biomolecules on the PANI film, comparative study using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) showed that BSA immobilized on CS-modified PANI could be increased by at least 20% than that without CS-modified PANI in BSA solution with the concentration of 0.1-1mg/mL. The CS-modified PANI film would be significant for the immobilization and detection of biomolecules and especially promising in the application of immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Physicochemical characterization of the yeast cells and the waste lignocellulosic particles in the immobilization process for ethanol production

    Agudelo-Escobar, Lina María; Mussatto, Solange I.; Peñuela, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the leading alternative fuels. Efforts have increased the development of technologies for producing ethanol efficiently and economically. The continuous fermentation using yeast cells immobilized in low‐cost materials is presented as an excellent alternative. We used four...... to confirm the hydrophobic or hydrophilic character and the free energies interaction was established. Images were obtained by scanning electron microscope, and determination of surface areas and volumes was performed by adsorption and desorption isotherms. It was established that cell surface properties...... are modified by the immobilization process to which they are subjected. It was evident that cell immobilization depended on the properties of the carrier, as well as cell surface properties. Thus, in order to improve the process of cell immobilization, it is essential to understand the type of carrier‐cell...

  20. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    Cohn, Celine

    abilities of the CSS fibers were compared to that of hydrophobic polycaprolactone (PCL) fibers and hydrophilic plasma-treated PCL fibers. Electrospun CSS fibers were found to immobilize equivalent amounts of protein as hydrophobically immobilized proteins. However, these proteins captured 6 times more cells, indicative of retained protein function. The second key concept was the design and fabrication of a hybridized lipid fiber. Lipid fibers provide improved protein function but fabrication difficulties have limited their adoption. Thus, we sought to fabricate a lipid-polymer hybrid that is easily fabricated while maintaining protein function. The hybrid fiber consists of a PCL backbone with conjugated CSS. The hybrid lipid fibers showed improved protein function. In addition, higher lipid concentrations were directly correlated to higher cell capture efficiencies. The third key concept was on the development of dually functionalized lipid fibers and understanding the resulting cell capture efficiencies. Many platforms are unable to simultaneously search for heterogeneous populations of CTCs -- the ability to dually functionalize cell-capturing platforms would address this technological weakness. Studies indicated that dually functionalizing the lipid fibers did not compromise the platforms' abilities to capture the cells of interest. Such dually functionalized fibers allow for a single cell-capture platform to successfully detect heterogeneous populations of CTCs. The body of work encompassed herein describes the use of lipid fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture. Data from various projects indicate that the use of cholesterol-based fibers produced from electrospun CSS are well suited for protein immobilization. The CSS fibers are able to immobilize equivalent amounts of protein as compared to other immobilization techniques. However, the benefit of these fibers is illustrated by the strong cell-capturing efficiencies, indicating that the immobilized

  1. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  2. Preparation and characterization of an improved borosilicate glass for the solidification of high level radioactive fission product solutions (HLW). Pt. 2

    Kahl, L.; Ruiz-Lopez, M.C.; Saidl, J.; Dippel, T.

    1982-04-01

    In the 'Institut fuer Nuklare Entsorgungstechnik' the borosilicate glass VG 98/12 has been developed for the solidification of the high level radioactive waste (HLW). This borosilicate glass can be used in a direct heated ceramic melter and forms together with the HLW the borosilicate glass product GP 98/12. This borosilicate glass product has been examined in detail both in liquid and solid state. The elements contained in the HLW can be incorporated without problems. Only in a few exceptions the concentration must be kept below certain limits to exclude the formation of a second phase ('yellow phase') by separation. No spontaneous crystallization and no crystallization over a long time could be observed as long as the temperature of the borosilicate glass product is kept below its transformation area. Simulating accidental conditions in the final storage, samples had been leached at temperatures up to 200 0 C and pressures up to 130 bar with saturated rock salt brine and saturated quinary salt brine. The leaching process seems to be stopped by the formed 'leached layer' on the surface of the borosilicate glass product after a limited leaching time. Detailed investigations have been started to explain this phenomenon. (orig.) [de

  3. Immobilization of oxidases and their analytical applications

    Yasinzai, M.

    2007-01-01

    Immobilized enzymes are replacing their soluble counter-parts in nearly every field of application. These enzyme modifications have evolved from a research curiosity into an entire branch of Biotechnology. An immobilization method for flavin containing oxidases and their use in flow injection system is described. An electrochemical detector for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is assembled which is used effectively for the determination of glucose using more common glucose oxidase and the simultaneous determination of sugars. The combination of oxidases with hydrolases have been used for the determination of maltose and starch. (author)

  4. A disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste

    1980-02-01

    This report describes a conceptual design of a disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste. The surface facilities consist of plants for the preparation of steel cylinders containing nuclear waste immobilized in glass, shaft headframe buildings and all necessary support facilities. The underground disposal vault is located on one level at a depth of 1000 m. The waste cylinders are emplaced into boreholes in the tunnel floors. All surface and subsurface facilities are described, operations and schedules are summarized, and cost estimates and manpower requirements are given. (auth)

  5. Radiation Synthesis of Nanogel for Bioactives Immobilization

    Hamzah, M. Y. [Polymer Modification Group, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi (Malaysia)

    2009-07-01

    Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic core nanogel are currently being developed for immobilization and delivery purposes in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Hydrophilic nanogel is produced by using inverse micelles irradiation of polyethelyne glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). The hydrophobic nanogel is produced via irradiation of acrylated form of palm oil. These nanogels will be used to immobilize bio actives such as curcumin, tyhmoquinone, oryzanol and chitosan. Preliminary investigation of the nanogel size using dynamic light scattering (DLS) shows that nanogel with sizes below 100nm can be obtained. (author)

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-01

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  7. Radiation Synthesis of Nanogel for Bioactives Immobilization

    Hamzah, M.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic core nanogel are currently being developed for immobilization and delivery purposes in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Hydrophilic nanogel is produced by using inverse micelles irradiation of polyethelyne glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). The hydrophobic nanogel is produced via irradiation of acrylated form of palm oil. These nanogels will be used to immobilize bio actives such as curcumin, tyhmoquinone, oryzanol and chitosan. Preliminary investigation of the nanogel size using dynamic light scattering (DLS) shows that nanogel with sizes below 100nm can be obtained. (author)

  8. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-05-13

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  9. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  10. Single Phase Melt Processed Powellite (Ba,Ca) MoO{sub 4} For The Immobilization Of Mo-Rich Nuclear Waste

    Brinkman, Kyle [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, James [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fox, Kevin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Reppert, Jason [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Crum, Jarrod [Paci fic Northwest National Laboratory , Richland, WA (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2012-09-17

    Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO{sub 4} crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO{sub 4} and CaMoO{sub 4} were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In-situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO{sub 4} and BaMoO{sub 4} powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 X 10{sup 13} Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m{sup 2}).

  11. Technology.

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  12. Confidence building on the total system performance assessment code, MASCOT-K for permanent disposal of HLW in Korea

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H

    2002-12-01

    To perform Total System Performance Assessment(TSPA) of a potential HLW repository, it is necessary to develop the TSPA code. KAERI has developed the one-dimensional PSA code MASCOT-K since 1997 and verified special modules dedicated for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. In the second R and D phase, MASCOT-K is once again verified as a part of the confidence building for TSPA. The AMBER code based on the totally different mathematical approach, compartment theory is used together with MASCOT-K to assess the annual individual doses for given K- and Q- scenarios. Results indicate that both AMBER and MASCOT-K simulate the annual individual doses to a potential biosphere. And the MASCOT-K is more flexible to describe the natural barrier such as a fracture for sensitivity studies. In the third R and D phase, MASCOT-K will be actively used to check whether the proposed KAERI reference disposal concept is solid or not.

  13. Confidence building on the total system performance assessment code, MASCOT-K for permanent disposal of HLW in Korea

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-12-01

    To perform Total System Performance Assessment(TSPA) of a potential HLW repository, it is necessary to develop the TSPA code. KAERI has developed the one-dimensional PSA code MASCOT-K since 1997 and verified special modules dedicated for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. In the second R and D phase, MASCOT-K is once again verified as a part of the confidence building for TSPA. The AMBER code based on the totally different mathematical approach, compartment theory is used together with MASCOT-K to assess the annual individual doses for given K- and Q- scenarios. Results indicate that both AMBER and MASCOT-K simulate the annual individual doses to a potential biosphere. And the MASCOT-K is more flexible to describe the natural barrier such as a fracture for sensitivity studies. In the third R and D phase, MASCOT-K will be actively used to check whether the proposed KAERI reference disposal concept is solid or not

  14. A compartment model for nuclide release calculation in the near-and far-field of a HLW repository

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2004-01-01

    The HLW-relevant R and D program for disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since early 1997, from which a conceptual Korea Reference Repository System for direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel is to be introduced by the end of 2007. A preliminary reference geologic repository concept considering such established criteria and requirements as spent fuel and generic site characteristics in Korea was roughly envisaged in 2003. Not only to demonstrate how much a reference repository is safe in the generic point of view with several possible scenarios and cases associated with a preliminary repository concept by conducting calculations for nuclide release and transport in the near - and far - field components of the repository, even though sufficient information has not been available that much yet, but also to show a appropriate methodology by which both a generic and site - specific safety assessment could be performed for further in - depth development of Korea reference repository concept, nuclide release calculation study for various nuclide release cases is mandatory. To this end a similar study done and yet limited for the near - field release case has been extended to the case including far - field system by introducing some more geosphere compartments. Advective and longitudinal dispersive nuclide transports along the fracture with matrix diffusion as well as several retention mechanisms and nuclide ingrowth has been added

  15. Mechanical behavior of host rock close to H.L.W. disposal cavities in a deep granitic formation

    Hoorelbeke, J.M.; Dourthe, M.

    1986-01-01

    The construction of a H.L.W. repository in a deep granitic formation creates mechanical disturbances in the rock on the scale of the massif and in the nearfield. Amongst all the disturbances noted in the nearfield, this study is concerned with examining the evolution of stresses linked with the excavation of the rock and the rise in temperature in the proximity of the waste packages. Several linear elasticity calculations were made using on the one hand finite element models and on the other simple analytical models. These calculations concern two different storage concepts - in room concept and in floor concept- whose differences in mechanical behavior are analyzed. A study of sensitivity with regard to the characteristics of the rock and to the initial geostatic stresses is presented. The comparison of the calculated stresses with three-dimensional failure criteria gives a clear indication of the satisfactory behavior of granite for final storage. However, the need for experimental study and complementary calculation must be emphasized

  16. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure

  17. Preparation of Laccase Immobilized Cryogels and Usage for Decolorization

    Murat Uygun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(methyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate (poly(MMA-co-GMA cryogels were synthesized by radical cryopolymerization technique. Then, laccase enzyme was covalently attached to the cryogel and characterized by using swelling studies and SEM and EDX analyses. Kinetic properties and optimum conditions of the immobilized and free laccase were studied and it was found that of the immobilized laccase was lower than that of free laccase. of the immobilized laccase was increased upon immobilization. Optimum pH was found to be 4.0 for each type of laccase, while optimum temperature was shifted to the warmer region after the immobilization. It was also found that thermal stability of the immobilized laccase was higher than that of free laccase. Immobilized laccase could be used for 10 times successive reuse with no significant decrease in its activity. Also, these laccase immobilized cryogels were successfully used for the decolorization of seven different dyes.

  18. Immobilized cells of Candida rugosa possessing fumarase activity

    Yang, L.; Zhone, L.

    1980-01-01

    Immobilized cells of C. rugosa that possessed fumarase activity were prepared by different methods; the most active immobilized cells were entrapped in polyacrylamide gels. The effects of pH temperature, and divalent cations on the fumarase activity of both immobilized and native cells were the same. Mn/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Fe/sup 2 +/ did not protect the immobilized enzyme against thermal inactivation. The activity of immobilized fumarase remained constant during 91 days of storage of 4-6 degrees. The immobilized cell column was used for the continuous production of L-malic acid from 1M fumarate at 30 degrees and pH 8.5. The immobilized column operated steadily for 2 months. Half life of the immobilized fumarase at 30 degrees was 95 days.

  19. Bed Rest and Immobilization: Risk Factors for Bone Loss

    ... Risk Factors for Bone Loss Bed Rest and Immobilization: Risk Factors for Bone Loss Like muscle, bone ... complications of pregnancy; and those who are experiencing immobilization of some part of the body because of ...

  20. Preparation and characterization of two types of covalently immobilized amyloglucosidase

    ZORAN VUJCIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloglucosidase from A. niger was covalently immobilized onto poly (GMA-co-EGDMA by the glutaraldehyde and periodate method. The immobilization of amyloglucosidase after periodate oxidation gave a preparate with the highest specific activity reported so far on similar polymers. The obtained immobilized preparates show the same pH optimum, but a higher temperature optimum compared with the soluble enzyme. The kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis of soluble starch by free and both immobilized enzymes were determined.